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Sample records for abdominal computed tomographic

  1. Computed Tomographic Angiography of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) angiography (CTA) has become the preferred imaging test of choice for various aortic conditions because of its excellent spatial resolution, rapid image acquisition, and its wide availability. CTA provides a robust tool for planning aortic interventions and diagnosing acute and chronic vascular diseases in the abdomen. CTA is the standard for imaging aneurysms before intervention and evaluating the aorta in the acute setting to assess traumatic injury, dissection, and aneurysm rupture. Knowledge of the imaging features of these disease processes, inflammatory vasculitides, and occlusive atherosclerotic disease is essential for guiding surgical and medical management of patients.

  2. [The computed tomographic diagnosis of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Grützner, G; Jungblut, R M; Kniemeyer, H W; Mödder, U

    1994-07-01

    Amongst 1599 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, there were 89 patients (5.6%) who showed typical features of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA). 37 of the 89 patients had been examined preoperatively by CT. In 73% of the cases (27/37) a correct diagnosis had been made. Localisation, width and extent of the IAAA was correctly diagnosed in all patients. Involvement of the renal arteries by the inflammatory process, the extent of thrombus and of mural calcification were accurately shown. The inflammatory tissues were typically ventral and lateral to the aorta. Frequently, there were adhesions to neighbouring structures. Aortic rupture, aortic dissection and retroperitoneal lymphoma may produce similar CT appearances; nevertheless, CT remains at present the method of choice for the diagnosis of IAAA because of its high sensitivity.

  3. Use of spiral computed tomographic angiography in monitoring abdominal aortic aneurysms after transfemoral endovascular repair.

    PubMed Central

    Balm, R; Jacobs, M J

    1997-01-01

    Transfemoral endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has proved to be technically feasible in a selected group of patients. However, long-term efficacy has not been proved. Graft performance after implantation can be monitored by a single imaging technique: spiral computed tomographic angiography. With this technique, the parameters for continuing clinical success of the procedure-graft patency, endoleaks, graft migration, attachment site diameter, attachment system failure, and aneurysm diameter-can be monitored. Only in selected cases will an additional imaging technique be necessary. PMID:9339508

  4. Leiomyosarcoma: computed tomographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, A.J.; Zornoza, J.; Shirkhoda, A.

    1984-07-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 118 patients with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma were reviewed. The tumor masses visualized in these patients were often quite large; extensive necrotic or cystic change was a frequent finding. Calcification was not observed in these tumors. The liver was the most common site of metastasis in these patients, with marked necrosis of the liver lesions a common finding. Other manifestations of tumor spread included pulmonary metastases, mesenteric or omental metastases, retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, soft-tissue metastases, bone metastases, splenic metastases, and ascites. Although the CT appearance of leiomyosarcoma is not specific, these findings, when present, suggest consideration of this diagnosis.

  5. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, Cristiano; Stoker, Jaap; Alarcon, Onofre; Barbaro, Federico; Bellini, Davide; Bretthauer, Michael; De Haan, Margriet C; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Ferlitsch, Monika; Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Hellstrom, Mikael; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lefere, Philippe; Mang, Thomas; Neri, Emanuele; Petruzziello, Lucio; Plumb, Andrew; Regge, Daniele; Taylor, Stuart A; Hassan, Cesare; Laghi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR). It addresses the clinical indications for the use of computed tomographic colonography (CTC). A targeted literature search was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of CTC. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE/ESGAR recommend computed tomographic colonography (CTC) as the radiological examination of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend barium enema in this setting (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC, preferably the same or next day, if colonoscopy is incomplete. Delay of CTC should be considered following endoscopic resection. In the case of obstructing colorectal cancer, preoperative contrast-enhanced CTC may also allow location or staging of malignant lesions (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 When endoscopy is contraindicated or not possible, ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC as an acceptable and equally sensitive alternative for patients with symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 4 ESGE/ESGAR recommend referral for endoscopic polypectomy in patients with at least one polyp  ≥  6  mm in diameter detected at CTC. CTC surveillance may be clinically considered if patients do not undergo polypectomy (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 5 ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend CTC as a primary test for population screening or in individuals with a positive first-degree family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it may be proposed as a CRC screening test on an individual basis providing the screenee is adequately informed about test characteristics, benefits, and risks

  6. A Systematic Review of Protocols for the Three-Dimensional Morphologic Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Computed Tomographic Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatwary, Tamer M. H.; Patterson, Benjamin O.; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert; Thompson, Matt M.; Holt, Peter J. E.

    2013-02-15

    The morphology of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) directly influences the perioperative outcome and long-term durability of endovascular aneurysm repair. A variety of methods have been proposed for the characterization of AAA morphology using reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. At present, there is lack of consensus as to which of these methods is most applicable to clinical practice or research. The purpose of this review was to evaluate existing protocols that used 3D CT images in the assessment of various aspects of AAA morphology. An electronic search was performed, from January 1996 to the end of October 2010, using the Embase and Medline databases. The literature review conformed to PRISMA statement standards. The literature search identified 604 articles, of which 31 studies met inclusion criteria. Only 15 of 31 studies objectively assessed reproducibility. Existing published protocols were insufficient to define a single evidence-based methodology for preoperative assessment of AAA morphology. Further development and expert consensus are required to establish a standardized and validated protocol to determine precisely how morphology relates to outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair.

  7. Ovarian metastases: Computed tomographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Hulnick, D.H.; Bosniak, M.A.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Computed tomographic scans of 34 patients with ovarian metastases were reviewed to assess the radiographic appearances and to correlate these with the primary neoplasms. Primary neoplasms were located in the colon (20 patients), breast (six), stomach (five), small bowel (one), bladder (one), and Wilms tumor of the kidney (one). The radiographic appearance of the metastatic lesions could be described as predominantly cystic (14 lesions), mixed (12 lesions), or solid (seven lesions). The cystic and mixed lesions tended to be larger in overall diameter than the solid. The metastases from gastric carcinoma appeared solid in four of five cases. The metastases from the other neoplasms had variable appearances simulating primary ovarian carcinoma.

  8. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  9. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  10. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  11. Computer-aided marginal artery detection on computed tomographic colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhuoshi; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for colonic polyps and cancer screening. The marginal artery of the colon, also known as the marginal artery of Drummond, is the blood vessel that connects the inferior mesenteric artery with the superior mesenteric artery. The marginal artery runs parallel to the colon for its entire length, providing the blood supply to the colon. Detecting the marginal artery may benefit computer-aided detection (CAD) of colonic polyp. It can be used to identify teniae coli based on their anatomic spatial relationship. It can also serve as an alternative marker for colon localization, in case of colon collapse and inability to directly compute the endoluminal centerline. This paper proposes an automatic method for marginal artery detection on CTC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work presented for this purpose. Our method includes two stages. The first stage extracts the blood vessels in the abdominal region. The eigenvalue of Hessian matrix is used to detect line-like structures in the images. The second stage is to reduce the false positives in the first step. We used two different masks to exclude the false positive vessel regions. One is a dilated colon mask which is obtained by colon segmentation. The other is an eroded visceral fat mask which is obtained by fat segmentation in the abdominal region. We tested our method on a CTC dataset with 6 cases. Using ratio-of-overlap with manual labeling of the marginal artery as the standard-of-reference, our method yielded true positive, false positive and false negative fractions of 89%, 33%, 11%, respectively.

  12. Computed tomographic evaluation of laryngoceles

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Korobkin, M.

    1982-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the larynx was used in three patients with laryngoceles. One of the cases is described. CT was able to define the extent of the laryngocele more precisely than either clinical examination or conventional radiographic techniques.

  13. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  14. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  15. Computed tomographic measurement of canine urine concentration.

    PubMed

    Zwingenberger, Allison L; Carrade Holt, Danielle D

    2017-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is able to measure the attenuation of urine in Hounsfield units (HU) on abdominal imaging studies. This study was designed to measure the correlation of urine attenuation with urine specific gravity in urine samples of 40 dogs, providing a noninvasive measure of urine concentration. The HU of urine explained 72% of the variance in measured urine specific gravity [R(2) = 0.72, F(1,38) = 95.55, P < 0.001]. This noninvasive measurement can be used to estimate urine concentration in dogs undergoing abdominal CT imaging.

  16. [Computer-tomographic cisternography with amipaque].

    PubMed

    Kornienko, V N; Saakian, O A

    1984-01-01

    As compared to ordinary computer tomography, computer-aided tomographic cisternography (CTC) demonstrates better the anatomy of the brain cisterns and at the same time gives an idea of the processes of c.s.f. circulation in dynamic examination. The article discusses the results of examination of 112 patients with various neurosurgical diseases by means of CTC. A detailed classification of the brain cisterns is given. The authors show the advantages of the method in examination of patients with small three-dimentional processes in the chiasma-sellar region, cerebellopontine angle, and posterior cranial fossa, with the syndrome of an "empty" sella turcica, cystic structures, and disorders of c.s.f. circulation.

  17. Computed tomographic analysis of meteorite inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Testa, J. P., Jr.; Friedman, P. J.; Kambic, G. X.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining nondestructively a cross-sectional display of very dense heterogeneous rocky specimens, whether lunar, terrestrial or meteoritic, by using a fourth generation computed tomographic (CT) scanner, with modifications to the software only, is discussed. A description of the scanner, and of the experimental and analytical procedures is given. Using this technique, the interior of heterogeneous materials such as Allende can be probed nondestructively. The regions of material with high and low atomic numbers are displayed quickly; the object can then be cut to obtain for analysis just the areas of interest. A comparison of this technique with conventional industrial and medical techniques is made in terms of image resolution and density distribution display precision.

  18. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  19. Prognostic utility of coronary computed tomographic angiography

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Yuka; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) employing CT scanners of 64-detector rows or greater represents a noninvasive method that enables accurate detection and exclusion of anatomically obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), providing excellent diagnostic information when compared to invasive angiography. There are numerous potential advantages of CCTA beyond simply luminal stenosis assessment including quantification of atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as assessment of plaque composition, extent, location and distribution. In recent years, an array of studies has evaluated the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD for the prediction of major adverse cardiac events, all-cause death and plaque instability. This prognostic information enhances risk stratification and, if properly acted upon, may improve medical therapy and/or behavioral changes that may enhance event-free survival. The goal of the present article is to summarize the current status of the prognostic utility of CCTA findings of CAD. PMID:23809386

  20. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  1. Computed tomographic anatomy of the equine foot.

    PubMed

    Claerhoudt, S; Bergman, E H J; Saunders, J H

    2014-10-01

    This study describes a detailed computed tomographic reference of the normal equine foot. Ten forefeet of five adult cadavers, without evidence of orthopaedic disease, were used. Computed tomography (CT) was performed on all feet. Two-millimetre thick transverse slices were obtained, and sagittal and dorsal planes were reformatted. The CT images were matched with the corresponding anatomic slices. The phalanges and the distal sesamoid bone showed excellent detail. The extensor and flexor tendons (including their attachments) could be clearly evaluated. The collateral (sesamoidean) ligaments could be readily located, but were difficult to delineate at their proximal attachment. The distal digital annular ligament could only be distinguished from the deep digital flexor tendon proximal to the distal sesamoid bone, and its proximal attachment could be identified, but not its distal insertion. Small ligaments (impar ligament, chondrosesamoidean, chondrocoronal and chondrocompedal ligaments, axial and abaxial palmar ligaments of the proximal inter-phalangeal joint) were seen with difficulty and not at all slices. The joint capsules could not be delineated from the surrounding soft tissue structures. The lateral and medial proprius palmar digital artery and vein could be visualized occasionally on some slices. The ungular cartilages, corium and hoof wall layering were seen. The nerves, the articular and fibrocartilage of the distal sesamoid bone and the chondroungular ligament could not be assessed. Computed tomography of the equine foot can be of great value when results of radiography and ultrasonography are inconclusive. Images obtained in this study may serve as reference for CT of the equine foot.

  2. Computed tomographic studies of the painful abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, M.; Bree, R.L.; Schwab, R.E.; Ouimette, M.

    1985-05-01

    Abdominal CT scans were reviewed in a series of 53 patients who had abdominal pain without objective physical, radiographic, or laboratory abnormalities. Forty patients presented with abdominal pain alone, while the remaining patients had abdominal pain associated with nausea, vomiting or mild weight loss. Abdominal CT scans in all patients were interpreted as normal. One patient had a pancreatic carcinoma discovered at surgery one month after the CT scan was obtained. The patients were followed up for 6 to 12 months to confirm absence of significant disease. Our analysis suggests a very low yield from abdominal CT in patients with abdominal pain and no other objective findings.

  3. Computed tomographic findings in orbital Mucor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, M.R.; Lippman, S.M.; Grinnell, V.S.; Colman, M.F.; Edwards, J.E. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly important infection in immunocompromised patients; knowledge regarding the variability of its clinical manifestations is expanding steadily. The infection is of paranasal sinus origin and may involve the orbit secondarily via freely communicating foramina and venous channels. Death often ensues when the infection spreads either into the cavernous sinus or the central nervous system. Early diagnosis of rhinocerebral mucormycosis is crucial for a successful outcome. Computed tomographic (CT) scanning is used to visualize many intraorbital pathologic abnormalities. The patient discussed in this paper had extensive orbital Mucor that appeared minimal on a CT scan. This inability of the scan to reflect the severity of infection prompted a review of the literature describing the use of CT scans for detecting this potentially fatal, opportunistic infection. The search showed that a disparity between scan findings and the severity of the disease is the rule rather than the exception. Recognition of this disparity has significant implications for appropriate diagnosis and management of orbital Mucor.

  4. Computed tomographic features of feline nasopharyngeal polyps.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cintia R; O'Brien, Robert T; Matheson, Jodi S; Carrera, Inés

    2012-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings of histopathologically confirmed nasopharyngeal polyps are described in 13 cats. Most polyps were mildly hypoattenuating to adjacent muscles and isoattenuating to soft-tissue (n= 13), homogeneous (n = 12) and with ill-defined borders (n = 10) on precontrast images. After contrast medium administration, the polyps were homogeneous (n = 11), with well-defined borders (n = 13), oval (n = 13), and had rim enhancement (n = 13). Nasopharyngeal polyps were pedunculated in 11 cats with a stalk-like structure connecting the polyp through the auditory tube to an affected tympanic bulla. All cats had at least one tympanic bulla severely affected, with CT images identifying: (1) complete (n = 12) or partial (n = 1) obliteration of either the dorsal or ventral compartments with soft-tissue attenuating material; (2) pathologic expansion (n = 13) with wall thickening (n = 10) that was asymmetric in nine cats; and (3) identification of a polyp-associated stalk-like structure (n = 11). Nine cats had unilateral tympanic bulla disease ipsilateral to the polyp, and four cats had bilateral tympanic bulla disease, most severe ipsilateral to the polyp with milder contralateral pathologic changes. Two cats had minimal osteolysis of the tympanic bulla. Enlargement of the medial retropharyngeal lymph node was seen commonly (n = 8), and in all cats it was ipsilateral to the most affected tympanic bulla. One cat had bilateral lymphadenopathy. CT is an excellent imaging tool for the supportive diagnosis of nasopharyngeal polyps in cats. CT findings of a well-defined mass with strong rim enhancement, mass-associated stalk-like structure, and asymmetric tympanic bulla wall thickening with pathologic expansion of the tympanic bullae are highly indicative of an inflammatory polyp.

  5. Automatic delineation of the diaphragm in computed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Vu, Randy H; Boag, Graham S

    2008-10-01

    Segmentation of the internal organs in medical images is a difficult task. By incorporating a priori information regarding specific organs of interest, results of segmentation may be improved. Landmarking (i.e., identifying stable structures to aid in gaining more knowledge concerning contiguous structures) is a promising segmentation method. Specifically, segmentation of the diaphragm may help in limiting the scope of segmentation methods to the abdominal cavity; the diaphragm may also serve as a stable landmark for identifying internal organs, such as the liver, the spleen, and the heart. A method to delineate the diaphragm is proposed in the present work. The method is based upon segmentation of the lungs, identification of the lower surface of the lungs as an initial representation of the diaphragm, and the application of least-squares modeling and deformable contour models to obtain the final segmentation of the diaphragm. The proposed procedure was applied to nine X-ray computed tomographic (CT) exams of four pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The results were evaluated against the boundaries of the diaphragm as identified independently by a radiologist. Good agreement was observed between the results of segmentation and the reference contours drawn by the radiologist, with an average mean distance to the closest point of 5.85 mm over a total of 73 CT slices including the diaphragm.

  6. Current experience with computed tomographic cystography and blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Deck, A J; Shaves, S; Talner, L; Porter, J R

    2001-12-01

    We present our experience with computed tomographic (CT) cystography for the diagnosis of bladder rupture in patients with blunt abdominal and pelvic trauma and compare the results of CT cystography to operative exploration. We identified all blunt trauma patients diagnosed with bladder rupture from January 1992 to September 1998. We also reviewed the radiology computerized information system (RIS) for all CT cystograms performed for the evaluation of blunt trauma during the same time period. The medical records and pertinent radiographs of the patients with bladder rupture who underwent CT cystography as part of their admission evaluation were reviewed. Operative findings were compared to radiographic findings. Altogether, 316 patients had CT cystograms as part of an initial evaluation for blunt trauma. Of these patients, 44 had an ultimate diagnosis of bladder rupture; 42 patients had CT cystograms indicating bladder rupture. A total of 28 patients underwent formal bladder exploration; 23 (82%) had operative findings that exactly (i.e., presence and type of rupture) matched the CT cystogram interpretation. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CT cystography for detection of bladder rupture were 95% and 100%, respectively. For intraperitoneal rupture, the sensitivity and specificity were 78% and 99%, respectively. CT cystography provides an expedient evaluation for bladder rupture caused by blunt trauma and has an accuracy comparable to that reported for plain film cystography. We recommend CT cystography over plain film cystography for patients undergoing CT evaluation for other blunt trauma-related injuries.

  7. A COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC STUDY OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Siddharatha; Lal, Narottam; Tewari, S.C.; Dalal, P.K.; Kohli, Neera; Srivastava, Shrikant

    1997-01-01

    Fifty schizophrenic patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria, and group matched normal healthy controls were selected for the study The case and control groups have been compared in terms of VBR, WSF and WTF. In the study schizophrenics have been divided into positive, negative and mixed subgroups on basis of SAPS and SANS, and these subgroups are compared with each other for VBR, WSF & WTF. Tomographic abnormalities were noted in schizophrenics, particularly with negative and mixed subtypes, when compared to controls. PMID:21584057

  8. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  9. Computed tomographic findings in penetrating peptic ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Madrazo, B.L.; Halpert, R.D.; Sandler, M.A.; Pearlberg, J.L.

    1984-12-01

    Four cases of peptic ulcer penetrating the head of the pancreas were diagnosed by computed tomography (CT). Findings common to 3 cases included (a) an ulcer crater, (b) a sinus tract, and (c) enlargement of the head of the pancreas. Unlike other modalities, the inherent spatial resolution of CT allows a convenient diagnosis of this important complication of peptic ulcer disease.

  10. Computed tomographic findings in 15 dogs with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Luis; Lam, Richard; Lamb, Christopher R; McConnell, J Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy is a disease characterized by the infiltration of the lung and bronchial mucosa by eosinophils. The aim of the present study was to describe the CT findings in a large series of dogs with confirmed diagnosis of eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy. Computed tomographic scans of 15 dogs with confirmed diagnosis of eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy were evaluated retrospectively by two boarded radiologists who reached a consensus. Abnormalities were identified in 14/15 (93%) dogs, including pulmonary parenchymal abnormalities in 14/15 (93%) dogs, bronchial wall thickening in 13 (87%) dogs, which was considered marked in eight (53%), plugging of the bronchial lumen by mucus/debris in 11 (73%) dogs, and bronchiectasis in nine (60%) dogs. Pulmonary nodules were identified in 5/15 (33%) dogs including one dog with a mass. All dogs with a nodular lung pattern had additional abnormalities. Lymphadenopathy was present in 10 dogs (67%). Lesions associated with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy are variable and heterogeneous and encompass a wider variety of computed tomographic features than reported previously. Computed tomographic images were abnormal in the majority of affected dogs, hence CT is a useful modality to characterize the nature and distribution of thoracic lesions in dogs with eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy.

  11. Computed tomographic findings in Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Rollandi, G A; Tentarelli, T; Vespier, M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-one patients with Peyronie's disease were examined by computed tomography (CT) of the penis. Twenty nodules or plaques already diagnosed by clinical examination were identified. In 2 patients with a clinically palpable large plaque, all the albuginea could not be identified by CT, either in the fixed or mobile portion of the penis. Multiple lesions were palpable in 1 patient and could be seen by CT in 5 patients. Seven nonpalpable lesions were identified by CT. Lesions resembled calcified plaques in 10 instances and focal areas of diminished thickness and density of the tunica albuginea in 17 others. Computed tomography seems to be a very useful method in the study of Peyronie's disease. It allows precise evaluation of nodular lesions and it may be useful for monitoring their dimensional evolution. It may also give some insight into the structural composition of the nodules. This study supports theories that Peyronie's disease is a generalized disease of the penis.

  12. Lymphadenopathy in celiac disease: computed tomographic observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Bayless, T.M.; Fishman, E.K.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lymphadenopathy in patients with celiac disease is generally viewed with alarm due to the association between celiac disease and intestinal lymphoma. Four patients with celiac disease are described in whom significant mesenteric and paraaortic adenopathy was demonstrated by computed tomogrophy (CT). The subsequent clinical course of these patients revealed no evidence of lymphoma. In two patients with longstanding celiac disease and recent relapse, exploratory laparotomy revealed reactive hyperplasia in the enlarged glands; in one patient this was associated with intestinal ulceration, and in the other no underlying pathology was found. Follow-up CT scans in both these patients demonstrated regression of the findings with clinical improvement. In the other two patients, CT was performed as part of the initial evaluation.

  13. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  14. A computed tomographic imaging system for experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanping; Wang, Jue; Liu, Fenglin; Yu, Honglin

    2008-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive imaging technique, which is widely applied in medicine for diagnosis and surgical planning, and in industry for non-destructive testing (NDT) and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). So, it is significant for college students to understand the fundamental of CT. In this work, A CT imaging system named CD-50BG with 50mm field-of-view has been developed for experimental teaching at colleges. With the translate-rotate scanning mode, the system makes use of a 7.4×10 8Bq (20mCi) activity 137Cs radioactive source which is held in a tungsten alloy to shield the radiation and guarantee no harm to human body, and a single plastic scintillator + photomultitude detector which is convenient for counting because of its short-time brightness and good single pulse. At same time, an image processing software with the functions of reconstruction, image processing and 3D visualization has also been developed to process the 16 bits acquired data. The reconstruction time for a 128×128 image is less than 0.1 second. High quality images with 0.8mm spatial resolution and 2% contrast sensitivity can be obtained. So far in China, more than ten institutions of higher education, including Tsinghua University and Peking University, have already applied the system for elementary teaching.

  15. Technical innovation: Multidimensional computerized software enabled subtraction computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Mona; Rosset, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Didier, Dominique; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a frequent noninvasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography. We previously reported the development of a new subtraction software to overcome limitations of adjacent bone and calcification in CT angiographic subtraction. Our aim was to further develop and improve this fast and automated computerized software, universally available for free use and compatible with most CT scanners, thus enabling better delineation of vascular structures, artifact reduction, and shorter reading times with potential clinical benefits. This computer-based free software will be available as an open source in the next release of OsiriX at the Web site http://www.osirix-viewer.com.

  16. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: computed tomographic demonstration of unusual extranodal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, H.S.; Lee, J.K.T.; Balfe, D.M.; Mauro, M.A.; Griffith, R.; Sagel, S.S.

    1983-10-01

    With the advent of computed tomography, lymphomatous involvement of sites other than lymph nodes is being seen with increasing frequency. Review of computed tomographic scans in 400 patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma revealed 37 patients to have involvement of 56 unusual sites below the diaphragm: psoas/iliacus muscle (16 patients), kidney (13 patients), pancreas (5 patients), adrenal (4 patients), skin/subcutaneous tissue (4 patients), abdominal wall musculature (4 patients), peritoneum (4 patients), omentum (3 patients), and female reproductive tract (3 patients). These were mostly seen in patients with lymphomas of diffuse architecture, especially diffuse histiocytic lymphoma. Concomitant retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric adenopathy was very common; extraodal involvement was rarely the only site of initial or recurrent lymphoma.

  17. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma: computed tomographic demonstration of unusual extranodal involvement.

    PubMed

    Glazer, H S; Lee, J K; Balfe, D M; Mauro, M A; Griffith, R; Sagel, S S

    1983-10-01

    With the advent of computed tomography, lymphomatous involvement of sites other than lymph nodes is being seen with increasing frequency. Review of computed tomographic scans in 400 patients with newly diagnosed or recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma revealed 37 patients to have involvement of 56 unusual sites below the diaphragm: psoas/iliacus muscle (16 patients), kidney (13 patients), pancreas (5 patients), adrenal (4 patients), skin/subcutaneous tissue (4 patients), abdominal wall musculature (4 patients), peritoneum (4 patients), omentum (3 patients), and female reproductive tract (3 patients). These were mostly seen in patients with lymphomas of diffuse architecture, especially diffuse histiocytic lymphoma. Concomitant retroperitoneal and/or mesenteric adenopathy was very common; extranodal involvement was rarely the only site of initial or recurrent lymphoma.

  18. Pineal region tumors: computed tomographic-pathologic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Futrell, N.N.; Osborn, A.G.; Cheson. B.D.

    1981-11-01

    While several computed tomographic (CT) studies of posterior third ventricular neoplasms have included descriptions of pineal tumors, few reports have concentrated on these uncommon lesions. Some authors have asserted that the CT appearance of many pineal tumors is virtually pathognomonic. A series of nine biopsy-proved pineal gland and eight other presumed tumors is presented that illustrates their remarkable heterogeneity in both histopathologic and CT appearance. These tumors included germinomas, teratocarcinomas, hamartomas, and other varieties. They had variable margination, attentuation, calcification, and suprasellar extension. Germinomas have the best response to radiation therapy. Biopsy of pineal region tumors is now feasible and is recommended for treatment planning.

  19. The UF series of tomographic computational phantoms of pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2005-12-15

    Two classes of anthropomorphic computational phantoms exist for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations: tomographic voxel phantoms based upon three-dimensional (3D) medical images, and stylized mathematical phantoms based upon 3D surface equations for internal organ definition. Tomographic phantoms have shown distinct advantages over the stylized phantoms regarding their similarity to real human anatomy. However, while a number of adult tomographic phantoms have been developed since the early 1990s, very few pediatric tomographic phantoms are presently available to support dosimetry in pediatric diagnostic and therapy examinations. As part of a larger effort to construct a series of tomographic phantoms of pediatric patients, five phantoms of different ages (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male) have been constructed from computed tomography (CT) image data of live patients using an IDL-based image segmentation tool. Lungs, bones, and adipose tissue were automatically segmented through use of window leveling of the original CT numbers. Additional organs were segmented either semiautomatically or manually with the aid of both anatomical knowledge and available image-processing techniques. Layers of skin were created by adding voxels along the exterior contour of the bodies. The phantoms were created from fused images taken from head and chest-abdomen-pelvis CT exams of the same individuals (9-month and 4-year phantoms) or of two different individuals of the same sex and similar age (8-year, 11-year, and 14-year phantoms). For each model, the resolution and slice positions of the image sets were adjusted based upon their anatomical coverage and then fused to a single head-torso image set. The resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year, and 14-year are 0.43x0.43x3.0 mm, 0.45x0.45x5.0 mm, 0.58x0.58x6.0 mm, 0.47x0.47x6.00 mm, and 0.625x0.625x6.0 mm, respectively. While organ masses can be

  20. Visual phrase learning and its application in computed tomographic colonography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; McKenna, Matthew; Wei, Zhuoshi; Liu, Jiamin; Liu, Peter; Summers, Ronald M

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we propose a visual phrase learning scheme to learn an optimal visual composite of anatomical components/parts from CT colonography images for computer-aided detection. The key idea is to utilize the anatomical parts of human body from medical images and associate them with biological targets of interest (organs, cancers, lesions, etc.) for joint detection and recognition. These anatomical parts of the human body are not necessarily near each other regarding their physical locations, and they serve more like a human body navigation system for detection and recognition. To show the effectiveness of the proposed learning scheme, we applied it to two sub-problems in computed tomographic colonography: teniae detection and classification of colorectal polyp candidates. Experimental results showed its efficacy.

  1. Computer-aided interpretation approach for optical tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe J.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2010-11-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) in human finger joints using optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a classification algorithm that makes use of a so-called self-organizing mapping scheme to classify fingers as either affected or unaffected by RA. Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple image features, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging, and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used to produce ground truth benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities, while others to higher specificities when compared to single parameter classifications employed in previous studies. Maximum performances are reached when combining the minimum/maximum ratio of the absorption coefficient and image variance. In this case, sensitivities and specificities over 0.9 can be achieved. These values are much higher than values obtained when only single parameter classifications were used, where sensitivities and specificities remained well below 0.8.

  2. Computer-aided interpretation approach for optical tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Klose, Christian D; Klose, Alexander D; Netz, Uwe J; Scheel, Alexander K; Beuthan, Jurgen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2010-01-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) in human finger joints using optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a classification algorithm that makes use of a so-called self-organizing mapping scheme to classify fingers as either affected or unaffected by RA. Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple image features, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging, and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used to produce ground truth benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities, while others to higher specificities when compared to single parameter classifications employed in previous studies. Maximum performances are reached when combining the minimum/maximum ratio of the absorption coefficient and image variance. In this case, sensitivities and specificities over 0.9 can be achieved. These values are much higher than values obtained when only single parameter classifications were used, where sensitivities and specificities remained well below 0.8.

  3. Cystic tumors of the fetal and neonatal cerebrum: ultrasound and computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sauerbrei, E.E.; Cooperberg, P.L.

    1983-06-01

    Three patients (two infants and one fetus) had complex (partially cystic and partially solid) supratentorial tumors involving the brain. The sonographic and computed tomographic appearance in each of these lesions is described and discussed. The cystic component of each lesion was equally well delineated by the two modalities, whereas the peripheral solid component was better defined by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scans.

  4. Computed tomographic study of hormone-secreting microadenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hemminghytt, S.; Kalkhoff, R.K.; Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Grogan, J.P.; Haughton, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    A review was made of the computed tomographic (CT) studies of 33 patients with hormone-secreting microadenomas that had been verified by transsphenoidal surgery and endocrinologic evaluation. In previous studies in small series of patients, the CT appearance of pituitary microadenomas has been reported as hypodense, isodense, and hyperdense. In this study, CT showed a region of diminished enhancement and ususally an enlarged pituitary gland in cases of prolactin-secreting adenomas. HGH- or ACTH-secreting adenomas were less consistently hypodense. It is concluded that hypodensity and enlargement in the pituitary gland are the most useful criteria for identification of microadenomas. Some technical factors that may affect the CT appearance of microadenomas and lead to conflicting reports are discussed.

  5. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P

    2008-08-11

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}) was 14.3{+-}0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2{+-}0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  6. Pediatric computed tomographic angiography: imaging the cardiovascular system gently.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Pena, Andres; Poon, Michael; Chan, Frandics P; Epelman, Monica

    2010-03-01

    Whether congenital or acquired, timely recognition and management of disease is imperative, as hemodynamic alterations in blood flow, tissue perfusion, and cellular oxygenation can have profound effects on organ function, growth and development, and quality of life for the pediatric patient. Ensuring safe computed tomographic angiography (CTA) practice and "gentle" pediatric imaging requires the cardiovascular imager to have sound understanding of CTA advantages, limitations, and appropriate indications as well as strong working knowledge of acquisition principles and image post processing. From this vantage point, CTA can be used as a useful adjunct along with the other modalities. This article presents a summary of dose reduction CTA methodologies along with techniques the authors have employed in clinical practice to achieve low-dose and ultralow-dose exposure in pediatric CTA. CTA technical principles are discussed with an emphasis on the low-dose methodologies and safe contrast medium delivery strategies. Recommended parameters for currently available multidetector-row computed tomography scanners are summarized alongside recommended radiation and contrast medium parameters. In the second part of the article an overview of pediatric CTA clinical applications is presented, illustrating low-dose and ultra-low dose techniques, with an emphasis on the specific protocols.

  7. Computed tomographic characteristics of eosinophilic pulmonary granulomatosis in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Fina, Caroline; Vignoli, Massimo; Terragni, Rossella; Rossi, Federica; Wisner, Erik; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-01-01

    Canine pulmonary eosinophilic granulomatosis is a rare inflammatory pulmonary disease characterized by formation of eosinophilic granulomas that tend to obliterate the normal pulmonary architecture. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the CT characteristics of confirmed idiopathic pulmonary eosinophilic granulomatosis in a group of dogs. Five dogs met inclusion criteria. All patients were young adult dogs of variable breeds. No dog had concurrent occult heartworm disease. Computed tomographic characteristics most commonly included pulmonary masses and nodules of variable size, and lesions were most commonly located in the caudal lung lobes. Four dogs had large pulmonary masses with or without additional nodules and one dog had nodular lesions disseminated throughout the entire lung parenchyma. All large eosinophilic granulomas were smoothly margined, heterogeneous pulmonary masses displaying heterogeneous contrast enhancement. A honeycomb-like enhancement pattern was observed in all but one mass and consisted of multiple hyperattenuating rims delineating central hypoattenuating areas, suggestive of bronchiectatic lung with peripheral enhancing airway walls and fluid-filled, necrotic bronchial lumen. One dog had evidence of tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy. Findings indicated that canine eosinophilic pulmonary granulomatosis should be included as a differential diagnosis for dogs with CT characteristics of multiple pulmonary masses and/or nodules in caudal lung lobes, and a honeycomb-like enhancement pattern in masses after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast medium.

  8. Adoption of Computed Tomographic Colonography by U.S. Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Megan; Osei-Anto, Awo; Klabunde, Carrie N.; Galen, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a new non-invasivetechnology proposed as an option for colorectal cancer screening. The purpose of this study was to identify the percent of U.S. hospitals that offered CTC between 2005 and 2008 and factors that motivated or impeded adoption. Methods We analyzed data on the provision of colorectal cancer screening services by non-federal, general hospitals using the 2005 – 2008 American Hospital Association Annual Surveys. Additionally, in 2009, we conducted exploratory interviews with representatives from radiology departments at nine hospitals – six that provided CTC and three that did not. Results In 2008, 17% of hospitals offered CTC, up from 13% in 2005. Sixty-nine percent of hospitals that offered CTC in 2008 also offered optical colonoscopy services. Factors motivating adoption of CTC included a desire to provide an alternative screening option for frail, elderly patients and patients with a failed optical colonoscopy; long waits for optical colonoscopy; and promising evidence on CTC published in peer-reviewed literature. Lack of reimbursement was a commonly-cited barrier. Conclusion Growth of CTC services at U.S. hospitals occurred even in the absence of Medicare coverage or agreement among national guideline-setting organizations regarding CTC’s use in screening. Almost one-third of hospitals that offer CTC do not offer optical colonoscopy, and may not be prepared to provide adequate follow-up for patients with failed CTCs. PMID:21371666

  9. Computed Tomographic Exploration of the Middle Ethmoidal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo; Carrau, Ricardo L.; Figueroa, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The integral involvement of sinus and skull base surgeries in the field of otolaryngology makes the endonasal vasculature including the ethmoidal arteries important to consider. The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) and posterior ethmoidal artery (PEA) are well-known entities, yet the relatively recent notion of accessory or middle ethmoidal vessels complicates our understanding of this arterial system. Study Design Radiographic study. Methods Fifty computed tomographic angiographies were studied for the presence of accessory/middle ethmoidal arteries (MEAs). If contrasted arteries were not visualized reliably, foramina were accepted as evidence of arteries. The accessory arteries/foramina were then compared with the locations of the AEA and PEA. Results A total of 19 of the 50 patient samples studied had evidence of a right, left, or bilateral middle ethmoidal vessels (38%). Overall, 26 arteries total were identified out of the 100 sides (26%). Unilateral middle arteries were more common than bilateral, and right sided were more common than left. There was no evidence of multiple MEAs on a given side. Conclusion The endonasal surgeon must be cognizant of the possible presence of MEAs. These arteries should be considered when working in the medial orbit and anterior skull base region. PMID:26401479

  10. Computed tomographic findings of fungal rhinitis and sinusitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Ketaki; Reichle, Jean K; Fischetti, Anthony J; Goggin, Justin M

    2009-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings of fungal rhinitis/sinusitis in cats were characterized. The CT images of 10 cats ranging in age from 7 to 13 years were examined. The mean age was 10.8 years and all were neutered males. Nasal aspergillosis was diagnosed in five cats, cryptococcosis in three cats, hyalohyphomycosis in one cat, and trichosporonosis in one cat. Bilateral disease was present in eight cats, seven had abnormal soft tissue attenuation in two-thirds of the nasal cavity, and six had turbinate lysis. Seven cats had also lysis of the hard palate, nasal septum, or frontal bone. One cat had lysis of the cribriform plate. Five of the nine cats whose lymph nodes were imaged had lymph node enlargement. There was contrast medium enhancement in the nasal cavity in all cats, with either a primarily peripheral rim or heterogeneous pattern. There appears to be an overlap of clinical signs, age, and CT features of cats with nasal neoplasia and those with fungal rhinitis/ sinusitis.

  11. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach.

  12. Computed tomographic findings in 57 cats with primary pulmonary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Aarsvold, Stacie; Reetz, Jennifer A; Reichle, Jean K; Jones, Ian D; Lamb, Christopher R; Evola, Maria G; Keyerleber, Michele A; Marolf, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary neoplasia is relatively uncommon in cats and generally has a poor prognosis. In this multicenter, retrospective study of 57 cats with pulmonary neoplasia, the most frequent presenting signs were anorexia/inappetence (39%) and cough (37%). The pulmonary tumors were considered to be incidental findings in 9% cats. In computed tomographic (CT) images, primary pulmonary tumors appeared as a pulmonary mass in 55 (96%) cats and as a disseminated pulmonary lesion without a defined mass in two (4%) cats. Most pulmonary tumors were in the caudal lobes, with 28 (49%) in the right caudal lobe and 17 (30%) in the left caudal lobe. CT features associated with pulmonary tumors included mass in contact with visceral pleura (96%), irregular margins (83%), well-defined borders (79%), bronchial compression (74%), gas-containing cavities (63%), foci of mineral attenuation (56%), and bronchial invasion (19%). The mean (range) maximal dimension of the pulmonary masses was 3.5 cm (1.1-11.5 cm). Additional foci of pulmonary disease compatible with metastasis were observed in 53% cats. Pleural fluid was evident in 30% cats and pulmonary thrombosis in 12% cats. The histologic diagnoses were 47 (82%) adenocarcinomas, six (11%) tumors of bronchial origin, three (5%) adenosquamous cell carcinomas, and one (2%) squamous cell carcinoma. In this series, adenocarcinoma was the predominant tumor type, but shared many features with less common tumor types. No associations were identified between tumor type and CT features. Prevalence of suspected intrapulmonary metastasis was higher than in previous radiographic studies of cats with lung tumors.

  13. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Presumptively Normal Canine Sternal Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Ryota; Mori, Takashi; Ito, Yusuke; Kawabe, Mifumi; Murakmi, Mami; Maruo, Kohji

    The sternal lymph nodes receive drainage from a wide variety of structures in the thoraco-abdominal region. Evaluation of these lymph nodes is essential, especially in cancer patients. Computed tomography (CT) can detect sternal lymph nodes more accurately than radiography or ultrasonography, and the criteria of the sternal lymphadenopathy are unknown. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the CT characteristics of the sternal lymph nodes in dogs considered unlikely to have lymphadenopathy. The ratio of the short axis dimension of the sternal lymph nodes to the thickness of the second sternebra was also investigated. At least one sternal lymph node was identified in each of the 152 dogs included in the study. The mean long axis and short axis dimensions were 0.700 cm and 0.368 cm, respectively. The mean ratio of the sternal lymph nodes to the second sternebrae was 0.457, and the 95% prediction interval ranged from 0.317 to 0.596 (almost a fixed value independent of body weight). These findings will be useful when evaluating sternal lymphadenopathy using CT.

  14. Computed Tomographic Findings of Syphilitic Aortitis: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hideyuki; Sakai, Fumikazu; Nishii, Noriko; Tohda, Joe; Fujimura, Mikihiko; Haruta, Shoji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Endo, Masahiro; Sakomura, Yasunari; Kurosama, Hiromi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2004-03-15

    We describe the computerized tomographic (CT) findings of the aortic wall in a case of acute-phase syphilitic arteritis. The delayed phase of the contrast-enhanced CT shows a double-ring configuration of the thick thoracic aortic wall, which is similar to CT findings previously reported for Takayasu arteritis. We speculate that the resemblance of the CT findings for these two diseases accounts for their similar histopathological features.

  15. Invited review-Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Drees, Randi; François, Christopher J; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the thoracic cardiovascular system is offering new diagnostic opportunities in companion animal patients with the increasing availability of multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) units in veterinary facilities. Optimal investigation of the systemic, pulmonary, and coronary circulation provides unique challenges due to the constant movement of the heart, the small size of several of the structures of interest, and the dependence of angiographic quality on various contrast bolus design and patient factors. Technical and practical aspects of thoracic cardiovascular CTA are reviewed in light of the currently available veterinary literature and future opportunities given utilizing MDCT in companion animal patients with suspected thoracic cardiovascular disease.

  16. Computed tomographic findings of cerebral fat embolism following multiple bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Law, Huong Ling; Wong, Siong Lung; Tan, Suzet

    2013-02-01

    Fat embolism to the lungs and brain is an uncommon complication following fractures. Few reports with descriptions of computed tomographic (CT) findings of emboli to the brain or cerebral fat embolism are available. We report a case of cerebral fat embolism following multiple skeletal fractures and present its CT findings here.

  17. Parallel computing for simultaneous iterative tomographic imaging by graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello-Maldonado, Pedro D.; López, Ricardo; Rogers, Colleen; Jin, Yuanwei; Lu, Enyue

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of accelerating inversion algorithms for nonlinear acoustic tomographic imaging by parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). Nonlinear inversion algorithms for tomographic imaging often rely on iterative algorithms for solving an inverse problem, thus computationally intensive. We study the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) for the multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) tomography algorithm which enables parallel computations of the grid points as well as the parallel execution of multiple source excitation. Using graphics processing units (GPUs) and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming model an overall improvement of 26.33x was achieved when combining both approaches compared with sequential algorithms. Furthermore we propose an adaptive iterative relaxation factor and the use of non-uniform weights to improve the overall convergence of the algorithm. Using these techniques, fast computations can be performed in parallel without the loss of image quality during the reconstruction process.

  18. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with “rapid wash-in and slow wash-out” or “progressive enhancement” enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  19. Gouda frame redesigned specifically for computed tomographic compatibility.

    PubMed

    Gouda, K I; Freidberg, S R; Baker, R A; Larsen, C R; Silverman, M L

    1986-01-01

    The Gouda stereotactic frame has been redesigned for use with computed tomography. The patient is attached to the frame, is scanned, and is moved to the operating room for stereotactic biopsy. The Gouda frame permits accurate biopsy of otherwise inaccessible tumors of the brain.

  20. Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Annual technical report for program renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O.C.

    1993-05-01

    This progress report details the theoretical development, numerical results, experimental design (mechanical), experimental design (electronic), and experimental results for the research program for the development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flow analyzer.

  1. Computed tomographic beam-hardening artefacts: mathematical characterization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Chung, Yong Eun; Seo, Jin Keun

    2015-06-13

    This paper presents a mathematical characterization and analysis of beam-hardening artefacts in X-ray computed tomography (CT). In the field of dental and medical radiography, metal artefact reduction in CT is becoming increasingly important as artificial prostheses and metallic implants become more widespread in ageing populations. Metal artefacts are mainly caused by the beam-hardening of polychromatic X-ray photon beams, which causes mismatch between the actual sinogram data and the data model being the Radon transform of the unknown attenuation distribution in the CT reconstruction algorithm. We investigate the beam-hardening factor through a mathematical analysis of the discrepancy between the data and the Radon transform of the attenuation distribution at a fixed energy level. Separation of cupping artefacts from beam-hardening artefacts allows causes and effects of streaking artefacts to be analysed. Various computer simulations and experiments are performed to support our mathematical analysis.

  2. Computed tomographic identification of calcified optic nerve drusen

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, H.; Blatt, E.S.; Hibri, N.S.

    1983-07-01

    Four cases of optic disk drusen were accurately diagnosed with orbital computed tomography (CT). The radiologist should be aware of the characteristic CT finding of discrete calcification within an otherwise normal optic disk. This benign process is easily differentiated from lesions such as calcific neoplastic processes of the posterior globe. CT identification of optic disk drusen is essential in the evaluation of visual field defects, migraine-like headaches, and pseudopapilledema.

  3. [The current aspects of the computed tomographic and clinical diagnosis of degenerative changes in the spine of flight personnel].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Martynenko, M V; Martynenko, A V; Aleksakhina, T Iu

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the modern aspects of the computed tomographic and clinical diagnostics of the degenerative changes in the vertebral column of the pilots. There has been elaborated the classification of degenerative changes with consideration of the present-day requirements of clinical diagnostics and medical examination. The more frequently seen damages of intervertebral disks in the pilots in the form of protrusions and prolapses are indicated, the computed tomographic and clinical characteristics are compared.

  4. Improving the efficiency of abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress computations.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Jaime E; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses.

  5. Computed tomographic diagnosis of nongastrointestinal foreign bodies in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Ober, Christopher P

    2007-01-01

    Clinical data and computed tomography (CT) studies were reviewed for 13 dogs with confirmed nongastrointestinal foreign bodies. Locations of foreign bodies were the nasal cavity, thoracic wall, retropharyngeal region, and cerebellum. Types of foreign bodies included small plant components, blades of grass, wooden sticks, cloth fibers, and a needle. Foreign bodies in five dogs were not identified on CT, and secondary reactions resembled neoplastic or fungal disease. In eight dogs, foreign bodies were recognized by their shape and/or internal architecture. In two dogs, three-dimensional reformatting helped demonstrate foreign bodies in relation to palpable bony landmarks.

  6. Recent Advances in Computed Tomographic Technology: Cardiopulmonary Imaging Applications.

    PubMed

    Tabari, Azadeh; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Murugan, Venkatesh; Otrakji, Alexi; Digumarthy, Subba; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2017-03-01

    Cardiothoracic diseases result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Chest computed tomography (CT) has been an imaging modality of choice for assessing a host of chest diseases, and technologic advances have enabled the emergence of coronary CT angiography as a robust noninvasive test for cardiac imaging. Technologic developments in CT have also enabled the application of dual-energy CT scanning for assessing pulmonary vascular and neoplastic processes. Concerns over increasing radiation dose from CT scanning are being addressed with introduction of more dose-efficient wide-area detector arrays and iterative reconstruction techniques. This review article discusses the technologic innovations in CT and their effect on cardiothoracic applications.

  7. Computed tomographic images of discospondylitis in a calf

    PubMed Central

    TSUKA, Takeshi; YAMAMOTO, Naoki; SANESHIGE, Makoto; MORITA, Takehito; SUNDEN, Yuji; MURAHATA, Yusuke; AZUMA, Kazuo; OSAKI, Tomohiro; ITO, Norihito; OKAMOTO, Yoshiharu; IMAGAWA, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    A 2-month-old male Japanese Black calf was presented with a 30-day history of progressive ataxia. Antemortem examination using computed tomography (CT) revealed narrowing of the disc spaces due to destruction of intervertebral structures between the first and second thoracic vertebrae and between the second and third thoracic vertebrae. Osteolysis was evident as irregular hypoattenuating lesions within the opposing end plates of the first, second and third thoracic vertebrae. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected as the causative bacteria, and discospondylitis was diagnosed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first bovine case report describing the application of CT for the diagnosis of discospondylitis. PMID:26256229

  8. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  9. Maturation of normal primate white matter: computed tomographic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Quencer, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    Five infant baboons were examined with computed tomography (CT) during the first year of their lives to determine the rate and degree of normal white matter maturation in frontal, occipital, and parietal areas. The increase in CT numbers with age was correlated with gross and histologic specimens. Two phases of maturation were identified: a rapid phase (first 8-12 weeks) and a gradual phase (after 12 weeks). Frontal white matter was the most immature in the immediate postnatal period but it became equal in attenuation to the other regions by 4 weeks of age. Knowledge of white matter maturation rates may be particularly useful in cases of neonatal hypoxia/ischemia where zones of periventricular hypodensity are identified. The failure of such regions to follow a normal rate of maturation may indicate damage to the white matter and have significant prognostic implications.

  10. Computed tomographic diagnosis of intraventricular hemorrhage: etiology and prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Graeb, D.A.; Robertson, W.D.; Lapointe, J.S.; Nugent, R.A.; Harrison, P.B.

    1982-04-01

    Sixty-eight patients with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) were reviewed retrospectively to determine the etiology and prognosis, relationship to delayed hydrocephalus, and effect on neurological outcome. The most common causes were a ruptured aneurysm, trauma, and hypertensive hemorrhage. Ruptured aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery can often be predicted from the nonenhanced CT scan. The total mortality rate was 50%; however, 21% of patients returned to normal or had only mild disability. Patients in whom no cause was identified had a better prognosis. Delayed hydrocephalus was related to the effects of subarachnoid hemorrahage rather than obstruction of the ventricular system by blood. IVH per se is seldon a major factor in the neurological outcome.

  11. Computed tomographic analysis of calvarial hyperostosis in captive lions.

    PubMed

    Gross-Tsubery, Ruth; Chai, Orit; Shilo, Yael; Miara, Limor; Horowitz, Igal H; Shmueli, Ayelet; Aizenberg, Itzhak; Hoffman, Chen; Reifen, Ram; Shamir, Merav H

    2010-01-01

    Osseous malformations in the skull and cervical vertebrae of lions in captivity are believed to be caused by hypovitaminosis A. These often lead to severe neurologic abnormalities and may result in death. We describe the characterization of these abnormalities based on computed tomography (CT). CT images of two affected and three healthy lions were compared with define the normal anatomy of the skull and cervical vertebrae and provide information regarding the aforementioned osseous malformations. Because bone structure is influenced by various factors other than the aforementioned disease, all values were divided by the skull width that was not affected. The calculated ratios were compared and the most pronounced abnormalities in the affected lions were, narrowing of the foramen magnum, thickening of the tentorium osseus cerebelli and thickening of the dorsal arch of the atlas. CT is useful for detection of the calvarial abnormalities in lions and may be useful in further defining this syndrome.

  12. Computer-aided teniae coli detection using height maps from computed tomographic colonography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhuoshi; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for colonic polyps and cancer screening. Teniae coli are three bands of longitudinal smooth muscle on the colon surface. They are parallel, equally distributed on the colon wall, and form a triple helix structure from the appendix to the sigmoid colon. Because of their characteristics, teniae coli are important anatomical meaningful landmarks on human colon. This paper proposes a novel method for teniae coli detection on CT colonography. We first unfold the three-dimensional (3D) colon using a reversible projection technique and compute the two-dimensional (2D) height map of the unfolded colon. The height map records the elevation of colon surface relative to the unfolding plane, where haustral folds corresponding to high elevation points and teniae to low elevation points. The teniae coli are detected on the height map and then projected back to the 3D colon. Since teniae are located where the haustral folds meet, we break down the problem by first detecting haustral folds. We apply 2D Gabor filter banks to extract fold features. The maximum response of the filter banks is then selected as the feature image. The fold centers are then identified based on piecewise thresholding on the feature image. Connecting the fold centers yields a path of the folds. Teniae coli are finally extracted as lines running between the fold paths. Experiments were carried out on 7 cases. The proposed method yielded a promising result with an average normalized RMSE of 5.66% and standard deviation of 4.79% of the circumference of the colon.

  13. 64-MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANGIOGRAPHY OF THE CANINE CORONARY ARTERIES

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Reeder, Scott B.; Pinkerton, Marie E.; Johnson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Canine coronary artery angiography (CTA) was performed in four anesthetized healthy dogs using 64-multi-detector computed tomography. Esmolol, a β-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, and sodium nitroprusside, an arteriolar and venous dilator, were administered to enhance visualization of the coronary arteries by reducing heart rate and creating vasodilation. The left main coronary artery with its three main branches and the right coronary artery were visualized and subdivided in 13 segments for evaluation. Optimal reconstruction interval, expressed as percentage of the R-to-R interval, was determined at 5% in 2.9%, 35% in 1%, 75% in 21.2%, 85% in 43.3%, and 95% in 31.7% of the segments. Overall image quality was good in 41.3% of the segments and excellent in 14.4%. There was blur in 98.1%, motion in 17.3%, and stair step in 6.7% of the evaluated segments, but these artifacts did not interfere with anatomic depiction of the arteries. Cross-sectional anatomy of the coronary arteries as evaluated from the coronary CTA agreed well with gross anatomic evaluation and published information. The use of esmolol did not lead to the target heart rate of 60–65 beats/min. Nitroprusside had no significant effect on visualized length or diameter of the coronary artery branches. Coronary CTA is useful for the anatomic depiction of coronary artery branches in the dog. PMID:21521398

  14. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Bifid Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Kolahi, Shirin; Panahi, Nazi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Differential diagnosis of bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is important, since it may play a role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions and joint symptoms. In addition, radiographic appearance of BMC may mimic tumors and/or fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and orientation of BMC based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on CBCT scans of paranasal sinuses of 425 patients. In a designated NNT station, all CBCT scans were evaluated in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to find the frequency of BMC. The condylar head horizontal angulations were also determined in the transverse plane. T-test was used to compare the frequency of BMC between the left and right sides and between males and females. Results: Totally, 309 patients with acceptable visibility of condyles on CBCT scans were entered in the study consisting of 170 (55%) females and 139 (45%) males with a mean age of 39.43±9.7 years. The BMC was detected in 14 cases (4.53%). Differences between males and females, sides and horizontal angulations of condyle of normal and BMC cases were not significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of BMC in the studied population was 4.53%. No significant difference was observed between males and females, sides or horizontal angulations of the involved and uninvolved condyles. PMID:27559345

  15. [Recurrence paralysis: computed tomographic analysis of intrathoracic findings].

    PubMed

    Delorme, S; Knopp, M V; Kauczor, H U; Zuna, I; Trost, U; Haberkorn, U; van Kaick, G

    1992-09-01

    The long and singular course of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve makes it very vulnerable to infiltration by tumors of various locations. In particular, mediastinal and pulmonary lesions must be considered in the case of left vocal chord palsy. Recurrent nerve paralysis caused by a tumor indicates advanced disease. We retrospectively reviewed the computed tomography (CT) findings in 29 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma or mediastinal tumors and recurrent nerve paralysis with respect to the site, size and extent of the tumor and the lymph node status. The review revealed a marked predominance of left upper lobe tumors with extensive lymph node metastases to the anterior mediastinum and the aortopulmonary window. The extent of mediastinal involvement exceeded the average involvement in a control group of 30 randomly selected patients with bronchogenic carcinoma at the time of presentation. In all patients CT demonstrated tumor tissue which could have caused the paralysis at one or more sites along the anatomical course of the recurrent nerve. In most cases the tumor was located at the aortic arch. The left paratracheal region, right paratracheal region and right pulmonary apex were affected in one case each. We conclude that in patients with cancer, CT is a suitable method for localizing a recurrent nerve lesion.

