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Sample records for abdominal computer tomography

  1. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility. PMID:28670024

  2. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility.

  3. The Role of Computed Tomography in Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Karki, O B

    2015-01-01

    Blunt injury trauma is regularly encountered in the emergency department. Diagnostic tools that help in optimum management of blunt abdominal trauma include; Focussed Assessment Sonography for Trauma scan, Diagnostic peritoneal lavage and Computed Tomography scan. The aim of this study is to determine the validity of CT scan as an accurate diagnostic tool and its role in management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. A prospective analysis of 80 patients of blunt abdomen trauma who were admitted in Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal within a span of 15 months was done. Demographic data, mechanism of trauma, management and outcomes were studied. Organ injuries were graded using the Organ Injury Scale guidelines. Most of the patients in our study were in the age group of 21-40 years with an M: F ratio of 2.3:1. Road traffic accident (47.5%) was the most common mechanism of injury. Spleen (27.5%) was the commonest organ injured. CT scan was superior to FAST scan and had sensitivity of 97.3% specificity 75% positive predictive value 98.6%. FAST scan had sensitivity of 78.9%, specificity 50%, positive predictive value 96% with p- value of 0.0034. 81% of patients were conservatively managed. In conjunction with close clinical monitoring, CT scan is reliable in the evaluation and management of blunt abdominal trauma patients. Our study also shows CT as a superior diagnostic modality compared to FAST scan.

  4. Radiation Exposure of Abdominal Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl; Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl; Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate patients radiation exposure of abdominal C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT).MethodsThis prospective study was approved by the institutional review board; written, informed consent was waived. Radiation exposure of abdominal CBCT was evaluated in 40 patients who underwent CBCT during endovascular interventions. Dose area product (DAP) of CBCT was documented and effective dose (ED) was estimated based on organ doses using dedicated Monte Carlo simulation software with consideration of X-ray field location and patients’ individual body weight and height. Weight-dependent ED per DAP conversion factors were calculated. CBCT radiation dose was compared to radiation dose of procedural fluoroscopy. CBCTmore » dose-related risk for cancer was assessed.ResultsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv (95 % confidence interval [CI] 3.9; 4.8 mSv, range 1.1–7.4 mSv). ED was significantly higher in the upper than in the lower abdomen (p = 0.003) and increased with patients’ weight (r = 0.55, slope = 0.045 mSv/kg, p < 0.001). Radiation exposure of CBCT corresponded to the radiation exposure of on average 7.2 fluoroscopy minutes (95 % CI 5.5; 8.8 min) in the same region of interest. Lifetime risk of exposure related cancer death was 0.033 % or less depending on age and weight.ConclusionsMean ED of abdominal CBCT was 4.3 mSv depending on X-ray field location and body weight.« less

  5. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  6. Computed tomography diagnosis of a thoracic and abdominal penetrating foreign body in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Ryan; zur Linden, Alex; Singh, Ameet; Finck, Cyrielle; Crawford, Evan

    2015-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old, spayed female, mixed-breed dog was presented for hemoabdomen associated with an abdominal mass. Upon presentation bicavitary effusion was diagnosed. A penetrating intra-abdominal wooden foreign body was identified using computed tomography. This case describes a thoracic penetrating wooden foreign body causing bicavitary effusion following migration into the retroperitoneal space. PMID:26538669

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging of Injuries from Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian

    2010-04-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can cause multiple internal injuries. However, these injuries are often difficult to accurately evaluate, particularly in the presence of more obvious external injuries. Computed tomography (CT) imaging is currently used to assess clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma. CT can provide a rapid and accurate appraisal of the abdominal viscera, retroperitoneum and abdominal wall, as well as a limited assessment of the lower thoracic region and bony pelvis. This paper presents examples of various injuries in trauma patients depicted in abdominal CT images. We hope these images provide a resource for radiologists, surgeons and medical officers, as well as a learning tool for medical students.

  8. Intra-abdominal fat: Comparison of computed tomography fat segmentation and bioimpedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Finch, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Intra-abdominal fat is an important factor in determining the metabolic syndrome/insulin resistance, and thus the risk of diabetes and ischaemic heart disease. Computed Tomography (CT) fat segmentation represents a defined method of quantifying intra-abdominal fat, with attendant radiation risks. Bioimpedance spectroscopy may offer a method of assessment without any risks to the patients. A comparison is made of these two methods. This was a preliminary study of the utility of multifrequency bioimpedance spectroscopy of the mid abdomen as a measure of intra-abdominal fat, by comparison with fat segmentation of an abdominal CT scan in the -30 to -190 HU range. There was a significant (P < 0.01) correlation between intra-abdominal fat and mid-upper arm circumference, as well as the bioimpedance parameter, the R/S ratio. Multivariate analysis showed that these were the only independant variables and allowed the derivation of a formula to estimate intra-abdominal fat: IAF = 0.02 × MAC - 0.757 × R/S + 0.036. Circumabdominal bioimpedance spectroscopy may prove a useful method of assessing intra-abdominal fat, and may be suitable for use in studies to enhance other measures of body composition, such as mid-upper arm circumference.

  9. Abdominal fat distribution on computed tomography predicts ureteric calculus fragmentation by shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Juan, Hsu-Cheng; Lin, Hung-Yu; Chou, Yii-Her; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Chuang, Shu-Mien; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effects of abdominal fat on shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). We used pre-SWL unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the impact of abdominal fat distribution and calculus characteristics on the outcome of SWL. One hundred and eighty-five patients with a solitary ureteric calculus treated with SWL were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient underwent unenhanced CT within 1 month before SWL treatment. Treatment outcomes were evaluated 1 month later. Unenhanced CT parameters, including calculus surface area, Hounsfield unit (HU) density, abdominal fat area and skin to calculus distance (SSD) were analysed. One hundred and twenty-eight of the 185 patients were found to be calculus-free following treatment. HU density, total fat area, visceral fat area and SSD were identified as significant variables on multivariate logistic regression analysis. The receiver-operating characteristic analyses showed that total fat area, para/perirenal fat area and visceral fat area were sensitive predictors of SWL outcomes. This study revealed that higher quantities of abdominal fat, especially visceral fat, are associated with a lower calculus-free rate following SWL treatment. Unenhanced CT is a convenient technique for diagnosing the presence of a calculus, assessing the intra-abdominal fat distribution and thereby helping to predict the outcome of SWL. • Unenhanced CT is now widely used to assess ureteric calculi. • The same CT protocol can provide measurements of abdominal fat distribution. • Ureteric calculi are usually treated by shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). • Greater intra-abdominal fat stores are generally associated with poorer SWL results.

  10. When Should Abdominal Computed Tomography Be Considered in Patients with Lower Rib Fractures?

    PubMed

    Jeroukhimov, Igor; Hershkovitz, Yehuda; Wiser, Itay; Kessel, Boris; Ayyad, Mohammed; Gatot, Inbar; Shapira, Zahar; Jeoravlev, Svetlana; Halevy, Ariel; Lavy, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Lower rib fractures are considered as a marker of intra-abdominal organ injury. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the "gold standard" examination for patients with lower rib fractures. However, the reported incidence of concomitant intra-abdominal injuries (IAI) is 20%-40%. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of intra-abdominal organ injuries in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures. Medical charts and radiology reports of patients with lower rib (from the 8th to 12th rib) fractures admitted to our center during a 6-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I included patients with intra-abdominal injury (IAI) diagnosed either by CT or on urgent laparotomy, and Group II included those with normal abdominal CT scans. Data included demographics, mechanism of injury, laboratory tests, radiology results including number and location of fractured ribs, and incidence of IAI. Overall 318 patients were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (17.9%) had 71 IAIs compared with 265 (82.1%) patients with no IAI. Logistic regression identified age younger than 55 years (relative risk [RR] = 7.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1-16.8; p = 0.001), bilateral rib fractures (RR = 3.9; 95% CI 1.1-13.5; p = 0.03) and decreased levels of hematocrit (RR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.2-4.8; p = 0.016) as independent risk factors for the presence of IAI. Abdominal CT should be considered in blunt trauma patients with lower rib fractures who are younger than 55 years of age and have bilateral rib fractures and decreased levels of hematocrit on admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting hollow viscus injury in blunt abdominal trauma with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhagvan, Savitha; Turai, Matthew; Holden, Andrew; Ng, Alexander; Civil, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is commonly used but has limitations, especially in excluding hollow viscus injury in the presence of solid organ injury. To determine whether CT reports alone could be used to direct operative treatment in abdominal trauma, this study was undertaken. The trauma database at Auckland City Hospital was accessed for patients who had abdominal CT and subsequent laparotomy during a five-year period. The CT scans were reevaluated by a consultant radiologist who was blinded to operative findings. The CT findings were correlated with the operative findings. Between January 2002 and December 2007, 1,250 patients were evaluated for blunt abdominal injury with CT. A subset of 78 patients underwent laparotomy, and this formed the study group. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scan in predicting hollow viscus injury was 55.33 and 92.06 % respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 61.53 and 89.23 % respectively. Presence of free fluid in CT scan was sensitive in diagnosing hollow viscus injury (90 %). Specific findings for hollow viscus injuries on CT scan were free intraperitoneal air (93 %), retroperitoneal air (100 %), oral contrast extravasation (100 %), bowel wall defect (98 %), patchy bowel enhancement (97 %), and mesenteric abnormality (94 %). CT alone cannot be used as a screening tool for hollow viscus injury. The decision to operate in hollow viscus injury has to be based on mechanism of injury and clinical findings together with radiological evidence.

  12. Computational method for estimating boundary of abdominal subcutaneous fat for absolute electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tohru F; Okamoto, Yoshiwo

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal fat accumulation is considered an essential indicator of human health. Electrical impedance tomography has considerable potential for abdominal fat imaging because of the low specific conductivity of human body fat. In this paper, we propose a robust reconstruction method for high-fidelity conductivity imaging by abstraction of the abdominal cross section using a relatively small number of parameters. Toward this end, we assume homogeneous conductivity in the abdominal subcutaneous fat area and characterize its geometrical shape by parameters defined as the ratio of the distance from the center to boundary of subcutaneous fat to the distance from the center to outer boundary in 64 equiangular directions. To estimate the shape parameters, the sensitivity of the noninvasively measured voltages with respect to the shape parameters is formulated for numerical optimization. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. A 3-dimensional finite element method is used to construct a computer model of the human abdomen. The inverse problems of shape parameters and conductivities are solved concurrently by iterative forward and inverse calculations. As a result, conductivity images are reconstructed with a small systemic error of less than 1% for the estimation of the subcutaneous fat area. A novel method is devised for estimating the boundary of the abdominal subcutaneous fat. The fidelity of the overall reconstructed image to the reference image is significantly improved. The results demonstrate the possibility of realization of an abdominal fat scanner as a low-cost, radiation-free medical device. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Relevant incidental findings at abdominal multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography: A collateral screening?

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Muzzupappa, Claudia; Poloni, Alessandro; Bandirali, Michele; Esseridou, Anastassia; Tritella, Stefania; Secchi, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of relevant incidental findings (RIFs) detected during routine abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CeCT). METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the reports of a consecutive series of abdominal CeCT studies performed between January and May 2013. For each report, patients’ age and sex, admission as inpatient or outpatient, clinical suspicion as indicated by the requesting physician, availability of a previous abdominal examination, and name of the reporting radiologist were recorded. Based on the clinical suspicion, the presence and features of any RIFs (if needing additional workup) was noted. RESULTS: One thousand forty abdominal CeCT were performed in 949 patients (528 males, mean age 66 ± 14 years). No significant difference was found between inpatients and outpatients age and sex distribution (P > 0.472). RIFs were found in 195/1040 (18.8%) CeCT [inpatients = 108/470 (23.0%); outpatients = 87/570 (15.2%); P = 0.002]. RIFs were found in 30/440 (6.8%) CeCT with a previous exam and in 165/600 (27.5%) without a previous exam (P < 0.001). Radiologists’ distribution between inpatients or outpatients was significantly different (P < 0.001). RIFs prevalence increased with aging, except for a peak in 40-49 year group. Most involved organs were kidneys, gallbladder, and lungs. CONCLUSION: A RIF is detected in 1/5 patients undergoing abdominal CeCT. Risk of overdiagnosis should be taken into account. PMID:26516432

  14. Diagnostic value of unenhanced postmortem computed tomography in the detection of traumatic abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Carballeira Álvarez, A; Mancini, J; Tuchtan-Torrents, L; Gach, P; Bartoli, C; Desfeux, J; Piercecchi, M D; Gorincour, G

    2018-02-20

    To determine the diagnostic capabilities of unenhanced postmortem computed tomography (UPMCT) in detecting traumatic abdominal injuries. Cases of traumatic death with both UPMCT and classical autopsy were collected retrospectively from our institution "virtopsy" database in a period of 5 years. Cadavers with gunshot injuries were excluded. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative (NPV) and positive (PPV) predictive values of PMCT globally and for hemoperitoneum, liver, spleen, pancreas and kidney injuries individually were estimated using the autopsy report as gold standard. Seventy-one cadavers were included. UPMCT had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity 94%, with an accuracy of 83%, a PPV of 98% and a NPV of 59% for the diagnosis of traumatic abdominal injuries. The highest sensitivity was obtained for the detection of hepatic injuries (71%) and the lowest for pancreatic injuries (12%). UPMCT had a specificity of 100% for the detection of hemoperitoneum. A NPV of 98% was found for the detection of perihepatic hematomas. The low sensitivity and low NPV do not support the use of UPMCT as an alternative to conventional autopsy to diagnose and/or rule out traumatic abdominal injuries. Nevertheless, UPMCT remains a helpful tool as it helps detect hemoperitoneum and virtually exclude presence of perihepatic hematomas. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Computed tomography use among children presenting to emergency departments with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, Jahan; Herring, Andrew; Harries, Aaron; Gonzales, Ralph; Alter, Harrison

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate trends in and factors associated with computed tomography (CT) use among children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain. This study was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1998 to 2008. We identified ED patients aged <19 years with abdominal pain and collected patient demographic and hospital characteristics, and outcomes related to imaging, hospital admission, and diagnosis of appendicitis. Trend analysis was performed over the study period for the outcomes of interest, and a multivariate regression model was used to identify factors associated with CT use. Of all pediatric ED visits, 6.0% were for abdominal pain. We noted a rise in the proportion of these patients with CT use, from 0.9% in 1998 to 15.4% in 2008 (P < .001), with no change in ultrasound/radiograph use, diagnosis of appendicitis, or hospital admission. Older and male patients were more likely to have a CT scan, whereas black children were one-half as likely to undergo a CT scan compared with white children (odds ratio: 0.50 [95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.81]). Admitted children had much higher odds of undergoing a CT scan (odds ratio: 4.11 [95% confidence interval: 2.66-6.35]). There was a plateau in CT use in 2006 to 2008. There was a dramatic increase in the utilization of CT imaging in the ED evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain. Some groups of children may have a differential likelihood of receiving CT scans.

  16. Evaluation of normal abdominal aortic diameters in the Indian population using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jasper, A; Harshe, G; Keshava, S N; Kulkarni, G; Stephen, E; Agarwal, S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish normal diameters for the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels in the Indian population and to study the variation in aortic diameters with age, sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body surface area (BSA). One hundred and forty-two patients who underwent helical contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen for non-cardiovascular reasons were recruited.. The mean internal diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta (maximum anteroposterior and transverse diameter) were measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels and tabulated according to various age groups for both men and women. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the correlation between aortic diameters, height, weight, BSA, and BMI. The mean diameters of the suprarenal and infrarenal abdominal aorta measured at T12 and L3 vertebral levels, in men were 19.0 ± 2.3 and 13.8 ± 1.9 mm and in women 17.1 ± 2.3 and 12.0 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. The aortic diameter progressively increased in caliber with increasing age of the patients and was smaller in women than men. A significant positive correlation was found in men between the suprarenal and infrarenal aortic diameters and weight, BSA, and BMI. In women, this correlation was significant in the infrarenal aorta but not in the suprarenal aorta. We obtained a set of normal values for the abdominal aorta in the Indian population. The aortic diameters correlated with age, gender, and body size of the patients as seen with previously published data in the Western population. A brief comparison of data between Indian and Western population showed that the values obtained were less than published elsewhere and hence, this should be considered while formulating intervention protocols.

  17. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Paediatric blunt abdominal trauma - are we doing too many computed tomography scans?

    PubMed

    Arnold, M; Moore, S W

    2013-02-14

    Blunt abdominal trauma in childhood contributes significantly to both morbidity and mortality. Selective non-operative management of blunt abdominal trauma in children depends on both diagnostic and clinical factors. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is widely used to facilitate better management. Increased availability of CT may, however, result in its overuse in the management of blunt abdominal trauma in children, which carries significant radiation exposure risks. To evaluate the use and value of CT scanning in the overall management and outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in children in the Tygerberg Academic Hospital trauma unit, Parow, Cape Town, South Africa, before and after improved access to CT as a result of installation of a new rapid CT scanner in the trauma management area (previously the scanner had been 4 floors away). Patients aged 0 - 13 years who were referred with blunt abdominal trauma due to vehicle-related accidents before the introduction of the new CT scanner (group 1, n=66, November 2003 - March 2009) were compared with those seen in the 1-year period after the scanner was installed (group 2, n=37, April 2009 - April 2010). Details of clinical presentation, imaging results and their influence on management were retrospectively reviewed. A follow-up group was evaluated after stricter criteria for abdominal CT scanning (viz. prior evaluation by paediatric surgical personnel) were introduced (group 3, n=14, November 2011 - May 2012) to evaluate the impact of this clinical screening on the rate of negative scans. There were 66 patients in group 1 and 37 in group 2. An apparent increase in CT use with increased availability was accompanied by a marked increase in negative CT scans (38.9% compared with 6.2%; p<0.006). Despite a slightly higher prevalence of associated injuries in group 2, as well as a slightly longer length of hospital stay, there was a similar prevalence of intra-abdominal injuries detected in positive scans in the two groups

  19. X-ray dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography using advanced iterative reconstruction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ning, Peigang; Zhu, Shaocheng; Shi, Dapeng; Guo, Ying; Sun, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to explore the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms in reducing computed tomography (CT) radiation dosages in abdominal imaging. CT scans on a standard male phantom were performed at different tube currents. Images at the different tube currents were reconstructed with the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% ASiR and MBIR algorithms and compared. The CT value, image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of the reconstructed abdominal images were measured. Volumetric CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) were recorded. At different tube currents, 50% ASiR and MBIR significantly reduced image noise and increased the CNR when compared with FBP. The minimal tube current values required by FBP, 50% ASiR, and MBIR to achieve acceptable image quality using this phantom were 200, 140, and 80 mA, respectively. At the identical image quality, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced the radiation dose by 35.9% and 59.9% respectively when compared with FBP. Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques are able to reduce image noise and increase image CNRs. Compared with FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced radiation doses by 35.9% and 59.9%, respectively.

  20. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-M, E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at ''Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez'' in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used wasmore » a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}), the volumetric dose index (C{sub vol}) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the C{sub w}(31.1 mGy) and C{sub vol}(11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for C{sub w} and 5.5 mGy for C{sub vol}. However, this protocol presented the highest value for P{sub KL,CT}(282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.« less

  1. Planning 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography (4DCT) Cannot Adequately Represent Daily Intrafractional Motion of Abdominal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Noel, Camille

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) can adequately represent daily motion of abdominal tumors in regularly fractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients. Methods and Materials: Intrafractional tumor motion of 10 patients with abdominal tumors (4 pancreas-fractionated and 6 liver-stereotactic patients) with implanted fiducials was measured based on daily orthogonal fluoroscopic movies over 38 treatment fractions. The needed internal margin for at least 90% of tumor coverage was calculated based on a 95th and fifth percentile of daily 3-dimensional tumor motion. The planning internal margin was generated by fusing 4DCT motion from all phase bins. The disagreementmore » between needed and planning internal margin was analyzed fraction by fraction in 3 motion axes (superior-inferior [SI], anterior-posterior [AP], and left-right [LR]). The 4DCT margin was considered as an overestimation/underestimation of daily motion when disagreement exceeded at least 3 mm in the SI axis and/or 1.2 mm in the AP and LR axes (4DCT image resolution). The underlying reasons for this disagreement were evaluated based on interfractional and intrafractional breathing variation. Results: The 4DCT overestimated daily 3-dimensional motion in 39% of the fractions in 7 of 10 patients and underestimated it in 53% of the fractions in 8 of 10 patients. Median underestimation was 3.9 mm, 3.0 mm, and 1.7 mm in the SI axis, AP axis, and LR axis, respectively. The 4DCT was found to capture irregular deep breaths in 3 of 10 patients, with 4DCT motion larger than mean daily amplitude by 18 to 21 mm. The breathing pattern varied from breath to breath and day to day. The intrafractional variation of amplitude was significantly larger than intrafractional variation (2.7 mm vs 1.3 mm) in the primary motion axis (ie, SI axis). The SBRT patients showed significantly larger intrafractional amplitude variation than fractionated patients (3.0

  2. Predictors for cecal insertion time: the impact of abdominal visceral fat measured by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Naoyoshi; Sakamoto, Kayo; Arai, Tomohiro; Niikura, Ryota; Shimbo, Takuro; Shinozaki, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Uemura, Naomi

    2014-10-01

    Several factors affect the risk for longer cecal insertion time. The aim of this study was to identify the predictors of longer insertion time and to evaluate the effect of visceral fat measured by CT. This is a retrospective observational study. Outpatients for colorectal cancer screening who underwent colonoscopies and CT were enrolled. Computed tomography was performed in individuals who requested cancer screening and in those with GI bleeding. Information on obesity indices (BMI, visceral adipose tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue area), constipation score, history of abdominal surgery, poor preparation, fellow involvement, diverticulosis, patient discomfort, and the amount of sedation used was collected. The cecal insertion rate was 95.2% (899/944), and 899 patients were analyzed. Multiple regression analysis showed that female sex, lower BMI, lower visceral adipose tissue area, lower subcutaneous adipose tissue area, higher constipation score, history of surgery, poor bowel preparation, and fellow involvement were independently associated with longer insertion time. When obesity indices were considered simultaneously, smaller subcutaneous adipose tissue area (p = 0.038), but not lower BMI (p = 0.802) or smaller visceral adipose tissue area (p = 0.856), was associated with longer insertion time; the other aforementioned factors remained associated with longer insertion time. In the subanalysis of normal-weight patients (BMI <25 kg/m), a smaller subcutaneous adipose tissue area (p = 0.002), but not a lower BMI (p = 0.782), was independently associated with a longer insertion time. Longer insertion time had a positive correlation with a higher patient discomfort score (ρ = 0.51, p < 0.001) and a greater amount of midazolam use (ρ = 0.32, p < 0.001). This single-center retrospective study includes a potential selection bias. In addition to BMI and intra-abdominal fat, female sex, constipation, history of abdominal surgery, poor preparation, and fellow

  3. Hepatic and splenic blush on computed tomography in children following blunt abdominal trauma: Is intervention necessary?

    PubMed

    Ingram, Martha-Conley E; Siddharthan, Ragavan V; Morris, Andrew D; Hill, Sarah J; Travers, Curtis D; McKracken, Courtney E; Heiss, Kurt F; Raval, Mehul V; Santore, Matthew T

    2016-08-01

    There are no widely accepted guidelines for management of pediatric patients who have evidence of solid organ contrast extravasation ("blush") on computed tomography (CT) scans following blunt abdominal trauma. We report our experience as a Level 1 pediatric trauma center in managing cases with hepatic and splenic blush. All pediatric blunt abdominal trauma cases resulting in liver or splenic injury were queried from 2008 to 2014. Patients were excluded if a CT was unavailable in the medical record. The presence of contrast blush was based on final reports from attending pediatric radiologists. Correlations between incidence of contrast blush and major outcomes of interest were determined using χ and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively, evaluating statistical significance at p < 0.05. Of 318 patients with splenic or liver injury after blunt abdominal trauma, we report on 30 patients (9%) with solid organ blush, resulting in 18 cases of hepatic blush and 16 cases of splenic blush (four patients had extravasation from both organs). Blush was not found to correlate significantly with age, gender, or type of injury (liver vs. splenic) but was found to associate with higher grades of solid organ injury (p = 0.002) and higher ISS overall (p < 0.001). Patients with contrast blush on imaging were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit (90% vs. 41%, p < 0.001), receive blood products, (50% vs. 12%, p < 0.001), and be considered for an intervention (p < 0.001). Eighty percent of patients with an isolated contrast blush of the spleen or liver did not require an operation. Only 17% of patients with blush required definitive treatment, such as embolization (n = 1), packing (n = 1), or splenectomy (n = 3). Blush had no significant correlation with overall survival (p = 0.13). The finding of a blush on CT from a splenic or liver injury is associated with higher grade of injury. These patients receive intensive medical

  4. Contrast medium usage reduction in abdominal computed tomography by using high-iodinated concentration contrast medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwannasri, A.; Kaewlai, R.; Asavaphatiboon, S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to determine if administration of a low volume high-concentration iodinated contrast medium can preserve image quality in comparison with regular-concentration intravenous contrast medium in patient undergoing contrast-enhancement abdominal computed tomography (CT). Eighty-four patients were randomly divided into 3 groups of similar iodine delivery rate; A: 1.2 cc/kg of iomeprol-400, B: 1.0 cc/kg of iomeprol-400 and C: 1.5 cc/kg of ioversol-350. Contrast enhancement of the liver parenchyma, pancreas and aorta was quantitatively measured in Hounsfield units and qualitative assessed by a radiologist. T-test was used to evaluate contrast enhancement, and Chi-square test was used to evaluate qualitative image assessment, at significance level of 0.05 with 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant differences in contrast enhancement of liver parenchyma and pancreas between group A and group C in both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Group C showed superior vascular enhancement to group A and B on quantitative analysis.

  5. Significance of computed tomography finding of intra-abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury after blunt abdominal trauma: time for laparotomy on demand.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ismail; Tawfek, Zainab; Abdelrahman, Yassir; Siddiuqqi, Tariq; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Tuma, Mazin; Peralta, Ruben; Zarour, Ahmad; Yakhlef, Sawsan; Hamzawi, Hazim; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-06-01

    Optimal management of patients with intra-abdominal free fluid found on computed tomography (CT) scan without solid organ injury remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of CT scan findings of free fluid in the management of blunt abdominal trauma patients who otherwise have no indications for laparotomy. During the 3-year study period, all patients presenting with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent abdominal CT examination were retrospectively reviewed. All hemodynamically stable patients who presented with abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury on CT scan were analyzed for radiological interpretation, clinical management, operative findings, and outcome. A total of 122 patients were included in the study, 91 % of whom were males. The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 12 years. A total of 34 patients underwent exploratory laparotomy, 31 of whom had therapeutic interventions. Small bowel injuries were found in 12 patients, large bowel injuries in ten, and mesenteric injuries in seven patients. One patient had combined small and large bowel injury, and one had traumatic gangrenous appendix. In the remaining three patients, laparotomy was non-therapeutic. A total of 36 patients had associated pelvic fractures and 33 had multiple lumbar transverse process fractures. Detection of intra-peritoneal fluid by CT scan is inaccurate for prediction of bowel injury or need for surgery. However, the correlation between CT scan findings and clinical course is important for optimal diagnosis of bowel and mesenteric injuries.

  6. Correlation of quantitative dual-energy computed tomography iodine maps and abdominal computed tomography perfusion measurements: are single-acquisition dual-energy computed tomography iodine maps more than a reduced-dose surrogate of conventional computed tomography perfusion?

    PubMed

    Stiller, Wolfram; Skornitzke, Stephan; Fritz, Franziska; Klauss, Miriam; Hansen, Jens; Pahn, Gregor; Grenacher, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Study objectives were the quantitative evaluation of whether conventional abdominal computed tomography (CT) perfusion measurements mathematically correlate with quantitative single-acquisition dual-energy CT (DECT) iodine concentration maps, the determination of the optimum time of acquisition for achieving maximum correlation, and the estimation of the potential for radiation exposure reduction when replacing conventional CT perfusion by single-acquisition DECT iodine concentration maps. Dual-energy CT perfusion sequences were dynamically acquired over 51 seconds (34 acquisitions every 1.5 seconds) in 24 patients with histologically verified pancreatic carcinoma using dual-source DECT at tube potentials of 80 kVp and 140 kVp. Using software developed in-house, perfusion maps were calculated from 80-kVp image series using the maximum slope model after deformable motion correction. In addition, quantitative iodine maps were calculated for each of the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient. Within a manual segmentation of the pancreas, voxel-by-voxel correlation between the perfusion map and each of the iodine maps was calculated for each patient to determine the optimum time of acquisition topt defined as the acquisition time of the iodine map with the highest correlation coefficient. Subsequently, regions of interest were placed inside the tumor and inside healthy pancreatic tissue, and correlation between mean perfusion values and mean iodine concentrations within these regions of interest at topt was calculated for the patient sample. The mean (SD) topt was 31.7 (5.4) seconds after the start of contrast agent injection. The mean (SD) perfusion values for healthy pancreatic and tumor tissues were 67.8 (26.7) mL per 100 mL/min and 43.7 (32.2) mL per 100 mL/min, respectively. At topt, the mean (SD) iodine concentrations were 2.07 (0.71) mg/mL in healthy pancreatic and 1.69 (0.98) mg/mL in tumor tissue, respectively. Overall, the correlation between perfusion values and

  7. Investigation of relation between visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat volumes and calcified aortic plaques via multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Efe, Duran; Aygün, Fatih; Acar, Türker; Yildiz, Melda; Gemici, Kazım

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated effect of subcutaneous fat volume and abdominal visceral fat volume on aortic atherosclerosis via multislice computed tomography. The present study comprised 424 subjects who underwent non-contrast-enhanced abdominal CT in our clinic between June 2012 and June 2013. Using dedicated software visceral fat volume was calculated for each individual and then subcutaneous fat volume was calculated by subtracting visceral fat volume from total fat volume. By dividing visceral fat volume/subcutaneous fat volume participants were assigned to three groups according to their mean visceral fat volume/subcutaneous fat volume: Group 1 consisted of subjects with visceral fat volume/subcutaneous fat volume lower than 0.48 (Group 1 < 0.48); Group 2 consisted of subjects with visceral fat volume/subcutaneous fat volume equal to or higher than 0.48 and lower than 0.69 (0.48 ≤ Group 2 < 0.69); and Group 3 consisted of subjects with visceral fat volume/subcutaneous fat volume equal to or higher than 0.69 (Group 3 ≥ 0.69). The mean abdominal aortic calcium scores according to Agatston scoring (au) were 136.8 ± 418.7 au in Group 1, 179.9 ± 463 au in Group 2 and 212.2 ± 486.9 in Group 3, respectively. We have demonstrated a significant correlation between visceral fat volume and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis, while there was absence of significant correlation between subcutaneous fat volume and abdominal atherosclerosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  9. Dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography: intraindividual comparison of image quality of full-dose standard and half-dose iterative reconstructions with dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    May, Matthias S; Wüst, Wolfgang; Brand, Michael; Stahl, Christian; Allmendinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael M

    2011-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the image quality of iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in half-dose (HD) datasets compared with full-dose (FD) and HD filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction in abdominal computed tomography (CT). To acquire data with FD and HD simultaneously, contrast-enhanced abdominal CT was performed with a dual-source CT system, both tubes operating at 120 kV, 100 ref.mAs, and pitch 0.8. Three different image datasets were reconstructed from the raw data: Standard FD images applying FBP which served as reference, HD images applying FBP and HD images applying IRIS. For the HD data sets, only data from 1 tube detector-system was used. Quantitative image quality analysis was performed by measuring image noise in tissue and air. Qualitative image quality was evaluated according to the European Guidelines on Quality criteria for CT. Additional assessment of artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and edge sharpness was performed. : Image noise in soft tissue was substantially decreased in HD-IRIS (-3.4 HU, -22%) and increased in HD-FBP (+6.2 HU, +39%) images when compared with the reference (mean noise, 15.9 HU). No significant differences between the FD-FBP and HD-IRIS images were found for the visually sharp anatomic reproduction, overall diagnostic acceptability (P = 0.923), lesion conspicuity (P = 0.592), and edge sharpness (P = 0.589), while HD-FBP was rated inferior. Streak artifacts and beam hardening was significantly more prominent in HD-FBP while HD-IRIS images exhibited a slightly different noise pattern. Direct intrapatient comparison of standard FD body protocols and HD-IRIS reconstruction suggest that the latest iterative reconstruction algorithms allow for approximately 50% dose reduction without deterioration of the high image quality necessary for confident diagnosis.

  10. Top 50 Highly Cited Articles on Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) in Abdominal Radiology: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bo; Wu, Yuhao; O'Keeffe, Michael E; Berger, Ferco H; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the 50 most highly cited articles on dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in abdominal radiology Thomson Reuters Web of Science All Databases was queried without year or language restriction. Only original research articles with a primary focus on abdominal radiology using DECT were selected. Review articles, meta-analyses, and studies without human subjects were excluded. Fifty articles with the highest average yearly citation were identified. These articles were published between 2007 and 2017 in 12 journals, with the most in Radiology (12 articles). Articles had a median of 7 authors, with all first authors but one primarily affiliated to radiology departments. The United States of America produced the most articles (16), followed by Germany (13 articles), and China (7 articles). Most studies used Dual Source DECT technology (35 articles), followed by Rapid Kilovoltage Switching (14 articles), and Sequential Scanning (1 article). The top three scanned organs were the liver (24%), kidney (16%), and urinary tract (15%). The most commonly studied pathology was urinary calculi (28%), renal lesion/tumor (23%), and hepatic lesion/tumor (20%). Our study identifies intellectual milestones in the applications of DECT in abdominal radiology. The diversity of the articles reflects on the characteristics and quality of the most influential publications related to DECT.

  11. Top 50 Highly Cited Articles on Dual Energy Computed Tomography (DECT) in Abdominal Radiology: A Bibliometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bo; Wu, Yuhao; O’Keeffe, Michael E; Berger, Ferco H; McLaughlin, Patrick D; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2017-01-01

    Summary This study aims to identify the 50 most highly cited articles on dual energy computed tomography (DECT) in abdominal radiology Thomson Reuters Web of Science All Databases was queried without year or language restriction. Only original research articles with a primary focus on abdominal radiology using DECT were selected. Review articles, meta-analyses, and studies without human subjects were excluded. Fifty articles with the highest average yearly citation were identified. These articles were published between 2007 and 2017 in 12 journals, with the most in Radiology (12 articles). Articles had a median of 7 authors, with all first authors but one primarily affiliated to radiology departments. The United States of America produced the most articles (16), followed by Germany (13 articles), and China (7 articles). Most studies used Dual Source DECT technology (35 articles), followed by Rapid Kilovoltage Switching (14 articles), and Sequential Scanning (1 article). The top three scanned organs were the liver (24%), kidney (16%), and urinary tract (15%). The most commonly studied pathology was urinary calculi (28%), renal lesion/tumor (23%), and hepatic lesion/tumor (20%). Our study identifies intellectual milestones in the applications of DECT in abdominal radiology. The diversity of the articles reflects on the characteristics and quality of the most influential publications related to DECT. PMID:29657641

  12. Computed tomography has an important role in hollow viscus and mesenteric injuries after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ker-Kan; Liu, Jody Zhiyang; Go, Tsung-Shyen; Vijayan, Appasamy; Chiu, Ming-Terk

    2010-05-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans have become invaluable in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma. No clear consensus exists on its role in hollow viscus injuries (HVI) and mesenteric injuries (MI). The aim of this study was to correlate operative findings of HVI and MI to findings on pre-operative CT. All patients treated for blunt abdominal trauma at Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2003 to January 2008 were reviewed. CT scans were only performed if the patients were haemodynamically stable and indicated. All scans were performed with intravenous contrast using a 4-slice CT scanner from 2003 to December 2004 and a 64-slice CT scanner from January 2005 onwards. All cases with documented HVI/MI that underwent both CT scans and exploratory laparotomy were analysed. Thirty-one patients formed the study group, with median age of 40 (range, 22-65) years and a significant male (83.9%) predominance. Vehicular-related incidents accounted for 67.7% of the injuries and the median Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 13 (4-50). The 2 commonest findings on CT scans were extra-luminal gas (35.5%) and free fluid without significant solid organ injuries (93.5%). During exploratory laparotomy, perforation of hollow viscus (51.6%) occurred more frequently than suspected from the initial CT findings of extra-luminal gas. Other notable findings included haemoperitoneum (64.5%), and mesenteric tears (67.7%). None of our patients with HVI and MI had a normal pre-operative CT scan. Our study suggests that patients with surgically confirmed HVI and MI found at laparotomy were very likely to have an abnormal pre-operative CT scan. Unexplained free fluid was a very common finding in blunt HVI/MI and is one major indication to consider exploratory laparotomy. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Noncontrast computed tomography can predict the outcome of shockwave lithotripsy via accurate stone measurement and abdominal fat distribution determination.

    PubMed

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Tu, Hung-Pin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Jang, Mei-Yu; Wu, Wen-Jen; Li, Ching-Chia; Chou, Yii-Her; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Urolithiasis is a common disease of the urinary system. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) has become one of the standard treatments for renal and ureteral stones; however, the success rates range widely and failure of stone disintegration may cause additional outlay, alternative procedures, and even complications. We used the data available from noncontrast abdominal computed tomography (NCCT) to evaluate the impact of stone parameters and abdominal fat distribution on calculus-free rates following SWL. We retrospectively reviewed 328 patients who had urinary stones and had undergone SWL from August 2012 to August 2013. All of them received pre-SWL NCCT; 1 month after SWL, radiography was arranged to evaluate the condition of the fragments. These patients were classified into stone-free group and residual stone group. Unenhanced computed tomography variables, including stone attenuation, abdominal fat area, and skin-to-stone distance (SSD) were analyzed. In all, 197 (60%) were classified as stone-free and 132 (40%) as having residual stone. The mean ages were 49.35 ± 13.22 years and 55.32 ± 13.52 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, stone size, stone surface area, stone attenuation, SSD, total fat area (TFA), abdominal circumference, serum creatinine, and the severity of hydronephrosis revealed statistical significance between these two groups. From multivariate logistic regression analysis, the independent parameters impacting SWL outcomes were stone size, stone attenuation, TFA, and serum creatinine. [Adjusted odds ratios and (95% confidence intervals): 9.49 (3.72-24.20), 2.25 (1.22-4.14), 2.20 (1.10-4.40), and 2.89 (1.35-6.21) respectively, all p < 0.05]. In the present study, stone size, stone attenuation, TFA and serum creatinine were four independent predictors for stone-free rates after SWL. These findings suggest that pretreatment NCCT may predict the outcomes after SWL. Consequently, we can use these predictors for selecting

  14. Mass screening of multiple abdominal solid organs using mobile helical computed tomography scanner--a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Susumu; Aoki, Jun; Ohwada, Susumu; Takahashi, Toru; Morishita, Yasuo; Ueda, Keisuke

    2007-04-01

    The possibility of a new screening procedure for multiple abdominal solid organs using a mobile helical computed tomography (CT) scanner was evaluated. A total of 4,543 residents, who were 40 years of age or older, received CT scanning without contrast medium. The mean age of participants was 64 years including 2,022 males and 2,521 females. A total of 2,105 abnormal findings were uniquely detected in 1,594 participants. Liver and kidney diseases including ureter occupied around 30% of total abnormal findings, respectively. Besides frequent cystic or calcified lesions, solid tumours were suspected in 56 lesions, which received further examination by specialized physicians. Five (9%) of them were confirmed as being malignant tumours including pancreatic cancer in two patients, and liver, lung and ovary cancers in one patient each, respectively. All five patients with each malignant lesion received curative operations. Small-sized abdominal aortic aneurysms and heart valve diseases were uniquely found in 22 and two patients, respectively. Qualitative diagnoses of solid tumours were difficult using CT findings without contrast medium. CT screening procedures require further investigation in aspect of the selection of examinees, CT scanning procedure, sensitivity and specificity, and cost-effectiveness.

  15. Pretreatment of patients requiring oral contrast abdominal computed tomography with antiemetics: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Garra, Gregory; Singer, Adam J; Bamber, Danny; Chohan, Jasmine; Troxell, Regina; Thode, Henry C

    2009-04-01

    Ingestion of diatrizoate meglumine before abdominal computed tomography (CT) is time consuming. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metoclopramide or ondansetron would result in faster ingestion of diatrizoate meglumine than placebo. The study was a double-blind, randomized controlled trial on adults requiring oral contrast abdominal CT. Patients were randomized to placebo, metoclopramide 10 mg, or ondansetron 4 mg intravenously 15 minutes before ingesting 2 L of diatrizoate meglumine. The primary outcome was time to complete diatrizoate meglumine ingestion. Secondary outcome measures included volume of diatrizoate meglumine ingested, 100-mm visual analog scale for nausea at 15-minute intervals, time to CT, vomiting, and use of rescue antiemetics. The study was powered to detect a 60-minute difference in diatrizoate meglumine ingestion time between saline and medication groups. One hundred six patients were randomized; placebo (36), metoclopramide (35), and ondansetron (35). Groups were similar in baseline characteristics. Median (interquartile range) times for diatrizoate meglumine ingestion were placebo 109 minutes (82 to 135 minutes); metoclopramide 105 minutes (75 to 135 minutes); and ondansetron 110 minutes (79 to 140 minutes) (P=.67). Vomiting was less frequent with metoclopramide (3%) than placebo (18%) or ondansetron (9%) (P=.11). The visual analog scale for nausea at each point was not significantly different between groups (P=.11). The need for rescue antiemetics was lowest for metoclopramide (3%) compared with placebo (27%) and ondansetron (12%) (P=.02). Pretreatment with ondansetron or metoclopramide does not reduce oral contrast solution ingestion time.

  16. Quality of abdominal computed tomography angiography: hand versus mechanical intravenous contrast administration in children.

    PubMed

    Ayyala, Rama S; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal CT angiography has been increasingly used for evaluation of various conditions related to abdominal vasculature in the pediatric population. However, no direct comparison has evaluated the quality of abdominal CT angiography in children using hand versus mechanical administration of intravenous (IV) contrast agent. To compare hand versus mechanical administration of IV contrast agent in the quality of abdominal CT angiography in the pediatric population. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical record to identify pediatric patients (≤18 years) who had abdominal CT angiography between August 2012 and August 2013. The information obtained includes: (1) type of administration of IV contrast agent (hand [group 1] versus mechanical [group 2]), (2) size (gauge) of IV catheter, (3) amount of contrast agent administered and (4) rate of contrast agent administration (ml/s). Two reviewers independently performed qualitative and quantitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality. Qualitative evaluation of abdominal CT angiography image quality was performed by visual assessment of the degree of contrast enhancement in the region of interest (ROI) based on a 4-point scale. Quantitative evaluation of each CT angiography examination was performed by measuring the Hounsfield unit (HU) using an ROI within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and the inferior mesenteric artery) for each child. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using the F-test was applied to compare contrast enhancement within the abdominal aorta at two levels (celiac axis and inferior mesenteric artery) between hand administration and mechanical administration of IV contrast methods with adjustment for age. We identified 46 pediatric patients (24 male, 22 female; mean age 7.3 ± 5.5 years; range 5 weeks to 18 years) with abdominal CT angiography performed during the study period. Of these patients, 16 (35%; 1.7 ± 2.2 years; range 5 weeks to 5 years) had hand

  17. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2005-07-15

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric tomore » tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved.« less

  18. Evaluation Experiment of Ultrasound Computed Tomography for the Abdominal Sound Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Yamada, Akira

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal sound speed tomographic imaging using through-transmission travel time data on the body surface was investigated. To this end, a hundred kHz range low-frequency wave was used to reduce the wave attenuation within an inner body medium. A method was investigated for the reconstruction of the image with the smallest possible number of path data around the abdominal surface. Specifically, the data from a strong scattering spinal cord should be avoided. To fulfill the requirement, the smoothed path algebraic reconstruction technique was introduced. The validity of this method was examined both on the numerically synthesized data and the experimentally measured data for the phantom specimen and actual human subject. It was shown that an abdominal tomographic sound speed image could be successfully obtained by preparing only 32 transducer locations at the circumference around the abdominal surface and their combination of less than 100 number of observation path data as well as by avoiding the data intersecting the spinal cord. In addition, fat regions were extracted having a sound speed lower than the threshold value to demonstrate the possibility of this method for metabolic syndrome diagnosis.

  19. Prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in a population undergoing computed tomography colonography in Canterbury, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Khashram, M; Jones, G T; Roake, J A

    2015-08-01

    There is compelling level 1 evidence in support of screening men for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to reduce AAA mortality. However, New Zealand (NZ) lacks data on AAA prevalence, and national screening has not been implemented. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of AAA in a population undergoing a computed tomography colonography (CTC) for gastrointestinal symptoms. This was an observational study; all consecutive CTCs performed in three regions of the South Island of NZ over a 4 year period were reviewed. Data on abdominal and thoracic aorta diameters ≥30 mm, and iliac and femoral aneurysms ≥20 mm were recorded. Previous aortic surgical grafts or endovascular stents were also documented. Demographics, survival, and AAA related outcomes were collected and used for analysis. Included were 4,893 scans on 4,644 patients (1,933 men [41.6%], 2,711 women [58.4%]) with a median age of 69.3 years (range 17.0-97.0 years). There were 309 scans on 289 patients (75.4% men) who had either an aneurysm or a previous aortic graft with a median age of 79.6 years (range 57.0-96.0 years). Of these, 223 had a native AAA ≥30 mm. The prevalence of AAA rose with age from 1.3% in men aged 55-64 years, to 9.1% in 65-74 year olds, 16.8% in 75-84 year olds, and 22.0% in ≥85 year olds. The corresponding figures in women were 0.4%, 2%, 3.9%, and 6.2%, respectively. In this observational study, the prevalence of AAA was high and warrants further evaluation. The results acquired help to define a population that may benefit from a national AAA screening programme. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Can Abdominal Computed Tomography Imaging Help Accurately Identify a Dedifferentiated Component in a Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma?

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Priya; Wang, Jieqi; Varma, Datla; Jensen, Corey; Patnana, Madhavi; Wei, Wei; Chauhan, Anil; Feig, Barry; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Somaiah, Neeta; Sagebiel, Tara

    To assess the ability of computed tomography (CT) to differentiate an atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (WDLPS) from a WDLPS with a dedifferentiated component (DDLPS) within it. Forty-nine untreated patients with abdominal atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas who had undergone contrast-enhanced CT were identified using an institutional database. Three radiologists who were blinded to the pathology findings evaluated all the images independently to determine whether a dedifferentiated component was present within the WDLPS. The CT images were evaluated for fat content (≤25% or >25%); presence of ground-glass density, enhancing and/or necrotic nodules; presence of a capsule surrounding the mass; septations; and presence and pattern of calcifications. A multivariate logistic regression model with generalized estimating equations was used to correlate imaging features with pathology findings. Kappa statistics were calculated to assess agreement between the three radiologists. On the basis of pathological findings, 12 patients had been diagnosed with DDLPS within a WDLPS and 37 had been diagnosed with WDLPS. The presence of an enhancing or a centrally necrotic nodule within the atypical lipomatous tumor was associated with dedifferentiated liposarcoma (P = 0.02 and P = 0.0003, respectively). The three readers showed almost perfect agreement in overall diagnosis (κ r = 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-0.99). An enhancing or centrally necrotic nodule may be indicative of a dedifferentiated component in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Ground-glass density nodules may not be indicative of dedifferentiation.

  1. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy in Iranians in vivo using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pak, Neda; Patel, Shilpan G; Hashemi Taheri, Amir P; Hashemi, Fariba; Eftekhari Vaghefi, Raana; Naybandi Atashi, Sara; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2016-03-01

    Surface anatomy is a core component of human anatomy in clinical practice. It allows clinicians to assess patients accurately and quickly; however, recent studies have revealed variability among individuals and ethnicities. The aim of this study is to investigate possible variations in adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in an Iranian population. This study used 100 thoracoabdominal CT scans (mean age: 47 ± 17 years, age range: 20-77 years, 47% females), noted the most common locations of clinically relevant surface markings, and analyzed correlations between these variables and age or gender. While many common surface markings in Iranians were consistent with the evidence-based literature, there were some differences. In relation to the corresponding segments of the vertebral column, the superior vena cava formation and the lower border of the pleura adjacent to the vertebral column and right kidney tended to be at higher levels in adult Iranians than a Caucasian population. There were also discrepancies between the Iranian population and commonly-referenced medical textbooks and recent evidence-based literature concerning the vertebral levels of the diaphragmatic openings of the esophagus, aorta, and inferior vena cava. This study emphasizes the need to consider evidence-based reappraisals of surface anatomy to guide clinical practice. Much of our current knowledge of surface anatomy is based on older studies of cadavers rather than living people, and does not take ethnic and individual variations into consideration. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reproducibility of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Diameter Measurement and Growth Evaluation on Axial and Multiplanar Computed Tomography Reformations

    SciTech Connect

    Dugas, Alexandre; Therasse, Eric; Kauffmann, Claude

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare different methods measuring abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (Dmax) and its progression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: Forty AAA patients with two MDCT scans acquired at different times (baseline and follow-up) were included. Three observers measured AAA diameters by seven different methods: on axial images (anteroposterior, transverse, maximal, and short-axis views) and on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images (coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal views). Diameter measurement and progression were compared over time for the seven methods. Reproducibility of measurement methods was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Dmax, as measuredmore » on axial slices at baseline and follow-up (FU) MDCTs, was greater than that measured using the orthogonal method (p = 0.046 for baseline and 0.028 for FU), whereas Dmax measured with the orthogonal method was greater those using all other measurement methods (p-value range: <0.0001-0.03) but anteroposterior diameter (p = 0.18 baseline and 0.10 FU). The greatest interobserver ICCs were obtained for the orthogonal and transverse methods (0.972) at baseline and for the orthogonal and sagittal MPR images at FU (0.973 and 0.977). Interobserver ICC of the orthogonal method to document AAA progression was greater (ICC = 0.833) than measurements taken on axial images (ICC = 0.662-0.780) and single-plane MPR images (0.772-0.817). Conclusion: AAA Dmax measured on MDCT axial slices overestimates aneurysm size. Diameter as measured by the orthogonal method is more reproducible, especially to document AAA progression.« less

  3. Utility of cervical spinal and abdominal computed tomography in diagnosing occult pneumothorax in patients with blunt trauma: Computed tomographic imaging protocol matters.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Haldun; Akoglu, Ebru Unal; Evman, Serdar; Akoglu, Tayfun; Denizbasi, Arzu; Guneysel, Ozlem; Onur, Ozge; Onur, Ender

    2012-10-01

    Small pneumothoraces (PXs), which are not initially recognized with a chest x-ray film and diagnosed by a thoracic computed tomography (CT), are described as occult PX (OCPX). The objective of this study was to evaluate cervival spine (C-spine) and abdominal CT (ACT) for diagnosing OCPX and overt PX (OVPX). All patients with blunt trauma who presented consecutively to the emergency department during a 26-months period were included. Among all the chest CTs (CCTs) (6,155 patients) conducted during that period, 254 scans were confirmed to have a true PX. The findings in their C-spine CT and ACT were compared with the findings in CCTs. Among these patients, 254 had a diagnosis of PX confirmed with CCT. OCPXs were identified on the chest computed tomographic scan of 128 patients (70.3%), whereas OVPXs were evident in 54 patients (29.7%). Computed tomographic imaging of the C-spine was performed in 74% of patients with OCPX and 66.7% of patients with OVPX trauma. Only 45 (35.2%) cases of OCPX and 42 (77.8%) cases of OVPX were detected by C-spine CT. ACT was performed in almost all patients, and 121 (95.3%) of 127 of these correctly identified an existing OCPX. Sensitivity of C-spine CT and ACT was 35.1% and 96.5%, respectively; specificity was 100% and 100%, respectively. Almost all OCPXs, regardless of intrathoracic location, could be detected by ACT or by combining C-spine and abdominal computed tomographic screening for patients. If the junction of the first and second vertebra is used as the caudad extent, C-spine CT does not have sufficient power to diagnose more than a third of the cases. Diagnostic study, level III.

  4. Evaluation of Abdominal Computed Tomography Image Quality Using a New Version of Vendor-Specific Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Corey T; Telesmanich, Morgan E; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A; Liu, Xinming; Rong, John; Szklaruk, Janio; Qayyum, Aliya; Wei, Wei; Chandler, Adam G; Tamm, Eric P

    2017-01-01

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare abdominal computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with a new version of model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0; GE Healthcare) to those created with Veo 2.0. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant. The raw data from 29 consecutive patients who had undergone CT abdomen scanning was used to reconstruct 4 sets of 3.75-mm axial images: Veo 2.0, Veo 3.0 standard, Veo 3.0 5% resolution preference (RP), and Veo 3.0 20% RP. A slice thickness optimization of 3.75 mm and texture feature was selected for Veo 3.0 reconstructions.The images were reviewed by 3 independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion using a 5-point Likert scale and 5-point comparative scale.Multiple 2-dimensional circular regions of interest were defined for noise and contrast-to-noise ratio measurements. Line profiles were drawn across the 7 lp/cm bar pattern of the CatPhan 600 phantom for spatial resolution evaluation. The Veo 3.0 standard image set was scored better than Veo 2.0 in terms of artifacts (mean difference, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.25-0.6; P < 0.0001), overall image quality (mean difference, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.62-1.13; P < 0.0001) and qualitative resolution (mean difference, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.69-1.1; P < 0.0001). Although the Veo 3.0 standard and RP05 presets were preferred across most categories, the Veo 3.0 RP20 series ranked best for bone detail. Image noise and spatial resolution increased along a spectrum with Veo 2.0 the lowest and RP20 the highest. Veo 3.0 enhances imaging evaluation relative to Veo 2.0; readers preferred Veo 3.0 image appearance despite the associated mild increases in image noise. These results provide suggested parameters to be used clinically and as a basis for future evaluations, such as focal lesion detection, in the oncology setting.

  5. Sensitivity and Specificity of Emergency Physicians and Trainees for Identifying Internally Concealed Drug Packages on Abdominal Computed Tomography Scan: Do Lung Windows Improve Accuracy?

    PubMed

    Asha, Stephen Edward; Cooke, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Suspected body packers may be brought to emergency departments (EDs) close to international airports for abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning. Senior emergency clinicians may be asked to interpret these CT scans. Missing concealed drug packages have important clinical and forensic implications. The accuracy of emergency clinician interpretation of abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs is not known. Limited evidence suggests that accuracy for identification of concealed packages can be increased by viewing CT images on "lung window" settings. To determine the accuracy of senior emergency clinicians in interpreting abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs, and to determine if this accuracy was improved by viewing scans on both abdominal and lung window settings. Emergency clinicians blinded to all patient identifiers and the radiology report interpreted CT scans of suspected body packers using standard abdominal window settings and then with the addition of lung window settings. The reference standard was the radiologist's report. Fifty-five emergency clinicians reported 235 CT scans. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of interpretation using abdominal windows was 89.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.0-94.7), 81.9% (95% CI 73.7-88.4), and 86.0% (95% CI 81.5-90.4), respectively, and with both window settings was 94.1% (95% CI 88.3-97.6), 76.7% (95% CI 68.0-84.1), 85.5% (95% CI 81.0-90.0), respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was similar regardless of the clinician's experience. Interrater reliability was moderate (kappa 0.46). The accuracy of interpretation of abdominal CT scans performed for the purpose of detecting concealed drug packages by emergency clinicians is not high enough to safely discharge these patients from the ED. The use of lung windows improved sensitivity, but at the expense of specificity. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma causing low abdominal pain, using Tc-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schütz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  7. Emergency medicine physicians' and pediatricians' use of computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Grim, Paul Francis

    2014-05-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding emergency department (ED) provider type and computed tomography (CT) scan use in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma. The purpose of this retrospective single community hospital study was to determine if there was a difference in CT use between emergency medicine physicians (EMPs) and pediatricians (PEDs) in all patients younger than 18 years with abdominal pain without trauma who presented to the ED during the study period. The study included 165 patients. EMPs saw 83 patients and used CT in 31 compared with PEDs who saw 82 patients and used CT in 12 (P = .002). EMPs used CT significantly more frequently than PEDs in the designated sample. Economic pressures may cause changes in ED provider type in community and rural hospitals and this study shows that ED provider type may affect medical decision making, including CT use.

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is ... of CT Scanning of the Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly ...

  9. Utility of Computed Tomography versus Abdominal Ultrasound Examination to Identify Iliosacral Lymphadenomegaly in Dogs with Apocrine Gland Adenocarcinoma of the Anal Sac.

    PubMed

    Palladino, S; Keyerleber, M A; King, R G; Burgess, K E

    2016-11-01

    Apocrine gland adenocarcinoma of the anal sac (AGAAS) is associated with high rates of iliosacral lymph node metastasis, which may influence treatment and prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) recently has been shown to be more sensitive than abdominal ultrasound examination (AUS) in affected patients. To compare the rate of detection of iliosacral lymphadenomegaly between AUS and computed tomography (CT) in dogs with AGAAS. Cohort A: A total of 30 presumed normal dogs. Cohort B: A total of 20 dogs with AGAAS that underwent AUS and CT. Using cohort A, mean normalized lymph node : aorta (LN : AO) ratios were established for medial iliac, internal iliac, and sacral lymph nodes. The CT images in cohort B then were reviewed retrospectively and considered enlarged if their LN : AO ratio measured 2 standard deviations above the mean normalized ratio for that particular node in cohort A. Classification and visibility of lymph nodes identified on AUS were compared to corresponding measurements obtained on CT. Computed tomography identified lymphadenomegaly in 13 of 20 AGAAS dogs. Of these 13 dogs, AUS correctly identified and detected all enlarged nodes in only 30.8%, and either misidentified or failed to detect additional enlarged nodes in the remaining dogs. Despite limitations in identifying enlargement in all affected lymph nodes, AUS identified at least 1 enlarged node in 100% of affected dogs. Abdominal ultrasound examination is an effective screening test for lymphadenomegaly in dogs with AGAAS, but CT should be considered in any patient in which an additional metastatic site would impact therapeutic planning. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  10. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Internal Motion Tracking Should Be Used to Validate 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Abdominal Radiation Therapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rankine, Leith; Wan, Hanlin; Parikh, Parag

    Purpose: To demonstrate that fiducial tracking during pretreatment Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) can accurately measure tumor motion and that this method should be used to validate 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) margins before each treatment fraction. Methods and Materials: For 31 patients with abdominal tumors and implanted fiducial markers, tumor motion was measured daily with CBCT and fluoroscopy for 202 treatment fractions. Fiducial tracking and maximum-likelihood algorithms extracted 3-dimensional fiducial trajectories from CBCT projections. The daily internal margin (IM) (ie, range of fiducial motion) was calculated for CBCT and fluoroscopy as the 5th-95th percentiles of displacement in each cardinal direction. The planning IMmore » from simulation 4DCT (IM{sub 4DCT}) was considered adequate when within ±1.2 mm (anterior–posterior, left–right) and ±3 mm (superior–inferior) of the daily measured IM. We validated CBCT fiducial tracking as an accurate predictive measure of intrafraction motion by comparing the daily measured IM{sub CBCT} with the daily IM measured by pretreatment fluoroscopy (IM{sub pre-fluoro}); these were compared with pre- and posttreatment fluoroscopy (IM{sub fluoro}) to identify those patients who could benefit from imaging during treatment. Results: Four-dimensional CT could not accurately predict intrafractional tumor motion for ≥80% of fractions in 94% (IM{sub CBCT}), 97% (IM{sub pre-fluoro}), and 100% (IM{sub fluoro}) of patients. The IM{sub CBCT} was significantly closer to IM{sub pre-fluoro} than IM{sub 4DCT} (P<.01). For patients with median treatment time t < 7.5 minutes, IM{sub CBCT} was in agreement with IM{sub fluoro} for 93% of fractions (superior–inferior), compared with 63% for the t > 7.5 minutes group, demonstrating the need for patient-specific intratreatment imaging. Conclusions: Tumor motion determined from 4DCT simulation does not accurately predict the daily motion observed on CBCT or fluoroscopy. Cone-beam CT

  11. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI.

  12. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Song, Mi Kyong; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. • There was no difference in diagnostic performance of HVP CT and multiphasic CT. • The diagnostic confidence level was improved after review of the LAP images. • HVP CT can achieve diagnostic performance similar to that of multiphasic CT, while minimizing radiation.

  13. Radiation dose reduction in abdominal computed tomography during the late hepatic arterial phase using a model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm: how low can we go?

    PubMed

    Husarik, Daniela B; Marin, Daniele; Samei, Ehsan; Richard, Samuel; Chen, Baiyu; Jaffe, Tracy A; Bashir, Mustafa R; Nelson, Rendon C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of abdominal computed tomography scans in an anthropomorphic phantom acquired at different radiation dose levels where each raw data set is reconstructed with both a standard convolution filtered back projection (FBP) and a full model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm. An anthropomorphic phantom in 3 sizes was used with a custom-built liver insert simulating late hepatic arterial enhancement and containing hypervascular liver lesions of various sizes. Imaging was performed on a 64-section multidetector-row computed tomography scanner (Discovery CT750 HD; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) at 3 different tube voltages for each patient size and 5 incrementally decreasing tube current-time products for each tube voltage. Quantitative analysis consisted of contrast-to-noise ratio calculations and image noise assessment. Qualitative image analysis was performed by 3 independent radiologists rating subjective image quality and lesion conspicuity. Contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher and mean image noise was significantly lower on MBIR images than on FBP images in all patient sizes, at all tube voltage settings, and all radiation dose levels (P < 0.05). Overall image quality and lesion conspicuity were rated higher for MBIR images compared with FBP images at all radiation dose levels. Image quality and lesion conspicuity on 25% to 50% dose MBIR images were rated equal to full-dose FBP images. This phantom study suggests that depending on patient size, clinically acceptable image quality of the liver in the late hepatic arterial phase can be achieved with MBIR at approximately 50% lower radiation dose compared with FBP.

  14. Assessment of Added Value of Noncontrast to Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography Scan for Characterization of Hypervascular Liver Metastases☆

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh, Gelareh; Nandwana, Sadhna B.; Moreno, Courtney; Cox, Kelly L.; Baumgarten, Deborah A.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Easter, Tiffany; Applegate, Kimberly E.

    2017-01-01

    Assess the added value of nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT) to contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) of the abdomen for characterization of hypervascular liver metastases and incidental findings. Institutional review board approved, Health Insurance Probability and Accountability Act compliant, retrospective study of patients with melanoma, neuroendocrine tumor, or thyroid cancer. First available triphasic abdomen CT after initial diagnosis was reviewed by 3 radiologists. The 3 most suspicious lesions were characterized on the CECT as benign or malignant and then recharacterized after reviewing the NECT with CECT. Incidental renal and adrenal lesions were characterized similarly. Diagnostic performance of CECT vs its combination with NECT was assessed. Statistical significance level was set at P < 0.05. A total of 81 patients were included (mean age = 55 years; 52% male; 64% with liver lesions; 27% and 11% with incidental renal and adrenal lesions, respectively). Percentage area under the curve and 95% CI of CECT vs combination with NECT for characterization of liver metastases was 98(94–100) vs 99(96–100) for reviewer 1 (P = 0.35), 93(86–100) vs 94(87–100) for reviewer 2 (P = 0.23), and 96(90–100) vs 99(97–100) for reviewer 3 (P = 0.32). Mean difference in area under the curve and 95% CI between 2 protocols for characterization of liver, renal, and adrenal lesions were −0.007(−0.05 to 0.04) (P = 0.63), −0.09(−0.25 to 0.07) (P = 0.22), and −0.01(−0.05 to 0.02) (P = 0.27), respectively. After addition of NECT, confidence level for lesion characterization increased 4%–15% for liver metastases, 18%–59% and 33%–67% for renal and adrenal lesions, respectively. In conclusion, while addition of NECT to CECT improved radiologist' confidence, there was no statistically significant change in characterization of hypervascular liver metastases or incidental renal and adrenal lesions. PMID:27397022

  15. Practical human abdominal fat imaging utilizing electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Maki, K; Katashima, M

    2010-07-01

    The fundamental cause of metabolic syndrome is thought to be abdominal obesity. Accurate diagnosis of abdominal obesity can be done by an x-ray computed tomography (CT) scan. But CT is expensive, bulky and entails the risks involved with radiation. To overcome such disadvantages, we attempted to develop a measuring device that could apply electrical impedance tomography to abdominal fat imaging. The device has 32 electrodes that can be attached to a subject's abdomen by a pneumatic mechanism. That way, electrode position data can be acquired simultaneously. An applied alternating current of 1.0 mArms was used at a frequency of 500 kHz. Sensed voltage data were carefully filtered to remove noise and processed to satisfy the reciprocal theorem. The image reconstruction software was developed concurrently, applying standard finite element methods and the Marquardt method to solve the mathematical inverse problem. The results of preliminary experiments showed that abdominal subcutaneous fat and the muscle surrounding the viscera could be imaged in humans. While our imaging of visceral fat was not of sufficient quality, it was suggested that we will be able to develop a safe and practical abdominal fat scanner through future improvements.

  16. A comparative study of software programmes for cross-sectional skeletal muscle and adipose tissue measurements on abdominal computed tomography scans of rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Jeroen L A; Levolger, Stef; Gharbharan, Arvind; Koek, Marcel; Niessen, Wiro J; Burger, Jacobus W A; Willemsen, Sten P; de Bruin, Ron W F; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2017-04-01

    The association between body composition (e.g. sarcopenia or visceral obesity) and treatment outcomes, such as survival, using single-slice computed tomography (CT)-based measurements has recently been studied in various patient groups. These studies have been conducted with different software programmes, each with their specific characteristics, of which the inter-observer, intra-observer, and inter-software correlation are unknown. Therefore, a comparative study was performed. Fifty abdominal CT scans were randomly selected from 50 different patients and independently assessed by two observers. Cross-sectional muscle area (CSMA, i.e. rectus abdominis, oblique and transverse abdominal muscles, paraspinal muscles, and the psoas muscle), visceral adipose tissue area (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (SAT) were segmented by using standard Hounsfield unit ranges and computed for regions of interest. The inter-software, intra-observer, and inter-observer agreement for CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements using FatSeg, OsiriX, ImageJ, and sliceOmatic were calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses. Cohen's κ was calculated for the agreement of sarcopenia and visceral obesity assessment. The Jaccard similarity coefficient was used to compare the similarity and diversity of measurements. Bland-Altman analyses and ICC indicated that the CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements between the different software programmes were highly comparable (ICC 0.979-1.000, P < 0.001). All programmes adequately distinguished between the presence or absence of sarcopenia (κ = 0.88-0.96 for one observer and all κ = 1.00 for all comparisons of the other observer) and visceral obesity (all κ = 1.00). Furthermore, excellent intra-observer (ICC 0.999-1.000, P < 0.001) and inter-observer (ICC 0.998-0.999, P < 0.001) agreement for all software programmes were found. Accordingly, excellent Jaccard similarity coefficients were found

  17. A comparative study of software programmes for cross‐sectional skeletal muscle and adipose tissue measurements on abdominal computed tomography scans of rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Levolger, Stef; Gharbharan, Arvind; Koek, Marcel; Niessen, Wiro J.; Burger, Jacobus W.A.; Willemsen, Sten P.; de Bruin, Ron W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The association between body composition (e.g. sarcopenia or visceral obesity) and treatment outcomes, such as survival, using single‐slice computed tomography (CT)‐based measurements has recently been studied in various patient groups. These studies have been conducted with different software programmes, each with their specific characteristics, of which the inter‐observer, intra‐observer, and inter‐software correlation are unknown. Therefore, a comparative study was performed. Methods Fifty abdominal CT scans were randomly selected from 50 different patients and independently assessed by two observers. Cross‐sectional muscle area (CSMA, i.e. rectus abdominis, oblique and transverse abdominal muscles, paraspinal muscles, and the psoas muscle), visceral adipose tissue area (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (SAT) were segmented by using standard Hounsfield unit ranges and computed for regions of interest. The inter‐software, intra‐observer, and inter‐observer agreement for CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements using FatSeg, OsiriX, ImageJ, and sliceOmatic were calculated using intra‐class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland–Altman analyses. Cohen's κ was calculated for the agreement of sarcopenia and visceral obesity assessment. The Jaccard similarity coefficient was used to compare the similarity and diversity of measurements. Results Bland–Altman analyses and ICC indicated that the CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements between the different software programmes were highly comparable (ICC 0.979–1.000, P < 0.001). All programmes adequately distinguished between the presence or absence of sarcopenia (κ = 0.88–0.96 for one observer and all κ = 1.00 for all comparisons of the other observer) and visceral obesity (all κ = 1.00). Furthermore, excellent intra‐observer (ICC 0.999–1.000, P < 0.001) and inter‐observer (ICC 0.998–0.999, P < 0.001) agreement for all software programmes were

  18. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  19. Comparison between low (3:1) and high (6:1) pitch for routine abdominal/pelvic imaging with multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Dushyant; Saini, Sanjay; D'Souza, Roy V; O'Neill, Mary Jane; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Halpern, Elkan F; Mueller, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of low helical pitch acquisition (3:1) and high helical pitch acquisition (6:1) for routine abdominal/pelvic imaging with multislice computed tomography (CT). Three hundred eighty-four patients referred for abdominal/pelvic CT were examined in a breath-hold on a multislice CT scanner (LightSpeed QX/I; General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). Patients were randomized and scanned with pitch of 3:1 or 6:1 using a constant 140 peak kV and 280-300 mA. Images were reconstructed at a 3.75-mm slice thickness. Direct comparison between the two pitches was possible in a subset of 40 patients who had a follow-up scan performed with the second pitch used in each patient. A comparison was also performed between standard dose CT using a pitch of 6:1 and 20% reduced radiation dose CT using a pitch of 3:1. Two readers performed a blind evaluation using a three-point scale for image quality, anatomic details, and motion artifacts. Statistical analysis was performed using a rank sum test and the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Overall image quality mean scores were 2.5 and 2.3 for a pitch of 3:1 and a pitch of 6:1, respectively (P = 0.134). Likewise, mean anatomic detail and motion artifact scores were 2.5 and 2.6 for a 3:1 pitch and 2.3 and 2.5 for a 6:1 pitch, respectively (P > 0.05). In patients with a direct comparison of the two pitches (with the standard radiation dose as well as with a 20% reduction in milliamperes), no statistically significant difference in the performance of the two pitches was observed (P > 0.05). Image quality with a high pitch (6:1) is acceptable for routine abdominal/pelvic CT.

  20. Use of positive oral contrast agents in abdominopelvic computed tomography for blunt abdominal injury: meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chau Hung; Haaland, Benjamin; Earnest, Arul; Tan, Cher Heng

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether positive oral contrast agents improve accuracy of abdominopelvic CT compared with no, neutral or negative oral contrast agent. Literature was searched for studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of abdominopelvic CT with positive oral contrast agents against imaging with no, neutral or negative oral contrast agent. Meta-analysis reviewed studies correlating CT findings of blunt abdominal injury with positive and without oral contrast agents against surgical, autopsy or clinical outcome allowing derivation of pooled sensitivity and specificity. Systematic review was performed on studies with common design and reference standard. Thirty-two studies were divided into two groups. Group 1 comprised 15 studies comparing CT with positive and without oral contrast agents. Meta-analysis of five studies from group 1 provided no difference in sensitivity or specificity between CT with positive or without oral contrast agents. Group 2 comprised 17 studies comparing CT with positive and neutral or negative oral contrast agents. Systematic review of 12 studies from group 2 indicated that neutral or negative oral contrasts were as effective as positive oral contrast agents for bowel visualisation. There is no difference in accuracy between CT performed with positive oral contrast agents or with no, neutral or negative oral contrast agent. • There is no difference in the accuracy of CT with or without oral contrast agent. • There is no difference in the accuracy of CT with Gastrografin or water. • Omission of oral contrast, utilising neutral or negative oral contrast agent saves time, costs and decreases risk of aspiration.

  1. Nasal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Ned F

    2006-05-01

    Chronic nasal disease is often a challenge to diagnose. Computed tomography greatly enhances the ability to diagnose chronic nasal disease in dogs and cats. Nasal computed tomography provides detailed information regarding the extent of disease, accurate discrimination of neoplastic versus nonneoplastic diseases, and identification of areas of the nose to examine rhinoscopically and suspicious regions to target for biopsy.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) uses small amounts of ... What is Positron Emission TomographyComputed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging ...

  3. Improved Peritoneal Cavity and Abdominal Organ Imaging Using a Biphasic Contrast Agent Protocol and Spectral Photon Counting Computed Tomography K-Edge Imaging.

    PubMed

    Si-Mohamed, Salim; Thivolet, Arnaud; Bonnot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bar-Ness, Daniel; Képénékian, Vahan; Cormode, David P; Douek, Philippe; Rousset, Pascal

    2018-05-23

    To validate in vitro the capability of a high-spatial-resolution prototype spectral photon-counting computed tomography (SPCCT) scanner to differentiate between 2 contrast agents and to assess in vivo the image quality and the feasibility to image the peritoneal cavity in rats using the 2 contrast agents simultaneously within the vascular and peritoneal compartments. The authors performed SPCCT imaging (100 mAs, 120 kVp) with energy bin thresholds set to 30, 51, 64, 72, and 85 keV in vitro on a custom-made polyoxymethylene cylindrical phantom consisting of tubes with dilutions of both contrast agents and in vivo on 2 groups of adult rats using 2 injection protocols. Approval from the institutional animal ethics committee was obtained. One group received macrocylic gadolinium chelate intraperitoneal (IP) and iodine intravenous (IV) injections (protocol A, n = 3), whereas the second group received iodine IP and gadolinium IV (protocol B, n = 3). Helical scans were performed 35 minutes after IP injection and 20 seconds after IV injection. The SPCCT and contrast material images, that is, iodine and gadolinium maps, were reconstructed with a field of view of 160 mm, an isotropic voxel size of 250 μm, and a matrix size of 640 × 640 pixels using a soft reconstruction kernel. The SPCCT images were reconstructed with 2 different spatial resolutions to compare the image quality (sharpness, diagnostic quality, and organ visualization) of SPCCT (250 μm) with single-energy computed tomography (CT) (600 μm). Two radiologists evaluated the peritoneal opacification index in 13 regions (score = 0-3 per region) on each type of image. Concentrations of contrast agents were measured in the organs of interest. In vitro, the concentration measurements correlated well with the expected concentrations. The linear regressions both had R values of 0.99, slopes of 0.84 and 0.87, and offsets at -0.52 and -0.38 mg/mL for iodine and gadolinium, respectively. In vivo, the SPCCT images were

  4. Incidental Findings in Abdominal Dual-Energy Computed Tomography: Correlation Between True Noncontrast and Virtual Noncontrast Images Considering Renal and Liver Cysts and Adrenal Masses.

    PubMed

    Slebocki, Karin; Kraus, Bastian; Chang, De-Hua; Hellmich, Martin; Maintz, David; Bangard, Christopher

    To assess correlation between attenuation measurements of incidental findings in abdominal second generation dual-energy computed tomography (CT) on true noncontrast (TNC) and virtual noncontrast (VNC) images. Sixty-three patients underwent arterial dual-energy CT (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens; pitch factor, 0.75-1.0; gantry rotation time, 0.28 seconds) after endovascular aneurysm repair, consisting of a TNC single energy CT scan (collimation, 128 × 0.6 mm; 120 kVp) and a dual-energy arterial phase scan (collimation, 32 × 0.6 mm, 140 and 100 kVp; blended, 120 kVp data set). Attenuation measurements in Hounsfield units (HU) of liver parenchyma and incidental findings like renal and hepatic cysts and adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images were done by drawing regions of interest. Statistical analysis was performed by paired t test and Pearson correlation. Incidental findings were detected in 56 (89%) patients. There was excellent correlation for both renal (n = 40) and hepatic cysts (n = 12) as well as adrenal masses (n = 6) with a Pearson correlation of 0.896, 0.800, and 0.945, respectively, and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 10.6 HU ± 12.8 versus 5.1 HU ± 17.5 (attenuation value range from -8.8 to 59.1 HU vs -11.8 to 73.4 HU), 6.4 HU ± 5.8 versus 6.3 HU ± 4.6 (attenuation value range from 2.0 to 16.2 HU vs -3.0 to 15.9 HU), and 12.8 HU ± 11.2 versus 12.4 HU ± 10.2 (attenuation value range from -2.3 to 27.5 HU vs -2.2 to 23.6 HU), respectively. As proof of principle, liver parenchyma measurements also showed excellent correlation between TNC and VNC (n = 40) images with a Pearson correlation of 0.839 and mean attenuation values on TNC and VNC images of 47.2 HU ± 10.5 versus 43.8 HU ± 8.7 (attenuation value range from 21.9 to 60.2 HU vs 4.5 to 65.3 HU). In conclusion, attenuation measurements of incidental findings like renal cysts or adrenal masses on TNC and VNC images derived from second generation dual-energy CT scans show excellent

  5. Computed Tomography Status

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Hansche, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a relatively new radiographic technique which has become widely used in the medical field, where it is better known as computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning. This technique is also being adopted by the industrial radiographic community, although the greater range of densities, variation in samples sizes, plus possible requirement for finer resolution make it difficult to duplicate the excellent results that the medical scanners have achieved.

  6. Mathematics of Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, William Grant

    A review of the applications of the Radon transform is presented, with emphasis on emission computed tomography and transmission computed tomography. The theory of the 2D and 3D Radon transforms, and the effects of attenuation for emission computed tomography are presented. The algebraic iterative methods, their importance and limitations are reviewed. Analytic solutions of the 2D problem the convolution and frequency filtering methods based on linear shift invariant theory, and the solution of the circular harmonic decomposition by integral transform theory--are reviewed. The relation between the invisible kernels, the inverse circular harmonic transform, and the consistency conditions are demonstrated. The discussion and review are extended to the 3D problem-convolution, frequency filtering, spherical harmonic transform solutions, and consistency conditions. The Cormack algorithm based on reconstruction with Zernike polynomials is reviewed. An analogous algorithm and set of reconstruction polynomials is developed for the spherical harmonic transform. The relations between the consistency conditions, boundary conditions and orthogonal basis functions for the 2D projection harmonics are delineated and extended to the 3D case. The equivalence of the inverse circular harmonic transform, the inverse Radon transform, and the inverse Cormack transform is presented. The use of the number of nodes of a projection harmonic as a filter is discussed. Numerical methods for the efficient implementation of angular harmonic algorithms based on orthogonal functions and stable recursion are presented. The derivation of a lower bound for the signal-to-noise ratio of the Cormack algorithm is derived.

  7. Computed tomographic evaluation of abdominal fat in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jinhwa; Jung, Joohyun; Lee, Hyeyeon; Chang, Dongwoo; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Mincheol

    2011-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) exams were conducted to determine the distribution of abdominal fat identified based on the CT number measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) and to measure the volume of the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous fat in minipigs. The relationship between the CT-based fat volumes of several vertebral levels and the entire abdomen and anthropometric data including the sagittal abdominal diameter and waist circumference were evaluated. Moreover, the total fat volumes at the T11, T13, L3, and L5 levels were compared with the total fat volume of the entire abdomen to define the landmark of abdominal fat distribution. Using a single-detector CT, six 6-month-old male minipigs were scanned under general anesthesia. Three radiologists then assessed the HU value of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat by drawing the region of interest manually at the T11, T13, L1, L3, and L5 levels. The CT number and abdominal fat determined in this way by the three radiologists was found to be correlated (intra-class coefficient = 0.9). The overall HU ranges for the visceral and subcutaneous fat depots were -147.47 to -83.46 and -131.62 to -90.97, respectively. The total fat volume of the entire abdomen was highly correlated with the volume of abdominal fat at the T13 level (r = 0.97, p < 0.0001). These findings demonstrate that the volume of abdominal adipose tissue measured at the T13 level using CT is a strong and reliable predictor of total abdominal adipose volume.

  8. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22more » fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 {+-} 27 cm{sup 3} and 489 {+-} 34 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001) in Group I patients with Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-3 diarrhea, respectively. The corresponding mean V100 of Group II patients was 56 {+-} 14 cm{sup 3} and 132 {+-} 19 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery.« less

  9. Computed Tomography Measuring Inside Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wozniak, James F.; Scudder, Henry J.; Anders, Jeffrey E.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography applied to obtain approximate measurements of radial distances from centerline of turbopump to leading edges of diffuser vanes in turbopump. Use of computed tomography has significance beyond turbopump application: example of general concept of measuring internal dimensions of assembly of parts without having to perform time-consuming task of taking assembly apart and measuring internal parts on coordinate-measuring machine.