  16. Vertebrobasilar system computed tomographic angiography in central vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Paşaoğlu, Lale

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of vertigo in the population is 20% to 30% and one-fourth of the cases are related to central causes. The aim of this study was to evaluate computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings of the vertebrobasilar system in central vertigo without stroke. CTA and magnetic resonance images of patients with vertigo were retrospectively evaluated. One hundred twenty-nine patients suspected of having central vertigo according to history, physical examination, and otological and neurological tests without signs of infarction on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. The control group included 120 patients with similar vascular disease risk factors but without vertigo. Vertebral and basilar artery diameters, hypoplasias, exit-site variations of vertebral artery, vertebrobasilar tortuosity, and stenosis of ≥50% detected on CTA were recorded for all patients. Independent-samples t test was used in variables with normal distribution, and Mann–Whitney U test in non-normal distribution. The difference of categorical variable distribution according to groups was analyzed with χ2 and/or Fisher exact test. Vertebral artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis were seen more often in the vertigo group (P = 0.000, <0.001). Overall 78 (60.5%) vertigo patients had ≥50% stenosis, 54 (69.2%) had stenosis at V1 segment, 9 (11.5%) at V2 segment, 2 (2.5%) at V3 segment, and 13 (16.6%) at V4 segment. Both vertigo and control groups had similar basilar artery hypoplasia and ≥50% stenosis rates (P = 0.800, >0.05). CTA may be helpful to clarify the association between abnormal CTA findings of vertebral arteries and central vertigo. This article reveals the opportunity to diagnose posterior circulation abnormalities causing central vertigo with a feasible method such as CTA. PMID:28328808

  17. Quantification of Vasa Vasorum Density in Multi-Slice Computed Tomographic Coronary Angiograms: Role of Computed Tomographic Image Voxel Size

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, R.; Eaker, D; Langheinrich, A; Jorgensen, S; Bohle, R; Ritman, E

    2010-01-01

    This study is motivated by the possibility of using computed tomography (CT) to detect early coronary atherosclerosis by the increased CT values within the arterial wall resulting from vasa vasorum proliferation. Coronary arteries (n = 5) with early atherosclerotic changes were injected with Microfil and scanned (micro-CT). Noise was added to the CT projection data sets (to represent the radiation exposure of current clinical CT scanners) and then reconstructed to generate 3-dimensional images at different voxel sizes. Higher CT values were detected because of contrast agent in vasa vasorum if voxel size was less than (150 {micro}m){sup 3}. Contrast in the main lumen increased the CT values dramatically at voxels greater than (100 {micro}m){sup 3}, whereas CT values of the same specimen without contrast in the main lumen remained constant. Voxel sizes less than (200 {micro}m){sup 3} are needed to quantitate arterial wall opacification due to vasa vasorum proliferation.

  18. Automating the segmentation of medical images for the production of voxel tomographic computational models.

    PubMed

    Caon, M; Mohyla, J

    2001-12-01

    Radiation dosimetry for the diagnostic medical imaging procedures performed on humans requires anatomically accurate, computational models. These may be constructed from medical images as voxel-based tomographic models. However, they are time consuming to produce and as a consequence, there are few available. This paper discusses the emergence of semi-automatic segmentation techniques and describes an application (iRAD) written in Microsoft Visual Basic that allows the bitmap of a medical image to be segmented interactively and semi-automatically while displayed in Microsoft Excel. iRAD will decrease the time required to construct voxel models.

  19. Computed tomographic mammography. Diagnosis of mammographically and clinically occult carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Sibala, J L; Chang, C H; Lin, F; Jewell, W R

    1981-01-01

    If breast cancer can be detected early, while it is still localized and before it can be palpated, the prognosis for cure is excellent. Heretofore, conventional mammography has been the only means available to detect cancer at such an early stage. Two cases of minimal breast carcinoma measuring less than 5 mm in diameter have been detected and correctly diagnosed using computed tomographic mammography (CT/M). Both cases occurred in fatty breasts and were clinically and mammographically occult. These cases demonstrate the value of CT/M in the diagnosis of minimal breast carcinoma that would have been missed otherwise.

  20. Computed Tomographic Features in a Case of Bilateral Neoplastic Cryptorchidism with Suspected Torsion in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Stokowski, Scott; Ruth, Jeffrey; Lanz, Otto; Ziglioli, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    An 11-year-old male German Shepherd dog presented for inappetence and weight loss. Physical examination and initial bloodwork revealed palpable abdominal masses, mild non-regenerative anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Survey radiography and abdominal ultrasonography confirmed the presence of bilateral abdominal masses and lymphadenopathy. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) was performed in order to further investigate the origin of the intraabdominal masses, confirming two enlarged cryptorchid testes, one of which had an associated CT “whirl sign.” Histopathology of the testes and lymph nodes revealed bilateral malignant Sertoli cell tumors and seminomas with lymph node metastasis of both neoplasms. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the benefits of CT in the diagnosis of cryptorchid testes and describe an additional organ that may display CT “whirl sign.” PMID:27200365

  1. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Wildberger, Joachim E. Graaf, Rick de Zwam, Willem H. van Haan, Michiel W. de Kemerink, Gerrit J. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCT dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.

  2. PATHOLOGIC BASIS FOR RIM ENHANCEMENT OBSERVED IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGES OF FELINE NASOPHARYNGEAL POLYPS.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Sibbing, Kendall; Priestnall, Simon L

    2016-01-01

    In postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) images, feline nasopharyngeal polyps typically demonstrate enhancement of the peripheral rim. Computed tomographic images and histologic specimens of a case series of 22 cats with surgically removed nasopharyngeal polyps were reviewed retrospectively in an attempt to elucidate the origin of rim enhancement. Polyps were present in the tympanic cavity in 15 (68%) cats (three with extension into the nasopharynx), only in the nasopharynx in four (18%) cats, and only in the external ear canal in the remaining three (14%) cats. All polyps had variable degrees of epithelial injury. Hemorrhage and inflammatory infiltration were significantly more marked in the superficial stroma whereas edema was significantly more marked in the core stroma. In noncontrast CT images (n = 22), the tympanic bulla was thickened in all 15 cats with a polyp in the tympanic cavity and enlarged in eight (53%) of these cats. In postcontrast CT images (n = 15), an outer zone of relatively increased attenuation compatible with a rim was observed in 11 (73%) polyps. The magnitude and extent of rim enhancement in CT images was positively correlated with the histologic grade of inflammation in the superficial stroma and negatively correlated with the grade of edema in the superficial stroma. It appears that inflammation is the major determinant of contrast medium accumulation in feline nasopharyngeal polyps, and the tendency for inflammation to affect predominantly the superficial layers explains the frequent observation of a rim in postcontrast CT images.

  3. Simple load frame for in situ computed tomography and x-ray tomographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, T.M. ); Stock, S.R.; Brown, R.C. )

    1993-05-01

    In many instances, the response of a sample to external stimuli must be observed repeatedly during the course of an experiment. The sequence in which features are formed is often critical to proper identification of the mechanisms operating, for example, in fatigue and fracture. Merely observing what is visible at the surface of the sample can be misleading or can provide inadequate information about what governs fatigue crack growth or about what controls the fracture process. X-ray imaging allows one to observe the interior of samples and is an attractive technique to use with in situ stressing of test specimens. Here, a simple compact, inexpensive load frame is described for in situ x-ray computed tomography and for very high resolution computed tomography, termed x-ray tomographic microscopy. The load frame is evaluated, and its use is illustrated by observations of crack closure as a function of load in a notched tensile sample of Al-Li-2090.

  4. Electromagnetic tracking for abdominal interventions in computer aided surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Banovac, Filip; Lin, Ralph; Glossop, Neil; Wood, Bradford J; Lindisch, David; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    Electromagnetic tracking has great potential for assisting physicians in precision placement of instruments during minimally invasive interventions in the abdomen, since electromagnetic tracking is not limited by the line-of-sight restrictions of optical tracking. A new generation of electromagnetic tracking has recently become available, with sensors small enough to be included in the tips of instruments. To fully exploit the potential of this technology, our research group has been developing a computer aided, image-guided system that uses electromagnetic tracking for visualization of the internal anatomy during abdominal interventions. As registration is a critical component in developing an accurate image-guided system, we present three registration techniques: 1) enhanced paired-point registration (time-stamp match registration and dynamic registration); 2) orientation-based registration; and 3) needle shape-based registration. Respiration compensation is another important issue, particularly in the abdomen, where respiratory motion can make precise targeting difficult. To address this problem, we propose reference tracking and affine transformation methods. Finally, we present our prototype navigation system, which integrates the registration, segmentation, path-planning and navigation functions to provide real-time image guidance in the clinical environment. The methods presented here have been tested with a respiratory phantom specially designed by our group and in swine animal studies under approved protocols. Based on these tests, we conclude that our system can provide quick and accurate localization of tracked instruments in abdominal interventions, and that it offers a user-friendly display for the physician.

  5. Stature estimation from skull measurements using multidetector computed tomographic images: A Japanese forensic sample.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between stature and cranial measurements in a contemporary Japanese population, using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) images. A total of 228 cadavers (123 males, 105 females) underwent postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy between May 2011 and April 2015. Five cranial measurements were taken from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only cranial data. The correlations between stature and each of the cranial measurements were assessed with Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. Simple and multiple regression analyses showed significant correlations between stature and cranial measurements. In conclusion, cranial measurements obtained from 3D CT images may be useful for forensic estimation of the stature of Japanese individuals, particularly in cases where better predictors, such as long bones, are not available.

  6. Myocardial stunning in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: recovery predicted by single photon emission computed tomographic thallium-201 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fine, D.G.; Clements, I.P.; Callahan, M.J.

    1989-05-01

    A young woman with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization presented with chest pain and features of a large left ventricular aneurysm. The initial diagnosis was myocardial ischemia with either an evolving or an ancient myocardial infarction. Subsequently, verapamil therapy was associated with complete resolution of the extensive left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, normalization of left ventricular ejection fraction and a minimal myocardial infarction. Normal thallium uptake on single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy early in the hospital course predicted myocardial viability in the region of the aneurysm. Thus, orally administered verapamil may reverse spontaneous extensive myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and possibly limit the extent of myocardial infarction in such circumstances.

  7. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  8. The use of helical computed tomographic scan to assess bony physeal bridges.

    PubMed

    Loder, R T; Swinford, A E; Kuhns, L R

    1997-01-01

    Coronal and sagittal reformatted images of the physis obtained with the helical computed tomography (CT) scanner were studied in five children. This technique allows tomographic slices at 1.0-mm thickness and can be performed in approximately 20 s. The distal femora were studied in two children, the distal tibia in two children, and the distal radius in one child. In three children, after physeal mapping, bar resections were performed. In all cases, the location and size of the bar was accurately predicted by the map constructed from the helical CT scan. We recommend the helical CT scan to prepare physeal maps to determine the extent and location of physeal bony bars because of excellent bony detail, radiation doses one half to one quarter those of conventional tomography, and the rapidity of scanning, which bypasses the need for sedation.

  9. Computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis in the mummified remains of humans from around the world.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Randall C; Allam, Adel H; Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Lombardi, Guido P; Cox, Samantha L; Frohlich, Bruno; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Frohlich, Thomas C; King, Samantha I; Miyamoto, Michael I; Monge, Janet M; Valladolid, Clide M; El-Halim Nur El-Din, Abd; Narula, Jagat; Thompson, Adam M; Finch, Caleb E; Thomas, Gregory S

    2014-06-01

    Although atherosclerosis is widely thought to be a disease of modernity, computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis has been found in the bodies of a large number of mummies. This article reviews the findings of atherosclerotic calcifications in the remains of ancient people-humans who lived across a very wide span of human history and over most of the inhabited globe. These people had a wide range of diets and lifestyles and traditional modern risk factors do not thoroughly explain the presence and easy detectability of this disease. Nontraditional risk factors such as the inhalation of cooking fire smoke and chronic infection or inflammation might have been important atherogenic factors in ancient times. Study of the genetic and environmental risk factors for atherosclerosis in ancient people may offer insights into this common modern disease.

  10. Ultrasound-guided mesenteric lymph node iohexol injection for thoracic duct computed tomographic lymphography in cats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mieun; Lee, Hyeyeon; Lee, Namsoon; Choi, Mihyeon; Kim, Junyoung; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) lymphography was performed in cats using percutaneous ultrasound-guided injection of contrast medium into a mesenteric lymph node. The thoracic duct and its branches were clearly delineated in CT images of seven cats studied. The thoracic duct was characterized by anatomic variation and appeared as single or multiple branches. The thoracic duct and the cisterna chyli were identified along the ventral or left ventral aspect of the vertebrae from the level of the cranial lumbar to the caudal cervical vertebrae. The thoracic duct was identified in the central caudal mediastinum, deviated to the left in the cranial mediastinum, and finally moved toward the venous system. Small volumes of extranodal contrast medium leakage were identified in all cats. After injection, the mesenteric lymph nodes were cytologically normal. Ultrasound-guided CT lymphography via percutaneous mesenteric lymph node injection appears safe and effective in cats.

  11. Assessment of feline abdominal adipose tissue using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyeon; Kim, Mieun; Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Chang, Jinhwa; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2010-12-01

    Obesity is a common nutritional disorder in cats and it increases the risk factors for various diseases. The aim of this study is to suggest a method for the evaluation of feline obesity using computed tomography. The attenuation range from -156 to -106 was determined as the range of feline abdominal adipose tissue. With this range, total (TAT), visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissues were measured. The best correlation between the adipose tissue in cross-sectional image and entire abdomen volume was obtained at the L3 and L5 levels. The mean VAT/SAT ratio was 1.18±0.32, which was much higher than in humans. The cats with an overweight body condition had a significantly lower VAT/SAT ratio than cats with an ideal body condition. This technique may contribute to both the clinical diagnosis and the experimental study of feline obesity.

  12. Evaluation Experiment of Ultrasound Computed Tomography for the Abdominal Sound Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Yamada, Akira

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal sound speed tomographic imaging using through-transmission travel time data on the body surface was investigated. To this end, a hundred kHz range low-frequency wave was used to reduce the wave attenuation within an inner body medium. A method was investigated for the reconstruction of the image with the smallest possible number of path data around the abdominal surface. Specifically, the data from a strong scattering spinal cord should be avoided. To fulfill the requirement, the smoothed path algebraic reconstruction technique was introduced. The validity of this method was examined both on the numerically synthesized data and the experimentally measured data for the phantom specimen and actual human subject. It was shown that an abdominal tomographic sound speed image could be successfully obtained by preparing only 32 transducer locations at the circumference around the abdominal surface and their combination of less than 100 number of observation path data as well as by avoiding the data intersecting the spinal cord. In addition, fat regions were extracted having a sound speed lower than the threshold value to demonstrate the possibility of this method for metabolic syndrome diagnosis.

  13. Seeing is believing: video classification for computed tomographic colonography using multiple-instance learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; McKenna, Matthew T; Nguyen, Tan B; Burns, Joseph E; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present development and testing results for a novel colonic polyp classification method for use as part of a computed tomographic colonography (CTC) computer-aided detection (CAD) system. Inspired by the interpretative methodology of radiologists using 3-D fly-through mode in CTC reading, we have developed an algorithm which utilizes sequences of images (referred to here as videos) for classification of CAD marks. For each CAD mark, we created a video composed of a series of intraluminal, volume-rendered images visualizing the detection from multiple viewpoints. We then framed the video classification question as a multiple-instance learning (MIL) problem. Since a positive (negative) bag may contain negative (positive) instances, which in our case depends on the viewing angles and camera distance to the target, we developed a novel MIL paradigm to accommodate this class of problems. We solved the new MIL problem by maximizing a L2-norm soft margin using semidefinite programming, which can optimize relevant parameters automatically. We tested our method by analyzing a CTC data set obtained from 50 patients from three medical centers. Our proposed method showed significantly better performance compared with several traditional MIL methods.

  14. Two methods of Haustral fold detection from computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Linguraru, Marius G.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC) has gained popularity as a new colon diagnostic method over the last decade. VC is a new, less invasive alternative to the usually practiced optical colonoscopy for colorectal polyp and cancer screening, the second major cause of cancer related deaths in industrial nations. Haustral (colonic) folds serve as important landmarks for virtual endoscopic navigation in the existing computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) system. In this paper, we propose and compare two different methods of haustral fold detection from volumetric computed tomographic virtual colonoscopy images. The colon lumen is segmented from the input using modified region growing and fuzzy connectedness. The first method for fold detection uses a level set that evolves on a mesh representation of the colon surface. The colon surface is obtained from the segmented colon lumen using the Marching Cubes algorithm. The second method for fold detection, based on a combination of heat diffusion and fuzzy c-means algorithm, is employed on the segmented colon volume. Folds obtained on the colon volume using this method are then transferred to the corresponding colon surface. After experimentation with different datasets, results are found to be promising. The results also demonstrate that the first method has a tendency of slight under-segmentation while the second method tends to slightly over-segment the folds.

  15. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation.

  16. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  17. Semiquantitative Computed Tomographic Characteristics for Lung Adenocarcinoma and Their Association with Lung Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Schabath, Matthew B.; Liu, Ying; Berglund, Anders E.; Bloom, Gregory C.; Kim, Jongphil; Stringfield, Olya; Eikman, Edward A.; Klippenstein, Donald L.; Heine, John J.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Ye, Zhaoxiang; Gillies, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Computed tomographic (CT) characteristics derived from noninvasive images that represent the entire tumor may have diagnostic and prognostic value. The purpose of this study was to assess the association of a standardized set of semiquantitative CT characteristics of lung adenocarcinoma with overall survival. Patients and Methods An initial set of CT descriptors was developed to semiquantitatively assess lung adenocarcinoma in patients (n=117) who underwent resection. Survival analyses were used to determine the association between each characteristic and overall survival. Principle component analysis (PCA) was used to determine characteristics that may differentiate histological subtypes. Results Characteristics significantly associated with overall survival included pleural attachment (p < 0.001), air bronchogram (p = 0.03), and lymphadenopathy (p = 0.02). Multivariate analyses revealed pleural attachment was significantly associated with an increased risk of death overall (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.53 – 6.70) and among patients with lepidic predominant adenocarcinomas (HR = 5.85; 95% CI 1.75 – 19.59), while lymphadenopathy was significantly associated with an increased risk of death among patients with adenocarcinomas without a predominant lepidic component (HR = 3.07; 95% CI 1.09 – 8.70). A PCA model showed that texture (ground-glass opacity component) was most important for separating the two subtypes. Conclusion A subset of the semiquantitative characteristics described herein has prognostic importance and ability to distinguish between different histological subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26077095

  18. A novel colonic polyp volume segmentation method for computer tomographic colonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huafeng; Li, Lihong C.; Han, Hao; Song, Bowen; Peng, Hao; Wang, Yunhong; Wang, Lihua; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer. However, this disease can be prevented by detection and removal of precursor adenomatous polyps after the diagnosis given by experts on computer tomographic colonography (CTC). During CTC diagnosis, the radiologist looks for colon polyps and measures not only the size but also the malignancy. It is a common sense that to segment polyp volumes from their complicated growing environment is of much significance for accomplishing the CTC based early diagnosis task. Previously, the polyp volumes are mainly given from the manually or semi-automatically drawing by the radiologists. As a result, some deviations cannot be avoided since the polyps are usually small (6~9mm) and the radiologists' experience and knowledge are varying from one to another. In order to achieve automatic polyp segmentation carried out by the machine, we proposed a new method based on the colon decomposition strategy. We evaluated our algorithm on both phantom and patient data. Experimental results demonstrate our approach is capable of segment the small polyps from their complicated growing background.

  19. Splanchnic vein thrombosis in necrotizing acute pancreatitis: Detection by computed tomographic venography

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Ke, Lu; Li, Gang; Tong, Zhi-Hui; Li, Wei-Qin; Li, Jie-Shou

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomographic venography (CTV) for splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) detection in necrotizing acute pancreatitis (AP) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with necrotizing AP who underwent both CTV and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) within 3 d were analyzed in this retrospective comparative study. All CTV procedures were performed with a dual-source CT scanner. The presence and location of SVT were determined via blinded imaging data analyses. RESULTS: According to the DSA results, 17 (39.5%) of the total 43 patients had SVT. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of CTV for SVT detection were 100% (95%CI: 77.1%-100%), 92.3% (95%CI: 73.4%-98.7%), 89.5% (95%CI: 65.5%-98.2%) and 100% (95%CI: 82.8%-100%), respectively. CONCLUSION: CTV is an effective examination for SVT detection in patients with necrotizing AP with high positive and negative predictive values. PMID:25469039

  20. Quantitative evaluation of cervical cord compression by computed tomographic myelography in Thoroughbred foals

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HADA, Tetsuro; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; IKEDA, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Kahori; SASAKI, Naoki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Five Thoroughbred foals (age, 8–33 weeks; median age, 31 weeks; weight, 122–270 kg; median weight, 249 kg) exhibiting ataxia with suspected cervical myelopathy (n=4) and limb malformation (n=1) were subjected to computed tomographic (CT) myelography. The areas of the subarachnoid space and cervical cord were measured on transverse CT images. The area of the cervical cord was divided by the area of subarachnoid space, and stenosis ratios were quantitatively evaluated and compared on the basis of histopathological examination. The sites with a ratio above 52.8% could have been primary lesion sites in the histopathological examination, although one site with a ratio of 54.1% was not a primary lesion site. Therefore, in this study, a ratio between 52.8–54.1% was suggested to be borderline for physical compression that damages the cervical cord. All the cervical vertebrae could not be scanned in three of the five cases. Therefore, CT myelography is not a suitable method for locating the site of compression, but it should be used for quantitative evaluation of cervical stenosis diagnosed by conventional myelography. In conclusion, the stenosis ratios determined using CT myelography could be applicable for detecting primary lesion sites in the cervical cord. PMID:27974873

  1. A Novel Colon Wall Flattening Model for Computed Tomographic Colonography: Method and Validation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Chen, Yuexi; Li, Lihong; Pan, Haixia; Gu, Xianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) has been developed for screening of colon cancer. Flattening the three-dimensional (3D) colon wall into two-dimensional (2D) image is believed to (1) provide supplementary information to the endoscopic views and further (2) facilitate colon registration, taniae coli (TC) detection, and haustral fold segmentation. Though the previously-used conformal mapping-based flattening methods can preserve the angular geometry, they have the limitations in providing accurate information of the 3D inner colon wall due to the lack of undulating topography. In this paper, we present a novel colon-wall flattening method using a strategy of 2.5D approach. Coupling with the conformal flattening model, the presented new approach builds an elevation distance map to depict the neighborhood characteristics of the inner colon wall. We validated the new method via two CTC applications: TC detection and haustral fold segmentation. Experimental results demonstrated the effectiveness of our strategy for CTC studies. PMID:25642397

  2. Normal morphometry of the thoracic aorta in the german shepherd dog: a computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Dabanoglu, I

    2007-06-01

    Computed tomographic images of the thoracic aorta of 14 German shepherd dogs were examined in order to determine the morphometry of the thoracic aorta. Examinations were carried out in the transverse plane at both intervertebral and mid-vertebral levels of each thoracic vertebra between T(5) and T(13). The dorsoventral and transversal diameters as well as cross-section area of the thoracic aorta were measured. The widest transversal diameter was observed at T(4-5), whereas the largest dorsoventral diameter was detected at T(5). The maximum cross-section area was detected at T(4-5). When dorsoventral and transversal diameters were compared between males and females, the aortic diameter was found to be smaller in males than in females. Although the shape of the thoracic aorta was transversal oval in the majority of the examined females, the shape of the thoracic aorta was dorsoventral oval in the majority of the males. There were significant differences between all levels measured for transversal (P < 0.001), dorsoventral (P < 0.001) diameters and cross-section area (P < 0.001) of the thoracic aorta. And there was a significant correlation between the three parameters examined. However, the correlation coefficient was highest in females.

  3. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy of malignant astrocytomas with remarks on postimplantation computed tomographic appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, B.K.; Heilbrun, M.P.; Sapozink, M.D.; McDonald, P.R.

    1988-09-01

    Seventeen patients were treated with stereotactically implanted high activity iodine-125 seeds, 12 patients for recurrent malignant astrocytomas (Protocol I) and 5 patients for newly diagnosed glioblastomas (Protocol II). Total radiation dosage to the recurrent tumors in Protocol I, including prior external beam irradiation, averaged 13,500 cGy. In the follow-up period of 6 to 50 months, the survival rate was 93% at 6 months, 60% at 12 months, 50% at 18 months, and 38% at 24 months after implantation. In Protocol II, brachytherapy was used as an interstitial radiation boost to the conventional treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastomas. External beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy provided 11,000 cGy to these tumors. In the follow-up period of 15 to 27 months, there was a 100% survival at 12 months, 75% at 18 months, and 25% at 24 months after implantation. Eight of our 17 patients required reoperation for persistent or recurrent mass lesions at 6 to 15 months postimplantation; 7 were found to harbor masses of radionecrosis containing nests of anaplastic astrocytes; 1 had frank tumor recurrence. Median survival in this group of patients requiring reoperation was 18.7 months postimplantation. In a review of postimplantation computed tomographic scans, significant mass effect and crossover of hypodensity or enhancement into the corpus callosum or opposite hemisphere were found to have prognostic significance; persistent areas of contrast enhancement and excessive peritumoral hypodensity did not.

  4. Whole-Brain Computed Tomographic Perfusion Imaging in Acute Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mokin, Maxim; Ciambella, Chelsey C.; Masud, Muhammad W.; Levy, Elad I.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (VST) can be difficult to diagnose because of its diverse clinical presentation. The utility of perfusion imaging for diagnosing VST is not well understood. Summary We retrospectively reviewed cases of acute VST in patients who underwent whole-brain (320-detector-row) computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging in combination with craniocervical CT venography. Perfusion maps that were analyzed included cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral blood flow (CBF), mean transit time, and time to peak. Among the 10 patients with acute VST included in this study, 9 had perfusion abnormalities. All perfusion abnormalities were localized in areas adjacent to the occluded sinus and did not match typical anterior or posterior circulation arterial territories. Bilateral perfusion deficits were seen in 4 cases. In 2 cases, parenchymal hemorrhage was diagnosed on noncontrast CT imaging; in those cases, focal CBV and CBF were reduced. Key Messages Whole-brain CT perfusion imaging with 320-detector-row scanners can further assist in establishing the diagnosis of VST by detecting perfusion abnormalities corresponding to venous and not arterial territories. CT perfusion could assist in the differentiation between focal reversible changes, such as those caused by vasogenic edema, and irreversible changes due to infarction. PMID:27051406

  5. Hyperspectral Computed Tomographic Imaging Spectroscopy of Vascular Oxygen Gradients in the Rabbit Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Amir H.; Kirkman, Erlinda; Martin, Gabriel; Humayun, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of retinal vascular diseases depends on ophthalmoscopic findings that most often occur after severe visual loss (as in vein occlusions) or chronic changes that are irreversible (as in diabetic retinopathy). Despite recent advances, diagnostic imaging currently reveals very little about the vascular function and local oxygen delivery. One potentially useful measure of vascular function is measurement of hemoglobin oxygen content. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel method of accurately, rapidly and easily measuring oxygen saturation within retinal vessels using in vivo imaging spectroscopy. This method uses a commercially available fundus camera coupled to two-dimensional diffracting optics that scatter the incident light onto a focal plane array in a calibrated pattern. Computed tomographic algorithms are used to reconstruct the diffracted spectral patterns into wavelength components of the original image. In this paper the spectral components of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin are analyzed from the vessels within the image. Up to 76 spectral measurements can be made in only a few milliseconds and used to quantify the oxygen saturation within the retinal vessels over a 10–15 degree field. The method described here can acquire 10-fold more spectral data in much less time than conventional oximetry systems (while utilizing the commonly accepted fundus camera platform). Application of this method to animal models of retinal vascular disease and clinical subjects will provide useful and novel information about retinal vascular disease and physiology. PMID:21931729

  6. Arterial Obstruction on Computed Tomographic or Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Response to Intravenous Thrombolytics in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mair, Grant; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Adami, Alessandro; White, Philip M.; Adams, Matthew E.; Yan, Bernard; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Farrall, Andrew J.; Sellar, Robin J.; Sakka, Eleni; Palmer, Jeb; Perry, David; Lindley, Richard I.; Sandercock, Peter A.G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Computed tomographic angiography and magnetic resonance angiography are used increasingly to assess arterial patency in patients with ischemic stroke. We determined which baseline angiography features predict response to intravenous thrombolytics in ischemic stroke using randomized controlled trial data. Methods— We analyzed angiograms from the IST-3 (Third International Stroke Trial), an international, multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled trial of intravenous alteplase. Readers, masked to clinical, treatment, and outcome data, assessed prerandomization computed tomographic angiography and magnetic resonance angiography for presence, extent, location, and completeness of obstruction and collaterals. We compared angiography findings to 6-month functional outcome (Oxford Handicap Scale) and tested for interactions with alteplase, using ordinal regression in adjusted analyses. We also meta-analyzed all available angiography data from other randomized controlled trials of intravenous thrombolytics. Results— In IST-3, 300 patients had prerandomization angiography (computed tomographic angiography=271 and magnetic resonance angiography=29). On multivariable analysis, more extensive angiographic obstruction and poor collaterals independently predicted poor outcome (P<0.01). We identified no significant interaction between angiography findings and alteplase effect on Oxford Handicap Scale (P≥0.075) in IST-3. In meta-analysis (5 trials of alteplase or desmoteplase, including IST-3, n=591), there was a significantly increased benefit of thrombolytics on outcome (odds ratio>1 indicates benefit) in patients with (odds ratio, 2.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–3.64; P=0.011) versus without (odds ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.58–1.35; P=0.566) arterial obstruction (P for interaction 0.017). Conclusions— Intravenous thrombolytics provide benefit to stroke patients with computed tomographic angiography or magnetic

  7. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles.

  8. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Konosuke; Fujikawa, Takuro; Saito, Yasuo; Ando, Takaaki; Obi, Takeshi; Miura, Naoki; Kubota, Chikara

    2015-09-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery.

  9. Radiographic, computed tomographic, and ultrasonographic findings with migrating intrathoracic grass awns in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Ryan M; Zwingenberger, Allison

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical, radiographic, and computed tomographic findings in dogs and cats with migrating intrathoracic grass awns. Thirty-five dogs and five cats with visual confirmation of a grass awn following surgery, endoscopy or necropsy, and histology were assessed. The medical records and all diagnostic imaging studies were reviewed retrospectively. Labrador Retrievers or English Pointers < 5 years of age, with a history of coughing and hyperthermia, were the most common presentations. Seventeen animals had an inflammatory leukogram of which 14 had a left shift or toxic neutrophils. Radiographs were performed in 38 animals and computed tomography (CT) in 14. Thoracic radiographs were characterized by focal pulmonary interstitial to alveolar opacities (n = 26) that occurred most commonly in the caudal (n = 19) or accessory lobes (n = 8). Additional findings included pneumothorax (n = 9), pleural effusion (n = 8), and pleural thickening (n = 7). Pulmonary opacities identified on radiographs correlated to areas of pneumonia and foreign body location. CT findings included focal interstitial to alveolar pulmonary opacities (n = 12) most commonly in the right caudal lung lobe (n = 9), pleural thickening (n = 11), mildly enlarged intrathoracic lymph nodes (n = 10), soft tissue tracking (n = 7) with enhancing margins (n = 4), pneumothorax (n = 6), pleural effusion (n = 4), and foreign body visualization (n = 4). Histologic diagnoses included pulmonary and mediastinal granulomas or abscesses, bronchopneumonia, and pleuritis. Migrating intrathoracic grass awns should be considered as a differential diagnosis in coughing, febrile animals with focal interstitial to alveolar pulmonary opacities, pleural effusion, pleural thickening, and/or pneumothorax on radiographs or CT.

  10. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    PubMed Central

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal. PMID:24850976

  11. Computed 3D visualisation of an extinct cephalopod using computer tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeneder, Alexander

    2012-08-01

    The first 3D visualisation of a heteromorph cephalopod species from the Southern Alps (Dolomites, northern Italy) is presented. Computed tomography, palaeontological data and 3D reconstructions were included in the production of a movie, which shows a life reconstruction of the extinct organism. This detailed reconstruction is according to the current knowledge of the shape and mode of life as well as habitat of this animal. The results are based on the most complete shell known thus far of the genus Dissimilites. Object-based combined analyses from computed tomography and various computed 3D facility programmes help to understand morphological details as well as their ontogentical changes in fossil material. In this study, an additional goal was to show changes in locomotion during different ontogenetic phases of such fossil, marine shell-bearing animals (ammonoids). Hence, the presented models and tools can serve as starting points for discussions on morphology and locomotion of extinct cephalopods in general, and of the genus Dissimilites in particular. The heteromorph ammonoid genus Dissimilites is interpreted here as an active swimmer of the Tethyan Ocean. This study portrays non-destructive methods of 3D visualisation applied on palaeontological material, starting with computed tomography resulting in animated, high-quality video clips. The here presented 3D geometrical models and animation, which are based on palaeontological material, demonstrate the wide range of applications, analytical techniques and also outline possible limitations of 3D models in earth sciences and palaeontology. The realistic 3D models and motion pictures can easily be shared amongst palaeontologists. Data, images and short clips can be discussed online and, if necessary, adapted in morphological details and motion-style to better represent the cephalopod animal.

  12. Association between renal dysfunction and the mixed plaque of coronary artery on computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jiyoon; Chang, Jae Hyun; Chung, Wook-Jin; Jung, Ji Yong; Na, Sun Young; Lee, Hyun Hee; Sung, Yon Mi; Moon, Chan Il; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Sejoong

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery plaque is related to development of coronary artery disease (CAD), and chronic kidney disease is associated with CAD. However, the association of renal dysfunction (RD) with coronary artery plaque characteristics has not been fully elucidated. We evaluated the association between RD and coronary artery plaque characteristics in patients with suspected CAD, who underwent multislice computed tomographic angiography (CTA). A total of 918 patients were classified into 4 groups: group with no plaque (NP) (48.9%), group with calcified plaque (CP) (16.0%), group with noncalcified plaque (NCP) (22.4%), and group with mixed plaque (MP) (12.7%). NCP is considered as rupture-prone soft plaque, and CP as more stable lesion. The mean of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 82.5 ± 15.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and the prevalence of RD (defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was 6.3%. The prevalence of RD was 3.3% in the NP group, 10.2% in the CP group, 5.3% in the NCP group, and 14.5% in the MP group (P < 0.001 by ANOVA tests). The adjusted odds ratio for RD was 3.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.04) for the MP group, compared with the NP group. The presence of RD showed an independent association with the MP counts (r = 0.155, P < 0.001); however, there was no association between RD and other plaque characteristics. In conclusion, RD is associated with MP rather than CP or NCP, compared with NP, which may reflect one of the developmental processes of CAD in patients with RD.

  13. A Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Study on Mandibular First Molars in a Chinese Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue; Han, Ting; Chen, Xinyu; Wan, Fang; Lu, Yating; Yan, Songhe; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) investigation on the root and canal configuration of the mandibular first molars, especially the morphology of the disto-lingual (DL) root, in a Chinese subpopulation. A total of 910 CBCT images of the mandibular first molars were collected from 455 patients who underwent CBCT examinations as a preoperative assessment for implants or orthodontic treatment. The following information was analyzed and evaluated: tooth position, gender, root and root canal number per tooth, root canal type of the mesial root(s) and distal root(s), angle of the DL root canal curvature, distance between two distal canal orifices in the teeth with DL root, and angle of disto-buccal canal orifice–disto-lingual canal orifice–mesio-lingual canal orifice (DB-DL-ML). Most of the mandibular first molars (64.9%, n = 591) had two roots with three root canals, and most of the mesial root canals (87.7%, n = 798) were type VI. The prevalence of the DL root was 22.1% (n = 201). The right side had a higher prevalence of DL root than the left side (p<0.05). Additionally, the curvature of the DL root canal were greater in the bucco-lingual (BL) orientation (30.10°±14.02°) than in the mesio-distal (MD) orientation (14.03°± 8.56°) (p<0.05). Overall there was a high prevalence of DL root in the mandibular first molars, and most of the DL roots were curved in different degrees. This study provided detailed information about the root canal morphology of the mandibular first molars in a Chinese subpopulation. PMID:26241480

  14. Coronary computed tomographic angiographic findings in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyung-Min; Lee, Seung-Whan; Cho, Young-Rak; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho; Ahn, Jung-Min; Lee, Jong-Young; Park, Duk-Woo; Kang, Soo-Jin; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Koh, Eun Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Kim, Min-Seon; Lee, Ki-Up; Kang, Joon-Won; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Park, Seong-Wook; Park, Seung-Jung; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2014-03-01

    There are limited data regarding the role of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We analyzed 557 asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients who underwent CCTA. Cardiac event was defined as a composite of cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome requiring hospitalization, or late revascularization. Atherosclerotic plaques were observed in 395 patients (70.9%), and 170 patients (30.5%) showed significant coronary artery disease (CAD) on CCTA. Ninety-two patients (16.5%) were associated with a significant stenosis in the left main or proximal left anterior descending artery. During the follow-up period (33.7 ± 7.8 months), although an excellent prognosis was observed in patients without significant CAD on CCTA, those with significant CAD showed more cardiac events (7.1% vs 0.5%) and lower 3-year event-free survival rates (99.2 ± 0.6% vs 90.9 ± 2.6%, p <0.001). Furthermore, in group with significant CAD, patients with significant CAD in the left main or proximal left anterior descending artery had more cardiac events (10.9% vs 2.6%) and lower 3-year event-free survival rates (97.4 ± 1.8% vs 86.1 ± 4.2%, p = 0.049). On multivariate analysis, family history of premature CAD, previous history of stroke, higher UK Prospective Diabetes Study 10-year risk scores, neuropathy, and retinopathy were independent clinical predictors of having significant CAD and left main or proximal left anterior descending artery significant CAD on CCTA. In conclusion, about 1/3 of asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients had significant CAD on CCTA with a subsequent high risk for cardiac events. These findings suggest that CCTA may have a potential role in identifying patients with high cardiovascular risks in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes.

  15. Radiation dose to patients and image quality evaluation from coronary 256-slice computed tomographic angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Yang, Ching-Ching; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess radiation dose and the corresponding image quality from suggested CT protocols which depends on different mean heart rate and high heart rate variability by using 256-slice CT. Fifty consecutive patients referred for a cardiac CT examination were included in this study. All coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner with one of five different protocols: retrospective ECG-gating (RGH) with full dose exposure in all R-R intervals (protocol A), RGH of 30-80% pulsing window with tube current modulation (B), RGH of 78±5% pulsing window with tube current modulation (C), prospective ECG-triggering (PGT) of 78% R-R interval with 5% padding window (D) and PGT of 78% R-R interval without padding window (E). Radiation dose parameters and image quality scoring were determined and compared. In this study, no significant differences were found in comparison on image quality of the five different protocols. Protocol A obtained the highest radiation dose comparing with those of protocols B, C, D and E by a factor of 1.6, 2.4, 2.5 and 4.3, respectively ( p<0.001), which were ranged between 2.7 and 11.8 mSv. The PGT could significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to patients, as compared to the RGH. However, the use of PGT has limitations and is only good in assessing cases with lower mean heart rate and stable heart rate variability. With higher mean heart rate and high heart rate variability circumstances, the RGH within 30-80% of R-R interval pulsing window is suggested as a feasible technique for assessing diagnostic performance.

  16. Evaluation of contraindications and efficacy of oral Beta blockade before computed tomographic coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Fleur R; Schuijf, Joanne D; van Velzen, Joëlla E; Kroft, Lucia J; de Roos, Albert; Sieders, Allard; Jukema, J Wouter; Schalij, Martin J; van der Wall, Ernst E; Bax, Jeroen J

    2010-03-15

    Multidetector computed tomographic coronary angiography (CTA) image quality is inversely related to the heart rate (HR). As a result beta-blocking medication is routinely administered before investigation. In the present study, the use, contraindications, and efficacy of prescan beta blockade with regard to HR reduction and CTA image quality were assessed. In 537 patients referred for CTA, the baseline HR and blood pressure were measured on arrival, and contraindications for beta blockade were noted. Unless contraindicated, a single dose of metoprolol was administered orally 1 hour before data acquisition in patients with a HR of > or =65 beats/min according to a predefined medication protocol. After 1 hour, the HR was remeasured. A total of 283 patients (53%) had a HR of > or =65 beats/min. In this group, beta blockade was contraindicated in 46 patients (16%). Metoprolol was administered to the remaining 237 patients. However, 26 patients (11%) received suboptimal (lower dose than prescribed by protocol) beta blockade because of contraindications. Of the 211 patients receiving optimal beta blockade, 57 (27%) did not achieve the target HR. Of the patients with contraindications to beta blockade, 43 (60%) did not achieve the target HR. Compared to patients with optimal HR control, those receiving no or suboptimal beta blockade because of contraindications had significantly fewer examinations of good image quality (40% vs 74%, p <0.001), and significantly more examinations of poor image quality (20% vs 6%, p <0.001). In conclusion, most patients require HR reduction before CTA. Contraindications to beta blockade are present in a substantial proportion of patients. This results in suboptimal HR control and image quality, indicating the need for alternative approaches for HR reduction.

  17. A Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Study on Mandibular First Molars in a Chinese Subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Xiong, Shijiang; Ma, Yue; Han, Ting; Chen, Xinyu; Wan, Fang; Lu, Yating; Yan, Songhe; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) investigation on the root and canal configuration of the mandibular first molars, especially the morphology of the disto-lingual (DL) root, in a Chinese subpopulation. A total of 910 CBCT images of the mandibular first molars were collected from 455 patients who underwent CBCT examinations as a preoperative assessment for implants or orthodontic treatment. The following information was analyzed and evaluated: tooth position, gender, root and root canal number per tooth, root canal type of the mesial root(s) and distal root(s), angle of the DL root canal curvature, distance between two distal canal orifices in the teeth with DL root, and angle of disto-buccal canal orifice-disto-lingual canal orifice-mesio-lingual canal orifice (DB-DL-ML). Most of the mandibular first molars (64.9%, n = 591) had two roots with three root canals, and most of the mesial root canals (87.7%, n = 798) were type VI. The prevalence of the DL root was 22.1% (n = 201). The right side had a higher prevalence of DL root than the left side (p<0.05). Additionally, the curvature of the DL root canal were greater in the bucco-lingual (BL) orientation (30.10°±14.02°) than in the mesio-distal (MD) orientation (14.03°± 8.56°) (p<0.05). Overall there was a high prevalence of DL root in the mandibular first molars, and most of the DL roots were curved in different degrees. This study provided detailed information about the root canal morphology of the mandibular first molars in a Chinese subpopulation.

  18. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  19. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Deglint, Hanford J; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Ayres, Fábio J; Boag, Graham S; Zuffo, Marcelo K

    2007-09-01

    Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to therapy and in the planning of the delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. We propose methods to achieve 3-dimensional segmentation of the neuroblastic tumor. In our scheme, some of the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images are delineated and removed from further consideration; the remaining parts of the image volume are then examined for tumor mass. Mathematical morphology, fuzzy connectivity, and other image processing tools are deployed for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by a radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are incorporated into the segmentation algorithm. In this preliminary study, the methods were tested with 10 CT exams of four cases from the Alberta Children's Hospital. False-negative error rates of less than 12% were obtained in eight of 10 exams; however, seven of the exams had false-positive error rates of more than 20% with respect to manual segmentation of the tumor by a radiologist.

  20. Three-dimensional segmentation of the tumor mass in computed tomographic images of neuroblastoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deglint, Hanford J.; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Boag, Graham S.

    2004-05-01

    Tumor definition and diagnosis require the analysis of the spatial distribution and Hounsfield unit (HU) values of voxels in computed tomography (CT) images, coupled with a knowledge of normal anatomy. Segmentation of the tumor in neuroblastoma is complicated by the fact that the mass is almost always heterogeneous in nature; furthermore, viable tumor, necrosis, fibrosis, and normal tissue are often intermixed. Rather than attempt to separate these tissue types into distinct regions, we propose to explore methods to delineate the normal structures expected in abdominal CT images, remove them from further consideration, and examine the remaining parts of the images for the tumor mass. We explore the use of fuzzy connectivity for this purpose. Expert knowledge provided by the radiologist in the form of the expected structures and their shapes, HU values, and radiological characteristics are also incorporated in the segmentation algorithm. Segmentation and analysis of the tissue composition of the tumor can assist in quantitative assessment of the response to chemotherapy and in the planning of delayed surgery for resection of the tumor. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated using cases acquired from the Alberta Children's Hospital.

  1. Physiological and Computed Tomographic Predictors of Outcome from Lung Volume Reduction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Washko, George R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Loring, Stephen H.; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Han, MeiLan K.; DeCamp, Malcolm; Reilly, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Previous investigations have identified several potential predictors of outcomes from lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). A concern regarding these studies has been their small sample size, which may limit generalizability. We therefore sought to examine radiographic and physiologic predictors of surgical outcomes in a large, multicenter clinical investigation, the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. Objectives: To identify objective radiographic and physiological indices of lung disease that have prognostic value in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being evaluated for LVRS. Methods: A subset of the subjects undergoing LVRS in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial underwent preoperative high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) scanning of the chest and measures of static lung recoil at total lung capacity (SRtlc) and inspiratory resistance (Ri). The relationship between CT measures of emphysema, the ratio of upper to lower zone emphysema, CT measures of airway disease, SRtlc, Ri, the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC), and both 6-month postoperative changes in FEV1 and maximal exercise capacity were assessed. Measurements and Main Results: Physiological measures of lung elastic recoil and inspiratory resistance were not correlated with improvement in either the FEV1 (R = −0.03, P = 0.78 and R = –0.17, P = 0.16, respectively) or maximal exercise capacity (R = –0.02, P = 0.83 and R = 0.08, P = 0.53, respectively). The RV/TLC ratio and CT measures of emphysema and its upper to lower zone ratio were only weakly predictive of postoperative changes in both the FEV1 (R = 0.11, P = 0.01; R = 0.2, P < 0.0001; and R = 0.23, P < 0.0001, respectively) and maximal exercise capacity (R = 0.17, P = 0.0001; R = 0.15, P = 0.002; and R = 0.15, P = 0.002, respectively). CT assessments of airway disease were not predictive of change in FEV1 or exercise capacity in this cohort. Conclusions: The RV/TLC ratio and CT measures

  2. Should computed tomographic colonography replace optical colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer?

    PubMed

    Veerappan, Ganesh R; Cash, Brooks D

    2009-04-01

    Clinical evidence amassed over the last several decades indicates that routine colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, compared to no screening, detects CRC at an earlier stage, reduces the incidence of CRC or the progression early CRC through polypectomy, and reduces CRC mortality. Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive, structural evaluation of the entire colorectum that has recently been advocated by multiple American professional medical societies as an effective alternative for CRC screening. The potential advantages of CTC, including rapid image acquisition and processing, non-invasiveness, and decreased procedural risks of perforation, bleeding, and sedation complications may serve to improve the low rates of colorectal cancer screening that are currently observed in our society. Several large studies of CTC as a CRC screening test have reported excellent results but have been criticized because of the expertise of CTC interpreters participating in those trials. As a response to these criticisms, the long-awaited results of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) National CT Colonography Trial were recently published. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of CTC in a "community based" environment to determine if previous results obtained at expert sites could be replicated. All CTC were confirmed and compared to conventional colonoscopy, the gold-standard colorectal cancer screening test. For polyps >10 mm, the results obtained in the ACRIN trial were comparable to previous studies with a mean CTC sensitivity of 90% and a mean CTC specificity of 86%. The sensitivity of CTC fell to 78% for lesions >6 mm, a value that some studies have suggested is comparable to the detection rate of conventional colonoscopy. This study adds to the body of literature regarding the efficacy of CTC and will likely be cited by many as evidence supporting CTC as an acceptable CRC screening test, in the same league as colonoscopy

  3. Good visibility of TITAN-2 coronary stents demonstrable on cardiac computer tomographic angiography: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ong, Paul Jau; Jau, Ong Paul; Ho, Hee Hwa; Hwa, Ho Hee; Jafary, Fahim Haider; Haider, Jafary Fahim; Loh, Kwok Kong; Kong, Loh Kwok; Ooi, Yau Wei; Wei, Ooi Yau; Wong, Chun Pong; Pong, Wong Chun; Foo, David; David, Foo

    2011-09-01

    Numerous studies have sought to assess stent patency by cardiac computer tomographic angiography (CCTA) in comparison with invasive coronary angiography in patients who had undergone percutaneous coronary stenting. Even with newer generation scanners, CCTA has been of limited value in the assessment of the revascularized patient. The main reason being blooming artifact from metallic stents often obscures stent luminal dimension, making the stented segment unassessable. We report on a novel finding of good visibility of TITAN-2 coronary stents demonstrable on CCTA for 2 patients and discuss the possible mechanism and potential implications of this observation.

  4. Organ dose assessment in pediatric fluoroscopy and CT via a tomographic computational phantom of the newborn patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, Robert J.

    Of the various types of imaging modalities used in pediatric radiology, fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) have the highest associated radiation dose. While these examinations are commonly used for pediatric patients, little data exists on the magnitude of the organ and effective dose values for these procedures. Calculation of these dose values is necessary because of children's increased sensitivity to radiation and their long life expectancy for which to express radiation's latent effects. In this study, a newborn tomographic phantom has been implemented in a radiation transport code to evaluate organ and effective doses for newborn patients in commonly performed fluoroscopy and CT examinations. Organ doses were evaluated for voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) fluoroscopy studies of infant patients. Time-sequence analysis was performed for videotaped VCUG studies of five different patients. Organ dose values were then estimated for each patient through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The effective dose values of the VCUG examination for five patients ranged from 0.6 mSv to 3.2 mSv, with a mean of 1.8 +/- 0.9 mSv. Organ doses were also assessed for infant upper gastrointestinal (UGI) fluoroscopy exams. The effective dose values of the UGI examinations for five patients ranged from 1.05 mSv to 5.92 mSv, with a mean of 2.90 +/- 1.97 mSv. MC simulations of helical multislice CT (MSCT) exams were also completed using, the newborn tomographic phantom and a stylized newborn phantom. The helical path of the source, beam shaping filter, beam profile, patient table, were all included in the MC simulations of the helical MSCT scanner. Organ doses and effective doses and their dependence on scan parameters were evaluated for newborn patients. For all CT scans, the effective dose was found to range approximately 1-13 mSv, with the largest values occurring for CAP scans. Tube current modulation strategies to reduce patient dose were also evaluated for newborn patients

  5. Whole body computed tomographic characteristics of skeletal and cardiac muscular metastatic neoplasia in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Massimo; Terragni, Rossella; Rossi, Federica; Frühauf, Lukas; Bacci, Barbara; Ressel, Lorenzo; Capitani, Ombretta; Marconato, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Muscular metastatic neoplasia has been reported to be rare in domestic animals, however previous studies were based primarily on necropsy findings. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe whole body computed tomography (CT) characteristics of confirmed muscular metastases in a cohort of dogs and cats presented for oncology evaluation. Medical records of 1201 oncology patients were reviewed. Included animals underwent pre and postcontrast whole body CT, and CT-guided tru-cut biopsy or fine needle aspiration of one or more metastatic lesions. Twenty-one dogs and six cats met inclusion criteria, representing 2.08% of all canine oncology patients and 3.1% of all feline oncology patients. Mean age was 9.6 years. Postcontrast CT characteristics included well-demarcated, oval-to-round lesions with varying enhancement patterns: ring enhancing (n = 16), heterogeneously enhancing (n = 8), or homogeneously enhancing (n = 5). Five animals showed concurrent and varying nodular patterns. In seven cases (five dogs and two cats), one single muscular nodule was observed. In 20 cases, two or more lesions were observed. In two cases, cardiac hypodense nodules were observed in the postcontrast CT, while appearing isodense in the precontrast study. Necropsy confirmed neoplasia in both of them. Locations of muscular metastases included epaxial/paraspinal muscles of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine (n = 18), superficial muscles of the thoracic wall (n = 13), scapular/shoulder region (n = 3), hind limb (n = 3), and abdominal wall muscles (n = 1). Findings supported the use of pre and postcontrast whole body CT for oncologic staging in dogs and cats, especially for primary tumors characterized by a high metastatic rate.

  6. Tuning the cache memory usage in tomographic reconstruction on standard computers with Advanced Vector eXtensions (AVX).

    PubMed

    Agulleiro, Jose-Ignacio; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus

    2015-06-01

    Cache blocking is a technique widely used in scientific computing to minimize the exchange of information with main memory by reusing the data kept in cache memory. In tomographic reconstruction on standard computers using vector instructions, cache blocking turns out to be central to optimize performance. To this end, sinograms of the tilt-series and slices of the volumes to be reconstructed have to be divided into small blocks that fit into the different levels of cache memory. The code is then reorganized so as to operate with a block as much as possible before proceeding with another one. This data article is related to the research article titled Tomo3D 2.0 - Exploitation of Advanced Vector eXtensions (AVX) for 3D reconstruction (Agulleiro and Fernandez, 2015) [1]. Here we present data of a thorough study of the performance of tomographic reconstruction by varying cache block sizes, which allows derivation of expressions for their automatic quasi-optimal tuning.

  7. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma: A Report of 5 Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with "rapid wash-in and slow wash-out" or "progressive enhancement" enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen.

  8. Ultrasonographic, computed tomographic, and operative findings in dogs infested with giant kidney worms (Dioctophyme renale).

    PubMed

    Rahal, Sheila C; Mamprim, Maria J; Oliveira, Hugo S; Mesquita, Luciane R; Faria, Luis G; Takahira, Regina K; Matsubara, Lídia M; Agostinho, Felipe S

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare ultrasonographic, CT, and surgical findings in dogs infested with giant kidney worms (Dioctophyme renale). DESIGN--Case series. ANIMALS--15 crossbred dogs infected with D renale. PROCEDURES--Immediately after ultrasonography was performed with dogs in dorsal recumbency, sequential transverse images of the abdomen were acquired with a helical CT scanner. After plain CT, contrast CT was performed with a nonionic iodinated contrast agent. Subsequently, exploratory celiotomy was performed. RESULTS--In the corticomedullary area of the right kidney of 12 dogs, ultrasonography revealed several ring-like structures with an echogenic wall and anechoic central area in the transverse plane and arrayed as bands in the longitudinal plane. Similar structures were observed in the abdominal cavity of 10 dogs. In 13 dogs, CT revealed loss of corticomedullary differentiation in the right kidney, with discrete uptake of contrast material in the periphery of the kidney, and several ring-like or elongated structures with a hyperdense wall and hypodense center. In 11 dogs, the same structures were observed free in the abdominal cavity. Surgery revealed that 13 dogs had a damaged right kidney that required nephrectomy. Parasites were found free in the abdominal cavity of 7 dogs. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE--Ultrasonography and CT were effective imaging methods for detecting D renale in the kidney and less effective for detecting parasites in the abdominal cavity. Care should be taken to avoid erroneously interpreting normal structures as parasites, especially in the abdominal cavity.