  10. Computer tomography of the neurocranium.

    PubMed

    Liliequist, B; Forssell, A

    1976-07-01

    The experience with computer tomography of the neurocranium in 300 patients submitted for computer tomography of the brain is reported. The more appropriate projections which may be obtained with the second generation of scanners in combination with an elaborated reconstruction technique seem to constitute a replacement of conventional skull films.

  11. Quadruple Axis Neutron Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, Burkhard; Bausenwein, Dominik

    Neutron computed tomography takes more time for a full tomography than X-rays or Synchrotron radiation, because the source intensity is limited. Most neutron imaging detectors have a square field of view, so if tomography of elongated, narrow samples, e.g. fuel rods, sword blades is recorded, much of the detector area is wasted. Using multiple rotation axes, several samples can be placed inside the field of view, and multiple tomographies can be recorded at the same time by later splitting the recorded images into separate tomography data sets. We describe a new multiple-axis setup using four independent miniaturized rotation tables.

  12. Improving the Efficiency of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress Computations

    PubMed Central

    Zelaya, Jaime E.; Goenezen, Sevan; Dargon, Phong T.; Azarbal, Amir-Farzin; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a pathological dilation of the abdominal aorta, which carries a high mortality rate if ruptured. The most commonly used surrogate marker of rupture risk is the maximal transverse diameter of the aneurysm. More recent studies suggest that wall stress from models of patient-specific aneurysm geometries extracted, for instance, from computed tomography images may be a more accurate predictor of rupture risk and an important factor in AAA size progression. However, quantification of wall stress is typically computationally intensive and time-consuming, mainly due to the nonlinear mechanical behavior of the abdominal aortic aneurysm walls. These difficulties have limited the potential of computational models in clinical practice. To facilitate computation of wall stresses, we propose to use a linear approach that ensures equilibrium of wall stresses in the aneurysms. This proposed linear model approach is easy to implement and eliminates the burden of nonlinear computations. To assess the accuracy of our proposed approach to compute wall stresses, results from idealized and patient-specific model simulations were compared to those obtained using conventional approaches and to those of a hypothetical, reference abdominal aortic aneurysm model. For the reference model, wall mechanical properties and the initial unloaded and unstressed configuration were assumed to be known, and the resulting wall stresses were used as reference for comparison. Our proposed linear approach accurately approximates wall stresses for varying model geometries and wall material properties. Our findings suggest that the proposed linear approach could be used as an effective, efficient, easy-to-use clinical tool to estimate patient-specific wall stresses. PMID:25007052

  13. Intraoperative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tonn, J C; Schichor, C; Schnell, O; Zausinger, S; Uhl, E; Morhard, D; Reiser, M

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) has gained increasing impact among modern neurosurgical techniques. Multislice CT with a sliding gantry in the OR provides excellent diagnostic image quality in the visualization of vascular lesions as well as bony structures including skull base and spine. Due to short acquisition times and a high spatial and temporal resolution, various modalities such as iCT-angiography, iCT-cerebral perfusion and the integration of intraoperative navigation with automatic re-registration after scanning can be performed. This allows a variety of applications, e.g. intraoperative angiography, intraoperative cerebral perfusion studies, update of cerebral and spinal navigation, stereotactic procedures as well as resection control in tumour surgery. Its versatility promotes its use in a multidisciplinary setting. Radiation exposure is comparable to standard CT systems outside the OR. For neurosurgical purposes, however, new hardware components (e.g. a radiolucent headholder system) had to be developed. Having a different range of applications compared to intraoperative MRI, it is an attractive modality for intraoperative imaging being comparatively easy to install and cost efficient.

  14. On the effect of computed tomography resolution to distinguish between abdominal aortic aneurysm wall tissue and calcification: A proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Barrett, H E; Cunnane, E M; O Brien, J M; Moloney, M A; Kavanagh, E G; Walsh, M T

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal target CT spatial resolution for accurately imaging abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall characteristics, distinguishing between tissue and calcification components, for an accurate assessment of rupture risk. Ruptured and non-ruptured AAA-wall samples were acquired from eight patients undergoing open surgical aneurysm repair upon institutional review board approval and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Physical measurements of AAA-wall cross-section were made using scanning electron microscopy. Samples were scanned using high resolution micro-CT scanning. A resolution range of 15.5-155μm was used to quantify the influence of decreasing resolution on wall area measurements, in terms of tissue and calcification. A statistical comparison between the reference resolution (15.5μm) and multi-detector CT resolution (744μm) was also made. Electron microscopy examination of ruptured AAAs revealed extremely thin outer tissue structure <200μm in radial distribution which is supporting the aneurysm wall along with large areas of adjacent medial calcifications far greater in area than the tissue layer. The spatial resolution of 155μm is a significant predictor of the reference AAA-wall tissue and calcification area measurements (r=0.850; p<0.001; r=0.999; p<0.001 respectively). The tissue and calcification area at 155μm is correct within 8.8%±1.86 and 26.13%±9.40 respectively with sensitivity of 87.17% when compared to the reference. The inclusion of AAA-wall measurements, through the use of high resolution-CT will elucidate the variations in AAA-wall tissue and calcification distributions across the wall which may help to leverage an improved assessment of AAA rupture risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kretschmann, H.J.; Weinrich, W.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions.

  16. Low-dose abdominal computed tomography for detection of urinary stone disease - Impact of additional spectral shaping of the X-ray beam on image quality and dose parameters.

    PubMed

    Dewes, Patricia; Frellesen, Claudia; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Fischer, Sebastian; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W; Schulz, Boris

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate a novel tin filter-based abdominal CT protocol for urolithiasis in terms of image quality and CT dose parameters. 130 consecutive patients with suspected urolithiasis underwent non-enhanced CT with three different protocols: 48 patients (group 1) were examined at tin-filtered 150kV (150kV Sn) on a third-generation dual-source-CT, 33 patients were examined with automated kV-selection (110-140kV) based on the scout view on the same CT-device (group 2), and 49 patients were examined on a second-generation dual-source-CT (group 3) with automated kV-selection (100-140kV). Automated exposure control was active in all groups. Image quality was subjectively evaluated on a 5-point-likert-scale by two radiologists and interobserver agreement as well as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) was calculated. Dose-length-product (DLP) and volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) were compared. Image quality was rated in favour for the tin filter protocol with excellent interobserver agreement (ICC=0.86-0.91) and the difference reached statistical significance (p<0.001). SNR was significantly higher in group 1 and 2 compared to second-generation DSCT (p<0.001). On third-generation dual-source CT, there was no significant difference in SNR between the 150kV Sn and the automated kV selection protocol (p=0.5). The DLP of group 1 was 23% and 21% (p<0.002) lower in comparison to group 2 and 3, respectively. So was the CTDIvol of group 1 compared to group 2 (-36%) and 3 (-32%) (p<0.001). Additional shaping of a 150kV source spectrum by a tin filter substantially lowers patient exposure while improving image quality on un-enhanced abdominal computed tomography for urinary stone disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Computer-assisted abdominal surgery: new technologies.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, H G; Wagner, M; Nickel, F; Wekerle, A L; Preukschas, A; Apitz, M; Schulte, T; Rempel, R; Mietkowski, P; Wagner, F; Termer, A; Müller-Stich, Beat P

    2015-04-01

    Computer-assisted surgery is a wide field of technologies with the potential to enable the surgeon to improve efficiency and efficacy of diagnosis, treatment, and clinical management. This review provides an overview of the most important new technologies and their applications. A MEDLINE database search was performed revealing a total of 1702 references. All references were considered for information on six main topics, namely image guidance and navigation, robot-assisted surgery, human-machine interface, surgical processes and clinical pathways, computer-assisted surgical training, and clinical decision support. Further references were obtained through cross-referencing the bibliography cited in each work. Based on their respective field of expertise, the authors chose 64 publications relevant for the purpose of this review. Computer-assisted systems are increasingly used not only in experimental studies but also in clinical studies. Although computer-assisted abdominal surgery is still in its infancy, the number of studies is constantly increasing, and clinical studies start showing the benefits of computers used not only as tools of documentation and accounting but also for directly assisting surgeons during diagnosis and treatment of patients. Further developments in the field of clinical decision support even have the potential of causing a paradigm shift in how patients are diagnosed and treated.

  18. X-ray Computed Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Greg

    2001-01-01

    Describes computed tomography (CT), a medical imaging technique that produces images of transaxial planes through the human body. A CT image is reconstructed mathematically from a large number of one-dimensional projections of a plane. The technique is used in radiological examinations and radiotherapy treatment planning. (Author/MM)

  19. Viewing Welds By Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Computer tomography system used to inspect welds for root penetration. Source illuminates rotating welded part with fan-shaped beam of x rays or gamma rays. Detectors in circular array on opposite side of part intercept beam and convert it into electrical signals. Computer processes signals into image of cross section of weld. Image displayed on video monitor. System offers only nondestructive way to check penetration from outside when inner surfaces inaccessible.

  20. Hermaphroditism demonstrated by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    The categorization of disorders of gender differentiation is based on chromosome analysis, physical examination, gonadal histology, and endocrine evaluation. In most cases of hermaphroditism, radiologic studies have been limited to assessment of associated urinary tract anomalies before surgical revconstruction. Noninvasive evaluation with computed tomography (CT) or sonography is potentially useful for investigation of internal pelvic anatomy in these cases. A case report of a 65-year-old man is reported. (KRM)

  1. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, H.I.; Gore, R.M.; Margulis, A.R.

    1983-02-01

    The abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic examinations in 28 patients with Crohn disease were analyzed and correlated with conventional barium studies, sinograms, and surgical findings. Mucosal abnormalities such as aphthous lesions, pseudopolyps, and ulcerations were only imaged by conventional techniques. Computed tomography proved superior in demonstrating the mural, serosal, and mesenteric abnormalities such as bowel wall thickening (82%), fibrofatty proliferation of mesenteric fat (39%), mesenteric abscess (25%), inflammatory reaction of the mesentery (14%), and mesenteric lymphadenopathy (18%). Computed tomography was most useful clinically in defining the nature of mass effects, separation, or displacement of small bowel segments seen on smallmore » bowel series. Although conventional barium studies remain the initial diagnostic procedure in evaluating Crohn disease, computed tomography can be a useful adjunct in resolving difficult clinical and radiologic diagnostic problems.« less

  2. Measuring Weld Profiles By Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascua, Antonio G.; Roy, Jagatjit

    1990-01-01

    Noncontacting, nondestructive computer tomography system determines internal and external contours of welded objects. System makes it unnecessary to take metallurgical sections (destructive technique) or to take silicone impressions of hidden surfaces (technique that contaminates) to inspect them. Measurements of contours via tomography performed 10 times as fast as measurements via impression molds, and tomography does not contaminate inspected parts.

  3. Utility of screening computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis in patients after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Tarun W; Pavlovic-Surjancev, Biljana; Dusek, Linda; Patel, Nilamkumar; Heroux, Alain L

    2011-12-01

    Malignancy is a late cause of mortality in heart transplant recipients. It is unknown if screening computed tomography scan would lead to early detection of such malignancies or serious vascular anomalies post heart transplantation. This is a single center observational study of patients undergoing surveillance computed tomography of chest, abdomen and pelvis at least 5 years after transplantation. Abnormal findings, included pulmonary nodules, lymphadenopathy and intra-thoracic and intra-abdominal masses and vascular anomalies such as abdominal aortic aneurysm. The clinical follow up of each of these major abnormal findings is summarized. A total of 63 patients underwent computed tomography scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis at least 5 years after transplantation. Of these, 54 (86%) were male and 9 (14%) were female. Mean age was 52±9.2 years. Computed tomography revealed 1 lung cancer (squamous cell) only. Non specific pulmonary nodules were seen in 6 patients (9.5%). The most common incidental finding was abdominal aortic aneurysms (N=6 (9.5%)), which necessitated follow up computed tomography (N=5) or surgery (N=1). Mean time to detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms from transplantation was 14.6±4.2 years. Mean age at the time of detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms was 74.5±3.2 years. Screening computed tomography scan in patients 5 years from transplantation revealed only one malignancy but lead to increased detection of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Thus the utility is low in terms of detection of malignancy. Based on this study we do not recommend routine computed tomography post heart transplantation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed tomography of calcaneal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.; Seddiqi, M.S.A.

    1985-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of 25 fractured calcanei was performed to investigate the potential of CT in evaluating the pattern and biomechanics of these fractures. The characteristic findings of typical fractures are presented, including the number and type of principal fragments, size and dislocation of the sustentacular fragment, and involvement of the anterior and posterior facets of the subtalar joint. In 17 cases, the calcaneus consisted of four or more fragments. Furthermore, in 17 cases the sustentacular fragment included all or part of the posterior facet joint. In 18 of the 25 cases, the sustentacular fragment was displaced. It is concludedmore » that well performed CT is an invaluable adjunct in understanding the fracture mechanism and in detecting pain-provoking impingement between the fibular malleolus and the tuberosity fragment.« less

  5. Renal incidental findings on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Hans Jonas; Pfeil, Alina; Schramm, Dominik; Bach, Andreas Gunter; Surov, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Renal incidental findings (IFs) are common. However, previous reports investigated renal IFs were limited to patient selection. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and distribution of all renal IFs on computed tomography (CT) in a large patient collective. All patients, who underwent CT investigations of the abdominal region at our institution in the time period between January 2006 and February 2014 were included in this study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: no previous history of renal diseases and well image quality. Patients with known kidney disorders were excluded from the study. Overall, 7365 patients meet the inclusion criteria were identified. There were 2924 (39.7%) women and 4441 men (60.3%) with a mean age of 59.8 ± 16.7 years. All CTs were retrospectively analyzed in consensus by 2 radiologists. Collected data were evaluated by means of descriptive statistics. Overall, 2756 patients (37.42% of all included patients) showed 3425 different renal IFs (1.24 findings per patient). Of all renal IFs, 123 (3.6%) findings were clinically relevant, 259 (7.6%) were categorized as possibly clinically relevant, and 3043 (88.8%) were clinically non relevant. Different renal IFs can be detected on CT. The present study provides a real prevalence and proportion of them in daily clinical routine. Kidneys should be thoroughly evaluated because of the fact that incidental renal findings occur frequently. PMID:28658098

  6. Radiological protection in computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rehani, M M

    2015-06-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has sustained interest in radiological protection in computed tomography (CT), and ICRP Publications 87 and 102 focused on the management of patient doses in CT and multi-detector CT (MDCT) respectively. ICRP forecasted and 'sounded the alarm' on increasing patient doses in CT, and recommended actions for manufacturers and users. One of the approaches was that safety is best achieved when it is built into the machine, rather than left as a matter of choice for users. In view of upcoming challenges posed by newer systems that use cone beam geometry for CT (CBCT), and their widened usage, often by untrained users, a new ICRP task group has been working on radiological protection issues in CBCT. Some of the issues identified by the task group are: lack of standardisation of dosimetry in CBCT; the false belief within the medical and dental community that CBCT is a 'light', low-dose CT whereas mobile CBCT units and newer applications, particularly C-arm CT in interventional procedures, involve higher doses; lack of training in radiological protection among clinical users; and lack of dose information and tracking in many applications. This paper provides a summary of approaches used in CT and MDCT, and preliminary information regarding work just published for radiological protection in CBCT. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm.

  8. A Freeware Path to Neutron Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, Burkhard; Craft, Aaron E.

    Neutron computed tomography has become a routine method at many neutron sources due to the availability of digital detection systems, powerful computers and advanced software. The commercial packages Octopus by Inside Matters and VGStudio by Volume Graphics have been established as a quasi-standard for high-end computed tomography. However, these packages require a stiff investment and are available to the users only on-site at the imaging facility to do their data processing. There is a demand from users to have image processing software at home to do further data processing; in addition, neutron computed tomography is now being introduced even at smaller and older reactors. Operators need to show a first working tomography setup before they can obtain a budget to build an advanced tomography system. Several packages are available on the web for free; however, these have been developed for X-rays or synchrotron radiation and are not immediately useable for neutron computed tomography. Three reconstruction packages and three 3D-viewers have been identified and used even for Gigabyte datasets. This paper is not a scientific publication in the classic sense, but is intended as a review to provide searchable help to make the described packages usable for the tomography community. It presents the necessary additional preprocessing in ImageJ, some workarounds for bugs in the software, and undocumented or badly documented parameters that need to be adapted for neutron computed tomography. The result is a slightly complicated, but surprisingly high-quality path to neutron computed tomography images in 3D, but not a replacement for the even more powerful commercial software mentioned above.

  9. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  10. Computed Tomography of the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Ballegeer, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has specific uses in veterinary species' appendicular musculoskeletal system. Parameters for acquisition of images, interpretation limitations, as well as published information regarding its use in small animals is reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed Tomography For Internal Inspection Of Castings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Timothy L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomography used to detect internal flaws in metal castings before machining and otherwise processing them into finished parts. Saves time and money otherwise wasted on machining and other processing of castings eventually rejected because of internal defects. Knowledge of internal defects gained by use of computed tomography also provides guidance for changes in foundry techniques, procedures, and equipment to minimize defects and reduce costs.

  12. Advanced Computed-Tomography Inspection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Lowell D.; Gupta, Nand K.; Smith, Charles R.; Bernardi, Richard T.; Moore, John F.; Hediger, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) is computed-tomography x-ray apparatus revealing internal structures of objects in wide range of sizes and materials. Three x-ray sources and adjustable scan geometry gives system unprecedented versatility. Gantry contains translation and rotation mechanisms scanning x-ray beam through object inspected. Distance between source and detector towers varied to suit object. System used in such diverse applications as development of new materials, refinement of manufacturing processes, and inspection of components.

  13. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly very quickly. This test may be used to look ...

  14. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{submore » cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image

  15. Ultrasonography versus computed tomography for suspected nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Aubin, Chandra; Bailitz, John; Bengiamin, Rimon N; Camargo, Carlos A; Corbo, Jill; Dean, Anthony J; Goldstein, Ruth B; Griffey, Richard T; Jay, Gregory D; Kang, Tarina L; Kriesel, Dana R; Ma, O John; Mallin, Michael; Manson, William; Melnikow, Joy; Miglioretti, Diana L; Miller, Sara K; Mills, Lisa D; Miner, James R; Moghadassi, Michelle; Noble, Vicki E; Press, Gregory M; Stoller, Marshall L; Valencia, Victoria E; Wang, Jessica; Wang, Ralph C; Cummings, Steven R

    2014-09-18

    There is a lack of consensus about whether the initial imaging method for patients with suspected nephrolithiasis should be computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography. In this multicenter, pragmatic, comparative effectiveness trial, we randomly assigned patients 18 to 76 years of age who presented to the emergency department with suspected nephrolithiasis to undergo initial diagnostic ultrasonography performed by an emergency physician (point-of-care ultrasonography), ultrasonography performed by a radiologist (radiology ultrasonography), or abdominal CT. Subsequent management, including additional imaging, was at the discretion of the physician. We compared the three groups with respect to the 30-day incidence of high-risk diagnoses with complications that could be related to missed or delayed diagnosis and the 6-month cumulative radiation exposure. Secondary outcomes were serious adverse events, related serious adverse events (deemed attributable to study participation), pain (assessed on an 11-point visual-analogue scale, with higher scores indicating more severe pain), return emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and diagnostic accuracy. A total of 2759 patients underwent randomization: 908 to point-of-care ultrasonography, 893 to radiology ultrasonography, and 958 to CT. The incidence of high-risk diagnoses with complications in the first 30 days was low (0.4%) and did not vary according to imaging method. The mean 6-month cumulative radiation exposure was significantly lower in the ultrasonography groups than in the CT group (P<0.001). Serious adverse events occurred in 12.4% of the patients assigned to point-of-care ultrasonography, 10.8% of those assigned to radiology ultrasonography, and 11.2% of those assigned to CT (P=0.50). Related adverse events were infrequent (incidence, 0.4%) and similar across groups. By 7 days, the average pain score was 2.0 in each group (P=0.84). Return emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and diagnostic

  16. Parallel Computing for the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon

    2008-01-01

    This software computes the tomographic reconstruction of spatial-spectral data from raw detector images of the Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS), which enables transient-level, multi-spectral imaging by capturing spatial and spectral information in a single snapshot.

  17. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Chang, Ted T; Fish, Lindsay M; Bradley, Yong C

    2013-09-01

    Fludeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has been invaluable in the assessment of melanoma throughout the course of the disease. As with any modality, the studies are incomplete and more information will be gleaned as our experience progresses. Additionally, it is hoped that a newer PET agent in the pipeline will give us even greater success in the identification and subsequent treatment of melanoma. This article aims to examine the utilization of PET/CT in the staging, prognostication, and follow-up of melanoma while providing the physicians who order and interpret these studies practical guidelines and interpretive pitfalls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Microfocus computed tomography in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obodovskiy, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of high-frequency power schemes for X-ray devices allow the creation of high-resolution instruments. At the department of electronic devices and Equipment of the St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University, a model of a microfocus computer tomograph was developed. Used equipment allows to receive projection data with an increase up to 100 times. A distinctive feature of the device is the possibility of implementing various schemes for obtaining projection data.

  19. Introducing Seismic Tomography with Computational Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, R.; Neves, M. L.; Teodoro, V.

    2011-12-01

    Learning seismic tomography principles and techniques involves advanced physical and computational knowledge. In depth learning of such computational skills is a difficult cognitive process that requires a strong background in physics, mathematics and computer programming. The corresponding learning environments and pedagogic methodologies should then involve sets of computational modelling activities with computer software systems which allow students the possibility to improve their mathematical or programming knowledge and simultaneously focus on the learning of seismic wave propagation and inverse theory. To reduce the level of cognitive opacity associated with mathematical or programming knowledge, several computer modelling systems have already been developed (Neves & Teodoro, 2010). Among such systems, Modellus is particularly well suited to achieve this goal because it is a domain general environment for explorative and expressive modelling with the following main advantages: 1) an easy and intuitive creation of mathematical models using just standard mathematical notation; 2) the simultaneous exploration of images, tables, graphs and object animations; 3) the attribution of mathematical properties expressed in the models to animated objects; and finally 4) the computation and display of mathematical quantities obtained from the analysis of images and graphs. Here we describe virtual simulations and educational exercises which enable students an easy grasp of the fundamental of seismic tomography. The simulations make the lecture more interactive and allow students the possibility to overcome their lack of advanced mathematical or programming knowledge and focus on the learning of seismological concepts and processes taking advantage of basic scientific computation methods and tools.

  20. Common celiacomesenteric trunk: a computed tomography radiological study.

    PubMed

    Özgökçe, Mesut; Ayyıldız, Veysel Atilla; Oğul, Hayri; Arslan, Harun; Batur, Abdussamet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; İnce, Suat; Yüce, Deniz

    2018-03-03

    There is an increasing trend for administration of invasive radiological interventions, laparoscopic surgery, and transplantation procedures in recent years, and determining the vascular variations prior to these procedures is crucially important. Celiacomesenteric trunk (CMT) is among these variations. This study aimed to retrospectively evaluate this rare anomaly by computed tomography (CT). A total of 1000 CT angiography images were analyzed retrospectively, and the patients with mesenteric and celiac arteries arising from the abdominal aorta with a single root were identified. The level that CMT arose, and its branching patterns were determined individually for all patients. Ten patients (6 males and 4 females) with a mean age of 50.2 years (17-87 years) had CMT in CT images. The knowledge of variations in the CMT prior to vascular or laparoscopic interventions will contribute to early intervention in case of a complication, or to avoid from a potential damage.

  1. The use of iohexol as oral contrast for computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Fishman, Elliot K; Gayler, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Positive oral contrast agents (high-osmolar iodinated solutions [high-osmolar contrast medium] or barium sulfate suspensions) are used routinely for abdominal computed tomography. However, these agents are not ideal. Patients complain about the taste and, sometimes, refuse to drink the required quantity. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are frequent. In certain clinical indications, either barium suspensions or high-osmolar contrast mediums may be contraindicated. This technical note describes the potential advantages of using low-osmolar iodinated solutions as an oral contrast agent for computed tomography.

  2. Ectopic Multinodular Goiter: Multidetector Computed Tomography Findings

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Afak Durur; Kantarci, Mecit; Yalcin, Ahmet; Demir, Berrin

    2008-01-01

    The thyroid is the first endocrine gland to form during embryogenesis. At this stage, incomplete or anomalous migration of thyroid tissue causes ectopic localization of the gland. In our case, a 55-year-old woman who was evaluated via ultrasonography (USG) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) had no thyroid gland at the normal location, but did have ectopic thyroid tissue in the left submandibular and submental regions. PMID:25610021

  3. Pharyngitis of infectious mononucleosis: computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Kutuya, Naoki; Kurosaki, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Takata, Koremochi; Shiraihshi, Akihiko

    2008-05-01

    Two women presented with sore throat and fever. Their symptoms were not alleviated by antibiotics. Cervical computed tomography (CT) with contrast enhancement demonstrated enlargement of predominant posterior cervical lymph nodes and streaky heterogeneous tonsils with interspersed low attenuation. They were diagnosed as having infectious mononucleosis by their laboratory data. Thus, when radiologists encounter these CT findings of pharyngitis that is not alleviated by antibiotic therapy, infectious mononucleosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  4. Computer-aided Assessment of Regional Abdominal Fat with Food Residue Removal in CT

    PubMed Central

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Caturegli, Giorgio; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Separate quantification of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat regions is essential to understand the role of regional adiposity as risk factor in epidemiological studies. Fat quantification is often based on computed tomography (CT) because fat density is distinct from other tissue densities in the abdomen. However, the presence of intestinal food residues with densities similar to fat may reduce fat quantification accuracy. We introduce an abdominal fat quantification method in CT with interest in food residue removal. Materials and Methods Total fat was identified in the feature space of Hounsfield units and divided into subcutaneous and visceral components using model-based segmentation. Regions of food residues were identified and removed from visceral fat using a machine learning method integrating intensity, texture, and spatial information. Cost-weighting and bagging techniques were investigated to address class imbalance. Results We validated our automated food residue removal technique against semimanual quantifications. Our feature selection experiments indicated that joint intensity and texture features produce the highest classification accuracy at 95%. We explored generalization capability using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with variable k. Losses in accuracy and area under ROC curve between maximum and minimum k were limited to 0.1% and 0.3%. We validated tissue segmentation against reference semimanual delineations. The Dice similarity scores were as high as 93.1 for subcutaneous fat and 85.6 for visceral fat. Conclusions Computer-aided regional abdominal fat quantification is a reliable computational tool for large-scale epidemiological studies. Our proposed intestinal food residue reduction scheme is an original contribution of this work. Validation experiments indicate very good accuracy and generalization capability. PMID:24119354

  5. Computer-aided assessment of regional abdominal fat with food residue removal in CT.

    PubMed

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Caturegli, Giorgio; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Separate quantification of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat regions is essential to understand the role of regional adiposity as risk factor in epidemiological studies. Fat quantification is often based on computed tomography (CT) because fat density is distinct from other tissue densities in the abdomen. However, the presence of intestinal food residues with densities similar to fat may reduce fat quantification accuracy. We introduce an abdominal fat quantification method in CT with interest in food residue removal. Total fat was identified in the feature space of Hounsfield units and divided into subcutaneous and visceral components using model-based segmentation. Regions of food residues were identified and removed from visceral fat using a machine learning method integrating intensity, texture, and spatial information. Cost-weighting and bagging techniques were investigated to address class imbalance. We validated our automated food residue removal technique against semimanual quantifications. Our feature selection experiments indicated that joint intensity and texture features produce the highest classification accuracy at 95%. We explored generalization capability using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with variable k. Losses in accuracy and area under ROC curve between maximum and minimum k were limited to 0.1% and 0.3%. We validated tissue segmentation against reference semimanual delineations. The Dice similarity scores were as high as 93.1 for subcutaneous fat and 85.6 for visceral fat. Computer-aided regional abdominal fat quantification is a reliable computational tool for large-scale epidemiological studies. Our proposed intestinal food residue reduction scheme is an original contribution of this work. Validation experiments indicate very good accuracy and generalization capability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Basic principles of cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Kenneth; Rice, Dwight D

    2014-07-01

    At the end of the millennium, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) heralded a new dental technology for the next century. Owing to the dramatic and positive impact of CBCT on implant dentistry and orthognathic/orthodontic patient care, additional applications for this technology soon evolved. New software programs were developed to improve the applicability of, and access to, CBCT for dental patients. Improved, rapid, and cost-effective computer technology, combined with the ability of software engineers to develop multiple dental imaging applications for CBCT with broad diagnostic capability, have played a large part in the rapid incorporation of CBCT technology into dentistry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Sido, B; Grenacher, L; Friess, H; Büchler, M W

    2005-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is much more frequent than penetrating abdominal trauma in Europe. As a consequence of improved quality of computed tomography, even complex liver injuries are increasingly being treated conservatively. However, missed hollow viscus injuries still remain a problem, as they considerably increase mortality in multiply injured patients. Laparoscopy decreases the rate of unnecessary laparotomies in perforating abdominal trauma and helps to diagnose injuries of solid organs and the diaphragm. However, the sensitivity in detecting hollow viscus injuries is low and the role of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal injury has not been defined. If intra-abdominal bleeding is difficult to control in hemodynamically unstable patients, damage control surgery with packing of the liver, total splenectomy, and provisional closure of hollow viscus injuries is of importance. Definitive surgical treatment follows hemodynamic stabilization and restoration of hemostasis. Injuries of the duodenum and pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma are often associated with other intra-abdominal injuries and the treatment depends on their location and severity.

  8. Electromagnetic tracking for abdominal interventions in computer aided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Banovac, Filip; Lin, Ralph; Glossop, Neil; Wood, Bradford J.; Lindisch, David; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking has great potential for assisting physicians in precision placement of instruments during minimally invasive interventions in the abdomen, since electromagnetic tracking is not limited by the line-of-sight restrictions of optical tracking. A new generation of electromagnetic tracking has recently become available, with sensors small enough to be included in the tips of instruments. To fully exploit the potential of this technology, our research group has been developing a computer aided, image-guided system that uses electromagnetic tracking for visualization of the internal anatomy during abdominal interventions. As registration is a critical component in developing an accurate image-guided system, we present three registration techniques: 1) enhanced paired-point registration (time-stamp match registration and dynamic registration); 2) orientation-based registration; and 3) needle shape-based registration. Respiration compensation is another important issue, particularly in the abdomen, where respiratory motion can make precise targeting difficult. To address this problem, we propose reference tracking and affine transformation methods. Finally, we present our prototype navigation system, which integrates the registration, segmentation, path-planning and navigation functions to provide real-time image guidance in the clinical environment. The methods presented here have been tested with a respiratory phantom specially designed by our group and in swine animal studies under approved protocols. Based on these tests, we conclude that our system can provide quick and accurate localization of tracked instruments in abdominal interventions, and that it offers a user friendly display for the physician. PMID:16829506

  9. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Cun; Xie, Qiang; Lv, Wei-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a phenotypically heterogeneous, chronic, destructive inflammatory disease of the synovial joints. A number of imaging tools are currently available for evaluation of inflammatory conditions. By targeting the upgraded glucose uptake of infiltrating granulocytes and tissue macrophages, positron emission tomography/computed tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18) F-FDG PET/CT) is available to delineate inflammation with high sensitivity. Recently, several studies have indicated that FDG uptake in affected joints reflects the disease activity of RA. In addition, usage of FDG PET for the sensitive detection and monitoring of the response to treatment has been reported. Combined FDG PET/CT enables the detailed assessment of disease in large joints throughout the whole body. These unique capabilities of FDG PET/CT imaging are also able to detect RA-complicated diseases. Therefore, PET/CT has become an excellent ancillary tool to assess disease activity and prognosis in RA. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  11. Positron Computed Tomography: Current State, Clinical Results and Future Trends

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1980-09-01

    An overview is presented of positron computed tomography: its advantages over single photon emission tomography, its use in metabolic studies of the heart and chemical investigation of the brain, and future trends. (ACR)

  12. Total variation-based neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Richard C.; Bilheux, Hassina; Toops, Todd; Nafziger, Eric; Finney, Charles; Splitter, Derek; Archibald, Rick

    2018-05-01

    We perform the neutron computed tomography reconstruction problem via an inverse problem formulation with a total variation penalty. In the case of highly under-resolved angular measurements, the total variation penalty suppresses high-frequency artifacts which appear in filtered back projections. In order to efficiently compute solutions for this problem, we implement a variation of the split Bregman algorithm; due to the error-forgetting nature of the algorithm, the computational cost of updating can be significantly reduced via very inexact approximate linear solvers. We present the effectiveness of the algorithm in the significantly low-angular sampling case using synthetic test problems as well as data obtained from a high flux neutron source. The algorithm removes artifacts and can even roughly capture small features when an extremely low number of angles are used.

  13. Computed tomography of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Amat, L.

    1985-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on five infants with hepatic hemangioendothelioma. Precontrast scans showed solitary or multiple, homogeneous, circumscribed areas with reduced attenuation values. Tiny tumoral calcifications were identified in two patients. Serial scans, after injection of a bolus of contrast material, showed early massive enhancement, which was either diffuse or peripheral. On delayed scans, multinocular tumors became isodense with surrounding liver, while all solitary ones showed varied degrees of centripetal enhancement and persistent central cleftlike unenhanced areas. The authors believe that these CT features are characteristic and obviate arteriographic confirmation.

  14. Alzheimer disease: focus on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately 5.3 million Americans. This debilitating disease is marked by memory loss, confusion, and loss of cognitive ability. The exact cause of Alzheimer disease is unknown although research suggests that it might result from a combination of factors. The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Radiologic imaging can help physicians detect these structural characteristics and monitor disease progression and brain function. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered first-line imaging modalities for the routine evaluation of Alzheimer disease.

  15. Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the evaluation of opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prathamesh; Lele, Vikram

    2013-04-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (OMA) syndrome is the most common paraneoplastic neurological syndrome of childhood, associated with occult neuroblastoma in 20%-50% of all cases. OMA is the initial presentation of neuroblastoma in 1%-3% of children. Conventional radiological imaging approaches include chest radiography and abdominal computed tomography (CT). Nuclear medicine techniques, in form of (123)I/(131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy have been incorporated in various diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of OMA. We describe use of somatostatin receptor PET/CT with (68)Gallium- DOTA-DPhe(1), Tyr(3)-octreotate (DOTATATE) in diagnosis of neuroblastoma in two cases of OMA.

  16. Electrical impedance tomography during major open upper abdominal surgery: a pilot-study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) of the lungs facilitates visualization of ventilation distribution during mechanical ventilation. Its intraoperative use could provide the basis for individual optimization of ventilator settings, especially in patients at risk for ventilation-perfusion mismatch and impaired gas exchange, such as patients undergoing major open upper abdominal surgery. EIT throughout major open upper abdominal surgery could encounter difficulties in belt positioning and signal quality. Thus, we conducted a pilot-study and tested whether EIT is feasible in patients undergoing major open upper abdominal surgery. Methods Following institutional review board’s approval and written informed consent, we included patients scheduled for major open upper abdominal surgery of at least 3 hours duration. EIT measurements were conducted prior to intubation, at the time of skin incision, then hourly during surgery until shortly prior to extubation and after extubation. Number of successful intraoperative EIT measurements and reasons for failures were documented. From the valid measurements, a functional EIT image of changes in tidal impedance was generated for every time point. Regions of interest were defined as horizontal halves of the picture. Monitoring of ventilation distribution was assessed using the center of ventilation index, and also using the total and dorsal ventilated lung area. All parameter values prior to and post intubation as well as extubation were compared. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 120 intraoperative EIT measurements during major abdominal surgery lasting 4-13 hours were planned in 14 patients. The electrode belt was attached between the 2nd and 4th intercostal space. Consecutive valid measurements could be acquired in 13 patients (93%). 111 intraoperative measurements could be retrieved as planned (93%). Main obstacle was the contact of skin electrodes. Despite the high belt

  17. Space shuttle main engine computed tomography applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sporny, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    For the past two years the potential applications of computed tomography to the fabrication and overhaul of the Space Shuttle Main Engine were evaluated. Application tests were performed at various government and manufacturer facilities with equipment produced by four different manufacturers. The hardware scanned varied in size and complexity from a small temperature sensor and turbine blades to an assembled heat exchanger and main injector oxidizer inlet manifold. The evaluation of capabilities included the ability to identify and locate internal flaws, measure the depth of surface cracks, measure wall thickness, compare manifold design contours to actual part contours, perform automatic dimensional inspections, generate 3D computer models of actual parts, and image the relationship of the details in a complex assembly. The capabilities evaluated, with the exception of measuring the depth of surface flaws, demonstrated the existing and potential ability to perform many beneficial Space Shuttle Main Engine applications.

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Tetradis, Sotirios; Anstey, Paul; Graff-Radford, Steven

    2011-07-01

    Conventional radiographs provide important information for dental disease diagnosis. However, they represent 2-D images of 3-D objects with significant structure superimposition and unpredictable magnification. Cone beam computed tomography, however, allows true 3-D visualization of the dentoalveolar structures, avoiding major limitations of conventional radiographs. Cone beam computed tomography images offer great advantages in disease detection for selected patients. The authors discuss cone beam computed tomography applications in dental disease diagnosis, reviewing the pertinent literature when available.

  19. Computed Tomography of the Abdomen in Eight Clinically Normal Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    du Plessis, W M; Groenewald, H B; Elliott, D

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a detailed anatomical description of the abdomen in the clinically normal common marmoset by means of computed tomography (CT). Eight clinically healthy mature common marmosets ranging from 12 to 48 months and 235 to 365 g bodyweight were anesthetized and pre- and post-contrast CT examinations were performed using different CT settings in dorsal recumbency. Abdominal organs were identified and visibility noted. Diagnostic quality abdominal images could be obtained of the common marmoset despite its small size using a dual-slice CT scanner. Representative cross-sectional images were chosen from different animals illustrating the abdominal CT anatomy of clinically normal common marmosets. Identification or delineation of abdominal organs greatly improved with i.v. contrast. A modified high-frequency algorithm with edge enhancement added valuable information for identification of small structures such as the ureters. The Hounsfield unit (HU) of major abdominal organs differed from that of small animals (domestic dogs and cats). Due to their size and different anatomy, standard small animal CT protocols need to be critically assessed and adapted for exotics, such as the common marmoset. The established normal reference range of HU of major abdominal organs and adapted settings for a CT protocol will aid clinical assessment of the common marmoset. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography in Cardiothoracic Vascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Domenico; Eid, Marwen; De Cecco, Carlo N; Jacobs, Brian E; Albrecht, Moritz H; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Caruso, Damiano; Laghi, Andrea; Schoepf, Uwe Joseph

    2018-07-01

    Dual energy computed tomography is becoming increasingly widespread in clinical practice. It can expand on the traditional density-based data achievable with single energy computed tomography by adding novel applications to help reach a more accurate diagnosis. The implementation of this technology in cardiothoracic vascular imaging allows for improved image contrast, metal artifact reduction, generation of virtual unenhanced images, virtual calcium subtraction techniques, cardiac and pulmonary perfusion evaluation, and plaque characterization. The improved diagnostic performance afforded by dual energy computed tomography is not associated with an increased radiation dose. This review provides an overview of dual energy computed tomography cardiothoracic vascular applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Extracolonic Findings on Computed Tomography (CT) Colonography

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Solitary Pulmonary Nodules; Multiple Pulmonary Nodules; Renal Neoplasms; Adrenal Gland Neoplasms; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Liver Neoplasms; Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms; Lymphadenopathy; Pancreatic Neoplasms

  2. To image analysis in computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalina, Marina; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Ingacheva, Anastasia; Buzmakov, Alexey; Yakimchuk, Ivan; Asadchikov, Victor

    2017-03-01

    The presence of errors in tomographic image may lead to misdiagnosis when computed tomography (CT) is used in medicine, or the wrong decision about parameters of technological processes when CT is used in the industrial applications. Two main reasons produce these errors. First, the errors occur on the step corresponding to the measurement, e.g. incorrect calibration and estimation of geometric parameters of the set-up. The second reason is the nature of the tomography reconstruction step. At the stage a mathematical model to calculate the projection data is created. Applied optimization and regularization methods along with their numerical implementations of the method chosen have their own specific errors. Nowadays, a lot of research teams try to analyze these errors and construct the relations between error sources. In this paper, we do not analyze the nature of the final error, but present a new approach for the calculation of its distribution in the reconstructed volume. We hope that the visualization of the error distribution will allow experts to clarify the medical report impression or expert summary given by them after analyzing of CT results. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach we present both the simulation and real data processing results.

  3. A CW FFAG for Proton Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D. V.; Snopok, P.

    2012-05-01

    An advantage of the cyclotron in proton therapy is the continuous (CW) beam output which reduces complexity and response time in the dosimetry requirements and beam controls. A CW accelerator requires isochronous particle orbits at all energie s through the acceleration cycle and present compact isochronous cyclotrons for proton therapy reach only 250 MeV (kinetic energy) which is required for patient treatment, but low for full Proton Computed Tomography (PCT) capability. PCT specifications ne ed 300-330 MeV in order for protons to transit the human body. Recent innovations in nonscaling FFAG design have achieved isochronous performance in a compact (~3more » m radius) design at these higher energies. Preliminary isochronous designs are presented her e. Lower energy beams can be efficiently extracted for patient treatment without changes to the acceleration cycle and magnet currents.« less

  4. System Matrix Analysis for Computed Tomography Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Liubov; Vidal, Vicent; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-01-01

    In practical applications of computed tomography imaging (CT), it is often the case that the set of projection data is incomplete owing to the physical conditions of the data acquisition process. On the other hand, the high radiation dose imposed on patients is also undesired. These issues demand that high quality CT images can be reconstructed from limited projection data. For this reason, iterative methods of image reconstruction have become a topic of increased research interest. Several algorithms have been proposed for few-view CT. We consider that the accurate solution of the reconstruction problem also depends on the system matrix that simulates the scanning process. In this work, we analyze the application of the Siddon method to generate elements of the matrix and we present results based on real projection data. PMID:26575482

  5. Ward nurses' knowledge of computed tomography scanning.

    PubMed

    Majeed, M A; Nayeemuddin, M; Christie, M

    Patients benefit from and are reassured by advance information on procedures that they are to undergo. Ward nurses should have adequate knowledge of radiological investigations to ensure proper patient preparation and good interdepartmental communication to avoid delays and cancellations. This study was conducted to assess the ward nurses' knowledge of the process of computed tomography (CT) scanning. One hundred and twenty qualified nurses were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding CT scanning. The findings revealed a suboptimal level of awareness about the process. This is probably due to lack of formal teaching for nurses on the wards in regards the different radiological procedures and patient preparation. There is a strong case for better educational talks on rapidly changing radiological techniques for ward staff to ensure high-quality patient care.

  6. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and inmore » defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.« less

  7. The dynamic micro computed tomography at SSRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Xu, L.; Du, G.; Deng, B.; Xie, H.; Xiao, T.

    2018-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT) is a critical technique for quantitative characterizing the 3D internal structure of samples, recently the dynamic SR-μCT has been attracting vast attention since it can evaluate the three-dimensional structure evolution of a sample. A dynamic μCT method, which is based on monochromatic beam, was developed at the X-ray Imaging and Biomedical Application Beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, by combining the compressed sensing based CT reconstruction algorithm and hardware upgrade. The monochromatic beam based method can achieve quantitative information, and lower dose than the white beam base method in which the lower energy beam is absorbed by the sample rather than contribute to the final imaging signal. The developed method is successfully used to investigate the compression of the air sac during respiration in a bell cricket, providing new knowledge for further research on the insect respiratory system.

  8. Computed Tomography Studies of Lung Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Brett A.; Christensen, Gary E.; Low, Daniel A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    The study of lung mechanics has progressed from global descriptions of lung pressure and volume relationships to the high-resolution, three-dimensional, quantitative measurement of dynamic regional mechanical properties and displacements. X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging is ideally suited to the study of regional lung mechanics in intact subjects because of its high spatial and temporal resolution, correlation of functional data with anatomic detail, increasing volumetric data acquisition, and the unique relationship between CT density and lung air content. This review presents an overview of CT measurement principles and limitations for the study of regional mechanics, reviews some of the early work that set the stage for modern imaging approaches and impacted the understanding and management of patients with acute lung injury, and presents evolving novel approaches for the analysis and application of dynamic volumetric lung image data. PMID:16352757

  9. Compressed sensing for ultrasound computed tomography.

    PubMed

    van Sloun, Ruud; Pandharipande, Ashish; Mischi, Massimo; Demi, Libertario

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) allows the reconstruction of quantitative tissue characteristics, such as speed of sound, mass density, and attenuation. Lowering its acquisition time would be beneficial; however, this is fundamentally limited by the physical time of flight and the number of transmission events. In this letter, we propose a compressed sensing solution for UCT. The adopted measurement scheme is based on compressed acquisitions, with concurrent randomised transmissions in a circular array configuration. Reconstruction of the image is then obtained by combining the born iterative method and total variation minimization, thereby exploiting variation sparsity in the image domain. Evaluation using simulated UCT scattering measurements shows that the proposed transmission scheme performs better than uniform undersampling, and is able to reduce acquisition time by almost one order of magnitude, while maintaining high spatial resolution.

  10. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOEpatents

    Paulus, Michael J.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Gleason, Shaun S.; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  11. Computed tomography of radioactive objects and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicka, B. D.; Murphy, R. V.; Tosello, G.; Reynolds, P. W.; Romaniszyn, T.

    1990-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been performed on a number of radioactive objects and materials. Several unique technical problems are associated with CT of radioactive specimens. These include general safety considerations, techniques to reduce background-radiation effects on CT images and selection criteria for the CT source to permit object penetration and to reveal accurate values of material density. In the present paper, three groups of experiments will be described, for objects with low, medium and high levels of radioactivity. CT studies on radioactive specimens will be presented. They include the following: (1) examination of individual ceramic reactor-fuel (uranium dioxide) pellets, (2) examination of fuel samples from the Three Mile Island reactor, (3) examination of a CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uraniun: registered trademark) nuclear-fuel bundle which underwent a simulated loss-of-coolant accident resulting in high-temperature damage and (4) examination of a PWR nuclear-reactor fuel assembly.

  12. Computed tomography assessment of hip joints in asymptomatic individuals in relation to femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Alan C L; Gooding, Andrew J; Coates, Mark H; Goh, Tony D; Armour, Paul; Rietveld, John

    2010-06-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement has become a well-recognized entity predisposing to acetabular labral tears and chondral damage, and subsequently development of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. In the authors' experience, it is common to see bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in the contralateral asymptomatic hips in patients with unilateral femoroacetabular impingement. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of bony abnormalities predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement in asymptomatic individuals without exposing study participants to unnecessary radiation. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Fifty individuals (100 hip joints), ranging from 15 to 40 years of age, who were seen at a local hospital between March and August 2008 with abdominal trauma or nonspecific abdominal pain in whom abdominal computed tomography was performed to aid diagnosis were prospectively studied. These patients were not known to have any history of hip-related problems. Raw data from the abdominal computed tomography scan, performed on a 64-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner, were reformatted using bone algorithm into several different planes. Several measurements and observations of the hip joints were made in relation to femoroacetabular impingement. The 100 hip joints from 50 patients with no history of hip problems demonstrated that 39% of the joints (31% of female, 48% of male joints) have at least 1 morphologic aspect predisposing to femoroacetabular impingement. The majority (66% to 100% ) of the findings were bilateral; 33% of female and 52% of male asymptomatic participants in our study had at least 1 predisposing factor for femoroacetabular impingement in 1 or both of their hip joints. Based on the data collected from this study, the acetabular crossover sign had a 71% sensitivity and 88% specificity for detecting acetabular retroversion. Nonquantitative assessment of the femoral head at the anterior

  13. Nano-Computed Tomography: Technique and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kampschulte, M; Langheinirch, A C; Sender, J; Litzlbauer, H D; Althöhn, U; Schwab, J D; Alejandre-Lafont, E; Martels, G; Krombach, G A

    2016-02-01

    Nano-computed tomography (nano-CT) is an emerging, high-resolution cross-sectional imaging technique and represents a technical advancement of the established micro-CT technology. Based on the application of a transmission target X-ray tube, the focal spot size can be decreased down to diameters less than 400 nanometers (nm). Together with specific detectors and examination protocols, a superior spatial resolution up to 400 nm (10 % MTF) can be achieved, thereby exceeding the resolution capacity of typical micro-CT systems. The technical concept of nano-CT imaging as well as the basics of specimen preparation are demonstrated exemplarily. Characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques (intraplaque hemorrhage and calcifications) in a murine model of atherosclerosis (ApoE (-/-)/LDLR(-/-) double knockout mouse) are demonstrated in the context of superior spatial resolution in comparison to micro-CT. Furthermore, this article presents the application of nano-CT for imaging cerebral microcirculation (murine), lung structures (porcine), and trabecular microstructure (ovine) in contrast to micro-CT imaging. This review shows the potential of nano-CT as a radiological method in biomedical basic research and discusses the application of experimental, high resolution CT techniques in consideration of other high resolution cross-sectional imaging techniques. Nano-computed tomography is a high resolution CT-technology for 3D imaging at sub-micrometer resolution. The technical concept bases on a further development of the established ex-vivo-micro-CT technology. By improvement of the spatial resolution, structures at a cellular level become visible (e.g. osteocyte lacunae). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. GPU-based cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Noël, Peter B; Walczak, Alan M; Xu, Jinhui; Corso, Jason J; Hoffmann, Kenneth R; Schafer, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is growing in the clinical arena due to its ability to provide 3D information during interventions, its high diagnostic quality (sub-millimeter resolution), and its short scanning times (60 s). In many situations, the short scanning time of CBCT is followed by a time-consuming 3D reconstruction. The standard reconstruction algorithm for CBCT data is the filtered backprojection, which for a volume of size 256(3) takes up to 25 min on a standard system. Recent developments in the area of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) make it possible to have access to high-performance computing solutions at a low cost, allowing their use in many scientific problems. We have implemented an algorithm for 3D reconstruction of CBCT data using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) provided by NVIDIA (NVIDIA Corporation, Santa Clara, California), which was executed on a NVIDIA GeForce GTX 280. Our implementation results in improved reconstruction times from minutes, and perhaps hours, to a matter of seconds, while also giving the clinician the ability to view 3D volumetric data at higher resolutions. We evaluated our implementation on ten clinical data sets and one phantom data set to observe if differences occur between CPU and GPU-based reconstructions. By using our approach, the computation time for 256(3) is reduced from 25 min on the CPU to 3.2 s on the GPU. The GPU reconstruction time for 512(3) volumes is 8.5 s. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Terahertz Computed Tomography of NASA Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    A terahertz axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three-dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 cubic meters (1 cubic foot) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the system is evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize flat bottom holes, drilled holes, and embedded voids in foam materials utilized as thermal protection on the external fuel tanks for the Space Shuttle. X-ray micro-computed tomography was also performed on the samples to compare against the terahertz computed tomography results and better define embedded voids. Limits of detectability based on depth and size for the samples used in this study are loosely defined. Image sharpness and morphology characterization ability for terahertz computed tomography are qualitatively described.

  16. Segmental arterial mediolysis: findings at computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    García-Barquín, P; Bilbao, J I; Quílez, A; Aragón, M S; Vivas, I

    To review the principal findings on computed tomography angiography for segmental arterial mediolysis, and to emphasize the points that help to differentiate it from other vasculopathies such as vasculitis. We also review the protocols for follow-up and the various treatment options. Segmental arterial mediolysis is a rare disease that is defined as a non-atherosclerotic, non-hereditary, and non-inflammatory vasculopathy characterized by lysis of the medial layer of the arterial wall. It should be suspected in middle-aged patients with aneurysms, dissections, or spontaneous ruptures of visceral arteries of unknown etiology who do not fulfill the clinical and laboratory criteria for vasculitis. The arteries of the abdominal organs are the most commonly affected, including the arteries of the celiac trunk and the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries. Radiologically, segmental arterial mediolysis can present as arterial dilation; single or multiple, saccular or fusiform aneurysms; stenoses; or dissections. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Computed tomography imaging features of hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Sun, Mei-Yu; Liu, Jing-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Meng-Yao; Fan, Rui; Qamar, Sahrish

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare tumor which is most frequently found in uterus. The tumor arising from liver is extremely uncommon. Patient concerns: A 36-year-old female with abdominal distention, cramps, and low-grade fever for over 15 days. The patient had a history of gastric adenocarcinoma with ovarian, celiac lymph nodes, and retroperitoneal lymph nodes metastases. Diagnoses: Computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated an ill-defined heterogeneous hypo-dense mass in segment 8 (S8) of the liver. Contrast-enhanced CT imaging showed marked enhancement in arterial phase, mild-to-moderate enhancement in portal and equilibrium phases. Tumor-feeding artery was demonstrated from the right hepatic artery by the three-dimensional reconstruction images. Biopsy was performed, and a diagnosis of PEComa was rendered. Interventions: No intervention for this tumor before liver biopsy. Lessons: We present a rare case of hepatic PEComa. The information we provided is useful for summarizing the CT features of this kind of tumors. It should be included in differential diagnoses from common hypervascular neoplasms of liver. The final diagnosis is established on histopathological and immunohistochemical studies that are the “gold standard.” PMID:29245304

  18. Serial computed tomography scanning in acute pancreatitis: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    London, N J; Neoptolemos, J P; Lavelle, J; Bailey, I; James, D

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and two patients with acute pancreatitis had abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans within 72 hours of admission, at one week and at six weeks. Twenty eight attacks were clinically severe, 74 clinically mild. Ninety three (91%) admission scans, 85 (84%) one week scans, and 52 (51%) six week scans were abnormal. The aetiology of the pancreatitis could be inferred from 28 (27%) of admission scans, the CT sign of fatty liver having a sensitivity of 21% and specificity of 100% for alcoholic aetiology. The sensitivity of CT for gall stone aetiology was 34%, specificity 100%. The pancreatic size indices (max anteroposterior measurement of head x max anteroposterior measurement of body) of those patients with severe attacks were significantly greater than those with mild attacks on admission, at one week and at six weeks (p less than 0.004). Fourteen pseudocysts were detected by CT, five (36%) of which were clinically apparent. The pseudocyst size indices (max anteroposterior x max transverse measurement) of the pseudocysts which were clinically apparent were significantly greater than those which were not apparent (p less than 0.01) and only those pseudocysts with a size index greater than or equal to 15 cm2 required treatment. PMID:2651228

  19. Texture classification of lung computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pheng, Hang See; Shamsuddin, Siti M.

    2013-03-01

    Current development of algorithms in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme is growing rapidly to assist the radiologist in medical image interpretation. Texture analysis of computed tomography (CT) scans is one of important preliminary stage in the computerized detection system and classification for lung cancer. Among different types of images features analysis, Haralick texture with variety of statistical measures has been used widely in image texture description. The extraction of texture feature values is essential to be used by a CAD especially in classification of the normal and abnormal tissue on the cross sectional CT images. This paper aims to compare experimental results using texture extraction and different machine leaning methods in the classification normal and abnormal tissues through lung CT images. The machine learning methods involve in this assessment are Artificial Immune Recognition System (AIRS), Naive Bayes, Decision Tree (J48) and Backpropagation Neural Network. AIRS is found to provide high accuracy (99.2%) and sensitivity (98.0%) in the assessment. For experiments and testing purpose, publicly available datasets in the Reference Image Database to Evaluate Therapy Response (RIDER) are used as study cases.

  20. Temporal response improvement for computed tomography fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang

    1997-10-01

    Computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF) has attracted significant attention recently. This is mainly due to the growing clinical application of CTF in interventional procedures, such as guided biopsy. Although many studies have been conducted for its clinical efficacy, little attention has been paid to the temporal response and the inherent limitations of the CTF system. For example, during a biopsy operation, when needle is inserted at a relatively high speed, the true needle position will not be correctly depicted in the CTF image due to the time delay. This could result in an overshoot or misplacement of the biopsy needle by the operator. In this paper, we first perform a detailed analysis of the temporal response of the CTF by deriving a set of equations to describe the average location of a moving object observed by the CTF system. The accuracy of the equations is verified by computer simulations and experiments. We show that the CT reconstruction process acts as a low pass filter to the motion function. As a result, there is an inherent time delay in the CTF process to the true biopsy needle motion and locations. Based on this study, we propose a generalized underscan weighting scheme which significantly improve the performance of CTF in terms of time lag and delay.

  1. A simple, effective and clinically applicable method to compute abdominal aortic aneurysm wall stress.

    PubMed

    Joldes, Grand Roman; Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Doyle, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent and irreversible dilation of the lower region of the aorta. It is a symptomless condition that if left untreated can expand to the point of rupture. Mechanically-speaking, rupture of an artery occurs when the local wall stress exceeds the local wall strength. It is therefore desirable to be able to non-invasively estimate the AAA wall stress for a given patient, quickly and reliably. In this paper we present an entirely new approach to computing the wall tension (i.e. the stress resultant equal to the integral of the stresses tangent to the wall over the wall thickness) within an AAA that relies on trivial linear elastic finite element computations, which can be performed instantaneously in the clinical environment on the simplest computing hardware. As an input to our calculations we only use information readily available in the clinic: the shape of the aneurysm in-vivo, as seen on a computed tomography (CT) scan, and blood pressure. We demonstrate that tension fields computed with the proposed approach agree well with those obtained using very sophisticated, state-of-the-art non-linear inverse procedures. Using magnetic resonance (MR) images of the same patient, we can approximately measure the local wall thickness and calculate the local wall stress. What is truly exciting about this simple approach is that one does not need any information on material parameters; this supports the development and use of patient-specific modelling (PSM), where uncertainty in material data is recognised as a key limitation. The methods demonstrated in this paper are applicable to other areas of biomechanics where the loads and loaded geometry of the system are known. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rib Radiography versus Chest Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Rib Fractures.

    PubMed

    Sano, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

     The accurate diagnosis of rib fractures is important in chest trauma. Diagnostic images following chest trauma are usually obtained via chest X-ray, chest computed tomography, or rib radiography. This study evaluated the diagnostic characteristics of rib radiography and chest computed tomography.  Seventy-five rib fracture patients who underwent both chest computed tomography and rib radiography between April 2008 and December 2013 were included. Rib radiographs, centered on the site of pain, were taken from two directions. Chest computed tomography was performed using a 16-row multidetector scanner with 5-mm slice-pitch without overlap, and axial images were visualized in a bone window.  In total, 217 rib fractures were diagnosed in 75 patients. Rib radiography missed 43 rib fractures in 24 patients. The causes were overlap with organs in 15 cases, trivial fractures in 21 cases, and injury outside the imaging range in 7 cases. Left lower rib fractures were often missed due to overlap with the heart, while middle and lower rib fractures were frequently not diagnosed due to overlap with abdominal organs. Computed tomography missed 21 rib fractures in 17 patients. The causes were horizontal fractures in 10 cases, trivial fractures in 9 cases, and insufficient breath holding in 1 case.  In rib radiography, overlap with organs and fractures outside the imaging range were characteristic reasons for missed diagnoses. In chest computed tomography, horizontal rib fractures and insufficient breath holding were often responsible. We should take these challenges into account when diagnosing rib fractures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Electrode Models for Electric Current Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, KUO-SHENG; ISAACSON, DAVID; NEWELL, J. C.; GISSER, DAVID G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a mathematical model for the physical properties of electrodes suitable for use in electric current computed tomography (ECCT). The model includes the effects of discretization, shunt, and contact impedance. The complete model was validated by experiment. Bath resistivities of 284.0, 139.7, 62.3, 29.5 Ω · cm were studied. Values of “effective” contact impedance z used in the numerical approximations were 58.0, 35.0, 15.0, and 7.5 Ω · cm2, respectively. Agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured values was excellent throughout the range of bath conductivities studied. It is desirable in electrical impedance imaging systems to model the observed voltages to the same precision as they are measured in order to be able to make the highest resolution reconstructions of the internal conductivity that the measurement precision allows. The complete electrode model, which includes the effects of discretization of the current pattern, the shunt effect due to the highly conductive electrode material, and the effect of an “effective” contact impedance, allows calculation of the voltages due to any current pattern applied to a homogeneous resistivity field. PMID:2777280

  4. Electrode models for electric current computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K S; Isaacson, D; Newell, J C; Gisser, D G

    1989-09-01

    This paper develops a mathematical model for the physical properties of electrodes suitable for use in electric current computed tomography (ECCT). The model includes the effects of discretization, shunt, and contact impedance. The complete model was validated by experiment. Bath resistivities of 284.0, 139.7, 62.3, 29.5 omega.cm were studied. Values of "effective" contact impedance zeta used in the numerical approximations were 58.0, 35.0, 15.0, and 7.5 omega.cm2, respectively. Agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured values was excellent throughout the range of bath conductivities studied. It is desirable in electrical impedance imaging systems to model the observed voltages to the same precision as they are measured in order to be able to make the highest resolution reconstructions of the internal conductivity that the measurement precision allows. The complete electrode model, which includes the effects of discretization of the current pattern, the shunt effect due to the highly conductive electrode material, and the effect of an "effective" contact impedance, allows calculation of the voltages due to any current pattern applied to a homogeneous resistivity field.

  5. Internal-illumination photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mucong; Lan, Bangxin; Liu, Wei; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie

    2018-03-01

    We report a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system using a customized optical fiber with a cylindrical diffuser to internally illuminate deep targets. The traditional external light illumination in PACT usually limits the penetration depth to a few centimeters from the tissue surface, mainly due to strong optical attenuation along the light propagation path from the outside in. By contrast, internal light illumination, with external ultrasound detection, can potentially detect much deeper targets. Different from previous internal illumination PACT implementations using forward-looking optical fibers, our internal-illumination PACT system uses a customized optical fiber with a 3-cm-long conoid needle diffuser attached to the fiber tip, which can homogeneously illuminate the surrounding space and substantially enlarge the field of view. We characterized the internal illumination distribution and PACT system performance. We performed tissue phantom and in vivo animal studies to further demonstrate the superior imaging depth using internal illumination over external illumination. We imaged a 7.5-cm-deep leaf target embedded in optically scattering medium and the beating heart of a mouse overlaid with 3.7-cm-thick chicken tissue. Our results have collectively demonstrated that the internal light illumination combined with external ultrasound detection might be a useful strategy to improve the penetration depth of PACT in imaging deep organs of large animals and humans.

  6. Postmortem computed tomography findings in suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Garetier, M; Deloire, L; Dédouit, F; Dumousset, E; Saccardy, C; Ben Salem, D

    2017-02-01

    Suicide is the eighth cause of mortality in France and the leading cause in people aged between 25 and 34 years. The most common methods of suicide are hanging, self-poisoning with medicines and firearms. Postmortem computed tomography (CT) is a useful adjunct to autopsy to confirm suicide and exclude other causes of death. At autopsy, fractures of the hyoid bone or thyroid cartilage, or both, are found in more than 50% of suicidal hangings. Cervical vertebra fractures are rare and only seen in suicide victims jumping from a great height. Three-dimensional reconstructions from CT data are useful to visualize the ligature mark on the neck. In suicides by firearm, postmortem CT shows entry and exit wounds, parenchymal lesions along the bullet path, as well as projectiles in case of penetrating trauma. However, in the chest and abdomen it is more difficult to identify the path of the projectile. Postmortem CT also shows specific features of suicide by drowning or stabbing, but its use is limited in cases of self-poisoning. The use of postmortem CT is also limited by decomposition and change of body position. This article presents the imaging features seen on postmortem CT according to the method of suicide. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Computed tomography imaging and angiography - principles.

    PubMed

    Kamalian, Shervin; Lev, Michael H; Gupta, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of patients with diverse neurologic disorders was forever changed in the summer of 1973, when the first commercial computed tomography (CT) scanners were introduced. Until then, the detection and characterization of intracranial or spinal lesions could only be inferred by limited spatial resolution radioisotope scans, or by the patterns of tissue and vascular displacement on invasive pneumoencaphalography and direct carotid puncture catheter arteriography. Even the earliest-generation CT scanners - which required tens of minutes for the acquisition and reconstruction of low-resolution images (128×128 matrix) - could, based on density, noninvasively distinguish infarct, hemorrhage, and other mass lesions with unprecedented accuracy. Iodinated, intravenous contrast added further sensitivity and specificity in regions of blood-brain barrier breakdown. The advent of rapid multidetector row CT scanning in the early 1990s created renewed enthusiasm for CT, with CT angiography largely replacing direct catheter angiography. More recently, iterative reconstruction postprocessing techniques have made possible high spatial resolution, reduced noise, very low radiation dose CT scanning. The speed, spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and low radiation dose capability of present-day scanners have also facilitated dual-energy imaging which, like magnetic resonance imaging, for the first time, has allowed tissue-specific CT imaging characterization of intracranial pathology. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molar axis estimation from computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Dongxia Zhang; Yangzhou Gan; Zeyang Xia; Xinwen Zhou; Shoubin Liu; Jing Xiong; Guanglin Li

    2016-08-01

    Estimation of tooth axis is needed for some clinical dental treatment. Existing methods require to segment the tooth volume from Computed Tomography (CT) images, and then estimate the axis from the tooth volume. However, they may fail during estimating molar axis due to that the tooth segmentation from CT images is challenging and current segmentation methods may get poor segmentation results especially for these molars with angle which will result in the failure of axis estimation. To resolve this problem, this paper proposes a new method for molar axis estimation from CT images. The key innovation point is that: instead of estimating the 3D axis of each molar from the segmented volume, the method estimates the 3D axis from two projection images. The method includes three steps. (1) The 3D images of each molar are projected to two 2D image planes. (2) The molar contour are segmented and the contour's 2D axis are extracted in each 2D projection image. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and a modified symmetry axis detection algorithm are employed to extract the 2D axis from the segmented molar contour. (3) A 3D molar axis is obtained by combining the two 2D axes. Experimental results verified that the proposed method was effective to estimate the axis of molar from CT images.

  9. Modelling the penumbra in Computed Tomography1

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Audrey; Warnett, Jason M.; Gibbons, Gregory J.; Brettschneider, Julia; Nichols, Thomas E.; Williams, Mark A.; Kendall, Wilfrid S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In computed tomography (CT), the spot geometry is one of the main sources of error in CT images. Since X-rays do not arise from a point source, artefacts are produced. In particular there is a penumbra effect, leading to poorly defined edges within a reconstructed volume. Penumbra models can be simulated given a fixed spot geometry and the known experimental setup. OBJECTIVE: This paper proposes to use a penumbra model, derived from Beer’s law, both to confirm spot geometry from penumbra data, and to quantify blurring in the image. METHODS: Two models for the spot geometry are considered; one consists of a single Gaussian spot, the other is a mixture model consisting of a Gaussian spot together with a larger uniform spot. RESULTS: The model consisting of a single Gaussian spot has a poor fit at the boundary. The mixture model (which adds a larger uniform spot) exhibits a much improved fit. The parameters corresponding to the uniform spot are similar across all powers, and further experiments suggest that the uniform spot produces only soft X-rays of relatively low-energy. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, the precision of radiographs can be estimated from the penumbra effect in the image. The use of a thin copper filter reduces the size of the effective penumbra. PMID:27232198

  10. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry.

    PubMed

    Van Thielen, Bert; Siguenza, Francis; Hassan, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstructions were created using specialized software. Image quality and visibility of anatomical landmarks were subjectively assessed by two observers. Good image quality was obtained for the MPR para-sagittal reconstructions through multiple teeth. The image quality of the panoramic reconstructions of dogs was moderate while the panoramic reconstructions of cats were poor since the images were associated with an increased noise level. Segmental panoramic reconstructions of the mouth seem to be useful for studying the dental anatomy especially in dogs. The results of this study using human dental CBCT technology demonstrate the potential of this scanning technology in veterinary medicine. Unfortunately, the moderate image quality obtained with the CBCT technique reported here seems to be inferior to the diagnostic image quality obtained from 2-dimensional dental radiographs. Further research is required to optimize scanning and reconstruction protocols for veterinary applications.

  11. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  12. [Cone-beam computed tomography in paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Buzhilova, A P; Egorova, E A; Makarova, D V; Berezina, N Ia; Zorina, I S; Khartanovich, V I

    2014-01-01

    To study the capabilities of cone-bean computed tomography (CBCT) in estimating the bone structure when analyzing anthropological findings. Twenty-four bone fragments (remains) of Napoléon Bonaparte Imperial Army soldiers who had died at a Königsberg military hospital during their retreat from Russia in the War of 1812 were examined by CBCT. A total of 28 tubular bones with different injury healing signs and a skull with maxillofacial trauma marks were investigated. Furthermore, an object from D.G. Rokhlin's paleopathological collection was used to analyze a complicated humeral infectious process. CBCT was performed by individually selecting the scanning foldings, physicotechnical conditions and regimens in relation to the anatomic location and size of fragments. Processing of the obtained images reveled fractures of different bones in 19 (65.5%) cases. The signs of ununited fractures were visualized in 20.7% of the samples. Image post-processing showed intraarticular consolidated fractures in 13.8% of the anthropological findings. The CBCT examination of bone fragments exhibited the signs of their fusion. A wound pattern was established in 31% of the samples. The specific features of a bone amputation stump could be characterized in detail in 17.2% of the anthropological findings. 51.7% of the cases were found to have signs of sustained bone inflammatory diseases of various genesis, which in 41.4% of them were presented by linear, bulbar, and assimilated periostal reactions and significantly detectable on CBCT scans. Sequestral cavities were imaged in 31% of the fragments. The CBCT images are characterized by high informative value (from 7.5 to 10.6 pixels/mm), optimal spatial resolution, definition, and hardness. The software of CBCT involves the parameters and possible postprocessing of images (building of panoramic and mulplanar reconstructions, assessment of the density characteristics of tissues), which allow an analysis of anthropological material, by

  13. Mandibular incisive canal: cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pires, Carlos A; Bissada, Nabil F; Becker, Jeffery J; Kanawati, Ali; Landers, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Panoramic radiography is often used to analyze the anatomical structure of the teeth, jaws, and temporomandibular joints. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging allows multiple axial slices of the image to be obtained through these anatomical structures. The aim of this study was to assess CBCT compared with panoramic radiography to verify the presence, location, and dimensions of the mandibular incisive canal. CBCT scan images and panoramic radiographs of 89 subjects were compared for the presence of the mandibular incisive canal, its location, size, and anterior-posterior length. The distance between the incisive canal and the buccal and lingual plate of the alveolar bone, and the distance from the canal to the inferior border of the mandible and the tooth apex were also measured. A paired t-test was used to calculate any significant difference between the two imaging techniques. Eighty-three percent of the CBCT scans showed the presence of the incisive canal, as did 11% of the panoramic radiographs. The range of the incisive canal diameter, as seen in the CBCT scans, was from 0.4 × 0.4 mm to 4.6 × 3.2 mm. The mean length of the canal was 7 ± 3.8 mm. The distance from the inferior border of the mandible to the canal was 10.2 ± 2.4 mm, and the mean distance to the buccal plate was 2.4 mm. The apex-canal distance (in dentate subjects) was 5.3 mm. The presence, location, and dimensions of the mandibular incisive canal are better determined by CBCT imaging than by panoramic radiography. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  15. Computer aided stress analysis of long bones utilizing computer tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Marom, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    A computer aided analysis method, utilizing computed tomography (CT) has been developed, which together with a finite element program determines the stress-displacement pattern in a long bone section. The CT data file provides the geometry, the density and the material properties for the generated finite element model. A three-dimensional finite element model of a tibial shaft is automatically generated from the CT file by a pre-processing procedure for a finite element program. The developed pre-processor includes an edge detection algorithm which determines the boundaries of the reconstructed cross-sectional images of the scanned bone. A mesh generation procedure than automatically generatesmore » a three-dimensional mesh of a user-selected refinement. The elastic properties needed for the stress analysis are individually determined for each model element using the radiographic density (CT number) of each pixel with the elemental borders. The elastic modulus is determined from the CT radiographic density by using an empirical relationship from the literature. The generated finite element model, together with applied loads, determined from existing gait analysis and initial displacements, comprise a formatted input for the SAP IV finite element program. The output of this program, stresses and displacements at the model elements and nodes, are sorted and displayed by a developed post-processor to provide maximum and minimum values at selected locations in the model.« less

  16. Revisiting the potential signs of colorectal cancer on contrast-enhanced computed tomography without bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Jawad; Hosmane, Sharath; Lapsia, Snehal

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer death in the US. Earlier detection can allow treatment with curative intent and improve prognosis. Optical and virtual colonoscopy are widely used in screening for colonic polyps and in the investigation of suspected CRC. However, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is still performed to investigate various non-specific abdominal complaints. Hence, a significant number of CRC are identified on contrast-enhanced CT without bowel preparation. We describe several signs, which when present in tandem, raise suspicion of CRC, and may warrant further investigation with optical colonoscopy. These include an intraluminal mass, eccentric or circumferential wall thickening >3 mm, focal wall enhancement, pericolic fat stranding, a cluster of >3 local lymph nodes, and enlarged lymph nodes >10 mm in short axis. Multiplanar evaluation of the bowel should be performed on all CT abdominal studies, including those without bowel preparation, to identify subtle features of CRC.

  17. Computed tomography-assisted laparoscopic removal of intraabdominally migrated levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamad S; Merhi, Zaher O

    2010-04-01

    To report three cases of migrated levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUS) into the pelvic/abdominal cavity removed laparoscopically with the aid of preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan imaging. Three patients presenting with a missing LNG-IUS on examination and pelvic ultrasound are presented. A preoperative CT scan was performed, what helped in a successful removal of the LNG-IUS. The patients were discharged home the same day of the procedure. Our cases reinforce, besides the diagnosis of a migrated LNG-IUS by ultrasound, the fact that preoperative CT scan imaging assists in the diagnosis of the precise location of a migrated LNG-IUS into the pelvic/abdominal cavity and helps the physician in the prediction of the difficulty of the laparoscopic removal.

  18. Recurrent pyogenic cholangitis in Asian immigrants: use of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cholangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Federle, M.P.; Cello J.P.; Laing, F.C.

    1982-04-01

    Five cases of recurrent pyogenic cholangitis (RPC) were studied by ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT), and cholangiography. All patients were recent immigrants from the Orient or Indonesia and had had recurrent attacks of cholangitis for many years. The bile was infected by E. coli and the biliary ducts were dilated; in addition, extrahepatic bile-pigment calculi we represent in all 5 and intrahepatic calculi in 4. Abdominal ultrasound usually failed to demonstrate duct calculi and extrahepatic dilatation due to the soft, mud-like consistency of the stones. CT was successful in showing the calculi and the full extent of dilatation. The authors concludemore » that preoperative diagnosis of RPC is best achieved by awareness of the characteristic clinical presentation and the findings on abdominal CT. Preoperative cholangiography provides excellent detail, but poses the danger of biliary sepsis requiring antibiotics.« less

  19. Comparison of Tissue Density in Hounsfield Units in Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Varshowsaz, Masoud; Goorang, Sepideh; Ehsani, Sara; Azizi, Zeynab; Rahimian, Sepideh

    2016-03-01

    Bone quality and quantity assessment is one of the most important steps in implant treatment planning. Different methods such as computed tomography (CT) and recently suggested cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with lower radiation dose and less time and cost are used for bone density assessment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the tissue density values in Hounsfield units (HUs) in CBCT and CT scans of different tissue phantoms with two different thicknesses, two different image acquisition settings and in three locations in the phantoms. Four different tissue phantoms namely hard tissue, soft tissue, air and water were scanned by three different CBCT and a CT system in two thicknesses (full and half) and two image acquisition settings (high and low kVp and mA). The images were analyzed at three sites (middle, periphery and intermediate) using eFilm software. The difference in density values was analyzed by ANOVA and correction coefficient test (P<0.05). There was a significant difference between density values in CBCT and CT scans in most situations, and CBCT values were not similar to CT values in any of the phantoms in different thicknesses and acquisition parameters or the three different sites. The correction coefficients confirmed the results. CBCT is not reliable for tissue density assessment. The results were not affected by changes in thickness, acquisition parameters or locations.

  20. Computed tomography scan diagnosis of occult groin hernia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, J F W

    2012-06-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of clinically occult (hidden) groin hernia was assessed in a series of patients presenting with undiagnosed groin pain. A total of 158 consecutive patients presenting over a period of 5 years with undiagnosed groin pain or lower abdominal pain and negative or equivocal clinical findings were radiologically assessed with non-contrast CT. The decision to manage operatively or conservatively was then based on a combination of the clinical and CT findings. Outcomes were assessed at 10 years follow-up. The study cohort comprised 158 patients presenting with groin or lower abdominal pain and/or swelling, and was studied prospectively. Seven of these patients were re-investigated at a later date after developing new pain on either the ipsilateral or contralateral side, giving a total of 165 CT examinations. One-third of cases (54) had clinically occult groin hernias and most of the remaining cases had diagnoses that could be managed non-operatively. Of those who came to surgery, the pre-operative CT diagnosis of hernia had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 92% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96% (overall accuracy 94%). Lipoma of the spermatic cord was responsible for three of five false-positive CT results. The concept of sports hernia/groin disruption injury (GDI) was encountered, and this entity is discussed in this paper. In the group of patients without hernia findings on CT, the most common diagnoses were rectus abdominis and/or pyramidalis muscle injury which could be treated by physiotherapy (22%), GDI (16%), post-surgical problems (14%), miscellaneous (20%) and 'no abnormality' was identified in 15%. Overall, there were 111 patients with a 'non-hernia' CT diagnosis, of which urological, gynaecological, gastrointestinal and neuralgia contributed to the non-musculoskeletal diagnosis. This prospective non-contrast CT study of patients with undiagnosed chronic groin pain detected the majority of

  1. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Advances in equine computed tomography and use of contrast media.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Sarah M

    2012-12-01

    Advances in equine computed tomography have been made as a result of improvements in software and hardware and an increasing body of knowledge. Contrast media can be administered intravascularly or intrathecally. Contrast media is useful to differentiate between tissues of similar density. Equine computed tomography can be used for many different clinical conditions, including lameness diagnosis, fracture identification and characterization, preoperative planning, and characterization of skull diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Do C-reactive protein level, white blood cell count, and pain location guide the selection of patients for computed tomography imaging in non-traumatic acute abdomen?

    PubMed

    Ozan, E; Atac, G K; Evrin, T; Alisar, K; Sonmez, L O; Alhan, A

    2017-02-01

    The value of abdominal computed tomography in non-traumatic abdominal pain has been well established. On the other hand, to manage computed tomography, appropriateness has become more of an issue as a result of the concomitant increase in patient radiation exposure with increased computed tomography use. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, and pain location may guide the selection of patients for computed tomography in non-traumatic acute abdomen. Patients presenting with acute abdomen to the emergency department over a 12-month period and who subsequently underwent computed tomography were retrospectively reviewed. Those with serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell count measured on admission or within 24 h of the computed tomography were selected. Computed tomography examinations were retrospectively reviewed, and final diagnoses were designated either positive or negative for pathology relating to presentation with acute abdomen. White blood cell counts, C-reactive protein levels, and pain locations were analyzed to determine whether they increased or decreased the likelihood of producing a diagnostic computed tomography. The likelihood ratio for computed tomography positivity with a C-reactive protein level above 5 mg/L was 1.71, while this increased to 7.71 in patients with combined elevated C-reactive protein level and white blood cell count and right lower quadrant pain. Combined elevated C-reactive protein level and white blood cell count in patients with right lower quadrant pain may represent a potential factor that could guide the decision to perform computed tomography in non-traumatic acute abdomen.