  9. 64-Slice Computed Tomographic Angiography for the Diagnosis of Intermediate Risk Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2009, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding different cardiac imaging modalities to ensure that appropriate technologies are accessed by patients suspected of having CAD. This project came about when the Health Services Branch at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care asked MAS to provide an evidentiary platform on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, MAS identified five key non-invasive cardiac imaging technologies for the diagnosis of CAD. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, 64-slice computed tomographic angiography, stress echocardiography, and stress echocardiography with contrast. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed (where appropriate). A summary decision analytic model was then developed to encapsulate the data from each of these reports (available on the OHTAC and MAS website). The Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography with Contrast for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis 64-Slice Computed Tomographic Angiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Cardiac

  10. The influence of computational assumptions on analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ene, Florentina; Delassus, Patrick; Morris, Liam

    2014-08-01

    The variation in computational assumptions for analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics can influence the desired output results and computational cost. Such assumptions for abdominal aortic aneurysm modelling include static/transient pressures, steady/transient flows and rigid/compliant walls. Six computational methods and these various assumptions were simulated and compared within a realistic abdominal aortic aneurysm model with and without intraluminal thrombus. A full transient fluid-structure interaction was required to analyse the flow patterns within the compliant abdominal aortic aneurysms models. Rigid wall computational fluid dynamics overestimates the velocity magnitude by as much as 40%-65% and the wall shear stress by 30%-50%. These differences were attributed to the deforming walls which reduced the outlet volumetric flow rate for the transient fluid-structure interaction during the majority of the systolic phase. Static finite element analysis accurately approximates the deformations and von Mises stresses when compared with transient fluid-structure interaction. Simplifying the modelling complexity reduces the computational cost significantly. In conclusion, the deformation and von Mises stress can be approximately found by static finite element analysis, while for compliant models a full transient fluid-structure interaction analysis is required for acquiring the fluid flow phenomenon.

  11. Gross Osteology, Radiographic and Computed Tomographic Morphology of the Axial Skeleton of the Nine-Banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus).

    PubMed

    Alves, L S; Midon, M; Filadelpho, A L; Vulcano, L C

    2017-04-01

    This study used 20 nine-banded armadillo, four in vivo and 16 cadavers, to describe the osteoarticular anatomy of the axial skeleton by means of digital radiography and computed tomography. Vertebral formula obtained in this sample specimens was seven cervical, 10 thoracic, five lumbar, nine vertebrae related to the synsacrum and 20-27 free caudal vertebrae. Peculiar features of this species were noted as the presence of xenarthrous processes in the caudal thoracic vertebra to the last lumbar vertebra, with prominent mammillary processes in the thoracolumbar segment, fused cervical vertebra from the second to fourth vertebra and the presence of synsacrum related to sacral and caudal vertebra fused to the pelvis. They are homodont animals presenting only molariform teeth with formula of 8/8, totalling 32 teeth. There was no complexity in the execution of radiographic and tomographic examinations, concluding that execution can be carried out in nine-banded armadillos during the clinical routine for wild animals.

  12. The Emerging Roles of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Acute Chest Pain Evaluation and Screening for Asymptomatic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Ning; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Lin, Po-Chih; Tseng, Yao-Hui; Lee, Yee-Fan; Ko, Wei-Chun; Lee, Bai-Chin; Lee, Wen-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has been widely available since 2004. After that, the diagnostic accuracy of CCTA has been extensively validated with invasive coronary angiography for detection of coronary arterial stenosis. In this paper, we reviewed the updated evidence of the role of CCTA in both scenarios including acute chest pain and screening in asymptomatic adults. Several large-scale studies have been conducted to evaluate the diagnostic value of CCTA in the context of acute chest pain patients. CCTA could play a role in delivering more efficient care. For risk stratification of asymptomatic patients using CCTA, latest studies have revealed incremental benefits. Future studies evaluating the totality of plaque characteristics may be useful for determining the role of noncalcified plaque for risk stratification in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:27122947

  13. Clinical, histologic, and computed tomographic features of oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma in dogs: 9 cases (2008- 2011).

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Snyder, Christopher J; Simmons, Betsie T; Pinkerton, Marie E; Chun, Ruthanne

    2013-01-01

    Medical records of dogs diagnosed with oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma between December 2008 and April 2011 were reviewed. Information abstracted included signalment, tumor location, tumor size, computed tomographic (CT) features, evidence of metastatic disease based on cytologic examination of lymph node aspirates and thoracic radiography, treatment, surgical margins, histologic features, and treatment outcome. Dogs included in the study were all sexually altered, predominantly large breed dogs with a mean age of 3.9-years (range, 0.5 to 9.0-years). The most common location was the rostral maxilla. Invasion of underlying bone and lymphadenopathy were evident on CT imaging in most dogs. No evidence of metastasis was found on mandibular lymph node cytology and thoracic radiography. Histologic analysis revealed similar morphologic findings for all surgically resected tumors. Surgical excision with 1-2 cm margins was complete in all cases, with a mean tumor-free interval of 12.1-months.

  14. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS: COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN A CASE OF ADENOSQUAMOUS CARCINOMA OF THE HEAD AND NECK IN A CAT.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kathleen Ella; Krockenberger, Mark; Collins, David

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old female spayed domestic long-haired cat was referred for trismus, hypersalivation, and bilateral ocular discharge. On examination, the cat showed pain on palpation of the left zygomatic arch, palpable crepitus of the frontal region, and limited retropulsion of both globes. A contrast-enhanced sinonasal computed tomographic study was performed, showing facial distortion and extensive osteolysis of the skull, extending beyond the confines of the sinonasal and paranasal cavities. Additionally, soft tissue and fluid accumulation were observed in the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses. Postmortem biopsy samples acquired from the calvarium yielded a histologic diagnosis of sinonasal adenosquamous carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive neoplasm previously only reported in the esophagus of one cat.

  15. COMPARISON OF TRANSVERSE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EXCRETORY UROGRAPHY IMAGES AND MAXIMUM INTENSITY PROJECTION IMAGES FOR DIAGNOSING ECTOPIC URETERS IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Secrest, Scott; Bugbee, Andrew; Waller, Kenneth; Jiménez, David A

    2017-03-01

    Computed tomographic maximum intensity projection (MIP) images have been shown to improve reader confidence in their diagnoses and to improve detection of vascular structures and pulmonary nodules. The objectives of this method comparison study were to compare transverse source computed tomographic excretory urography (CTEU) images to two, five, and 10 slab thick MIP images for diagnosing canine ectopic ureters, compare reader confidence, and evaluate interobserver agreement. Two board-certified veterinary radiologists and a board-certified small animal internist blindly reviewed transverse source CTEU and two, five, and 10 slab thick MIP images of 24 dogs enrolled in the study. Inclusion criteria included a diagnostic CTEU and either cystoscopic or surgical confirmation of the presence or absence of ureteral ectopia. Eleven dogs were confirmed to have 17 ectopic ureters at surgery and/or cystoscopically. There was no significant difference in reader diagnoses between viewing methods or between viewing methods and the surgical/cystoscopic findings (P < 0.001). Reader confidence was significantly greater on two (P = 0.0080) and five (P = 0.0009) slab thick MIP images with significant interobserver agreement between readers for all viewing methods (P values ranging between 0.0363 and <0.001). In addition, the diagnostic accuracy of MIP images was similar to or better than transverse source CTEU images, when assessed by a radiologist. The study results suggest that CTEU is a reliable imaging technique for diagnosing canine ectopic ureters among specialists of varied experience. In addition, thin slice reconstructed MIP images improve reader confidence and potentially diagnostic accuracy, and thus their use should be considered, especially in more challenging cases.

  16. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS-RADIOGRAPHIC, ULTRASONOGRAPHIC, AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF A DUODENAL DUPLICATION CYST IN A YOUNG CAT.

    PubMed

    Agut, Amalia; Carrillo, Juana D; Martínez, Miryam; Murciano, Jose; Belda, Eliseo; Bernabé, Antonio; Soler, Marta

    2017-01-29

    A 7-month-old, 2.8 kg, intact female Siamese cat was evaluated for repetitive and intermittent episodes of vomiting and anorexia. Abdominal palpation revealed a round, firm, nonpainful mass in the right cranial abdomen. Ultrasonography findings were consistent with a cystic structure adjacent to the descending duodenum. The structure exhibited a "muscular rim sign." A duodenal duplication cyst was confirmed by histopathological analysis. Computed tomography ruled out concurrent vertebral anomalies and clarified anatomic relationships for surgical planning. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an ultrasound "muscular rim sign" in a duodenal duplication cyst in a cat.

  17. Impact of Abdominal Follow-Up Sonography in Trauma Patients Without Abdominal Parenchymal Organ Lesion or Free Intraabdominal Fluid in Whole-Body Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emmanuel; Koch, Christian; Borgards, Mara; Reichert, Martin; Hecker, Andreas; Heiß, Christian; Padberg, Winfried; Alejandre-Lafont, Enrique; Röhrig, Rainer; Krombach, Gabriele Anja; Weigand, Markus; Bernhard, Michael; Roller, Fritz Christian

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Patients suffering from severe blunt abdominal trauma are challenging because of their need for accurate diagnostic imaging and fast therapeutic action. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) is highly sensitive and represents the gold standard in the trauma room diagnostic setting. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact and therapy relevance of abdominal follow-up sonography (AFS) as part of the tertiary trauma survey (TTS) in patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free abdominal fluid in initial WBCT. Materials and Methods All adult patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free intraabdominal fluid in the initial WBCT examination, who received AFS within 24 hours after trauma, were included in this retrospective analysis between January 2008 and December 2011. Results 316 patients were analyzed (ISS 10 ± 8, NISS 13 ± 11) according to the inclusion criteria. Overall, only small amounts of free intraabdominal fluid were detected in AFS in 3 patients (0.9 %) and remained without therapeutic consequence. None of the patients died due to intraabdominal bleeding. Conclusion AFS as part of the TTS did not show additional benefits and had no impact on further treatment in patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free intraabdominal fluid in the initial WBCT examination. We conclude that AFS is not routinely required but should be performed if indicated on a clinical or laboratory basis because of its fast and less invasive character. Key points  · Seriously injured patients are challenging for medical imaging and treatment.. · Whole-body computed tomography is known for its high accuracy in trauma patients.. · Nonetheless, missed injuries are a major challenge in trauma patients.. · Therefore, follow-up ultrasound is often performed within the tertiary trauma survey.. · Follow-up ultrasound in patients with an inconspicuous abdominal computed tomography scan did not show any

  18. Trial of a Computer Based Program for the Diagnosis of Abdominal Plan in Males.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-02

    ulcer, small bowel obstruction , not included in the computer cholecystitis, renal colic, and non- database. In addition, the clerks kept a specific...Specific Abdominal Pain NSAP Appendicitis APPY Cholecystitis CHOL Perforated Duodenal Ulcer PDU Renal Colic RENC Small Bowel Obstruction SBO Case grouping...perforated duodenal ulcer, and small diagnoses were verified when present, bowel obstruction were categorized as and their absence was specifically surgical

  19. Effect of beta blockade on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) thallium-201 images in patients with coronary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Narahara, K.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Hazen, J.F.; Brizendine, M.; Mena, I.

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated the effect of beta blockers on thallium-201 (Tl-201) single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in 12 patients with coronary disease using an automated computer algorithm. Maximal exercise heart rate and blood pressure were reduced and exercise time was increased with beta blockers. Estimated stress defect size decreased from 47 +/- 36.3 gm during placebo treatment to 32 +/- 27.1 gm during beta blocker therapy (-32%; p less than 0.01). The placebo treatment redistribution defect was estimated to be 28 +/- 29.8 gm. It fell to 15 +/- 23.3 gm with beta blockade (-46%; p less than 0.005). All patients had a stress Tl-201 defect during placebo treatment and eight had redistribution defects consistent with residual scar. During beta blocker therapy, 2 of 12 patients had normal stress-redistribution studies and only five patients had redistribution defects. Beta blockade can reduce exercise and redistribution Tl-201 SPECT defect size significantly while simultaneously increasing exercise time and reducing angina. Beta blockers may unmask or may eliminate evidence of redistribution. Tl-201 SPECT imaging may be useful in defining the reduction in ischemia produced by cardiac drugs.

  20. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Joshua L.; Mori, Shinichiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Hong, Theodore S.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40-T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of {approx}10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  1. Influence of IABP-Induced Abdominal Occlusions on Aortic Hemodynamics: A Patient-Specific Computational Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Maria Vittoria; Renzulli, Attilio; Fragomeni, Gionata

    Intraaortic balloon pump (IABP) is used as temporary mechanical assistance in case of cardiovascular diseases, even if different hemodynamic problems and, thus, clinical complications may happen, such as the decrease of visceral perfusion. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study was carried out to investigate the effects of different IABP-induced abdominal occlusions on patient-specific aortic flow. Two possible sizes (25 and 34 cm) and two locations (2 and 3 cm) of the balloon were compared, modeling four abdominal occlusions and numerically reproducing IAB inflation/deflation behavior. The results highlighted that the perfusion in renal, mesenteric, and iliac arteries decreases when the abdominal occlusion increases with balloon inflation. The study illustrates also how the balloon size affects the flow in aorta vessels in both locations, and that the positioning is of little relevance for the 34 cm balloon, whereas it influences the aortic flow very much in case of 25 cm IAB. This analysis demonstrates how the IAB-induced occlusion may vary the abdominal circulation; therefore, the correct size and positioning are emphasized for patient's outcome.

  2. A Method for Identifying Contours in Processing Digital Images from Computer Tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Şerban; Pater, Flavius; Costea, Dan; Munteanu, Mihnea; Roşu, Doina; Fratila, Mihaela

    2011-09-01

    The first step in digital processing of two-dimensional computed tomography images is to identify the contour of component elements. This paper deals with the collective work of specialists in medicine and applied mathematics in computer science on elaborating new algorithms and methods in medical 2D and 3D imagery.

  3. Use of abdominal computed tomography in blunt trauma: Do we scan too much?

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Bigelow, Eric; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Pagliarello, Guiseppe

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine what proportion of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans ordered after blunt trauma are positive and the applicability and accuracy of existing clinical prediction rules for obtaining a CT scan of the abdomen in this setting. Setting A leading trauma hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods All patients with blunt trauma admitted to hospital over a 1-year period having an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 who underwent CT of the abdomen during the initial assessment. Recorded data included age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ISS, type of injuries, number of abdominal CT scans ordered, and scan results. Two clinical prediction rules were found in the literature that identify patients likely to have intra-abdominal injuries. These rules were applied retrospectively to the cohort. The predicted proportion of positive CT scans was compared with the observed proportion, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were estimated. Results Of the 297 patients entered in the study, 109 underwent abdominal CT. The median age was 32 years, 71% were male and the median ISS was 24. In only 36.7% (40 of 109) of scans were findings suggestive of intra-abdominal injuries. Application of one of the clinical prediction rules gave a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 25.5% but excluded 23% of patients because of a GCS score less than 11. The second prediction rule tested could be applied to all patients and was highly sensitive (92.5%) and specific (100.0%). Conclusions The assessment of the abdomen in blunt trauma remains a challenge. Accuracy in predicting positive scans in equivocal cases is poor. Retrospective application of an existing clinical prediction rule was found to be highly accurate in identifying patients with positive CT findings. Prospective use of such a rule could reduce the number of CT scans ordered without missing significant injuries. PMID

  4. Diagnosis of sclerosing cholangitis with technetium 99m-labeled iminodiacetic acid planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, C.A.; Keeffe, E.B.; Lieberman, D.A.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Gilbert, S.; Eklem, M.J.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid planar biliary scintigraphy combined with single photon emission computed tomography could detect sclerosing cholangitis and provide additional information regarding the extent and severity of disease. Thirteen patients with sclerosing cholangitis and 13 normal control subjects were studied. Scintigraphic results were also compared with previously reported studies of patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction and with primary biliary cirrhosis. The planar scintigraphy in patients with sclerosing cholangitis showed beading or bandlike constrictions of the biliary tract corresponding to lesions seen on cholangiography, and the image pattern was distinctly different from images obtained from patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction or primary biliary cirrhosis. The single photon emission computed tomography images of the liver in patients with sclerosing cholangitis demonstrated multiple focal areas of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid retention, representing bile stasis in intrahepatic bile ducts. Compared to controls, the mean hepatic clearance half-time of /sup 99m/Tc-iminodiacetic acid was markedly delayed in patients with sclerosing cholangitis (6-10 times normal). Individual patients with sclerosing cholangitis had wider variation in isotope clearance half-time from three regions of the liver than patients with isolated common bile duct obstruction, consistent with regional difference in disease severity and variable impairment of bile flow. In 4 patients with sclerosing cholangitis with incomplete filling of the right and left hepatic ducts at cholangiography, planar and single photon emission computed tomographic scintigraphy provided evidence of significant intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis.

  5. Myocardial rupture associated with bolus injection of contrast medium during computed tomographic study in a patient with acute myocardial infarction: a rare but lethal complication.

    PubMed

    Lai, Vincent; Hau, K C; Lau, H Y; Chan, W C

    2009-08-01

    Well-documented potential cardiovascular complications associated with the use of contrast media include bradycardia, hypotension, arrhythmia, and conduction disturbances. Rupture of the myocardium after acute myocardial infarction is a known cause of death, but has yet to be recognised as a potential complication of the use of a bolus injection of contrast medium. On the contrary, contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies have been performed widely for the diagnosis and evaluation of myocardial infarction. We report a case of complicated myocardial rupture after a single bolus injection of contrast medium during a computed tomographic study in an elderly woman with acute myocardial infarction, which led to cardiac tamponade and rapid death. Although rare, this should alert us to the need for cautious use of contrast medium in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  6. Three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external device in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Wery, M F; Nada, R M; van der Meulen, J J; Wolvius, E B; Ongkosuwito, E M

    2015-03-01

    There is little anteroposterior growth of the midface in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who are followed up over time without intervention. A Le Fort III with distraction osteogenesis can be done to correct this. This is a controlled way in which to achieve appreciable stable advancement of the midface without the need for bone grafting, but the vector of the movement is not always predictable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 3-dimensional effect of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external frame. Ten patients (aged 7-19 years) who had the procedure were included in the study. The le Fort III procedure and the placement of the external frame were followed by an activation period and then a 3-month retention period. Computed tomographic (CT) images taken before and after operation were converted and loaded into 3-dimensional image rendering software and compared with the aid of a paired sample t test and a colour-coded qualitative analysis. Comparison of the CT data before and after distraction indicated that the amount of midface advancement was significant. Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis is an effective way to advance the midface. However, the movement during osteogenesis is not always exactly in the intended direction, and a secondary operation is often necessary. Three-dimensional evaluation over a longer period of time is necessary.

  7. Comparison of computed tomographic angiography and noncontrast magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation of living renal donors

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Abhijit Dnyandeo; Shailage, K.; Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Harigovind, P.; Mohan, R. Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The computed tomographic angiography (CTA) renal donor protocol is an established method of preoperative renal vascular pedicle evaluation in prospective renal donors. However, CTA is associated with significant radiation exposure and intravenous contrast administration. The newer noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA) techniques, especially arterial spin labeling (ASL) with steady-state free precession (SSFP) hold promise as an effective alternative. We prospectively compared CTA with NCE MRA for accuracy in the evaluation of renal arterial anatomy in prospective renal donors. Methods: A total of 43 subjects underwent CTA followed by NCE MRA in a prospective comparative study. The number of renal arteries and early branching of renal arteries were noted in both kidneys in all subjects. Intermodality agreement was calculated using “K” (Kappa) statistics and 95% confidence interval for both modalities. Results: A total of 63 single, 21 double, and 2 triple arteries were detected in 43 subjects on CTA. CTA showed an early branch in 17 kidneys. NCE MRAshowed 64 single arteries, 20 double arteries, and 2 triple arteries. A total of 14 kidneys showed an early branch. Unweighted Kappa statistic of agreement between CTA and NCE MRA for number of renal arteries and for frequency of early branching was 0.9707 and 0.8822, respectively. Conclusions: The newer NCE MRA techniques such as ASL with SSFP among others are potential alternatives for CTA, in the evaluation of prospective renal donors. PMID:28197027

  8. Evaluation of a prototype dual-energy computed tomographic apparatus. II. Determination of vertebral bone mineral content.

    PubMed

    Vetter, J R; Perman, W H; Kalender, W A; Mazess, R B; Holden, J E

    1986-01-01

    A prototype dual-energy computed tomographic (CT) scanner (Siemens Somatom DR3) with rapid kVp switching and prereconstruction processing has been used to measure vertebral bone mineral density. With this approach misregistration and beam hardening inaccuracies can be reduced considerably. Basis material images of aluminum- and Lucite-equivalent density enable measurements of bone mineral density that are nearly independent of the amount of marrow fat. To simulate variable marrow fat, alcohol-water mixtures were used as media in calibration standards. A section of dried trabecular bone was also scanned immersed in varying alcohol-water mixtures. In both simulations it was shown that the dual-energy measurement is nearly independent of marrow composition whereas the single-energy measurement would be strongly influenced by marrow fat. Dual-energy CT was compared to dual-photon absorptiometry (153Gd) for the measurement of bone mineral mass of ten excised human vertebrae. There was a high degree of correlation between the two measurements (r = 0.97). Dual-energy and single-energy CT measurements on 17 patients with suspected metabolic bone disease strongly support the conclusion that the influence of fat can lead to significant errors in single-energy determinations of the mineral density of trabecular bone.

  9. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hun; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. Materials and Methods CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. Results In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. Conclusion The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions. PMID:27358821

  10. Microcomputer-based technique for 3-D reconstruction and volume measurement of computer tomographic images. Part 1: Phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Albright, R E; Fram, E K

    1988-12-01

    This paper presents a microcomputer-based technique that accurately quantifies volumes from computed tomographic (CT) scans of irregularly shaped objects as well as displaying 3-D reconstructions. The method uses standard CT film, allowing analysis of previous or outside CT studies. The planimetry method showed less than 5% error in measuring irregular 2-D areas larger than 6 mm2. The method is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than spherical, ellipsoid, or rectangular geometric models in quantifying object volume by CT (P less than .001). With a single gantry angle, planimetry showed a two standard deviation error under 10% in measuring the volume of irregular objects compared with an error over 30% for ellipsoid models. The inaccuracy of the spherical model (80% error) and the rectangular prism model (192% error) renders them impractical to provide quantitative object volume. Microcomputer planimetry provides an accurate and versatile means to measure the volume and produce 3-D reconstructions of objects scanned with CT, and it has potential application in quantifying tumor response with CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  12. Chondrosarcoma of the maxilla: panoramic radiographic and computed tomographic with multiplanar reconstruction findings.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Becker, L; Katz, D S

    1998-03-01

    Chondrosarcomas are extremely rare tumors of which approximately 10% are found in the maxillofacial region. In this report, we present the imaging findings of a maxillary chondrosarcoma on a panoramic radiograph of the jaws and computed tomography with multiplanar reconstructions. We recommend the latter as an excellent way to image evolving or suspected lesions of the maxilla, particularly for surgical treatment planning.

  13. 3D computed tomographic evaluation of the upper airway space of patients undergoing mandibular distraction osteogenesis for micrognathia.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Betti, E; Badiali, G; Ricotta, F; Marchetti, C; Tarsitano, A

    2015-10-01

    Mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) is currently an accepted method of treatment for patients requiring reconstruction of hypoplastic mandibles. To date one of the unsolved problems is how to assess the quantitative increase of mandible length needed to achieve a significant change in the volume of the posterior airway space (PAS) in children with mandibular micrognathia following distraction osteogenesis. The purpose of this study is to present quantitative volumetric evaluation of PAS in young patients having distraction osteogenesis for micrognathia using 3D-CT data sets and compare it with pre-operative situation. In this observational retrospective study, we report our experience in five consecutive patients who underwent MDO in an attempt to relieve severe upper airway obstruction. Each patient was evaluated before treatment (T0) and at the end of distraction procedure (T1) with computer tomography (CT) in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes and three-dimensional CT of the facial bones and upper airway. Using parameters to extract only data within anatomic constraints, a digital set of the edited upper airway volume was obtained. The volume determination was used for volumetric qualification of upper airway. The computed tomographic digital data were used to evaluate the upper airway volumes both pre-distraction and post-distraction. The mean length of distraction was 23 mm. Quantitative assessment of upper airway volume before and after distraction demonstrated increased volumes ranging from 84% to 3,087% with a mean of 536%. In conclusion, our study seems to show that DO can significantly increase the volume of the PAS in patients with upper airway obstruction following micrognathia, by an average of 5 times. Furthermore, the worse is the starting volume, the greater the increase in PAS to equal distraction.

  14. Computed tomographic analysis of deformity and dimensional changes in the eyeball

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, D.R.; Foulks, G.N.

    1984-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 40 patients with a confirmed ophthalmic diagnosis and a change in the dimensions or configuration of the eyeball. Abnormalities studied included coloboma, microphthalmus, buphthalmos, axial myopia, macrophthalmus, phthisis bulbi, trauma, neoplasm, posterior staphyloma, granuloma, pseudotumor, and surgicalscleral banding for retinal detachment. CT findings could be grouped into three categories depending upon whether the eye was small, large, or normal in size, with the findings in each group allowing distinction of most disease processes.

  15. Integrative computed tomographic imaging of cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Hanley, Michael; Bastarrika, Gorka; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) technology have created new opportunities in cardiac imaging and provided new insights into a variety of disease states. Use of 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography has been validated for the evaluation of clinically relevant coronary artery stenosis with high negative predictive values for ruling out significant obstructive disease. This technology has also advanced the care of patients with acute chest pain by simultaneous assessment of acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome ("triple rule out"). Although MDCT has been instrumental in the advancement of cardiac imaging, there are still limitations in patients with high or irregular heart rates. Newer MDCT scanner generations hold promise to improve some of these limitations for noninvasive cardiac imaging. The evaluation of coronary artery stenosis remains the primary clinical indication for cardiac computed tomography angiography. However, the use of MDCT for simultaneous assessment of coronary artery stenosis, atherosclerotic plaque formation, ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and viability with a single modality is under intense investigation. Recent technical developments hold promise for accomplishing this goal and establishing MDCT as a comprehensive stand-alone test for integrative imaging of coronary heart disease.

  16. [Diprosopus triophthalmus. From ancient terracotta sculptures to spiral computer tomographic reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Sokiranski, R; Pirsig, W; Nerlich, A

    2005-03-01

    A still-born male fetus from the 19th century, fixed in formalin and presenting as diprosopia triophthalmica, was analysed by helical computer tomography and virtually reconstructed without damage. This rare, incomplete, symmetrical duplication of the face on a single head with three eyes, two noses and two mouths develops in the first 3 weeks of gestation and is a subset of the category of conjoined twins with unknown underlying etiology. Spiral computer tomography of fixed tissue demonstrated in the more than 100 year old specimen that virtual reconstruction can be performed in nearly the same way as in patients (contrast medium application not possible). The radiological reconstruction of the Munich fetus, here confined to head and neck data, is the basis for comparison with a number of imaging procedures of the last 3000 years. Starting with some Neolithic Mesoamerican ceramics, the "Pretty Ladies of Tlatilco", diprosopia triophthalmica was also depicted on engravings of the 16th and 17th century A.D. by artists as well as by the anatomist Soemmering and his engraver Berndt in the 18th century. Our modern spiral computer tomography confirms the ability of our ancestors to depict diprosopia triophthalmica in paintings and sculptures with a high level of natural precision.

  17. Sector computed tomographic spine scanning in the diagnosis of lumbar nerve root entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Risius, B.; Modic, M.T.; Hardy, R.W. Jr.; Duchesneau, P.M.; Weinstein, M.A.

    1982-04-01

    The diagnosis of lumbar nerve root entrapment was made by sector computed tomography (CT) scanning in 25 patients whose myelograms were normal at the site of the CT scan abnormalities. Sector CT scanning demonstrates preoperatively which neural foramina are narrow. This information, correlated with the patient's history and physical examination, indicates which foramina should be operated on and prevents unnecessary exploration of normal neutral foramina. CT findings were confirmed surgically in 14 patients. Eleven of these 14 patients had excellent postoperative results and remain pain free.

  18. Computed tomographic detection of sinusitis responsible for intracranial and extracranial infections

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, B.L.; Bankoff, M.S.; Fisk, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is now used extensively for the evaluation of orbital, facial, and intracranial infections. Nine patients are presented to illustrate the importance of detecting underlying and unsuspected sinusitis. Prompt treatment of the sinusitis is essential to minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with complications such as brain abscess, meningitis, orbital cellulitis, and osteomyelitis. A review of the literature documents the persistence of these complications despite the widespread use of antibiotic therapy. Recognition of the underlying sinusitis is now possible with CT if the region of the sinuses is included and bone-window settings are used during the examination of patients with orbital and intracranial infection.

  19. Computed tomographic demonstration of the effects of bromocriptine on pituitary microadenoma size

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville, J.F.; Poulignot, D.; Cattin, F.; Couturier, M.; Mollet, E.; Dietemann, J.L.

    1982-05-01

    A group of 17 strictly intrasellar prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas between 2 and 9 mm in size was examined by computed tomography before and after bromocriptine therapy of 3 months to 1 year duration. These findings were compared with clinical and biological data. Bromocriptine therapy was effective clinically and biologically in 14 of the 17 cases. Of the 15 intrasellar adenomas in nonpregnant patients treated with bromocriptine, six disappeared completely with normalization of the pituitary appearance, five decreased approximately 50% in volume (three showed an increase in density, two a decrease), and four remained unchanged in size (two showed increased density, two showed very low densities).

  20. Computed tomographical (CT) anatomy of the thoracoabdominal cavity of the male turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Petnehazy, O; Benczik, J; Takacs, I; Petrasi, Zs; Süto, Z; Horn, P; Repa, I

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, our goal was to match high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans with cross-sectional anatomical pictures of the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Two male BUT 6 (a commercial line) turkeys were used. CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness were performed. The images covered the trunk from the level of the 9th cervical vertebra to the end of the coccyx. The anatomical sections and the CT scans were matched, and the important structures were identified and labelled on the corresponding pictures. The aim of this study was to create a reference for evaluating CT scans of avian species.

  1. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Evaluation and Diagnosis of Mandibular First Molar with 6 Canals

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Shiraz; Chaitanya, Bathula Vimala; Somisetty, Kusum Valli

    2016-01-01

    Root canal treatment of tooth with aberrant root canal morphology is very challenging. So thorough knowledge of both the external and internal anatomy of teeth is an important aspect of root canal treatment. With the advancement in technology it is imperative to use modern diagnostic tools such as magnification devices, CBCT, microscopes, and RVG to confirm the presence of these aberrant configurations. However, in everyday endodontic practice, clinicians have to treat teeth with atypical configurations for root canal treatment to be successful. This case report presents the management of a mandibular first molar with six root canals, four in mesial and two in distal root, and also emphasizes the use and importance of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) as a diagnostic tool in endodontics. PMID:26904310

  2. Computed tomographic evaluation of an experimental model for pyogenic liver abscesses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W M; Stude, R A; McDonald, M I; Halvorsen, R A; Dunnick, N R; Silverman, P M; Korobkin, M; Durack, D T; Shelbourne, J

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 15 rabbits with experimentally induced liver abscesses. The animals were examined both before and after intravenous contrast injection. After sacrificing the animals, postfreeze CT scans were made to mark the abdomen for 1-cm thick whole body sections for correlating the gross pathology with the results of the CT scans. CT detected 15 abscesses in 13 of the 14 rabbits with true positive lesions. Ten abscesses less than 1.4 cm in diameter were not detected by CT. Contrast agent enhancement was helpful in 70% of the studies. These abscesses have characteristics similar to human liver abscesses, but there was more gas and calcium in the experimentally induced abscesses than is encountered in humans with hepatic abscesses. The model and its CT characteristics appear well suited for future studies in the diagnosis and treatment of liver abscesses.

  3. Carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx: computed tomographic-histopathologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, P.M.; Bossen, E.H.; Fisher, S.R.; Cole, T.B.; Korobkin, M.; Halvorsen, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    Twenty consecutive patients underwent computed tomography (CT) prior to total laryngectomy in order to assess the accuracy of CT scanning in the evaluation of carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx. CT scans were prospectively interpreted and the extent of tumor was recorded graphically at five major levels of the larynx. The extent of tumor was similarly evaluated on whole-mount histologic sections of the laryngeal specimens prepared in the horizontal plane similar to the CT scans. The results were compared to assess the ability of CT to identify tumor extent accurately. Despite good correlation of gross tumor extent between histologic specimens and TC scanning, specific pitfalls in CT diagnosis were identified. Overestimation of tumor extent was caused by edematous changes in six patients and tumor-associated inflammatory changes in three patients. In seven patients, mass effect from adjacent bulky tumor significantly distorted normal structures, mimicking tumor involvement.

  4. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  5. Computed tomographic anatomy of the head of the loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Arencibia, A; Rivero, M A; De Miguel, I; Contreras, S; Cabrero, A; Orós, J

    2006-10-01

    The heads of three loggerhead sea turtles were disarticulated and imaged immediately to minimize postmortem changes and then frozen and sectioned. For computed tomography (CT) imaging, the heads were positioned in ventral recumbency. Transverse CT images with soft-tissue window were obtained from the olfactory sac region to the temporomandibular joint region. After CT imaging, the heads were sectioned and the gross sections were compared to CT images, to assist in the accurate identification of the anatomic structures. Different clinically relevant anatomic structures were identified and labelled in two series of photographs (CT images and anatomic cross-sections). CT images provided good differentiation between the bones and the soft tissues of the head. The information presented in this paper should serve as an initial reference to evaluate CT images of the head of the loggerhead sea turtle and to assist in the interpretation of lesions of this region.

  6. High-resolution computed tomographic appearance of the intrasellar contents in women of childbearing age

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, J.D.; Russell, K.B.; Basile, B.A.; O'Donnell, P.C.; Popky, G.L.

    1983-04-01

    Our experience with high-resolution computed tomography has indicated that the accepted norms for appearance and size of the pituitary gland may not be entirely valid for women of childbearing age. Fifty women with normal menstrual histories and who were not taking oral contraceptives were studied. The study consisted of overlapping 1.5-mm sections through the pituitary fossa in the coronal position only, using a bolus of contrast material followed by a continuous drip during the study. The results indicate that the top of the normal range of gland height is well over the accepted 7 mm and that focal defects within the gland are common. Other variables such as gland shape, width, and overall density were also evaluated.

  7. Computed tomographic studies of the head in a teaching hospital and a community hospital: a comparison

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, B.J.; Kirkwood, J.R.; Hanley, J.A.; Polak, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Funkenstein, H.H.

    1982-11-01

    This investigation compared the use of computed tomography (CT) of the head at a large primary medical-school-affiliated hospital and at a large community hospital. There were two aims: first, to study the intrinsic characteristics of the patients in an attempt to determine the protential for developing accurate discrimination algorithms; and second, to study the patterns of neurodiagnostic tests used at these facilities. The results indicated that separability of patients into normal and abnormal categories at both institutions was extremely small. In addition, there was no significant difference in the numbers or types of ancillary tests used at both institutions. Overall, these data once more confirm the difficulty of altering CT usage patterns in primary or secondary hospitals without significantly affecting the number of abnormal patients identified.

  8. Multicolor Computed Tomographic Molecular Imaging with Non-crystalline High Metal Density Nanobeacons

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Schirra, Carsten O.; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most frequently pursued radiology technologies applied in the clinics today and in the preclinical field of biomedical imaging. Myriad advancement has been made to make this technique more powerful with improved signal sensitivity, rapid image acquisition and faster reconstruction. Synergistic development of novel nanoparticles has been adopted as the next generation CT contrasts agents for imaging specific biological markers. Nanometer-sized agents are anticipated to play a critical part in the prospect of medical diagnostics owing to their capabilities of targeting specific biological markers, extended blood circulation time and defined biological clearance. This review paper introduces the readers to the fundamental design principles of nanoparticulate CT contrast agents with a special emphasis on the molecular Imaging with non-crystalline high metal density nanobeacons. PMID:24470291

  9. Meckel cave: computed tomographic study. Part I. Normal anatomy. Part II. Pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Chakeres, D.W.; Blanco, E.

    1984-08-01

    A formalin-fixed cadaver head with air filling the cisternal and ventricular spaces was scanned by high-resolution computed tomography (CT) in multiple planes (axial, coronal, and sagittal) through the Meckel cave. Correlation of the CT appearance of the Meckel cave was made with an anatomic dissection and whole-head band saw cross-sections. CT techniques allowed consistent and accurate definition of the Meckel cave, the fifth cranial nerve, and adjacent anatomic structures. CT findings of 13 patients with lesions of the Meckel cave are also reviewed, including six trigeminal schwannomas, three meningiomas, two secondary tumors, one glioma, and one congenital fatty tumor. Surgical confirmation was present in 11 cases. Diagnosis and determination of the extent of Meckel cave lesions is possible with the use of high-resolution CT.

  10. Development of an electrical impedance computed tomographic two-phase flows analyzer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ovacik, L.; Jones, O.C.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the work on the research project on this cooperative program between DOE and Hitachi, Ltd. Major advances were made in the computational reconstruction of images from electrical excitation and response data with respect to existing capabilities reported in the literature. A demonstration is provided of the imaging of one or more circular objects within the measurement plane with demonstrated linear resolution of six parts in two hundred. At this point it can be said that accurate excitation and measurement of boundary voltages and currents appears adequate to obtain reasonable images of the real conductivity distribution within a body and the outlines of insulating targets suspended within a homogeneous conducting medium. The quality of images is heavily dependent on the theoretical and numerical implementation of imaging algorithms. The overall imaging system described has the potential of being both fast and cost effective in comparison with alternative methods. The methods developed use multiple plate-electrode excitation in conjunction with finite element block decomposition, preconditioned voltage conversion, layer approximation of the third dimension and post processing of boundary measurements to obtain optimal boundary excitations. Reasonably accurate imaging of single and multiple targets of differing size, location and separation is demonstrated and the resulting images are better than any others found in the literature. Recommendations for future effort include the improvement in computational algorithms with emphasis on internal conductivity shape functions and the use of adaptive development of quadrilateral (2-D) or tetrahedral or hexahedral (3-D) elements to coincide with large discrete zone boundaries in the fields, development of a truly binary model and completion of a fast imaging system. Further, the rudimentary methods shown herein for three-dimensional imaging need improving.

  11. Clamshell tomograph

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    1984-01-01

    In brief, the invention is a tomograph modified to be in a clamshell configuration so that the ring or rings may be moved to multiple sampling positions. The tomograph includes an array of detectors arranged in successive adjacent relative locations along a closed curve in a first position in a selected plane, and means for securing the detectors in the relative locations in a first sampling position. The securing means is movable in the plane in two sections and pivotable at one p The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

  12. Computed tomographic evaluation of the proximal femur: A predictive classification in displaced femoral neck fracture management

    PubMed Central

    Magu, Narender Kumar; Magu, Sarita; Rohilla, Rajesh Kumar; Batra, Amit; Jaipuria, Abhishek; Singh, Amanpreet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fracture is truly an enigma due to the high incidence of avascular necrosis and nonunion. Different methods have been described to determine the size of the femoral head fragment, as a small head has been said to be associated with poor outcome and nonunion due to inadequate implant purchase in the proximal fragment. These methods were two dimensional and were affected by radiography techniques, therefore did not determine true head size. Computed tomography (CT) is an important option to measure true head size as images can be obtained in three dimensions. Henceforth, we subjected patients to CT scan of hip in cases with displaced fracture neck of femur. The study aims to define the term small head or inadequate size femoral head” objectively for its prognostic significance. Materials and Methods: 70 cases of displaced femoral neck fractures underwent CT scan preoperatively for proximal femoral geometric measurements of both hips. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan was done in all cases. Patients were treated with either intertrochanteric osteotomy or lag screw osteosynthesis based on the size of the head fragment on plain radiographs. Results: The average femoral head fragment volume was 57 cu cm (range 28.3-84.91 cu cm; standard deviation 14 cu cm). Proximal fragment volume of >43 cu cm was termed adequate size (type I) and of ≤43 cu cm as small femoral head (type II). Fractures which united (n = 54) had a relatively large average head size (59 cu cm) when compared to fractures that did not (n = 16), which had a small average head size (49 cu cm) and this difference was statistically significant. In type I fractures union rate was comparable in both osteotomy and lag screw groups (P > 0.05). Lag screw fixation failed invariably, while osteotomy showed good results in type II fractures (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Computed tomography scan of the proximal femur is advisable for measuring true size of head fragment. An objective

  13. Use of computed tomographic scanning and aortography in the diagnosis of acute dissection of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J M; Oldershaw, P J; Gray, H H

    1990-01-01

    Before the introduction of computed tomographic (CT) scanning, aortography was the investigation of choice for acute aortic dissection. Between 1978 and 1982, 24 patients were referred to the Brompton Hospital with suspected acute thoracic aortic dissection; all had aortography with diagnosis confirmed at surgery (n = 12) or necropsy (n = 2) or supported by clinical outcome (n = 8). One patient in whom aortography was negative had type B dissection at necropsy and another patient was lost to follow up. CT scanning became available in this unit in 1983 and between 1983 and 1987 was used as the only imaging investigation in 32 patients with suspected acute dissection of the thoracic aorta while in a further 22 patients aortography was used alone. Results were confirmed at surgery (n = 18), necropsy (n = 3), or supported by clinical outcome (n = 31). Two patients were lost to follow up. In an additional 16 patients both aortography and CT scanning were performed with concordant findings in 10. In six in whom the results were discordant, aortography was normal in three in whom subsequent CT scanning showed type B dissection and CT scanning was normal in three patients in whom aortography showed type A dissection. Both CT scanning and aortography are reliable techniques for assessment of suspected acute dissection of the thoracic aorta. Both techniques misdiagnose occasionally and the frequency of misdiagnosis will be minimised by performing both investigations in patients where the level of clinical suspicion is high and the initial investigation negative. CT scanning tends to miss type A dissection and in view of the success of surgery in this condition this failing has the more serious clinical consequences. PMID:2223304

  14. Automatic segmentation of the ribs, the vertebral column, and the spinal canal in pediatric computed tomographic images.

    PubMed

    Banik, Shantanu; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Boag, Graham S

    2010-06-01

    We propose methods to perform automatic identification of the rib structure, the vertebral column, and the spinal canal in computed tomographic (CT) images of pediatric patients. The segmentation processes for the rib structure and the vertebral column are initiated using multilevel thresholding and the results are refined using morphological image processing techniques with features based on radiological and anatomical prior knowledge. The Hough transform for the detection of circles is applied to a cropped edge map that includes the thoracic vertebral structure. The centers of the detected circles are used to derive the information required for the opening-by-reconstruction algorithm used to segment the spinal canal. The methods were tested on 39 CT exams of 13 patients; the results of segmentation of the vertebral column and the spinal canal were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively by comparing with segmentation performed independently by a radiologist. Using 13 CT exams of six patients, including a total of 458 slices with the vertebra from different sections of the vertebral column, the average Hausdorff distance was determined to be 3.2 mm with a standard deviation (SD) of 2.4 mm; the average mean distance to the closest point (MDCP) was 0.7 mm with SD = 0.6 mm. Quantitative analysis was also performed for the segmented spinal canal with three CT exams of three patients, including 21 slices with the spinal canal from different sections of the vertebral column; the average Hausdorff distance was 1.6 mm with SD = 0.5 mm, and the average MDCP was 0.6 mm with SD = 0.1 mm.

  15. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  16. Retreatability of two endodontic sealers, EndoSequence BC Sealer and AH Plus: a micro-computed tomographic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Oltra, Enrique; Cox, Timothy C.; LaCourse, Matthew R.; Johnson, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recently, bioceramic sealers like EndoSequence BC Sealer (BC Sealer) have been introduced and are being used in endodontic practice. However, this sealer has limited research related to its retreatability. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatability of two sealers, BC Sealer as compared with AH Plus using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) analysis. Materials and Methods Fifty-six extracted human maxillary incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into 4 groups of 14 teeth: 1A, gutta-percha, AH Plus retreated with chloroform; 1B, gutta-percha, AH Plus retreated without chloroform; 2A, gutta-percha, EndoSequence BC Sealer retreated with chloroform; 2B, gutta-percha, EndoSequence BC Sealer retreated without chloroform. Micro-CT scans were taken before and after obturation and retreatment and analyzed for the volume of residual material. The specimens were longitudinally sectioned and digitized images were taken with the dental operating microscope. Data was analyzed using an ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey test. Fisher exact tests were performed to analyze the ability to regain patency. Results There was significantly less residual root canal filling material in the AH Plus groups retreated with chloroform as compared to the others. The BC Sealer samples retreated with chloroform had better results than those retreated without chloroform. Furthermore, patency could be re-established in only 14% of teeth in the BC Sealer without chloroform group. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate that the BC Sealer group had significantly more residual filling material than the AH Plus group regardless of whether or not both sealers were retreated with chloroform. PMID:28194360

  17. Hyperbaric computed tomographic measurement of lung compression in seals and dolphins.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael John; Hammar, Terrence; Arruda, Julie; Cramer, Scott; Dennison, Sophie; Montie, Eric; Fahlman, Andreas

    2011-07-15

    Lung compression of vertebrates as they dive poses anatomical and physiological challenges. There has been little direct observation of this. A harbor and a gray seal, a common dolphin and a harbor porpoise were each imaged post mortem under pressure using a radiolucent, fiberglass, water-filled pressure vessel rated to a depth equivalent of 170 m. The vessel was scanned using computed tomography (CT), and supported by a rail and counterweighted carriage magnetically linked to the CT table movement. As pressure increased, total buoyancy of the animals decreased and lung tissue CT attenuation increased, consistent with compression of air within the lower respiratory tract. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the external surface of the porpoise chest showed a marked contraction of the chest wall. Estimation of the volumes of different body compartments in the head and chest showed static values for all compartments except the lung, which showed a pressure-related compression. The depth of estimated lung compression ranged from 58 m in the gray seal with lungs inflated to 50% total lung capacity (TLC) to 133 m in the harbor porpoise with lungs at 100% TLC. These observations provide evidence for the possible behavior of gas within the chest of a live, diving mammal. The estimated depths of full compression of the lungs exceeds previous indirect estimates of the depth at which gas exchange ceases, and concurs with pulmonary shunt measurements. If these results are representative for living animals, they might suggest a potential for decompression sickness in diving mammals.

  18. On-Site Geologic Core Analysis Using a Portable X-ray ComputedTomographic System

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Rack, Frank

    2004-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an established techniquefor nondestructively characterizing geologic cores. CT providesinformation on sediment structure, diagenetic alteration, fractures, flowchannels and barriers, porosity, and fluid-phase saturation. A portableCT imaging system has been developed specifically for imaging whole-roundcores at the drilling site. The new system relies upon carefully designedradiological shielding to minimize the size and weight of the resultinginstrument. Specialized x-ray beam collimators and filters maximizesystem sensitivity and performance. The system has been successfullydeployed on the research vessel Joides Resolution for Ocean DrillingProgram's Leg 204 and 210, within the Ocean Drilling Program'srefrigerated Gulf Coast Core Repository, as well as on the Hot Ice #1drilling platform located near the Kuparuk Field, Alaska. A methodologyfor performingsimple densiometry measurements, as well as scanning forgross structural features, will be presented using radiographs from ODPLeg 204. Reconstructed CT images from Hot Ice #1 will demonstrate the useof CT for discerning core textural features. To demonstrate the use of CTto quantitatively interpret dynamic processes, we calculate 95 percentconfidence intervals for density changes occurring during a laboratorymethane hydrate dissociation experiment. The field deployment of a CTrepresents a paradigm shift in core characterization, opening up thepossibility for rapid systematic characterization of three-dimensionalstructural features and leading to improved subsampling andcore-processing procedures.

  19. Fragile X syndrome and cerebral perfusion abnormalities: single-photon emission computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Kabakus, Nimet; Aydin, Mustafa; Akin, Haluk; Balci, Tansel Ansal; Kurt, Abdullah; Kekilli, Ersoy

    2006-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome is an inherited disorder caused by a defective gene on the X chromosome. It is associated with developmental or behavioral symptoms and various degrees of mental retardation. Morphologic abnormalities and altered perfusion of various brain areas can underlie these functional disturbances. The aim of this study was to investigate the cerebral perfusion state in patients with fragile X syndrome using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Structural and functional assessment was also performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG). Eight boys with cytogenetically confirmed fragile X syndrome (mean age 8.8 +/- 4.4 years, range 5-18 years), were included. All patients had mental retardation, with a mean IQ of 58.9 +/- 8.8 (range 40-68), and additional neurobehavioral symptoms. SPECT revealed cerebral perfusion abnormalities in six patients (75%), most commonly in the frontoparietotemporal area and prominent in the right hemisphere. The SPECT and EEG findings were concordant: hypoperfused areas in SPECT corresponded to regions of persistent slow-wave paroxysms on EEG. On the other hand, cranial MRI was abnormal qualitatively only in two patients (25%) showing cerebellar and vermal hypoplasia and cerebral hemispheric asymmetry. Our results indicate that cerebral perfusion abnormalities, which are correlated with electrophysiologic findings but not necessarily with anatomic abnormalities, can underlie the pathogenesis of the clinical findings observed in fragile X syndrome.

  20. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E; Hartup, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross-sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical.

  1. Computed tomographic evaluation of the canine intercondylar notch in normal and cruciate deficient stifles.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A; Allen, D A; Henrikson, T D; Lehenbauer, T W

    2008-01-01

    In the human and veterinary orthopaedic literature it has been implied that intercondylar notch stenosis is a mechanical factor in cranial cruciate ligament rupture and intraarticular graft failure. The patients in this study were classified as normal (32), unilateral cruciate rupture (23), or bilateral cruciate rupture (17). The dogs were placed under general anaesthesia and both stifles were scanned via computed tomography (CT) as previously described. Three CT slices at predetermined levels were evaluated within the notch. Measurements included opening notch angle, notch width and height, condyle width, and notch width index (notch width/condyle width) at two different heights within the notch. Intercondylar notch measurements at the most cranial extent were significantly more narrow in unilateral and bilaterally affected stifles when compared to the normal population. Significant differences were noted in the opening notch angle (ONA), notch width index (NWI), NWI at two thirds notch height (NWI2/3), and tibial slope index (TSI). No significant differences were noted between unilateral and bilateral affected stifles. Increased mechanical contact of the cranial cruciate ligament with a stenotic intercondylar notch may predispose the ligament to mechanical wear and structural weakening. Intercondylar notch measurements have been used as a tool to predict the risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in young human athletes, and to assess the risk factors for intra-articular graft replacements. Our findings may be useful in developing similar predictive models using stifle CT scans.

  2. Expiratory computed tomographic techniques: a cause of a poor rate of change in lung volume.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Keiko; Okada, Fumito; Mori, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients (29 males and 70 females; mean age, 57.1 years; range, 22-81 years) were included in this study to evaluate the factors affecting smaller lung volume changes in expiratory high-resolution computed tomography performed to depict air trapping. All patients underwent inspiratory and expiratory chest thin-section CT examinations and pulmonary function tests. Air trapping on CT images was graded subjectively. All variables (age, sex, diagnosis, pulmonary function index, and air trapping score) were compared with the degree of change in lung volume between the inspiratory and expiratory CT examinations. The variables affecting a lower degree of volume change were vital capacity, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0), and the FEV1.0/FVC ratio. Bronchiolitis obliterans was the dominant diagnosis in patients with insufficient degrees of breath holding and in patients with negative air trapping scores despite an abnormal air trapping index. An insufficient degree of lung changes between inspiration and expiration on CT examinations represented bronchiolitis obliterans, which resulted in low FEV1.0 and FEV1.0/FVC values. Changes in the time gap from the announcement of exhalation and breath holding to the start of scanning most effectively indicated air trapping in patients with bronchiolar disorders.

  3. Three-dimensional helical computed tomographic evaluation of three obturation techniques: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Chokkalingam, M; Ramaprabha; Kandaswamy, D

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of three obturation techniques namely lateral condensation, EQ Fil (backfill obturation) and thermafil (core carrier obturation) techniques using three-dimensional (3D) helical computed tomography (CT) by volume rendering method. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. Biomechanical preparation was done in all the teeth using rotary instruments. All three sets of teeth were placed in helical CT slice scanner and were imaged before obturation. The three sets were then obturated by following methods: Group I: lateral condensation, Group II: EQ Fil (backfill) and Group III: thermafil (core carrier obturation).Volume of the pulp chamber and gutta-percha after obturation were calculated using volume rendering technique and adequacy of the obturation techniques were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way ANOVA and Multiple-Range Tukey Test by Tukey-HSD procedure Results: Mean change in lateral condensation (0.005±0.002) was significantly higher than that of thermafil obturation (0.002±0.001) [P<0.05]. Conclusions: Conventional lateral condensation technique showed maximal inadequacy of obturation and thermafil obturation technique showed the least inadequacy of obturation when the volume of the specimens were calculated and reconstructed PMID:22025832

  4. Gross, Histologic, and Computed Tomographic Anatomy of the Lacrimal System of Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nicole M.; Maggs, David J.; Park, Shin Ae; Puchalski, Sarah; Reilly, Christopher M.; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the lacrimal system of snakes using contrast micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) with 3-dimensional reconstruction, fluorescein passage (“Jones”) testing, histology, and gross dissection. Animals studied One Royal Python and 19 snake cadavers representing 10 species. Procedures Direct observation following injection of fluorescein into the subspectacular space, micro-CT following injection of 3 contrast agents into the subspectacular space, gross dissection following injection of latex into the subspectacular space, and histopathology. Results Injection of fluorescein confirmed patency but not course of the lacrimal duct. Barium enabled clear visualization of the lacrimal duct whereas two iodinated contrast agents proved inadequate. Collectively, micro-CT, anatomic dissections, and histology suggest tears are produced by a single, large, serous, retrobulbar gland, released into the subspectacular space via several ductules, and drained through a single punctum originating in the ventronasal subspectacular space and the lacrimal duct taking one of 3 routes of variable tortuosity before opening into the oral cavity in close association with the opening of the duct of the vomeronasal organ. Conclusions The ophidian lacrimal duct has a generally tortuous course and the details of its anatomy is species variable. The tortuous course of the duct likely predisposes snakes to duct occlusion and must be considered when planning medical and surgical interventions in snakes with pseudobuphthalmos and subspectacular abscessation. PMID:24862081

  5. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Aliasghari, Sepideh; Němcová, Aneta; Burnett, Timothy L; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, George E; Skeldon, Peter; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-06

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is of increasing interest for the formation of ceramic coatings on metals for applications that require diverse coating properties, such as wear and corrosion resistance, low thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Porosity in the coatings can have an important impact on the coating performance. However, the quantification of the porosity in coatings can be difficult due to the wide range of pore sizes and the complexity of the coating morphology. In this work, a PEO coating formed on titanium is examined using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). The observations are validated by comparisons of surface views and cross-sectional views of specific coating features obtained using X-ray CT and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray CT technique is shown to be capable of resolving pores with volumes of at least 6 μm(3). Furthermore, the shapes of large pores are revealed and a correlation is demonstrated between the locations of the pores, nodules on the coating surface, and depressions in the titanium substrate. The locations and morphologies of the pores, which constitute 5.7% of the coating volume, indicate that they are generated by release of oxygen gas from the molten coating.

  6. COMPARISONS AMONG COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF ADIPOSE MASSES IN DOGS AND CATS.

    PubMed

    Spoldi, Elisa; Schwarz, Tobias; Sabattini, Silvia; Vignoli, Massimo; Cancedda, Simona; Rossi, Federica

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the CT features of different forms of canine and feline adipose tumors would be valuable for improving patient management and treatment. The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe and compare the CT features of pathologically confirmed lipomas, infiltrative lipomas, and liposarcomas in a sample of canine and feline patients. A total of 50 animals (46 dogs, four cats) and a total of 60 lesions (23 lipomas, 20 infiltrative lipomas, and 17 liposarcomas) were included in the study. Lipomas appeared as round to oval-shaped (n = 21), well-marginated (n = 20) fat-attenuating lesions. Infiltrative lipomas appeared as homogeneous, fat-attenuating masses but, unlike lipomas, they were most commonly characterized by an irregular shape (75%; P < 0.001), and linear components, hyperattenuating relative to the surrounding fat (100%; P < 0.05). Liposarcomas were represented exclusively by heterogeneous lesions with soft tissue attenuating components with a multinodular appearance (76.5%; P < 0.05). Regional lymphadenopathy (n = 10) and amorphous mineralization (n = 4) were also observed in association with liposarcomas. Computed tomography can provide useful information regarding disease location, extent, and involvement of the adjacent structures. Tumor definition and shape were the most useful parameters to differentiate between lipomas and infiltrative lipomas. The presence of a heterogeneous mass, with a multinodular soft tissue component and associated regional lymphadenopathy and mineralization, were features favoring a diagnosis of liposarcoma.

  7. Computed Tomographic Pattern of Physiological Intracranial Calcifications in a City in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Uduma, Uduma Felix; Pius, Fokam; Mathieu, Motah

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intracranial calcifications underlie certain brain diseases which may be de novo or systemic. But calclfications un-connected to pathologies are classified physiological. Aim: To evaluate physiological intracranial calcifications in Douala with establishment of earliest age range of detection. Materials and Methods: Prospective study of brain computed tomograms was done from April to October 2009 using Schumadzu CT Scan machine. Axial, reconstructed and bone window images as well Hounsfield unit measurements were used for final evaluations. Results were analysed with SSPS 3. Results: 132 patients with 75 males and 57 females were studied and 163 separate calcifications were identified due to co-existent calcifications. The highest calcification was in choroid plexi, constituiting 56.82% of the studied population. This was followed by pineal gland. Both were commonly co-existent with advancing age. These calcifications were first seen at 10-19years. No type of physiological intracranial calcification was seen below age 10. The least calcification of 0.76% of population was in dentate nucleus. Conclusion: No intra-cranial physiological calcifications started earlier than 9years in Douala, a city in Cameroon, Central Africa. PMID:22980109

  8. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF RESPIRATORY ASPERGILLOSIS IN JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Cristin; Pinkerton, Marie E.; Hartup, Barry K.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in captivity reared, endangered whooping cranes (Grus americana). Objectives of this retrospective, case series, cross‐sectional study were to describe computed tomography (CT) respiratory anatomy in a juvenile whooping crane without respiratory disease, compare CT characteristics with gross pathologic characteristics in a group of juvenile whooping cranes with respiratory aspergillosis, and test associations between the number of CT tracheal bends and bird sex and age. A total of 10 juvenile whooping cranes (one control, nine affected) were included. Seven affected cranes had CT characteristics of unilateral extrapulmonary bronchial occlusion or wall thickening, and seven cranes had luminal occlusion of the intrapulmonary primary or secondary bronchi. Air sac membrane thickening was observed in three cranes in the cranial and caudal thoracic air sacs, and air sac diverticulum opacification was observed in four cranes. Necropsy lesions consisted of severe, subacute to chronic, focally extensive granulomatous pathology of the trachea, primary bronchi, lungs, or air sacs. No false positive CT scan results were documented. Seven instances of false negative CT scan results occurred; six of these consisted of subtle, mild air sacculitis including membrane opacification or thickening, or the presence of small plaques found at necropsy. The number of CT tracheal bends was associated with bird age but not sex. Findings supported the use of CT as a diagnostic test for avian species with respiratory disease and tracheal coiling or elongated tracheae where endoscopic evaluation is impractical. PMID:26592357

  9. Shaping Ability of Single-file Systems with Different Movements: A Micro-computed Tomographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Rosa, Joedy; de Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Versiani, Marco Aurelio; Nevares, Giselle; Xavier, Felipe; Romeiro, Kaline; Cassimiro, Marcely; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; de Menezes, Rebeca Ferraz; Albuquerque, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to perform a rigorous sample standardization and also evaluate the preparation of mesiobuccal (MB) root canals of maxillary molars with severe curvatures using two single-file engine-driven systems (WaveOne with reciprocating motion and OneShape with rotary movement), using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods and Materials: Ten MB roots with single canals were included, uniformly distributed into two groups (n=5). The samples were prepared with a WaveOne or OneShape files. The shaping ability and amount of canal transportation were assessed by a comparison of the pre- and post-instrumentation micro-CT scans. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t-tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Instrumentation of canals increased their surface area and volume. Canal transportation occurred in coronal, middle and apical thirds and no statistical difference was observed between the two systems (P>0.05). In apical third, significant differences were found between groups in canal roundness (in 3 mm level) and perimeter (in 3 and 4 mm levels) (P<0.05). Conclusion: The WaveOne and One Shape single-file systems were able to shape curved root canals, producing minor changes in the canal curvature. PMID:27471537

  10. High resolution computed tomographic evaluation of bronchial wall thickness in healthy and clinically asthmatic cats

    PubMed Central

    WON, Sungjun; YUN, Sookyung; LEE, Jeosoon; LEE, Mikyung; CHOI, Mincheol; YOON, Junghee

    2017-01-01

    The objective of study is to determine the thickness of bronchial walls of clinically diagnosed asthmatic cats using high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) compared to that of healthy cats. The bronchial walls and pulmonary arteries were measured in healthy 16 cats and clinically asthmatic 4 cats. The bronchial walls and pulmonary arteries were measured under general anesthesia with positive pressure inspiration using HRCT. In healthy and asthmatic cats, bronchial lumen to the artery ratio (BA ratio), the ratio of bronchial wall thickness to bronchial diameter (TD ratio) and ratio of bronchial wall thickness to pulmonary artery (TA ratio) were measured. The mean BA ratio, TD ratio and TA ratio in healthy cats were 0.86 ± 0.12, 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.25 ± 0.05, respectively. Under the same condition, the mean BA ratio, TD ratio and TA ratio in asthmatic cats were 0.93 ± 0.21, 0.22 ± 0.24 and 0.37 ± 0.06. The TD ratio and TA ratio in asthmatic cats were significantly higher than healthy cats (P<0.001). BA ratio was not significantly different in both groups (P>0.05). The evaluation of bronchial wall thickness by HRCT could be useful for diagnosis of disease of bronchial wall thickening, such as feline asthma. PMID:28163274

  11. Early postmortem volume reduction of adrenal gland: initial longitudinal computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masanori; Gonoi, Wataru; Hagiwara, Kazuchika; Okuma, Hidemi; Shirota, Go; Shintani, Yukako; Abe, Hiroyuki; Takazawa, Yutaka; Fukayama, Masashi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to confirm whether postmortem adrenal volumetric changes occur by measuring adrenal volumes on computed tomography (CT). Fifty-five adrenal glands from 28 subjects who died were included. All subjects underwent antemortem CT (AMCT) and postmortem CT (PMCT) within 94-1,191 min after death, followed by conventional autopsy. CT volumetry was performed using freely-available software. Differences between AMCT and PMCT adrenal volumes were evaluated statistically along with differences in the degree of volume change, elapsed time to PMCT, and presence of underlying malignant disease. The mean volume of the right adrenal gland decreased from 3.8 cm(3) on AMCT to 2.6 cm(3) on PMCT (P < 0.001); the left adrenal gland decreased from 4.2 cm(3) on AMCT to 3.1 cm(3) on PMCT (P < 0.001). Conventional autopsy revealed decreased intracellular lipid components in portions of the adrenal glands. No correlation between the adrenal gland reduction rate and the elapsed time from AMCT to death or from death to PMCT was observed (P = 0.99 and 0.79; P = 0.28 and 0.59 for the right and left adrenal glands, respectively). Significant differences in both the bilateral adrenal gland reduction rates and underlying malignant disease were found for the left adrenal gland (P = 0.015), but not for the right (P = 0.74). Adrenal volume reduction was observed on PMCT compared to AMCT. This highlights the need to further elucidate the mechanism of adrenal shrinkage during the agonal stage and after death. This may be explained by pathological findings of intracellular lipid depletion.

  12. Comparison of computed tomographic findings in pulmonary mucormycosis and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Kim, M Y; Lee, H J; Park, Y S; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Kim, S-H

    2015-07-01

    Because there are no available molecular markers for pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), which has low culture sensitivity, early diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on imaging modes such as computed tomography (CT). However, there are limited data comparing CT findings for PM with those for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Adult patients who met the modified criteria for proven and probable PM (over an 11-year period) and IPA (over a 6-year period, owing to the availability of the galactomannan assay) according to the modified European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group definitions were retrospectively enrolled. IPA cases were selected at a 1 : 4 (PM/IPA) ratio. Thoracic CT scans were reviewed by two experienced radiologists blinded to the patients' demographics and clinical outcomes. A total of 24 patients with PM, including 20 (83%) with proven PM and four (17%) with probable PM, and 96 patients with IPA, including 12 (13%) with proven IPA and 84 (87%) with probable IPA, were eventually analysed. The reverse halo sign was more common in patients with PM (54%) than in those with IPA (6%, p < 0.001), whereas some airway-invasive features, such as clusters of centrilobular nodules, peribronchial consolidations, and bronchial wall thickening, were more common in patients with IPA (IPA 52% vs. PM 29%, p 0.04; IPA 49% vs. PM 21%, p 0.01; IPA 34% vs. PM 4%, p 0.003, respectively). The reverse halo sign was more common, and airway-invasive features were less common, in patients with PM than in those with IPA. These findings may help physicians to initiate Zygomycetes-active antifungal treatment earlier.

  13. Computed tomographic features of feline sino-nasal and sino-orbital aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Barrs, V R; Beatty, J A; Dhand, N K; Talbot, J J; Bell, E; Abraham, L A; Chapman, P; Bennett, S; van Doorn, T; Makara, M

    2014-08-01

    Feline upper respiratory tract aspergillosis (URTA) occurs as two distinct anatomical forms, namely, sino-nasal aspergillosis (SNA) and sino-orbital aspergillosis (SOA). An emerging pathogen, Aspergillus felis, is frequently involved. The pathogenesis of URTA, in particular the relationship between the infecting isolate and outcome, is poorly understood. In this study, computed tomography was used to investigate the route of fungal infection and extension in 16 cases (SNA n = 7, SOA n = 9) where the infecting isolate had been identified by molecular testing. All cases had nasal cavity involvement except for one cat with SNA that had unilateral frontal sinus changes. There was a strong association between the infecting species and anatomic form (P = 0.005). A. fumigatus infections remained within the sino-nasal cavity, while cryptic species infections were associated with orbital and paranasal soft-tissue involvement and with orbital lysis. Cryptic species were further associated with a mass in the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses or nasopharynx. Orbital masses showed heterogeneous contrast enhancement, with central coalescing hypoattenuating foci and peripheral rim enhancement. Severe, cavitated turbinate lysis, typical of canine SNA, was present only in cats with SNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the nasal cavity is the portal of entry for fungal spores in feline URTA and that the route of extension to involve the orbit is via direct naso-orbital communication from bone lysis. Additionally, a pathogenic role for A. wyomingensis and a sinolith in a cat with A. udagawae infection are reported for the first time.

  14. EFFECTS OF FLUID AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNICAL FACTORS ON CONSPICUITY OF CANINE AND FELINE NASAL TURBINATES

    PubMed Central

    Uosyte, Raimonda; Shaw, Darren J; Gunn-Moore, Danielle A; Fraga-Manteiga, Eduardo; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Turbinate destruction is an important diagnostic criterion in canine and feline nasal computed tomography (CT). However decreased turbinate visibility may also be caused by technical CT settings and nasal fluid. The purpose of this experimental, crossover study was to determine whether fluid reduces conspicuity of canine and feline nasal turbinates in CT and if so, whether CT settings can maximize conspicuity. Three canine and three feline cadaver heads were used. Nasal slabs were CT-scanned before and after submerging them in a water bath; using sequential, helical, and ultrahigh resolution modes; with images in low, medium, and high frequency image reconstruction kernels; and with application of additional posterior fossa optimization and high contrast enhancing filters. Visible turbinate length was measured by a single observer using manual tracing. Nasal density heterogeneity was measured using the standard deviation (SD) of mean nasal density from a region of interest in each nasal cavity. Linear mixed-effect models using the R package ‘nlme’, multivariable models and standard post hoc Tukey pair-wise comparisons were performed to investigate the effect of several variables (nasal content, scanning mode, image reconstruction kernel, application of post reconstruction filters) on measured visible total turbinate length and SD of mean nasal density. All canine and feline water-filled nasal slabs showed significantly decreased visibility of nasal turbinates (P < 0.001). High frequency kernels provided the best turbinate visibility and highest SD of aerated nasal slabs, whereas medium frequency kernels were optimal for water-filled nasal slabs. Scanning mode and filter application had no effect on turbinate visibility. PMID:25867935

  15. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of K3 Rotary and Stainless Steel K File Instrumentation in Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, Swaminathan; Thomas, Eapen; Anadhan, Vasanthakumari; Vijayakumar, Rajendran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The intention of root canal preparation is to reduce infected content and create a root canal shape allowing for a well condensed root filling. Therefore, it is not necessary to remove excessive dentine for successful root canal preparation and concern must be taken not to over instrument as perforations can occur in the thin dentinal walls of primary molars. Aim This study was done to evaluate the time preparation, the risk of lateral perforation and dentine removal of the stainless steel K file and K3 rotary instrumentation in primary teeth. Materials and Methods Seventy-five primary molars were selected and divided into three groups. Using spiral computed tomography the teeth were scanned before instrumentation. Teeth were prepared using a stainless steel K file for manual technique. All the canals were prepared up to file size 35. In K3 rotary files (.02 taper) instrumentation was done up to 35 size file. In K3 rotary files (.04 taper) the instrumentation was done up to 25 size file and simultaneously the instrumentation time was recorded. The instrumented teeth were once again scanned and the images were compared with the images of the uninstrumented canals. Statistical Analysis Data was statistically analysed using Kruskal Wallis One-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-Test and Pearson’s Chi-square Test. Results K3 rotary files (.02 taper) removed a significantly less amount of dentine, required less instrumentation time than a stainless steel K file. Conclusion K3 files (.02 taper) generated less dentine removal than the stainless steel K file and K3 files (.04 taper). K3 rotary files (.02 taper) were more effective for root canal instrumentation in primary teeth. PMID:26894166

  16. 3D printing of preclinical X-ray computed tomographic data sets.

    PubMed

    Doney, Evan; Krumdick, Lauren A; Diener, Justin M; Wathen, Connor A; Chapman, Sarah E; Stamile, Brian; Scott, Jeremiah E; Ravosa, Matthew J; Van Avermaete, Tony; Leevy, W Matthew

    2013-03-22

    Three-dimensional printing allows for the production of highly detailed objects through a process known as additive manufacturing. Traditional, mold-injection methods to create models or parts have several limitations, the most important of which is a difficulty in making highly complex products in a timely, cost-effective manner.(1) However, gradual improvements in three-dimensional printing technology have resulted in both high-end and economy instruments that are now available for the facile production of customized models.(2) These printers have the ability to extrude high-resolution objects with enough detail to accurately represent in vivo images generated from a preclinical X-ray CT scanner. With proper data collection, surface rendering, and stereolithographic editing, it is now possible and inexpensive to rapidly produce detailed skeletal and soft tissue structures from X-ray CT data. Even in the early stages of development, the anatomical models produced by three-dimensional printing appeal to both educators and researchers who can utilize the technology to improve visualization proficiency. (3, 4) The real benefits of this method result from the tangible experience a researcher can have with data that cannot be adequately conveyed through a computer screen. The translation of pre-clinical 3D data to a physical object that is an exact copy of the test subject is a powerful tool for visualization and communication, especially for relating imaging research to students, or those in other fields. Here, we provide a detailed method for printing plastic models of bone and organ structures derived from X-ray CT scans utilizing an Albira X-ray CT system in conjunction with PMOD, ImageJ, Meshlab, Netfabb, and ReplicatorG software packages.

  17. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses <1 year old commonly had alterations in the shape and density of the mandibular condyle. Older horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology.

  18. Evaluation of condylar positions in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Imanimoghaddam, Mahrokh; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mahdavi, Pirooze; Bagherpour, Ali; Darijani, Mansoreh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to compare the condylar position in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) and a normal group by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods In the TMD group, 25 patients (5 men and 20 women) were randomly selected among the ones suffering from TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). The control group consisted of 25 patients (8 men and 17 women) with normal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) who were referred to the radiology department in order to undergo CBCT scanning for implant treatment in the posterior maxilla. Linear measurements from the superior, anterior, and posterior joint spaces between the condyle and glenoid fossa were made through defined landmarks in the sagittal view. The inclination of articular eminence was also determined. Results The mean anterior joint space was 2.3 mm in the normal group and 2.8 mm in the TMD group, respectively. The results showed that there was a significant correlation between the superior and posterior joint spaces in both the normal and TMD groups, but it was only in the TMD group that the correlation coefficient among the dimensions of anterior and superior spaces was significant. There was a significant correlation between the inclination of articular eminence and the size of the superior and posterior spaces in the normal group. Conclusion The average dimension of the anterior joint space was different between the two groups. CBCT could be considered a useful diagnostic imaging modality for TMD patients. PMID:27358820

  19. EFFECTS OF FLUID AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNICAL FACTORS ON CONSPICUITY OF CANINE AND FELINE NASAL TURBINATES.

    PubMed

    Uosyte, Raimonda; Shaw, Darren J; Gunn-Moore, Danielle A; Fraga-Manteiga, Eduardo; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Turbinate destruction is an important diagnostic criterion in canine and feline nasal computed tomography (CT). However decreased turbinate visibility may also be caused by technical CT settings and nasal fluid. The purpose of this experimental, crossover study was to determine whether fluid reduces conspicuity of canine and feline nasal turbinates in CT and if so, whether CT settings can maximize conspicuity. Three canine and three feline cadaver heads were used. Nasal slabs were CT-scanned before and after submerging them in a water bath; using sequential, helical, and ultrahigh resolution modes; with images in low, medium, and high frequency image reconstruction kernels; and with application of additional posterior fossa optimization and high contrast enhancing filters. Visible turbinate length was measured by a single observer using manual tracing. Nasal density heterogeneity was measured using the standard deviation (SD) of mean nasal density from a region of interest in each nasal cavity. Linear mixed-effect models using the R package 'nlme', multivariable models and standard post hoc Tukey pair-wise comparisons were performed to investigate the effect of several variables (nasal content, scanning mode, image reconstruction kernel, application of post reconstruction filters) on measured visible total turbinate length and SD of mean nasal density. All canine and feline water-filled nasal slabs showed significantly decreased visibility of nasal turbinates (P < 0.001). High frequency kernels provided the best turbinate visibility and highest SD of aerated nasal slabs, whereas medium frequency kernels were optimal for water-filled nasal slabs. Scanning mode and filter application had no effect on turbinate visibility.

  20. Computed tomographic signs of acromegaly in 68 diabetic cats with hypersomatotropism.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Ciasca, Taízha C; Mantis, Panagiotis; Forcada, Yaiza; Potter, Maegan; Church, David B; Niessen, Stijn J

    2014-02-01

    In order to describe the signs of acromegaly in cats, a case-control study was done based on computed tomography (CT) scans of the heads of 68 cats with hypersomatotropism and 36 control cats. All cats with a diagnosis of hypersomatotropism had diabetes mellitus, serum insulin-like growth factor-1 >1000 ng/ml and a pituitary mass. Measurements of bones and soft tissues were done by two independent observers without knowledge of the diagnosis. Pituitary masses were identified in CT images of 64 (94%) cats with hypersomatotropism. Analysis of variance found a moderate effect of gender on the size of bones and a large effect of hypersomatotropism on the size of bones and thickness of soft tissues. In cats with hypersomatotropism the frontal and parietal bones were, on average, 0.8 mm thicker (P <0.001); the distance between the zygomatic arches was, on average, 5.4 mm greater (P <0.001); and the mandibular rami were, on average, 1.1 mm thicker (P <0.001) than in control cats. The skin and subcutis dorsal to the frontal bone were, on average, 0.4 mm thicker (P = 0.001); lateral to the zygomatic arch were, on average, 0.7 mm thicker (P <0.001); and ventral to the mandibular rami were, on average, 1.1 mm thicker (P = 0.002) in cats with hypersomatotropism than in control cats. The cross-sectional area of the nasopharynx was, on average, 11.1 mm(2) smaller in cats with hypersomatotropism than in control cats (P = 0.02). Prognathia inferior and signs of temporomandibular joint malformation were both observed more frequently in cats with hypersomatotropism than in control cats (P = 0.03). Overall, differences between affected and unaffected cats were small. Recognising feline acromegaly on the basis of facial features is difficult.

  1. The VetMousetrap: a device for computed tomographic imaging of the thorax of awake cats.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cintia R; Ranallo, Frank N; Pijanowski, Gerald J; Mitchell, Mark A; O'Brien, Mauria A; McMichael, Maureen; Hartman, Susan K; Matheson, Jodi S; O'Brien, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    The VetMousetrap, a novel device that allows computed tomography (CT) of awake cats and provides a clinically supportive environment, is described. Ten normal cats were used to test the device for ambient internal oxygen, carbon dioxide levels, and temperature. Twenty-two awake normal cats were imaged using a 16-multislice helical CT unit to evaluate dose-equivalent protocols. Two different X-ray tube potentials (kV), 80 and 120, and two different helical pitches, 0.562 and 1.75, were evaluated. The signal intensity of the pulmonary parenchyma (SIlung), signal intensity of background (SIbackgr), contrast, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Three evaluators ranked the images for sharpness of liver margins, motion, helical, and windmill artifacts. CT was successfully completed in 20 of 22 cats. No artifacts directly related to the device were detected. Overall, 75 of 80 (94%) examinations were judged to have absent or minimal motion artifact. A statistically significant difference was found for SNR (P = 0.001) and CNR (P = 0.001) between all protocols. The higher pitch protocols had significantly lower noise and higher SNR and CNR, lower motion artifact but greater helical artifacts. A protocol using 80 kV, 130 mA, 0.5s, and 0.562 pitch with 1.25mm slice thickness, and 0.625 mm slice reconstruction interval is recommended. The VetMousetrap appears to provide the opportunity for diagnostic CT imaging of the thorax of awake cats.

  2. Decreased Diagnostic Accuracy of Multislice Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography in Women with Atypical Angina Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wen-Ying; Zhao, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) coronary angiography (CAG) is a noninvasive technique with a reported high diagnostic accuracy for coronary artery disease (CAD). Women, more frequently than men, are known to develop atypical angina symptoms. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the diagnostic accuracy of MSCT in women with atypical presentation differs from that in men. Methods: We enrolled 396 in-hospital patients (141 women and 255 men) with suspected or proven CAD who successively underwent both MSCT and invasive CAG. CAD was defined as any coronary stenosis of ≥50% on conventional invasive CAG, which was used as the reference standard. The patients were divided into typical and atypical groups based on their symptoms of angina pectoris. The diagnostic accuracy of MSCT, including its sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value (PPV), was calculated to determine the usefulness of MSCT in assessing stenoses. The diagnostic performance of MSCT was also assessed by constructing receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results: The PPV (91% vs. 97%, χ2 = 5.705, P < 0.05) and diagnostic accuracy (87% vs. 93%, χ2 = 5.093, P < 0.05) of MSCT in detecting CAD were lower in women than in men. Atypical presentation was an independent influencing factor on the diagnostic accuracy of MSCT in women (odds ratio = 4.94, 95% confidence intervals: 1.16–20.92, Walds = 4.69, P < 0.05). Compared with those in the atypical group, women with typical angina pectoris had higher PPV (98% vs. 74%, χ2 = 17.283. P < 0.001), diagnostic accuracy (93% vs. 72%, χ2 = 9.571, P < 0.001), and area under the ROC curve (0.91 vs. 0.64, Z = 2.690, P < 0.01) in MSCT diagnosis. Conclusions: Although MSCT is a reliable diagnostic modality for the exclusion of significant coronary artery stenoses in all patients, gender and atypical symptoms might have some influence on its diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27625091

  3. Reproducibility and Repeatability of Computer Tomography-based Measurement of Abdominal Subcutaneous and Visceral Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Hsiao, Hsing-Fen; Yang, Hou-Ting; Huang, Shih-Yi; Chan, Wing P.

    2017-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of abdominal adipose tissue is a widely recognized as a major feature of obesity, and it can be quantified by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). However, in a phantom study, the inter- and intra-instrument reliability of DXA remains unpredictable. Thus, we attempted to determine the precision of estimates from computer tomography-based measurements and analysis with AZE Virtual Place software. To determine the inter-rater reproducibility and intra-rater repeatability of adipose tissue area estimates, we used the automatic boundary-tracing function of the AZE Virtual Place to generate cross-sectional areas of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues from the abdomen of reconstructed CT images. The variability of inter-rater and intra-rater estimates expressed as the coefficient of variation ranged from 0.47% to 1.43% for subcutaneous adipose tissue and 1.08% to 2.20% for visceral adipose tissue; the optimal coefficient of variation of the fat rate calculation ranged from 0.55% to 1.13%, respectively. There was high and significant correlation between adipose tissue areas as estimated in 40 obese subjects by two raters or repeatedly on 20 obese subjects by either rater. This indicates excellent reproducibility and repeatability via a computer tomography-based measurement of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues. PMID:28071718

  4. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic anatomy of the heads of green iguana (Iguana iguana) , common tegu ( Tupinambis merianae) and bearded dragon ( Pogona vitticeps)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiology and computed tomography are the most commonly available diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of pathologies affecting the head and skull in veterinary practice. Nevertheless, accurate interpretation of radiographic and CT studies requires a thorough knowledge of the gross and the cross-sectional anatomy. Despite the increasing success of reptiles as pets, only a few reports over their normal imaging features are currently available. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cadaveric, radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of the green iguana, tegu and bearded dragon. Results 6 adult green iguanas, 4 tegus, 3 bearded dragons, and, the adult cadavers of : 4 green iguana, 4 tegu, 4 bearded dragon were included in the study. 2 cadavers were dissected following a stratigraphic approach and 2 cadavers were cross-sectioned for each species. These latter specimens were stored in a freezer (−20°C) until completely frozen. Transversal sections at 5 mm intervals were obtained by means of an electric band-saw. Each section was cleaned and photographed on both sides. Radiographs of the head of each subject were obtained. Pre- and post- contrast computed tomographic studies of the head were performed on all the live animals. CT images were displayed in both bone and soft tissue windows. Individual anatomic structures were first recognised and labelled on the anatomic images and then matched on radiographs and CT images. Radiographic and CT images of the skull provided good detail of the bony structures in all species. In CT contrast medium injection enabled good detail of the soft tissues to be obtained in the iguana whereas only the eye was clearly distinguishable from the remaining soft tissues in both the tegu and the bearded dragon. Conclusions The results provide an atlas of the normal anatomical and in vivo radiographic and computed tomographic features of the heads of lizards, and this may be useful in interpreting any

  5. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  6. Quantitative strain analysis in analogue modelling experiments: insights from X-ray computed tomography and tomographic image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Klinkmueller, M.; Schreurs, G.; Wieneke, B.

    2009-04-01

    deformation. We have adapted our analogue modelling setups for optimal analysis of complex deformation processes using leading-edge volumetric strain monitoring techniques (3D volume DIC, Tomographic DIC). In this study, we apply DIC on X-ray CT images of analogue models. Our first results indicate that DIC can successfully be applied to quantify the 2D and 3D spatial and temporal patterns of strain accumulation. REFERENCES Adam, J., Urai, J.L, Wieneke, B., Oncken, O., Pfeiffer, K., Kukowski, N., Lohrmann, J., Hoth, S. van der Zee, W., and Schmatz, J.; 2005: Shear localisation and strain distribution during tectonic faulting - new insights from granular-flow experiments and high-resolution optical image correlation techniques. Journal of Structural Geology, 27, 283-301. Lohrmann, J., Kukowski, N., Adam, J. & Oncken, O.; 2003: The control of sand wedges by material properties: sensitivity analyses and application to convergent margin mechanics. - Journal of Structural Geology, 25, 1691-1711 Panien, M., Schreurs, G., and Pfiffner, A.; 2006. Mechanical behaviour of granular materials used in analogue modelling: insights from grain characterisation, ring-shear tests and analogue experiments. Journal of Structural Geology, 28, 1710-1724. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, and Vock, P.; 2002: Analogue modelling of transfer zones in fold and thrust belts: a 4-D analysis. In: Schellart, W.P. and Passchier, C. (eds). Analogue modelling of large-scale tectonic processes. Journal of the Virtual Explorer, 7, 67-73. Schreurs, G., Hänni, R, Panien, M. and Vock, P.; 2003: Analysis of analogue models by helical X-ray computed tomography. In: Mees, F., Swennen, R., Van Geet, M. and Jacobs, P. (eds). Applications of X-ray Computed Tomogaphy in Earth Sciences. Geological Society, London, Special Publications, 215, 213-223.

  7. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT

  8. A Review of Computational Methods to Predict the Risk of Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Canchi, Tejas; Kumar, S D; Ng, E Y K; Narayanan, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods have played an important role in health care in recent years, as determining parameters that affect a certain medical condition is not possible in experimental conditions in many cases. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to accurately determine the nature of blood flow in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and air flow in the respiratory system, thereby giving the surgeon a diagnostic tool to plan treatment accordingly. Machine learning or data mining (MLD) methods are currently used to develop models that learn from retrospective data to make a prediction regarding factors affecting the progression of a disease. These models have also been successful in incorporating factors such as patient history and occupation. MLD models can be used as a predictive tool to determine rupture potential in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) along with CFD-based prediction of parameters like wall shear stress and pressure distributions. A combination of these computer methods can be pivotal in bridging the gap between translational and outcomes research in medicine. This paper reviews the use of computational methods in the diagnosis and treatment of AAA.

  9. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period.

  10. Does the pancreatic volume reduction rate using serial computed tomographic volumetry predict new onset diabetes after pancreaticoduodenectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Pil; Seo, Hyung-Il; Kim, Suk; Kim, Dong Uk; Baek, Dong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Volume reduction of the pancreatic tissues following a pancreatectomy can lead to the deterioration of glucose homeostasis. This is defined as pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus (DM). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of new-onset DM (NODM) and evaluate the risk factors, including the pancreas volume reduction rate in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Sixty-six patients without preoperative DM underwent PD for periampullary tumors between August 2007 and December 2012 and were included in this analysis. These patients underwent follow-up tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan 7 days, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months after the operation. The pancreas volume reduction rate was calculated by CT volumetry. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the postoperative development of DM. After PD, newly diagnosed DM occurred in 16 patients (24.2%). The incidence of DM was highest among patients with carcinomas with an advanced T stage. The pancreatic volume reduction rate after 6 and 12 months in the NODM group was significantly higher than the normal glucose group in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis, the pancreatic volume reduction rate 6 months after PD was the only significant predictive factor for the development of NODM (P = 0.002). This study suggests that the pancreatic volume reduction rate 6 months after PD was the only significant predictive factor for the development of NODM. CT volumetry of the pancreas may be useful as a predictor of NODM after PD. PMID:28353594

  11. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreement between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0 mm vs 2

  12. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-M, E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Dies, P.

    2010-12-07

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at ''Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez'' in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}), the volumetric dose index (C{sub vol}) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the C{sub w}(31.1 mGy) and C{sub vol}(11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for C{sub w} and 5.5 mGy for C{sub vol}. However, this protocol presented the highest value for P{sub KL,CT}(282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  13. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-M, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at "Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez" in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (Cw), the volumetric dose index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the Cw (31.1 mGy) and Cvol (11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for Cw and 5.5 mGy for Cvol. However, this protocol presented the highest value for PKL,CT (282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  14. Endoleak Assessment Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Image Processing Methods in Stented Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Hsun; Mani, Karthick; Panigrahi, Bivas; Hsu, Wen-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a predominant surgical procedure to reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Endoleak formation, which eventually requires additional surgical reoperation, is a major EVAR complication. Understanding the etiology and evolution of endoleak from the hemodynamic perspective is crucial to advancing the current posttreatments for AAA patients who underwent EVAR. Therefore, a comprehensive flow assessment was performed to investigate the relationship between endoleak and its surrounding pathological flow fields through computational fluid dynamics and image processing. Six patient-specific models were reconstructed, and the associated hemodynamics in these models was quantified three-dimensionally to calculate wall stress. To provide a high degree of clinical relevance, the mechanical stress distribution calculated from the models was compared with the endoleak positions identified from the computed tomography images of patients through a series of imaging processing methods. An endoleak possibly forms in a location with high local wall stress. An improved stent graft (SG) structure is conceived accordingly by increasing the mechanical strength of the SG at peak wall stress locations. The presented analytical paradigm, as well as numerical analysis using patient-specific models, may be extended to other common human cardiovascular surgeries. PMID:27660648

  15. Adaptive Flow Simulation of Turbulence in Subject-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Massively Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Onkar; Jansen, Kenneth; Shephard, Mark; Taylor, Charles

    2007-11-01

    Flow within the healthy human vascular system is typically laminar but diseased conditions can alter the geometry sufficiently to produce transitional/turbulent flows in regions focal (and immediately downstream) of the diseased section. The mean unsteadiness (pulsatile or respiratory cycle) further complicates the situation making traditional turbulence simulation techniques (e.g., Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANSS)) suspect. At the other extreme, direct numerical simulation (DNS) while fully appropriate can lead to large computational expense, particularly when the simulations must be done quickly since they are intended to affect the outcome of a medical treatment (e.g., virtual surgical planning). To produce simulations in a clinically relevant time frame requires; 1) adaptive meshing technique that closely matches the desired local mesh resolution in all three directions to the highly anisotropic physical length scales in the flow, 2) efficient solution algorithms, and 3) excellent scaling on massively parallel computers. In this presentation we will demonstrate results for a subject-specific simulation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using stabilized finite element method on anisotropically adapted meshes consisting of O(10^8) elements over O(10^4) processors.

  16. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS - ECTOPIC SPLEEN MIMICKING HEPATIC TUMOR WITH INTRA-ABDOMINAL METASTASES INVESTIGATED VIA TRIPLE-PHASE HELICAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN A DOG.

    PubMed

    Kutara, Kenji; Konno, Toshiaki; Kondo, Hirotaka; Aoki, Kotoyo; Yamazoe, Hinako; Matsunaga, Satoru

    2016-07-05

    A 10-year-old castrated male miniature dachshund was presented with an abdominal mass. The dog had a history of splenectomy. Triple-phase helical computed tomography was utilized, revealing a hepatic mass and multiple intra-abdominal solid masses. In triple-phase helical computed tomography the images, hepatic mass and two of four intra-abdominal masses were heterogenous in all phases. Therefore, we diagnosed a malignant hepatic tumor and presumed intra-abdominal metastases. The masses were surgically removed and were histologically composed of normal spleen tissues, findings which were consistent with ectopic spleen.

  17. Computational Growth and Remodeling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Constrained by the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Farsad, Mehdi; Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) evolve over time, and the vertebral column, which acts as an external barrier, affects their biomechanical properties. Mechanical interaction between AAAs and the spine is believed to alter the geometry, wall stress distribution, and blood flow, although the degree of this interaction may depend on AAAs specific configurations. In this study, we use a growth and remodeling (G&R) model, which is able to trace alterations of the geometry, thus allowing us to computationally investigate the effect of the spine for progression of the AAA. Medical image-based geometry of an aorta is constructed along with the spine surface, which is incorporated into the computational model as a cloud of points. The G&R simulation is initiated by local elastin degradation with different spatial distributions. The AAA–spine interaction is accounted for using a penalty method when the AAA surface meets the spine surface. The simulation results show that, while the radial growth of the AAA wall is prevented on the posterior side due to the spine acting as a constraint, the AAA expands faster on the anterior side, leading to higher curvature and asymmetry in the AAA configuration compared to the simulation excluding the spine. Accordingly, the AAA wall stress increases on the lateral, posterolateral, and the shoulder regions of the anterior side due to the AAA–spine contact. In addition, more collagen is deposited on the regions with a maximum diameter. We show that an image-based computational G&R model not only enhances the prediction of the geometry, wall stress, and strength distributions of AAAs but also provides a framework to account for the interactions between an enlarging AAA and the spine for a better rupture potential assessment and management of AAA patients. PMID:26158885

  18. Contrast medium usage reduction in abdominal computed tomography by using high-iodinated concentration contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannasri, A.; Kaewlai, R.; Asavaphatiboon, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to determine if administration of a low volume high-concentration iodinated contrast medium can preserve image quality in comparison with regular-concentration intravenous contrast medium in patient undergoing contrast-enhancement abdominal computed tomography (CT). Eighty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of similar iodine delivery rate; A: 1.2 cc/kg of iomeprol-400, B: 1.0 cc/kg of iomeprol-400 and C: 1.5 cc/kg of ioversol-350. Contrast enhancement of the liver parenchyma, pancreas and aorta was quantitatively measured in Hounsfield units and qualitative assessed by a radiologist. T-test was used to evaluate contrast enhancement, and Chi-square test was used to evaluate qualitative image assessment, at significance level of 0.05 with 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma and pancreas between group A and group C in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Group C showed superior vascular enhancement to group A and B on quantitative analysis.

  19. Assessment of sub-milli-sievert abdominal computed tomography with iterative reconstruction techniques of different vendors

    PubMed Central

    Padole, Atul; Sainani, Nisha; Lira, Diego; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess diagnostic image quality of reduced dose (RD) abdominal computed tomography (CT) with 9 iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) from 4 different vendors to the standard of care (SD) CT. METHODS: In an Institutional Review Board approved study, 66 patients (mean age 60 ± 13 years, 44 men, and 22 women) undergoing routine abdomen CT on multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners from vendors A, B, and C (≥ 64 row CT scanners) (22 patients each) gave written informed consent for acquisition of an additional RD CT series. Sinogram data of RD CT was reconstructed with two vendor-specific and a vendor-neutral IRTs (A-1, A-2, A-3; B-1, B-2, B-3; and C-1, C-2, C-3) and SD CT series with filtered back projection. Subjective image evaluation was performed by two radiologists for each SD and RD CT series blinded and independently. All RD CT series (198) were assessed first followed by SD CT series (66). Objective image noise was measured for SD and RD CT series. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank, kappa, and analysis of variance tests. RESULTS: There were 13/50, 18/57 and 9/40 missed lesions (size 2-7 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Missed lesions includes liver cysts, kidney cysts and stone, gall stone, fatty liver, and pancreatitis. There were also 5, 4, and 4 pseudo lesions (size 2-3 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Lesions conspicuity was sufficient for clinical diagnostic performance for 6/24 (RD-A-1), 10/24 (RD-A-2), and 7/24 (RD-A-3) lesions for vendor A; 5/26 (RD-B-1), 6/26 (RD-B-2), and 7/26 (RD-B-3) lesions for vendor B; and 4/20 (RD-C-1) 6/20 (RD-C-2), and 10/20 (RD-C-3) lesions for vendor C (P = 0.9). Mean objective image noise in liver was significantly lower for RD A-1 compared to both RD A-2 and RD A-3 images (P < 0.001). Similarly, mean objective image noise lower for RD B-2 (compared to RD B-1, RD B-3) and RD C-3 (compared to RD C-1 and C-2) (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Regardless of IRTs and MDCT vendors

  20. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  1. Computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and cross-sectional anatomic features of the manus in a normal American black bear (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Ober, C P; Freeman, L E

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed description of cross-sectional anatomic structures of the manus of a black bear cadaver and correlate anatomic findings with corresponding features in computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. CT, MR imaging, and transverse sectioning were performed on the thoracic limb of a cadaver female black bear which had no evidence of lameness or thoracic limb abnormality prior to death. Features in CT and MR images corresponding to clinically important anatomic structures in anatomic sections were identified. Most of the structures identified in transverse anatomic sections were also identified using CT and MR imaging. Bones, muscles and tendons were generally easily identified with both imaging modalities, although divisions between adjacent muscles were rarely visible with CT and only visible sometimes with MR imaging. Vascular structures could not be identified with either imaging modality.

  2. How will you need me, how will you read me, when I'm 64 (or more!)?: volume computed tomographic scanning and information overload in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Chason, David P; Anderson, Jon A; Stephens, Jason S; Suss, Richard A; Guild, Jeffrey B; Blackburn, Timothy J; Champine, Julie G; Lane, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scanning technology now employs up to 320 detector rows of 0.5-mm width and allows rapid acquisition of isotropic volume datasets over the entire body. Data from a single CT acquisition can be reconstructed into image series that would formerly have required multiple acquisitions. Small isotropic voxels permit scan parameters to be general while reconstruction algorithms remain specific to anatomy. While this results in more efficient operation in the Emergency Department, it necessitates new ways of displaying, interpreting, and archiving the information. Critical decisions include how much of the patient to scan and how to time contrast injections when imaging multiple organs. These choices must be made in light of dose considerations to the patient and the general population of patients. The technical basis of high-density CT scanning is discussed, including detector configurations and reconstruction techniques. Volumetric scanning in the Emergency Department can improve patient care but requires a change of technical habits.

  3. Validation of a technique for integration of a digital dental model into stereophotogrammetric images of the face using cone-beam computed tomographic data.

    PubMed

    Codari, Marina; Pucciarelli, Valentina; Tommasi, Davide G; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-06-01

    We wanted to find and validate a new way to visualise patients' faces and their dental arches non-invasively. The stereophotogrammetric images of the faces and the digitised dental casts of seven healthy subjects were analysed. Point-based and surface-based recording techniques matched the facial image with those of the mandibular and maxillary dental arches in their relative positions. The cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images of the same subjects were analysed retrospectively. Twenty-eight dentofacial distances were obtained on cone-beam CT images and on the recorded facial and dental surfaces. The median (IQR) distances of more than 96% of the measurements did not differ significantly.

  4. Computed tomographic observations pertinent to intracranial venous thrombotic and occulsive disease in childhood: state of the art, some new data, and hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, H.D.; Ahmadi, J.; McComb, J.G.; Zee, C.S.; Becker, T.S.; Han, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Selected topics are discussed and new observations recorded regarding computed tomographic (CT) evaluation of intracranial venous thrombotic and occlusive disease in childhood. High density of the vein of Galen and adjacent venous sinuses (relative to brain) can be seen normally in children. A number of potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis are also disclosed. A case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with abnormal CT changes is included. In addition, the normal CT appearance of the cavernous sinus is described. In some cases, filling defects occur which appear to correlate with normal cranial nerves. An unusual case of venous sinus occlusion by neoplasm (sarcoma) is presented. Finally, new findings in the Sturge-Weber syndrome are analyzed. Enhancement of the brain in this condition may have its basis in altered circulation resulting from fundamental venous abnormalities.

  5. Comparative Validity and Reproducibility Study of Various Landmark-Oriented Reference Planes in 3-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Analysis for Patients Receiving Orthognathic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiu-Hsia; Chuang, Ya-Fang; Weng, Jing-Ling; Lo, Lun-Jou

    2015-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging has become popular in clinical evaluation, treatment planning, surgical simulation, and outcome assessment for maxillofacial intervention. The purposes of this study were to investigate whether there is any correlation among landmark-based horizontal reference planes and to validate the reproducibility and reliability of landmark identification. Materials and Methods Preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomographic images of patients who had undergone orthognathic surgery were collected. Landmark-oriented reference planes including the Frankfort horizontal plane (FHP) and the lateral semicircular canal plane (LSP) were established. Four FHPs were defined by selecting 3 points from the orbitale, porion, or midpoint of paired points. The LSP passed through both the lateral semicircular canal points and nasion. The distances between the maxillary or mandibular teeth and the reference planes were measured, and the differences between the 2 sides were calculated and compared. The precision in locating the landmarks was evaluated by performing repeated tests, and the intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver reliability were assessed. Results A total of 30 patients with facial deformity and malocclusion—10 patients with facial symmetry, 10 patients with facial asymmetry, and 10 patients with cleft lip and palate—were recruited. Comparing the differences among the 5 reference planes showed no statistically significant difference among all patient groups. Regarding intraobserver reproducibility, the mean differences in the 3 coordinates varied from 0 to 0.35 mm, with correlation coefficients between 0.96 and 1.0, showing high correlation between repeated tests. Regarding interobserver reliability, the mean differences among the 3 coordinates varied from 0 to 0.47 mm, with correlation coefficients between 0.88 and 1.0, exhibiting high correlation between the different examiners. Conclusions The

  6. Tomographic image via background subtraction using an x-ray projection image and a priori computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Yi, Byongyong; Lasio, Giovanni; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Yu, Cedric

    2009-01-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray projection images (kV images for brevity) are increasingly available in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for patient positioning. These images are two-dimensional (2D) projections of a three-dimensional (3D) object along the x-ray beam direction. Projecting a 3D object onto a plane may lead to ambiguities in the identification of anatomical structures and to poor contrast in kV images. Therefore, the use of kV images in IGRT is mainly limited to bony landmark alignments. This work proposes a novel subtraction technique that isolates a slice of interest (SOI) from a kV image with the assistance of a priori information from a previous CT scan. The method separates structural information within a preselected SOI by suppressing contributions to the unprocessed projection from out-of-SOI-plane structures. Up to a five-fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) was observed in selected regions of the isolated SOI, when compared to the original unprocessed kV image. The tomographic image via background subtraction (TIBS) technique aims to provide a quick snapshot of the slice of interest with greatly enhanced image contrast over conventional kV x-ray projections for fast and accurate image guidance of radiation therapy. With further refinements, TIBS could, in principle, provide real-time tumor localization using gantry-mounted x-ray imaging systems without the need for implanted markers. PMID:19928074

  7. Superimposition-based personal identification using skull computed tomographic images: application to skull with mouth fixed open by residual soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Masuko; Saitoh, Hisako; Yasjima, Daisuke; Yohsuk, Makino; Sakuma, Ayaka; Yayama, Kazuhiro; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2013-09-01

    We previously reported that superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) images reconstructed from computed tomographic images of skeletonized skulls on photographs of the actual skulls afforded a match of skull contours, thereby demonstrating that superimposition of 3D-reconstructed images provides results identical to those obtained with actual skulls. The current superimposition procedure requires a skeletonized skull with mouth closed and thus is not applicable to personal identification using a skull with residual soft tissue or the mouth fixed open, such as those found in mummified or burned bodies. In this study, we scanned using computed tomography the skulls of mummified and immersed body with mandibles fixed open by residual soft tissue, created 3D-reconstructed skull images, which were digitally processed by computer software to close the mandible, and superimposed the images on antemortem facial photographs. The results demonstrated morphological consistency between the 3D-reconstructed skull images and facial photographs, indicating the applicability of the method to personal identification.

  8. Treatment of abdominal abscesses: comparative evaluation of operative drainage versus percutaneous catheter drainage guided by computed tomography or ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W C; Gerzof, S G; Robbins, A H; Nabseth, D C

    1981-01-01

    Computed tomography and, to a lesser extent, ultrasonography provide detailed anatomic localization of intra-abdominal abscesses that permit precise percutaneous placement of catheters large enough to effect drainage. Using routes similar to surgical approaches, the authors have used this technique as definitive therapy for intra-abdominal abscesses. To assess its efficacy, the results in the 27 patients treated percutaneously over the last five years have been compared with the results in the 43 patients treated by operative intervention over the past ten years. In the percutaneous group, complications (4%), inadequate drainage (11%), and duration of drainage (17 days) were less than in the operative group (16%, 21% and 29 days respectively). These results indicate that percutaneous drainage is at least as efficacious as operative drainage and avoids the risks of a major operative procedure. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:7283510

  9. Computed Tomographic Angiography as an Adjunct to Digital Subtraction Angiography for the Pre-Operative Assessment of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Farsad, Khashayar; Mamourian, Alexander C; Eskey, Clifford J; Friedman, Jonathan A

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Computerized tomographic angiography (CTA) has emerged as a valuable diagnostic tool for the management of patients with cerebrovascular disease. The use of CTA in lieu of, or as an adjunct to, conventional cerebral angiography in the management of cerebral aneurysms awaits further experience. In this study, we evaluated the role of CTA specifically for the pre-operative assessment and planning of cerebral aneurysm surgery. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the relevant neuroimaging of all patients treated at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center between January, 2001 and December, 2004 with a diagnosis of cerebral aneurysm and diagnostic evaluation with both CTA and conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) using standard imaging protocols. 32 patients underwent both CTA and DSA during the study period for a total of 36 aneurysms. Images were independently re-assesed by two neurosurgeons for information valuable for pre-operative surgical planning. Results: In 26 of 36 aneurysms (72%), the CTA was felt to provide the best image quality in defining the morphology of the aneurysm. In 14 aneurysms (39%), CTA provided clinically valuable anatomic detail not demonstrated on DSA, largely due to better visualization of parent and perforating vessel relationships at the aneurysm neck. There were no instances where a lesion was seen on DSA but missed on CTA. The DSA was of most clinical value in determining flow dynamics, such as the arterial supply of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm and distal anterior cerebral branches via the two A1 segments. Conclusion: CTA with three-dimensional reconstructions is a valuable adjunct to the preoperative evaluation of cerebral aneurysms. We advocate routine use of CTA in all patients in whom surgical aneurysm repair is planned, even when DSA has already been performed. PMID:19452029

  10. Comparative evaluation of the cadaveric and computed tomographic features of the coelomic cavity in the green iguana (Iguana iguana), black and white tegu (Tupinambis merianae) and bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Banzato, T; Selleri, P; Veladiano, I A; Zotti, A

    2013-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic studies of the coelomic cavity in four green iguanas, four black and white tegus and four bearded dragons were performed using a conventional CT scanner. Anatomical reference cross sections were obtained from four green iguana, four black and white tegu and six bearded dragon cadavers; the specimens were stored in a -20°C freezer for 24 h then sliced into 5-mm intervals. The frozen sections were cleaned with water and photographed on both sides. The individual anatomical structures were identified by means of the available literature; these were labelled first on the anatomical images and then matched to the corresponding computed tomography images. The results provide an atlas of the normal cross-sectional and computed tomographic anatomy of the coelomic cavity in the green iguana, the black and white tegu and the bearded dragon, which is useful in the interpretation of any imaging modality.

  11. On the prediction of monocyte deposition in abdominal aortic aneurysms using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, David; Doyle, Barry J; Semple, Scott I K; Richards, Jennifer M J; Newby, David E; Easson, William J; Hoskins, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm disease, the aortic wall is exposed to intense biological activity involving inflammation and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix. These processes are orchestrated by monocytes and rather than affecting the aorta uniformly, damage and weaken focal areas of the wall leaving it vulnerable to rupture. This study attempts to model numerically the deposition of monocytes using large eddy simulation, discrete phase modelling and near-wall particle residence time. The model was first applied to idealised aneurysms and then to three patient-specific lumen geometries using three-component inlet velocities derived from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a novel, variable wall shear stress-limiter based on previous experimental data significantly improved the results. Simulations identified a critical diameter (1.8 times the inlet diameter) beyond which significant monocyte deposition is expected to occur. Monocyte adhesion occurred proximally in smaller abdominal aortic aneurysms and distally as the sac expands. The near-wall particle residence time observed in each of the patient-specific models was markedly different. Discrete hotspots of monocyte residence time were detected, suggesting that the monocyte infiltration responsible for the breakdown of the abdominal aortic aneurysm wall occurs heterogeneously. Peak monocyte residence time was found to increase with aneurysm sac size. Further work addressing certain limitations is needed in a larger cohort to determine clinical significance.

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  13. Comparison of alveolar ridge preservation methods using three-dimensional micro-computed tomographic analysis and two-dimensional histometric evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Kim, Sungtae; Oh, Seung-Hee; Park, Hee-Jung; Lee, Sophia; Lee, Young-Kyu; Heo, Min-Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the efficacy of alveolar ridge preservation methods with and without primary wound closure and the relationship between histometric and micro-computed tomographic (CT) data. Materials and Methods Porcine hydroxyapatite with polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was implanted into a canine extraction socket. The density of the total mineralized tissue, remaining hydroxyapatite, and new bone was analyzed by histometry and micro-CT. The statistical association between these methods was evaluated. Results Histometry and micro-CT showed that the group which underwent alveolar preservation without primary wound closure had significantly higher new bone density than the group with primary wound closure (P<0.05). However, there was no significant association between the data from histometry and micro-CT analysis. Conclusion These results suggest that alveolar ridge preservation without primary wound closure enhanced new bone formation more effectively than that with primary wound closure. Further investigation is needed with respect to the comparison of histometry and micro-CT analysis. PMID:24944964

  14. The Japan Lung Cancer Society-Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology consensus-based computed tomographic atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Itazawa, Tomoko; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Komiyama, Takafumi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Yuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Sakai, Shuji; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a consensus-based computed tomographic (CT) atlas that defines lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer based on the lymph node map of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). A project group in the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) initially prepared a draft of the atlas in which lymph node Stations 1-11 were illustrated on axial CT images. Subsequently, a joint committee of the Japan Lung Cancer Society (JLCS) and the Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology (JASTRO) was formulated to revise this draft. The committee consisted of four radiation oncologists, four thoracic surgeons and three thoracic radiologists. The draft prepared by the JROSG project group was intensively reviewed and discussed at four meetings of the committee over several months. Finally, we proposed definitions for the regional lymph node stations and the consensus-based CT atlas. This atlas was approved by the Board of Directors of JLCS and JASTRO. This resulted in the first official CT atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer authorized by the JLCS and JASTRO. In conclusion, the JLCS-JASTRO consensus-based CT atlas, which conforms to the IASLC lymph node map, was established.

  15. Computed tomographic angiography of the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis based on volume rendering, multi-planar reconstruction, and integral imaging display.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qiong; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Anhong; Huang, Yanping; Deng, Xuefei

    2015-12-01

    As damage to the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis may create catastrophic complications even after successful surgery, it is important to visualize and determine the normal features of the venous anastomosis with computed tomographic angiography. A total of 90 patients underwent a 64-detector row helical CT scan of head. The superficial cerebral venous anastomosis was reconstructed by volume rendering, multi-planar reconstruction, and integral display algorithm. In particular, we examined the vein of Trolard, the vein of Labbe, and the vein of Sylvian, in order to analyze the venous anastomosis. The superficial cerebral venous anastomosis varied across different individuals, and in this study, six types of anastomosis were found. In 28 % of patients, no venous anastomosis was found in the unilateral cerebral hemisphere. The display rate of the vein of Trolard, the vein of Labbe, and the vein of Sylvian in contributing to venous anastomosis was 70, 80, and 91 %, respectively. The number of vein of Trolard and vein of Labbe on the left side was greater than that of those on the right side. We implemented the 64-detector row helical CT as a rapid and noninvasive method to investigate the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis in our group of patients. We performed substantial image processing for the visualization of the superficial cerebral venous anastomosis; this would not only enable the early diagnosis of cerebral venous disease, but also protect the cerebral vein during neurosurgical intervention.

  16. [Computed tomographic evaluation of the healing of experimental defect of a long bone of the skeleton after implantation into its cavity osteoplastic material "Cerabone®"].