  4. Use of multidetector computed tomography in the assessment of dogs with pericardial effusion.

    PubMed

    Scollan, K F; Bottorff, B; Stieger-Vanegas, S; Nemanic, S; Sisson, D

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) allows high spatial and temporal resolution imaging of cardiac, thoracic, and abdominal structures. Accurate determination of the cause of pericardial effusion (PE) is essential to providing appropriate treatment and prognosis. Echocardiography and pericardial fluid analysis may not differentiate between causes of PE and cannot identify extracardiac metastasis. Describe the thoracic and abdominal MDCT findings and evaluate the utility of MDCT to differentiate between neoplastic and nonneoplastic causes of PE in dogs. Eleven client-owned dogs with PE diagnosed by echocardiography. Prospective observational study. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), 3-view thoracic radiography, and contrast-enhanced thoracic and abdominal MDCT images were evaluated for the presence of cardiac masses, pulmonary metastases, and abdominal masses. Histopathology in 5 dogs and survival analysis in all dogs were evaluated. A neoplastic cause was identified in 6/11 dogs and a nonneoplastic cause was identified in 5/11. Cardiac MDCT findings were consistent with TTE findings in all dogs with right atrial (5/5) and heart base masses (1/1). Pulmonary metastases were identified in 1/11 dogs by thoracic radiography and in 2/11 dogs by MDCT. MDCT identified splenic or hepatic lesions consistent with neoplasia in 6/11 and 5/11 dogs, respectively. Focal MDCT pericardial changes at the pericardiocentesis site were noted in 3/11 dogs. Multidetector computed tomography did not improve the detection of cardiac masses in dogs with PE over echocardiography. The benefit of MDCT was primarily in the detection of pulmonary metastases and extracardiac lesions using a single imaging modality. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Computed tomography findings in liver fibrosis and cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Huber, A; Ebner, L; Montani, M; Semmo, N; Roy Choudhury, K; Heverhagen, J; Christe, A

    2014-02-19

    Computed tomography (CT) is inferior to the fibroscan and laboratory testing in the noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis. On the other hand, CT is a frequently used diagnostic tool in modern medicine. The auxiliary finding of clinically occult liver fibrosis in CT scans could result in an earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to analyse quantifiable direct signs of liver remodelling in CT scans to depict liver fibrosis in a precirrhotic stage. Retrospective review of 148 abdominal CT scans (80 liver cirrhosis, 35 precirrhotic fibrosis and 33 control patients). Fibrosis and cirrhosis were histologically proven. The diameters of the three main hepatic veins were measured 1-2 cm before their aperture into the inferior caval vein. The width of the caudate and the right hepatic lobe were divided, and measured horizontally at the level of the first bifurcation of the right portal vein in axial planes (caudate-right-lobe ratio). A combination of both (sum of liver vein diameters divided by the caudate-right lobe ratio) was defined as the ld/crl ratio. These metrics were analysed for the detection of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. An ld/crl-r <24 showed a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 76% for precirrhotic liver fibrosis. Liver cirrhosis could be detected with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 82% if ld/crl-r <20. An ld/crl-r <24 justifies laboratory testing and a fibroscan. This could bring forward the diagnosis and patients would profit from early treatment in a potentially reversible stage of disease.

  6. 128 slice computed tomography dose profile measurement using thermoluminescent dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehhon, N.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Ang, W. C.; Musa, Y.; Bahruddin, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice marks the needs to understand the dose descriptor and dose profile. The purposes of the current study were to determine the CT dose index free-in-air (CTDIair) in 128 slice CT scanner and to evaluate the single scan dose profile (SSDP). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were used to measure the dose profile of the scanner. There were three sets of CT protocols where the tube potential (kV) setting was manipulated for each protocol while the rest of parameters were kept constant. These protocols were based from routine CT abdominal examinations for male adult abdomen. It was found that the increase of kV settings made the values of CTDIair increased as well. When the kV setting was changed from 80 kV to 120 kV and from 120 kV to 140 kV, the CTDIair values were increased as much as 147.9% and 53.9% respectively. The highest kV setting (140 kV) led to the highest CTDIair value (13.585 mGy). The p-value of less than 0.05 indicated that the results were statistically different. The SSDP showed that when the kV settings were varied, the peak sharpness and height of Gaussian function profiles were affected. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose profiles for all protocols were coincided with the nominal beam width set for the measurements. The findings of the study revealed much information on the characterization and performance of 128 slice CT scanner.

  7. Application of Computer Tomography for Life Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A.; Nealson, K.

    2001-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most fundamentally difficult challenges facing those who would search for life is that of scale determination. Spatial scales of life on Earth range over more than 15 orders of magnitude in mass and volume, and more than 8 orders of magnitude in 2 dimensional space. If the distribution of life is sparse in comparison to the background on which it is found, then the choice of the right scale is critical to finding that life. But how does one identify the proper scale? To put this in other words, how does one recognize the "haystacks" in which the needles (biosignatures and evidence of life) might be most profitably searched for? The problem is further exacerbated when conditions get extreme because much of the life moves from the clement surface environment into the pores and more clement environments inside of rocks, minerals and soils. Once encased in their lithic homes, these microbes become nearly impossible to study by standard techniques because of the opacity of the rocks. It is this problem that we propose to address in the work proposed here. Computer Tomography (CT) has been a very valuable tool in medicine, where the best resolution available has typically been of the order of about 0.5 mm. However, to adapt the approach for life detection of microbial endoliths, the resolution needs to be moved to the micrometer and even submicrometer levels. Thus for the studies proposed here, we begin with a commercially available instrument that can yield resolution of approximately 10 micrometers. The rational for this is twofold: first, this is the "state of the art" in laboratory instruments; and second, that while the usual size of a microbial cell is about 1 micron, microorganisms tend to live in communities that usually exceed the 10 micrometer size range. The resolution also depends on the sample size itself, so having a small lab instrument into which small samples can be placed will be beneficial to the resolution. We have now used several

  8. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Technetium pertechnetate (99mTcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of 99mTcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of 99mTcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent 99mTcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Results: Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal–Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other 99mTcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Conclusions: Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring 99mTcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake. PMID:27399139

  9. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  10. Domain identification in impedance computed tomography by spline collocation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    A method for estimating an unknown domain in elliptic boundary value problems is considered. The problem is formulated as an inverse problem of integral equations of the second kind. A computational method is developed using a splice collocation scheme. The results can be applied to the inverse problem of impedance computed tomography (ICT) for image reconstruction.

  11. Dual-energy computed tomography for the detection of focal liver lesions.

    PubMed

    Lago, K N; Vallejos, J; Capuñay, C; Salas, E; Reynoso, E; Carpio, J B; Carrascosa, P M

    To qualitatively and quantitatively explore the spectral study of focal liver lesions, comparing it with the usual polychromatic assessment with single-energy computed tomography. We prospectively studied 50 patients with at least one focal liver lesion who were referred for abdominal multidetector computed tomography with intravenous contrast material. The portal phase was acquired with dual energy sources. The density of the lesions and of the surrounding liver parenchyma was measured both in the baseline polychromatic acquisition and in the posterior monochromatic reconstructions at 40 keV, 70 keV, and 140 keV. Spectral curves were traced and the dual-energy indices and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated. Lastly, the quality of the images and the detectability of the lesions were assessed qualitatively. Densitometric differences between the different types of lesions (avascular and vascularized) and the liver were greater at low energy levels (left side of the spectral curve) than in the polychromatic evaluation. In the subjective assessment, the 40keV energy level had the greatest lesion detectability. Monochromatic spectral study with dual-energy computed tomography provides better lesion detectability at 40keV compared to that provided by the ordinary polychromatic evaluation. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of thoracic aortic prosthetic graft infection with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Yoshiyuki; Oshima, Hideki; Araki, Yoshimori; Narita, Yuji; Mutsuga, Masato; Kato, Katsuhiko; Usui, Akihiko

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in detecting thoracic aortic prosthetic graft infection. Nine patients with clinically suspected thoracic aortic graft infection underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. In these patients, the diagnoses could not be confirmed using conventional modalities. The patients' clinical courses were retrospectively reviewed. On the basis of surgical, microbiological and clinical follow-up findings, the aortic grafts were considered infected in 4 patients and not infected in 5. All 4 patients with graft infection (root: 2 cases, arch: 1 case and descending: 1 case) eventually underwent in situ re-replacement. Two of the 4 patients also had abdominal grafts; however, only the thoracic grafts were replaced because uptake was low around the abdominal grafts. The maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in the perigraft area was higher in the infected group than in the non-infected group (11.4 ± 4.5 vs 6.9 ± 6.4), although the difference was not statistically significant. According to the receiver operating characteristic analysis, SUVmax >8 appeared to be the cut-off value in distinguishing the two groups (sensitivity: 1.0 and specificity: 0.8). FDG-PET/CT is useful for confirming the presence of graft infection by detecting high uptake around grafts and excluding other causes of inflammation. An SUVmax value greater than 8 around a graft suggests the presence of graft infection. In addition, FDG-PET/CT can be used to clarify the precise extent of infection. This is especially useful if multiple separated prosthetic grafts have been implanted.

  13. The influence of computational assumptions on analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ene, Florentina; Delassus, Patrick; Morris, Liam

    2014-08-01

    The variation in computational assumptions for analysing abdominal aortic aneurysm haemodynamics can influence the desired output results and computational cost. Such assumptions for abdominal aortic aneurysm modelling include static/transient pressures, steady/transient flows and rigid/compliant walls. Six computational methods and these various assumptions were simulated and compared within a realistic abdominal aortic aneurysm model with and without intraluminal thrombus. A full transient fluid-structure interaction was required to analyse the flow patterns within the compliant abdominal aortic aneurysms models. Rigid wall computational fluid dynamics overestimates the velocity magnitude by as much as 40%-65% and the wall shear stress by 30%-50%. These differences were attributed to the deforming walls which reduced the outlet volumetric flow rate for the transient fluid-structure interaction during the majority of the systolic phase. Static finite element analysis accurately approximates the deformations and von Mises stresses when compared with transient fluid-structure interaction. Simplifying the modelling complexity reduces the computational cost significantly. In conclusion, the deformation and von Mises stress can be approximately found by static finite element analysis, while for compliant models a full transient fluid-structure interaction analysis is required for acquiring the fluid flow phenomenon. © IMechE 2014.

  14. Single photon emission computed tomography and oth selected computer topics

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, G.D.

    1981-07-01

    This book, the proceedings of a meeting in January 1980, contains 21 papers. Thirteen are devoted to aspects of emission tomography, four to nuclear cardiology, and five to other topics. The initial set of papers consists of reviews of the single photon emission tomography process. These include transverse axial tomography using scintillation cameras and other devices, longitudinal section tomography, and pin-hole and slant-hole systems. These reviews are generally well done, but as might be expected, lack any coherence from paper to paper. The papers on nuclear cardiology include several of Fourier analysis in nuclear cardiology and one on shunt quantification.more » Other clinical papers are on quantifying Tc-99m glucoheptonate uptake in the brain and on iron-59 retention studies. A general criticism of the book is the poor quality of photographic reproductions.« less

  15. Novel Assessment of Renal Motion in Children as Measured via Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pai Panandiker, Atmaram S., E-mail: atmaram.pai-panandiker@stjude.org; Sharma, Shelly; Naik, Mihir H.

    Objectives: Abdominal intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy require quantification of target and organ motion to optimize localization and treatment. Although addressed in adults, there is no available literature on this issue in pediatric patients. We assessed physiologic renal motion in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty free-breathing pediatric patients at a median age of 8 years (range, 2-18 years) with intra-abdominal tumors underwent computed tomography simulation and four-dimensional computed tomography acquisition (slice thickness, 3 mm). Kidneys and diaphragms were contoured during eight phases of respiration to estimate center-of-mass motion. We quantified center of kidney mass mobility vectors in threemore » dimensions: anteroposterior (AP), mediolateral (ML), and superoinferior (SI). Results: Kidney motion decreases linearly with decreasing age and height. The 95% confidence interval for the averaged minima and maxima of renal motion in children younger than 9 years was 5-9 mm in the ML direction, 4-11 mm in the AP direction, and 12-25 mm in the SI dimension for both kidneys. In children older than 9 years, the same confidence interval reveals a widening range of motion that was 5-16 mm in the ML direction, 6-17 mm in the AP direction, and 21-52 mm in the SI direction. Although not statistically significant, renal motion correlated with diaphragm motion in older patients. The correlation between diaphragm motion and body mass index was borderline (r = 0.52, p = 0.0816) in younger patients. Conclusions: Renal motion is age and height dependent. Measuring diaphragmatic motion alone does not reliably quantify pediatric renal motion. Renal motion in young children ranges from 5 to 25 mm in orientation-specific directions. The vectors of motion range from 5 to 52 mm in older children. These preliminary data represent novel analyses of pediatric intra-abdominal organ motion.« less

  16. Cone beam computed tomography: basics and applications in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Elluru; Elluru, Snehal Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) devices, changed the way oral and maxillofacial radiology is practiced. CBCT was embraced into the dental settings very rapidly due to its compact size, low cost, low ionizing radiation exposure when compared to medical computed tomography. Alike medical CT, 3 dimensional evaluation of the maxillofacial region with minimal distortion is offered by the CBCT. This article provides an overview of basics of CBCT technology and reviews the specific application of CBCT technology to oral and maxillofacial region with few illustrations.

  17. Microstructure of cotton fibrous assemblies based on computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hui; Yu, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes for the first time the analysis of inner microstructure of cotton fibrous assemblies using computed tomography. Microstructure parameters such as packing density, fractal dimension as well as porosity including open porosity, closed porosity and total porosity are calculated based on 2D data from computed tomography. Values of packing density and fractal dimension are stable in random oriented fibrous assemblies, and there exists a satisfactory approximate linear relationship between them. Moreover, poles analysis indicates that porosity represents the tightness of fibrous assemblies and open poles are main existence.

  18. [Cardiac computed tomography: new applications of an evolving technique].

    PubMed

    Martín, María; Corros, Cecilia; Calvo, Juan; Mesa, Alicia; García-Campos, Ana; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Barreiro, Manuel; Rozado, José; Colunga, Santiago; de la Hera, Jesús M; Morís, César; Luyando, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    During the last years we have witnessed an increasing development of imaging techniques applied in Cardiology. Among them, cardiac computed tomography is an emerging and evolving technique. With the current possibility of very low radiation studies, the applications have expanded and go further coronariography In the present article we review the technical developments of cardiac computed tomography and its new applications. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. [Axial computer tomography of the neurocranium (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stöppler, L

    1977-05-27

    Computer tomography (CT), a new radiographic examination technique, is very highly efficient, for it has high informative content with little stress for the patient. In contrast to the conventional X-ray technology, CT succeeds, by direct presentation of the structure of the soft parts, in obtaining information which comes close to that of macroscopic neuropathology. The capacity and limitations of the method at the present stage of development are reported. Computer tomography cannot displace conventional neuroradiological methods of investigation, although it is rightly presented as a screening method and helps towards selective use. Indications, technical integration and handling of CT are prerequisites for the exhaustive benefit of the excellent new technique.

  20. Abdomen/pelvis computed tomography in staging of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: is it always necessary?

    PubMed

    Farruggia, Piero; Puccio, Giuseppe; Sala, Alessandra; Todesco, Alessandra; Terenziani, Monica; Mura, Rosamaria; D'Amico, Salvatore; Casini, Tommaso; Mosa, Clara; Pillon, Marta; Boaro, Maria Paola; Bottigliero, Gaetano; Burnelli, Roberta; Consarino, Caterina; Fedeli, Fausto; Mascarin, Maurizio; Perruccio, Katia; Schiavello, Elisabetta; Trizzino, Angela; Ficola, Umberto; Garaventa, Alberto; Rossello, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if abdomen/pelvis computed tomography (CT) can be safety omitted in the initial staging of a subgroup of children affected by Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL). Every participating center of A.I.E.O.P (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia ed Oncologia Pediatrica) sent local staging reports of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and abdominal ultrasound (US) along with digital images of staging abdomen/pelvis CT to the investigation center where the CT scans were evaluated by an experienced pediatric radiologist. The local radiologist who performed the US was unaware of local CT and PET reports (both carried out after US), and the reviewer radiologist examining the CT images was unaware of local US, PET and CT reports. A new abdominal staging of 123 patients performed on the basis of local US report, local PET report, and centralized CT report was then compared to a simpler staging based on local US and PET. No additional lesion was discovered by CT in patients with abdomen/pelvis negativity in both US and PET or isolated spleen positivity in US (or US and PET), and so it seems that in the initial staging, abdomen/pelvis CT can be safety omitted in about 1/2 to 2/3 of children diagnosed with HL. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Determining injuries from posterior and flank stab wounds using computed tomography tractography.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Vishal; Reid, Chris M; Fortlage, Dale; Lee, Jeanne; Kobayashi, Leslie; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-04-01

    Unlike anterior stab wounds (SW), in which local exploration may direct management, posterior SW can be challenging to evaluate. Traditional triple contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging is cumbersome and technician-dependent. The present study examines the role of CT tractography as a strategy to manage select patients with back and flank SW. Hemodynamically stable patients with back and flank SW were studied. After resuscitation, Betadine- or Visipaque®-soaked sterile sponges were inserted into each SW for the estimated depth of the wound. Patients underwent abdominal helical CT scanning, including intravenous contrast, as the sole abdominal imaging study. Images were reviewed by an attending radiologist and trauma surgeon. The tractogram was evaluated to determine SW trajectory and injury to intra- or retroperitoneal organs, vascular structures, the diaphragm, and the urinary tract. Complete patient demographics including operative management and injuries were collected. Forty-one patients underwent CT tractography. In 11 patients, tractography detected violation of the intra- or retroperitoneal cavity leading to operative exploration. Injuries detected included: the spleen (two), colon (one), colonic mesentery (one), kidney (kidney), diaphragm (kidney), pneumothorax (seven), hemothorax (two), iliac artery (one), and traumatic abdominal wall hernia (two). In all patients, none had negative CT findings that failed observation. In this series, CT tractography is a safe and effective imaging strategy to evaluate posterior torso SW. It is unknown whether CT tractography is superior to traditional imaging modalities. Other uses for CT tractography may include determining trajectory from missile wounds and tangential penetrating injuries.

  2. The relationship of body mass index and abdominal fat on the radiation dose received during routine computed tomographic imaging of the abdomen and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Victoria O; McDermott, Shaunagh; Buckley, Orla; Allen, Sonya; Casey, Michael; O'Laoide, Risteard; Torreggiani, William C

    2012-11-01

    To determine the relationship of increasing body mass index (BMI) and abdominal fat on the effective dose acquired from computed tomography (CT) abdomen and pelvis scans. Over 6 months, dose-length product and total milliamp-seconds (mAs) from routine CT abdomen and pelvis scans of 100 patients were recorded. The scans were performed on a 64-slice CT scanner by using an automatic exposure control system. Effective dose (mSv) based on dose-length product, BMI, periumbilical fat thickness, and intra-abdominal fat were documented for each patient. BMI, periumbilical fat thickness, and intra-abdominal fat were compared with effective dose. Thirty-nine men and 61 women were included in the study (mean age, 56.3 years). The mean BMI was 26.2 kg/m(2). The mean effective dose was 10.3 mSv. The mean periumbilical fat thickness was 2.4 cm. Sixty-five patients had a small amount of intra-abdominal fat, and 35 had a large amount of intra-abdominal fat. The effective dose increased with increasing BMI (P < .001) and increasing amounts of intra-abdominal fat (P < .001). For every kilogram of weight, there is a 0.13 mSv increase in effective dose, which is equal to 6.5 chest radiographs per CT examination. For an increase in BMI by 5 kg/m(2), there is a 1.95 mSv increase in effective dose, which is equal to 97.5 chest radiographs per CT examination. Increasing BMI and abdominal fat significantly increases the effective dose received from CT abdomen and pelvis scans. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of pericardial effusions by echocardiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, David; Perlman, Gidon; Planer, David; Gilon, Dan; Berman, Philip; Bogot, Naama

    2011-01-15

    Echocardiography is a well-accepted tool for the diagnosis and quantification of pericardial effusion (PEff). Given the increasing use of computed tomographic (CT) scanning, more PEffs are being initially diagnosed by computed tomography. No study has compared quantification of PEff by computed tomography and echocardiography. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of quantification of PEff by 2-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography compared to the amount of pericardial fluid drained at pericardiocentesis. We retrospectively reviewed an institutional database to identify patients who underwent chest computed tomography and echocardiography before percutaneous pericardiocentesis with documentation of the amount of fluid withdrawn. Digital 2-dimensional echocardiographic and CT images were retrieved and quantification of PEff volume was performed by applying the formula for the volume of a prolate ellipse, π × 4/3 × maximal long-axis dimension/2 × maximal transverse dimension/2 × maximal anteroposterior dimension/2, to the pericardial sac and to the heart. Nineteen patients meeting study qualifications were entered into the study. The amount of PEff drained was 200 to 1,700 ml (mean 674 ± 340). Echocardiographically calculated pericardial effusion volume correlated relatively well with PEff volume (r = 0.73, p <0.001, mean difference -41 ± 225 ml). There was only moderate correlation between CT volume quantification and actual volume drained (r = 0.4, p = 0.004, mean difference 158 ± 379 ml). In conclusion, echocardiography appears a more accurate imaging technique than computed tomography in quantitative assessment of nonloculated PEffs and should continue to be the primary imaging in these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and computed tomography features of secondary renal hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Vanbrugghe, Benoît; Blond, Laurent; Carioto, Lisa; Carmel, Eric Norman; Nadeau, Marie-Eve

    2011-01-01

    An atypical case of secondary renal hyperparathyroidism was diagnosed in a 9-year-old miniature schnauzer after a skull computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of 2 bilateral and symmetrical soft tissue maxillary masses, and osteopenia of the skull. PMID:21532826

  5. Computed tomography: Will the slices reveal the truth

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Harish; Mohan, Abarajithan; Papisetti, Sravanthi; Ealla, Kranti K. R.

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in the field of imaging sciences, new methods have been developed in dental radiology. These include digital radiography, density analyzing methods, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging techniques, which provide high-resolution detailed images of oral structures. The current review aims to critically elaborate the use of CBCT in endodontics. PMID:27652253

  6. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers, component...

  7. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers, component...

  8. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers, component...

  9. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers, component...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... analysis and display equipment, patient and equipment supports, radionuclide anatomical markers, component...

  11. Computed tomography as a diagnostic aid for extracanal invasive resorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Kee-Deog; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Seung-Jong

    2003-07-01

    A case of multiple extracanal invasive resorption is reported. The patient had a history of hypothyroidism for approximately 1 yr before the dental visit. Utilization of computed tomography and a rapid prototyping tooth model in diagnosing the exact location and the size of the resorption area are discussed.

  12. RADIAL COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY OF AIR CONTAMINANTS USING OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes the application of an optical remote-sensing (ORS) system to map air contaminants and locate fugitive emissions. Many ORD systems may utilize radial non-overlapping beam geometry and a computed tomography (CT) algorithm to map the concentrations in a plane. In...

  13. Documentation of the ISA Micro Computed Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, William D.; Smith, Jerel A.

    2013-12-18

    This document is intended to provide information on the ISA Micro Computed Tomography (MicroCT) system that will be installed in Yavne, Israel. X-ray source, detector, and motion control hardware are specified as well as specimen platforms, containers, and reference material types. Most of the details on the system are derived from Reference 1 and 2.

  14. An Easily Assembled Laboratory Exercise in Computed Tomography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mylott, Elliot; Klepetka, Ryan; Dunlap, Justin C.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a laboratory activity in computed tomography (CT) primarily composed of a photogate and a rotary motion sensor that can be assembled quickly and partially automates data collection and analysis. We use an enclosure made with a light filter that is largely opaque in the visible spectrum but mostly transparent to the near…

  15. How to interpret computed tomography of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Mobasheri, R; Das, T; Vaidya, S; Mallik, S; El-Hussainy, M; Casey, A

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the spine has remained an important tool in the investigation of spinal pathology. This article helps to explain the basics of CT of the lumbar spine to allow the clinician better use of this diagnostic tool. PMID:25245727

  16. Recent Scientific Evidence and Technical Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Roy; Ruff, Christer; Burgstahler, Christof; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Geisler, Tobias; Schroeder, Stephen; Bamberg, Fabian

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, coronary computed tomography angiography has become an increasingly safe and noninvasive modality for the evaluation of the anatomical structure of the coronary artery tree with diagnostic benefits especially in patients with a low-to-intermediate pretest probability of disease. Currently, increasing evidence from large randomized diagnostic trials is accumulating on the diagnostic impact of computed tomography angiography for the management of patients with acute and stable chest pain syndrome. At the same time, technical advances have substantially reduced adverse effects and limiting factors, such as radiation exposure, the amount of iodinated contrast agent, and scanning time, rendering the technique appropriate for broader clinical applications. In this work, we review the latest developments in computed tomography technology and describe the scientific evidence on the use of cardiac computed tomography angiography to evaluate patients with acute and stable chest pain syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Usefulness of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for detection of a neuroblastic nodule in a ganglioneuroblastoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuka; Sano, Hideki; Kawano, Asuka; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuhisa; Kobayashi, Shogo; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Hosoya, Mitusuaki; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2018-05-03

    Ganglioneuroblastoma, nodular is defined as a composite tumor of biologically distinct clones. The peripheral neuroblastic tumors in this category are characterized by the presence of grossly visible neuroblastoma nodules coexisting with ganglioneuroblastoma, intermixed, or with ganglioneuroma. Making a correct diagnosis of ganglioneuroblastoma, nodular is often difficult by biopsy or partial tumor resection, because the neuroblastic nodule could be hidden and not sampled for pathological examination. We report a case of a Japanese boy aged 3 years, 8 months, with an unresectable abdominal tumor and elevated vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid levels. The initial biopsy was ganglioneuroma. However, after the second biopsy from a hidden neuroblastoma nodule that was clearly highlighted by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography, we reached the diagnosis of ganglioneuroblastoma, nodular. Because the nodule demonstrated neuroblastoma, differentiating subtype, with a low mitosis-karyorrhexis index (favorable histology) and nonamplified MYCN, the boy was treated according to the intermediate-risk protocol and is now alive and well 4 years after the diagnosis. This case illustrates the critical role of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for detecting a neuroblastoma nodule in a ganglioneuroblastoma.

  18. Clinical Utility of Preoperative Computed Tomography in Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bogani, Giorgio; Gostout, Bobbie S; Dowdy, Sean C; Multinu, Francesco; Casarin, Jvan; Cliby, William A; Frigerio, Luigi; Kim, Bohyun; Weaver, Amy L; Glaser, Gretchen E; Mariani, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical utility of routine preoperative pelvic and abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations in patients with endometrial cancer (EC). We retrospectively reviewed records from patients with EC who underwent a preoperative endometrial biopsy and had surgery at our institution from January 1999 through December 2008. In the subset with an abdominal CT scan obtained within 3 months before surgery, we evaluated the clinical utility of the CT scan. Overall, 224 patients (18%) had a preoperative endometrial biopsy and an available CT scan. Gross intra-abdominal disease was observed in 10% and 20% of patients with preoperative diagnosis of endometrioid G3 and type II EC, respectively, whereas less than 5% of patients had a preoperative diagnosis of hyperplasia or low-grade EC. When examining retroperitoneal findings, we observed that a negative CT scan of the pelvis did not exclude the presence of pelvic node metastasis. Alternately, a negative CT scan in the para-aortic area generally reduced the probability of finding para-aortic dissemination but with an overall low sensitivity (42%). However, the sensitivity for para-aortic dissemination was as high as 67% in patients with G3 endometrioid cancer. In the case of negative para-aortic nodes in the CT scan, the risk of para-aortic node metastases decreased from 18.8% to 7.5% in patients with endometrioid G3 EC. Up to 15% of patients with endometrioid G3 cancer had clinically relevant incidental findings that necessitated medical or surgical intervention. In patients with endometrioid G3 and type II EC diagnosed by the preoperative biopsy, CT scans may help guide the operative plan by facilitating preoperative identification of gross intra-abdominal disease and enlarged positive para-aortic nodes that are not detectable during physical examinations. In addition, CT may reveal other clinically relevant incidental findings.

  19. Role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Austin C; Warren, Lance A; Chang, Ted T; Embry, Scott; Hudson, Kathleen; Bradley, Yong C

    2013-09-01

    Although positron emission tomography (PET) imaging may not be used in the diagnosis of breast cancer, the use of PET/computed tomography is imperative in all aspects of breast cancer staging, treatment, and follow-up. PET will continue to be relevant in personalized medicine because accurate tumor status will be even more critical during and after the transition from a generic metabolic agent to receptor imaging. Positron emission mammography is an imaging proposition that may have benefits in lower doses, but its use is limited without new radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  1. Spent nuclear fuel assembly inspection using neutron computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Chad Lee

    The research presented here focuses on spent nuclear fuel assembly inspection using neutron computed tomography. Experimental measurements involving neutron beam transmission through a spent nuclear fuel assembly serve as benchmark measurements for an MCNP simulation model. Comparison of measured results to simulation results shows good agreement. Generation of tomography images from MCNP tally results was accomplished using adapted versions of built in MATLAB algorithms. Multiple fuel assembly models were examined to provide a broad set of conclusions. Tomography images revealing assembly geometric information including the fuel element lattice structure and missing elements can be obtained using high energy neutrons. A projection difference technique was developed which reveals the substitution of unirradiated fuel elements for irradiated fuel elements, using high energy neutrons. More subtle material differences such as altering the burnup of individual elements can be identified with lower energy neutrons provided the scattered neutron contribution to the image is limited. The research results show that neutron computed tomography can be used to inspect spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purpose of identifying anomalies such as missing elements or substituted elements. The ability to identify anomalies in spent fuel assemblies can be used to deter diversion of material by increasing the risk of early detection as well as improve reprocessing facility operations by confirming the spent fuel configuration is as expected or allowing segregation if anomalies are detected.

  2. F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Appearance of Extramedullary Hematopoesis in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old female with known primary myelofibrosis presented with shortness of breath. High Resolution Computed Tomography thorax revealed large heterogeneously enhancing extraparenchymal soft tissue density mass involving bilateral lung fields. F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography revealed mildly FDG avid soft tissue density mass with specks of calcification involving bilateral lung fields, liver, and spleen. Subsequent histopathologic evaluation from the right lung mass was suggestive of extramedullary hematopoesis. PMID:28533647

  3. Computed Tomography of the Normal Bovine Tarsus.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M; Brehm, W; Gerlach, K

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a detailed multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) anatomic reference for the bovine tarsus. The tarsal regions from twelve healthy adult cow cadavers were scanned in both soft and bone windows via a 16-slice multidetector CT scanner. Tarsi were frozen at -20 o C and sectioned to 10-mm-thick slices in transverse, dorsal and sagittal planes respecting the imaging protocol. The frozen sections were cleaned and then photographed. Anatomic structures were identified, labelled and compared with the corresponding CT images. The sagittal plane was indispensable for evaluation of bone contours, the dorsal plane was valuable in examination of the collateral ligaments, and both were beneficial for assessment of the tarsal joint articulations. CT images allowed excellent delineation between the cortex and medulla of bones, and the trabecular structure was clearly depicted. The tarsal soft tissues showed variable shades of grey, and the synovial fluid was the lowest attenuated structure. This study provided full assessment of the clinically relevant anatomic structures of the bovine tarsal joint. This technique may be of value when results from other diagnostic imaging techniques are indecisive. Images presented in this study should serve as a basic CT reference and assist in the interpretation of various bovine tarsal pathology. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Primary intestinal lymphangiectasia: Multiple detector computed tomography findings after direct lymphangiography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenbin; Chen, Xiaobai; Wen, Tingguo; Duan, Yongli; Wang, Rengui

    2017-10-01

    To analyse the findings of multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) after direct lymphangiography in primary intestinal lymphangiectasia (PIL). Fifty-five patients with PIL were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent MDCT after direct lymphangiography. The pathologies of 16 patients were confirmed by surgery and the remaining 39 patients were confirmed by gastroendoscopy and/or capsule endoscopy. After direct lymphangiography, MDCT found intra- and extraintestinal as well as lymphatic vessel abnormalities. Among the intra- and extraintestinal disorders, 49 patients had varying degrees of intestinal dilatation, 46 had small bowel wall thickening, 9 had pleural and pericardial effusions, 21 had ascites, 41 had mesenteric oedema, 20 had mesenteric nodules and 9 had abdominal lymphatic cysts. Features of lymphatic vessel abnormalities included intestinal trunk reflux (43.6%, n = 24), lumbar trunk reflux (89.1%, n = 49), pleural and pulmonary lymph reflux (14.5%, n = 8), pericardial and mediastinal lymph reflux (16.4%, n = 9), mediastinal and pulmonary lymph reflux (18.2%, n = 10), and thoracic duct outlet obstruction (90.9%, n = 50). Multiple detector computed tomography after direct lymphangiography provides a safe and accurate examination method and is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of PIL. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  5. Computed tomography arterial portography for assessment of portal vein injury after blunt hepatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chen-Ju; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Wang, Li-Jen; Chen, Huan-Wu; Ku, Yi-Kang; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wen; Kang, Shih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Intrahepatic portal vein injuries secondary to blunt abdominal trauma are difficult to diagnose and can result in insidious bleeding. We aimed to compare computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP), reperfusion CTAP (rCTAP), and conventional computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing portal vein injuries after blunt hepatic trauma. METHODS Patients with blunt hepatic trauma, who were eligible for nonoperative management, underwent CTAP, rCTAP, and CT. The number and size of perfusion defects observed using the three methods were compared. RESULTS A total of 13 patients (seven males/six females) with a mean age of 34.5±14.1 years were included in the study. A total of 36 hepatic segments had perfusion defects on rCTAP and CT, while there were 47 hepatic segments with perfusion defects on CTAP. The size of perfusion defects on CT (239 cm3; interquartile range [IQR]: 129.5, 309.5) and rCTAP (238 cm3; IQR: 129.5, 310.5) were significantly smaller compared with CTAP (291 cm3; IQR: 136, 371) (both, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Perfusion defects measured by CTAP were significantly greater than those determined by either rCTAP or CT in cases of blunt hepatic trauma. This finding suggests that CTAP is superior to rCTAP and CT in evaluating portal vein injuries after blunt liver trauma. PMID:26268303

  6. Computed tomography arterial portography for assessment of portal vein injury after blunt hepatic trauma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chen Ju; Wong, Yon Cheong; Tsang, Yuk Ming; Wang, Li Jen; Chen, Huan Wu; Ku, Yi Kang; Wu, Cheng Hsien; Chen, Huan Wen; Kang, Shih Ching

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic portal vein injuries secondary to blunt abdominal trauma are difficult to diagnose and can result in insidious bleeding. We aimed to compare computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP), reperfusion CTAP (rCTAP), and conventional computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing portal vein injuries after blunt hepatic trauma. Patients with blunt hepatic trauma, who were eligible for nonoperative management, underwent CTAP, rCTAP, and CT. The number and size of perfusion defects observed using the three methods were compared. A total of 13 patients (seven males/six females) with a mean age of 34.5±14.1 years were included in the study. A total of 36 hepatic segments had perfusion defects on rCTAP and CT, while there were 47 hepatic segments with perfusion defects on CTAP. The size of perfusion defects on CT (239 cm3; interquartile range [IQR]: 129.5, 309.5) and rCTAP (238 cm3; IQR: 129.5, 310.5) were significantly smaller compared with CTAP (291 cm3; IQR: 136, 371) (both, P = 0.002). Perfusion defects measured by CTAP were significantly greater than those determined by either rCTAP or CT in cases of blunt hepatic trauma. This finding suggests that CTAP is superior to rCTAP and CT in evaluating portal vein injuries after blunt liver trauma.

  7. Terahertz computed tomography of NASA thermal protection system materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. J.; Reyes-Rodriguez, S.; Zimdars, D. A.; Rauser, R. W.; Ussery, W. W.

    2012-05-01

    A terahertz (THz) axial computed tomography system has been developed that uses time domain measurements in order to form cross-sectional image slices and three dimensional volume renderings of terahertz-transparent materials. The system can inspect samples as large as 0.0283 m3 (1 ft3) with no safety concerns as for x-ray computed tomography. In this study, the THz-CT system was evaluated for its ability to detect and characterize 1) an embedded void in Space Shuttle external fuel tank thermal protection system (TPS) foam material and 2) impact damage in a TPS configuration under consideration for use in NASA's multi-purpose Orion crew module (CM). Micro-focus X-ray CT is utilized to characterize the flaws and provide a baseline for which to compare the THz CT results.

  8. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Methods: Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. Results: The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0

  9. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-04-05

    Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0.36 and -1.716 for liver, -0.153 and

  10. A Clinical Evaluation Of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY by Bryan James Behm, D.D.S. Lieutenant, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontic Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in...partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2016 Naval Postgraduate Dental School Unif01med

  11. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    the extent of dental caries . The radiographic image is essential to successfully diagnose pathosis of odontogenic and non-odontogenic origin. The...A CLINICAL EVALUATION OF CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY by Thomas Patrick Cairnll, D.D.S. Commander, Dental Corps United States Navy A thesis...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in

  12. Pathomorphism of spiral tibial fractures in computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    Spiral fractures of the tibia are virtually homogeneous with regard to their pathomorphism. The differences that are seen concern the level of fracture of the fibula, and, to a lesser extent, the level of fracture of the tibia, the length of fracture cleft, and limb shortening following the trauma. While conventional radiographs provide sufficient information about the pathomorphism of fractures, computed tomography can be useful in demonstrating the spatial arrangement of bone fragments and topography of soft tissues surrounding the fracture site. Multiple cross-sectional computed tomography views of spiral fractures of the tibia show the details of the alignment of bone chips at the fracture site, axis of the tibial fracture cleft, and topography of soft tissues that are not visible on standard radiographs. A model of a spiral tibial fracture reveals periosteal stretching with increasing spiral and longitudinal displacement. The cleft in tibial fractures has a spiral shape and its line is invariable. Every spiral fracture of both crural bones results in extensive damage to the periosteum and may damage bellies of the long flexor muscle of toes, flexor hallucis longus as well as the posterior tibial muscle. Computed tomography images of spiral fractures of the tibia show details of damage that are otherwise invisible on standard radiographs. Moreover, CT images provide useful information about the spatial location of the bone chips as well as possible threats to soft tissues that surround the fracture site. Every spiral fracture of the tibia is associated with disruption of the periosteum. 1. Computed tomography images of spiral fractures of the tibia show details of damage otherwise invisible on standard radiographs, 2. The sharp end of the distal tibial chip can damage the tibialis posterior muscle, long flexor muscles of the toes and the flexor hallucis longus, 3. Every spiral fracture of the tibia is associated with disruption of the periosteum.

  13. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  14. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws and geometric features were inspected using a 2-megavolt linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  15. Intranasal dexmedetomidine for sedation for pediatric computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Mekitarian Filho, Eduardo; Robinson, Fay; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Mason, Keira P

    2015-05-01

    This prospective observational pilot study evaluated the aerosolized intranasal route for dexmedetomidine as a safe, effective, and efficient option for infant and pediatric sedation for computed tomography imaging. The mean time to sedation was 13.4 minutes, with excellent image quality, no failed sedations, or significant adverse events. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01900405. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  17. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography–Computed Tomography in Disseminated Cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Singhal, Abhinav; Mallick, Saumya Ranjan; Tripathi, Madhavi; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis without pulmonary involvement is a very rare phenomenon. Patterns of organ involvement in cryptococcosis resemble various other infective conditions as well as malignant conditions on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography–computed tomography. We present a case of a 43-year-old male patient who had disseminated cryptococcosis. The rarity of the case being noninvolvement of lungs and meninges and resembling more like lymphoma due to the diffuse involvement of the lymph nodes on both sides of the diaphragm. PMID:29142368

  18. [Value of computer tomography in the managment of brain injuries].

    PubMed

    Keita, A D; Toure, M; Sissako, A; Doumbia, S; Coulibaly, Y; Doumbia, D; Kane, M; Diallo, A K; Toure, A A; Traore, I

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this prospective study conducted from January 2001 to December 2001 was to ascertain the value of computer tomography for evaluation of brain injuries. Computer tomography was performed using a Toshiba X VID system with contiguous 5 mm axial sections through the posterior fossa and 10 mm contiguous axial sections through the subtentorial region without contrast injection. A total of 107 patients with brain injuries were enrolled over the one-year study period. These patients accounted for 0.8% of all admissions to surgical emergency unit of Gabriel Toure Hospital in Bamako, Mali. The predominant age group for brain injuries was the 20- to 29-year-old group (35 cases). The male-to-female sex ratio was 5:1. Vehicular accident was the most frequent cause of brain injury (76 cases). Trauma was severe in 48 patients with a Glasgow score less than 8. Coma occurred immediately after injury in 90 cases. Ventricular hemorrhage led to coma in 100% of cases whereas brain hemorrhage and hematoma led to coma in 93.3% and 83.3% of cases respectively. Treatment was medical in 99 cases and neurosurgical in 8. The mortality rate was 34% and the morbidity rate (permanent sequels) was 36%. Computer tomography is a valuable tool for therapeutic decision-making in medico-surgical emergencies involving brain injuries.