    PubMed

    Korenkov, A V; Sikora, V Z

    2015-01-01

    Described in the literature properties of osteoplastic material "Cerabone®" have been obtained from studies in the maxilla and cancellous bone. The lack of data on the impact of «Cerabone®» on the dynamics of the healing of defects of compact substance of the long bones of the skeleton dictates the need for such studies. Implantation of osteoplastic material «Cerabone ®» was performed into the defect of rat femoral shaft followed by computer-tomographic analysis of its healing. Starting from the 30th day until the end of the experiment (120th day) there were found faint signs of rarefaction in the distal part adjacent to the defect of parent bone, with no signs of bone resorption in its proximal part. There was identified an extremely high density of the implantation site «Cerabone®», no visible radiographic evidence of resorption of osteoplastic material and ensuring by the latter the stability of volume of the defect in cortical bone at all stages of the experiment.

  17. 3-D volumetric computed tomographic scoring as an objective outcome measure for chronic rhinosinusitis: Clinical correlations and comparison to Lund-Mackay scoring

    PubMed Central

    Pallanch, John; Yu, Lifeng; Delone, David; Robb, Rich; Holmes, David R.; Camp, Jon; Edwards, Phil; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ponikau, Jens; Dearking, Amy; Lane, John; Primak, Andrew; Shinkle, Aaron; Hagan, John; Frigas, Evangelo; Ocel, Joseph J.; Tombers, Nicole; Siwani, Rizwan; Orme, Nicholas; Reed, Kurtis; Jerath, Nivedita; Dhillon, Robinder; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to test the hypothesis that 3-D volume-based scoring of computed tomographic (CT) images of the paranasal sinuses was superior to Lund-Mackay CT scoring of disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). We determined correlation between changes in CT scores (using each scoring system) with changes in other measures of disease severity (symptoms, endoscopic scoring, and quality of life) in patients with CRS treated with triamcinolone. Methods The study group comprised 48 adult subjects with CRS. Baseline symptoms and quality of life were assessed. Endoscopy and CT scans were performed. Patients received a single systemic dose of intramuscular triamcinolone and were reevaluated 1 month later. Strengths of the correlations between changes in CT scores and changes in CRS signs and symptoms and quality of life were determined. Results We observed some variability in degree of improvement for the different symptom, endoscopic, and quality-of-life parameters after treatment. Improvement of parameters was significantly correlated with improvement in CT disease score using both CT scoring methods. However, volumetric CT scoring had greater correlation with these parameters than Lund-Mackay scoring. Conclusion Volumetric scoring exhibited higher degree of correlation than Lund-Mackay scoring when comparing improvement in CT score with improvement in score for symptoms, endoscopic exam, and quality of life in this group of patients who received beneficial medical treatment for CRS. PMID:24106202

  18. The Influence of the Size, Age and Sex on the Computed Tomographic Measured Size of the Pituitary Gland in Normal Horses.

    PubMed

    Crijns, C P; Van Bree, H J; Broeckx, B J G; Schauvliege, S; Van Loon, G; Martens, A; Vanderperren, K; Dingemanse, W B; Gielen, I M

    2017-02-27

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of the size, age and sex of the horse on the size of the pituitary gland and determine the possibility of using the pituitary gland height-to-brain area ratio (P:B ratio) to allow comparison of different sized and aged horses. Thirty-two horses without pituitary pars inter-media dysfunction that underwent a contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) examination were included in a cross-sectional study. On the CT images, the pituitary gland height was measured and the P:B ratio was calculated. These measurements were correlated to the size, age and sex of the horses. The pituitary gland height was significantly associated with the size (P < 0.001) and the age (P < 0.001), but not with the sex (P = 0.40), of the horses. No significant association was found between the P:B ratio and the size (P = 0.25), the age (P = 0.06) or the sex (P = 0.25) of the horses. In conclusion, the pituitary gland size varies between different sized and aged horses. The use of the P:B ratio is a valuable metric for making comparisons between the pituitary glands of these horses.

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analyses of the Position and Course of the Mandibular Canal: Relevance to the Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Sahman, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to document the position and course of the mandibular canal through the region of the mandibular angle and body in dental patients, using cone beam computed tomographic imaging. Methods. The position and course of the mandibular canal from the region of the third molar to the first molar were measured at five specific locations in the same plane: at three different positions just between the first and second molars; between the second and third molars; and just distal to the third molar. Results. The study sample was composed of 500 hemimandibles from 250 dental patients with a mean age of 26.32. Significant differences were found between genders, distances, and positions. B decreased significantly from the anterior positions to the posterior positions in both females and males. The mean values of S and CB increased significantly from the posterior positions to the anterior positions in both females and males. Conclusion. Because the sagittal split ramus osteotomy is a technically difficult procedure, we hope that the findings of the present study will help the surgeon in choosing the safest surgical technique for the treatment of mandibular deformities. PMID:24719896

  20. What Have We Learned from CONFIRM? Prognostic Implications from a Prospective Multicenter International Observational Cohort Study of Consecutive Patients Undergoing Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Otaki, Yuka; Arsanjani, Reza; Gransar, Heidi; Cheng, Victor Y.; Dey, Damini; Labounty, Troy; Lin, Fay Y.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; Delago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Dunning, Allison; Cury, Ricardo C.; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Berman, Daniel S.; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) employing CT scanners of 64-detector rows or greater represents a novel noninvasive method for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), providing excellent diagnostic information when compared to invasive angiography. In addition to its high diagnostic performance, prior studies have shown that CCTA can provide important prognostic information, although these prior studies have been generally limited to small cohorts at single centers. The Coronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For clinical Outcomes: An InterRnational Multicenter Registry, or CONFIRM, is a large, prospective, multinational, dynamic observational cohort study of patients undergoing CCTA. This registry currently represents more than 32,000 consecutive adults suspected of having CAD who underwent ≥ 64–detector row CCTA at 12 centers in 6 countries between 2005 and 2009. Based on its large sample size and adequate statistical power, the data derived from CONFIRM registry has and will continue to provide key answers to many important topics regarding CCTA. Based on its multisite international national design, the results derived from CONFIRM should be considered as more generalizable than prior smaller single-center studies. This article summarizes the current status of several studies from CONFIRM registry. PMID:22689072

  1. The Japan Lung Cancer Society–Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology consensus-based computed tomographic atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Itazawa, Tomoko; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Komiyama, Takafumi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Yuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Sakai, Shuji; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a consensus-based computed tomographic (CT) atlas that defines lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer based on the lymph node map of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). A project group in the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) initially prepared a draft of the atlas in which lymph node Stations 1–11 were illustrated on axial CT images. Subsequently, a joint committee of the Japan Lung Cancer Society (JLCS) and the Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology (JASTRO) was formulated to revise this draft. The committee consisted of four radiation oncologists, four thoracic surgeons and three thoracic radiologists. The draft prepared by the JROSG project group was intensively reviewed and discussed at four meetings of the committee over several months. Finally, we proposed definitions for the regional lymph node stations and the consensus-based CT atlas. This atlas was approved by the Board of Directors of JLCS and JASTRO. This resulted in the first official CT atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer authorized by the JLCS and JASTRO. In conclusion, the JLCS–JASTRO consensus-based CT atlas, which conforms to the IASLC lymph node map, was established. PMID:27609192

  2. The Role of Computed Tomography in the Diagnostics of Diaphragmatic Injury After Blunt Thoraco-Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gmachowska, Agata; Pacho, Ryszard; Anysz-Grodzicka, Agnieszka; Bakoń, Leopold; Gorycka, Maria; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Patkowski, Waldemar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Diaphragmatic injuries occur in 0.8–8% of patients with blunt trauma. The clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture is difficult and may be overshadowed by associated injuries. Diaphragmatic rupture does not resolve spontaneously and may cause life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to present radiological findings in patients with diaphragmatic injury. Material/Methods The analysis of computed tomography examinations performed between 2007 and 2012 revealed 200 patients after blunt thoraco-abdominal trauma. Diaphragmatic rupture was diagnosed in 13 patients. Twelve of these patients had suffered traumatic injuries and underwent a surgical procedure that confirmed the rupture of the diaphragm. Most of diaphragmatic ruptures were left-sided (10) while only 2 of them were right-sided. In addition to those 12 patients there, another patient was admitted to the emergency department with left-sided abdominal and chest pain. That patient had undergone a blunt thoracoabdominal trauma 5 years earlier and complained of recurring pain. During surgery there was only partial relaxation of the diaphragm, without rupture. The most important signs of the diaphragmatic rupture in computed tomography include: segmental discontinuity of the diaphragm with herniation through the rupture, dependent viscera sign, collar sign and other signs (sinus cut-off sign, hump sign, band sign). Results In our study blunt diaphragmatic rupture occurred in 6% of cases as confirmed intraoperatively. In all patients, coronal and sagittal reformatted images showed herniation through the diaphragmatic rupture. In left-sided ruptures, herniation was accompanied by segmental discontinuity of the diaphragm and collar sign. In right-sided ruptures, predominance of hump sign and band sign was observed. Other signs were less common. Conclusions The knowledge of the CT findings suggesting diaphragmatic rupture improves the detection of injuries in thoraco-abdominal

  3. C-arm Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Needle Path Overlay for Fluoroscopic-Guided Placement of Translumbar Central Venous Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, Alda; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Rohm, Esther; Wallace, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    C-arm cone beam computed tomography is an advanced 3D imaging technology that is currently available on state-of-the-art flat-panel-based angiography systems. The overlay of cross-sectional imaging information can now be integrated with real-time fluoroscopy. This overlay technology was used to guide the placement of three percutaneous translumbar inferior vena cava catheters.

  4. Spiral computed tomographic scanning of the chest with three dimensional imaging in the diagnosis and management of paediatric intrathoracic airway obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Sagy, M.; Poustchi-Amin, M.; Nimkoff, L.; Silver, P.; Shikowitz, M.; Leonidas, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The usefulness of spiral computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest with three dimensional imaging (3D-CT) of intrathoracic structures in the diagnosis and management of paediatric intrathoracic airway obstruction was assessed. METHODS: A retrospective review was made of five consecutive cases (age range six months to four years) admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit and paediatric radiology division of a tertiary care children's hospital with severe respiratory decompensation suspected of being caused by intrathoracic large airway obstruction. Under adequate sedation, the patients underwent high speed spiral CT scanning of the thorax. Non-ionic contrast solution was injected in two patients to demonstrate the anatomical relationship between the airway and the intrathoracic large vessels. Using computer software, three-dimensional images of intrathoracic structures were then reconstructed by the radiologist. RESULTS: In all five patients the imaging results were useful in directing the physician to the correct diagnosis and appropriate management. In one patient, who had undergone repair of tetralogy of Fallot with absent pulmonary valve, the 3D-CT image showed bilateral disruptions in the integrity of the tracheobronchial tree due to compression by a dilated pulmonary artery. This patient underwent pulmonary artery aneurysmorrhaphy and required continued home mechanical ventilation via tracheostomy. In three other patients with symptoms of lower airway obstruction the 3D-CT images showed significant stenosis in segments of the tracheobronchial tree in two of them, and subsequent bronchoscopy established a diagnosis of segmental bronchomalacia. These two patients required mechanical ventilation and distending pressure to relieve their bronchospasm. In another patient who had undergone surgical repair of intrathoracic tracheal stenosis three years prior to admission the 3D-CT scan ruled out restenosis as the reason for her acute respiratory

  5. COMBINATION OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING CHARACTERISTICS OF MEDIAL RETROPHARYNGEAL LYMPH NODES AND NASAL PASSAGES AIDS DISCRIMINATION BETWEEN RHINITIS AND NEOPLASIA IN CATS.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; Hollars, Katelyn; Nelson, Nathan C; Bobe, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Feline nasal diseases are a diagnostic challenge. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine whether computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of the medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes (MRPLN), alone or in combination with CT imaging characteristics of the nasal passages, could aid in differentiation between rhinitis and nasal neoplasia. Cats were recruited from record archives at two veterinary facilities during the period of 2008-2012. Selection criteria were presentation for chronic nasal discharge, contrast-enhanced CT of the head that included the MRPLN, and rhinoscopic nasal biopsy resulting in diagnosis of rhinitis or neoplasia. For each CT scan, two board-certified veterinary radiologists recorded MRPLN size, attenuation, heterogeneity, contrast-medium enhancement, margination, shape, presence of a lymph node hilus, perinodal fat, turbinate lysis, paranasal bone lysis, and nasal mass. Both readers were unaware of patient information at the time of CT interpretation. Thirty-four cats with rhinitis and 22 cats with neoplasia were included. Computed tomographic characteristics significantly associated with neoplasia included abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 5.1), paranasal bone lysis (OR 5.6), turbinate lysis (5.6), mass (OR 26.1), MRPLN height asymmetry (OR 4.5), and decreased MRPLN precontrast heterogeneity (OR 7.0). The combined features predictive of neoplasia were a nasal mass with abnormal hilus (OR 47.7); lysis of turbinates/paranasal bones with abnormal MRPLN hilus (OR 16.2). Findings supported the hypothesis that combining CT features of the nasal passages and MRPLN aided in differentiating rhinitis from neoplasia in cats.

  6. Correlative multiple porosimetries for reservoir sandstones with adoption of a new reference-sample-guided computed-tomographic method

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jae Hwa; Kim, Junho; Lee, Jeong-Yil; Oh, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    One of the main interests in petroleum geology and reservoir engineering is to quantify the porosity of reservoir beds as accurately as possible. A variety of direct measurements, including methods of mercury intrusion, helium injection and petrographic image analysis, have been developed; however, their application frequently yields equivocal results because these methods are different in theoretical bases, means of measurement, and causes of measurement errors. Here, we present a set of porosities measured in Berea Sandstone samples by the multiple methods, in particular with adoption of a new method using computed tomography and reference samples. The multiple porosimetric data show a marked correlativeness among different methods, suggesting that these methods are compatible with each other. The new method of reference-sample-guided computed tomography is more effective than the previous methods when the accompanied merits such as experimental conveniences are taken into account. PMID:27445105

  7. Noncontrast computed tomography can predict the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy via accurate stone measurement and abdominal fat distribution determination.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Tu, Hung-Pin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Jang, Mei-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jen; Li, Ching-Chia; Chou, Yii-Her; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease of the urinary system. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become one of the standard treatments for renal and ureteral stones; however, the success rates range widely and failure of stone disintegration may cause additional outlay, alternative procedures, and even complications. We used the data available from noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCCT) to evaluate the impact of stone parameters and abdominal fat distribution on calculus-free rates following SWL. We retrospectively reviewed 328 patients who had urinary stones and had undergone SWL from August 2012 to August 2013. All of them received pre-SWL NCCT; 1 month after SWL, radiography was arranged to evaluate the condition of the fragments. These patients were classified into stone-free group and residual stone group. Unenhanced computed tomography variables, including stone attenuation, abdominal fat area, and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) were analyzed. In all, 197 (60%) were classified as stone-free and 132 (40%) as having residual stone. The mean ages were 49.35 ± 13.22 years and 55.32 ± 13.52 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, stone size, stone surface area, stone attenuation, SSD, total fat area (TFA), abdominal circumference, serum creatinine, and the severity of hydronephrosis revealed statistical significance between these two groups. From multivariate logistic regression analysis, the independent parameters impacting SWL outcomes were stone size, stone attenuation, TFA, and serum creatinine. [Adjusted odds ratios and (95% confidence intervals): 9.49 (3.72-24.20), 2.25 (1.22-4.14), 2.20 (1.10-4.40), and 2.89 (1.35-6.21) respectively, all p < 0.05]. In the present study, stone size, stone attenuation, TFA and serum creatinine were four independent predictors for stone-free rates after SWL. These findings suggest that pretreatment NCCT may predict the outcomes after SWL. Consequently, we can use these predictors for selecting

  8. Segmentation and Estimation of the Histological Composition of the Tumor Mass in Computed Tomographic Images of Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    spontaneous regression for a malignant tumor and one of the tumors with the poorest cure potential for some groups [ 1 ]. Neuroblastoma is the most common...Canada; and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP), São Paulo, Brazil. definitively by diagnostic imaging, due to errors in...is shown in Figure 1 . The path on the left shows the sequence of computer-based operations that lead to the estimation of the statistical model. The

  9. Anatomical study of the gastrointestinal tract of a pudu (Pudu puda) using contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Henning, B C; Gómez, M A; Mieres, L M; Freeman, L; Herzberg, D E; Aleuy, O A

    2012-04-01

    The pudu (Pudu puda), which is the smallest deer in the world and inhabits central and southern Chile and Argentina, is a ruminant and a browsing herbivore. The aim of this study was to provide a reference for interpretation of the normal anatomy of the pudu's gastrointestinal tract as imaged by abdominal computed tomography (CT). For the study, one adult female pudu was used. After a 24-h fast, the pudu was anaesthetized and positioned in sternal recumbency at the CT table. Image acquisition began immediately after intravenous injection of contrast media (MD-76(®); 370 mgI/ml) into the cephalic vein. Injection of contrast material was administered as a biphasic protocol. First, a manual bolus of contrast material was injected at a rate of 4 ml/s. Then, an additional continuous infusion injection (0.1 ml/min) was performed for adequate opacification of vascular structures. Transverse images of 5 mm thickness and 5 mm interval were obtained with a fourth-generation CT scanner, from the ninth thoracic vertebra (T9) until the first sacral (S1) vertebrae. CT images were labelled and compared with anatomical reference images for ruminants. Structures that were identified in the abdominal cavity included the stomach with its four compartments (rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum), the small and large intestines, liver, spleen, kidneys and some major blood vessels (aorta, caudal vena cava). The distal loop of the ascending colon, the transverse colon, the pancreas and lymph nodes could not be identified. The resulting CT images provide a reference for normal cross-sectional abdominal anatomy of the adult pudu.

  10. Association of achondroplasia with Down syndrome: difficulty in prenatal diagnosis by sonographic and 3-D helical computed tomographic analyses.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Murotsuki, Jun; Kamimura, Miki; Kimura, Masato; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Kanno, Junko; Hoshi, Kazuhiko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2015-05-01

    Achondroplasia and Down syndrome are relatively common conditions individually. But co-occurrence of both conditions in the same patient is rare and there have been no reports of fetal analysis of this condition by prenatal sonographic and three-dimensional (3-D) helical computed tomography (CT). Prenatal sonographic findings seen in persons with Down syndrome, such as a thickened nuchal fold, cardiac defects, and echogenic bowel were not found in the patient. A prenatal 3-D helical CT revealed a large head with frontal bossing, metaphyseal flaring of the long bones, and small iliac wings, which suggested achondroplasia. In a case with combination of achondroplasia and Down syndrome, it may be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence prenatally without typical markers of Down syndrome.

  11. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies.

  12. Traumatic hypovolemic shock revisited: the spectrum of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography findings and clinical implications for its management.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Hiroki; Kanki, Akihiko; Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Akira; Noda, Yasufumi; Yasokawa, Kazuya; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Hypovolemic shock is often seen in patients with severe blunt trauma who have suffered from blood circulation inadequate to maintain oxygen delivery to multiple organs. The early recognition and prompt management of hypovolemic shock in patients with multiple injuries are mandatory to improving prognosis and patient conditions. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) as a primary diagnostic tool is well established. The abdominal organs show several common and classic appearances on contrast-enhanced CT in patients with trauma. The hypovolemic shock complex is reported in the previous literature as decreased enhancement of the viscera, increased mucosal enhancement and luminal dilation of the small bowel, mural thickening and fluid-filled loops of the small bowel, the halo sign and flattening of the inferior vena cava, reduced aortic diameter, and peripancreatic edema. However, there have been controversial CT reports with contradictory appearances. Physicians understanding these findings could prompt alternative approaches to the early assessment and management of hypovolemic shock. The aim of this article is to illustrate common and well-known abdominal CT features in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock, to discuss controversial CT signs in the pancreas and adrenal gland, and to describe CT findings' clinical implications when managing hypovolemic shock.

  13. Computed tomographic-based morphometric study of thoracic spine and its relevance to anaesthetic and spinal surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Singh, Roop; Prasath, Vishnu; Magu, Sarita; Tanwar, Milind

    2016-01-01

    Background To collect a baseline computer software aided normative morphometric data of thoracic spine in the Indian population and analyze it to give pre-procedural guidelines to clinicians for safe surgical and anaesthetic procedures in the thoracic spine. Methods CT scans of thoracic spine of patients free from spinal disorders were reviewed in a total of 600 vertebrae in 50 patients. Parameters recorded with the help of computer software were pedicle width, length and height, transverse pedicle angles, chord length, canal dimensions, body width and height, spinous process angle and transverse process length. Results Pedicle width decreased from T1 (9.27 ± 1.01) to T4 (4.5 ± 0.93) and increased to T12 (8.31 ± 1.83). At T4 76% and at T5 62% of the pedicles were smaller than 5 mm and would not accept 4 mm screw with 1.0-mm clearance. However, at T1 2%, at T11 7% and at T12 8% would not accept a 4 mm screw. Chord length gradually increased in upper thoracic vertebrae and was relatively constant in middle and decreased in lower thoracic vertebrae. Shortest estimated chord length was at T1 (30.30 ± 2.11). On an average, from T1 to T6 and at T11 and T12, a screw length of 25–30 mm could be accommodated and from T7 to T10, 30–35 mm screw length could be accommodated. Transverse pedicle angle decreased from T1 (35.4 ± 2.21) to T12 (−9.8 ± 2.39). Canal dimensions were narrowest at T4/T5 (20.02 ± 1.23) in anteroposterior and 21.12 ± 1.23 in interpedicular diameters. Spinous process angle increased from T1 (30.11 ± 6.74) to T6 (57.89 ± 9.31) and decreased to 16.21 ± 7.38 at T12. Transverse process length increased from T1 to T7 (23.54 + 2.12 to 31.21 + 1.91) and then decreased to 12.11 + 2.3 at T12. Vertebral body dimensions showed increasing trends from T1 to T12. Conclusions A thorough knowledge of anatomical and radiological characteristics of the spine and their variations is essential for the clinicians. Data collected

  14. Endoscopic and computed tomographic evaluation of influence of nasal septal deviation on lateral wall of nose and its relation to sinus diseases.

    PubMed

    Poorey, V K; Gupta, Neha

    2014-09-01

    To correlate symptoms of deviated nasal septum (DNS) and chronic rhinosinusitis with the findings of nasal endoscopy and computed tomographic (CT) imaging. To evaluate the influence of degree of septal angle deviation on the severity of lateral nasal wall abnormalities. A prospective study was conducted on 67 patients with clinical evidence of DNS and chronic sinusitis attending ENT OPD between January 2012 and September 2013. All these patients underwent nasal endoscopy and CT scan PNS coronal sections. Direction and degree of DNS was recorded. Range of sinus mucosal thickening on CT scan films was also recorded. Chronic sinusitis is common in the age group between 21 and 40 years (50.74 %) with male preponderance (55.22 %), chief symptoms being nasal obstruction (86.56 %), headache (73.13 %) and nasal discharge (52.23 %). Left sided DNS is more common (64.17 %). Most of the patients have moderate DNS, i.e. 6°-10° (56.7 %), followed by severe (22.4 %) and then mild (20.9 %). DNS results in compensatory structural changes in the turbinates and/or lateral nasal wall which causes ostiomeatal complex (OMC) obstruction resulting in sinusitis. Contralateral concha bullosa and ethmoid bulla prominence was noted. Maxillary sinus is most commonly affected sinus (73.13 %). Patients with increasing septal angles were associated with a higher incidence of maxillary sinus mucosal changes (p < 0.05). Present study reemphasized the concept that septal deviation causes obstruction at OMC which results in an increased incidence and severity of bilateral chronic sinus disease.

  15. A Pilot Evaluation of a 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Scheme Based on Simultaneous Motion Estimation and Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Jun; Gu, Xuejun; Pan, Tinsu; Wang, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a 4-dimensional (4-D) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) reconstruction scheme based on simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) through patient studies. Methods and Materials: The SMEIR algorithm contains 2 alternating steps: (1) motion-compensated CBCT reconstruction using projections from all phases to reconstruct a reference phase 4D-CBCT by explicitly considering the motion models between each different phase and (2) estimation of motion models directly from projections by matching the measured projections to the forward projection of the deformed reference phase 4D-CBCT. Four lung cancer patients were scanned for 4 to 6 minutes to obtain approximately 2000 projections for each patient. To evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm on a conventional 1-minute CBCT scan, the number of projections at each phase was reduced by a factor of 5, 8, or 10 for each patient. Then, 4D-CBCTs were reconstructed from the down-sampled projections using Feldkamp-Davis-Kress, total variation (TV) minimization, prior image constrained compressive sensing (PICCS), and SMEIR. Using the 4D-CBCT reconstructed from the fully sampled projections as a reference, the relative error (RE) of reconstructed images, root mean square error (RMSE), and maximum error (MaxE) of estimated tumor positions were analyzed to quantify the performance of the SMEIR algorithm. Results: The SMEIR algorithm can achieve results consistent with the reference 4D-CBCT reconstructed with many more projections per phase. With an average of 30 to 40 projections per phase, the MaxE in tumor position detection is less than 1 mm in SMEIR for all 4 patients. Conclusion: The results from a limited number of patients show that SMEIR is a promising tool for high-quality 4D-CBCT reconstruction and tumor motion modeling.

  16. MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND LOW-FIELD MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING ANATOMY OF THE QUADRIGEMINAL CISTERN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPRACOLLICULAR FLUID ACCUMULATIONS IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, G; Ricciardi, M; Caldin, M

    2016-05-01

    Focal fluid accumulations in the supracollicular region are commonly termed quadrigeminal cysts and may be either subclinical or associated with neurologic deficits in dogs. Little published information is available on normal imaging anatomy and anatomic relationships for the canine quadrigeminal cistern. Objectives of this observational, cross-sectional study were to describe normal quadrigeminal cistern anatomy and determine the prevalence and characteristics of supracollicular fluid accumulations in dogs. Normal descriptions were accomplished using computed tomographic (CT) cisternography in one canine cadaver, and CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the brain in four prospectively recruited dogs with no evidence of intracranial disease. Prevalence and characteristics descriptions were accomplished using a retrospective review of brain CT or MRI studies performed during the period of 2005-2015. The normal quadrigeminal cistern consistently exhibited a complex H shape and was separated from the third ventricle by a thin membrane. Prevalence of supracollicular fluid accumulations (SFAs) was 2.19% among CT studies (n = 4427) and 2.2% among MRI studies (n = 626). Dogs with SFA were significantly younger than control dogs (P < 0.0001). Shih-tzu (OR = 111.6), Chihuahua (OR = 81.1), and Maltese (OR = 27.6) breed dogs were predisposed (P < 0.0001). Among dogs with SFAs, the following three patterns were defined: (1) third ventricle (49.54%), (2) quadrigeminal cistern (13.51%), and (3) both third ventricle and quadrigeminal cistern (36.93%). Authors recommend that the term supracollicular fluid accumulation (SFA) should be used rather than the term quadrigeminal cyst to describe these focal fluid accumulations in dogs.

  17. Effects of Cardiac Medications for Patients With Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease by Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography: Results from the Multicenter CONFIRM Registry

    PubMed Central

    Schulman-Marcus, Joshua; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Giambrone, Ashley E; Gransar, Heidi; Valenti, Valentina; Berman, Daniel S.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Andreini, Daniele; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Pontone, Gianluca; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Dunning, Allison; Min, James K

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the correlation between baseline cardiac medications and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosed by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA). Methods 1637 patients (mean age 64.8 ± 10.2 years, 69.6% male) with obstructive CAD from the CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter) registry were followed over the course of three years. Obstructive CAD was defined as a >50% stenosis in an epicardial vessel. Medications analyzed included statins, aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). Using Cox proportional-hazards models, we calculated the hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for incident major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as death, acute coronary syndrome, or myocardial infarction. Results At the time of CCTA, 59%, 54%, 40%, and 46% of patients were using statins, aspirin, beta-blockers, and ACE inhibitors or ARBs, respectively. Statins were associated with a 43% (95% CI = 0.38-0.87, p=0.008) lower adjusted risk of MACE. Following adjustment, aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and ARBs did not attenuate the risk of MACE. When restricted to patients with multivessel obstructive CAD, only statins were associated with lower risk of MACE. Conclusion In patients with obstructive CAD by CCTA, the baseline use of statins was associated with improved clinical outcomes. Other cardiac medications—including aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, and ARBs—were not associated with reduced risk of MACE. PMID:25479800

  18. COMPARISON BETWEEN SEDATION AND GENERAL ANESTHESIA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CANINE IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS IN WEST HIGHLAND WHITE TERRIERS.

    PubMed

    Roels, Elodie; Couvreur, Thierry; Farnir, Frédéric; Clercx, Cécile; Verschakelen, Johny; Bolen, Géraldine

    2017-02-23

    Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive interstitial lung disease mainly affecting West Highland white terriers. Thoracic high-resolution computed tomographic (T-HRCT) findings for Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis acquired under general anesthesia have been described previously. However, the use of general anesthesia may be contraindicated for some affected dogs. Sedation may allow improved speed and safety, but it is unknown whether sedation would yield similar results in identification and grading of Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions. The aim of this prospective, observational, method-comparison, case-control study was to compare findings from T-HRCT images acquired under sedation versus general anesthesia for West Highland white terriers affected with Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 9), using the glossary of terms of the Fleischner Society and a scoring system. Ground-glass opacity was identified in all affected West Highland white terriers for both sedation and general anesthesia acquisitions, although the Ground-glass opacity extent varied significantly between the two acquisitions (P < 0.001). Ground-glass opacity was the sole lesion observed in control dogs (n = 6), but was less extensive compared with affected West Highland white terriers. Identification and grading of a mosaic attenuation pattern differed significantly between acquisitions (P < 0.001). Identification of lesions such as consolidations, nodules, parenchymal and subpleural bands, bronchial wall thickening, and bronchiectasis did not differ between acquisitions. The present study demonstrated that T-HRCT obtained under sedation may provide different information than T-HRCT obtained under general anesthesia for identification and grading of some Canine idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lesions, but not all of them. These differences should be taken into consideration when general anesthesia is contraindicated and sedation is

  19. Volumetric three-dimensional computed tomographic evaluation of the upper airway in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome treated by maxillomandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Alberto; Betti, Enrico; Tarsitano, Achille; Morselli-Labate, Antonio Maria; Lancellotti, Lorenzo; Marchetti, Claudio

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is the periodic reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep together with daytime sleepiness. Its diagnosis requires polysomnographic evidence of 5 or more episodes of apnoea or hypopnoea/hour of sleep (apnoea/hypopnoea index, AHI). Volumetric 3-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) reconstruction enables the accurate measurement of the volume of the airway. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the conventional non-surgical treatment for patients with severe disease. Operations on the soft tissues that are currently available give success rates of only 40%-60%. Maxillomandibular advancement is currently the most effective craniofacial surgical technique for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea in adults. However, the appropriate distance for advancement has not been established. Expansion of the air-flow column volume did not result in an additional reduction in AHI, which raises the important issue of how much the maxillomandibular complex should be advanced to obtain an adequate reduction in AHI while avoiding the risks of overexpansion or underexpansion. We have shown that there is a significant linear relation between increased absolute upper airway volume after advancement and improvement in the AHI (p=0.013). However, increases in upper airway volume of 70% or more achieved no further reduction in the AHI, which suggests that the clinical improvement in AHI reaches a plateau, and renders further expansion unnecessary. This gives a new perspective to treatment based on the prediction of changes in volume, so the amount of sagittal advancement can be tailored in each case, which replaces the current standard of 1cm.

  20. Comprehensive coronary risk determination in primary prevention: an imaging and clinical based definition combining computed tomographic coronary artery calcium score and national cholesterol education program risk score.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Khurram; Vasamreddy, Chandra; Blumenthal, Roger S; Rumberger, John A

    2006-06-16

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and a major cause of morbidity. Coronary heart disease (CHD) accounts for nearly half of all CVD deaths. Currently estimation of risk in primary prevention is based on the Framingham risk equations, which inputs traditional risk factors and is helpful in predicting the development of CHD in asymptomatic individuals. However many individuals suffer events in the absence of established risk factors for atherosclerosis and broad based population risk estimations may have little precision when applied to a given individual. To meet the challenge of CHD risk assessment, several tools have been developed to identify atherosclerotic disease in its preclinical stages. This paper aims to incorporate information from coronary artery calcification (CAC) scoring from a computed tomographic "heartscan" (using Electron Beam Tomography (EBT) as the validated prototype) along with current Framingham risk profiling in order to refine risk on an absolute scale by combining imaging and clinical data to affect a more comprehensive calculation of absolute risk in a given individual. For CAC scores above the 75th percentile but <90th percentile, 10 years is added to chronological age, and for CAC scores above the 90th percentile, 20 years is added to current chronological age. Among those in whom a positive CAC score is the norm such as older individuals (men> or =55 years, women> or =65 years) a CAC = 0 will result in an age point score corresponding to the age-group whose median CAC score is zero i.e., 40-44 years for men and 55-59 years for women. The utilization of CAC scores allows the inclusion of sub-clinical disease definition into the context of modifiable risk factors as well as identifies high-risk individuals requiring aggressive treatment.

  1. Computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and cross-sectional anatomic features of the manus in cadavers of dogs without forelimb disease.

    PubMed

    Ober, Christopher P; Freeman, Larry E

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To provide a detailed description of cross-sectional anatomic structures of the manus in canine cadavers in association with corresponding features in computed tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. SAMPLE POPULATION-7 cadavers of adult large-breed-type dogs (weight range, 25 to 30 kg) without forelimb disease. PROCEDURES-Forelimbs were removed from the cadavers within 4 hours after euthanasia and frozen. The right forelimbs of 3 cadavers were cut into 4-mm sections by use of a band saw; 1 limb each was sectioned in the transverse, dorsal, or sagittal plane. Sections were cleaned and then photographed. After thawing, transverse CT images of the right forelimbs of 3 additional cadavers were obtained, and the right forelimb of a seventh cadaver underwent MR imaging in the transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes. The evaluated regions extended from the digits to the carpus. Features in CT and MR images that corresponded to clinically important anatomic structures in tissue sections were identified. RESULTS-For most of the anatomic structures evident in tissue sections, corresponding CT and MR imaging features were identified. Osseous and musculotendinous structures of the manus were readily detected in CT and MR images, whereas vascular structures were only rarely identified by use of the imaging techniques. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Results of the detailed assessment of anatomic structures of the canine manus in association with corresponding features in CT and MR images will facilitate detection of pathological conditions and be beneficial in planning surgical procedures for diseases of the manus in dogs.

  2. Use of a Diagnostic Score to Prioritize Computed Tomographic (CT) Imaging for Patients Suspected of Ischemic Stroke Who May Benefit from Thrombolytic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bots, Michiel L.; Selvarajah, Sharmini; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Abdul Aziz, Zariah; Sidek, Norsima Nazifah; Vaartjes, Ilonca

    2016-01-01

    Background A shortage of computed tomographic (CT) machines in low and middle income countries often results in delayed CT imaging for patients suspected of a stroke. Yet, time constraint is one of the most important aspects for patients with an ischemic stroke to benefit from thrombolytic therapy. We set out to assess whether application of the Siriraj Stroke Score is able to assist physicians in prioritizing patients with a high probability of having an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Methods From the Malaysian National Neurology Registry, we selected patients aged 18 years and over with clinical features suggesting of a stroke, who arrived in the hospital 4.5 hours or less from ictus. The prioritization of receiving CT imaging was left to the discretion of the treating physician. We applied the Siriraj Stroke Score to all patients, refitted the score and defined a cut-off value to best distinguish an ischemic stroke from a hemorrhagic stroke. Results Of the 2176 patients included, 73% had an ischemic stroke. Only 33% of the ischemic stroke patients had CT imaging within 4.5 hours. The median door-to-scan time for these patients was 4 hours (IQR: 1;16). With the recalibrated score, it would have been possible to prioritize 95% (95% CI: 94%–96%) of patients with an ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. Conclusions In settings where CT imaging capacity is limited, we propose the use of the Siriraj Stroke Score to prioritize patients with a probable ischemic stroke for urgent CT imaging. PMID:27768752

  3. Micro-computed tomographic analysis of progression of artificial enamel lesions in primary and permanent teeth after resin infiltration.

    PubMed

    Ozgul, Betul Memis; Orhan, Kaan; Oz, Firdevs Tulga

    2015-09-01

    We investigated inhibition of lesion progression in artificial enamel lesions. Lesions were created on primary and permanent anterior teeth (n = 10 each) and were divided randomly into two groups with two windows: Group 1 (window A: resin infiltration; window B: negative control) and Group 2 (window A: resin infiltration + fluoride varnish; window B: fluoride varnish). After pH cycling, micro-computed tomography was used to analyze progression of lesion depth and changes in mineral density. Resin infiltration and resin infiltration + fluoride varnish significantly inhibited progression of lesion depth in primary teeth (P < 0.05). Inhibition of lesion depth progression in permanent teeth was significantly greater after treatment with resin infiltration + fluoride varnish than in the negative control (P < 0.05). Change in mineral density was smaller in the resin infiltration and resin infiltration + fluoride varnish groups; however, the difference was not significant for either group (P > 0.05). Resin infiltration is a promising method of inhibiting progression of caries lesions.

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of the Shape, Height, and Location of the Mandibular Lingula in a Population of Children

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Cantekin, Kenan; Aydinbelge, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

     Objectives. This is the first study to identify and classify the different morphological shapes of the mandibular lingula (ML) in children using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the shape, height, and location of the ML in relation to the surrounding structures using CBCT images of mandibles obtained from 269 children. The shape of the ML was classified into triangular, truncated, nodular, or assimilated types. The location was determined by five distances. The height of the lingula was also measured from the lingular tip to the mandibular foramen. Results. A nodular shape of the ML was most commonly found (48.3%, n = 260) followed by truncated (23.4%, n = 126), assimilated (14.4%, n = 78), and triangular (13.7%, n = 74). The mean distance of ML from the anterior and posterior borders of mandibular ramus was 13.3 ± 2.3 mm and 10.2 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. In the majority of the mandibles studied, the ML was located above the occlusal plane. Conclusion. The present study provides new information to the literature concerning the shape, height, and location of the lingula in a Turkish pediatric population. This finding may assist clinicians to localize the lingula and avoid intraoperative complications. PMID:24490173

  5. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Materials and Methods Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. Results The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Conclusion The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task. PMID:28035302

  6. The association of superior attachment of uncinate process with pneumatization of middle turbinate: a computed tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Sheng-Yao; Yang, Chih-Jen; Lee, Chiao-Hua; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Kuo, Chao-Yin; Lee, Jih-Chin; Shih, Cheng-Ping

    2017-04-01

    The frontal sinus outflow pathway is complex and can be influenced by the configuration of the uncinate process (UP). The UP can attach superior to the lamina papyracea, skull base, and middle turbinate. The factors associated with superior attachment remain unclear. This study analyzed the relationships between different types of superior UP attachment and characteristics of the surrounding structures including the agger nasi cell, skull base, and middle turbinate. This retrospective study utilized computed tomography images of 836 sides with identifiable sinus structure from 434 Taiwanese patients. Types of superior UP attachment, height of the ethmoid cribriform plate, prevalence of agger nasi cell, and degree of pneumatization of the middle turbinate were analyzed. In the current study, neither the presence of an agger nasi cell nor height of the cribriform plate had significant relationship with superior UP attachment type. However, UP attachment type was statistically significantly associated with pneumatized middle turbinate (PMT) type (p < 0.01). The PMT group had a higher incidence of UP attachment to the middle turbinate (38%) than the non-PMT group (18%). In the extensive PMT group, the incidence of UP attachment to the middle turbinate was high to 49%. In conclusion, superior UP attachment to the middle turbinate was associated with pneumatization of the middle turbinate. The UP has a greater tendency to attach to the middle turbinate in cases with more PMT.

  7. Comparison of in vivo cone-beam and multidetector computed tomographic scans by three-dimensional merging software.

    PubMed

    Rostetter, Claudio; Metzler, Philipp; Schenkel, Jan S; Seifert, Burkhardt; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-12-01

    In dentomaxillofacial radiology, cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is used to give fast and high-resolution 3-dimensional images of bone with a low dose of radiation. However, its use for quantitative measurement of bone density based on absolute values (Hounsfield units, HU) as in multidetector CT is still controversial. We know of no in vivo study of 3-dimensional merging software that will reliably match identical bone areas of cone-beam and multidetector CT datasets. We studied 19 multidetector, and 19 cone-beam, CT scans of the skull. The two datasets were fused, corresponding points were identified for measurement, and we compared mean density. We used linear regression to analyse the relation between the two different scanning methods, and studied a total of 4180 measurements. The mean time interval between scans was 5.2 (4.7) months. Mean R(2) over all measurements was 0.63 (range 0.22 - 0.79) with a mean internal consistency (Cronbach's α) of 0.86 (range 0.61 - 0.93). The strongest linearity, seen at the left mastoid, was R(2)=0.79 with high internal consistency (Cronbach's α 0.89), and the weakest was at the left zygomatic bone with R(2)=0.22 and Cronbach's α=0.61. Measurements of bone density based on cone-beam and multidetector CT scans generated in vivo showed high and reproducible internal consistency but poor linearity.

  8. Anatomical, radiographical and computed tomographic study of the limbs skeleton of the Euphrates soft shell turtle (Rafetus euphraticus).

    PubMed

    Asadi Ahranjani, Behnaz; Shojaei, Bahador; Tootian, Zahra; Masoudifard, Madjid; Rostami, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Euphrates turtle is the only soft shell turtle of Iran, and unfortunately is in danger of extinction due to multiple reasons. Imaging techniques, in addition to their importance in diagnosis of injuries to animals, have been used as non-invasive methods to provide normal anatomic views. A few studies have been conducted to understand body structure of the Euphrates turtle. Since there is only general information about the anatomy of turtle limbs, the normal skeleton of the Euphrates limbs was studied. For this purpose four adult Euphrates turtles were used. Digital radiographic examination was performed by computed radiographic (CR) in dorsoventral (DV) and lateral (L) positions. Spiral CT-scanning was done and 3D images of the bones were reconstructed for anatomical evaluation. For skeletal preparation, the skeleton was cleaned by a combination of boiling and mealworm methods and limbs' bones were examined anatomically. In the present study, simultaneous anatomic, radiographic and CT studies of bones in individual turtles made us possible to describe bones anatomically and provided comparable and complementary conditions to represent the abilities of the radiography and CT for better understanding of the anatomy. Arrangement and the number of carpal and tarsal bones are used in turtles' classification. Among the studied species, Euphrates turtle carpal and tarsal bones show the most similarities to the Apolone spinifera.

  9. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients.

  10. Anatomical, radiographical and computed tomographic study of the limbs skeleton of the Euphrates soft shell turtle (Rafetus euphraticus)

    PubMed Central

    Asadi Ahranjani, Behnaz; Shojaei, Bahador; Tootian, Zahra; Masoudifard, Madjid; Rostami, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Euphrates turtle is the only soft shell turtle of Iran, and unfortunately is in danger of extinction due to multiple reasons. Imaging techniques, in addition to their importance in diagnosis of injuries to animals, have been used as non-invasive methods to provide normal anatomic views. A few studies have been conducted to understand body structure of the Euphrates turtle. Since there is only general information about the anatomy of turtle limbs, the normal skeleton of the Euphrates limbs was studied. For this purpose four adult Euphrates turtles were used. Digital radiographic examination was performed by computed radiographic (CR) in dorsoventral (DV) and lateral (L) positions. Spiral CT-scanning was done and 3D images of the bones were reconstructed for anatomical evaluation. For skeletal preparation, the skeleton was cleaned by a combination of boiling and mealworm methods and limbs’ bones were examined anatomically. In the present study, simultaneous anatomic, radiographic and CT studies of bones in individual turtles made us possible to describe bones anatomically and provided comparable and complementary conditions to represent the abilities of the radiography and CT for better understanding of the anatomy. Arrangement and the number of carpal and tarsal bones are used in turtles’ classification. Among the studied species, Euphrates turtle carpal and tarsal bones show the most similarities to the Apolone spinifera. PMID:27482356

  11. Cephalic vascular anatomy in flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) based on novel vascular injection and computed tomographic imaging analyses.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Casey M; Ridgely, Ryan C; Balanoff, Amy M; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2006-10-01

    Head vascular anatomy of the greater (or Caribbean) flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) is investigated and illustrated through the use of a differential contrast, dual vascular injection technique, and high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT), allowing arteries and veins to be differentiated radiographically. Vessels were digitally isolated with segmentation tools and reconstructed in 3D to facilitate topographical visualization of the cephalic vascular tree. Major vessels of the temporal, orbital, pharyngeal, and encephalic regions are described and illustrated, which confirm that the general pattern of avian cephalic vasculature is evolutionarily conservative. In addition to numerous arteriovenous vascular devices, a previously undescribed, large, bilateral, paralingual cavernous sinus that excavates a large bony fossa on the medial surface of the mandible was identified. Despite the otherwise conservative vascular pattern, this paralingual sinus was found only in species of flamingo and is not known otherwise in birds. The paralingual sinus remains functionally enigmatic, but a mechanical role in association with the peculiar lingual-pumping mode of feeding in flamingos is perhaps the most likely hypothesis.

  12. Computer Tomographic Illustration of the Development of the Pulmonary Function in Bovine Neonates until the Twenty-First Day Postnatum

    PubMed Central

    Bostedt, H.; Richter, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the development of the lung in newborn calves. The sample consisted of 28 Holstein Friesians calves which were examined clinically, and their chest segment was measured with computed tomography. The tests were performed on the first, sixth, and twelfth hours of life and after the first, second, and third weeks. Also, blood gases and blood counts were determined. Besides Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, analyses of variance, t-tests (on a significance level of P < 0.05), and correlation analyses were used. The most significant changes occurred between birth and the first hour. However, there were significant differences in the gas filling between cranial and caudal and between dorsal and ventral parenchyma segments. This difference remained over the entire study period. At the end of the first week between 85 and 93% were involved in gas exchange. Only after the completion of the second week of life, the air supply was achieved throughout the whole lung. The pO2, pCO2, and pH values confirmed this. This study shows that a healthy bovine neonate needs about 2 weeks before all lung units are integrated into the gas exchange. This explains why calves in unfavorable environments often suffer from pulmonary affections. PMID:24175112

  13. Infrared thermography of the pig thorax: an assessment of selected regions of interest by computed tomographical and anatomical parameters.

    PubMed

    Menzel, A; Siewert, C; Gasse, H; Seifert, H; Hoeltig, D; Hennig-Pauka, I

    2015-04-01

    Current methods of diagnosis of respiratory diseases in swine are invasive, time-consuming and expensive. Infrared thermography (IRT) of the thorax might provide a new method of high specificity to select swine affected with lung alterations for further diagnostics. In this study, layer thickness of different tissues was determined in frozen thorax slices (FTS) by computed tomography (CT) and then related to skin temperatures measured by IRT in healthy pigs. The aim was to determine appropriate regions of interest (ROI) for evaluation of IRT images. Organ layer thicknesses measured in CT images correspond to those measured in FTS. Temperature differences between lung ROIs and abdomen ROIs were positively correlated with lung layer thickness at certain localizations, and negatively correlated with the thickness of the thorax wall and of inner organ layers. Reference values of differences between skin temperatures were established for two ROIs on the thorax with potential practical use for lung health status determination. Respective ROIs were located on vertical lines crossing the 7th (right) and the 10th (left) thoracic vertebrae. The presence of ribs affected skin temperature significantly.

  14. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients. PMID:26681944

  15. The internal cranial morphology of an armoured dinosaur Euoplocephalus corroborated by X-ray computed tomographic reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Tetsuto; Arbour, Victoria M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Currie, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Internal cranial anatomy is a challenging area to study in fossilized skulls because of small sample sizes and varied post-mortem preservational alterations. This difficulty has led to the lack of correspondence between results obtained from direct osteological observation and from more indirect reconstruction methods. This paper presents corroborating evidence from direct osteological observation and from reconstruction based on computed X-ray tomography (CT) on the internal cranial anatomy of the ankylosaurid dinosaur Euoplocephalus tutus. A remarkable specimen of Euoplocephalus preserves rarely observed internal cranial structures such as vascular impressions in the nasal cavity, olfactory turbinates and possible impressions of conchae. Comparison with fossils and CT models of other taxa and other Euoplocephalus specimens adds osteological evidence for the previously reconstructed nasal cavity in this dinosaur and revises the previously described braincase morphology. A new interpretation of the ethmoidal homology identifies a mesethmoid, sphenethmoid and ectethmoid. These ethmoidal ossifications are continuous with the mineralized walls of the nasal cavity. The location of the olfactory fenestra provides further evidence that the olfactory regions of the nasal cavity are pushed to the sides of the main airway. This implies that the function of the vascular impressions in the nasal cavity and the looping of the cavity are not related to olfaction. A byproduct of the elongate, looping airway is a dramatic increase in surface area of the nasal respiratory mucosa, which in extant species has been linked to heat and water balance. A role in vocalization as a resonating chamber is another possible function of the looping and elongation of the nasal cavity. Olfaction remains as a possible function for the enlarged olfactory region, suggesting that multiple functions account for different parts of the ankylosaurid nasal cavity that underwent substantial modification

  16. Phantom and Clinical Study of Differences in Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Registration When Aligned to Maximum and Average Intensity Projection

    SciTech Connect

    Shirai, Kiyonori; Nishiyama, Kinji; Katsuda, Toshizo; Teshima, Teruki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Tsujii, Katsutomo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether maximum or average intensity projection (MIP or AIP, respectively) reconstructed from 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is preferred for alignment to cone beam CT (CBCT) images in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Stationary CT and 4DCT images were acquired with a target phantom at the center of motion and moving along the superior–inferior (SI) direction, respectively. Motion profiles were asymmetrical waveforms with amplitudes of 10, 15, and 20 mm and a 4-second cycle. Stationary CBCT and dynamic CBCT images were acquired in the same manner as stationary CT and 4DCT images. Stationary CBCT was aligned to stationary CT, and the couch position was used as the baseline. Dynamic CBCT was aligned to the MIP and AIP of corresponding amplitudes. Registration error was defined as the SI deviation of the couch position from the baseline. In 16 patients with isolated lung lesions, free-breathing CBCT (FBCBCT) was registered to AIP and MIP (64 sessions in total), and the difference in couch shifts was calculated. Results: In the phantom study, registration errors were within 0.1 mm for AIP and 1.5 to 1.8 mm toward the inferior direction for MIP. In the patient study, the difference in the couch shifts (mean, range) was insignificant in the right-left (0.0 mm, ≤1.0 mm) and anterior–posterior (0.0 mm, ≤2.1 mm) directions. In the SI direction, however, the couch position significantly shifted in the inferior direction after MIP registration compared with after AIP registration (mean, −0.6 mm; ranging 1.7 mm to the superior side and 3.5 mm to the inferior side, P=.02). Conclusions: AIP is recommended as the reference image for registration to FBCBCT when target alignment is performed in the presence of asymmetrical respiratory motion, whereas MIP causes systematic target positioning error.

  17. Bone mineral density (BMD) and computer tomographic measurements of the equine proximal phalanx in correlation with breaking strength.

    PubMed

    Tóth, P; Horváth, C; Ferencz, V; Tóth, B; Váradi, A; Szenci, O; Bodó, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that bone mineral density (BMD) is an important fracture risk predictor in human medicine, studies in equine orthopedic research are still lacking. We hypothesized that BMD correlates with bone failure and fatigue fractures of this bone. Thus, the objectives of this study were to measure the structural and mechanical properties of the proximal phalanx with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), to correlate the data obtained from DXA and computer tomography (CT) measurements to those obtained by loading pressure examination and to establish representative region of interest (ROI) for in vitro BMD measurements of the equine proximal phalanx for predicting bone failure force. DXA was used to measure the whole bone BMD and additional three ROI sites in 14 equine proximal phalanges. Following evaluation of the bone density, whole bone, cortical width and area in the mid-diaphyseal plane were measured on CT images. Bones were broken using a manually controlled universal bone crusher to measure bone failure force and reevaluated for the site of fractures on follow-up CT images. Compressive load was applied at a constant displacement rate of 2 mm/min until failure, defined as the first clear drop in the load measurement. The lowest BMD was measured at the trabecular region (mean +/- SD: 1.52 +/- 0.12 g/cm2; median: 1.48 g/cm2; range: 1.38-1.83 g/cm2). There was a significant positive linear correlation between trabelcular BMD and the breaking strength (P = 0.023, r = 0.62). The trabecular region of the proximal phalanx appears to be the only significant indicator of failure of strength in vitro. This finding should be reassessed to further reveal the prognostic value of trabecular BMD in an in vivo fracture risk model.

  18. Computed tomographic analysis of the internal structure of the metacarpals and its implications for hand use, pathology, and surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alison L; Meals, Clifton G; Ruff, Christopher B

    2017-03-24

    The variation of bone structure and biomechanics between the metacarpals is not well characterized. It was hypothesized that their structure would reflect their common patterns of use (i.e., patterns of hand grip), specifically that trabecular bone density would be greater on the volar aspect of all metacarpal bases, that this would be most pronounced in the thumb, and that the thumb diaphysis would have the greatest bending strength. Cross-sections at basal and mid-diaphyseal locations of 50 metacarpals from 10 human hands were obtained by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The volar and dorsal trabecular densities of each base were measured and characterized using the volar/dorsal density ratio. The polar stress-strain index (SSIp), a surrogate measure of torsional/bending strength, was measured for each diaphysis and standardized for bone length and mass. Comparisons were made using mixed-model analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and post hoc tests. Volar/dorsal trabecular density ratios showed even distribution in all metacarpal bases except for the thumb, which showed greater values on the volar aspect. The thumb, second, and third metacarpals all had high bending strength (SSIp), but the thumb's SSIp relative to its length and trabecular mass was much higher than those of the other metacarpals. Trabecular density of the metacarpal bases was evenly distributed except in the thumb, which also showed higher bending strength relative to its length and mass. Understanding of how these indicators of strength differ across metacarpals may improve both fracture diagnosis and treatment and lays the groundwork for investigating changes with age, hand dominance, and occupation.

  19. Use of computed X-ray tomographic data for analyzing the thermodynamics of a dissociating porous sand/hydrate mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2002-02-28

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

  20. Cost analysis of non-invasive fractional flow reserve derived from coronary computed tomographic angiography in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takeshi; Shiomi, Hiroki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Isshiki, Takaaki; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Shunya; Forrest, Ben; Zarins, Christopher K; Hlatky, Mark A; Norgaard, Bjarne L

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) based on fractional flow reserve (FFRcath) measurement during invasive coronary angiography (CAG) results in improved patient outcome and reduced healthcare costs. FFR can now be computed non-invasively from standard coronary CT angiography (cCTA) scans (FFRCT). The purpose of this study is to determine the potential impact of non-invasive FFRCT on costs and clinical outcomes of patients with suspected coronary artery disease in Japan. Clinical data from 254 patients in the HeartFlowNXT trial, costs of goods and services in Japan, and clinical outcome data from the literature were used to estimate the costs and outcomes of 4 clinical pathways: (1) CAG-visual guided PCI, (2) CAG-FFRcath guided PCI, (3) cCTA followed by CAG-visual guided PCI, (4) cCTA-FFRCT guided PCI. The CAG-visual strategy demonstrated the highest projected cost ($10,360) and highest projected 1-year death/myocardial infarction rate (2.4 %). An assumed price for FFRCT of US $2,000 produced equivalent clinical outcomes (death/MI rate: 1.9 %) and healthcare costs ($7,222) for the cCTA-FFRCT strategy and the CAG-FFRcath guided PCI strategy. Use of the cCTA-FFRCT strategy to select patients for PCI would result in 32 % lower costs and 19 % fewer cardiac events at 1 year compared to the most commonly used CAG-visual strategy. Use of cCTA-FFRCT to select patients for CAG and PCI may reduce costs and improve clinical outcome in patients with suspected coronary artery disease in Japan.

  1. COMPARISON BETWEEN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MIDDLE EAR IN NONBRACHYCEPHALIC AND BRACHYCEPHALIC DOGS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE AIRWAY SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Salgüero, Raquel; Herrtage, Michael; Holmes, Mark; Mannion, Paddy; Ladlow, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of subclinical middle ear lesions in dogs that undergo computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging of the head has been reported up to 41%. A predisposition in brachycephalics has been suggested, however evidence-based studies are lacking. Aims of this retrospective cross-sectional study were to compare CT characteristics of the middle ear in groups of nonbrachycephalic and brachycephalic dogs that underwent CT of the head for conditions unrelated to ear disease, and test associations between thickness of the soft palate and presence of subclinical middle ear lesions. One observer recorded CT findings for each dog without knowledge of group status. A total of 65 dogs met inclusion criteria (25 brachycephalic, 40 nonbrachycephalic). Brachycephalic dogs had a significantly thicker bulla wall (P = 2.38 × 10(-26)) and smaller luminal volume (P = 5.74 × 10(-20)), when compared to nonbrachycephalic dogs. Soft palate thickness was significantly greater in the brachycephalic group (P = 2.76 × 10(-9)). Nine of 25 brachycephalic dogs had material in the lumen of the tympanic cavity, compared to zero of 45 of nonbrachycephalics. Within the brachycephalic group, a significant difference in mean soft palate thickness was identified for dogs with material in the middle ear (12.2 mm) vs. air-filled bullae (9 mm; P = 0.016). Findings from the current study supported previous theories that brachycephalic dogs have a greater prevalence of subclinical middle ear effusion and smaller bulla luminal size than nonbrachycephalic dogs. Authors recommend that the bulla lumen volume formula previously developed for mesaticephalic dogs, (-0.612 + 0.757 [lnBW]) be adjusted to 1/3(-0.612 + 0.757 [lnBW]) for brachycephalic breeds.

  2. Proximity of the mandibular molar root apex from the buccal bone surface: a cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dokyung; Jin, Myoung-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the proximity of the mandibular molar apex to the buccal bone surface in order to provide anatomic information for apical surgery. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 127 mandibular first molars and 153 mandibular second molars were analyzed from 160 patients' records. The distance was measured from the buccal bone surface to the root apex and the apical 3.0 mm on the cross-sectional view of CBCT. Results The second molar apex and apical 3 mm were located significantly deeper relative to the buccal bone surface compared with the first molar (p < 0.01). For the mandibular second molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the root apex was significantly shorter in patients over 70 years of age (p < 0.05). Furthermore, this distance was significantly shorter when the first molar was missing compared to nonmissing cases (p < 0.05). For the mandibular first molars, the distance to the distal root apex of one distal-rooted tooth was significantly greater than the distance to the disto-buccal root apex (p < 0.01). In mandibular second molar, the distance to the apex of C-shaped roots was significantly greater than the distance to the mesial root apex of non-C-shaped roots (p < 0.01). Conclusions For apical surgery in mandibular molars, the distance from the buccal bone surface to the apex and apical 3 mm is significantly affected by the location, patient age, an adjacent missing anterior tooth, and root configuration. PMID:27508159

  3. Development of a portable x-ray computed tomographic imaging system for drill-site investigation of recovered core

    SciTech Connect

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Pruess, Jacob

    2003-05-01

    A portable x-ray computed tomography (CT) system was constructed for imaging core at drill sites. Performing drill-site-based x-ray scanning and CT analysis permits rapid evaluation of core properties (such as density, lithologic structure, and macroporosity distribution) and allows for real-time decision making for additional core-handling procedures. Because of the speed with which scanning is performed, systematic imaging and electronic cataloging of all retrieved core is feasible. Innovations (such as a novel clamshell shielding arrangement integrated with system interlocks) permit safe operation of the x-ray system in a busy core handling area. The minimization of the volume encapsulated with shielding reduces the overall system weight and facilitates instrument portability. The x-ray system as originally fabricated had a 110 kV x-ray source with a fixed 300-micron focal spot size. A 15 cm image intensifier with a cesium iodide phosphor input screen was coupled to a CCD for image capture. The CT system has since been modified with a 130 kV micro-focal x-ray source. With the x-ray system's variable focal spot size, high-resolution studies (10-micron resolution) can be performed on core plugs and coarser (100-micron resolution) images can be acquired of whole drill cores. The development of an aluminum compensator has significantly improved the dynamic range and accuracy of the system. An x-ray filter has also been incorporated, permitting rapid acquisition of multi-energy scans for more quantitative analysis of sample mineralogy. The x-ray CT system has operated reliably under extreme field conditions, which have varied from shipboard to arctic.

  4. Use of Computed X-ray Tomographic Data for Analyzing the Thermodynamics of a Dissociating Porous Sand/Hydrate Mixture

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2002-02-28

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

  5. Impact of Preoperative Computed Tomography Angiogram on Abdominal Flap Breast Reconstruction Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Mossa-Basha, Malik; Lee, Clara

    2017-02-24

    Introduction CT angiogram (CTA) is widely believed to improve operative time and flap outcomes for perforator flap breast reconstruction, but the quality of the evidence is not known. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy of preoperative CTA for abdominal perforator flap breast reconstruction. Methods Inclusion criteria included published articles in English, CTA group, and control group, between 2000 and March 2013. Medline and PubMed were queried. Study quality criteria were developed based on standards of internal and external validity. One reviewer screened titles and abstracts. Two authors independently reviewed the full-text articles. Outcomes of interest were operative time and flap outcomes. Results Ten publications met inclusion criteria. Study designs included retrospective or mixed prospective-retrospective cohorts. In every study, the control group time period preceded the CTA group time period and no studies adjusted for improved surgical skill (i.e., learning curve effect). Sample sizes ranged from 41 to 357. Five studies did not perform or provide statistical analysis for the results presented. The mean quality rating was 2.8 (out of a maximum of 7). Seven of 10 studies found a shorter operative time with CTA. Two of nine studies found fewer partial flap failures with CTA. Conclusion CTA is associated with shorter operative time, but some of this may be due to a learning curve effect. The evidence does not show a difference in flap outcomes. The evidence in support of preoperative CTA is limited and subject to bias due to study design.

  6. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78{+-}0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48{+-}0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility

  7. Quantification of hemodynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Les, Andrea S; Shadden, Shawn C; Figueroa, C Alberto; Park, Jinha M; Tedesco, Maureen M; Herfkens, Robert J; Dalman, Ronald L; Taylor, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) affect 5-7% of older Americans. We hypothesize that exercise may slow AAA growth by decreasing inflammatory burden, peripheral resistance, and adverse hemodynamic conditions such as low, oscillatory shear stress. In this study, we use magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics to describe hemodynamics in eight AAAs during rest and exercise using patient-specific geometric models, flow waveforms, and pressures as well as appropriately resolved finite-element meshes. We report mean wall shear stress (MWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) at four aortic locations (supraceliac, infrarenal, mid-aneurysm, and suprabifurcation) and turbulent kinetic energy over the entire computational domain on meshes containing more than an order of magnitude more elements than previously reported results (mean: 9.0-million elements; SD: 2.3 M; range: 5.7-12.0 M). MWSS was lowest in the aneurysm during rest 2.5 dyn/cm(2) (SD: 2.1; range: 0.9-6.5), and MWSS increased and OSI decreased at all four locations during exercise. Mild turbulence existed at rest, while moderate aneurysmal turbulence was present during exercise. During both rest and exercise, aortic turbulence was virtually zero superior to the AAA for seven out of eight patients. We postulate that the increased MWSS, decreased OSI, and moderate turbulence present during exercise may attenuate AAA growth.

  8. Prior Distributions of Material Parameters for Bayesian Calibration of Growth and Remodeling Computational Model of Abdominal Aortic Wall.

    PubMed

    Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Zhang, Liangliang; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-10-01

    For the accurate prediction of the vascular disease progression, there is a crucial need for developing a systematic tool aimed toward patient-specific modeling. Considering the interpatient variations, a prior distribution of model parameters has a strong influence on computational results for arterial mechanics. One crucial step toward patient-specific computational modeling is to identify parameters of prior distributions that reflect existing knowledge. In this paper, we present a new systematic method to estimate the prior distribution for the parameters of a constrained mixture model using previous biaxial tests of healthy abdominal aortas (AAs). We investigate the correlation between the estimated parameters for each constituent and the patient's age and gender; however, the results indicate that the parameters are correlated with age only. The parameters are classified into two groups: Group-I in which the parameters ce, ck1, ck2, cm2,Ghc, and ϕe are correlated with age, and Group-II in which the parameters cm1, Ghm, G1e, G2e, and α are not correlated with age. For the parameters in Group-I, we used regression associated with age via linear or inverse relations, in which their prior distributions provide conditional distributions with confidence intervals. For Group-II, the parameter estimated values were subjected to multiple transformations and chosen if the transformed data had a better fit to the normal distribution than the original. This information improves the prior distribution of a subject-specific model by specifying parameters that are correlated with age and their transformed distributions. Therefore, this study is a necessary first step in our group's approach toward a Bayesian calibration of an aortic model. The results from this study will be used as the prior information necessary for the initialization of Bayesian calibration of a computational model for future applications.

  9. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  10. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  11. Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Diagnosis Program for Acute Abdominal Pain with Physician-Collected Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-26

    Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel Obstruction APPY NONSAP* RCOLIC PERFDU CHOLE...Diagnostic Category Males Females Appendicitis Nonspecific Abdominal Pain Renal Colic Perforated Duodenal Ulcer Cholecystitis Small Bowel ... Obstruction .18 • TO ■ .03 .001** .05 .03 .12 • 75 .01 .001** .11 .02 *Rounded to nearest hundredth, except for PERFDU. **This is an

  12. Tomographic PIV: principles and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarano, F.

    2013-01-01

    A survey is given of the major developments in three-dimensional velocity field measurements using the tomographic particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The appearance of tomo-PIV dates back seven years from the present review (Elsinga et al 2005a 6th Int. Symp. PIV (Pasadena, CA)) and this approach has rapidly spread as a versatile, robust and accurate technique to investigate three-dimensional flows (Arroyo and Hinsch 2008 Topics in Applied Physics vol 112 ed A Schröder and C E Willert (Berlin: Springer) pp 127-54) and turbulence physics in particular. A considerable number of applications have been achieved over a wide range of flow problems, which requires the current status and capabilities of tomographic PIV to be reviewed. The fundamental aspects of the technique are discussed beginning from hardware considerations for volume illumination, imaging systems, their configurations and system calibration. The data processing aspects are of uppermost importance: image pre-processing, 3D object reconstruction and particle motion analysis are presented with their fundamental aspects along with the most advanced approaches. Reconstruction and cross-correlation algorithms, attaining higher measurement precision, spatial resolution or higher computational efficiency, are also discussed. The exploitation of 3D and time-resolved (4D) tomographic PIV data includes the evaluation of flow field pressure on the basis of the flow governing equation. The discussion also covers a-posteriori error analysis techniques. The most relevant applications of tomo-PIV in fluid mechanics are surveyed, covering experiments in air and water flows. In measurements in flow regimes from low-speed to supersonic, most emphasis is given to the complex 3D organization of turbulent coherent structures.

  13. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  14. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study*

    PubMed Central

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emílio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fábio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. PMID:27777476

  15. Relationship between abdominal aortic and coronary artery calcification as detected by computed tomography in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yohei; Yasuda, Yoshinari; Suzuki, Susumu; Shibata, Yohei; Tatami, Yosuke; Shibata, Kanako; Niwa, Misao; Sawai, Akihiro; Morimoto, Ryota; Kato, Sawako; Ishii, Hideki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We evaluated 126 asymptomatic CKD patients (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate: 36.1 ± 14.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2), mean age 70.3 ± 10.1 years). A non-contrast computed tomography scan was used to determine the abdominal aortic calcification index (ACI) and CAC score, and this relationship was investigated. Among the subjects, AAC was present in 109 patients (86.5 %) as defined by ACI >0 and median ACI was 11.7 %. ACI increased in accordance with advances in CAC score grades (3.0, 5.2, 17.2, and 32.8 % for CAC score 0, 1-100, 101-400, and 401 or more, respectively, p < 0.001). Even after multivariate adjustment, ACI was independently associated with severe CAC score as defined by CAC score >400 [odds ratio 1.08, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.12, p < 0.001]. Receiver-operating curve analysis showed that the ACI optimal cut-off value predicting severe CAC score was 16.5 % (area under the curve = 0.79, 95 % CI 0.69-0.90, p < 0.001). The C statics for predicting CAC score was significantly increased by adding ACI values to the model including other risk factors (0.853 versus 0.737, p = 0.023). In conclusion, the ACI value of 16.5 % allows us to predict the presence of severe CAC in CKD patients, and that the addition of ACI to the model with traditional risk factors significantly improves the predictive ability of severe CAC score. These data reinforce the utility of ACI as a screening tool in clinical practice.

  16. Incremental prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography over coronary artery calcium score for risk prediction of major adverse cardiac events in asymptomatic diabetic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Min, James K.; Labounty, Troy M.; Gomez, Millie J.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M.; Chow, Benjamin; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jorg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is useful for identification of symptomatic diabetic individuals at heightened risk for death. Whether CCTA-detected CAD enables improved risk assessment of asymptomatic diabetic individuals beyond clinical risk factors and coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) remains unexplored. Methods From a prospective 12-center international registry of 27,125 individuals undergoing CCTA, we identified 400 asymptomatic diabetic individuals without known CAD. Coronary stenosis by CCTA was graded as 0%, 1–49%, 50–69%, and ≥70%. CAD was judged on a per-patient, per-vessel and per-segment basis as maximal stenosis severity, number of vessels with ≥50% stenosis, and coronary segments weighted for stenosis severity (segment stenosis score), respectively. We assessed major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) – inclusive of mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), and late target vessel revascularization ≥90 days (REV) – and evaluated the incremental utility of CCTA for risk prediction, discrimination and reclassification. Results Mean age was 60.4 ± 9.9 years; 65.0% were male. At a mean follow-up 2.4 ± 1.1 years, 33 MACE occurred (13 deaths, 8 MI, 12 REV) [8.25%; annualized rate 3.4%]. By univariate analysis, per-patient maximal stenosis [hazards ratio (HR) 2.24 per stenosis grade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61–3.10, p < 0.001], increasing numbers of obstructive vessels (HR 2.30 per vessel, 95% CI 1.75–3.03, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.14 per segment, 95% CI 1.09–1.19, p < 0.001) were associated with increased MACE. After adjustment for CAD risk factors and CACS, maximal stenosis (HR 1.80 per grade, 95% CI 1.18–2.75, p = 0.006), number of obstructive vessels (HR 1.85 per vessel, 95% CI 1.29–2.65, p < 0.001) and segment stenosis score (HR 1.11 per segment, 95% CI 1.05–1.18, p < 0.001) were associated with increased risk of

  17. Abdominal x-ray and pathological findings in distal unishunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, P; Berger, M; Benjamin, D

    1988-12-01

    A new x-ray finding suggesting distal obstruction of the Unishunt is described. Fusiform swelling of the distal slit valve ("pantaloon sign") seen on an abdominal x-ray film was associated with surgically proven distal shunt obstruction in 8 of 10 patients. No patient with a normally functioning (n = 67) or proximally malfunctioning shunt (n = 6) displayed this abnormality. This finding in association with clinical and computed tomographic evidence of shunt malfunction can direct surgical revision to the appropriate site. The pathology of distal shunt malfunction is also reviewed.

  18. Sac Hygroma After Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Successful Treatment with Endograft Relining

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Robert K. Palestrant, Sarah; Ryu, Jessica; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey

    2007-06-15

    Aneurysm sac expansion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is typically associated with endoleaks that can be readily diagnosed on computed tomographic angiography (CTA), ultrasound, or catheter-directed arteriography. Sac hygromas are a cause of sac expansion without apparent endoleak and are presumed to be a result of ultrafiltration of serum manifested by accumulation of fibrinous, gelatinous material within the aneurysm sac following EVAR. Although there are no reported associated ruptures, sac expansion is nevertheless disconcerting and intervention is presumably indicated. We report a case of an expanding aneurysm after EVAR secondary to sac hygroma that was successfully treated with relining of the existing, original endograft.

  19. The relationship of abdominal fat mass assessed by helical or conventional computed tomography to serum leptin concentration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junji; Sasaki, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Mitsuyo

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we focused on the relationship of intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) or subcutaneous fat (SF) mass to serum leptin levels, and also on the relationship of leptin to serum lipid and lipoprotein concentration. Subjects with obesity (26 men, 26 women) were recruited for this study. We obtained helical CT scans with a tube current of 150 mA, voltage of 120 kV and 2:1 pitch (table speed in relation to slice thickness), starting at the upper edge of the liver and continuing to the pelvis. The intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) volume was measured by drawing a line within the muscle wall surrounding the abdominal cavity. The abdominal SF volume was calculated by subtracting the VF volume from the total abdominal fat volume. By comparison, the abdominal VF and SF areas were determined at the umbilical level by the established slice-by-slice CT scanning technique. We found: 1) abdominal SF mass, either as volume or area, was a more important determinant of serum leptin than was VF mass; 2) among TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C, only TG had a positive correlation to serum leptin levels in men, whereas in women no lipid parameters had any relationship with leptin; and 3) VF mass had a positive correlation to serum TC and TG in men, whereas SF did not. The present study provides considerable evidence on the relationship between abdominal fat mass and serum leptin, and shows that the relationships between serum leptin and serum lipids and lipoproteins are not straightforward. We also suggest that fat area measured by conventional CT is a better indicator than its corresponding volume assessed by helical CT, based on the present results showing its closer association to serum lipids.

  20. Perfusion computed tomography imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms may be of value for patient specific rupture risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Galanakis, Nikolaos; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to pose a significant cause of unexpected mortality in the developed countries with its incidence constantly rising. The indication of elective surgical repair is currently based on the maximum diameter and growth rate criteria which represent an oversimplification of the Law of Laplace stating that the stress exerted in a cylinder or sphere is proportional to its radius. These criteria fail to capture the complex pathophysiology of the aneurismal disease thus often leading to therapeutic inaccuracies (treating large AAAs with a very low actual rupture risk while observing smaller ones with a much greater risk). Aneurysmal disease is mainly a degenerative process leading to loss of structural integrity of the diseased aortic wall which cannot withhold the stresses due to systemic pressurization. Moreover aortic wall degeneration has been shown to be a localized phenomenon and rupture depends on the pointwise comparison of strength and stress rather than a global aortic wall weakening. Ex-vivo mechanical studies have related vessel wall hypoxia to loss of structural endurance and reduced wall strength. Therefore a module to capture in vivo variation of aortic wall blood supply and oxygenation would be of value for the evaluation of AAA rupture risk. Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) imaging represents a novel technique which has been already used to estimate tissue vascularity in several clinical conditions but not aneurismal disease. We hypothesize that PCT could be used as an adjunct tool during AAA diagnostics in order to evaluate aortic wall oxygenation in vivo, therefore providing a possible means to identify weak spots making the lesion amenable to rupture.

  1. Kinky tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Bilisoly, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    We address the issue of how to make decisions about the degree of smoothness demanded of a flexible contour used to model the boundary of a 2D object. We demonstrate the use of a Bayesian approach to set the strength of the smoothness prior for a tomographic reconstruction problem. The Akaike Information Criterion is used to determine whether to allow a kink in the contour.

  2. Medical ultrasonic tomographic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.; Lecroissette, D. H.; Nathan, R.; Wilson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An electro-mechanical scanning assembly was designed and fabricated for the purpose of generating an ultrasound tomogram. A low cost modality was demonstrated in which analog instrumentation methods formed a tomogram on photographic film. Successful tomogram reconstructions were obtained on in vitro test objects by using the attenuation of the fist path ultrasound signal as it passed through the test object. The nearly half century tomographic methods of X-ray analysis were verified as being useful for ultrasound imaging.

  3. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  4. Medical diagnosis aboard submarines. Use of a computer-based Bayesian method of analysis in an abdominal pain diagnostic program.

    PubMed

    Osborne, S F

    1984-02-01

    The medical issues that arise in the isolated environment of a submarine can occasionally be grave. While crewmembers are carefully screened for health problems, they are still susceptible to serious acute illness. Currently, the submarine medical department representative, the hospital corpsman, utilizes a history and physical examination, clinical acumen, and limited laboratory testing in diagnosis. The application of a Bayesian method of analysis to an abdominal pain diagnostic system utilizing an onboard microcomputer is described herein. Early results from sea trials show an appropriate diagnosis in eight of 10 cases of abdominal pain, but the program should still be viewed as an extended "laboratory test" until proved effective at sea.

  5. Clinical outcomes of fractional flow reserve by computed tomographic angiography-guided diagnostic strategies vs. usual care in patients with suspected coronary artery disease: the prospective longitudinal trial of FFRCT: outcome and resource impacts study

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Pontone, Gianluca; Hlatky, Mark A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Norgaard, Bjarne L.; Byrne, Robert A.; Curzen, Nick; Purcell, Ian; Gutberlet, Matthias; Rioufol, Gilles; Hink, Ulrich; Schuchlenz, Herwig Walter; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Gilard, Martine; Andreini, Daniele; Jensen, Jesper M.; Hadamitzky, Martin; Chiswell, Karen; Cyr, Derek; Wilk, Alan; Wang, Furong; Rogers, Campbell; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Aims In symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), computed tomographic angiography (CTA) improves patient selection for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) compared with functional testing. The impact of measuring fractional flow reserve by CTA (FFRCT) is unknown. Methods and results At 11 sites, 584 patients with new onset chest pain were prospectively assigned to receive either usual testing (n = 287) or CTA/FFRCT (n = 297). Test interpretation and care decisions were made by the clinical care team. The primary endpoint was the percentage of those with planned ICA in whom no significant obstructive CAD (no stenosis ≥50% by core laboratory quantitative analysis or invasive FFR < 0.80) was found at ICA within 90 days. Secondary endpoints including death, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization were independently and blindly adjudicated. Subjects averaged 61 ± 11 years of age, 40% were female, and the mean pre-test probability of obstructive CAD was 49 ± 17%. Among those with intended ICA (FFRCT-guided = 193; usual care = 187), no obstructive CAD was found at ICA in 24 (12%) in the CTA/FFRCT arm and 137 (73%) in the usual care arm (risk difference 61%, 95% confidence interval 53–69, P< 0.0001), with similar mean cumulative radiation exposure (9.9 vs. 9.4 mSv, P = 0.20). Invasive coronary angiography was cancelled in 61% after receiving CTA/FFRCT results. Among those with intended non-invasive testing, the rates of finding no obstructive CAD at ICA were 13% (CTA/FFRCT) and 6% (usual care; P = 0.95). Clinical event rates within 90 days were low in usual care and CTA/FFRCT arms. Conclusions Computed tomographic angiography/fractional flow reserve by CTA was a feasible and safe alternative to ICA and was associated with a significantly lower rate of invasive angiography showing no obstructive CAD. PMID:26330417

  6. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses following abdominal surgery under real-time CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 +/- 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 +/- 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  7. A 15-year-old female with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated human chorionic gonadotropin: pregnancy, right? Not so fast….

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Arun; Ocon, Anthony J; Nibhanipudi, Kumara

    2012-10-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma, a rare ovarian tumor, may present in young women with amenorrhea, abdominal distention, and elevated urine human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), all of which may be mistaken for pregnancy. A 15-year-old Hispanic female, who reported no sexual activity, presented with 6 months of amenorrhea, abdominal pain, and progressive abdominal distension. Initially, suspicion of pregnancy was considered. Physical examination was significant for abdominal distension, but no uterine fundus or fetal anatomy could be palpated, and auscultation did not reveal any fetal heart sounds or bruits. Laboratory values showed elevated urine hCG, cancer antigen 125, and cancer antigen 19.9 levels but normal serum hCG level and was inconsistent with pregnancy. Computed tomographic scans revealed a large abdominal heterogeneous mass and pleural effusions. Salpingo-oophorectomy with total omentectomy and inversion appendectomy removed a 21 × 20.5 × 16.5-cm tumor. Pathological testing determined it to be a nongestational choriocarcinoma. This rare tumor is more common in the pediatric adolescent population than in adults. Surgical resection and chemotherapy often result in a positive prognosis. In female adolescent patients presenting with elevated hCG level, amenorrhea, and abdominal distention, choriocarcinoma should be considered, especially in those with no history of sexual activity or before menarche.

  8. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. Uniaxial Compression of Cellular Materials at a 10-1 s-1 Strain Rate Simultaneously with Synchrotron X-ray Computed Tomographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Brian M.

    2016-03-01

    The topic is presented as a series of slides. Motivation for the work included the following: X-ray tomography is a fantastic technique for characterizing a material’s starting structure as well as for non-destructive, in situ experiments to investigate material response; 3D X-ray tomography is needed to fully characterize the morphology of cellular materials; and synchrotron micro-CT can capture 3D images without pausing experiment. Among the conclusions reached are these: High-rate radiographic and tomographic imaging (0.25 s 3D frame rate) using synchrotron CT can capture full 3D images of hyper-elastic materials at a 10-2 strain rate; dynamic true in situ uniaxial loading can be accurately captured; the three stages of compression can be imaged: bending, buckling, and breaking; implementation of linear modeling is completed; meshes have been imported into LANL modeling codes--testing and validation is underway and direct comparison and validation between in situ data and modeled mechanical response is possible.

  10. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  11. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  12. Significant changes in combined consistent biomarkers and computed tomography angiography revealed during an interval of 6months before abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    PubMed

    Szumilowicz, Pawel; Wiernicki, Ireneusz; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz; Golubinska-Szemitko, Elzbieta; Zurkowska, Joanna; Kasprzak, Piotr

    2017-02-28

    The most commonly used predictor of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is the diameter, but this does not correlate well with the risk of rupture. Therefore, in order to make further improvements in clinical decisions regarding AAA patients, the development of additional predictive tools other than aneurysm size alone is needed. We herein report a case of a 72-year-old man with AAA that underwent rupture transformation during six months. We review the morphological features changes detected by computed tomography and also observe several alters circulating biomarkers at the same time. In the study presented essentially an association of those combined parameters with the risk of AAA impending rupture.

  13. Low-dose Computed Tomography in a Pregnant Woman with a Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ramac, Jelena Popić; Vidjak, Vinko; Skegro, Dinko; Duić, Zeljko; Blasković, Darko; Erdelez, Lidija; Skopljanac-Macina, Andrija; Suknaić, Slaven; Slavica, Marko; Leder, Nikola Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Imaging the pregnant patient presents a unique challenge to radiologist due to the risk of radiation to the conceptus (embryo/fetus). A rare case of a successfully recognized and treated pseudoaneurysm (PA) of the abdominal aorta is to be presented. The pseudoaneurysm occurred in the third trimester and had a favorable outcome for the mother and the baby. Emergent abdominal ultrasound (US) is the first modality in diagnostic algorithm for the rupture of aortic aneurysm in a pregnant woman. It provides the most rapid diagnostic information, although intestinal gas and abdominal tenderness may limit its accuracy. To confirm the findings, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography (CTA) can be used. In our case, the diagnosis was established using a color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdomen and was later confirmed by a low dose CT scan of the abdominal aorta. MRA in such cases have some disadvantages. At many health centers, the monitoring of patients with acute ruptures is more difficult in the MR suite than at the CT scanner. MRA angiographic images are also subject to degradation by multiple artifacts and the visualization of the distal vasculature is suboptimal and inferior to the one done by CTA. Due to fetal movements, a small quantity of fresh blood can be overlooked by MR. MRA is often not available on a 24-hours basis, and the time required for making a diagnosis can preclude the use of MRA in an unstable patient. For this reason, we used a low dose CTA protocol to confirm the diagnosis. Low dose scanning protocols in CT can obtain sufficient diagnostic information while reducing the risk of radiation. A particular focus is put on the outline of new concepts for dose management and optimization. We used new approaches based on tube current modulation. The birth was induced by an urgent Caesarean section followed by a resection of a pseudoaneurysm and a reconstruction of the aorta with an end-to-end vascular prosthesis.

  14. Computed tomography and ultrasound in follow-up of patients after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Elkouri, Stéphane; Panneton, Jean M; Andrews, James C; Lewis, Bradley D; McKusick, Michael A; Noel, Audra A; Rowland, Charles M; Bower, Thomas C; Cherry, Kenneth J; Gloviczki, Peter

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare our experience with duplex ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) for the routine follow-up of patients after endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We reviewed the electronic charts and radiologic exams of the first 125 patients (113 males, 12 females, median age of 76 years, range 48-98 years) with AAA treated by EVAR from June 1996 to November 2001. Our follow-up protocol included serial CT and US at regular intervals after the procedure (before discharge, at 1 month, and then every 6 months). Adequacy of each exam, ability to detect endoleaks, measurements of AAA diameter, and ability to determine graft patency were compared. For endoleak detection, comparison between CT and US was done using CT as the gold standard. A total of 608 exams, 337 CTs and 271 US, were performed 1 day to 5 years after endovascular aneurysm repair; 98% of CT and 74% of US were technically adequate. Contrary to CT, the proportion of adequate US exam was significantly less in patients with higher body mass index (BMI > or = 30 = 54% vs. BMI < 30 = 81%, p < 0.001) and for pre-discharge US compared to the post-discharge US (54% vs. 88%, p = 0.0005). Concurrent scan pairs were obtained in 252 instances in 107 patients (1-8 pairs per patient). Excellent correlation between AAA diameter measured on CT and US was noted (correlation coefficient of 0.9, p < 0.0001). However, agreement was poor. CT anteroposterior (AP) and transverse measurements were on average 2.9 mm (95% limits of agreement = -7 to 13 mm) and 1.8 mm (95% limits of agreement = -9 to 12 mm) greater than US. For AAA diameter change, there was no case of increase AP diameter on CT. However, in 23% (29/128 pairs of sets) of US, an increase in AAA size that could have influenced patient management (> or = 4 mm) was reported despite no change demonstrated on CT. For endoleak detection, sensitivity and specificity of US compared to that of CT was 25% and 89

  15. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  17. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  18. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  19. A computational simulation of the effect of hybrid treatment for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jun; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Qingyuan; Hu, Yao; Zhao, Jichun; Zheng, Tinghui; Fan, Yubo

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid visceral-renal debranching procedures with endovascular repair have been proposed as an appealing technique to treat conventional thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). This approach, however, still remained controversial because of the non-physiological blood flow direction of its retrograde visceral revascularization (RVR) which is generally constructed from the aortic bifurcation or common iliac artery. The current study carried out the numerical simulation to investigate the effect of RVR on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta. The results indicated that the inflow sites for the RVR have great impact on the hemodynamic performance. When RVR was from the distal aorta, the perfusion to visceral organs were adequate but the flow flux to the iliac artery significantly decreased and a complex disturbed flow field developed at the distal aorta, which endangered the aorta at high risk of aneurysm development. When RVR was from the right iliac artery, the abdominal aorta was not troubled with low WSS or disturbed flow, but the inadequate perfusion to the visceral organs reached up to 40% and low WSS and flow velocity predominated appeared at the right iliac artery and the grafts, which may result in the stenosis in grafts and aneurysm growth on the host iliac artery. PMID:27029949

  20. A computational simulation of the effect of hybrid treatment for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Qingyuan; Hu, Yao; Zhao, Jichun; Zheng, Tinghui; Fan, Yubo

    2016-03-31

    Hybrid visceral-renal debranching procedures with endovascular repair have been proposed as an appealing technique to treat conventional thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). This approach, however, still remained controversial because of the non-physiological blood flow direction of its retrograde visceral revascularization (RVR) which is generally constructed from the aortic bifurcation or common iliac artery. The current study carried out the numerical simulation to investigate the effect of RVR on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta. The results indicated that the inflow sites for the RVR have great impact on the hemodynamic performance. When RVR was from the distal aorta, the perfusion to visceral organs were adequate but the flow flux to the iliac artery significantly decreased and a complex disturbed flow field developed at the distal aorta, which endangered the aorta at high risk of aneurysm development. When RVR was from the right iliac artery, the abdominal aorta was not troubled with low WSS or disturbed flow, but the inadequate perfusion to the visceral organs reached up to 40% and low WSS and flow velocity predominated appeared at the right iliac artery and the grafts, which may result in the stenosis in grafts and aneurysm growth on the host iliac artery.

  1. A computational simulation of the effect of hybrid treatment for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jun; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Qingyuan; Hu, Yao; Zhao, Jichun; Zheng, Tinghui; Fan, Yubo

    2016-03-01

    Hybrid visceral-renal debranching procedures with endovascular repair have been proposed as an appealing technique to treat conventional thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). This approach, however, still remained controversial because of the non-physiological blood flow direction of its retrograde visceral revascularization (RVR) which is generally constructed from the aortic bifurcation or common iliac artery. The current study carried out the numerical simulation to investigate the effect of RVR on the hemodynamics of abdominal aorta. The results indicated that the inflow sites for the RVR have great impact on the hemodynamic performance. When RVR was from the distal aorta, the perfusion to visceral organs were adequate but the flow flux to the iliac artery significantly decreased and a complex disturbed flow field developed at the distal aorta, which endangered the aorta at high risk of aneurysm development. When RVR was from the right iliac artery, the abdominal aorta was not troubled with low WSS or disturbed flow, but the inadequate perfusion to the visceral organs reached up to 40% and low WSS and flow velocity predominated appeared at the right iliac artery and the grafts, which may result in the stenosis in grafts and aneurysm growth on the host iliac artery.

  2. Comments on "hydrodynamic and dispersion behavior in a non-porous silica monolith through fluid dynamic study of a computational mimic reconstructed from sub-micro-tomographic scans".

    PubMed

    Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Höltzel, Alexandra; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2013-08-09

    We comment on a recently published paper by Loh and Vasudevan [J. Chromatogr. A 1274 (2013) 65], which reported the physical reconstruction of the bulk macropore space of an analytical silica monolith by X-ray computed microtomography and the subsequent computational fluid dynamics simulations of flow and mass transport in the reconstructed monolith model. Loh and Vasudevan claim that their combined reconstruction and simulation approach offers a significant reduction of computational expenses without significant loss in accuracy in characterizing the macropore space heterogeneity of the monolith and predicting its transport properties. We challenge their claim and question the validity and validation of their results by discussing the employed scanning resolution, the characterization of macropore space heterogeneities, the interpretation of the simulated dispersion data, as well as the comparison of computational expenses with previous work.

  3. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  4. Comparison of image quality from filtered back projection, statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in abdominal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu; Lin, Yi-Yang; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiou, Yi-You; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image noise-reducing abilities of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) with those of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) imagesThis institutional review board-approved retrospective study enrolled 103 patients; informed consent was waived. Urinary bladder (n = 83) and renal cysts (n = 44) were used as targets for evaluating imaging quality. Raw data were retrospectively reconstructed using FBP, statistical IR, and IMR. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Subjective image quality was evaluated and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test with Bonferroni correction.Objective analysis revealed a reduction in image noise for statistical IR compared with that for FBP, with no significant differences in SNR. In the urinary bladder group, IMR achieved up to 53.7% noise reduction, demonstrating a superior performance to that of statistical IR. IMR also yielded a significantly superior SNR to that of statistical IR. Similar results were obtained in the cyst group. Subjective analysis revealed reduced image noise for IMR, without inferior margin delineation or diagnostic confidence.IMR reduced noise and increased SNR to greater degrees than did FBP and statistical IR. Applying the IMR technique to abdominal CT imaging has potential for reducing the radiation dose without sacrificing imaging quality.

  5. Comparison of image quality from filtered back projection, statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in abdominal computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu; Lin, Yi-Yang; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiou, Yi-You; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the image noise-reducing abilities of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) with those of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) images This institutional review board-approved retrospective study enrolled 103 patients; informed consent was waived. Urinary bladder (n = 83) and renal cysts (n = 44) were used as targets for evaluating imaging quality. Raw data were retrospectively reconstructed using FBP, statistical IR, and IMR. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Subjective image quality was evaluated and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test with Bonferroni correction. Objective analysis revealed a reduction in image noise for statistical IR compared with that for FBP, with no significant differences in SNR. In the urinary bladder group, IMR achieved up to 53.7% noise reduction, demonstrating a superior performance to that of statistical IR. IMR also yielded a significantly superior SNR to that of statistical IR. Similar results were obtained in the cyst group. Subjective analysis revealed reduced image noise for IMR, without inferior margin delineation or diagnostic confidence. IMR reduced noise and increased SNR to greater degrees than did FBP and statistical IR. Applying the IMR technique to abdominal CT imaging has potential for reducing the radiation dose without sacrificing imaging quality. PMID:27495078

  6. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  7. Tomographic 3D-PIV and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsinga, Gerrit E.; Wieneke, Bernhard; Scarano, Fulvio; Schröder, Andreas

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry is a 3D PIV technique based on the illumination, recording, reconstruction and analysis of tracer-particle motion within a three-dimensional measurement volume. The recently developed technique makes use of several simultaneous views of the illuminated particles, typically 4, and their three-dimensional reconstruction as a light-intensity distribution by means of optical tomography. The reconstruction is performed with the MART algorithm (multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique), yielding a 3D distribution of light intensity discretized over an array of voxels. The reconstructed tomogram pair is then analyzed by means of 3D crosscorrelation with an iterative multigrid volume-deformation technique, returning the three-component velocity vector distribution over the measurement volume. The implementation of the tomographic technique in time-resolved mode by means of high repetition rate PIV hardware has the capability to yield 4D velocity information. The first part of the chapter describes the operation principles and gives a detailed assessment of the tomographic reconstruction algorithm performance based upon a computer-simulated experiment. The second part of the chapter proposes four applications on two flow cases: 1. the transitional wake behind a circular cylinder; 2. the turbulent boundary layer developing over a flat plate. For the first case, experiments in air at ReD = 2700 are described together with the experimental assessment of the tomographic reconstruction accuracy. In this experiment a direct comparison is made between the results obtained by tomographic PIV and stereo-PIV. Experiments conducted in a water facility on the cylinder wake shows the extension of the technique to time-resolved measurements in water at ReD = 540 by means of a low repetition rate PIV system. A high data yield is obtained using high-resolution cameras (2k × 2k pixels) returning 650k vectors per volume. Measurements of the

  8. Validity of Acute Stroke Lesion Volume Estimation by Diffusion-Weighted Imaging–Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomographic Score Depends on Lesion Location in 496 Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Julian; Cheng, Bastian; Ebinger, Martin; Köhrmann, Martin; Wu, Ona; Kang, Dong-Wha; Liebeskind, David S.; Tourdias, Thomas; Singer, Oliver C.; Christensen, Soren; Campbell, Bruce; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Fiehler, Jens; Fiebach, Jochen B.; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomographic Score (ASPECTS) has been used to estimate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion volume in acute stroke. We aimed to assess correlations of DWI-ASPECTS with lesion volume in different middle cerebral artery (MCA) subregions and reproduce existing ASPECTS thresholds of a malignant profile defined by lesion volume ≥100 mL. Methods We analyzed data of patients with MCA stroke from a prospective observational study of DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery in acute stroke. DWI-ASPECTS and lesion volume were calculated. The population was divided into subgroups based on lesion localization (superficial MCA territory, deep MCA territory, or both). Correlation of ASPECTS and infarct volume was calculated, and receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis was performed to identify the optimal ASPECTS threshold for ≥100-mL lesion volume. Results A total of 496 patients were included. There was a significant negative correlation between ASPECTS and DWI lesion volume (r=−0.78; P<0.0001). With regards to lesion localization, correlation was weaker in deep MCA region (r=−0.19; P=0.038) when compared with superficial (r=−0.72; P<0.001) or combined superficial and deep MCA lesions (r=−0.72; P<0.001). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis revealed ASPECTS≤6 as best cutoff to identify ≥100-mL DWI lesion volume; however, positive predictive value was low (0.35). Conclusions ASPECTS has limitations when lesion location is not considered. Identification of patients with malignant profile by DWI-ASPECTS may be unreliable. ASPECTS may be a useful tool for the evaluation of noncontrast computed tomography. However, if MRI is used, ASPECTS seems dispensable because lesion volume can easily be quantified on DWI maps. PMID:25316278

  9. Accelerated nonlinear multichannel ultrasonic tomographic imaging using target sparseness.

    PubMed

    Chengdong Dong; Yuanwei Jin; Enyue Lu

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an accelerated iterative Landweber method for nonlinear ultrasonic tomographic imaging in a multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) configuration under a sparsity constraint on the image. The proposed method introduces the emerging MIMO signal processing techniques and target sparseness constraints in the traditional computational imaging field, thus significantly improves the speed of image reconstruction compared with the conventional imaging method while producing high quality images. Using numerical examples, we demonstrate that incorporating prior knowledge about the imaging field such as target sparseness accelerates significantly the convergence of the iterative imaging method, which provides considerable benefits to real-time tomographic imaging applications.

  10. Numerical restoration of hyperspectral datacubes in tomographic imaging spectroscopic instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, Harvey C.

    2004-08-01

    The operation of tomographic spectral imaging devices is analogous to problems in image restoration with similar restoration techniques. Generally the problem is cast as restoration of a sparse, singular kernel where both accuracy and computational speed are trade off issues. While there is much conventional wisdom concerning the ability to restore such systems, experience has shown that the situation is often less bleak than imagined. Results of the restoration of several tomographic instruments are presented with a series of improvements which are the result of both ad hoc numerical techniques and theoretical constraints. The influence of physical hardware on restoration results is discussed as well as counter intuitive lessons learned from a multi-year program to develop efficient restoration techniques for tomographic imaging spectrometers.

  11. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    DOE PAGES

    Bicer, Tekin; Gursoy, Doga; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; ...

    2016-01-01

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modelingmore » of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum resources, which in

  12. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    PubMed Central

    Bicer, Tekin; Gürsoy, Doǧa; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; De Carlo, Francesco; Foster, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modeling of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum resources, which in turn can

  13. Microcomputer-based technique for 3-D reconstruction and volume measurement of computed tomographic images. Part 2: Anaplastic primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Albright, R E; Fram, E K

    1988-12-01

    Serial computed tomography (CT) plays an integral part in monitoring effects of therapy for primary anaplastic brain tumors. Despite advances in CT technology, clinicians often cannot obtain accurate quantitative volume information to complement the qualitative assessment of tumor change. This paper presents a microcomputer-based method that provides both quantitative volume measurements and 3-D reconstructions of primary anaplastic brain tumors based on their hard copy CT or magnetic resonance imaging studies. The findings of this study demonstrate that planimetry is feasible for routine clinical use and is superior in accuracy to the spherical geometric model, which is shown to significantly overestimate tumor volume. The findings of 62 quantitative tumor studies (17 patients) showed a direct relationship between the total tumor volume and the volume of the hypodense intratumor core. There was no evidence of a relationship between the total tumor volume and the amount of peritumor low density (edema).

  14. Computed tomographic and densitometric analysis of tibiotarsal bone mineral density and content in postnatal Peking ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var. domestica) as influenced by age and sex.

    PubMed

    Charuta, A; Cooper, R G

    2012-01-01

    The bone mineral density BMD and content BMC were analysed in the tibiotarsal bones of ducks in the postnatal development as influenced by age and sex. One hundred birds from the nesting till the slaughtering maturity were included in the experiment. The analysis was conducted using a densitometer, Norland - Excell Plus and pQCT computed tomography, XCT Research SA Plus. The statistical analysis was conducted using the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance (age) and the U-Mann -Withney test (sex). All calculations were performed in Statistica 9.0 (StatSoft, Inc. Tulsa, USA), at P < or = 0.05. Two-factor analysis of variance ANOVA was applied and Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. The densitometer research showed that BMD and BMC increased in the postnatal development for both sexes. The volumetric bone mineral density vBMD analysis using computed tomography showed that volumetric bone mineral density vBMD of the middle of the diaphyses in situ gradually attenuated during the postnatal development both in males and females, i.e. from 620 mg/cm3 (2 wk) to 500 mg/cm3 (8 wk). The biggest vBMD loss was observed in the diaphyses of females in 4 and 6 wk (r = -0.63 and r = -0.79; P > or = 0.05). The BMC decrease was observed in the proximal metaphyses between 4 and 6 wk for both sexes, r = -0.52 (males), r = -0.53 (females); P < or = 0.05. The gradual loss may be the cause of deformities and fractures of the tibiotarsal bones observed from 4 wk in particular bone sections of both sexes. The achieved results may constitute a helpful source of information for water poultry breeders to prevent limb diseases.

  15. Automated detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) images: multiscale hierachical expectation-maximization segmentation of vessels and PEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Cascade, Philip N.; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Ge, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2007-03-01

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been reported to be an effective means for clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologist in PE detection in CTPA images. 3D multiscale filters in combination with a newly designed response function derived from the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices is used to enhance vascular structures including the vessel bifurcations and suppress non-vessel structures such as the lymphoid tissues surrounding the vessels. A hierarchical EM estimation is then used to segment the vessels by extracting the high response voxels at each scale. The segmented vessels are pre-screened for suspicious PE areas using a second adaptive multiscale EM estimation. A rule-based false positive (FP) reduction method was designed to identify the true PEs based on the features of PE and vessels. 43 CTPA scans were used as an independent test set to evaluate the performance of PE detection. Experienced chest radiologists identified the PE locations which were used as "gold standard". 435 PEs were identified in the artery branches, of which 172 and 263 were subsegmental and proximal to the subsegmental, respectively. The computer-detected volume was considered true positive (TP) when it overlapped with 10% or more of the gold standard PE volume. Our preliminary test results show that, at an average of 33 and 24 FPs/case, the sensitivities of our PE detection method were 81% and 78%, respectively, for proximal PEs, and 79% and 73%, respectively, for subsegmental PEs. The study demonstrates the feasibility that the automated method can identify PE accurately on CTPA images. Further study is underway to improve the sensitivity and reduce the FPs.

  16. Effects of Intraluminal Thrombus on Patient-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Hemodynamics via Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocity and Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yuan; Antón, Raúl; Hung, Ming-yang; Menon, Prahlad; Finol, Ender A.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2014-01-01

    The pathology of the human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and its relationship to the later complication of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) formation remains unclear. The hemodynamics in the diseased abdominal aorta are hypothesized to be a key contributor to the formation and growth of ILT. The objective of this investigation is to establish a reliable 3D flow visualization method with corresponding validation tests with high confidence in order to provide insight into the basic hemodynamic features for a better understanding of hemodynamics in AAA pathology and seek potential treatment for AAA diseases. A stereoscopic particle image velocity (PIV) experiment was conducted using transparent patient-specific experimental AAA models (with and without ILT) at three axial planes. Results show that before ILT formation, a 3D vortex was generated in the AAA phantom. This geometry-related vortex was not observed after the formation of ILT, indicating its possible role in the subsequent appearance of ILT in this patient. It may indicate that a longer residence time of recirculated blood flow in the aortic lumen due to this vortex caused sufficient shear-induced platelet activation to develop ILT and maintain uniform flow conditions. Additionally, two computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling codes (Fluent and an in-house cardiovascular CFD code) were compared with the two-dimensional, three-component velocity stereoscopic PIV data. Results showed that correlation coefficients of the out-of-plane velocity data between PIV and both CFD methods are greater than 0.85, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. The stereoscopic PIV study can be utilized as test case templates for ongoing efforts in cardiovascular CFD solver development. Likewise, it is envisaged that the patient-specific data may provide a benchmark for further studying hemodynamics of actual AAA, ILT, and their convolution effects under physiological conditions for clinical applications. PMID:24316984

  17. Coronary dominance and prognosis in patients undergoing coronary computed tomographic angiography: results from the CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter) registry

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Catherine; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Gransar, Heidi; Berman, Daniel S.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Andreini, Daniele; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M.; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Delago, Augustin; Gomez, Millie J.; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Hindoyan, Niree; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Pontone, Gianluca; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Dunning, Allison M.; Min, James K.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) has become an important tool for non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary dominance can be assessed by CCTA; however, the predictive value of coronary dominance is controversially discussed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and prognosis of coronary dominance in a large prospective, international multicentre cohort of patients undergoing CCTA. Methods and results The study population consisted of 6382 patients with or without CAD (47% females, 53% males, mean age 56.9 ± 12.3 years) who underwent CCTA and were followed over a period of 60 months. Right or left coronary dominance was determined. Right dominance was present in 91% (n = 5817) and left in 9% (n = 565) of the study population. At the end of follow-up, outcome in patients with obstructive CAD (>50% luminal stenosis) and right dominance was similar compared with patients with left dominance [hazard ratio (HR) 0.46, 95% CI 0.16–1.32, P = 0.15]. Furthermore, no differences were observed for the type of coronary dominance in patients with non-obstructive CAD (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.41–2.21, P = 0.8962) or normal coronary arteries (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.68–1.59, P = 0.9). Subgroup analysis in patients with left main disease revealed an elevated hazard of the combined endpoint for left dominance (HR 6.45, 95% CI 1.66–25.0, P = 0.007), but not for right dominance. Conclusion In our study population, survival after 5 years of follow-up did not differ significantly between patients with left or right coronary dominance. Thus, assessment of coronary vessel dominance by CCTA may not enhance risk stratification in patients with normal coronary arteries or obstructive CAD, but may add prognostic information for specific subpopulations. PMID:25744341

  18. Cone-beam computed tomographic evaluation of the condylar remodeling occurring after mandibular set-back by bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy and rigid fixation

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Man-Hee; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Seong-Sik; Son, Woo-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate condylar head remodeling after mandibular set-back sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) with rigid fixation in skeletal class III deformities. The correlation between condylar head remodeling and condylar axis changes was determined using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) superimposition. Methods The CBCT data of 22 subjects (9 men and 13 women) who had undergone mandibular set-back SSRO with rigid fixation were analyzed. Changes in the condylar head measurements and the distribution of the signs of condylar head remodeling were evaluated by CBCT superimposition. Results The subjects showed inward rotation of the axial condylar angle; reduced condylar heights on the sagittal and coronal planes; and resorptive remodeling in the anterior and superior areas on the sagittal plane, superior and lateral areas on the coronal plane, and anterior-middle and anterior-lateral areas on the axial plane (p < 0.05). Conclusions The CBCT superimposition method showed condylar head remodeling after mandibular set-back SSRO with rigid fixation. In skeletal class III patients, SSRO with rigid fixation resulted in rotation, diminution, and remodeling of the condylar head. However, these changes did not produce clinical signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. PMID:24396735

  19. Determination of optimal dosage and delay time for computed tomographic lymphography after percutaneous injection of Iohexol into popliteal lymph nodes in dogs.

    PubMed

    Chun, Hyeyoung; Cho, Hangmyo; Cheon, Haengbok; Kim, Juhyung; Kim, Taehun; Kang, Ji-Houn; Kim, Gonhyung; Lee, Youngwon; Choi, Hojung; Lee, Heechun; Chang, Dongwoo

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the optimal dose and delay time for lymphography by injection of Iohexol into popliteal lymph nodes and to assess images of computed tomography by the established protocol. Three different doses (30, 60 and 90 mgI/kg) of water-soluble iodinated contrast medium were injected into 15 popliteal lymph nodes of 10 adult beagles, and fluoroscopy was performed. Filling and duration of contrast media and the number of visible ducts from popliteal lymph nodes to the thoracic duct and its branches were recorded. CT lymphography was performed, and the number of visible thoracic ducts was compared with that found by radiographic lymphography. Radiographs obtained between 130 and 800 seconds after injection of contrast medium provided a detailed view of the thoracic duct. The dose of 60 mgI/kg was determined to enable quality diagnostic imaging without extranodal leakage in radiographic lymphography. There was no significant difference in the number of thoracic ducts between the two modalities at each anatomic location. However, CT lymphography provided images of the thoracic duct with better spatial resolution and without superimposition of surrounding tissue. The present study provides an adequate delay time and injection for identification of the canine thoracic duct, and therefore, this technique could be applied to diagnosis of disease associated with chest lymphatic drainage.

  20. Screw Placement and Osteoplasty Under Computed Tomographic-Fluoroscopic Guidance in a Case of Advanced Metastatic Destruction of the Iliosacral Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Trumm, Christoph Gregor; Rubenbauer, Bianca; Piltz, Stefan; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    2011-02-15

    We present a case of combined surgical screw placement and osteoplasty guided by computed tomography-fluoroscopy (CTF) in a 68-year-old man with unilateral osteolytic destruction and a pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint due to a metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. The patient experienced intractable lower back pain that was refractory to analgesia. After transarterial particle and coil embolization of the tumor-feeding vessels in the angiography unit, the procedure was performed under general anesthesia by an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologists and trauma surgeons. Under intermittent single-shot CTF, two K wires were inserted into the left iliosacral joint from a lateral transiliac approach at the S1 level followed by two self-tapping surgical screws. Continuous CTF was used for monitoring of the subsequent polymethylmethacrylate injection through two vertebroplasty cannulas for further stabilization of the screw threads within the osteolytic sacral ala. Both the screw placement and cement injection were successful, with no complications occurring during or after the procedure. With additional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and opioid medication, the patient reported a marked decrease in his lower back pain and was able to move independently again at the 3-month follow-up assessment. In our patient with intolerable back pain due to tumor destruction and consequent pathological fracture of the iliosacral joint, CTF-guided iliosacral screw placement combined with osteoplasty was successful with respect to joint stabilization and a reduction in the need for analgesic therapy.