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma within a horseshoe kidney with associated renal stones detected by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Imbriaco, Massimo; Iodice, Delfina; Erra, Paola; Terlizzi, Angela; Di Carlo, Rosanna; Di Vito, Concetta; Imbimbo, Ciro

    2011-07-01

    We describe a 69-year-old man who came to our observation with a history of persistent left flank abdominal pain, fever for several weeks, and a previous history of passing renal stones. Radiological examinations with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a solid mass within the left side of a horseshoe kidney, with associated large renal stones. The patient subsequently underwent partial left nephrectomy. The final diagnosis was consistent with squamous cell carcinoma arising in a horseshoe kidney, with associated renal stones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound and computed tomography of the iliosacral lymphatic centre in dogs with anal sac gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pollard, R E; Fuller, M C; Steffey, M A

    2017-06-01

    In this prospective study, we hypothesized that computed tomography (CT) would identify more normal and abnormal iliosacral lymph nodes (LNs) than abdominal ultrasound in dogs with anal sac gland carcinoma (ASGC). Twelve client-owned dogs with ASGC but without distant metastasis were enrolled. Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced CT scans of the abdomen were obtained. Iliosacral LNs were counted and assessed for location, laterality and size. Significantly (P < 0.00001) more iliosacral LNs were identified with CT (61) than ultrasound (30), including significantly (P = 0.00012) more medial iliac LNs with CT (33) than ultrasound (19). There was no difference in number of internal iliac LNs identified with CT versus ultrasound. Significantly (P = 0.000061) more sacral LNs were identified with CT (15) than ultrasound (0). Ultrasound identified slightly more (7) abnormal iliosacral LNs than CT (5). Contrast CT was able to identify more normal but not more abnormal LNs than ultrasound. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography evaluation of subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma and treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetskiy, Vadim R; Mukhortova, Olga V; Aslanidis, Irakli P; Klapper, Wolfram; Probatova, Natalya A

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is a very rare variant of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Currently, there is no standard imaging method for staging of SPTCL nor for assessment of treatment response. Here, we describe our use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for staging and monitoring of treatment response in 3 cases of SPTCL. Primary staging by PET/CT showed that all 3 patients had multiple foci in the subcutaneous fat tissue, with SUVmax from 10.5 to 14.6. Involvement of intra-abdominal fat with high SUVmax was identified in 2 of the patients. Use of the triple drug regimen of gemcitabine, cisplatin and methylprednisolone (commonly known as “GEM-P”) as first-line therapy or second-line therapy facilitated complete metabolic response for all 3 cases. FDG PET/CT provides valuable information for staging and monitoring of treatment response and can reveal occult involvement of the intra-abdominal visceral fat. High FDG uptake on pre-treatment PET can identify patients with aggressive disease and help in selection of first-line therapy. PMID:27672640

  2. Desmoid tumors of the abdominal wall: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Overhaus, Marcus; Decker, Pan; Fischer, Hans Peter; Textor, Hans Jochen; Hirner, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumors are slow growing deep fibromatoses with aggressive infiltration of adjacent tissue but without any metastatic potential. Case Presentation We report on two female patients with desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall who underwent primary resection. Both patients had a history of an earlier abdominal surgery. Preoperative evaluation included abdominal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The histology in both cases revealed a desmoid tumor. Conclusion Complete surgical resection is the first line management of this tumor entity. PMID:12890284

  3. Prediction of the distance from skin to epidural space for low-thoracic epidural catheter insertion by computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kao, M C; Tsai, S K; Chang, W K; Liu, H T; Hsieh, Y C; Hu, J S; Mok, M S

    2004-02-01

    It may be clinically useful to predict the depth of the epidural space. To investigate the accuracy of preoperative abdominal computed tomography (CT) in prediction of the distance for low-thoracic epidural insertion, a single group observational study was conducted in 30 male patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery requiring epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief. Using the paramedian approach, low-thoracic epidural insertion at T10-11 interspace was performed with a standardized procedure to obtain an actual insertion length (AIL). According to the principles of trigonometry, an estimated insertion length (EIL) was calculated as 1.26 times the distance from skin to epidural space measured from the preoperative abdominal CT. The mean (SD) EIL and AIL were 5.5 (0.7) and 5.1 (0.6) cm, respectively, with a significant correlation (r=0.899, P<0.01). The EIL tended to have a higher value than the AIL (0.4 (0.3) cm). There were significant correlations of both EIL and AIL with weight (P<0.01), BMI (P<0.01), and body fat percentage (P<0.01), but not with height (P>0.05). We conclude that the preoperative abdominal CT is helpful in prediction of the distance for low-thoracic epidural insertion using the paramedian approach.

  4. Computed tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings in adrenal candidiasis and histoplasmosis: two cases.

    PubMed

    Altinmakas, Emre; Guo, Ming; Kundu, Uma R; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Ng, Chaan

    2015-01-01

    We report the contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography findings in adrenal histoplasmosis and candidiasis. Both demonstrated bilateral hypermetabolic heterogeneous adrenal masses with limited wash-out on delayed CT. Adrenal candidiasis has not been previously reported, nor have the CT wash-out findings in either infection. The adrenal imaging findings are indistinguishable from malignancy, which is more common; but in this setting, physicians should be alert to the differential diagnosis of fungal infections, since it can be equally deadly. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Multi-GPU Jacobian Accelerated Computing for Soft Field Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Borsic, A.; Attardo, E. A.; Halter, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Image reconstruction in soft-field tomography is based on an inverse problem formulation, where a forward model is fitted to the data. In medical applications, where the anatomy presents complex shapes, it is common to use Finite Element Models to represent the volume of interest and to solve a partial differential equation that models the physics of the system. Over the last decade, there has been a shifting interest from 2D modeling to 3D modeling, as the underlying physics of most problems are three-dimensional. Though the increased computational power of modern computers allows working with much larger FEM models, the computational time required to reconstruct 3D images on a fine 3D FEM model can be significant, on the order of hours. For example, in Electrical Impedance Tomography applications using a dense 3D FEM mesh with half a million elements, a single reconstruction iteration takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes with optimized routines running on a modern multi-core PC. It is desirable to accelerate image reconstruction to enable researchers to more easily and rapidly explore data and reconstruction parameters. Further, providing high-speed reconstructions are essential for some promising clinical application of EIT. For 3D problems 70% of the computing time is spent building the Jacobian matrix, and 25% of the time in forward solving. In the present work, we focus on accelerating the Jacobian computation by using single and multiple GPUs. First, we discuss an optimized implementation on a modern multi-core PC architecture and show how computing time is bounded by the CPU-to-memory bandwidth; this factor limits the rate at which data can be fetched by the CPU. Gains associated with use of multiple CPU cores are minimal, since data operands cannot be fetched fast enough to saturate the processing power of even a single CPU core. GPUs have a much faster memory bandwidths compared to CPUs and better parallelism. We are able to obtain acceleration factors of

  6. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain; past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gans, Sarah L; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a diagnosis based solely on a patient’s medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests is not reliable enough, despite the fact that these aspects are essential parts of the workup of a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. Traditionally, imaging workup starts with abdominal radiography. However, numerous studies have demonstrated low sensitivity and accuracy for plain abdominal radiography in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain as well as various specific diseases such as perforated viscus, bowel obstruction, ingested foreign body, and ureteral stones. Computed tomography, and in particular computed tomography after negative ultrasonography, provides a better workup than plain abdominal radiography alone. The benefits of computed tomography lie in decision-making for management, planning of a surgical strategy, and possibly even avoidance of negative laparotomies. Based on abundant available evidence, major advances in diagnostic imaging, and changes in the management of certain diseases, we can conclude that there is no place for plain abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute abdominal pain presenting in the emergency department in current practice. PMID:22807640

  7. Computed tomography vs. digital radiography assessment for detection of osteolysis in asymptomatic patients with uncemented cups: a proposal for a new classification system based on computer tomography.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Buster; Crafoord, Joakim; Garellick, Göran; Carlsson, Lars; Weidenhielm, Lars; Olivecrona, Henrik

    2013-10-01

    Digital radiographic images in the anterior-posterior and lateral view have been gold standard for evaluation of peri-acetabular osteolysis for patients with an uncemented hip replacement. We compared digital radiographic images and computer tomography in detection of peri-acetabular osteolysis and devised a classification system based on computer tomography. Digital radiographs were compared with computer tomography on 206 hips, with a mean follow up 10 years after surgery. The patients had no clinical signs of osteolysis and none were planned for revision surgery. On digital radiographs, 192 cases had no osteolysis and only 14 cases had osteolysis. When using computer tomography there were 184 cases showing small or large osteolysis and only 22 patients had no osteolysis. A classification system for peri-acetabular osteolysis is proposed based on computer tomography that is easy to use on standard follow up evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of Lacrimal Sac Fossa Using Orbital Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwan; Park, Jinhwan; Na, Jaehoon; Lee, Hwa; Baek, Sehyun

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of measuring the lacrimal sac fossa length using orbital computed tomography in normal Koreans. The authors retrospectively evaluated 140 patients (70 males and 70 females) who underwent orbital computed tomography at Guro Hospital and who had no history of orbital disease or orbital trauma. Computed tomography scans of the right orbit, including the proportion of the lacrimal bone and maxillary bone that comprise the lacrimal sac fossa, were evaluated at 3 different axial planes (lower, middle, and upper levels). Additionally, the mid-point thickness and maximum thickness of the maxillary bone were measured. Finally, the authors also evaluated the relationship between nasal bone height and maxillary bone thickness in the lacrimal sac fossa. Maxillary bone thickness in the lacrimal sac fossa was thicker in males than in females at mid-point thickness and maximum thickness (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in the size of the lacrimal sac fossa and the proportion of the maxillary bone between males and females.In comparisons between maxillary cross-sections, bone thickness was greater toward the upper level of the lacrimal sac fossa (P = 0.008), and the proportion of the maxillary bone was also greater (P = 0.006).Aging had a significant positive correlation with maxillary bone thickness at all 3 axial planes (P < 0.05), but there was no relationship between age and maxillary bone proportion. Nasal bone height and maxillary bone thickness were also not significantly related. In comprising the lacrimal sac fossa, the maxillary bone accounted for a bigger proportion than the lacrimal bone. Male maxillary bone thickness was greater than female thickness. The authors also observed that maxillary bone thickness increased toward the upper areas of the lacrimal sac fossa and with increasing subject age. Understanding the form and variation of a normal lacrimal sac fossa is helpful for preparing for a

  9. Diagnosis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome by positron emission tomography/computed tomography: report of two cases treated by defibrotide.

    PubMed

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Bozec, Laurence; Bedossa, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal liver injury that mainly occurs after myeloablative chemotherapy. We report two cases of SOS investigated by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with defibrotide. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Improved patient size estimates for accurate dose calculations in abdomen computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Lae

    2017-07-01

    The radiation dose of CT (computed tomography) is generally represented by the CTDI (CT dose index). CTDI, however, does not accurately predict the actual patient doses for different human body sizes because it relies on a cylinder-shaped head (diameter : 16 cm) and body (diameter : 32 cm) phantom. The purpose of this study was to eliminate the drawbacks of the conventional CTDI and to provide more accurate radiation dose information. Projection radiographs were obtained from water cylinder phantoms of various sizes, and the sizes of the water cylinder phantoms were calculated and verified using attenuation profiles. The effective diameter was also calculated using the attenuation of the abdominal projection radiographs of 10 patients. When the results of the attenuation-based method and the geometry-based method shown were compared with the results of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, the effective diameter of the attenuation-based method was found to be similar to the effective diameter of the reconstructed-axial-CT-image-based method, with a difference of less than 3.8%, but the geometry-based method showed a difference of less than 11.4%. This paper proposes a new method of accurately computing the radiation dose of CT based on the patient sizes. This method computes and provides the exact patient dose before the CT scan, and can therefore be effectively used for imaging and dose control.

  11. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  12. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  13. Computed tomography of the azygo-oesophageal recess. Normal appearances.

    PubMed

    Lund, G; Lien, H H

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography of the azygo--oesophageal recess was performed in 85 normal subjects. The recess was convex towards the left or had an approximately straight left wall. Convexity towards the right did not occur. Localized bulges caused by the azygos vein, oesophagus and aorta were frequent. The recess became gradually deeper caudally in patients below 50 years of age. Above that age a marked posterior extension of the heart and a prevertebral position of the aorta often caused a localized shallowing at the level of the inferior pulmonary veins or the ventricles.

  14. THz computed tomography system with zero-order Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Liting; Wu, Qiao; Wang, Kejia; Liu, Jinsong; Yang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) waves can penetrate many optically opaque dielectric materials such as plastics, ceramics and colorants. It is effective to reveal the internal structures of these materials. We have built a THz Computed Tomography (CT) system with 0.3 THz zero-order Bessel beam to improve the depth of focus of this imaging system for the non-diffraction property of Bessel beam. The THz CT system has been used to detect a paper cup with a metal rod inside. Finally, the acquired projection data have been processed by the filtered back-projection algorithm and the reconstructed image of the sample has been obtained.

  15. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography: Image Acquisition, Processing, and Workflow.

    PubMed

    Megibow, Alec J; Kambadakone, Avinash; Ananthakrishnan, Lakshmi

    2018-07-01

    Dual energy computed tomography has been available for more than 10 years; however, it is currently on the cusp of widespread clinical use. The way dual energy data are acquired and assembled must be appreciated at the clinical level so that the various reconstruction types can extend its diagnostic power. The type of scanner that is present in a given practice dictates the way in which the dual energy data can be presented and used. This article compares and contrasts how dual source, rapid kV switching, and spectral technologies acquire and present dual energy reconstructions to practicing radiologists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The value of computed tomography in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.; Muhm, J.R.; Sheedy, P.F. II

    1983-01-01

    In a 5 year study, 19 patients with myasthenia gravis were studied by computed tomography (CT) and underwent thymectomy. CT was accurate in detecting the nine true thymic masses but could not differentiate thymomas from nonthymomatous masses, including thymic cysts. No thymoma was found in a patient under 25 years of age. In one case, the 18 sec scanner could not differentiate a large gland from a thymoma. In eight cases, glands with histologic thymic hyperplasia and histologically normal thymus appeared to be similar and could not be differentiated by CT.

  17. PRaVDA: High Energy Physics towards proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T.; PRaVDA Consortium

    2016-07-01

    Proton radiotherapy is an increasingly popular modality for treating cancers of the head and neck, and in paediatrics. To maximise the potential of proton radiotherapy it is essential to know the distribution, and more importantly the proton stopping powers, of the body tissues between the proton beam and the tumour. A stopping power map could be measured directly, and uncertainties in the treatment vastly reduce, if the patient was imaged with protons instead of conventional x-rays. Here we outline the application of technologies developed for High Energy Physics to provide clinical-quality proton Computed Tomography, in so reducing range uncertainties and enhancing the treatment of cancer.

  18. Trauma Patient with Fat Embolism Detected on Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Isabel; Janeiro, João; Campos, Paula; Távora, Isabel

    2017-01-31

    Fat embolism is frequent following fractures of long bones, however the development of the clinical syndrome of fat embolism (characterized by progressive respiratory distress, mental status depression and petechial rash) is rare, but relevant because of its potential severity. We report a case of a trauma patient with multiple fractures of the right lower limb in whom an emergency computed tomography scan showed fat emboli within the lumen of the homolateral common femoral vein. The imaging detection of macroscopic fat emboli should alert the clinician to the potential for subsequent fat embolism syndrome.

  19. X-Ray Computed Tomography of Tranquility Base Moon Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin S.; Garvin, Jim; Viens, Mike; Kent, Ryan; Munoz, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) was used for the first time on the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample number 10057.30, which had been previously maintained by the White House, then transferred back to NASA under the care of Goddard Space Flight Center. Results from this analysis show detailed images of the internal structure of the moon rock, including vesicles (pores), crystal needles, and crystal bundles. These crystals, possibly the common mineral ilmenite, are found in abundance and with random orientation. Future work, in particular a greater understanding of these crystals and their formation, may lead to a more in-depth understanding of the lunar surface evolution and mineral content.

  20. Computer Tomography Analysis of Fastrac Composite Thrust Chamber Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection has been integrated into the production process for NASA's Fastrac composite thrust chamber assemblies (TCAs). CT has been proven to be uniquely qualified to detect the known critical flaw for these nozzles, liner cracks that are adjacent to debonds between the liner and overwrap. CT is also being used as a process monitoring tool through analysis of low density indications in the nozzle overwraps. 3d reconstruction of CT images to produce models of flawed areas is being used to give program engineers better insight into the location and nature of nozzle flaws.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography: techniques and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Liu, Xin; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C; Qu, Mingliang; Christner, Jodie; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2011-01-01

    Despite universal consensus that computed tomography (CT) overwhelmingly benefits patients when used for appropriate indications, concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk of cancer induction from CT due to the exponentially increased use of CT in medicine. Keeping radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, consistent with the diagnostic task, remains the most important strategy for decreasing this potential risk. This article summarizes the general technical strategies that are commonly used for radiation dose management in CT. Dose-management strategies for pediatric CT, cardiac CT, dual-energy CT, CT perfusion and interventional CT are specifically discussed, and future perspectives on CT dose reduction are presented. PMID:22308169

  2. Precision Medicine and PET/Computed Tomography: Challenges and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    Precision Medicine is about selecting the right therapy for the right patient, at the right time, specific to the molecular targets expressed by disease or tumors, in the context of patient's environment and lifestyle. Some of the challenges for delivery of precision medicine in oncology include biomarkers for patient selection for enrichment-precision diagnostics, mapping out tumor heterogeneity that contributes to therapy failures, and early therapy assessment to identify resistance to therapies. PET/computed tomography offers solutions in these important areas of challenges and facilitates implementation of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ceftriaxone-associated pancreatitis captured on serial computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Nozomu; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yamane, Hiromichi; Honda, Yoshihiro; Nagasaki, Yasunari; Urata, Noriyo; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Takigawa, Nagio

    2018-02-01

    A 74-year-old man was treated with ceftriaxone for 5 days and subsequently experienced epigastric pain. Computed tomography (CT) was performed 7 and 3 days before epigastralgia. Although the first CT image revealed no radiographic signs in his biliary system, the second CT image revealed dense radiopaque material in the gallbladder lumen. The third CT image, taken at symptom onset, showed high density in the common bile duct and enlargement of the pancreatic head. This is a very rare case of pseudolithiasis involving the common bile duct, as captured on a series of CT images.

  4. Micro Computer Tomography for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, Florine; Zurbach, Raphael; Roggo, Yves

    2015-04-10

    Biomedical device and medicine product manufacturing are long processes facing global competition. As technology evolves with time, the level of quality, safety and reliability increases simultaneously. Micro Computer Tomography (Micro CT) is a tool allowing a deep investigation of products: it can contribute to quality improvement. This article presents the numerous applications of Micro CT for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis. The samples investigated confirmed CT suitability for verification of integrity, measurements and defect detections in a non-destructive manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Computed tomography of orbital tumors in the dog.

    PubMed

    LeCouteur, R A; Fike, J R; Scagliotti, R H; Cann, C E

    1982-04-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to investigate orbital tumors in 3 dogs. Tumors were clearly defined on transverse CT scans by their inherent density and gross distortion of normal orbital anatomy. Dorsal images synthesized from the original transverse scans were also used to visualize size and extent of tumors. Use of an iodinated contrast medium did not appear to improve localization of tumors in the orbit but was useful for identification of tumor extension into the calvaria. It was concluded that CT offered advantages over existing methods of radiographic diagnosis of orbital tumors and exophthalmos.

  6. Mixed spine metastasis detection through positron emission tomography/computed tomography synthesis and multiclassifier

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Sanoria, Vic; Summers, Ronald M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. Bone metastases are a frequent occurrence with cancer, and early detection can guide the patient’s treatment regimen. Metastatic bone disease can present in density extremes as sclerotic (high density) and lytic (low density) or in a continuum with an admixture of both sclerotic and lytic components. We design a framework to detect and characterize the varying spectrum of presentation of spine metastasis on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) data. A technique is proposed to synthesize CT and PET images to enhance the lesion appearance for computer detection. A combination of watershed, graph cut, and level set algorithms is first run to obtain the initial detections. Detections are then sent to multiple classifiers for sclerotic, lytic, and mixed lesions. The system was tested on 44 cases with 225 sclerotic, 139 lytic, and 92 mixed lesions. The results showed that sensitivity (false positive per patient) was 0.81 (2.1), 0.81 (1.3), and 0.76 (2.1) for sclerotic, lytic, and mixed lesions, respectively. It also demonstrates that using PET/CT data significantly improves the computer aided detection performance over using CT alone. PMID:28612036

  7. Neutron Radiography and Computed Tomography at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Raine, Dudley A. III; Hubbard, Camden R.; Whaley, Paul M.

    1997-12-31

    The capability to perform neutron radiography and computed tomography is being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility will be located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which has the highest steady state neutron flux of any reactor in the world. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP), versions 4A and 4B, has been used extensively in the design phase of the facility to predict and optimize the operating characteristics, and to ensure the safety of personnel working in and around the blockhouse. Neutrons are quite penetrating in most engineering materials and can be useful to detect internalmore » flaws and features. Hydrogen atoms, such as in a hydrocarbon fuel, lubricant or a metal hydride, are relatively opaque to neutron transmission. Thus, neutron based tomography or radiography is ideal to image their presence. The source flux also provides unparalleled flexibility for future upgrades, including real time radiography where dynamic processes can be observed. A novel tomography detector has been designed using optical fibers and digital technology to provide a large dynamic range for reconstructions. Film radiography is also available for high resolution imaging applications. This paper summarizes the results of the design phase of this facility and the potential benefits to science and industry.« less

  8. Pulmonary lobar volumetry using novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iwano, Shingo; Kitano, Mariko; Matsuo, Keiji; Kawakami, Kenichi; Koike, Wataru; Kishimoto, Mariko; Inoue, Tsutomu; Li, Yuanzhong; Naganawa, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To compare the accuracy of pulmonary lobar volumetry using the conventional number of segments method and novel volumetric computer-aided diagnosis using 3D computed tomography images. METHODS We acquired 50 consecutive preoperative 3D computed tomography examinations for lung tumours reconstructed at 1-mm slice thicknesses. We calculated the lobar volume and the emphysematous lobar volume < −950 HU of each lobe using (i) the slice-by-slice method (reference standard), (ii) number of segments method, and (iii) semi-automatic and (iv) automatic computer-aided diagnosis. We determined Pearson correlation coefficients between the reference standard and the three other methods for lobar volumes and emphysematous lobar volumes. We also compared the relative errors among the three measurement methods. RESULTS Both semi-automatic and automatic computer-aided diagnosis results were more strongly correlated with the reference standard than the number of segments method. The correlation coefficients for automatic computer-aided diagnosis were slightly lower than those for semi-automatic computer-aided diagnosis because there was one outlier among 50 cases (2%) in the right upper lobe and two outliers among 50 cases (4%) in the other lobes. The number of segments method relative error was significantly greater than those for semi-automatic and automatic computer-aided diagnosis (P < 0.001). The computational time for automatic computer-aided diagnosis was 1/2 to 2/3 than that of semi-automatic computer-aided diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS A novel lobar volumetry computer-aided diagnosis system could more precisely measure lobar volumes than the conventional number of segments method. Because semi-automatic computer-aided diagnosis and automatic computer-aided diagnosis were complementary, in clinical use, it would be more practical to first measure volumes by automatic computer-aided diagnosis, and then use semi-automatic measurements if automatic computer

  9. Inflammatory Pseudotumor-Like Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Spleen: Computed Tomography Imaging Characteristics in 5 Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumei; Shi, Zhenshan; You, Ruixiong; Li, Yueming; Cao, Dairong; Lin, Renjie; Huang, Xinming

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review the computed tomography (CT) and clinicopathological characteristics of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT)-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) of the spleen in 5 patients. Clinical, pathologic, and CT imaging findings of 5 patients with IPT-like FDCS of the spleen were reviewed and analyzed. Computed tomography imaging and pathologic features were compared. Abdominal unenhanced CT revealed a well-defined hypodense mass in the spleen with complex internal architecture with focal necrosis and/or speckle-strip calcification. On postcontrast CT, slightly delayed enhancement was observed in 5 cases. Four patients had a normalized spleen. The fourth patient had lung metastasis. The fifth patient had 2 relatively small lesions as well as metastases to the spine. Computed tomography imaging features of IPT-like FDCS of the spleen are distinctly different from other hypovascular splenic neoplasm; however, the definitive diagnosis requires further confirmation with needle biopsy or surgery. Inflammatory pseudotumor-like FDCS of the spleen should be suggested by using the CT imaging features of the splenic mass with evidence of metastatic disease.

  10. Automated selection of computed tomography display parameters using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Neu, Scott; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2001-07-01

    A collection of artificial neural networks (ANN's) was trained to identify simple anatomical structures in a set of x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. These neural networks learned to associate a point in an image with the anatomical structure containing the point by using the image pixels located on the horizontal and vertical lines that ran through the point. The neural networks were integrated into a computer software tool whose function is to select an index into a list of CT window/level values from the location of the user's mouse cursor. Based upon the anatomical structure selected by the user, the software tool automatically adjusts the image display to optimally view the structure.

  11. CatSim: a new computer assisted tomography simulation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Man, Bruno; Basu, Samit; Chandra, Naveen; Dunham, Bruce; Edic, Peter; Iatrou, Maria; McOlash, Scott; Sainath, Paavana; Shaughnessy, Charlie; Tower, Brendon; Williams, Eugene

    2007-03-01

    We present a new simulation environment for X-ray computed tomography, called CatSim. CatSim provides a research platform for GE researchers and collaborators to explore new reconstruction algorithms, CT architectures, and X-ray source or detector technologies. The main requirements for this simulator are accurate physics modeling, low computation times, and geometrical flexibility. CatSim allows simulating complex analytic phantoms, such as the FORBILD phantoms, including boxes, ellipsoids, elliptical cylinders, cones, and cut planes. CatSim incorporates polychromaticity, realistic quantum and electronic noise models, finite focal spot size and shape, finite detector cell size, detector cross-talk, detector lag or afterglow, bowtie filtration, finite detector efficiency, non-linear partial volume, scatter (variance-reduced Monte Carlo), and absorbed dose. We present an overview of CatSim along with a number of validation experiments.

  12. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction for industrial computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannier, M. W.; Knapp, R. H.; Gayou, D. E.; Sammon, N. P.; Butterfield, R. L.; Larson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Modern high resolution medical computed tomography (CT) scanners can produce geometrically accurate sectional images of many types of industrial objects. Computer software has been developed to convert serial CT scans into a three-dimensional surface form, suitable for display on the scanner itself. This software, originally developed for imaging the skull, has been adapted for application to industrial CT scanning, where serial CT scans thrrough an object of interest may be reconstructed to demonstrate spatial relationships in three dimensions that cannot be easily understood using the original slices. The methods of three-dimensional reconstruction and solid modeling are reviewed, and reconstruction in three dimensions from CT scans through familiar objects is demonstrated.

  13. Computed tomography image-guided surgery in complex acetabular fractures.

    PubMed

    Brown, G A; Willis, M C; Firoozbakhsh, K; Barmada, A; Tessman, C L; Montgomery, A

    2000-01-01

    Eleven complex acetabular fractures in 10 patients were treated by open reduction with internal fixation incorporating computed tomography image guided software intraoperatively. Each of the implants placed under image guidance was found to be accurate and without penetration of the pelvis or joint space. The setup time for the system was minimal. Accuracy in the range of 1 mm was found when registration was precise (eight cases) and was in the range of 3.5 mm when registration was only approximate (three cases). Added benefits included reduced intraoperative fluoroscopic time, less need for more extensive dissection, and obviation of additional surgical approaches in some cases. Compared with a series of similar fractures treated before this image guided series, the reduction in operative time was significant. For patients with complex anterior and posterior combined fractures, the average operation times with and without application of three-dimensional imaging technique were, respectively, 5 hours 15 minutes and 6 hours 14 minutes, revealing 16% less operative time for those who had surgery using image guidance. In the single column fracture group, the operation time for those with three-dimensional imaging application, was 2 hours 58 minutes and for those with traditional surgery, 3 hours 42 minutes, indicating 20% less operative time for those with imaging modality. Intraoperative computed tomography guided imagery was found to be an accurate and suitable method for use in the operative treatment of complex acetabular fractures with substantial displacement.

  14. Quantitative features in the computed tomography of healthy lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Fromson, B H; Denison, D M

    1988-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether quantitative features of lung computed tomography scans could be identified that would lead to a tightly defined normal range for use in assessing patients. Fourteen normal subjects with apparently healthy lungs were studied. A technique was developed for rapid and automatic extraction of lung field data from the computed tomography scans. The Hounsfield unit histograms were constructed and, when normalised for predicted lung volumes, shown to be consistent in shape for all the subjects. A three dimensional presentation of the data in the form of a "net plot" was devised, and from this a logarithmic relationship between the area of each lung slice and its mean density was derived (r = 0.9, n = 545, p less than 0.0001). The residual density, calculated as the difference between measured density and density predicted from the relationship with area, was shown to be normally distributed with a mean of 0 and a standard deviation of 25 Hounsfield units (chi 2 test: p less than 0.05). A presentation combining this residual density with the net plot is described. PMID:3353883

  15. Use of cone beam computed tomography in periodontology

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Buket; Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of periodontal disease mainly depends on clinical signs and symptoms. However, in the case of bone destruction, radiographs are valuable diagnostic tools as an adjunct to the clinical examination. Two dimensional periapical and panoramic radiographs are routinely used for diagnosing periodontal bone levels. In two dimensional imaging, evaluation of bone craters, lamina dura and periodontal bone level is limited by projection geometry and superpositions of adjacent anatomical structures. Those limitations of 2D radiographs can be eliminated by three-dimensional imaging techniques such as computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) generates 3D volumetric images and is also commonly used in dentistry. All CBCT units provide axial, coronal and sagittal multi-planar reconstructed images without magnification. Also, panoramic images without distortion and magnification can be generated with curved planar reformation. CBCT displays 3D images that are necessary for the diagnosis of intra bony defects, furcation involvements and buccal/lingual bone destructions. CBCT applications provide obvious benefits in periodontics, however; it should be used only in correct indications considering the necessity and the potential hazards of the examination. PMID:24876918

  16. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R B

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice - from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors' clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled.

  17. Fundamentals of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT, also referred to as C-arm computed tomography [CT], cone beam volume CT, or flat panel CT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray CT where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone.[1] CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. CBCT is capable of providing sub-millimeter resolution in images of high diagnostic quality, with short scanning times (10–70 s) and radiation dosages reportedly up to 15–100 times lower than those of conventional CT scans. Increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. The aim of this article is to sensitize the Prosthodontist to CBCT technology, provide an overview of currently available maxillofacial CBCT systems and review the specific application of various CBCT display modes to clinical Prosthodontic practice. A MEDLINE search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:26929479

  18. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  19. Paradigm of pretest risk stratification before coronary computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Ovrehus, Kristian A; Nielsen, Lene H; Jensen, Jesper K; Larsen, Henrik M; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2009-01-01

    The optimal method of determining the pretest risk of coronary artery disease as a patient selection tool before coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is unknown. We investigated the ability of 3 different clinical risk scores to predict the outcome of coronary MDCT. This was a retrospective study of 551 patients consecutively referred for coronary MDCT on a suspicion of coronary artery disease. Diamond-Forrester, Duke, and Morise risk models were used to predict coronary artery stenosis (>50%) as assessed by coronary MDCT. The models were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The distribution of low-, intermediate-, and high-risk persons, respectively, was established and compared for each of the 3 risk models. Overall, all risk prediction models performed equally well. However, the Duke risk model classified the low-risk patients more correctly than did the other models (P < 0.01). In patients without coronary artery calcification (CAC), the predictive value of the Duke risk model was superior to the other risk models (P < 0.05). Currently available risk prediction models seem to perform better in patients without CAC. Between the risk prediction models, there was a significant discrepancy in the distribution of patients at low, intermediate, or high risk (P < 0.01). The 3 risk prediction models perform equally well, although the Duke risk score may have advantages in subsets of patients. The choice of risk prediction model affects the referral pattern to MDCT. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Applications of cone beam computed tomography for a prosthodontist

    PubMed Central

    John, George Puthenpurayil; Joy, Tatu Elenjickal; Mathew, Justin; Kumar, Vinod R. B.

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a medical imaging technique of X-ray computed tomography where the X-rays are divergent, forming a cone. CBCT systems have been designed for imaging hard tissues of the maxillofacial region. The increasing availability of this technology provides the dental clinician with an imaging modality capable of providing a three-dimensional representation of the maxillofacial skeleton with minimal distortion. This article is intended to elaborate and enunciate on the various applications and benefits of CBCT, in the realm of maxillofacial prosthodontics, over and beyond its obvious benefits in the rehabilitation of patients with implants. With the onus of meticulous reconstruction of near ideal occlusion resting on the prosthodontist, CBCT provides a unique imaging option, which can be a boon in various aspects of prosthodontic practice – from imaging of the temporomandibular joint for accurate movement simulation, to template assisted maxillofacial reconstruction or even over denture therapy. CBCT could play a crucial role in lessening the burden of a hectic prosthodontic routine for the clinician and critically contribute to accurate and effective treatment for the patient. Apart from the authors’ clinical experiences shared here, a web-based search for relevant articles in this specific area of interest was also conducted. The selected articles were critically reviewed and the data acquired were systematically compiled. PMID:27134420

  1. Estimation of feline renal volume using computed tomography and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Reid; Logsdon, Stacy A; Werre, Stephen R; Daniel, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    Renal volume estimation is an important parameter for clinical evaluation of kidneys and research applications. A time efficient, repeatable, and accurate method for volume estimation is required. The purpose of this study was to describe the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for estimating feline renal volume. Standardized ultrasound and CT scans were acquired for kidneys of 12 cadaver cats, in situ. Ultrasound and CT multiplanar reconstructions were used to record renal length measurements that were then used to calculate volume using the prolate ellipsoid formula for volume estimation. In addition, CT studies were reconstructed at 1 mm, 5 mm, and 1 cm, and transferred to a workstation where the renal volume was calculated using the voxel count method (hand drawn regions of interest). The reference standard kidney volume was then determined ex vivo using water displacement with the Archimedes' principle. Ultrasound measurement of renal length accounted for approximately 87% of the variability in renal volume for the study population. The prolate ellipsoid formula exhibited proportional bias and underestimated renal volume by a median of 18.9%. Computed tomography volume estimates using the voxel count method with hand-traced regions of interest provided the most accurate results, with increasing accuracy for smaller voxel sizes in grossly normal kidneys (-10.1 to 0.6%). Findings from this study supported the use of CT and the voxel count method for estimating feline renal volume in future clinical and research studies. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  2. X-ray computed tomography using curvelet sparse regularization.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Matthias; Frikel, Jürgen; Vogel, Jakob; Eggl, Elena; Kopp, Felix; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz; Demaret, Laurent; Lasser, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Reconstruction of x-ray computed tomography (CT) data remains a mathematically challenging problem in medical imaging. Complementing the standard analytical reconstruction methods, sparse regularization is growing in importance, as it allows inclusion of prior knowledge. The paper presents a method for sparse regularization based on the curvelet frame for the application to iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography. In this work, the authors present an iterative reconstruction approach based on the alternating direction method of multipliers using curvelet sparse regularization. Evaluation of the method is performed on a specifically crafted numerical phantom dataset to highlight the method's strengths. Additional evaluation is performed on two real datasets from commercial scanners with different noise characteristics, a clinical bone sample acquired in a micro-CT and a human abdomen scanned in a diagnostic CT. The results clearly illustrate that curvelet sparse regularization has characteristic strengths. In particular, it improves the restoration and resolution of highly directional, high contrast features with smooth contrast variations. The authors also compare this approach to the popular technique of total variation and to traditional filtered backprojection. The authors conclude that curvelet sparse regularization is able to improve reconstruction quality by reducing noise while preserving highly directional features.

  3. Acute Perforated Diverticulitis: Assessment With Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Barbara; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Pinto, Antonio; Trinci, Margherita; Miele, Vittorio

    2016-02-01

    Colonic diverticulitis is a common condition in the western population. Complicated diverticulitis is defined as the presence of extraluminal air or abscess, peritonitis, colon occlusion, or fistulas. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and the staging of diverticulitis and its complications, which enables performing an accurate differential diagnosis and addressing the patients to a correct management. MDCT is accurate in diagnosing the site of perforation in approximately 85% of cases, by the detection of direct signs (focal bowel wall discontinuity, extraluminal gas, and extraluminal enteric contrast) and indirect signs, which are represented by segmental bowel wall thickening, abnormal bowel wall enhancement, perivisceral fat stranding of fluid, and abscess. MDCT is accurate in the differentiation from complicated colon diverticulitis and colon cancer, often with a similar imaging. The computed tomography-guided classification is recommended to discriminate patients with mild diverticulitis, generally treated with antibiotics, from those with severe diverticulitis with a large abscess, which may be drained with a percutaneous approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Breast ultrasound computed tomography using waveform inversion with source encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Matthews, Thomas; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the speed-of-sound distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Computer-simulation studies are conducted to demonstrate the use of the WISE method. Using a single graphics processing unit card, each iteration can be completed within 25 seconds for a 128 × 128 mm2 reconstruction region. The results suggest that the WISE method maintains the high spatial resolution of waveform inversion methods while significantly reducing the computational burden.

  5. Observation of the pulp horn by swept source optical coherence tomography and cone beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Toshihiko; Hanada, Takahiro; Ebihara, Arata; Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sumi, Yasunori; Suda, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is one of the most useful diagnostic techniques in dentistry but it involves ionizing radiation, while swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has been introduced recently as a nondestructive, real-time, high resolution imaging technique using low-coherence interferometry, which involves no ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of SS-OCT to detect the pulp horn (PH) in comparison with that of CBCT. Ten extracted human mandibular molars were used. After horizontally removing a half of the tooth crown, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was measured using microfocus computed tomography (Micro CT) (SL) as the gold standard, by CBCT (CL) and by SS-OCT (OL). In the SS-OCT images, only when PH was observed beneath the overlying dentin, the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH was recorded. If the pulp was exposed, it was defined as pulp exposure (PE). The results obtained by the above three methods were statistically analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient at a significance level of p < 0.01. SS-OCT detected the presence of PH when the distance from the cut dentin surface to PH determined by SL was 2.33 mm or less. Strong correlations of the measured values were found between SL and CL (r=0.87), SL and OL (r=0.96), and CL and OL (r=0.86). The results showed that SS-OCT images correlated closely with CBCT images, suggesting that SS-OCT can be a useful tool for the detection of PH.

  6. Discrepancies between leg-to-leg bioelectrical Impedance analysis and computerized tomography in abdominal visceral fat measurement.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hsueh-Kuan; Chen, Yu-Yawn; Yeh, Chinagwen; Chuang, Chih-Lin; Chiang, Li-Ming; Lai, Chung-Liang; Casebolt, Kevin M; Huang, Ai-Chun; Lin, Wen-Long; Hsieh, Kuen-Chang

    2017-08-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate leg-to-leg bioelectrical impedance analysis (LBIA) using a four-contact electrode system for measuring abdominal visceral fat area (VFA). The present study recruited 381 (240 male and 141 female) Chinese participants to compare VFA measurements estimated by a standing LBIA system (VFALBIA) with computerized tomography (CT) scanned at the L4-L5 vertebrae (VFA CT ). The total mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.7 ± 4.2 kg/m 2 . Correlation analysis, regression analysis, Bland-Altman plot, and paired sample t-tests were used to analyze the accuracy of the VFA LBIA . For the total subjects, the regression line was VFA LBIA  = 0.698 VFA CT  + 29.521, (correlation coefficient (r) = 0.789, standard estimate of error (SEE) = 24.470 cm 2 , p < 0.001), Lin's correlation coefficient (CCC) was 0.785; and the limit of agreement (LOA; mean difference ±2 standard deviation) ranged from -43.950 to 67.951 cm 2 , LOA% (given as a percentage of mean value measured by the CT) was 48.2%. VFA LBIA and VFA CT showed significant difference (p < 0.001). Collectively, the current study indicates that LBIA has limited potential to accurately estimate visceral fat in a clinical setting.