  1. Cone beam computed tomographic evaluation of two access cavity designs and instrumentation on the thickness of peri-cervical dentin in mandibular anterior teeth

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinny Sara; George, John V.; Mathew, Sylvia; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Indiresha, H. N.; Madhu, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of two access cavity designs on the peri-cervical dentin thickness before and after instrumentation using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular anterior teeth were divided into two groups of thirty teeth each: Group I: conventional access cavity preparation, where access was prepared just above the cingulum and Group II: incisal access cavity preparation, where access was prepared in proximity to the incisal edge. CBCT scans were taken preoperatively, following access cavity preparation and post instrumentation. 200 μm thick slices were obtained 4mm apical and coronal to the cemento-enamel junction. The peri-cervical dentin thickness was calculated on the facial, lingual, mesial, and distal for all the three obtained scans. Results: The analysis showed that access cavity preparation and instrumentation resulted in a significant loss of tooth structure in Group I on all surfaces, but in Group II, there was a significant loss of tooth structure only in the mesial, lingual, and distal surfaces (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Incisal access cavity preparation resulted in lesser loss of dentin in the peri-cervical region. PMID:27656065

  2. Computer-Aided Tomographic Analysis of Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) in Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Correlation with Pulmonary Physiologic Tests and Patient-Centred Measures of Perceived Dyspnea and Functional Disability

    PubMed Central

    Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Di Donato, Eleonora; Di Carlo, Marco; Ceccarelli, Luca; Giuseppetti, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    ), patient-centred measures of perceived dyspnea and functional disability. Computer-aided tomographic analysis is computationally efficient, and in combination with physiologic and patient-centred measures, it could allow a means for accurately assessing and monitoring the disease progression or response to therapy. PMID:26930658

  3. Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Condylar Symmetry and Condyle-Fossa Relationship of the Temporomandibular Joint in Subjects with Normal Occlusion and Malocclusion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnada, Swaroopa Rani; Gaddam, Kranthi Praveen Raju; Perumalla, Kiran; Khan, Imran; Mohammed, Naqeed Abdul

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The relationship of the condyle and the mandibular fossa differs in shape with type of malocclusion and skeletal pattern. A review of literature shows till date there are no studies on Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) condyle-fossa relation to the type of malocclusion based on growth pattern. Computed Tomography (CT) provides optimal imaging of the osseous components of the TMJ. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the condyle-fossa relationship and the dimensional and positional symmetries between the right and left condyles in subjects with normal occlusion and malocclusion in different growth patterns utilizing the CT scans of the TMJ. Materials and Methods Sixty subjects with age group of 18-30 years were selected for the study. The sample was divided into three groups based on overbite and growth pattern. The groups included 20 subjects with normal occlusion and average growth pattern, 20 patients with horizontal growth pattern and deep bite, 20 patients with vertical growth pattern and deep bite. The depth of the mandibular fossa, the condyle-fossa relationship, and the concentric position of the condyles were evaluated by the images obtained from the sagittal slices. ANOVA was performed to assess the significance. If it was found significant, post-hoc Tukey’s test was performed to see which two groups were statistically significant. Results No statistically significant difference was found in the anterior joint space and the superior joint space in horizontal and vertical growers with deep bite. Statistically significant (p <0.05) posterior positioning of the condyles was observed (nonconcentric positioning) in vertical growers with deep bite. Conclusion There is a significant change in the position of the condyle in vertical growers compared to average and horizontal growers. Left condyle is more anteriorly placed than the right condyle in all the three groups. There is no significant change in the vertical depth of the mandibular

  4. Relative plan robustness of step-and-shoot vs rotational intensity–modulated radiotherapy on repeat computed tomographic simulation for weight loss in head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, David J.; Beasley, William J.; Garcez, Kate; Lee, Lip W.; Sykes, Andrew J.; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Slevin, Nicholas J.

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Interfractional anatomical alterations may have a differential effect on the dose delivered by step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The increased degrees of freedom afforded by rotational delivery may increase plan robustness (measured by change in target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk [OARs]). However, this has not been evaluated for head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients who required repeat computed tomography (CT) simulation and replanning during head and neck IMRT were included. Step-and-shoot IMRT and VMAT plans were generated from the original planning scan. The initial and second CT simulation scans were fused and targets/OAR contours transferred, reviewed, and modified. The plans were applied to the second CT scan and doses recalculated without repeat optimization. Differences between step-and-shoot IMRT and VMAT for change in target volume coverage and doses to OARs between first and second CT scans were compared by Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: There were clinically relevant dosimetric changes between the first and the second CT scans for both the techniques (reduction in mean D{sub 95%} for PTV2 and PTV3, D{sub min} for CTV2 and CTV3, and increased mean doses to the parotid glands). However, there were no significant differences between step-and-shoot IMRT and VMAT for change in any target coverage parameter (including D{sub 95%} for PTV2 and PTV3 and D{sub min} for CTV2 and CTV3) or dose to any OARs (including parotid glands) between the first and the second CT scans. Conclusions: For patients with head and neck cancer who required replanning mainly due to weight loss, there were no significant differences in plan robustness between step-and-shoot IMRT and VMAT. This information is useful with increased clinical adoption of VMAT.

  5. Prognostic value of coronary computed tomographic angiography among 1,125 consecutive military health care beneficiaries without known coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gore, Rosco; Hulten, Edward; Cheezum, Michael K; Goyal, Manju; Fischer, Collin; Nguyen, Binh; Surry, Luke; Villines, Todd C

    2012-09-01

    We sought to assess the prognostic value of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) among military health care system beneficiaries. We identified 1,125 consecutive symptomatic patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for 64-slice CCTA (2006-2010) at a single center. CAD was assessed as none, < 50%, or > or = 50% (obstructive) coronary stenosis. A combined endpoint of major adverse events (death, myocardial infarction [MI], coronary revascularization > 90 days after CCTA) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards. The mean age was 50 +/- 12 years, 59% were male, and 617 (55%) had no CAD, 411 (37%) nonobstructive CAD, and 97 (9%) obstructive CAD on CCTA. During 2.0 +/- 1.1-year follow-up, there were 6 deaths, 3 MIs, and 6 revascularizations. There was 1 event in the no-CAD group (0.08%/year), 4 events in the nonobstructive group (0.5%/year), and 9 events in patients with obstructive CAD (4.5%/year) (p < 0.001). Patients with obstructive CAD had significantly increased combined adverse events. Increasing angina typicality and risk factors (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.46; p = 0.01) and obstructive CAD (HR 12.1, 95% CI 3.99-36.9; p < 0.001) were independently predictive of events. Absence of CAD was associated with very low event rates, providing military health care system patients and providers confidence in regards to cardiovascular risk, future deployments, and occupational assignments.

  6. Cone beam computed tomographic analysis of maxillary premolars and molars to detect the relationship between periapical and marginal bone loss and mucosal thickness of maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet-Ercan; Köse, Emre; Sisman, Yildiray

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed the relationship between mucosal thickness (MT) of the maxillary sinus and periodontal bone loss (PBL) and periapical condition of related teeth. We also aimed to identify the association between root apices and the inferior wall of the maxillary sinus using Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods In this study, CBCT images of 205 patients with 410 maxillary sinuses were examined, retrospectively. A total of 582 maxillary molars and 587 premolars were observed. The relationship of each root with maxillary sinus and apical lesions of these roots were classified, PBL was examined and the situations of adjacent teeth were estimated. The effect of these conditions on sinus mucosal thickness (MT) was evaluated. Results There was a significant correlation between MT of maxillary sinus and both PBL and age (r = 0.52, p=0.000 and r = 0.111, p= 0.002, respectively). The frequency of MT increased as the severity of apical lesion enlarged. A positive correlation was found between MT and degree of PBL and periapical lesions. To reveal the association between MT and pulpoperiapical condition bivariate correlation was done and a significant relationship between the pulpoperiapical condition and MT was found (r = 0.17, p=0.000). Conclusions This retrospective study showed that MT of the maxillary sinus was common among patients with PBL and MT was significantly associated with PBL and apical lesions. The relationship of maxillary sinus to adjacent teeth had also positive correlation with MT. CBCT imaging enabled better evaluation of maxillary sinus, posterior teeth and surrounding structures compared to other imaging tools. Key words:Maxillary sinus mucosal thickness, apical periodontitis, periodontal bone loss, CBCT. PMID:26241459

  7. Utilization of Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Angiography in Planning for Gamma Knife Radiosurgery of Arteriovenous Malformations: A Case Series and Early Report

    PubMed Central

    Safain, Mina G.; Rahal, Jason P.; Raval, Ami; Rivard, Mark J.; Mignano, John; Wu, Julian; Malek, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKR) for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) is predicated on inclusion of the entire nidus while excluding normal tissue. As such, GKR may be limited by the resolution and accuracy of the imaging modality used in targeting. Objective We present the first case series to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing ultra-high-resolution C-arm cone beam computed tomography angiography (CBCT-A) in AVM targeting. Methods From June 2009 to June 2013, CBCT-A was utilized for targeting of all patients with AVMs treated with GKR at our institution. Patients underwent Leksell stereotactic head frame placement followed by catheter-based biplane 2-D digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 3-D rotational angiography (3DRA), as well as CBCT-A. The CBCT-A dataset was used for stereotactic planning for GKR. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and then annually thereafter. Results CBCT-A-based targeting was used in twenty-two consecutive patients. CBCT-A provided detailed spatial resolution and sensitivity of nidal angioarchitecture enabling treatment. The average radiation dose to the margin of the AVM nidus corresponding to the 50% percent isodose line was 15.6 Gy. No patient had treatment-associated hemorrhage. At early follow-up (mean=16 months), 84% of patients had a decreasing or obliterated AVM nidus. Conclusion CBCT-A-guided radiosurgery is feasible and useful because it provides sufficient detailed resolution and sensitivity for imaging brain AVMs. PMID:24584136

  8. Global Density of the Earth Plasmasphere Deduced from the Images of its Phantom by Using a Fbp and Art Computer Tomographic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ronglan; Huang, Ya; Zhao, Hua; Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jin, Xin; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Hua

    The similarity of the projection in X ray Computer Tomography (CT) with the column density of the EUV Imager, provide the possibility to deduct the global density of Plasmasphere from the image of plasmaspheric, by using CT technique. Similar with the Medical CT, a phantom consists of plasmasphere and ionosphere had been used. The boundary of the plasmasphere is supposed as a dipole field line, with L= 4 Earth radii (Re), and the density within is equal to 1 and uniform. The ionosphere can be expected as a shell, with an inner and outer radius equal to 1.1 and 1. 2Re. And the density is supposed as 10.A Filtered Back-projection (FBP) Algorithm, and Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) CT had been used. The FBP is the simplest and basic algorithm in CT Techniques by using parallel projections. It can be used in the lunar based Earth's Plasmaspheric EUV Imager, since the field of view of the EUV Imager is small. In the EUV Imager of IMAGE satellite, since the imager is near to the Earth, so that the reconstruction algorithm will be a cone-beam. By using a cone beam to parallel beam rebinning, where the noise-ratio of cone beam versus parallel back-projection is acceptable, we can also use parallel back projection in the EUV Imager of IMAGE satellite. An improve accuracy of reconstruction algorithm is achieved by using a more complicate ART. The reconstruction quality is more efficient than FBP, when the image included the Earth's shelter and limit view angle imaging. To illustrate our result, we divide our reconstruction into some typical slices, parallel with the noon meridian plane of the Erath. For FBP, when the distance of the slice from the noon meridian plane is smaller than an Earth radius, we find some discrepancies between the reconstruction and the initial phantom, where ART is much better than FBT

  9. A cone-beam computed tomographic study of root canal systems in mandibular premolars in a Turkish population: Theoretical model for determining orifice shape

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Hakan; Capar, Ismail Davut; Ertas, Elif Tarim; Ertas, Huseyin; Akcay, Merve

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purposes of this retrospective study were to represent a newly designed theoretical model for determining orifice shape and morphologic properties of mandibular premolars and to correlate these findings with each other. Materials and Methods: A total of 287 mandibular premolar images obtained from 88 patients by cone-beam computed tomography were included in this study. The measurements were performed below the cementoenamel junction, and different orifice configurations were defined in accordance with various ratios. The age and gender of the patient, the tooth type and position, the number of roots, orifice configuration, root canal configuration, presence of C-shaped canal, and the presence of radicular groove were recorded. It was also recorded whether the root canal becomes round or not and if any, length of the root canal from the orifice to the section in which it becomes round. Furthermore, the theoretical model for determining orifice shape was defined after measurements. The orifice shape was determined as round, oval, flat, keyhole-shaped, and T-shaped, and orifices with short, normal length, and long isthmus. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-square and Spearman's rank correlation tests (P = 0.05). Results: Orifice configurations were, usually, flat (37%), or keyhole-shaped (23%). The prevalence of T-shaped was found to be 3.8%. The prevalence of C-shaped canals was found to be 2.1%. The percentage of root canals that became round in the middle or apical thirds was 95.1%. Radicular grooves were detected in 37 (24%) of first premolars and six (4.5%) of second premolars. Statistical analysis revealed that the mean length of distance until the canal reached a round shape varied according to age group (r = −0.270; P < 0.001). There was a statistically significant difference between radicular groove and tooth type (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The mean length of distance until the canal reached a round shape correlated with the

  10. Relationship between routine multi-detector cardiac computed tomographic angiography prior to reoperative cardiac surgery, length of stay, and hospital charges.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Matthew A; Roy, Sion K; Hebsur, Shinivas; Maluenda, Gabriel; Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, Guy; Landsman, Marc J; Hill, Peter C; Pita, Francisco; Corso, Paul J; Boyce, Steven W; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron; Taylor, Allen J

    2013-03-01

    While multi-detector cardiac computed tomography angiography (MDCCTA) prior to reoperative cardiac surgery (RCS) has been associated with improved clinical outcomes, its impact on hospital charges and length of stay remains unclear. We studied 364 patients undergoing RCS at Washington Hospital Center between 2004 and 2008, including 137 clinically referred for MDCCTA. Baseline demographics, procedural data, and perioperative outcomes were recorded at the time of the procedure. The primary clinical endpoint was the composite of perioperative death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and hemorrhage-related reoperation. Secondary clinical endpoints included surgical procedural variables and the perioperative volume of bleeding and transfusion. Length of stay was determined using the hospital's electronic medical record. Cost data were extracted from the hospital's billing summary. Analysis was performed on individual categories of care, as well as on total hospital charges. Data were compared between subjects with and without MDCCTA, after adjustment for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score. Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. MDCCTA was associated with shorter procedural times, shorter intensive care unit stays, fewer blood transfusions, and less frequent perioperative MI. There was additionally a trend towards a lower incidence of the primary endpoint (17.5 vs. 24.2 %, p = 0.13) primarily due to a lower incidence of perioperative MI (0 vs. 5.7 %, p = 0.002). MDCCTA was also associated with lower median recovery room [$1,325 (1,250-3,302) vs. $3,217 (1,325-5,353) p < 0.001] and nursing charges [$6,335 (3,623-10,478) vs. $6,916 (3,915-14,499) p = 0.03], although operating room charges were higher [$24,100 (22,300-29,700) vs. $23,500 (19,900-27,700) p < 0.05]. Median total charges [$127,000 (95,000-188,000) vs. $123,000 (86,800-226,000) p = 0.77] and length of stay [9 days (6-19) vs. 11 days (7-19), p = 0.21] were similar. Means analysis

  11. Expediting model-based optoacoustic reconstructions with tomographic symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lutzweiler, Christian; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Image quantification in optoacoustic tomography implies the use of accurate forward models of excitation, propagation, and detection of optoacoustic signals while inversions with high spatial resolution usually involve very large matrices, leading to unreasonably long computation times. The development of fast and memory efficient model-based approaches represents then an important challenge to advance on the quantitative and dynamic imaging capabilities of tomographic optoacoustic imaging. Methods: Herein, a method for simplification and acceleration of model-based inversions, relying on inherent symmetries present in common tomographic acquisition geometries, has been introduced. The method is showcased for the case of cylindrical symmetries by using polar image discretization of the time-domain optoacoustic forward model combined with efficient storage and inversion strategies. Results: The suggested methodology is shown to render fast and accurate model-based inversions in both numerical simulations andpost mortem small animal experiments. In case of a full-view detection scheme, the memory requirements are reduced by one order of magnitude while high-resolution reconstructions are achieved at video rate. Conclusions: By considering the rotational symmetry present in many tomographic optoacoustic imaging systems, the proposed methodology allows exploiting the advantages of model-based algorithms with feasible computational requirements and fast reconstruction times, so that its convenience and general applicability in optoacoustic imaging systems with tomographic symmetries is anticipated.

  12. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  13. Interrelationships between changes in anthropometric variables and computed tomography indices of abdominal fat distribution in response to a 1-year physical activity-healthy eating lifestyle modification program in abdominally obese men.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Nicole; Pelletier-Beaumont, Emilie; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Lemieux, Isabelle; Alméras, Natalie; Bergeron, Jean; Tremblay, Angelo; Poirier, Paul; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2014-04-01

    The objectives were to (i) measure the effects of a 1-year lifestyle modification program on body fat distribution/anthropometric variables; (ii) determine the interrelationships between changes in all these variables; and (iii) investigate whether there is a selective reduction in deep (DSAT) vs. superficial subcutaneous adipose tissue (SSAT) at the abdominal level following a 1-year lifestyle modification program. Anthropometric variables, body composition and abdominal and midthigh fat distribution were assessed at baseline and after 1 year in 109 sedentary, dyslipidemic and abdominally obese men. Reductions in anthropometric variables, skinfold thicknesses (except the trunk/extremity ratio) and fat mass as well as an increase in fat-free mass were observed after 1 year (p < 0.0001). Decreases in abdominal adipose tissue volumes were also noted (-23%, -26%, -18%, -19%, -17%, p < 0.0001 for total adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, subcutaneous adipose tissue, DSAT and SSAT, respectively). Adipose tissue areas at midthigh also decreased (-18%, -18%, -17%, p < 0.0001 for total, deep, and subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively). A reduction (-9%, p < 0.0001) in low-attenuation muscle area and an increase (+1%, p < 0.05) in normal-attenuation muscle area were also observed. There was a positive relationship between changes in visceral adipose tissue and changes in DSAT (r = 0.65, p < 0.0001) or SSAT (r = 0.63, p < 0.0001). Although absolute changes in DSAT were greater than changes in SSAT, relative changes in both depots were similar, independent of changes in visceral adipose tissue. The 1-year lifestyle modification program therefore improved the body fat distribution pattern and midthigh muscle quality in abdominally obese men.

  14. Modes of presentation and management of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Curci, J J

    1994-06-01

    The preoperative diagnosis of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) is seldom made, yet knowledge of its presence would be an aid to the surgeon. A heightened awareness of the variety of clinical presentations of IAAA should prompt the clinician to consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of back pain, weight loss and obstructive uropathy. Hypovolemic shock, gastrointestinal bleeding and asymptomatic IAAA have also occurred, albeit much less frequently. Patients who are hemodynamically stable might benefit from a short period of diagnostic and therapeutic measures before operation. Patients undergoing aneurysm repair on an "urgent" rather than "emergent" basis have been shown to have lower mortality and morbidity rates with enhancement of their cardiopulmonary and renal status. Computed tomographic scanning preoperatively in stable patients using careful supervision can confirm the diagnosis and allow more time for patient and surgical team preparation. Knowledge and avoidance of technical pitfalls intraoperatively further lessens mortality and complications.

  15. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  16. Single-shot ultrafast tomographic imaging by spectral multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matlis, N. H.; Axley, A.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-10-01

    Computed tomography has profoundly impacted science, medicine and technology by using projection measurements scanned over multiple angles to permit cross-sectional imaging of an object. The application of computed tomography to moving or dynamically varying objects, however, has been limited by the temporal resolution of the technique, which is set by the time required to complete the scan. For objects that vary on ultrafast timescales, traditional scanning methods are not an option. Here we present a non-scanning method capable of resolving structure on femtosecond timescales by using spectral multiplexing of a single laser beam to perform tomographic imaging over a continuous range of angles simultaneously. We use this technique to demonstrate the first single-shot ultrafast computed tomography reconstructions and obtain previously inaccessible structure and position information for laser-induced plasma filaments. This development enables real-time tomographic imaging for ultrafast science, and offers a potential solution to the challenging problem of imaging through scattering surfaces.

  17. Single-shot ultrafast tomographic imaging by spectral multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Matlis, N H; Axley, A; Leemans, W P

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography has profoundly impacted science, medicine and technology by using projection measurements scanned over multiple angles to permit cross-sectional imaging of an object. The application of computed tomography to moving or dynamically varying objects, however, has been limited by the temporal resolution of the technique, which is set by the time required to complete the scan. For objects that vary on ultrafast timescales, traditional scanning methods are not an option. Here we present a non-scanning method capable of resolving structure on femtosecond timescales by using spectral multiplexing of a single laser beam to perform tomographic imaging over a continuous range of angles simultaneously. We use this technique to demonstrate the first single-shot ultrafast computed tomography reconstructions and obtain previously inaccessible structure and position information for laser-induced plasma filaments. This development enables real-time tomographic imaging for ultrafast science, and offers a potential solution to the challenging problem of imaging through scattering surfaces.

  18. Duplex Ultrasound versus Computed Tomography for the Postoperative Follow-Up of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair. Where Do We Stand Now?

    PubMed Central

    Karanikola, Evridiki; Dalainas, Ilias; Karaolanis, Georgios; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has rapidly developed to be the preferred method for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with suitable anatomy. EVAR offers the advantage of lower perioperative mortality and morbidity but carries the cost of device-related complications such as endoleak, graft migration, graft thrombosis, and structural graft failure. These complications mandate a lifelong surveillance of EVAR patients and their endografts. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the safety of color-duplex ultrasound (CDU) as compared with computed tomography (CT), based on the current literature, for post-EVAR surveillance. The post-EVAR follow-up modalities, CDU versus CT, are evaluated questioning three parameters: (1) accuracy of aneurysm size, (2) detection and classification of endoleaks, and (3) detection of stent-graft deformation. Studies comparing CDU with CT scan for investigation of post-EVAR complications have produced mixed results. Further and long-term research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of CDU versus CT, before CDU can be recommended as the primary imaging modality for EVAR surveillance, in place of CT for stable aneurysms. PMID:25317026

  19. Duplex Ultrasound versus Computed Tomography for the Postoperative Follow-Up of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair. Where Do We Stand Now?

    PubMed

    Karanikola, Evridiki; Dalainas, Ilias; Karaolanis, Georgios; Zografos, Georgios; Filis, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    In the last decade, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has rapidly developed to be the preferred method for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patients with suitable anatomy. EVAR offers the advantage of lower perioperative mortality and morbidity but carries the cost of device-related complications such as endoleak, graft migration, graft thrombosis, and structural graft failure. These complications mandate a lifelong surveillance of EVAR patients and their endografts. The purpose of this study is to review and evaluate the safety of color-duplex ultrasound (CDU) as compared with computed tomography (CT), based on the current literature, for post-EVAR surveillance. The post-EVAR follow-up modalities, CDU versus CT, are evaluated questioning three parameters: (1) accuracy of aneurysm size, (2) detection and classification of endoleaks, and (3) detection of stent-graft deformation. Studies comparing CDU with CT scan for investigation of post-EVAR complications have produced mixed results. Further and long-term research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of CDU versus CT, before CDU can be recommended as the primary imaging modality for EVAR surveillance, in place of CT for stable aneurysms.

  20. Optimal scan delay depending on contrast material injection duration in abdominal multi-phase computed tomography of pancreas and liver in normal Beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Young; Lee, In; Seo, Ji-Won; Park, Hyun-Young; Choi, Ho-Jung

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to establish the values for optimal fixed scan delays and diagnostic scan delays associated with the bolus-tracking technique using various contrast material injection durations in canine abdominal multi-phase computed tomography (CT). This study consisted of two experiments employing the crossover method. In experiment 1, three dynamic scans at the porta hepatis were performed using 5, 10 and 15 sec injection durations. In experiment 2, two CT scans consisting of five multi-phase series with different scan delays of 5 sec intervals for bolus-tracking were performed using 5, 10 and 15 sec injection duration. Mean arrival times to aortic enhancement peak (12.0, 15.6, and 18.6 sec for 5, 10, and 15 sec, respectively) and pancreatic parenchymal peak (17.8, 25.1, and 29.5 sec) differed among injection durations. The maximum mean attenuation values of aortas and pancreases were shown at the scan section with 0 and 5, 0 and 10 and 5 and 10 sec diagnostic scan delays during each injection duration, respectively. The optimal scan delays of the arterial and pancreatic parenchymal phase in multi-phase CT scan using fixed scan delay or bolus-tracking should be determined with consideration of the injection duration. PMID:27297414

  1. Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Classifying Endoleaks After Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aorta Aneurysms: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Recaldini, Chiara; Mangini, Monica; Bertolotti, Elena; Caronno, Roberto; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Annibale Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in endoleak classification after endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to computed tomography angiography (CTA). From May 2001 to April 2003, 10 patients with endoleaks already detected by CTA underwent CEUS with Sonovue (registered) to confirm the CTA classification or to reclassify the endoleak. In three conflicting cases, the patients were also studied with conventional angiography. CEUS confirmed the CTA classification in seven cases (type II endoleaks). Two CTA type III endoleaks were classified as type II using CEUS and one CTA type II endoleak was classified as type I by CEUS. Regarding the cases with discordant classification, conventional angiography confirmed the ultrasound classification. Additionally, CEUS documented the origin of type II endoleaks in all cases. After CEUS reclassification of endoleaks, a significant change in patient management occurred in three cases. CEUS allows a better attribution of the origin of the endoleak, as it shows the flow in real time. CEUS is more specific than CTA in endoleak classification and gives more accurate information in therapeutic planning.

  2. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  3. Varied computed tomographic appearance of intracranial cryptococcosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, S.H.; Jacoby, C.G.

    1982-06-01

    CT findings in 12 cases of intracranial cryptococcal infection were reviewed. Five patients had a normal scan. Seven patients had communicating or noncommunicating hydrocephalus. Additional findings included meningeal opacification, cerebritis, abscess, and granuloma. Although not specific for cryptococcosis, the CT scan is helpful for evaluating and following the status of the ventricles, subarachnoid spaces, and meninges.

  4. Shack-Hartmann tomographic wavefront reconstruction using LGS: analysis of spot elongation and fratricide effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clelia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Gratadour, Damien; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    Noise effects induced by elongation have to be considered globally in a multi-channel tomographic reconstruction analysis. Such an analysis allows a fine estimation of performance and to compare launching options. We developed a modal LGS tomographic code based on pseudo-analytical matrix formalism. This modal analysis is computing and memory intensive. Therefore we limit the simulation to downscaled cases with diameters ranging from D = 4 to 21 m. We also limit the number of turbulent layers to a few equivalent layers. Including spot elongation and Rayleigh fratricide effect, when considering a global tomographic reconstruction, edge launching gives lightly better performance and limits the risk of possible underestimation of fratricide scatter.

  5. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  6. CT-guided Irreversible Electroporation in an Acute Porcine Liver Model: Effect of Previous Transarterial Iodized Oil Tissue Marking on Technical Parameters, 3D Computed Tomographic Rendering of the Electroporation Zone, and Histopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M.; Fritz, S.; Vollherbst, D.; Zelzer, S.; Wachter, M. F. Bellemann, N. Gockner, T. Mokry, T. Schmitz, A.; Aulmann, S.; Stampfl, U.; Pereira, P.; Kauczor, H. U.; Werner, J.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the effect of previous transarterial iodized oil tissue marking (ITM) on technical parameters, three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided irreversible electroporation (IRE) in an acute porcine liver model as a potential strategy to improve IRE performance.MethodsAfter Ethics Committee approval was obtained, in five landrace pigs, two IREs of the right and left liver (RL and LL) were performed under CT guidance with identical electroporation parameters. Before IRE, transarterial marking of the LL was performed with iodized oil. Nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT examinations followed. One hour after IRE, animals were killed and livers collected. Mean resulting voltage and amperage during IRE were assessed. For 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, parameters for size and shape were analyzed. Quantitative data were compared by the Mann–Whitney test. Histopathological differences were assessed.ResultsMean resulting voltage and amperage were 2,545.3 ± 66.0 V and 26.1 ± 1.8 A for RL, and 2,537.3 ± 69.0 V and 27.7 ± 1.8 A for LL without significant differences. Short axis, volume, and sphericity index were 16.5 ± 4.4 mm, 8.6 ± 3.2 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for RL, and 18.2 ± 3.4 mm, 9.8 ± 3.8 cm{sup 3}, and 1.7 ± 0.3 for LL without significant differences. For RL and LL, the electroporation zone consisted of severely widened hepatic sinusoids containing erythrocytes and showed homogeneous apoptosis. For LL, iodized oil could be detected in the center and at the rim of the electroporation zone.ConclusionThere is no adverse effect of previous ITM on technical parameters, 3D CT rendering of the electroporation zone, and histopathology after CT-guided IRE of the liver.

  7. Relationship between lung function and quantitative computed tomographic parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A single-center study

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Ruth A.; Barker, Bethan L.; Newby, Chris; Pakkal, Mini; Baldi, Simonetta; Kajekar, Radhika; Kay, Richard; Laurencin, Marie; Marshall, Richard P.; Sousa, Ana R.; Parmar, Harsukh; Siddiqui, Salman; Gupta, Sumit; Brightling, Chris E.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of studies comparing asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on thoracic quantitative computed tomographic (QCT) parameters. Objectives We sought to compare QCT parameters of airway remodeling, air trapping, and emphysema between asthmatic patients and patients with COPD and explore their relationship with airflow limitation. Methods Asthmatic patients (n = 171), patients with COPD (n = 81), and healthy subjects (n = 49) recruited from a single center underwent QCT and clinical characterization. Results Proximal airway percentage wall area (%WA) was significantly increased in asthmatic patients (62.5% [SD, 2.2]) and patients with COPD (62.7% [SD, 2.3]) compared with that in healthy control subjects (60.3% [SD, 2.2], P < .001). Air trapping measured based on mean lung density expiratory/inspiratory ratio was significantly increased in patients with COPD (mean, 0.922 [SD, 0.037]) and asthmatic patients (mean, 0.852 [SD, 0.061]) compared with that in healthy subjects (mean, 0.816 [SD, 0.066], P < .001). Emphysema assessed based on lung density measured by using Hounsfield units below which 15% of the voxels lie (Perc15) was a feature of COPD only (patients with COPD: mean, −964 [SD, 19.62] vs asthmatic patients: mean, −937 [SD, 22.7] and healthy subjects: mean, −937 [SD, 17.1], P < .001). Multiple regression analyses showed that the strongest predictor of lung function impairment in asthmatic patients was %WA, whereas in the COPD and asthma subgrouped with postbronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted value of less than 80%, it was air trapping. Factor analysis of QCT parameters in asthmatic patients and patients with COPD combined determined 3 components, with %WA, air trapping, and Perc15 values being the highest loading factors. Cluster analysis identified 3 clusters with mild, moderate, or severe lung function impairment with corresponding decreased lung density (Perc15 values) and increased air

  8. Local tomographic phase microscopy from differential projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, G. N.; Levin, G. G.; Minaev, V. L.; Nekrasov, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed to use local tomography for optical studies of the internal structure of transparent phase microscopic objects, for example, living cells. From among the many local tomography methods that exist, the algorithms of back projection summation (in which partial derivatives of projections are used as projection data) are chosen. The application of local tomography to living cells is reasonable because, using optical phase microscopy, one can easily obtain projection data in the form of first-order derivatives of projections applying the methods of differential interference contrast and shear interferometry. The mathematical fundamentals of local tomography in differential projections are considered, and a computer simulation of different local tomography methods is performed. A tomographic phase microscope and the results of reconstructing a local tomogram of an erythrocyte from a set of experimental differential projections are described.

  9. Measuring of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction before Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoona; Joh, Jin Hyun; Park, Ho-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Conventional computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard method for case planning for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, aortography with a marking catheter is needed for measuring the actual length of an aneurysm. With advances in imaging technology, a 3-dimensional (3D) workstation can obviate the need for the aortography. The objective of this study was to determine whether a 3D workstation could obviate the need for aortography for EVAR. Materials and Methods One vascular surgeon and 1 interventional radiologist retrospectively assessed axial CT scans and reformatted the 3D CT scans by using the iNtuition workstation (TeraRecon Inc., San Mateo, CA, USA) for 25 patients who underwent EVAR. Four measurements of diameter and length were obtained from each modality. The actual length of an aneurysm for the proper graft was decided by 2 observers by reviewing the aortography with a marking catheter. Results The measurements from the 2 modalities were reproducible with intraobserver correlation coefficients of 0.89 to 1.0 for conventional CT and 0.98 to 1.0 for 3D workstation. Interobserver correlation coefficients were 0.29 to 0.95 for conventional CT and 0.85 to 0.99 for the 3D workstation. The length of the aneurysm for proper main graft coincided in 18 and 14 patients according to the conventional CT scan and in 21 and 18 patients according to the 3D workstation, respectively. Conclusion The interobserver agreement in planning EVAR was significantly better with the iNtuition 3D workstation. But aortography with a marking catheter may still be needed for selecting the proper graft. PMID:28377909

  10. SPICE benchmark for global tomographic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yilong; Capdeville, Yann; Maupin, Valerie; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Lebedev, Sergei; Beucler, Eric

    2008-11-01

    The existing global tomographic methods result in different models due to different parametrization, scale resolution and theoretical approach. To test how current imaging techniques are limited by approximations in theory and by the inadequacy of data quality and coverage, it is necessary to perform a global-scale benchmark to understand the resolving properties of each specific imaging algorithm. In the framework of the Seismic wave Propagation and Imaging in Complex media: a European network (SPICE) project, it was decided to perform a benchmark experiment of global inversion algorithms. First, a preliminary benchmark with a simple isotropic model is carried out to check the feasibility in terms of acquisition geometry and numerical accuracy. Then, to fully validate tomographic schemes with a challenging synthetic data set, we constructed one complex anisotropic global model, which is characterized by 21 elastic constants and includes 3-D heterogeneities in velocity, anisotropy (radial and azimuthal anisotropy), attenuation, density, as well as surface topography and bathymetry. The intermediate-period (>32 s), high fidelity anisotropic modelling was performed by using state-of-the-art anisotropic anelastic modelling code, that is, coupled spectral element method (CSEM), on modern massively parallel computing resources. The benchmark data set consists of 29 events and three-component seismograms are recorded by 256 stations. Because of the limitation of the available computing power, synthetic seismograms have a minimum period of 32 s and a length of 10 500 s. The inversion of the benchmark data set demonstrates several well-known problems of classical surface wave tomography, such as the importance of crustal correction to recover the shallow structures, the loss of resolution with depth, the smearing effect, both horizontal and vertical, the inaccuracy of amplitude of isotropic S-wave velocity variation, the difficulty of retrieving the magnitude of azimuthal

  11. Tomographic Neutron Imaging using SIRT

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor, Jens; FINNEY, Charles E A; Toops, Todd J

    2013-01-01

    Neutron imaging is complementary to x-ray imaging in that materials such as water and plastic are highly attenuating while material such as metal is nearly transparent. We showcase tomographic imaging of a diesel particulate filter. Reconstruction is done using a modified version of SIRT called PSIRT. We expand on previous work and introduce Tikhonov regularization. We show that near-optimal relaxation can still be achieved. The algorithmic ideas apply to cone beam x-ray CT and other inverse problems.

  12. Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintermüller, C; Marone, F; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M

    2010-07-01

    With synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy, three-dimensional structures down to the micrometer level can be visualized. Tomographic data sets typically consist of 1000 to 1500 projections of 1024 x 1024 to 2048 x 2048 pixels and are acquired in 5-15 min. A processing pipeline has been developed to handle this large amount of data efficiently and to reconstruct the tomographic volume within a few minutes after the end of a scan. Just a few seconds after the raw data have been acquired, a selection of reconstructed slices is accessible through a web interface for preview and to fine tune the reconstruction parameters. The same interface allows initiation and control of the reconstruction process on the computer cluster. By integrating all programs and tools, required for tomographic reconstruction into the pipeline, the necessary user interaction is reduced to a minimum. The modularity of the pipeline allows functionality for new scan protocols to be added, such as an extended field of view, or new physical signals such as phase-contrast or dark-field imaging etc.

  13. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  14. SCCT guidelines for the performance and acquisition of coronary computed tomographic angiography: A report of the society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee: Endorsed by the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging (NASCI).

    PubMed

    Abbara, Suhny; Blanke, Philipp; Maroules, Christopher D; Cheezum, Michael; Choi, Andrew D; Han, B Kelly; Marwan, Mohamed; Naoum, Chris; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Schoenhagen, Paul; Villines, Todd; Leipsic, Jonathon

    In response to recent technological advancements in acquisition techniques as well as a growing body of evidence regarding the optimal performance of coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA), the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee has produced this update to its previously established 2009 "Guidelines for the Performance of Coronary CTA" (1). The purpose of this document is to provide standards meant to ensure reliable practice methods and quality outcomes based on the best available data in order to improve the diagnostic care of patients. Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines for the Interpretation is published separately (2). The Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Guidelines Committee ensures compliance with all existing standards for the declaration of conflict of interest by all authors and reviewers for the purpose ofclarity and transparency.

  15. Superiorization of incremental optimization algorithms for statistical tomographic image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, E. S.; Zibetti, M. V. W.; Miqueles, E. X.

    2017-04-01

    We propose the superiorization of incremental algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The resulting methods follow a better path in its way to finding the optimal solution for the maximum likelihood problem in the sense that they are closer to the Pareto optimal curve than the non-superiorized techniques. A new scaled gradient iteration is proposed and three superiorization schemes are evaluated. Theoretical analysis of the methods as well as computational experiments with both synthetic and real data are provided.

  16. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management

    PubMed Central

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E.; Chaer, Rabih A.; Avgerinos, Efthymios D.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:27303669

  17. Contemporary Applications of Ultrasound in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Management.

    PubMed

    Scaife, Mark; Giannakopoulos, Triantafillos; Al-Khoury, Georges E; Chaer, Rabih A; Avgerinos, Efthymios D

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a well-established screening tool for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) and is currently recommended not only for those with a relevant family history but also for all men and high-risk women older than 65 years of age. The advent of minimally invasive endovascular techniques in the treatment of AAAs [endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR)] has increased the need for repeat imaging, especially in the postoperative period. Nevertheless, preoperative planning, intraoperative execution, and postoperative surveillance all mandate accurate imaging. While computed tomographic angiography and angiography have dominated the field, repeatedly exposing patients to the deleterious effects of cumulative radiation and intravenous nephrotoxic contrast, US technology has significantly evolved over the past decade. In addition to standard color duplex US, 2D, 3D, or 4D contrast-enhanced US modalities are revolutionizing AAA management and postoperative surveillance. This technology can accurately measure AAA diameter and volume, and most importantly, it can detect endoleaks post-EVAR with high sensitivity and specificity. 4D contrast-enhanced US can even provide hemodynamic information about the branch vessels following fenestrated EVARs. The need for experienced US operators and accredited vascular labs is mandatory to guarantee the reliability of the results. This review article presents a comprehensive overview of the literature on the state-of-art US imaging in AAA management, including post-EVAR follow-up, techniques, and diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Linear adaptive noise-reduction filters for tomographic imaging: Optimizing for minimum mean square error

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, W Y

    1993-04-01

    This thesis solves the problem of finding the optimal linear noise-reduction filter for linear tomographic image reconstruction. The optimization is data dependent and results in minimizing the mean-square error of the reconstructed image. The error is defined as the difference between the result and the best possible reconstruction. Applications for the optimal filter include reconstructions of positron emission tomographic (PET), X-ray computed tomographic, single-photon emission tomographic, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Using high resolution PET as an example, the optimal filter is derived and presented for the convolution backprojection, Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse, and the natural-pixel basis set reconstruction methods. Simulations and experimental results are presented for the convolution backprojection method.

  19. Optimization of tomographic reconstruction workflows on geographically distributed resources

    SciTech Connect

    Bicer, Tekin; Gursoy, Doga; Kettimuthu, Rajkumar; De Carlo, Francesco; Foster, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    New technological advancements in synchrotron light sources enable data acquisitions at unprecedented levels. This emergent trend affects not only the size of the generated data but also the need for larger computational resources. Although beamline scientists and users have access to local computational resources, these are typically limited and can result in extended execution times. Applications that are based on iterative processing as in tomographic reconstruction methods require high-performance compute clusters for timely analysis of data. Here, time-sensitive analysis and processing of Advanced Photon Source data on geographically distributed resources are focused on. Two main challenges are considered: (i) modeling of the performance of tomographic reconstruction workflows and (ii) transparent execution of these workflows on distributed resources. For the former, three main stages are considered: (i) data transfer between storage and computational resources, (i) wait/queue time of reconstruction jobs at compute resources, and (iii) computation of reconstruction tasks. These performance models allow evaluation and estimation of the execution time of any given iterative tomographic reconstruction workflow that runs on geographically distributed resources. For the latter challenge, a workflow management system is built, which can automate the execution of workflows and minimize the user interaction with the underlying infrastructure. The system utilizes Globus to perform secure and efficient data transfer operations. The proposed models and the workflow management system are evaluated by using three high-performance computing and two storage resources, all of which are geographically distributed. Workflows were created with different computational requirements using two compute-intensive tomographic reconstruction algorithms. Experimental evaluation shows that the proposed models and system can be used for selecting the optimum

  20. Downscaling Smooth Tomographic Models: Separating Intrinsic and Apparent Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a number of tomographic models based on full waveform inversion have been published. Due to computational constraints, the fitted waveforms are low pass filtered, which results in an inability to map features smaller than half the shortest wavelength. However, these tomographic images are not a simple spatial average of the true model, but rather an effective, apparent, or equivalent model that provides a similar 'long-wave' data fit. For example, it can be shown that a series of horizontal isotropic layers will be seen by a 'long wave' as a smooth anisotropic medium. In this way, the observed anisotropy in tomographic models is a combination of intrinsic anisotropy produced by lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of minerals, and apparent anisotropy resulting from the incapacity of mapping discontinuities. Interpretations of observed anisotropy (e.g. in terms of mantle flow) requires therefore the separation of its intrinsic and apparent components. The "up-scaling" relations that link elastic properties of a rapidly varying medium to elastic properties of the effective medium as seen by long waves are strongly non-linear and their inverse highly non-unique. That is, a smooth homogenized effective model is equivalent to a large number of models with discontinuities. In the 1D case, Capdeville et al (GJI, 2013) recently showed that a tomographic model which results from the inversion of low pass filtered waveforms is an homogenized model, i.e. the same as the model computed by upscaling the true model. Here we propose a stochastic method to sample the ensemble of layered models equivalent to a given tomographic profile. We use a transdimensional formulation where the number of layers is variable. Furthermore, each layer may be either isotropic (1 parameter) or intrinsically anisotropic (2 parameters). The parsimonious character of the Bayesian inversion gives preference to models with the least number of parameters (i.e. least number of layers, and

  1. Algebraic filter approach for fast approximation of nonlinear tomographic reconstruction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plantagie, Linda; Batenburg, Kees Joost

    2015-01-01

    We present a computational approach for fast approximation of nonlinear tomographic reconstruction methods by filtered backprojection (FBP) methods. Algebraic reconstruction algorithms are the methods of choice in a wide range of tomographic applications, yet they require significant computation time, restricting their usefulness. We build upon recent work on the approximation of linear algebraic reconstruction methods and extend the approach to the approximation of nonlinear reconstruction methods which are common in practice. We demonstrate that if a blueprint image is available that is sufficiently similar to the scanned object, our approach can compute reconstructions that approximate iterative nonlinear methods, yet have the same speed as FBP.

  2. Tomographic inversion for microseismic source parameters in mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hua-Xiang; Jiang, Fu-Xing; Song, Xue-Juan; Yang, Shu-Hua; Jiao, Jun-Ru

    2012-06-01

    We propose a new method for inverting source function of microseismic event induced in mining. The observed data from microseismic monitoring during mining are represented by a wave equation in a spherical coordinate system and then the data are transformed from the time-space domain to the time-slowness domain based on tomographic principle, from whichwe can obtain the signals related to the source in the time-slowness domain. Through analyzing the relationship between the signal located at the maximum energy and the source function, we derive the tomographic equations to compute the source function from the signals and to calculate the effective radiated energy based on the source function. Moreover, we fit the real amplitude spectrum of the source function computed from the observed data into the ω -2 model based on the least squares principle and determine the zero-frequency level spectrum and the corner frequency, finally, the source rupture radius of the event is calculated and The synthetic and field examples demonstrate that the proposed tomographic inversion methods are reliable and efficient

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  5. Evaluation of a multicore-optimized implementation for tomographic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Agulleiro, Jose-Ignacio; Fernández, José Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Tomography allows elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of an object from a set of projection images. In life sciences, electron microscope tomography is providing invaluable information about the cell structure at a resolution of a few nanometres. Here, large images are required to combine wide fields of view with high resolution requirements. The computational complexity of the algorithms along with the large image size then turns tomographic reconstruction into a computationally demanding problem. Traditionally, high-performance computing techniques have been applied to cope with such demands on supercomputers, distributed systems and computer clusters. In the last few years, the trend has turned towards graphics processing units (GPUs). Here we present a detailed description and a thorough evaluation of an alternative approach that relies on exploitation of the power available in modern multicore computers. The combination of single-core code optimization, vector processing, multithreading and efficient disk I/O operations succeeds in providing fast tomographic reconstructions on standard computers. The approach turns out to be competitive with the fastest GPU-based solutions thus far.

  6. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  7. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  8. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  9. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  10. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.; Moss, A.A.; Baker, E.L.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on small bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.

  11. Multimodality tomographic scintimammography with PET, PECI, and SPECT: initial evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, Andrzej; Feiglin, David H.; Thomas, Frank D.; Hellwig, Bradford J.; Gagne, George M.

    2002-04-01

    We compared tomographic scintimammography performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission coincidence imaging (PECI) and positron emission tomography (PET). A female thorax phantom was used. Activities of the myocardium, thorax and breasts were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. Hollow plastic spheres, imitating hot lesions (1.5-20ml), filled with radioactive saline were inserted in the center of each breast. Specific activities of internal organs were adjusted to emulate the count rate observed with patients. SPECT data were acquired with Tc-99m using gamma cameras with NaI(Tl) detectors. A modified FBP (CODE) reconstruction algorithm was used to render SPECT tomographic images. PECI (Siemens E.CAM with NaI(Tl)) and PET (GE Advance with BGO) data were acquired using F-18 FDG. Vendor supplied reconstruction algorithms were used. The reconstructed hot lesions contrast and resolution were investigated. Image quality obtained can be ranked as follows: (1) PET(BGO), (2) PECI(NaI), (3) SPECT(NaI) In conclusion, assuming comparable uptake values of Tc-99m-sestamibi and F-18 FDG, PET seems to be a superior methodology in visualization of breast lesion as compared to SPECT and PECI. All these tomographic methods appear to be promising adjunct to x-ray mammography in difficult to interpret cases.

  12. Computed tomography, lymphography, and staging laparotomy: correlations in initial staging of Hodgkin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.; Blank, N.; Young, S.W.; Neumann, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-07-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated Hodgkin disease underwent abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scanning and bipedal lymphography. These studies were followed by staging laparotomy, which included biopsy of the liver, retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes, and splenectomy. Correlation of the results of the imaging studies with the histopathologic diagnoses revealed a small - but significant - increased accuracy of lymphography compared with CT in assessing the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The theoretical advantages of CT scanning in detecting lymphomatous deposits in lymph nodes about the celiac axis and the mesentery, or in the liver and spleen, were not confirmed.

  13. Tomographic inversion for ALIS noise and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Björn

    1998-11-01

    In this report the problems of resolution and noise sensitivity of tomographic reconstructions from ground-based multistation imaging of aurora with the auroral large imaging system (ALIS) are considered. ALIS is a ground-based grid of high-performance CCD-imaging stations at high latitudes. For evaluation of the resolution and noise sensitivity of current tomographic reconstruction procedures a full model simulation of the ALIS system is presented. The results show that relative errors are typically in the range 0.05-0.1 for typical noise levels in measurements of aurora. A general method to estimate resolution in a tomographic imaging system is developed and used to give estimates of the horizontal and vertical resolution. Its current limitations and future perspective are briefly discussed. A method to retrieve feasible tomographic reconstructions from a few image projections with variable noise level are outlined.

  14. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  15. Guideline for minimizing radiation exposure during acquisition of coronary artery calcium scans with the use of multidetector computed tomography: a report by the Society for Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention Tomographic Imaging and Prevention Councils in collaboration with the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Voros, Szilard; Rivera, Juan J; Berman, Daniel S; Blankstein, Ron; Budoff, Matthew J; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Dey, Damini; Halliburton, Sandra S; Hecht, Harvey S; Nasir, Khurram; Santos, Raul D; Shapiro, Michael D; Taylor, Allen J; Valeti, Uma S; Young, Phillip M; Weissman, Gaby

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scanning is an important tool for risk stratification in intermediate-risk, asymptomatic subjects without previous coronary disease. However, the clinical benefit of improved risk prediction needs to be balanced against the risk of the use of ionizing radiation. Although there is increasing emphasis on the need to obtain CAC scans at low-radiation exposure to the patient, very few practical documents exist to aid laboratories and health care professionals on how to obtain such low-radiation scans. The Tomographic Imaging Council of the Society for Atherosclerosis Imaging and Prevention, in collaboration with the Prevention Council and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, created a task force and writing group to generate a practical document to address parameters that can be influenced by careful attention to image acquisition. Patient selection for CAC scanning should be based on national guidelines. It is recommended that laboratories performing CAC examinations monitor radiation exposure (dose-length-product [DLP]) and effective radiation dose (E) in all patients. DLP should be <200 mGy × cm; E should average 1.0-1.5 mSv and should be <3.0 mSv. On most scanner platforms, CAC imaging should be performed in an axial mode with prospective electrocardiographic triggering, using tube voltage of 120 kVp. Tube current should be carefully selected on the basis of patient size, potentially using chest lateral width measured on the topogram. Scan length should be limited for the coverage of the heart only. When patients and imaging parameters are selected appropriately, CAC scanning can be performed with low levels of radiation exposure.

  16. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilsky, A. V.; Lozhkin, V. A.; Markovich, D. M.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART.

  17. Torsion of an intra-abdominal testis.

    PubMed

    Lewis; Roller; Parra; Cotlar

    2000-09-01

    To present a case of torsion of a nonneoplastic intra-abdominal testis with an unusual clinical presentation.A 26-year-old active duty Navy Petty Officer presented to the emergency department on 3 occasions over a 5-day period with lower abdominal pain. Physical examination demonstrated acute tenderness in the left lower quadrant with sugestion of a normal spermatic cord and atrophic testis in the left scrotum. Computed tomography scan demonstrated an intra-abdominal lesion near the internal inguinal ring. The patient underwent surgical exploration through an inguinal incision. Torsion of a nonviable intra-abdominal testis was present. The scrotum contained only the vas deferens and cremasteric muscle. An orchiectomy was performed with removal of the vas deferens and other cord structures.The unusual clinical finding of acute torsion of an intra-abdominal testis, associated with an apparent atrophic scrotal testis, presented a confusing clinical picture. Computed tomography scan did not clarify the issue sufficiently to establish a definite preoperative diagnosis. Clinical suspicion prompted early surgical intervention. Review of the current literature produced 60 reported cases of torsion of an intra-abdominal testis. Two thirds of these involved testicular neoplasm, usually seminoma. Although the clinical presentation varied, most patients had recent onset of lower abdominal pain associated with tenderness and, in half the cases, a mass. Patients almost always presented with an absent scrotal testis on the involved side, and not infrequently reported previous surgery thought to be an orchiectomy.Diagnosis of an intra-abdominal testicular torsion is rare, particularly when no neoplasm is present. A high index of suspicion must be maintained whenever there is abdominal pain and undescended testis. The surgical history and imaging studies may not clarify a confusing clinical picture.

  18. Use of prediction equations to determine the accuracy of whole-body fat and fat-free mass and appendicular skeletal muscle mass measurements from a single abdominal image using computed tomography in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Robert D; Cardiff, Katrina; Rosenthall, Leonard; Lucar, Enriqueta; Trutschnigg, Barbara; Vigano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and single abdominal images from computed tomography (CT) in advanced cancer patients (ACP) have important diagnostic and prognostic value. The question arises as to whether CT scans can serve as surrogates for DXA in terms of whole-body fat-free mass (FFM), whole-body fat mass (FM), and appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) mass. Predictive equations to estimate body composition for ACP from CT images have been proposed (Mourtzakis et al. 2008; Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metabol. 33(5): 997-1006); however, these equations have yet to be validated in an independent cohort of ACP. Thus, this study evaluated the accuracy of these equations in estimating FFM, FM, and ASM mass using CT images at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae and compared these values with DXA measurements. FFM, FM, and ASM mass were estimated from the prediction equations proposed by Mourtzakis and colleagues (2008) using single abdominal CT images from 43 ACP and were compared with whole-body DXA scans using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman analyses. Despite a moderate to high correlation between the actual (DXA) and predicted (CT) values for FM (rho = 0.93; p ≤ 0.001), FFM (rho = 0.78; p ≤ 0.001), and ASM mass (rho = 0.70; p ≤ 0.001), Bland-Altman analyses revealed large range-of-agreement differences between the 2 methods (29.39 kg for FFM, 15.47 kg for FM, and 3.99 kg for ASM mass). Based on the magnitude of these differences, we concluded that prediction equations using single abdominal CT images have poor accuracy, cannot be considered as surrogates for DXA, and may have limited clinical utility.

  19. Analysis of the tomographic contrast during the immersion bleaching of layered biological tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Prokhorov, I V; Yarovenko, I P

    2010-01-31

    The control of optical properties of biological tissues irradiated by a cw laser source is considered. Within the framework of the stationary model of the radiation transfer, basic factors affecting the tomographic contrast of a layered medium are revealed theoretically and numerically, when immersion liquids, decreasing the radiation scattering level in a medium, are used. (optical computing)

  20. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  1. [Tomographic analysis of CBF in cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Segawa, H; Kimura, K; Ueda, Y; Nagai, M; Yoshimasu, N; Nakagomi, T; Tamura, A; Sano, K; Takakura, K

    1983-06-01

    Cerebral perfusion was examined in various types of occlusive disease by computed tomographic CBF method. The method utilized has several advantages over conventional studies using isotope, providing high resolution images in a direct relation to CT anatomy. Ten representative cases were presented from 25 consecutive cases of occlusive disease studied by this method. The method included inhalation of 40 to 60% xenon with serial CT scanning for 25 min. K (build-up rate), lambda (partition coefficient) and CBF values were calculated from HU for each pixel and Xe in expired air, based on Fick's principle, and displayed on CRT as K-, lambda- and CBF-map separately. CBF for gray matter of normal control was 82 +/- 11 ml/100 gm/min and that for white matter was 24 +/- 5 ml/100 gm/min. The ischemic threshold for gray matter appeared to be approximately 20 ml/100 gm/min, as blood flow in focus of complete infarction was below this level. Blood flow between 20-30 ml/100 gm/min caused some change on CT, such as localized atrophy, cortical thinning, loss of distinction between gray and white matter and decreased or increased density, which were considered to be compatible with pathological changes of laminar necrosis or gliosis with neuronal loss. In a case with occlusion of middle cerebral artery with subsequent recanalization, causing hemorrhagic infarct, hyperemia was observed in the infarcted cortex that was enhanced by iodine. Periventricular lucency observed in two cases, where blood flow was decreased below threshold, could be classified as "watershed infarction" mainly involving white matter. In moyamoya disease, blood flow in the anterior circulation was decreased near ischemic level, whereas that in basal ganglia and territory of posterior cerebral artery was fairly preserved, which was compatible with general angiographic finding of this disease.

  2. Registration of synthetic tomographic projection data sets using cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitchard, E. E.; Aldridge, J. S.; Reckwerdt, P. J.; Mackie, T. R.

    1998-06-01

    Tomographic registration, a method that makes possible accurate patient registration directly from projection data, consists of three processing steps: (i) manual coarse positioning, (ii) tomographic projection set acquisition, and (iii) computer mediated refined positioning. In the coarse positioning stage, the degree of patient alignment is comparable with that achieved with the standard radiotherapy set-up. However, the accuracy requirements are somewhat more relaxed in that meticulous alignment of the patient using external laser indicators is not necessary. Instead, tomographic projection sets are compared with planning CTs in order to achieve improved patient set-up. The projection sets are cross-correlated to obtain the best-fit translation and rotation offsets. The algorithm has been tested on synthetic data with the incorporation of varying amounts of Gaussian pseudo-random noise. These tests demonstrate the algorithm's stability and also confirm that alignment can be achieved with an accuracy of less than one projection pixel.

  3. Endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aneurysm into the inferior vena cava in patient after stent graft placement.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Wacław

    2009-07-01

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm into the Inferior Vena Cava in Patient After Stent Graft Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Zarzecka, Anna; Kulesza, Jerzy; Majewski, Waclaw

    2009-07-15

    We report the case of a patient who underwent endovascular repair and then reintervention as a result of the presence of a persistent endoleak complicated by an aortocaval fistula. A 76-year-old patient with a history of endovascular treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm 2 years earlier had a palpable abdominal mass, high-output cardiac failure, and renal failure. A computed tomographic scan and angiography revealed bending of the right iliac limb, a type I endoleak, and rupture of the aneurysm into the inferior vena cava with aortocaval fistula formation. An iliac extension was positioned in the right external iliac artery. The procedure was finished successfully. Control angiography showed normal flow within the endoprosthesis, and both iliac arteries were without signs of endoleakage and aortocaval fistula. Ectatic common iliac artery may lead to a late distal attachment site endoleak. The application of a stent graft in cases of secondary aortocaval fistula after stent graft repair is a good option, particularly in emergency cases.

  5. Tomographic methods in flow diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a viewpoint of tomography that should be well adapted to currently available optical measurement technology as well as the needs of computational and experimental fluid dynamists. The goals in mind are to record data with the fastest optical array sensors; process the data with the fastest parallel processing technology available for small computers; and generate results for both experimental and theoretical data. An in-depth example treats interferometric data as it might be recorded in an aeronautics test facility, but the results are applicable whenever fluid properties are to be measured or applied from projections of those properties. The paper discusses both computed and neural net calibration tomography. The report also contains an overview of key definitions and computational methods, key references, computational problems such as ill-posedness, artifacts, missing data, and some possible and current research topics.

  6. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  7. Steering in spin tomographic probability representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, V. I.; Markovich, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    The steering property known for two-qubit state in terms of specific inequalities for the correlation function is translated for the state of qudit with the spin j = 3 / 2. Since most steering detection inequalities are based on the correlation functions we introduce analogs of such functions for the single qudit systems. The tomographic probability representation for the qudit states is applied. The connection between the correlation function in the two-qubit system and the single qudit is presented in an integral form with an intertwining kernel calculated explicitly in tomographic probability terms.

  8. Protocluster discovery in tomographic Ly α forest flux maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey W.; White, Martin; Lee, Khee-Gan; Hennawi, Joseph F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method of finding protoclusters using tomographic maps of Ly α forest flux. We review our method of creating tomographic flux maps and discuss our new high-performance implementation, which makes large reconstructions computationally feasible. Using a large N-body simulation, we illustrate how protoclusters create large-scale flux decrements, roughly 10 h-1 Mpc across, and how we can use this signal to find them in flux maps. We test the performance of our protocluster finding method by running it on the ideal, noiseless map and tomographic reconstructions from mock surveys, and comparing to the halo catalogue. Using the noiseless map, we find protocluster candidates with about 90 per cent purity, and recover about 75 per cent of the protoclusters that form massive clusters (>3 × 1014 h-1 M⊙). We construct mock surveys similar to the ongoing COSMOS Lyman-Alpha Mapping And Tomography Observations survey. While the existing data have an average sightline separation of 2.3 h-1 Mpc, we test separations of 2-6 h-1 Mpc to see what can be tolerated for our application. Using reconstructed maps from small separation mock surveys, the protocluster candidate purity and completeness are very close to what was found in the noiseless case. As the sightline separation increases, the purity and completeness decrease, although they remain much higher than we initially expected. We extended our test cases to mock surveys with an average separation of 15 h-1 Mpc, meant to reproduce high source density areas of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We find that even with such a large sightline separation, the method can still be used to find some of the largest protoclusters.

  9. Couch height–based patient setup for abdominal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Shingo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kawanabe, Kiyoto; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-04-01

    There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height–based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5 mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1 mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9 mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7 mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6 mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1 mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2 mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sourabh; Qamar, Arman; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Alka

    2011-01-01

    An arterial aneurysm is defined as a focal dilation of a blood vessel with respect to the original artery. The risk of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) increases dramatically in the presence of the following factors: age older than 60 years, smoking, hypertension and Caucasian ethnicity. The likelihood that an aneurysm will rupture is influenced by the aneurysm size, expansion rate, continued smoking and persistent hypertension. The majority of AAAs are asymptomatic and are detected as an incidental finding on ultrasonography, abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed for other purposes. It can also present with abdominal pain or complications such as thrombosis, embolization and rupture. Approximately 30% of asymptomatic AAAs are discovered as a pulsatile abdominal mass on routine physical examination. Abdominal ultrasonography is considered the screening modality of choice for detecting AAAs because of its high sensitivity and specificity, as well as its safety and relatively lower cost. The decision to screen for AAAs is challenging. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommended that men between the age of 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked should be screened at least once for AAAs by abdominal ultrasonography. Management options for patients with an asymptomatic AAA include reduction of risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia; medical therapy with beta-blockers; watchful waiting; endovascular stenting; and surgical repair depending on the size and expansion rate of the aneurysm and underlying comorbidities. PMID:21523201

  11. A tomographic technique for aerodynamics at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, G.

    1985-01-01

    Computer aided tomography (CAT) provides a means of noninvasively measuring the air density distribution around an aerodynamic model. This technique is global in that a large portion of the flow field can be measured. A test of the applicability of CAT to transonic velocities was studied. A hemispherical-nose cylinder afterbody model was tested at a Mach number of 0.8 with a new laser holographic interferometer at the 2- by 2-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. Holograms of the flow field were taken and were reconstructed into interferograms. The fringe distribution (a measure of the local densities) was digitized for subsequent data reduction. A computer program based on the Fourier-transform technique was developed to convert the fringe distribution into three-dimensional densities around the model. Theoretical aerodynamic densities were calculated for evaluating and assessing the accuracy of the data obtained from the tomographic method.

  12. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancer Infection of the tubes (salpingitis) Ectopic pregnancy Fibroid tumors of the uterus (womb) Malignant tumors of the uterus or cervix Endometriosis Adhesions (scars) Screening and Diagnosis How is the cause of abdominal pain determined? ...

  13. [The abdominal catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian A

    2011-08-01

    Patients with an abdominal catastrophe are in urgent need of early, interdisciplinary medical help. The treatment plan should be based on medical priorities and clear leadership. First priority should be given to achieve optimal oxygenation of blood and stabilization of circulation during all treatment-phases. The sicker the patient, the less invasive the (surgical) treatment should to be, which means "damage control only". This short article describes 7 important, pragmatic rules that will help to increase the survival of a patient with an abdominal catastrophe. Preexisting morbidity and risk factors must be included in the overall risk-evaluation for every therapeutic intervention. The challenge in patients with an abdominal catastrophe is to carefully balance the therapeutic stress and the existing resistance of the individual patient. The best way to avoid abdominal disaster, however, is its prevention.

  14. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  15. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  17. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  18. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  19. Tomographic Gamma Scanner Experience: Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, David J.

    2014-06-30

    This is a summary of field applications of tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). Three cases are shown: enriched uranium scanning at Rocky Flats, heat-source plutonium at LANL, and plutonium-bearing pyrochemical salts at Rocky Flats. Materials are taken from the references shown below.

  20. A TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE FOR MAGNETIZED BEAM MATCHING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    To maintain low electron beam temperatures in the proposed RHIC electron cooler, careful matching of the magnetized beam from the source to the cooler solenoid is mandatory. We propose a tomographic technique to diagnose matching conditions. First simulation results will be presented.

  1. Hypovolemic shock in children: abdominal CT manifestations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G A; Fallat, M E; Eichelberger, M R

    1987-08-01

    The authors describe a "hypoperfusion complex," seen on abdominal computed tomography, which consists of marked, diffuse dilatation of the intestine with fluid; abnormally intense contrast enhancement of the bowel wall, mesentery, kidneys, and/or pancreas; decreased caliber of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava; and moderate to large peritoneal fluid collections. This complex was present in three patients less than 2 years of age and was associated with severe injury and a poor outcome. Recognition of this constellation of findings may help direct attention to the patient's serious hemodynamic abnormality as much as to individual organ defects.

  2. Evaluation of texture for classification of abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    García, Guillermo; Maiora, Josu; Tapia, Arantxa; De Blas, Mariano

    2012-06-01

    The use of the endovascular prostheses in abdominal aortic aneurysm has proven to be an effective technique to reduce the pressure and rupture risk of aneurysm. Nevertheless, in a long-term perspective, complications such as leaks inside the aneurysm sac (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and increasing the danger of rupture consequently. At present, computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is the most common examination for medical surveillance. However, endoleak complications cannot always be detected by visual inspection on CTA scans. The investigation on new techniques to detect endoleaks and analyse their effects on treatment evolution is of great importance for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the capability of texture features obtained from the aneurysmatic thrombus CT images to discriminate different types of evolutions caused by endoleaks. The regions of interest (ROIs) from patients with different post-EVAR evolution were extracted by experienced radiologists. Three techniques were applied to each ROI to obtain texture parameters, namely the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), the grey level run length matrix (GLRLM) and the grey level difference method (GLDM). The results showed that GLCM, GLRLM and GLDM features presented a good discrimination ability to differentiate between favourable or unfavourable evolutions. GLCM was the most efficient in terms of classification accuracy (93.41% ± 0.024) followed by GLRLM (90.17% ± 0.077) and finally by GLDM (81.98% ± 0.045). According to the results, we can consider texture analysis as complementary information to classified abdominal aneurysm evolution after EVAR.

  3. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  4. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Lesions With or Without Common Iliac Artery Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Oender, Hakan; Oguzkurt, Levent; Guer, Serkan; Tekbas, Gueven; Guerel, Kamil; Coskun, Isa; Oezkan, Ugur

    2013-02-15

    To evaluate the results of stent placement for obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease with or without involvement of the common iliac artery. Forty patients had self-expanding stents primarily or after balloon dilatation in the abdominal aorta between January 2005 and May 2011. All patients had trouble walking. Follow-up examinations were performed with clinical visits; these included color Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography. Technical, clinical, and hemodynamic success was achieved in all patients. None of the patients underwent reintervention during the follow-up period, which ranged from 3 months to 6 years (median 24 months). Nine complications occurred in six patients. Of the nine complications, four were distal thromboembolisms, which were successfully treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis or anticoagulation therapy. Endovascular treatment of the obstructive aortic disease using self-expanding stents was safe and effective, with high technical success and long-term patency. Thromboembolic complications were high even though direct stenting was considered protective for thromboembolism formation. Particularly for infrarenal aortic stenosis, it can be recommended as the first-line treatment option for patients with obstructive atherosclerotic aortic disease.

  5. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  6. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN DUAL-PHASE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FEATURES AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC DIAGNOSES IN 52 DOGS WITH HEPATIC OR SPLENIC MASSES.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian D; Lamb, Christopher R; Drees, Randi; Priestnall, Simon L; Mantis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Ability to noninvasively differentiate malignant from nonmalignant abdominal masses would aid clinical decision making. The aim of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to identify features in dual-phase computed tomographic (CT) studies that could be used to distinguish malignant from nonmalignant hepatic and splenic masses in dogs. Medical records were searched for dogs that had an abdominal dual-phase CT examination, a hepatic or splenic mass, and subsequent histopathologic diagnosis. Computed tomographic images for all included dogs were acquired prior to and <30 s (early phase) and >60 s (delayed phase) after intravenous contrast administration. Fifty-two dogs with 55 masses were studied: 24 hepatic, including 14 (58%) malignant and 10 (42%) non-malignant; 31 splenic, including 18 (58%) malignant and 13 (42%) nonmalignant. There was substantial overlap in the pre- and postcontrast CT features of malignant and nonmalignant hepatic and splenic masses. Regardless of histologic diagnosis, hepatic masses most frequently showed marked, generalized enhancement in early phase images that persisted in the delayed phase. Splenic hemangiosarcoma and nodular hyperplastic lesions most frequently showed marked, generalized enhancement in early phase images that persisted in delayed images whereas most splenic hematomas had slight enhancement in early phase images. All splenic hematomas and 77% of the hemangiosarcomas had contrast accumulation compatible with active hemorrhage. There were no other significant differences in quantitative or categorical CT data between malignant and nonmalignant hepatic or splenic masses. Dual-phase CT of dogs with hepatic or splenic masses provides limited specific diagnostic information.

  7. Optical tomographic imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H

    2005-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using visible and near-infrared light this technique can probe the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissues. The main applications are currently in brain, breast, limb and joint imaging; however, optical tomographic imaging of small animals is attracting increasing attention. This interest is fuelled by recent advances in the transgenic manipulation of small animals that has led to many models of human disease. In addition, an ever increasing number of optically reactive biochemical markers has become available, which allow diseases to be detected at the molecular level long before macroscopic symptoms appear. The past three years have seen an array of novel technological developments that have led to the first optical tomographic studies of small animals in the areas of cerebral ischemia and cancer.

  8. Video-rate tomographic phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Holbrow, Charles J.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic phase microscopy measures the 3-D refractive index distribution of cells and tissues by combining the information from a series of angle-dependent interferometric phase images. In the original device, the frame rate was limited to 0.1 frames per second (fps) by the technique used to acquire phase images, preventing measurements of moving or rapidly changing samples. We describe an improved tomographic phase microscope in which phase images are acquired via a spatial fringe pattern demodulation method, enabling a full tomogram acquisition rate of 30 fps. In addition, in this system the refractive index is calculated by a diffraction tomography algorithm that accounts for the effects of diffraction in the 3-D reconstruction. We use the instrument to quantitatively monitor rapid changes in refractive index within defined subregions of cells due to exposure to acetic acid or changes in medium osmolarity.

  9. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, Alan T.; Elmer, John W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process.

  10. Tomographic determination of the power distribution in electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Teruya, A.T.; Elmer, J.W.

    1996-12-10

    A tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron beam using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams is disclosed. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits is placed above a Faraday cup. The beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. Also, a single computer is used to generate the signals actuating the sweep, to acquire that data, and to do the reconstruction, thus reducing the time and equipment necessary to complete the process. 4 figs.

  11. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  12. Matched Field Tomographic Inversion for Geoacoustic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    geoacoustic properties of the ocean bottom, including sound speed profiles, densities, attenuations and sediment layer depths, have a significant effect on... sound propagation in shallow water. The long term goal of this work is to develop a new tomographic inversion method based on matched field processing of...cross-range. An experiment to obtain acoustic field data at a multi- array system was successfully carried out using broadband sound sources in the

  13. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  14. Robustness of tomographic reconstructors versus real atmospheric profiles in the ELT perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendron, E.; Morel, C.; Osborn, J.; Martin, O.; Gratadour, D.; Vidal, F.; Le Louarn, M.; Rousset, G.

    2014-08-01

    In this article we revisit a subject that has partly already been examined in previous studies: the behavior of tomographic reconstructors in adaptive optics systems, facing to an atmospheric profile (C2n(h)) different from the one they've been optimized for. We develop a new approach for that. The current usual approach is to simulate the performance of the reconstructor when slightly varying the C2n(h) profile around a nominal one, and show how far the deviation may go. This has the disadvantage that, as the parameter space for potential errors on the C2n(h) profile is basically infinite, it is particularly uneasy to span. Our approach consists in deriving a sort of sensitivity function, that we call vertical error distribution (VED), from the knowledge of any tomographic reconstructor. This function can be computed even for non-tomographic reconstructors, ground-layers reconstructors, single-conjugate AO reconstructors, etc. In any case, it allows us to derive the error when applied to a particular C2n(h) profile, have a direct, global visualization of the error variation with layer altitude, for any number at any altitude. This also allows us to understand what a given reconstructor is sensitive to, at what altitudes or altitude range, or explain why some GLAO reconstructors may perform better than optimized MMSE tomographic reconstructors if low-altitude layers pop up. We also discuss the case of ELTs and apply our approach to large scale reconstructors.

  15. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  16. Incision for abdominal laparoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal laparoscopy is a useful aid in diagnosing disease or trauma in the abdominal cavity with less scarring than ... as liver and pancreatic resections may begin with laparoscopy to exclude the presence of additional tumors (metastatic ...

  17. Response to "comments on 'Hydrodynamic and dispersion behavior in a non-porous silica monolith through fluid dynamic study of a computational mimic reconstructed from sub-micro-tomographic scans"'.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kai-Chee; Vasudevan, Vivek

    2013-08-09

    We respond to the comments made by Hlushkou et al. (2013) [1] (JCA-13-207) to our earlier work [J. Chromatogr. A 1274 (2013) 65], wherein the authors have questioned the validity of our reconstruction of the bulk macropore space in a silica monolith and challenged the interpretations from subsequent computational fluid dynamic simulations. We provide an explanation as to why a monotonic trend in external porosity values cannot be expected with decreasing scanning resolutions. The observed deviations of the pore and skeleton size distributions from those in literature are explained based on the differences in methods used to calculate these distributions. The difference in the scaled axial velocity frequency distributions is explained based on the assumptions made and the distributions are redrawn to reflect the said assumptions. The normalized transient diffusion (peak parking) and dispersion simulations are repeated with a higher resolution of detection planes to measure the variance of spreading pulse, thereby providing an explanation for the anomalies pointed out in our earlier work. Finally, we explain our comparison of the computational expenses with previous work as a study of the trade-off in accuracy that results from the lower resolution scan and use of commercial CFD packages.

  18. Projection approach to complexity reduction in tomographic alignment of extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Chanan, Gary

    2012-02-20

    We describe a complexity reduction approach intended to solve the tomographic alignment problem for the Thirty Meter Telescope by means of its alignment and phasing system (APS) with little loss of information. This approach is computationally efficient enough to perform detailed Monte-Carlo simulations of the APS on a standard PC. We present sample simulations to model error propagation through the system and to build a preliminary APS alignment error budget.

  19. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    2016-01-01

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  20. Abdominal cocoon accompanied by multiple peritoneal loose body

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yongyuan; Qu, Lintao; Li, Jun; Wang, Bin; Geng, Junzu; Xing, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Abdominal cocoon and peritoneal loose body are both rare abdominal diseases. Patient concerns: The patient reported in this case was a 47-year-old man who suffered from abdominal pain and distension for 3 days. Diagnosis: X-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple peritoneal loose body and small bowel obstruction, characterized by a total encapsulation of the small bowel with a fibrous membrane. Interventions: The patient underwent surgical treatment and exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal cocoon. Outcomes: Histopathological examination of pelvic nodules confirmed peritoneal loose body. Lessons: To our knowledge, the herein reported case is the first abdominal cocoon that was accompanied by multiple peritoneal loose body. PMID:28248873

  1. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  2. Do We Really Need Additional Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography for Differential Diagnosis in Triage of Middle-Aged Subjects With Suspected Biliary Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced computed tomography (CT) is widely used for evaluating acute biliary pain in the emergency department (ED). However, concern about radiation exposure from CT has also increased. We investigated the usefulness of pre-contrast CT for differential diagnosis in middle-aged subjects with suspected biliary pain. A total of 183 subjects, who visited the ED for suspected biliary pain from January 2011 to December 2012, were included. Retrospectively, pre-contrast phase and multiphase CT findings were reviewed and the detection rate of findings suggesting disease requiring significant treatment by noncontrast CT (NCCT) was compared with cases detected by multiphase CT. Approximately 70% of total subjects had a significant condition, including 1 case of gallbladder cancer and 126 (68.8%) cases requiring intervention (122 biliary stone-related diseases, 3 liver abscesses, and 1 liver hemangioma). The rate of overlooking malignancy without contrast enhancement was calculated to be 0% to 1.5%. Biliary stones and liver space-occupying lesions were found equally on NCCT and multiphase CT. Calculated probable rates of overlooking acute cholecystitis and biliary obstruction were maximally 6.8% and 4.2% respectively. Incidental significant finding unrelated with pain consisted of 1 case of adrenal incidentaloma, which was also observed in NCCT. NCCT might be sufficient to detect life-threatening or significant disease requiring early treatment in young adults with biliary pain. PMID:25700321

  3. Wavefront Healing and Tomographic Resolution of Superplumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, J.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography revealed two very broad S-wave anomalies at the bottom of the mantle, one under Africa and the other under the southern Pacific. Traditional tomographic results show strong anti-correlation between bulk sound wave speed and S wave speed perturbations, supporting at least partially chemical origin of deep mantle superplumes. The core-mantle boundary regions are best sampled by core diffracted waves while wave front healing effects of diffracted waves have been ignored in tomographic studies. To investigate the resolution of deep mantle superplumes as well as the robustness of the anti correlation between bulk sound wave speed and S wave speed, we use Spectral Element Method (SEM) to simulate global seismic wave propagation in 3-D plume models at periods down to 10s. We measure frequency-dependent P-wave and S-wave travel time anomalies caused by 3-D plume structures using a multi-taper technique, and calculate bulk sound speed perturbations based on measured P-wave and S-wave traveltimes. The comparison between measured delay times and ray-theory predictions shows that different healing rates between P waves and S waves in thermal plume models can lead to significant artifact as anti-correlation between bulk sound speed and S-wave speed perturbations. The strength of this artifact depends on epicenter distance and wave frequency. The artifact in anti-correlation is also confirmed in tomographic inversions using Pdiff and Sdiff traveltimes calculated from SEM seismograms. We show that resolutions of superplumes as well as artifacts in the anti-correlation are dependent upon the length scale of the anomalies, the frequency of the wave as well as source-receiver distribution.

  4. Medical tomograph system using ultrasonic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, Richard C. (Inventor); Nathan, Robert (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic energy transmission in rectilinear array scanning patterns of soft tissue provides projection density values of the tissue which are recorded as a function of scanning position and angular relationship, .theta., of the subject with a fixed coordinate system. A plurality of rectilinear scan arrays in the same plane for different angular relationships .theta..sub.1 . . . .theta..sub.n thus recorded are superimposed. The superimposition of intensity values thus yields a tomographic image of an internal section of the tissue in the scanning plane.

  5. Model-based Tomographic Reconstruction Literature Search

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Lehman, S K

    2005-11-30

    In the process of preparing a proposal for internal research funding, a literature search was conducted on the subject of model-based tomographic reconstruction (MBTR). The purpose of the search was to ensure that the proposed research would not replicate any previous work. We found that the overwhelming majority of work on MBTR which used parameterized models of the object was theoretical in nature. Only three researchers had applied the technique to actual data. In this note, we summarize the findings of the literature search.

  6. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  7. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  8. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  9. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  10. Computed tomographic imaging of subchondral fatigue cracks in the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in the thoroughbred racehorse can predict crack micromotion in an ex-vivo model.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Marie-Soleil; Morello, Samantha; Rayment, Kelsey; Markel, Mark D; Vanderby, Ray; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; McCabe, Ronald P; Marquis, Patricia; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Articular stress fracture arising from the distal end of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) is a common serious injury in Thoroughbred racehorses. Currently, there is no method for predicting fracture risk clinically. We describe an ex-vivo biomechanical model in which we measured subchondral crack micromotion under compressive loading that modeled high speed running. Using this model, we determined the relationship between subchondral crack dimensions measured using computed tomography (CT) and crack micromotion. Thoracic limbs from 40 Thoroughbred racehorses that had sustained a catastrophic injury were studied. Limbs were radiographed and examined using CT. Parasagittal subchondral fatigue crack dimensions were measured on CT images using image analysis software. MC3 bones with fatigue cracks were tested using five cycles of compressive loading at -7,500N (38 condyles, 18 horses). Crack motion was recorded using an extensometer. Mechanical testing was validated using bones with 3 mm and 5 mm deep parasagittal subchondral slots that modeled naturally occurring fatigue cracks. After testing, subchondral crack density was determined histologically. Creation of parasagittal subchondral slots induced significant micromotion during loading (p<0.001). In our biomechanical model, we found a significant positive correlation between extensometer micromotion and parasagittal crack area derived from reconstructed CT images (SR = 0.32, p<0.05). Correlations with transverse and frontal plane crack lengths were not significant. Histologic fatigue damage was not significantly correlated with crack dimensions determined by CT or extensometer micromotion. Bones with parasagittal crack area measurements above 30 mm2 may have a high risk of crack propagation and condylar fracture in vivo because of crack micromotion. In conclusion, our results suggest that CT could be used to quantify subchondral fatigue crack dimensions in racing Thoroughbred horses in-vivo to assess risk of

  11. Single-photon emission computed tomographic imaging of the early time course of therapy-induced cell death using technetium 99m tricarbonyl His-annexin A5 in a colorectal cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe; Mees, Gilles; Mertens, Koen; Staelens, Steven; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Pauwels, Patrick; Van Damme, Nancy; Peeters, Marc

    2012-04-01

    As apoptosis occurs over an interval of time after administration of apoptosis-inducing therapy in tumors, the changes in technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-tricarbonyl (CO)₃ His-annexin A5 (His-ann A5) accumulation over time were examined. Colo205-bearing mice were divided into six treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 250 mg/kg), (3) irinotecan (100 mg/kg), (4) oxaliplatin (30 mg/kg), (5) bevacizumab (5 mg/kg), and (6) panitumumab (6 mg/kg). (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 was injected 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours posttreatment, and micro-single-photon emission computed tomography was performed. Immunostaining of caspase-3 (apoptosis), survivin (antiapoptosis), and LC3-II (autophagy marker) was also performed. Different dynamics of (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 uptake were observed in this colorectal cancer xenograft model, in response to a single dose of three different chemotherapeutics (5-FU, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin). Bevacizumab-treated mice showed no increased uptake of the radiotracer, and a peak of (99m)Tc-(CO)₃ His-ann A5 uptake in panitumumab-treated mice was observed 24 hours posttreatment, as confirmed by caspase-3 immunostaining. For irinotecan-, oxaliplatin-, and bevacizumab-treated tumors, a significant correlation was established between the radiotracer uptake and caspase-3 immunostaining (r  =  .8, p < .05; r  =  .9, p < .001; r  =  .9, p < .001, respectively). For 5-FU- and panitumumab-treated mice, the correlation coefficients were r  =  .7 (p  =  .18) and r  =  .7 (p  =  .19), respectively. Optimal timing of annexin A5 imaging after the start of different treatments in the Colo205 model was determined.

  12. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  13. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  14. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  15. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  16. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  17. Fulminant abdominal gas gangrene in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mustafa; Okutur, Kerem; Aydin, Kübra; Namal, Esat; Oztürk, Akin; Balci, Cem; Demir, Gökhan

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of fulminant abdominal gas gangrene in a patient with metastatic colon cancer. A 39-year-old patient with descending colon, high-grade adenocarcinoma and coexisting liver and lymph node metastases received two courses of chemotherapy. The patient developed sudden acute abdominal symptoms accompanied by septic shock parameters. The imaging findings on computed tomography were characteristic for abdominal gas gangrene, involving liver metastases, portal vein and lymph nodes with associated pneumoperitoneum. The patient succumbed to the disease within hours following the onset of symptoms.

  18. Abdominal pain – learning when not to intervene!

    PubMed Central

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Timilsina, Bidhya; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Epiploic appendagitis (EA) is an uncommon cause of abdominal pain. It is a benign condition but may mimic other serious causes of acute abdomen such as appendicitis, diverticulitis, and gynecological emergency in severe cases. Knowledge of this condition in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain can save unnecessary hospital admission, antibiotics, and surgery. In this article, we present the case of a 43-year-old female who presented to our hospital with a 2-day history of right lower quadrant abdominal pain and diarrhea. She was diagnosed with EA with computed tomography of abdomen with contrast and was managed conservatively with good outcome. PMID:27987280

  19. Three-dimensional mapping of soil chemical characteristics at micrometric scale: Statistical prediction by combining 2D SEM-EDX data and 3D X-ray computed micro-tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapca, Simona

    2015-04-01

    Many soil properties and functions emerge from interactions of physical, chemical and biological processes at microscopic scales, which can be understood only by integrating techniques that traditionally are developed within separate disciplines. While recent advances in imaging techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT), offer the possibility to reconstruct the 3D physical structure at fine resolutions, for the distribution of chemicals in soil, existing methods, based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX), allow for characterization of the chemical composition only on 2D surfaces. At present, direct 3D measurement techniques are still lacking, sequential sectioning of soils, followed by 2D mapping of chemical elements and interpolation to 3D, being an alternative which is explored in this study. Specifically, we develop an integrated experimental and theoretical framework which combines 3D X-ray CT imaging technique with 2D SEM-EDX and use spatial statistics methods to map the chemical composition of soil in 3D. The procedure involves three stages 1) scanning a resin impregnated soil cube by X-ray CT, followed by precision cutting to produce parallel thin slices, the surfaces of which are scanned by SEM-EDX, 2) alignment of the 2D chemical maps within the internal 3D structure of the soil cube, and 3) development, of spatial statistics methods to predict the chemical composition of 3D soil based on the observed 2D chemical and 3D physical data. Specifically, three statistical models consisting of a regression tree, a regression tree kriging and cokriging model were used to predict the 3D spatial distribution of carbon, silicon, iron and oxygen in soil, these chemical elements showing a good spatial agreement between the X-ray grayscale intensities and the corresponding 2D SEM-EDX data. Due to the spatial correlation between the physical and chemical data, the regression-tree model showed a great potential

  20. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system....

  1. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system....

  2. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system....

  3. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system....

  4. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system....

  5. Tomographic PIV Study of Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Rossmann, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic PIV is used in a free surface water channel to quantify the flow behavior of hairpin vortices that are artificially generated in a laminar boundary layer. Direct injection from a 32:1 aspect ratio slot at low blowing ratios (0 . 1 < BR < 0 . 2) is used to generate an isolated hairpin vortex in a thick laminar boundary layer (485 < Reδ* < 600). Due to the large dynamic range of length and velocity scales (the resulting vortices have advection velocities 5X greater than their tangential velocities), a tailored optical arrangement and specialized post processing techniques are required to fully capture the small-scale behavior and long-time development of the flow field. Hairpin generation and evolution are presented using the λ2 criterion derived from the instantaneous, three-dimensional velocity field. The insight provided by the tomographic data is also compared to the conclusions drawn from 2D PIV and passive scalar visualizations. Finally, the three-dimensional behavior of the measured velocity field is correlated with that of a simultaneously imaged, passive scalar dye that marks the boundary of the injected fluid, allowing the examination of the entrainment behavior of the hairpin. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  6. Doppler encoded excitation pattern tomographic optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feldkhun, Daniel; Wagner, Kelvin H

    2010-12-01

    Most far-field optical imaging systems rely on lenses and spatially resolved detection to probe distinct locations on the object. We describe and demonstrate a high-speed wide-field approach to imaging that instead measures the complex spatial Fourier transform of the object by detecting its spatially integrated response to dynamic acousto-optically synthesized structured illumination. Tomographic filtered backprojection is applied to reconstruct the object in two or three dimensions. This technique decouples depth of field and working distance from resolution, in contrast to conventional imaging, and can be used to image biological and synthetic structures in fluoresced or scattered light employing coherent or broadband illumination. We discuss the electronically programmable transfer function of the optical system and its implications for imaging dynamic processes. We also explore wide-field fluorescence imaging in scattering media by coherence gating. Finally, we present two-dimensional high-resolution tomographic image reconstructions in both scattered and fluoresced light demonstrating a thousandfold improvement in the depth of field compared to conventional lens-based microscopy.

  7. Regional brain glucose metabolism in chronic schizophrenia. A positron emission transaxial tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, T.; Wolf, A.P.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Christman, D.R.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-03-01

    Thirteen diagnosed schizophrenics and 11 normal controls were studied with a method using the PETT III positron emission tomograph (PET) and fluorodeoxyglucose labeled with fluorine 18. Each subject also had a computed tomographic (CT) scan. For each subject, two brain levels, one through the basal ganglia and one through the semioval center, were analyzed for the mean regional metabolic glucose rate. Specifically, relationships between frontal and posterior regions were evaluated. The CT scans of matching levels were superimposed on the functional PET images to provide anatomic criteria for region of interest selection. While no whole-slice metabolic differences were apparent between groups, schizophrenics had significantly lower activity in the frontal lobes, relative to posterior regions. The medicated and drug-free groups did not differ from one another in these regards. Trait v state dependency of the phenomenon was analyzed, and several technological limitations were considered.

  8. Evaluation of the channelized Hotelling observer for signal detection in 2D tomographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRoque, Samuel J.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Edwards, Darrin C.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2007-03-01

    Signal detection by the channelized Hotelling (ch-Hotelling) observer is studied for tomographic application by employing a small, tractable 2D model of a computed tomography (CT) system. The primary goal of this manuscript is to develop a practical method for evaluating the ch-Hotelling observer that can generalize to larger 3D cone-beam CT systems. The use of the ch-Hotelling observer for evaluating tomographic image reconstruction algorithms is also demonstrated. For a realistic model for CT, the ch-Hotelling observer can be a good approximation to the ideal observer. The ch-Hotelling observer is applied to both the projection data and the reconstructed images. The difference in signal-to-noise ratio for signal detection in both of these domains provides a metric for evaluating the image reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by an iteratively re-weighted minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Xue, Zhenwen; Guo, Wei; Qin, Chenghu; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Tomographic bioluminescence imaging (TBI), with visible light emission in living organisms, is an effective way of molecular imaging, which allows for the study of ongoing tumor biological processes in vivo and non-invasively. This newly developed technology enables three-dimensional accuracy localization and quantitative analysis of the target tumor cells in small animal via reconstructing the images acquired by the high-resolution imaging system. Due to the difficulty of reconstruction, which is often referred to an ill-posed inverse problem, continuous efforts are still made to find more practical and efficient approaches. In this paper, an iteratively re-weighted minimization (IRM) has been applied to reconstruct the entire source distribution, which is known as sparse signals, inside the target tissue with the limited outgoing photon density on its boundary. By introducing a weight function into the objective function, we convert the lp norm problem into a more simple form of l2 norm to reduce the computational complexity. The weight function is updated in each iterative step to compute the final optimal solution more efficiently. This method is proved to be robust to different parameters, and mouse experiments are conducted to validate the feasibility of IRM approach, which is also reliable at whole-body imaging.

  10. Non-rigid registration of tomographic images with Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Ar; Isoardi, Ra; Mato, G.

    2007-11-01

    Spatial image registration of deformable body parts such as thorax and abdomen has important medical applications, but at the same time, it represents an important computational challenge. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm to perform non-rigid registration of tomographic images using a non-rigid model based on Fourier transforms. As a measure of similarity, we use the correlation coefficient, finding that the optimal order of the transformation is n = 3 (36 parameters). We apply this method to a digital phantom and to 7 pairs of patient images corresponding to clinical CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a fairly good agreement according to medical experts, with an average registration error of 2 mm for the case of clinical images. For 2D images (dimensions 512×512), the average running time for the algorithm is 15 seconds using a standard personal computer. Summarizing, we find that intra-modality registration of the abdomen can be achieved with acceptable accuracy for slight deformations and can be extended to 3D with a reasonable execution time.

  11. Recurrent pneumothorax following abdominal paracentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    A 62 year old man presented with abdominal ascites, without pleural effusion, due to peritoneal mesothelioma. He had chronic obstructive airways disease and a past history of right upper lobectomy for tuberculosis. On two occasions abdominal paracentesis was followed within 72 hours by pneumothorax. This previously unreported complication of abdominal paracentesis may be due to increased diaphragmatic excursion following the procedure and should be considered in patients with preexisting lung disease. PMID:2385561

  12. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  13. Abdominal pregnancy- a case report.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ii; Ude, Ac; Aderibigbe, Aso; Amu, Oc; Udeh, Pe; Obianyo, Nen; Ani, Coc

    2011-01-01

    A case of abdominal pregnancy in a 39 year old female gravida 4, para 0(+3) is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a viable abdominal pregnancy at 15 weeks gestational age. She was initially managed conservatively. Surgical intervention became necessary at 20 weeks gestational age following Ultrasound detection of foetal demise. The maternal outcome was favourable. This case is presented to highlight the dilemma associated with diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy with a review of literature.

  14. [Lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in children].

    PubMed

    Kvirikashvili, T O

    2006-01-01

    We investigated 79 patients (76.0%) with lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes among all 104 with general abdominal lymphosarcoma. Ultrasound tomography was used in 98.1 % cases; also, in the urgent cases cancer transcutaneal puncture was performed with the purpose of cytological investigation. In complicated situations computer tomography was considered as a highly informative method of investigation. Surgical intervention and radial therapy is inexpedient in a treatment program of lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in children. Besides, it is shown the superiority of intensive program of polychemical therapy OMDV: vincristine (oncovin) -- 1.5 mg/m(2) i/v in the 1 day; metotrexate -- 250 mg/m(2) i/v drop by drop in the I day; dexamethazone 10 mg/m(2) per os 1-5 day; vepesid -- 100 mg/m(2) i/v drop by drop in the 4 and 5 days.) in comparison with the ACOP scheme: adriamicine or rubomicine - 30 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); cyclophosphane -- 600 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); vincristine (oncovin) -- 1.4 mg/m(2) i/v 1 time in week (N 4-6); prednisolone -- 40 mg/m(2) every day 4-6 week quitting gradually) for treatment of lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes in childhood age. General recovery without recurrence in children with lymphosarcoma of abdominal lymph nodes was occurred in 44.2% cases. In the case of polychemical therapy according to ACOP scheme, recovery was 20% and in the case of polychemical therapy following OMDV scheme, 78.1% of the children recovered.

  15. Fertility after abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, G; Doyle, M; Barrett, T; Byrne, P; De Mello, M; Harrison, R F

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the morbidity and pregnancy outcome of myomectomy in infertile women with uterine fibroids. This was a cross-sectional study. Records were reviewed for 100 consecutive women in the Rotunda Hospital who underwent myomectomy in the years 1995-1996. A questionnaire regarding subsequent fertility was sent. The study was carried out in the infertility unit at the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Seventy-five women responded. Multiple myomectomy was performed in 52 (70%). Mean fibroid size was 6.8 cm (range 2-14.5 cm). Nine women (12%) developed complications; five had menstrual problems, two had wound discomfort and two had abdominal discomfort. Twenty-five women (33%) became pregnant. Seven (28%) were IVF pregnancies. Overall six (24%) miscarried. In 19 of 25, pregnancy occurred where fibroids were the only identifiable cause of infertility. We conclude that abdominal myomectomy is associated with a favourable outcome in infertile women particularly if no other confounding variable is present.

  16. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  17. Computed tomographic diagnosis of suprasellar masses by intrathecal enhancement.

    PubMed

    Drayer, B P; Rosenbaum, A E; Kennerdell, J S; Robinson, A G; Bank, W O; Deeb, Z L

    1977-05-01

    Ten suspected suprasellar mass lesions were evaluated by CT cisternography (CTC). In each case the cisterns could be defined. Suprasellar mass lesions were found in six. Precise assessment of the anterior, lateral, posterior, and superior extent, made by metrizamide CTC, was verified at surgery. In two masses the intravenously enhanced scan was not diagnostic, while a lesion was visualized by intrathecal (metrizamide) CT. The major diagnostic entity was an enlarged third ventricle. When a chiasmic lesion is suspected and the conventional scan is negative, metrizamide CTC is the examination of choice.

  18. Computed tomographic characteristics of odontogenic neoplasms in dogs.

    PubMed

    Amory, Joseph T; Reetz, Jennifer A; Sánchez, Melissa D; Bradley, Charles W; Lewis, John R; Reiter, Alexander M; Mai, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Odontogenic neoplasms are locally invasive oral tumors in dogs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe CT characteristics for varying histopathologic types of canine odontogenic neoplasms. A board-certified veterinary radiologist who was unaware of histologic findings reviewed and scored imaging studies. A total of 29 dogs were included in the study. Twenty-three of these dogs had concurrent dental radiographs. The most common CT characteristics for all tumor types were a direct association with or in the region of multiple teeth in 96.4% (27/28), contrast enhancement in 96.3% (26/27), alveolar bone lysis in 93.1% (27/29), and mass-associated tooth displacement in 85.2% (23/27). Mass-associated cyst-like structures were identified in 53.6% (15/28) and were only present in tumors containing odontogenic epithelium. Canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas (n = 15) appeared as extra-osseous (10/15) or intra-osseous (5/15) masses. Intra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas were more likely to have mass-associated cyst-like structures and were subjectively more aggressive when compared with extra-osseous canine acanthomatous ameloblastomas. Amyloid-producing odontogenic tumors (n = 3) had subjectively uniform CT imaging characteristics and consisted of round soft tissue and mineral attenuating masses with multiple associated cyst-like structures. Fibromatous epulides of periodontal ligament origin (n = 4) were contrast enhancing extra-osseous masses that were rarely referred for CT examinations and 25% (1/4) were not visible with CT. Other odontogenic tumors were less represented or had more variable CT imaging characteristics. Mass-associated tooth destruction was appreciated more often with dental radiographs and extra-oral tumor extension was identified more often with CT.

  19. Childhood Psychosis and Computed Tomographic Brain Scan Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher; Svendsen, Pal

    1983-01-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) of the brain was used to examine 27 infantile autistic children, 9 children with other kinds of childhood psychoses, 23 children with mental retardation, and 16 normal children. Gross abnormalities were seen in 26 percent of the autism cases. (Author/SEW)

  20. LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion: benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    We present the LOTOS-07 code for performing local earthquake tomographic (LET) inversion, which is freely available at www.ivan-art.com/science/LOTOS_07. The initial data for the code are the arrival times from local seismicity and coordinates of the stations. It does not require any information about the sources. The calculations start from absolute location of sources and estimates of an optimal 1D velocity model. Then the sources are relocated simultaneously with the 3D velocity distribution during iterative coupled tomographic inversions. The code allows results to be compared based on node or cell parameterizations. Both Vp-Vs and Vp - Vp/Vs inversion schemes can be performed by the LOTOS code. The working ability of the LOTOS code is illustrated with different real and synthetic datasets. Some of the tests are used to disprove existing stereotypes of LET schemes such as using trade-off curves for evaluation of damping parameters and GAP criterion for selection of events. We also present a series of synthetic datasets with unknown sources and velocity models (www.ivan-art.com/science/benchmark) that can be used as blind benchmarks for testing different tomographic algorithms. We encourage other users of tomography algorithms to join the program on creating benchmarks that can be used to check existing codes. The program codes and testing datasets will be freely distributed during the poster presentation.

  1. Tomographical transformation of Malvern spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, H. M.; Sun, T. Y.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is described which directly transforms Malvern line-integral data into point measurements of the radial drop mean size distribution and liquid volume concentration distribution. The transformed results have been compared with experimental point measurements by photography and the phase/Doppler spray analyzer. The comparison reveals the relation between point measurements and line-of-sight measurements. Three kinds of nozzles were investigated. After tomographical transformation of the Malvern results the different structures of the spray are revealed. A newly derived formula simplifies the transformation procedure. This method provides a direct means to extend the applicability of the Malvern particle sizer and has the potential to be developed for use in unsymmetric sprays.

  2. Fast tomographic methods for the tokamak ISTTOK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. J.; Thomsen, H.; Gori, S.; Toussaint, U. v.; Weller, A.; Coelho, R.; Neto, A.; Pereira, T.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.

    2008-04-01

    The achievement of long duration, alternating current discharges on the tokamak IST-TOK requires a real-time plasma position control system. The plasma position determination based on magnetic probes system has been found to be inadequate during the current inversion due to the reduced plasma current. A tomography diagnostic has been therefore installed to supply the required feedback to the control system. Several tomographic methods are available for soft X-ray or bolo-metric tomography, among which the Cormack and Neural networks methods stand out due to their inherent speed of up to 1000 reconstructions per second, with currently available technology. This paper discusses the application of these algorithms on fusion devices while comparing performance and reliability of the results. It has been found that although the Cormack based inversion proved to be faster, the neural networks reconstruction has fewer artifacts and is more accurate.

  3. Using NAI detectors for tomographic gamma scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R.J.; Melton, S.

    1997-03-01

    The authors examined two approaches for using NaI detectors to perform transmission corrections used in the tomographic gamma scanner (TGS) and segmented gamma scanner (SGS) nondestructive assay methods. They found that a material-basis-set (MBS) fit using empirical logarithmic response spectra is quite accurate. Because this is a gross count technique, it gives sensitivities (for equal numbers of detectors) that are roughly ten times better than those obtained using Germanium detectors. The authors also found that simple continuum subtraction can be used in MBS fits using the energy-group-analysis technique only when the Pu transmission is greater than 10%. Both approaches for using NaI detectors require a knowledge of the Pu (or other) isotopics to obtain full accuracy.

  4. A new art code for tomographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H.; Modarress, D.

    1987-01-01

    A new algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) code based on the iterative refinement method of least squares solution for tomographic reconstruction is presented. Accuracy and the convergence of the technique is evaluated through the application of numerically generated interferometric data. It was found that, in general, the accuracy of the results was superior to other reported techniques. The iterative method unconditionally converged to a solution for which the residual was minimum. The effects of increased data were studied. The inversion error was found to be a function of the input data error only. The convergence rate, on the other hand, was affected by all three parameters. Finally, the technique was applied to experimental data, and the results are reported.

  5. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  6. Fast tomographic methods for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P. J.; Coelho, R.; Neto, A.; Pereira, T.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Gori, S.; Toussaint, U. v.

    2008-04-07

    The achievement of long duration, alternating current discharges on the tokamak IST-TOK requires a real-time plasma position control system. The plasma position determination based on magnetic probes system has been found to be inadequate during the current inversion due to the reduced plasma current. A tomography diagnostic has been therefore installed to supply the required feedback to the control system. Several tomographic methods are available for soft X-ray or bolo-metric tomography, among which the Cormack and Neural networks methods stand out due to their inherent speed of up to 1000 reconstructions per second, with currently available technology. This paper discusses the application of these algorithms on fusion devices while comparing performance and reliability of the results. It has been found that although the Cormack based inversion proved to be faster, the neural networks reconstruction has fewer artifacts and is more accurate.

  7. Airborne Tomographic Swath Ice Sounding Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Freeman, Anthony; Jezek, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets modulate global sea level by storing water deposited as snow on the surface, and discharging water back into the ocean through melting. Their physical state can be characterized in terms of their mass balance and dynamics. To estimate the current ice mass balance, and to predict future changes in the motion of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, it is necessary to know the ice sheet thickness and the physical conditions of the ice sheet surface and bed. This information is required at fine resolution and over extensive portions of the ice sheets. A tomographic algorithm has been developed to take raw data collected by a multiple-channel synthetic aperture sounding radar system over a polar ice sheet and convert those data into two-dimensional (2D) ice thickness measurements. Prior to this work, conventional processing techniques only provided one-dimensional ice thickness measurements along profiles.

  8. Ultrasonic tomographic imaging of anisotropic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, D. P.; Chow, T.; Hutchins, D. A.; Young, R. P.

    Tomographic imaging is a technique to determine values of a spatially varying parameter on a cross-sectional slice through an object. In the ultrasonic case of tomography, waves are propagated through the sample between a series of source and receiver locations placed in a plane around the object. These locations are chosen such that the rays pass through as large a fraction of the object plane as possible, and to conform to any requirements for regular positioning in the reconstruction procedure. If the propagation delay is measured for each raypath between source and receiver, the acoustic slowness can be determined along the cross-sectional plane. There are in existence a variety of algorithms that can construct tomographic images, such as filtered backprojection and algebraic reconstruction tomography (ART). In many instances, however, the objects to be imaged exhibit some form of anisotropy, where the acoustic velocity varies with the direction of propagation. In such cases, it is desireable to incorporate some means of accounting for the effects of anisotropy into the imaging algorithm. A particular means of doing this is to modify an ART or simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) algorithm to incorporate a function into the reconstruction process which mathematically describes the angular variation of velocity with direction. In this paper, the necessary modifications to the SIRT algorithm will be briefly described. Applications of the method will be presented for a series of experimental samples, with varying amounts and forms of anisotropy present. These samples consist primarily of granite rocks, which were imaged in the course of experiments to induce stress-related microcracking within them. In addition, the imaging of non-elliptical anisotropy will be shown on a sample of glass fiber reinforced polymer composite.

  9. Color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, S; Danesino, G M; Danesino, V; Castellani, S

    2010-09-01

    Alterations of the abdominal aorta are relatively common, particularly in older people. Technological advances in the fields of ultrasonography, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging have greatly increased the imaging options for the assessment of these lesions. Because it can be done rapidly and is also non-invasive, ultrasonography plays a major role in the exploration of the abdominal aorta, from its emergence from the diaphragm to its bifurcation. It is indicated for the diagnosis and follow-up of various aortic diseases, especially aneurysms. It can be used to define the shape, size, and location of these lesions, the absence or presence of thrombi and their characteristics. It is also useful for monitoring the evolution of the lesion and for postoperative follow-up. However, its value is limited in surgical planning and in emergency situations.

  10. All-cause mortality benefit of coronary revascularization vs. medical therapy in patients without known coronary artery disease undergoing coronary computed tomographic angiography: results from CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Min, James K.; Berman, Daniel S.; Dunning, Allison; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Lin, Fay Y.; Maffei, Erica; Plank, Fabian; Raff, Gilbert; Villines, Todd; Labounty, Troy M.; Shaw, Leslee J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To date, the therapeutic benefit of revascularization vs. medical therapy for stable individuals undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) based upon coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) findings has not been examined. Methods and results We examined 15 223 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing CCTA from eight sites and six countries who were followed for median 2.1 years (interquartile range 1.4–3.3 years) for an endpoint of all-cause mortality. Obstructive CAD by CCTA was defined as a ≥50% luminal diameter stenosis in a major coronary artery. Patients were categorized as having high-risk CAD vs. non-high-risk CAD, with the former including patients with at least obstructive two-vessel CAD with proximal left anterior descending artery involvement, three-vessel CAD, and left main CAD. Death occurred in 185 (1.2%) patients. Patients were categorized into two treatment groups: revascularization (n = 1103; 2.2% mortality) and medical therapy (n = 14 120, 1.1% mortality). To account for non-randomized referral to revascularization, we created a propensity score developed by logistic regression to identify variables that influenced the decision to refer to revascularization. Within this model (C index 0.92, χ2 = 1248, P < 0.0001), obstructive CAD was the most influential factor for referral, followed by an interaction of obstructive CAD with pre-test likelihood of CAD (P = 0.0344). Within CCTA CAD groups, rates of revascularization increased from 3.8% for non-high-risk CAD to 51.2% high-risk CAD. In multivariable models, when compared with medical therapy, revascularization was associated with a survival advantage for patients with high-risk CAD [hazards ratio (HR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.18–0.83], with no difference in survival for patients with non-high-risk CAD (HR 3.24, 95% CI 0.76–13.89) (P-value for interaction = 0.03). Conclusion In an intermediate-term follow-up, coronary revascularization is

  11. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  12. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  14. System and method for generating motion corrected tomographic images

    DOEpatents

    Gleason, Shaun S [Knoxville, TN; Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2012-05-01

    A method and related system for generating motion corrected tomographic images includes the steps of illuminating a region of interest (ROI) to be imaged being part of an unrestrained live subject and having at least three spaced apart optical markers thereon. Simultaneous images are acquired from a first and a second camera of the markers from different angles. Motion data comprising 3D position and orientation of the markers relative to an initial reference position is then calculated. Motion corrected tomographic data obtained from the ROI using the motion data is then obtained, where motion corrected tomographic images obtained therefrom.

  15. Some principles in choosing parameters of magnetic resonance tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of amplifying the signal that ensures the visualization of internal organs in the magnetic resonance tomograph due to the optimal selection of some of its parameters has been considered. The operating principle of the tomograph has been analyzed. The relation between the angle of the magnetic moment precession in hydrogen nuclei in an organism, the frequency of the ac magnetic field exciting this precession, and the constant magnetic field used has been determined using quantum-mechanical concepts. This relation makes it possible to determine the optimal parameters for tomograph operation.

  16. Tomographic Aspects of Advanced Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Evaluation of Sequelae following Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Domenico; Mafort, Thiago; Mogami, Roberto; Rodrigues, Rosana de Souza; Menna Barreto, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate tomographic changes in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), degree of agreement among three radiologists regarding tomographic diagnoses, and sequelae following treatment. Methods. Cross-sectional and descriptive study of 74 TB patients confirmed by sputum culture and chest computed tomography before (CT1) and 6 months after (CT2) drug therapy. Results were performed by three radiologists blinded to clinical and laboratory results. Results. Main findings in CT1 included nodules indicating the presence of a tree-in-bud pattern in 93% of cases, ill-defined nodules in 84% of cases, consolidation in 77% of cases, architectural distortion in 71% of cases, cavitary lesions in 62% of cases, and ground glass opacities in 37% of cases. Airway involvement, characterized by increased thickness and dilatation of the bronchial walls, occurred in 93% of cases. Pleural involvement occurred in 54%. There was an agreement on active TB among the three radiologists in 85% of cases. The results in CT2 indicated the presence of architectural distortion in 91% of cases and cylindrical bronchiectasis in 86%. Conclusions. The study established a tomographic pattern for diagnosis of active TB characterized by the presence of airway nodules, consolidation, architectural distortion, and cavitary lesions, and an almost complete degree of agreement (Kappa) was observed among the radiologists (0.85). CT after treatment assists in defining the cure. PMID:28261498

  17. Hydrodynamic Simulations and Tomographic Reconstructions of the Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Casey William

    discuss differences in their convergence behavior, their overall agreement, and the implications for cosmological constraints. In the second part of my thesis, I present a tomographic reconstruction method that allows us to make 3D maps of the IGM with Mpc resolution. In order to make reconstructions of large surveys computationally feasible, I developed a new Wiener Filter application with an algorithm specialized to our problem, which significantly reduces the space and time complexity compared to previous implementations. I explore two scientific applications of the maps: finding protoclusters by searching the maps for large, contiguous regions of low flux and finding cosmic voids by searching the maps for regions of high flux. Using a large N-body simulation, I identify and characterize both protoclusters and voids at z = 2.5, in the middle of the redshift range being mapped by ongoing surveys. I provide simple methods for identifying protocluster and void candidates in the tomographic flux maps, and then test them on mock surveys and reconstructions. I present forecasts for sample purity and completeness and other scientific applications of these large, high-redshift objects.

  18. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  19. Advanced Gastric Cancer Perforation Mimicking Abdominal Wall Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinbeom; Park, Ilyoung; Lee, Dosang; Sung, Kiyoung; Baek, Jongmin

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons occasionally encounter a patient with a gastric cancer invading an adjacent organ, such as the pancreas, liver, or transverse colon. Although there is no established guideline for treatment of invasive gastric cancer, combined resection with radical gastrectomy is conventionally performed for curative purposes. We recently treated a patient with a large gastric cancer invading the abdominal wall, which was initially diagnosed as a simple abdominal wall abscess. Computed tomography showed that an abscess had formed adjacent to the greater curvature of the stomach. During surgery, we made an incision on the abdominal wall to drain the abscess, and performed curative total gastrectomy with partial excision of the involved abdominal wall. The patient received intensive treatment and wound management postoperatively with no surgery-related adverse events. However, the patient could not receive adjuvant chemotherapy and expired on the 82nd postoperative day. PMID:26468420

  20. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortoiliac vein fistula.

    PubMed

    Gyoten, Takayuki; Doi, Toshio; Yamashita, Akio; Fukahara, Kazuaki; Kotoh, Keiju; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-05-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with severe abdominal pain and back pain. Computed tomography showed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (8.4 × 8.3 cm) and a large retroperitoneal hematoma. Immediately afterwards, the patient suffered circulatory collapse and was rushed to the operating theater. A fistula communicating with the left iliac vein was found. It was repaired with a Dacron patch while balloon-tipped catheters controlled the bleeding. The abdominal aortic aneurysm was replaced with a bifurcated graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. There have been few reports of successful repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with aortoiliac arteriovenous fistula.