  7. Blunt trauma of bone structures of the chest--computed tomography vs multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Kosta; Turkalj, Ivan; Stojanović, Sanja; Vucaj-Cirilović, Viktorija; Nikolić, Olivera; Stojiljković, Dragana

    2013-08-01

    Computerized tomography (CT), especially multidetector CT (MDCT), has had a revolutionary impact in diagnostic in traumatized patients. The aim of the study was to identify and compare the frequency of injuries to bone structures of the thorax displayed with 5-mm-thick axial CT slices and thin-slice (MDCT) examination with the use of 3D reconstructions, primarily multiplanar reformations (MPR). This prospective study included 61 patients with blunt trauma submitted to CT scan of the thorax as initial assessment. The two experienced radiologists inde pendently and separately described the findings for 5-mm-thick axial CT slices (5 mm CT) as in monoslice CT examination; MPR and other 3D reconstructions along with thin-slice axial sections which were available in modern MDCT technologies. After describing thin-slice examination in case of disagreement in the findings, the examiners redescribed thin-slice examination together which was ultimately considered as a real, true finding. No statistically significant difference in interobserver evaluation of 5 mm CT examination was recorded (p > 0.05). Evaluation of fractures of sternum with 5 mm CT and MDCT showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in favor of better display of injury by MDCT examination. MDCT is a powerful diagnostic tool that can describe higher number of bone fractures of the chest in traumatized patients compared to 5 mm CT, especially in the region of sternum for which a statistical significance was obtained using MPR. Moreover, the importance of MDCT is also set by easier and more accurate determination of the level of bone injury.

  8. Imaging of the midpalatal suture in a porcine model: flat-panel volume computed tomography compared with multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Wolfram; Fricke-Zech, Susanne; Fialka-Fricke, Julia; Dullin, Christian; Zapf, Antonia; Gruber, Rudolf; Sennhenn-kirchner, Sabine; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza

    2009-09-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the image quality of prototype flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) and multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of suture structures. Bone samples were taken from the midpalatal suture of 5 young (16 weeks) and 5 old (200 weeks) Sus scrofa domestica and fixed in formalin solution. An fpVCT prototype and an MSCT were used to obtain images of the specimens. The facial reformations were assessed by 4 observers using a 1 (excellent) to 5 (poor) rating scale for the weighted criteria visualization of the suture structure. A linear mixed model was used for statistical analysis. Results with P < .05 were considered to be statistically significant. The visualization of the suture of young specimens was significantly better than that of older animals (P < .001). The visualization of the suture with fpVCT was significantly better than that with MSCT (P < .001). Compared with MSCT, fpVCT produces superior results in the visualization of the midpalatal suture in a Sus scrofa domestica model.

  9. The diagnostic value of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for severe sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tofuku, Katsuhiro; Koga, Hiroaki; Komiya, Setsuro

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the value of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction. SPECT/CT was performed in 32 patients with severe SIJ dysfunction, who did not respond to 1-year conservative treatment and had a score of >4 points on a 10-cm visual analog scale. We investigated the relationship between the presence of severe SIJ dysfunction and tracer accumulation, as confirmed by SPECT/CT. In cases of bilateral SIJ dysfunction, we also compared the intensity of tracer accumulation on each side. Moreover, we examined the relationship between the intensity of tracer accumulation and the different treatments the patients subsequently received. All 32 patients with severe SIJ dysfunction had tracer accumulation with a standardized uptake value (SUV) of >2.2 (mean SUV 4.7). In the 19 patients with lateralized symptom intensity, mean SUVs of the dominant side were significantly higher than those of the nondominant side. In 10 patients with no lateralization, the difference in the SUVs between sides was <0.6. Patients exhibiting higher levels of tracer accumulation required more advanced treatment. Patients with higher levels of tracer accumulation had greater symptom severity and also required more advanced treatment. Thus, we believe that SPECT/CT may be a suitable supplementary diagnostic modality for SIJ dysfunction as well as a useful technique for predicting the prognosis of this condition.

  10. Estimation of computed tomography dose index in cone beam computed tomography: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry; Toncheva, Greta; Yoo, Sua; Yin, Fang-Fang; Frush, Donald

    2010-05-01

    To address the lack of accurate dose estimation method in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), we performed point dose metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) was employed to measure point doses in the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) CT phantoms with MOSFETs for standard and low dose modes. A MC model of the OBI x-ray tube was developed using BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system and validated by the half value layer, x-ray spectrum and lateral and depth dose profiles. We compared the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) between MOSFET measurements and MC simulations. The CTDIw was found to be 8.39 cGy for the head scan and 4.58 cGy for the body scan from the MOSFET measurements in standard dose mode, and 1.89 cGy for the head and 1.11 cGy for the body in low dose mode, respectively. The CTDIw from MC compared well to the MOSFET measurements within 5% differences. In conclusion, a MC model for Varian CBCT has been established and this approach may be easily extended from the CBCT geometry to multi-detector CT geometry.

  11. Radiolabeling, whole-body single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography imaging, and pharmacokinetics of carbon nanohorns in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Jasim, Dhifaf A; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Nunes, Antonio; Iijima, Sumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yudasaka, Masako; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report that the biodistribution and excretion of carbon nanohorns (CNHs) in mice are dependent on their size and functionalization. Small-sized CNHs (30–50 nm; S-CNHs) and large-sized CNHs (80–100 nm; L-CNHs) were chemically functionalized and radiolabeled with [111In]-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and intravenously injected into mice. Their tissue distribution profiles at different time points were determined by single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography. The results showed that the S-CNHs circulated longer in blood, while the L-CNHs accumulated faster in major organs like the liver and spleen. Small amounts of S-CNHs- and L-CNHs were excreted in urine within the first few hours postinjection, followed by excretion of smaller quantities within the next 48 hours in both urine and feces. The kinetics of excretion for S-CNHs were more rapid than for L-CNHs. Both S-CNH and L-CNH material accumulated mainly in the liver and spleen; however, S-CNH accumulation in the spleen was more prominent than in the liver. PMID:27524892

  12. Assessing stapes piston position using computed tomography: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yoav; Diaz, Rodney; Hartman, Jonathan; Bobinski, Matthew; Brodie, Hilary

    2009-02-01

    Temporal bone computed tomographic (CT) scanning in the postoperative stapedotomy patient is inaccurate in assessing stapes piston position within the vestibule. Poststapedotomy patients that have persistent vertigo may undergo CT scanning to assess the position of the stapes piston within the vestibule to rule out overly deep insertion. Vertigo is a recognized complication of the deep piston, and CT evaluation is often recommended. The accuracy of CT scan in this setting is unestablished. Stapedotomy was performed on 12 cadaver ears, and stainless steel McGee pistons were placed. The cadaver heads were then scanned using a fine-cut temporal bone protocol. Temporal bone dissection was performed with microscopic measurement of the piston depth in the vestibule. These values were compared with depth of intravestibular penetration measured on CT scan by 4 independent measurements. The intravestibular penetration as assessed by computed tomography was consistently greater than the value found on cadaveric anatomic dissection. The radiographic bias was greater when piston location within the vestibule was shallower. The axial CT scan measurement was 0.53 mm greater, on average, than the anatomic measurement. On average, the coronal CT measurement was 0.68 mm greater than the anatomic measurement. The degree of overestimation of penetration, however, was highly inconsistent. Standard temporal bone CT scan is neither an accurate nor precise examination of stapes piston depth within the vestibule. We found that CT measurement consistently overstated intravestibular piston depth. Computed tomography is not a useful study in the evaluation of piston depth for poststapedectomy vertigo and is of limited value in this setting.

  13. Impedance computed tomography using an adaptive smoothing coefficient algorithm.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Uchiyama, A

    2001-01-01

    In impedance computed tomography, a fixed coefficient regularization algorithm has been frequently used to improve the ill-conditioning problem of the Newton-Raphson algorithm. However, a lot of experimental data and a long period of computation time are needed to determine a good smoothing coefficient because a good smoothing coefficient has to be manually chosen from a number of coefficients and is a constant for each iteration calculation. Thus, sometimes the fixed coefficient regularization algorithm distorts the information or fails to obtain any effect. In this paper, a new adaptive smoothing coefficient algorithm is proposed. This algorithm automatically calculates the smoothing coefficient from the eigenvalue of the ill-conditioned matrix. Therefore, the effective images can be obtained within a short computation time. Also the smoothing coefficient is automatically adjusted by the information related to the real resistivity distribution and the data collection method. In our impedance system, we have reconstructed the resistivity distributions of two phantoms using this algorithm. As a result, this algorithm only needs one-fifth the computation time compared to the fixed coefficient regularization algorithm. When compared to the fixed coefficient regularization algorithm, it shows that the image is obtained more rapidly and applicable in real-time monitoring of the blood vessel.

  14. Risk Assessment of Abdominal Wall Thickness Measured on Pre-Operative Computerized Tomography for Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Chatthamrak, Putipan; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2015-07-01

    The surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of abdominal operation. It relates to increased hospital stay, increased healthcare cost, and decreased patient's quality of life. Obesity, usually defined by BMI, is known as one of the risks of SSI. However, the thickness of subcutaneous layers of abdominal wall might be an important local factor affecting the rate of SSI after the abdominal operations. The objective of this study is to assess the importance of the abdominal wall thickness on incisional SSI rate. The subjects of the present study were patients who had undergone major abdominal operations at Thammasat University Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014, and had been investigated with CT scans before their operations. The demographic data and clinical information of these patients were recorded. The thickness ofsubcutaneous fatty tissue from skin down to the most superficial layer of abdominal wall muscle at the surgical site was measured on CT images. The wound infectious complication was reviewed and categorized as superficial and deep incisional SSIfollowing the definition from Centersfor Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. The significance ofeach potentialfactors on SSI rates was determined separately with student t-test for quantitative data and χ2-test for categorical data. Then all factors, which had p < 0.10, were included into the multivariate logistic regression analysis and were analyzed with significance at p < 0.05. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were included in this study. They all underwent major abdominal surgery and had had pre-operative CTscans. Post-operative SSI was 25.2% (35/139), superficial and deep types in 27 and 8 patients, respectively. The comparison of abdominal wall thickness between patients with and without infection was significantly different (20.0 ± 8.4 mm and 16.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively). When the thickness at 20 mm was used as the cut-off value, 43 of 139 patients had abdominal wall

  15. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  16. The role of positron emission tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography in thyroid tumours: an overview.

    PubMed

    Treglia, Giorgio; Muoio, Barbara; Giovanella, Luca; Salvatori, Massimo

    2013-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) with different tracers have been increasingly used in patients with thyroid tumours. The aim of this article is to perform an overview based on literature data about the usefulness of PET imaging in this setting. The role of Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET and PET/CT in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) is well established, particularly in patients presenting with elevated serum thyroglobulin levels and negative radioiodine whole-body scan. Iodine-124 PET and PET/CT may serve a role in staging DTC and obtaining lesional dosimetry for a better and more rationale planning of treatment with Iodine-131. FDG-PET and PET/CT are useful in the post-thyroidectomy staging of high-risk patients with less differentiated histological subtypes. PET and PET/CT with different tracers seem to be useful methods in localizing the source of elevated calcitonin levels in patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma. Incorporation of FDG-PET or PET/CT into the initial workup of patients with indeterminate thyroid nodules at fine needle aspiration biopsy deserves further investigation. FDG-PET report should suggest further evaluation when focal thyroid incidentalomas are described because these findings are associated with a significant risk of cancer.

  17. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of transducer arrays for ultrasound-computer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotzka, Rainer; Gobel, Georg; Schlote-Holubek, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Ultrasound computer-tomography (USCT) is a novel ultrasound imaging method capable of producing volume images with both high spatial and temporal resolution. Several thousand ultrasound transducers are arranged in a cylindrical array around a tank containing the object to be examined coupled by water. Every single transducer is small enough to emit an almost spherical sound-wave. While one transducer is transmitting, all others receive simultaneously. Our experimental setup, using only a few transducers simulating a ring-shaped geometry, showed even nylon threads (0.1 mm) with an image quality superior to clinical in-use ultrasound scanners. In order to build a complete circular array several thousand transducers, with cylindrical sound field characteristics, are needed. Since such transducer arrays are hardly available and expensive, we developed inexpensive transducer arrays consisting of 8 elements. Each array is based on a plate of lead titanate zirconate ceramics (PZT) sawn into 8 elements of 0.3 mm width, 3.8 mm height and 0.5 mm pitch. Each element has a mean frequency of 3.8 MHz and can be triggered separately. The main challenge was the development of production steps with reproducible results. Our transducer arrays show only small variances in the sound field characteristics which are strongly required for ultrasound tomography.

  19. Quantifying the debonding of inclusions through tomography and computational homology.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Johnson, George C.; Mota, Alejandro

    2010-09-01

    This report describes a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to use of synchrotron-radiation computed tomography (SRCT) data to determine the conditions and mechanisms that lead to void nucleation in rolled alloys. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has provided SRCT data of a few specimens of 7075-T7351 aluminum plate (widely used for aerospace applications) stretched to failure, loaded in directions perpendicular and parallel to the rolling direction. The resolution of SRCT data is 900nm, which allows elucidation of the mechanisms governing void growth and coalescence. This resolution is not fine enough, however, formore » nucleation. We propose the use statistics and image processing techniques to obtain sub-resolution scale information from these data, and thus determine where in the specimen and when during the loading program nucleation occurs and the mechanisms that lead to it. Quantitative analysis of the tomography data, however, leads to the conclusion that the reconstruction process compromises the information obtained from the scans. Alternate, more powerful reconstruction algorithms are needed to address this problem, but those fall beyond the scope of this project.« less

  20. X-ray computed tomography applied to investigate ancient manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettuzzi, Matteo; Albertin, Fauzia; Brancaccio, Rosa; Casali, Franco; Pia Morigi, Maria; Peccenini, Eva

    2017-03-01

    I will describe in this paper the first results of a series of X-ray tomography applications, with different system setups, running on some ancient manuscripts containing iron-gall ink. The purpose is to verify the optimum measurement conditions with a laboratory instrumentation -that is also in fact portable- in order to recognize the text from the inside of the documents, without opening them. This becomes possible by exploiting the X-rays absorption contrast of iron-based ink and the three-dimensional reconstruction potential provided by computed tomography that overcomes problems that appear in simple radiograph practice. This work is part of a larger project of EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland), the "Venice Time Machine" project (EPEL, Digital Heritage Venice, http://dhvenice.eu/, 2015) aimed at digitizing, transcribing and sharing in an open database all the information of the State Archives of Venice, exploiting traditional digitization technologies and innovative methods of acquisition. In this first measurement campaign I investigated a manuscript of the seventeenth century made of a folded sheet; a couple of unopened ancient wills kept in the State Archives in Venice and a handwritten book of several hundred pages of notes of Physics of the nineteenth century.

  1. Using Medical Claims for Policy Effectiveness Surveillance: Reimbursement and Utilization of Abdomen/Pelvis Computed Tomography Scans.

    PubMed

    Horný, Michal; Morgan, Jake R; Merker, Vanessa L

    2015-12-01

    To quantify changes in private insurance payments for and utilization of abdominal/pelvic computed tomography scans (CTs) after 2011 changes in CPT coding and Medicare reimbursement rates, which were designed to reduce costs stemming from misvalued procedures. TruvenHealth Analytics MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters database. We used difference-in-differences models to compare combined CTs of the abdomen/pelvis to CTs of the abdomen or pelvis only. Our main outcomes were inflation-adjusted log payments per procedure, daily utilization rates, and total annual payments. Claims data were extracted for all abdominal/pelvic CTs performed in 2009-2011 within noncapitated, employer-sponsored private plans. Adjusted payments per combined CTs of the abdomen/pelvis dropped by 23.8 percent (p < .0001), and their adjusted daily utilization rate accelerated by 0.36 percent (p = .034) per month after January 2011. Utilization rate of abdominal-only or pelvic-only CTs dropped by 5.0 percent (p < .0001). Total annual payments for combined CTs of the abdomen/pelvis decreased in 2011 despite the increased utilization. Private insurance payments for combined CTs of the abdomen/pelvis declined and utilization accelerated significantly after 2011 policy changes. While growth in total annual payments was contained in 2011, it may not be sustained if 2011 utilization trends persist. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Sensitivity of Noncontrast Computed Tomography for Small Renal Calculi With Endoscopy as the Gold Standard.

    PubMed

    Bhojani, Naeem; Paonessa, Jessica E; El Tayeb, Marawan M; Williams, James C; Hameed, Tariq A; Lingeman, James E

    2018-04-03

    To compare the sensitivity of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) with endoscopy for detection of renal calculi. Imaging modalities for detection of nephrolithiasis have centered on abdominal x-ray, ultrasound, and noncontrast CT. Sensitivities of 58%-62% (abdominal x-ray), 45% (ultrasound), and 95%-100% (CT) have been previously reported. However, these results have never been correlated with endoscopic findings. Idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers with symptomatic calculi requiring ureteroscopy were studied. At the time of surgery, the number and the location of all calculi within the kidney were recorded followed by basket retrieval. Each calculus was measured and sent for micro-CT and infrared spectrophotometry. All CT scans were reviewed by the same genitourinary radiologist who was blinded to the endoscopic findings. The radiologist reported on the number, location, and size of each calculus. Eighteen renal units were studied in 11 patients. Average time from CT scan to ureteroscopy was 28.6 days. The mean number of calculi identified per kidney was 9.2 ± 6.1 for endoscopy and 5.9 ± 4.1 for CT (P <.004). The mean size of total renal calculi (sum of the longest stone diameters) per kidney was 22.4 ± 17.1 mm and 18.2 ± 13.2 mm for endoscopy and CT, respectively (P = .06). CT scan underreports the number of renal calculi, probably missing some small stones and being unable to distinguish those lying in close proximity to one another. However, the total stone burden seen by CT is, on average, accurate when compared with that found on endoscopic examination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Routine Ultrasound and Limited Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Fraukje; Bakker, Rutger F. R.; Merkus, Jos W. S.; Breslau, Paul J.; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute appendicitis continues to be a challenging diagnosis. Preoperative radiological imaging using ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) has gained popularity as it may offer a more accurate diagnosis than classic clinical evaluation. The optimal implementation of these diagnostic modalities has yet to be established. The aim of the present study was to investigate a diagnostic pathway that uses routine US, limited CT, and clinical re-evaluation for patients with acute appendicitis. Methods A prospective analysis was performed of all patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the emergency department from June 2005 until July 2006 using a structured diagnosis and management flowchart. Daily practice was mimicked, while ensuring a valid assessment of clinical and radiological diagnostic accuracies and the effect they had on patient management. Results A total of 802 patients were included in this analysis. Additional radiological imaging was performed in 96.3% of patients with suspected appendicitis (n = 164). Use of CT was kept to a minimum (17.9%), with a US:CT ratio of approximately 6:1. Positive and negative predictive values for the clinical diagnosis of appendicitis were 63 and 98%, respectively; for US 94 and 97%, respectively; and for CT 100 and 100%, respectively. The negative appendicitis rate was 3.3%, the perforation rate was 23.5%, and the missed perforated appendicitis rate was 3.4%. No (diagnostic) laparoscopies were performed. Conclusions A diagnostic pathway using routine US, limited CT, and clinical re-evaluation for patients with acute abdominal pain can provide excellent results for the diagnosis and treatment of appendicitis. PMID:20582544

  4. 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography in infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Salomäki, Soile Pauliina; Saraste, Antti; Kemppainen, Jukka; Bax, Jeroen J; Knuuti, Juhani; Nuutila, Pirjo; Seppänen, Marko; Roivainen, Anne; Airaksinen, Juhani; Pirilä, Laura; Oksi, Jarmo; Hohenthal, Ulla

    2017-02-01

    The diagnosis of infective endocarditis (IE), especially the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is challenging since echocardiographic findings are often scarce in the early phase of the disease. We studied the use of 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in IE. Sixteen patients with suspected PVE and 7 patients with NVE underwent visual evaluation of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT. 18 F-FDG uptake was measured also semiquantitatively as maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and target-to-background ratio (TBR). The modified Duke criteria were used as a reference. There was strong, focal 18 F-FDG uptake in the area of the affected valve in all 6 cases of definite PVE, in 3 of 5 possible PVE cases, and in 2 of 5 rejected cases. In all patients with definite PVE, SUV max of the affected valve was higher than 4 and TBR higher than 1.8. In contrast to PVE, only 1 of 7 patients with NVE had uptake of 18 F-FDG by PET/CT in the valve area. Embolic infectious foci were detected in 58% of the patients with definite IE. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT appears to be a sensitive method for the detection of paravalvular infection associated with PVE. Instead, the sensitivity of PET/CT is limited in NVE.

  5. Overview of positron emission tomography chemistry: clinical and technical considerations and combination with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, G; Maravelis, G; Koukouraki, S; Padelakos, P; Kouloulias, V

    2009-01-01

    The concept of emission and transmission tomography was introduced by David Kuhl and Roy Edwards in the late 1950s. Their work later led to the design and construction of several tomographic instruments at the University of Pennsylvania. Tomographic imaging techniques were further developed by Michel Ter-Pogossian, Michael E. Phelps and others at the Washington University School of Medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a 3-dimensional image or map of functional processes in the body. The system detects pairs of gamma rays emitted indirectly by a positron-emitting radionuclide (tracer), which is introduced into the body on a biologically active molecule. Images of tracer concentration in 3-dimensional space within the body are then reconstructed by computer analysis. In modern scanners, this reconstruction is often accomplished with the aid of a CT X-ray scan performed on the patient during the same session, in the same machine. If the biologically active molecule chosen for PET is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), an analogue of glucose, the concentrations of tracer imaged give tissue metabolic activity in terms of regional glucose uptake. Although use of this tracer results in the most common type of PET scan, other tracer molecules are used in PET to image the tissue concentration of many other types of molecules of interest. The main role of this article was to analyse the available types of radiopharmaceuticals used in PET-CT along with the principles of its clinical and technical considerations.

  6. Brain Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Gender Differences in Tinnitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Shlamkovich, Nathan; Gavriel, Haim; Eviatar, Ephraim; Lorberboym, Mordechay; Aviram, Eliad

    2016-10-01

    Increased metabolism in the left auditory cortex has been reported in tinnitus patients. However, gender difference has not been addressed. To assess the differences in Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) results between the genders in tinnitus patients. Retrospective cohort. Included were patients referred to our clinic between January 2011 and August 2013 who complained of tinnitus and underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET to assess brain metabolism. Univariate and multivariate nominal logistic regressions were used to evaluate the association between upper temporal gyrus (UTG; right and left) and gender. Included were 140 patients (87 males) with an average age of 52.5 yr (median = 53.1). Bilateral tinnitus was found in 85 patients (60.7%), left sided in 30 (21.4%), and right sided in 21(15%). Increased uptake in the UTG was found in 60% of the patients on either side. Males had a statistically significant increased uptake in the UTG in those with unilateral tinnitus and in the entire population. We present the largest study reported so far on tinnitus patients who have undergone FDG-PET-CT. We found a statistically significant difference between the genders in FDG uptake by the UTG. Further investigations should be undertaken to reveal the etiologies for these differences and to assess different therapeutic protocols according to gender. American Academy of Audiology

  7. Technical aspects of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Scripes, Paola G; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra

    2012-09-01

    The usage of functional data in radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning (RTP) process is currently the focus of significant technical, scientific, and clinical development. Positron emission tomography (PET) using ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose is being increasingly used in RT planning in recent years. Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiotracer for diagnosis, staging, recurrent disease detection, and monitoring of tumor response to therapy (Lung Cancer 2012;76:344-349; Lung Cancer 2009;64:301-307; J Nucl Med 2008;49:532-540; J Nucl Med 2007;48:58S-67S). All the efforts to improve both PET and computed tomography (CT) image quality and, consequently, lesion detectability have a common objective to increase the accuracy in functional imaging and thus of coregistration into RT planning systems. In radiotherapy, improvement in target localization permits reduction of tumor margins, consequently reducing volume of normal tissue irradiated. Furthermore, smaller treated target volumes create the possibility of dose escalation, leading to increased chances of tumor cure and control. This article focuses on the technical aspects of PET/CT image acquisition, fusion, usage, and impact on the physics of RTP. The authors review the basic elements of RTP, modern radiation delivery, and the technical parameters of coregistration of PET/CT into RT computerized planning systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  9. Change in Abdominal Morphology After Surgical Correction of Thoracolumbar Kyphosis Secondary to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Computed Tomographic Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ming-Liang; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Bin; Mao, Sai-Hu; Zhu, Ze-Zhang; Yu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    A computed tomographic study. To investigate the change in abdominal morphology in surgically treated patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and thoracolumbar kyphosis. Severe thoracolumbar kyphosis in patients with AS exerts pressure on the abdominal cavity and subsequently causes intra-abdominal complications. Several spinal osteotomy techniques have been widely used to correct AS-related thoracolumbar kyphosis. To date, the changed abdominal morphology in patients with AS undergoing surgical correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis has not been addressed. A total of 29 patients with AS undergoing lumbar pedicle subtraction osteotomy for correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis were retrospectively reviewed. Computed tomographic scans of the spine were used to measure the longitudinal, transverse, and anterior-posterior diameters of the abdominal cavity. Furthermore, the abdominal cavity was considered as an ellipsoid structure, thereby allowing calculation of its volume. Radiographical evaluations included global kyphosis (GK), thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis (LL), and angle of fusion levels (AFL). The longitudinal diameter of abdominal cavity significantly increased (P < 0.01), whereas the transverse and anterior-posterior diameters of the abdominal cavity did not change, postoperatively (P > 0.05). Significant changes in GK, LL, and AFL were observed (P < 0.01). The abdominal cavity volume (ACV) increased by an average of 652  mL. The change in ACV was significantly correlated with the changes in GK (r = 0.453, P = 0.014), LL (r = 0.42, P = 0.023), and AFL (r = 0.388, P = 0.037). The increased ACV after correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis was quantitatively confirmed by this study. Thus, the improvement in digestive function after correction of thoracolumbar kyphosis secondary to AS, which has been previously documented, may be because of an increase in ACV. Moreover, spine surgeons should be aware of the potential risk for

  10. Cholesteatomas of the temporal bone: role of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Voorhees, R.L.; Lufkin, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone was performed in 64 patients thought to have a cholesteatoma of the middle ear. Twenty had not had surgery before, while 44 had been operated on; special consideration was given to 21 patients who were scanned immediately before a second operation and had confirmation of the CT findings. Inflammatory disease without cholesteatoma was characterized by absence of erosion of the otic capsule or ossicular chain. Sharply circumscribed cholesteatomas were easily diagnosed by CT. When they were combined with scarring, granulation tissue, or postsurgical changes, the resulting soft-tissue masses were indistinguishable, although cholesteatoma maymore » be suspected if there is evidence of progressive bone erosion about the middle ear. CT can play a major role in postoperative follow-up by confirming that the ear is normal and demonstrating displacement of ossicular grafts or prostheses.« less

  11. Computed tomography of cystic nerve root sleeve dilatation.

    PubMed

    Neave, V C; Wycoff, R R

    1983-10-01

    A case of cystic nerve root sleeve dilatation in the lumbar area associated with a chronic back pain syndrome is presented. Prominent computed tomography (CT) findings include: (a) rounded masses in the region of the foramina isodense with cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space; (b) associated asymmetry of epidural fat distribution; (c) enlargement of the neural foramina in axial sections with scalloped erosion of the adjacent posteriolateral vertebral body, pedicle, and pedicular-laminar junction with preservation of cortex and without bony sclerosis or infiltrative appearance; (d) prominent or ectatic dural sac with lack of usual epidural landmarks between the sac and vertebral body; and (e) multilevel abnormalities throughout the entire lumbar region. Myelographic and CT correlations are demonstrated with a review of the literature. A discussion of the various cystic abnormalities involving nerve root sheaths is undertaken in an attempt to clarify the confusing nomenclature applied to nerve root sleeve pathology.

  12. Dandy-Walker syndrome studied by computed tomography and pneumoencephalography

    SciTech Connect

    Masdeu, J.C.; Dobben, G.D.; Azar-Kia, B.

    1983-04-01

    Based on air studies, some authors have disputed the ability of computed tomography (CT) to diagnose posterior fossa cysts. The authors correlated the pneumoencephalographic, CT, and pathological findings in 4 patients with classic Dandy-Walker syndrome. Three cases had been misdiagnosed as retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts because the fourth ventricle was incorrectly considered normal on brow-up or erect air studies, reflecting the inability of such studies to evaluate an agenetic vermis and deficient posterior medullary velum which are characteristic of Dandy-Walker malformation. Careful correlation with autopsy findings showed that even with complete agenesis of the inferior vermis, if the slit between themore » cerebellar hemispheres is narrow, the fourth ventricle could be misinterpreted as normal on pneumoencephalography and sagittal CT. Radionuclide studies, a small amount of air, or metrizamide may be needed to determine whether the cyst communicates with the subarachnoid space.« less

  13. Scintillator performance considerations for dedicated breast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (BCT) is an emerging clinical modality that can eliminate tissue superposition and has the potential for improved sensitivity and specificity for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. It is performed without physical compression of the breast. Most of the dedicated BCT systems use large-area detectors operating in cone-beam geometry and are referred to as cone-beam breast CT (CBBCT) systems. The large-area detectors in CBBCT systems are energy-integrating, indirect-type detectors employing a scintillator that converts x-ray photons to light, followed by detection of optical photons. A key consideration that determines the image quality achieved by such CBBCT systems is the choice of scintillator and its performance characteristics. In this work, a framework for analyzing the impact of the scintillator on CBBCT performance and its use for task-specific optimization of CBBCT imaging performance is described.

  14. The role of mobile computed tomography in mass fatality incidents.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Guy N; Robinson, Claire E; BouHaidar, Ralph; Jeffery, Amanda J; Morgan, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Mobile multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners are potentially available to temporary mortuaries and can be operational within 20 min of arrival. We describe, to our knowledge, the first use of mobile MDCT for a mass fatality incident. A mobile MDCT scanner attended the disaster mortuary after a five vehicle road traffic incident. Five out of six bodies were successfully imaged by MDCT in c. 15 min per body. Subsequent full radiological analysis took c. 1 h per case. The results were compared to the autopsy examinations. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of imaging with mobile MDCT in relation to mass fatality work, illustrating the body pathway process, and its role in the identification of the pathology, personal effects, and health and safety hazards. We propose that the adoption of a single modality of mobile MDCT could replace the current use of multiple radiological sources within a mass fatality mortuary.

  15. Acute aortic syndromes: new insights from electrocardiographically gated computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Dominik; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2008-01-01

    The development of retrospective electrocardiographic (ECG)-gating has proved to be a diagnostic and therapeutic boon for computed tomography (CT) imaging of patients with acute thoracic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection/intramural hematoma (AD/IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (APU), and ruptured/leaking aneurysm. The notorious pulsation motion artifacts in the ascending aorta confounding regular CT scanning can be eliminated, and involvement of the sinuses of Valsalva, the valve cusps, the aortic annulus, and the coronary arteries in aortic dissection can be clearly depicted or excluded. Motion-free images also allow reliable identification of the site of the primary intimal tear, the location, and extent of the intimomedial flap, and branch artery involvement. ECG-gated CTA also allows the detection of more subtle lesions and variants of aortic dissection, which may ultimately expand our understanding of these complex, life-threatening disorders.

  16. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns.

  17. Malignant uveal melanoma and similar lesions studied by computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Peyman, G.A.; McKusick, M.A.

    1985-08-01

    Forty-four patients with intraocular disease were studied by computed tomography (CT); in 19 cases malignant uveal melanoma was considered the likely diagnosis. CT proved to be accurate in determining the location and size of uveal melanomas, demonstrating scleral invasion, and differentiating melanoma from choroidal detachment or angioma, toxocariasis, and senile macular degeneration. On CT, uveal melanomas appeared as hyperdense lesions with slight to moderate contrast enhancement. Tumors thinner than 2 mm could not be seen. Using dynamic CT, the authors noted moderate peak amplitude, normal or delayed tissue transit time, and persistently elevated washout phase (downslope), indicating increased permeability asmore » the result of an impaired tumor blood barrier. Histological types of uveal melanoma could not be differentiated on the basis of circulatory patterns. Dynamic CT may be useful in distinguishing uveal melanoma from choroidal hemangioma or hematoma.« less

  18. Local reconstruction in computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Feng; Zhang, Li; Kang, Ke-Jun; Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Yuan, Qing-Xi; Huang, Wan-Xia

    2007-07-01

    Computed tomography of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI-CT) based on synchrotron radiation source has extremely high sensitivity of weakly absorbing low-Z samples in medical and biological fields. The authors propose a modified backprojection filtration(BPF)-type algorithm based on PI-line segments to reconstruct region of interest from truncated refraction-angle projection data in DEI-CT. The distribution of refractive index decrement in the sample can be directly estimated from its reconstruction images, which has been proved by experiments at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The algorithm paves the way for local reconstruction of large-size samples by the use of DEI-CT with small field of view based on synchrotron radiation source.

  19. Computational optical tomography using 3-D deep convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh; Bui, Vy; Nehmetallah, George

    2018-04-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) offer a promising performance for many image processing areas, such as super-resolution, deconvolution, image classification, denoising, and segmentation, with outstanding results. Here, we develop for the first time, to our knowledge, a method to perform 3-D computational optical tomography using 3-D DCNN. A simulated 3-D phantom dataset was first constructed and converted to a dataset of phase objects imaged on a spatial light modulator. For each phase image in the dataset, the corresponding diffracted intensity image was experimentally recorded on a CCD. We then experimentally demonstrate the ability of the developed 3-D DCNN algorithm to solve the inverse problem by reconstructing the 3-D index of refraction distributions of test phantoms from the dataset from their corresponding diffraction patterns.

  20. Diagnosing acute pulmonary embolism with computed tomography: imaging update.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Anand; Sayer, Charlie; Sheard, Sarah; Grubnic, Sisa; Nair, Arjun; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is recognized as a difficult diagnosis to make. It is potentially fatal if undiagnosed, yet increasing referral rates for imaging and falling diagnostic yields are topics which have attracted much attention. For patients in the emergency department with suspected pulmonary embolism, computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is the test of choice for most physicians, and hence radiology has a key role to play in the patient pathway. This review will outline key aspects of the recent literature regarding the following issues: patient selection for imaging, the optimization of CTPA image quality and dose, preferred pathways for pregnant patients and other subgroups, and the role of CTPA beyond diagnosis. The role of newer techniques such as dual-energy CT and single-photon emission-CT will also be discussed.

  1. Recent Developments in Computed Tomography for Urolithiasis: Diagnosis and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mc Laughlin, P. D.; Crush, L.; Maher, M. M.; O'Connor, O. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To critically evaluate the current literature in an effort to establish the current role of radiologic imaging, advances in computed tomography (CT) and standard film radiography in the diagnosis, and characterization of urinary tract calculi. Conclusion. CT has a valuable role when utilized prudently during surveillance of patients following endourological therapy. In this paper, we outline the basic principles relating to the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as a result of CT scanning. We discuss the current developments in low-dose CT technology, which have resulted in significant reductions in CT radiation doses (to approximately one-third of what they were a decade ago) while preserving image quality. Finally, we will discuss an important recent development now commercially available on the latest generation of CT scanners, namely, dual energy imaging, which is showing promise in urinary tract imaging as a means of characterizing the composition of urinary tract calculi. PMID:22952473

  2. Quantitative Pulmonary Imaging Using Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Washko, George R.; Parraga, Grace; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of lung function, including spirometry and body plethesmography, are easy to perform and are the current clinical standard for assessing disease severity. However, these lung functional techniques do not adequately explain the observed variability in clinical manifestations of disease and offer little insight into the relationship of lung structure and function. Lung imaging and the image based assessment of lung disease has matured to the extent that it is common for clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation to have a component dedicated to image analysis. There are several exciting imaging modalities currently being used for the non-invasive study of lung anatomy and function. In this review we will focus on two of them, x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief introduction of each method we detail some of the most recent work being done to characterize smoking-related lung disease and the clinical applications of such knowledge. PMID:22142490

  3. Inspection of a Medieval Wood Sculpture Using Computer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitany, K.; Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Computer tomography (CT) is an excellent technique for obtaining accurate 3D information about the human body. It allows to visualize the organs, bones and blood vessels, furthermore it enables to diagnose anomalies and diseases. Its spatial reconstruction capability supports other interesting applications, such as inspecting different, even valuable objects like ancient sculptures. Current paper presents a methodology of evaluating CT and video imagery through the example of investigating a wood Madonna with infant Jesus sculpture from the 14th century. The developed techniques extract the outer boundary of the statue, which has been triangulated to derive the surface model. The interior of the sculpture has also been revealed: the iron bolts and rivets as well as the woodworm holes can be mapped. By merging the interior and outer data (geometry and texture) interesting visualizations (perspective views, sections etc.) have been created.

  4. Sodium hypochlorite accident with evaluation by cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Behrents, K T; Speer, M L; Noujeim, M

    2012-05-01

    To show the radiographic manifestation of sodium hypochlorite after accidental injection past the apical foramen and into the soft tissues. A female patient was seen for an emergency visit after suffering a sodium hypochlorite accident at her general dentist's office. The patient was seen within 1 h of the accident and was in pain associated with facial swelling. Radiographs, including a Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), and photographs were taken. Endodontic emergency treatment was initiated. The patient was reassured and given pain medication and antibiotics. Follow-up visits were scheduled over 6 days when the swelling had resolved. • Importance of multiple radiographic images during preoperative endodontic evaluation when undertaking endodontic retreatment. • Knowledge of apical anatomy as related to surrounding structures. • Effect of sodium hypochlorite when injected in the soft tissues. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  5. [The different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis: multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Koren Fernández, L; Alonso Charterina, S; Alcalá-Galiano Rubio, A; Sánchez Nistal, M A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a fungal infection usually caused by inhaling Aspergillus fumigatus spores. However, when we talk about aspergillosis, we normally refer to the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings that depend directly on the patient's immune status, on the prior existence of lung disease, and on the virulence of the infective organism. There are four types of pulmonary aspergillosis (aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive aspergillosis), and each type has its own distinct radiologic findings. We review the signs of pulmonary aspergillosis on multidetector computed tomography and we correlate them with patients' symptoms and immune responses. Likewise, we discuss the differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Initial results of finger imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, Peter; Biswas, Samir K.; Moens, Hein J. Bernelot; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2014-06-01

    We present a photoacoustic computed tomography investigation on a healthy human finger, to image blood vessels with a focus on vascularity across the interphalangeal joints. The cross-sectional images were acquired using an imager specifically developed for this purpose. The images show rich detail of the digital blood vessels with diameters between 100 μm and 1.5 mm in various orientations and at various depths. Different vascular layers in the skin including the subpapillary plexus could also be visualized. Acoustic reflections on the finger bone of photoacoustic signals from skin were visible in sequential slice images along the finger except at the location of the joint gaps. Not unexpectedly, the healthy synovial membrane at the joint gaps was not detected due to its small size and normal vascularization. Future research will concentrate on studying digits afflicted with rheumatoid arthritis to detect the inflamed synovium with its heightened vascularization, whose characteristics are potential markers for disease activity.

  7. X-ray-induced acoustic computed tomography of concrete infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shanshan; Ramseyer, Chris; Samant, Pratik; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2018-02-01

    X-ray-induced Acoustic Computed Tomography (XACT) takes advantage of both X-ray absorption contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single imaging modality by making use of the thermoacoustic effect. In XACT, X-ray absorption by defects and other structures in concrete create thermally induced pressure jumps that launch ultrasonic waves, which are then received by acoustic detectors to form images. In this research, XACT imaging was used to non-destructively test and identify defects in concrete. For concrete structures, we conclude that XACT imaging allows multiscale imaging at depths ranging from centimeters to meters, with spatial resolutions from sub-millimeter to centimeters. XACT imaging also holds promise for single-side testing of concrete infrastructure and provides an optimal solution for nondestructive inspection of existing bridges, pavement, nuclear power plants, and other concrete infrastructure.

  8. Computed tomography of deep fat masses in multiple symmetrical lipomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Enzi, G.; Biondetti, P.R.; Fiore, D.

    1982-07-01

    Deep fat masses were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) in 15 patients with multiple symmetrical lipomatosis. In 4 patients, peritracheal accumulations of fat were observed. In 3 of them, tracheal compression by lipomatous tissue was demonstrated: 2 were asymptomatic and the third severe respiratory insufficiency secondary to blockage of the air was by the vocal cords as the result of recurrent nerve palsy. In 6 patients, lipomatous tissue occupied the potential space between the spina scapulae and the trapezius, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus muscles. In 2, calcification of lipomatous masses was observed. There was no relationship between extension of subcutaneous fatmore » and accumulation at deep sites. CT facilitates early detection of peritracheal lipomatous tissue and is helpful in follow-up when deep fat accumulation is responsible for space-occupying lesions requiring surgery.« less

  9. Adaptive zooming in X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Dabravolski, Andrei; Batenburg, Kees Joost; Sijbers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the source-detector system commonly rotates around the object in a circular trajectory. Such a trajectory does not allow to exploit a detector fully when scanning elongated objects. Increase the spatial resolution of the reconstructed image by optimal zooming during scanning. A new approach is proposed, in which the full width of the detector is exploited for every projection angle. This approach is based on the use of prior information about the object's convex hull to move the source as close as possible to the object, while avoiding truncation of the projections. Experiments show that the proposed approach can significantly improve reconstruction quality, producing reconstructions with smaller errors and revealing more details in the object. The proposed approach can lead to more accurate reconstructions and increased spatial resolution in the object compared to the conventional circular trajectory.

  10. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalla Palma, L; Pozzi-Mucelli, R S

    1992-02-01

    The evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is based upon ultrasonography (US) which has proved to have a high sensitivity and is also extremely useful in guiding the percutaneous needle biopsy. The main role of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to supplement US in evaluating the extent of HCC. The Authors discuss the different techniques of examinations of the liver both for CT and MRI as far as the modalities of contrast enhancement, site of injection, and type of contrast agents are concerned. The differences between low field and high field magnets are also discussed. The main CT and MRI findings are illustrated, depending upon the technique of examination. Finally the role of these techniques is discussed. Based upon personal experience and the data in CT literature, and if performed with updated technology and intraarterial injection (lipiodol), CT is the method of choice in order to supplement US in the evaluation of HCC.

  11. Effect of object location on the density measurement in cone-beam computed tomography versus multislice computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Abdinian, Mehrdad; Salemi, Fatemeh; Hashemzadeh, Zahra; Safaei, Mehran

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bone density measurement in a radiographic view is a valuable method for evaluating the density of bone quality before performing some dental procedures such as, dental implant placements. It seems that Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating the density of the bone, prior to any treatment, as the reported radiation dose in this method is minimal. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of object location on the density measurement in CBCT versus Multislice computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, three samples with similar dimensions, but different compositions, different densities (Polyethylene, Polyamide, Polyvinyl Chloride), and three bone pieces of different parts of the mandibular bone were imaged in three different positions by CBCT and Multislice CT sets. The average density value was computed for each sample in each position. Then the data obtained from each CBCT was converted to a Hounsfield unit and evaluated using a single variable T analysis. A P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: The density in a Multislice CT is stable in the form of a Hounsfield Number, but this density is variable in the images acquired through CBCT, and the change in the position results in significant changes in the density. In this study, a statistically significant difference (P value = 0.000) has been observed for the position of the sample and its density in CBCT in comparison to Multislice CT. Conclusions: Density values in CBCT are not real because they are affected by the position of the object in the machine. PMID:23814567

  12. Fractional flow reserve based on computed tomography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Francesco; Alì, Marco; Faggiano, Elena; Cannaò, Paola Maria; Fedele, Marco; Tresoldi, Silvia; Di Leo, Giovanni; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2016-04-28

    Computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) is a technique proved to provide high sensitivity and negative predictive value for the identification of anatomically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) when compared with invasive X-ray coronary angiography. While the CTCA limitation of a ionizing radiation dose delivered to patients is substantially overcome by recent technical innovations, a relevant limitation remains the only anatomical assessment of coronary stenoses in the absence of evaluation of their functional haemodynamic significance. This limitation is highly important for those stenosis graded as intermediate at the anatomical assessment. Recently, non-invasive methods based on computational fluid dynamics were developed to calculate vessel-specific fractional flow reserve (FFR) using data routinely acquired by CTCA [computed tomographic fractional flow reserve (CT-FFR)]. Here we summarize methods for CT-FFR and review the evidence available in the literature up to June 26, 2016, including 16 original articles and one meta-analysis. The perspective of CT-FFR may greatly impact on CAD diagnosis, prognostic evaluation, and treatment decision-making. The aim of this review is to describe technical characteristics and clinical applications of CT-FFR, also in comparison with catheter-based invasive FFR, in order to make a cost-benefit balance in terms of clinical management and patient's health.

  13. Ocular biometry by computed tomography in different dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Chiwitt, Carolin L H; Baines, Stephen J; Mahoney, Paul; Tanner, Andrew; Heinrich, Christine L; Rhodes, Michael; Featherstone, Heidi J

    2017-09-01

    To (i) correlate B-mode ocular ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) (prospective pilot study), (ii) establish a reliable method to measure the normal canine eye using CT, (iii) establish a reference guide for some dog breeds, (iv) compare eye size between different breeds and breed groups, and (v) investigate the correlation between eye dimensions and body weight, gender, and skull type (retrospective study). B-mode US and CT were performed on ten sheep cadaveric eyes. CT biometry involved 100 adult pure-bred dogs with nonocular and nonorbital disease, representing eleven breeds. Eye length, width, and height were each measured in two of three planes (horizontal, sagittal, and equatorial). B-mode US and CT measurements of sheep cadaveric eyes correlated well (0.70-0.71). The shape of the canine eye was found to be akin to an oblate spheroid (a flattened sphere). A reference guide was established for eleven breeds. Eyes of large breed dogs were significantly larger than those of medium and small breed dogs (P < 0.01), and eyes of medium breed dogs were significantly larger than those of small breed dogs (P < 0.01). Eye size correlated with body weight (0.74-0.82) but not gender or skull type. Computed tomography is a suitable method for biometry of the canine eye, and a reference guide was established for eleven breeds. Eye size correlated with breed size and body weight. Because correlation between B-mode US and CT was shown, the obtained values can be applied in the clinical setting, for example, for the diagnosis of microphthalmos and buphthalmos. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  14. Sex estimation from sternal measurements using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Solmaz, Dilek; Erdil, Irem; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to show the utility and reliability of sternal morphometric analysis for sex estimation.Sex estimation is a very important step in forensic identification. Skeletal surveys are main methods for sex estimation studies. Morphometric analysis of sternum may provide high accuracy rated data in sex discrimination. In this study, morphometric analysis of sternum was evaluated in 1 mm chest computed tomography scans for sex estimation. Four hundred forty 3 subjects (202 female, 241 male, mean age: 44 ± 8.1 [distribution: 30-60 year old]) were included the study. Manubrium length (ML), mesosternum length (2L), Sternebra 1 (S1W), and Sternebra 3 (S3W) width were measured and also sternal index (SI) was calculated. Differences between genders were evaluated by student t-test. Predictive factors of sex were determined by discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Male sternal measurement values are significantly higher than females (P < 0.001) while SI is significantly low in males (P < 0.001). In discrimination analysis, MSL has high accuracy rate with 80.2% in females and 80.9% in males. MSL also has the best sensitivity (75.9%) and specificity (87.6%) values. Accuracy rates were above 80% in 3 stepwise discrimination analysis for both sexes. Stepwise 1 (ML, MSL, S1W, S3W) has the highest accuracy rate in stepwise discrimination analysis with 86.1% in females and 83.8% in males. Our study showed that morphometric computed tomography analysis of sternum might provide important information for sex estimation.

  15. Assessment of liver ablation using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Ronot, Maxime; Sibert, Annie; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2015-01-14

    To investigate the feasibility and accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in assessing the ablation zone after liver tumor ablation. Twenty-three patients (17 men and 6 women, range: 45-85 years old, mean age 65 years) with malignant liver tumors underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous tumor ablation [radiofrequency (n = 14), microwave (n = 9)] followed by intravenous contrast-enhanced CBCT. Baseline multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and peri-procedural CBCT images were compared. CBCT image quality was assessed as poor, good, or excellent. Image fusion was performed to assess tumor coverage, and quality of fusion was rated as bad, good, or excellent. Ablation zone volumes on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT were compared using the non-parametric paired Wilcoxon t-test. Rate of primary ablation effectiveness was 100%. There were no complications related to ablation. Local tumor recurrence and new liver tumors were found 3 mo after initial treatment in one patient (4%). The ablation zone was identified in 21/23 (91.3%) patients on CBCT. The fusion of baseline MDCT and peri-procedural CBCT images was feasible in all patients and showed satisfactory tumor coverage (at least 5-mm margin). CBCT image quality was poor, good, and excellent in 2 (9%), 8 (35%), and 13 (56%), patients respectively. Registration quality between peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT images was good to excellent in 17/23 (74%) patients. The median ablation volume on peri-procedural CBCT and post-procedural MDCT was 30 cm(3) (range: 4-95 cm(3)) and 30 cm(3) (range: 4-124 cm(3)), respectively (P-value > 0.2). There was a good correlation (r = 0.79) between the volumes of the two techniques. Contrast-enhanced CBCT after tumor ablation of the liver allows early assessment of the ablation zone.

  16. Sex Estimation From Sternal Measurements Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Solmaz, Dilek; Erdil, Irem; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to show the utility and reliability of sternal morphometric analysis for sex estimation. Sex estimation is a very important step in forensic identification. Skeletal surveys are main methods for sex estimation studies. Morphometric analysis of sternum may provide high accuracy rated data in sex discrimination. In this study, morphometric analysis of sternum was evaluated in 1 mm chest computed tomography scans for sex estimation. Four hundred forty 3 subjects (202 female, 241 male, mean age: 44 ± 8.1 [distribution: 30–60 year old]) were included the study. Manubrium length (ML), mesosternum length (2L), Sternebra 1 (S1W), and Sternebra 3 (S3W) width were measured and also sternal index (SI) was calculated. Differences between genders were evaluated by student t-test. Predictive factors of sex were determined by discrimination analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Male sternal measurement values are significantly higher than females (P < 0.001) while SI is significantly low in males (P < 0.001). In discrimination analysis, MSL has high accuracy rate with 80.2% in females and 80.9% in males. MSL also has the best sensitivity (75.9%) and specificity (87.6%) values. Accuracy rates were above 80% in 3 stepwise discrimination analysis for both sexes. Stepwise 1 (ML, MSL, S1W, S3W) has the highest accuracy rate in stepwise discrimination analysis with 86.1% in females and 83.8% in males. Our study showed that morphometric computed tomography analysis of sternum might provide important information for sex estimation. PMID:25501090

  17. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  18. Tomography in Geology: 3D Modeling and Analysis of Structural Features of Rocks Using Computed MicroTomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, A. A.; Mamadaliev, R. A.; Semenova, T. V.

    2016-10-01

    The article presents a brief overview of the current state of computed tomography in the sphere of oil and gas production in Russia and in the world. Operation of computed microtomograph Skyscan 1172 is also provided, as well as personal examples of its application in solving geological problems.

  19. Time-Domain Terahertz Computed Axial Tomography NDE System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimdars, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has identified the need for advanced non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods to characterize aging and durability in aircraft materials to improve the safety of the nation's airline fleet. 3D THz tomography can play a major role in detection and characterization of flaws and degradation in aircraft materials, including Kevlar-based composites and Kevlar and Zylon fabric covers for soft-shell fan containment where aging and durability issues are critical. A prototype computed tomography (CT) time-domain (TD) THz imaging system has been used to generate 3D images of several test objects including a TUFI tile (a thermal protection system tile used on the Space Shuttle and possibly the Orion or similar capsules). This TUFI tile had simulated impact damage that was located and the depth of damage determined. The CT motion control gan try was designed and constructed, and then integrated with a T-Ray 4000 control unit and motion controller to create a complete CT TD-THz imaging system prototype. A data collection software script was developed that takes multiple z-axis slices in sequence and saves the data for batch processing. The data collection software was integrated with the ability to batch process the slice data with the CT TD-THz image reconstruction software. The time required to take a single CT slice was decreased from six minutes to approximately one minute by replacing the 320 ps, 100-Hz waveform acquisition system with an 80 ps, 1,000-Hz waveform acquisition system. The TD-THZ computed tomography system was built from pre-existing commercial off-the-shelf subsystems. A CT motion control gantry was constructed from COTS components that can handle larger samples. The motion control gantry allows inspection of sample sizes of up to approximately one cubic foot (.0.03 cubic meters). The system reduced to practice a CT-TDTHz system incorporating a COTS 80- ps/l-kHz waveform scanner. The incorporation of this scanner in the system allows acquisition of 3D

  20. Measurement of Three-dimensional Density Distributions by Holographic Interferometry and Computer Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The use of holographic interferometry to measure two and threedimensional flows and the interpretation of multiple-view interferograms with computer tomography are discussed. Computational techniques developed for tomography are reviewed. Current research topics are outlined including the development of an automated fringe readout system, optimum reconstruction procedures for when an opaque test model is present in the field, and interferometry and tomography with strongly refracting fields and shocks.

  1. Fast automatic segmentation of anatomical structures in x-ray computed tomography images to improve fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Freyer, Marcus; Ale, Angelique; Schulz, Ralf B; Zientkowska, Marta; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of hybrid imaging scanners that integrate fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) allows the utilization of x-ray information as image priors for improving optical tomography reconstruction. To fully capitalize on this capacity, we consider a framework for the automatic and fast detection of different anatomic structures in murine XCT images. To accurately differentiate between different structures such as bone, lung, and heart, a combination of image processing steps including thresholding, seed growing, and signal detection are found to offer optimal segmentation performance. The algorithm and its utilization in an inverse FMT scheme that uses priors is demonstrated on mouse images.

  2. Just Scan It!-Weapon Reconstruction in Computed Tomography on Historical and Current Swiss Military Guns.

    PubMed

    Franckenberg, Sabine; Binder, Thomas; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen G

    2016-09-01

    Cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography, has been increasingly implemented in both historic and recent postmortem forensic investigations. It aids in determining cause and manner of death as well as in correlating injuries to possible weapons. This study illuminates the feasibility of reconstructing guns in computed tomography and gives a distinct overview of historic and recent Swiss Army guns.

  3. Trails on 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Leading to Diagnosis of Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Raghava

    2018-01-01

    Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) are secondary to hypertrophy of adrenal rest cells in the rete testis in settings of hypersecretion of androgens. We present a case of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with TART with clues to the diagnosis on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case on the role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in TART.

  4. The measurement of liver fat from single-energy quantitative computed tomography scans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoguang; Brown, J. Keenan; Guo, Zhe; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Fengzhe; Yang, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies of soft tissue composition using computed tomography (CT) scans are often semi-quantitative and based on Hounsfield units (HU) measurements that have not been calibrated with a quantitative CT (QCT) phantom. We describe a study to establish the water (H2O) and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) basis set equivalent densities of fat and fat-free liver tissue. With this information liver fat can be accurately measured from any abdominal CT scan calibrated with a suitable phantom. Methods Liver fat content was measured by comparing single-energy QCT (SEQCT) HU measurements of the liver with predicted HU values for fat and fat-free liver tissue calculated from their H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities and calibration data from a QCT phantom. The equivalent densities of fat were derived from a listing of its constituent fatty acids, and those of fat-free liver tissue from a dual-energy QCT (DEQCT) study performed in 14 healthy Chinese subjects. This information was used to calculate liver fat from abdominal SEQCT scans performed in a further 541 healthy Chinese subjects (mean age 62 years; range, 31–95 years) enrolled in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study. Results The equivalent densities of fat were 941.75 mg/cm3 H2O and –43.72 mg/cm3 K2HPO4, and for fat-free liver tissue 1,040.13 mg/cm3 H2O and 21.34 mg/cm3 K2HPO4. Liver fat in the 14 subjects in the DEQCT study varied from 0–17.9% [median: 4.5%; interquartile range (IQR): 3.0–7.9%]. Liver fat in the 541 PURE study subjects varied from –0.3–29.9% (median: 4.9%; IQR: 3.4–6.9%). Conclusions We have established H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities for fat and fat-free liver tissue that allow a measurement of liver fat to be obtained from any abdominal CT scan acquired with a QCT phantom. Although radiation dose considerations preclude the routine use of QCT to measure liver fat, the method described here facilitates its measurement in patients having CT scans

  5. Utility of Quantitative Parameters from Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients with Destructive Thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Moon, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Min; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hwa; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative parameters from Tc-99m pertechnetate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) are emerging as novel diagnostic markers for functional thyroid diseases. We intended to assess the utility of SPECT/CT parameters in patients with destructive thyroiditis. Thirty-five destructive thyroiditis patients (7 males and 28 females; mean age, 47.3 ± 13.0 years) and 20 euthyroid patients (6 males and 14 females; mean age, 45.0 ± 14.8 years) who underwent Tc-99m pertechnetate quantitative SPECT/CT were retrospectively enrolled. Quantitative parameters from the SPECT/CT (%uptake, standardized uptake value [SUV], thyroid volume, and functional thyroid mass [SUVmean × thyroid volume]) and thyroid hormone levels were investigated to assess correlations and predict the prognosis for destructive thyroiditis. The occurrence of hypothyroidism was the outcome for prognosis. All the SPECT/CT quantitative parameters were significantly lower in the 35 destructive thyroiditis patients compared to the 20 euthyroid patients using the same SPECT/CT scanner and protocol ( p < 0.001 for all parameters). T3 and free T4 did not correlate with any SPECT/CT parameters, but thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) significantly correlated with %uptake ( p = 0.004), SUVmean ( p < 0.001), SUVmax ( p = 0.002), and functional thyroid mass ( p < 0.001). Of the 35 destructive thyroiditis patients, 16 progressed to hypothyroidism. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only T3 levels were associated with the later occurrence of hypothyroidism ( p = 0.002, exp(β) = 1.022, 95% confidence interval: 1.008 - 1.035). Novel quantitative SPECT/CT parameters could discriminate patients with destructive thyroiditis from euthyroid patients, suggesting the robustness of the quantitative SPECT/CT approach. However, disease progression of destructive thyroiditis could not be predicted using the parameters, as these only correlated with TSH, but not with T3, the sole predictor of

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography in chronic pancreatitis: a comparative prospective study with conventional ultrasonography, computed tomography, and ERCP.

    PubMed

    Buscail, L; Escourrou, J; Moreau, J; Delvaux, M; Louvel, D; Lapeyre, F; Tregant, P; Frexinos, J

    1995-04-01

    The usefulness and accuracy rate of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) were prospectively evaluated in 81 patients with suspected pancreatic disease. All underwent EUS, abdominal ultrasonography (AUS), and computed tomography (CT), and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed in 55 of the cases. The diagnosis of CP was established in 44 patients (CP group) including 24 with a calcified form. No pancreatic disease was observed in 18 patients (control group), and 19 patients had a pancreatic tumor. In the CP group AUS was less accurate than EUS in visualizing the pancreas, performances of CT scan being identical to EUS in this respect. A good correlation was observed between EUS and ERCP for visualization and measurement of the Wirsung duct. The most significant changes observed by EUS in the CP group were dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, heterogeneous echogenicity of the pancreatic parenchyma, and cysts < 20 mm in size even in noncalcified CP or with normal pancreatograms. Sensitivity of EUS for diagnosis of CP was 88% (AUS, 58%; ERCP, 74%; CT scan, 75%), the specificity being 100% for ERCP and EUS, 95% for CT scan, and 75% for AUS. The good performances of EUS allow early diagnosis of CP in symptomatic patients since heterogeneous echogenicity of the pancreatic parenchyma seems to be almost specifically associated with the disease.

  7. The role of computed tomography in detecting splenic arteriovenous fistula and concomitant atrial myxoma.

    PubMed

    Rroji, Arben; Bilaj, Fatmir; Qirinxhi, Denis; Vucini, Ortencia; Hasimi, Endri; Goda, Artan

    2014-01-01

    Female, 45 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Arterio-venous fistula of the splean Symptoms: Lef-side abdominal pain Medication: - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Surgery. Rare disease. Splenic arterial-venous fistula and atrial myxoma are not rare cases but the co-existence of both lesions in the same patient is unpublished so far. A 45- year-old woman presented with vague left flank pain. She was initially scanned by B-dimensional echography, which revealed multiple enlarged hypo-echoic lesions in the splenic hilum. To further characterize the lesion, we performed computed tomography angiography (CTA). CTA showed dilatation of the splenic artery, and aneurismal dilatation of the splenic vein, associated with early opacification of the portal system. CTA showed also an intrasplenic venous aneurism, which was presumed to be the site of fistulous communication. Celiac arteriography confirmed the CTA findings. A left atrial mass was detected by cardiac echography, which was evaluated better by CTA, and was consistent with atrial myxoma. The patient underwent open surgery in different stage with resection of the atrial mass and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful. This is a unique case in the literature, showing the coexistence of a dual-pathology splenic arterial venous fistula and atrial myxoma.

  8. Spontaneous Acute Mesenteroaxial Gastric Volvulus Diagnosed by Computed Tomography Scan in a Young Man.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Gaby; Afifi, Ibrahim; Ellabib, Mohamed; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-04-26

    Acute gastric volvulus is a surgical emergency that requires early recognition and treatment. Acute idiopathic mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is a rare sub-type and there are few cases reported in children and there are even fewer reports in adults. We report a rare case of a 23-year-old man who presented with a 1-day history of vomiting, epigastric pain, distention, and constipation. The diagnosis for mesenteroaxial type gastric volvulus was confirmed by abdominal radiography and computed tomography. The patient was successfully treated by laparotomy with resection of the ischemic stomach wall and anastomosis. Acute spontaneous mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus is rare in adults and early diagnosis is challenging due to non-specific symptoms. A missed or delayed diagnosis may result in serious complications due to gastric obstruction. A patient presenting with severe epigastric pain and clinical evidence of gastric outlet obstruction should be considered as a surgical emergency to rule out gastric volvulus. High index of suspicion, early diagnosis and prompt surgical management are important for favorable outcome in patients with acute spontaneous gastric volvulus.

  9. Computed tomography imaging features of hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Sun, Mei-Yu; Liu, Jing-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Meng-Yao; Fan, Rui; Qamar, Sahrish

    2017-12-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare tumor which is most frequently found in uterus. The tumor arising from liver is extremely uncommon. A 36-year-old female with abdominal distention, cramps, and low-grade fever for over 15 days. The patient had a history of gastric adenocarcinoma with ovarian, celiac lymph nodes, and retroperitoneal lymph nodes metastases. Computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated an ill-defined heterogeneous hypo-dense mass in segment 8 (S8) of the liver. Contrast-enhanced CT imaging showed marked enhancement in arterial phase, mild-to-moderate enhancement in portal and equilibrium phases. Tumor-feeding artery was demonstrated from the right hepatic artery by the three-dimensional reconstruction images. Biopsy was performed, and a diagnosis of PEComa was rendered. No intervention for this tumor before liver biopsy. We present a rare case of hepatic PEComa. The information we provided is useful for summarizing the CT features of this kind of tumors. It should be included in differential diagnoses from common hypervascular neoplasms of liver. The final diagnosis is established on histopathological and immunohistochemical studies that are the "gold standard."

  10. Towards clinical computed ultrasound tomography in echo-mode: Dynamic range artefact reduction.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Computed ultrasound tomography in echo-mode (CUTE) allows imaging the speed of sound inside tissue using hand-held pulse-echo ultrasound. This technique is based on measuring the changing local phase of beamformed echoes when changing the transmit beam steering angle. Phantom results have shown a spatial resolution and contrast that could qualify CUTE as a promising novel diagnostic modality in combination with B-mode ultrasound. Unfortunately, the large intensity range of several tens of dB that is encountered in clinical images poses difficulties to echo phase tracking and results in severe artefacts. In this paper we propose a modification to the original technique by which more robust echo tracking can be achieved, and we demonstrate in phantom experiments that dynamic range artefacts are largely eliminated. Dynamic range artefact reduction also allowed for the first time a clinical implementation of CUTE with sufficient contrast to reproducibly distinguish the different speed of sound in different tissue layers of the abdominal wall and the neck. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Anatomic Suitability for Transcaval Access Based on Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Robert J; Greenbaum, Adam B; Rogers, Toby; Khan, Jaffar M; Fusari, Melissa; Chen, Marcus Y

    2017-01-09

    Transcaval access has been used successfully for over 200 transcatheter aortic valve replacements, large-bore percutaneous left ventricular assist devices, and thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs. This review teaches how to plan transcaval access and closure based on computed tomography. The main planning goals are to: 1) identify calcium-free crossing targets in the abdominal aorta along with optimal fluoroscopic projection angles and level with respect to lumbar vertebrae; 2) identify obstacles such as interposed bowel or pedunculated aortic atheroma; 3) plan covered stent bailout; and 4) identify jeopardized vascular branches such as renal arteries that might be obstructed by bailout covered stents if employed. The aorta and inferior vena cava are segmented (sculpted) using an image reconstruction workstation and crossing targets are highlighted. Important measurements such as aortic lumen diameter and target distance from renal arteries, aortoiliac bifurcation, and right femoral vein puncture site are reported to assist the operator. The proposed classification for transcaval feasibility has been revised, making some previously unfavorable candidates now feasible or favorable based on procedural success to date. Transcaval access allows percutaneous introduction of large devices into the aorta despite small or diseased iliofemoral arteries. By following these simplified procedures, both operators and imaging specialists can easily prepare comprehensive treatment plans. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of the renal segmental arterial anatomy with contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Francesco; Cozzi, Luigi Alberto; Cozzi, Gabriele

    2015-07-01

    To use triphasic multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) to study the renal segmental arterial anatomy and its relationship with the urinary tract to plan nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). One hundred and fifty nine patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT. We evaluated renal arteries and parenchymal vasculature. In 61 patients, the arteries and the urinary tract were represented simultaneously. 86.60% presented a single renal artery; 13.4%, multiple arteries. All single renal arteries divided into anterior and posterior branch before the hilum. The anterior artery branched into a superior, middle, and inferior branch. In 43.14%, the inferior artery arose before the others; in 45.75%, the superior artery arose before the others; in 9.80%, the branches shared a common trunk. In 26.80%, the posterior artery supplies the entire posterior surface; in 73.20%, it ends along the inferior calyx. In 96.73%, the upper pole was vascularized by the anterior superior branch and the posterior artery: the "tuning fork". MDCT showed four vascular segments in 96.73% and five in 3.27%. MDCT showed two avascular areas: the first along the projection of the inferior calyx on the posterior aspect, the second between the branches of the "tuning fork". The arterial phase provides the arterial tree representation; the delayed phase shows arteries and urinary tract simultaneously. MDCT provides a useful representation of the renal anatomy prior to intervascular-intrarenal NSS.

  13. Computed tomography angiography study of variations of the celiac trunk and hepatic artery in 100 patients.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Ivelise Regina Canito; de Araujo, Igor Farias; Lima, Adriana Augusta Lopes de Araujo; Melo, Ernesto Lima Araujo; Esmeraldo, Ronaldo de Matos

    2018-01-01

    To describe the main anatomical variations of the celiac trunk and the hepatic artery at their origins. This was a prospective analysis of 100 consecutive computed tomography angiography studies of the abdomen performed during a one-year period. The findings were stratified according to classification systems devised by Sureka et al. and Michels. The celiac trunk was "normal" (i.e., the hepatogastrosplenic trunk and superior mesenteric artery originating separately from the abdominal aorta) in 43 patients. In our sample, we identified four types of variations of the celiac trunk. Regarding the hepatic artery, a normal anatomical pattern (i.e., the proper hepatic artery being a continuation of the common hepatic artery and bifurcating into the right and left hepatic arteries) was seen in 82 patients. We observed six types of variations of the hepatic artery. We found rates of variations of the hepatic artery that are different from those reported in the literature. Our findings underscore the need for proper knowledge and awareness of these anatomical variations, which can facilitate their recognition and inform decisions regarding the planning of surgical procedures, in order to avoid iatrogenic intraoperative injuries, which could lead to complications.

  14. Retrospective Evaluation of Whole Body Computed Tomography for Tumor Staging in Dogs with Primary Appendicular Osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Talbott, Jessica L; Boston, Sarah E; Milner, Rowan J; Lejeune, Amandine; Souza, Carlos H de M; Kow, Kelvin; Bacon, Nicholas J; Hernandez, Jorge A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whole body computed tomography (CT) for staging canine appendicular osteosarcoma. Retrospective case series. Client-owned dogs diagnosed with appendicular osteosarcoma (n=39). Medical records for client-owned dogs diagnosed with appendicular osteosarcoma from August 2008 to July 2014 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had a confirmed diagnosis of appendicular osteosarcoma and were staged using whole body CT. Data collected included signalment, body weight, primary tumor location, serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, findings on 3-view thoracic radiographs, cytologic or histologic results, and findings on CT. Thirty-nine dogs (median age 8.5 years; median body weight 37 kg) had osteosarcoma of the distal radius (n=17), proximal humerus (11) and other sites. Serum ALP activity was elevated in 14 dogs. Bone metastasis was not detected in any dog on whole body CT. Pulmonary metastasis was considered definitive on CT based on board certified radiologist assessment in 2/39 dogs (5%). Two additional dogs (2/39, 5%) had soft tissue masses diagnosed on CT, consistent with concurrent, non-metastatic malignancies. Bone metastases were not identified in any dog with whole body CT. Thoracic and abdominal CT detected lung lesions and concurrent neoplasia in dogs with primary appendicular osteosarcoma. Whole body CT may be a useful adjunct to other screening tests for disseminated malignancy. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. 3D ultrasound computer tomography: update from a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; Zapf, M.; Kretzek, E.; Henrich, J.; Tukalo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Kaiser, C.; Knaudt, J.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis. We developed a 3D USCT system and tested it in a pilot study with encouraging results: 3D USCT was able to depict two carcinomas, which were present in contrast enhanced MRI volumes serving as ground truth. To overcome severe differences in the breast shape, an image registration was applied. We analyzed the correlation between average sound speed in the breast and the breast density estimated from segmented MRIs and found a positive correlation with R=0.70. Based on the results of the pilot study we now carry out a successive clinical study with 200 patients. For this we integrated our reconstruction methods and image post-processing into a comprehensive workflow. It includes a dedicated DICOM viewer for interactive assessment of fused USCT images. A new preview mode now allows intuitive and faster patient positioning. We updated the USCT system to decrease the data acquisition time by approximately factor two and to increase the penetration depth of the breast into the USCT aperture by 1 cm. Furthermore the compute-intensive reflectivity reconstruction was considerably accelerated, now allowing a sub-millimeter volume reconstruction in approximately 16 minutes. The updates made it possible to successfully image first patients in our ongoing clinical study.

  16. A Novel Automated Method for Analyzing Cylindrical Computed Tomography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Burke, E. R.; Rauser, R. W.; Martin, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    A novel software method is presented that is applicable for analyzing cylindrical and partially cylindrical objects inspected using computed tomography. This method involves unwrapping and re-slicing data so that the CT data from the cylindrical object can be viewed as a series of 2-D sheets in the vertical direction in addition to volume rendering and normal plane views provided by traditional CT software. The method is based on interior and exterior surface edge detection and under proper conditions, is FULLY AUTOMATED and requires no input from the user except the correct voxel dimension from the CT scan. The software is available from NASA in 32- and 64-bit versions that can be applied to gigabyte-sized data sets, processing data either in random access memory or primarily on the computer hard drive. Please inquire with the presenting author if further interested. This software differentiates itself in total from other possible re-slicing software solutions due to complete automation and advanced processing and analysis capabilities.

  17. Inexpensive computed tomography for remote areas via teleradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Richard

    1990-06-01

    While x-ray computed tomography (CT) is falling in price it is still beyond the means of most primary and secondary health care centres in the world. I would like to show how if a teleradiology system is installed there is a good prospect for also being able to install a simple but diagnostically effective CT system. This can be based on film used either as a one or two dimensional detector. 1. CT SYSTEMS The major components of a CT system are: 1) health care worker(s) who can decide which part of a patient needs to be imaged 2) an x-ray transparent bed on which a patient can be made comfortable positioned and restrained as necessary 3) an x-ray source mounted on a gantry 4) an x-ray detector mounted on the gantry 5) a digitizer for the x-ray signal 6) a computer to receive the signal 7) an algorithm that calculates the reconstructed CT image 8) a halftone or color display monitor 9) a radiologist who can interpret the images 10) communication from the radiologist to the health care worker(s). 2. BENEFITS OF CT VIA TELERADIOLOGY I would like to proceed on the premise that a teleradiology system could be placed between steps 6 and 7. This has the following benefits: a) Radiologists who are relatively scarce and generally located in urban tertiary care centres could serve people in remote areas

  18. Investigating the geometry of pig airways using computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Azad, Md Khurshidul; McMurray, Brandon; Henry, Brian; Royston, Thomas J.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2015-03-01

    Numerical modeling of sound propagation in the airways requires accurate knowledge of the airway geometry. These models are often validated using human and animal experiments. While many studies documented the geometric details of the human airways, information about the geometry of pig airways is scarcer. In addition, the morphology of animal airways can be significantly different from that of humans. The objective of this study is to measure the airway diameter, length and bifurcation angles in domestic pigs using computed tomography. After imaging the lungs of 3 pigs, segmentation software tools were used to extract the geometry of the airway lumen. The airway dimensions were then measured from the resulting 3 D models for the first 10 airway generations. Results showed that the size and morphology of the airways of different animals were similar. The measured airway dimensions were compared with those of the human airways. While the trachea diameter was found to be comparable to the adult human, the diameter, length and branching angles of other airways were noticeably different from that of humans. For example, pigs consistently had an early airway branching from the trachea that feeds the superior (top) right lung lobe proximal to the carina. This branch is absent in the human airways. These results suggested that the human geometry may not be a good approximation of the pig airways and may contribute to increasing the errors when the human airway geometric values are used in computational models of the pig chest.

  19. Preoperative N Staging of Gastric Cancer by Stomach Protocol Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Jeong Jae; Lee, Jeong Sub; Kim, Seung Hyoung; Kim, Bong Soo; Maeng, Young Hee; Hyun, Chang Lim; Kim, Min Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical stage of gastric cancer is currently assessed by computed tomography. Accurate clinical staging is important for the tailoring of therapy. This study evaluated the accuracy of clinical N staging using stomach protocol computed tomography. Materials and Methods Between March 2004 and November 2012, 171 patients with gastric cancer underwent preoperative stomach protocol computed tomography (Jeju National University Hospital; Jeju, Korea). Their demographic and clinical characteristics were reviewed retrospectively. Two radiologists evaluated cN staging using axial and coronal computed tomography images, and cN stage was matched with pathologic results. The diagnostic accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for clinical N staging and clinical characteristics associated with diagnostic accuracy were evaluated. Results The overall accuracy of stomach protocol computed tomography for cN staging was 63.2%. Computed tomography images of slice thickness 3.0 mm had a sensitivity of 60.0%; a specificity of 89.6%; an accuracy of 78.4%; and a positive predictive value of 78.0% in detecting lymph node metastases. Underestimation of cN stage was associated with larger tumor size (P<0.001), undifferentiated type (P=0.003), diffuse type (P=0.020), more advanced pathologic stage (P<0.001), and larger numbers of harvested and metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.001 each). Tumor differentiation was an independent factor affecting underestimation by computed tomography (P=0.045). Conclusions Computed tomography with a size criterion of 8 mm is highly specific but relatively insensitive in detecting nodal metastases. Physicians should keep in mind that computed tomography may not be an appropriate tool to detect nodal metastases for choosing appropriate treatment. PMID:24156034

  20. Lung Hot Spot Without Corresponding Computed Tomography Abnormality on Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Artifactual or Real, Iatrogenic or Pathologic?

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiyan

    Focal lung uptake without corresponding lesions or abnormalities on computed tomography (CT) scan poses a dilemma in the interpretation of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). A limited number of case reports have previously suggested an artifactual or iatrogenic nature of the uptake. In the present study, 8 relevant cases were included within a retrospective search of the database. Medical records were reviewed for follow-up radiological and pathologic information. In 7 of 8 cases with focal increased FDG uptake but no corresponding lesions or abnormalities on CT scan, the lung hot spots were artifactual or iatrogenic upon follow-up diagnostic chest CT or repeated PET/CT or both the scans. Microemboli were most likely a potential cause of the pulmonary uptake, with or without partial paravenous injection. One case in the series had a real pulmonary lesion demonstrated on follow-up PET/CT scans and on surgical pathology, although the initial integrated CT and follow-up diagnostic chest CT scans revealed negative findings to demonstrate pulmonary abnormalities corresponding to the hot spot on the PET scan. In conclusion, the finding of a lung hot spot in the absence of anatomical abnormality on FDG PET/CT was most likely artifactual or iatrogenic, but it might also represent a real pulmonary lesion. Nonvisualization of anatomical abnormality could be because of its small size and position directly overlying a segmental vessel. Further image follow-up is necessary and important to clarify the nature of the uptake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of incidental colorectal pathology on positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mui, Milton; Akhurst, Timothy; Warrier, Satish K; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2018-03-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important modality in cancer imaging. With its increasing availability and use, it is not uncommon to detect incidental focal colorectal 18 F-FDG uptake which poses a diagnostic challenge, as they may be associated with malignant or pre-malignant colorectal lesions. The aim of our study is to determine the proportion of these findings which represents true pathology. Patients with incidental focal colorectal 18 F-FDG uptake on PET/CT who subsequently underwent colonoscopy between January 2002 to September 2013 were identified from a prospective database in a tertiary referral centre. PET/CT results were correlated with colonoscopy and pathology results in these patients. Positive predictive values (PPVs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of PET/CT in the detection of incidental colorectal pathology were calculated. A total of 148 patients (92 men and 56 women), with a mean age 73 years (range of 36 to 93 years) were included in the study. A total of 170 foci of colorectal 18 F-FDG uptake were detected on PET/CT. Of these, 101 foci corresponded to a malignant or pre-malignant lesion (PPV 59%; 95% CI: 52-67%). On a per-patient analysis, 93 patients had at least one focus of colorectal 18 F-FDG uptake which corresponded to a pre-malignant or malignant lesion (PPV 63%; 95% CI: 54-71%). Focal colorectal 18 F-FDG uptake on PET/CT is associated with a significant proportion of malignant or pre-malignant lesions. Further evaluation with colonoscopy is recommended. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography predictors of progression after DA-R-EPOCH for PMBCL.

    PubMed

    Pinnix, Chelsea C; Ng, Andrea K; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Milgrom, Sarah A; Gunther, Jillian R; Fuller, C David; Smith, Grace L; Abou Yehia, Zeinab; Qiao, Wei; Wogan, Christine F; Akhtari, Mani; Mawlawi, Osama; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Chuang, Hubert H; Martin-Doyle, William; Armand, Philippe; LaCasce, Ann S; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle; Westin, Jason; Neelapu, Sattva; Nastoupil, Loretta

    2018-06-12

    Dose-adjusted rituximab plus etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (DA-R-EPOCH) has produced good outcomes in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL), but predictors of resistance to this treatment are unclear. We investigated whether [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) findings could identify patients with PMBCL who would not respond completely to DA-R-EPOCH. We performed a retrospective analysis of 65 patients with newly diagnosed stage I to IV PMBCL treated at 2 tertiary cancer centers who had PET-CT scans available before and after frontline therapy with DA-R-EPOCH. Pretreatment variables assessed included metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Optimal cutoff points for progression-free survival (PFS) were determined by a machine learning approach. Univariate and multivariable models were constructed to assess associations between radiographic variables and PFS. At a median follow-up of 36.6 months (95% confidence interval, 28.1-45.1), 2-year PFS and overall survival rates for the 65 patients were 81.4% and 98.4%, respectively. Machine learning-derived thresholds for baseline MTV and TLG were associated with inferior PFS (elevated MTV: hazard ratio [HR], 11.5; P = .019; elevated TLG: HR, 8.99; P = .005); other pretreatment clinical factors, including International Prognostic Index and bulky (>10 cm) disease, were not. On multivariable analysis, only TLG retained statistical significance ( P = .049). Univariate analysis of posttreatment variables revealed that residual CT tumor volume, maximum standardized uptake value, and Deauville score were associated with PFS; a Deauville score of 5 remained significant on multivariable analysis ( P = .006). A model combining baseline TLG and end-of-therapy Deauville score identified patients at increased risk of progression. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  3. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Kai-Lung; Hsu, Che-Hao; Hidayati, Shintami Chusnul; Cheng, Wen-Huang; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain. PMID:26346558

  4. Computer-aided classification of lung nodules on computed tomography images via deep learning technique.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai-Lung; Hsu, Che-Hao; Hidayati, Shintami Chusnul; Cheng, Wen-Huang; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer has a poor prognosis when not diagnosed early and unresectable lesions are present. The management of small lung nodules noted on computed tomography scan is controversial due to uncertain tumor characteristics. A conventional computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme requires several image processing and pattern recognition steps to accomplish a quantitative tumor differentiation result. In such an ad hoc image analysis pipeline, every step depends heavily on the performance of the previous step. Accordingly, tuning of classification performance in a conventional CAD scheme is very complicated and arduous. Deep learning techniques, on the other hand, have the intrinsic advantage of an automatic exploitation feature and tuning of performance in a seamless fashion. In this study, we attempted to simplify the image analysis pipeline of conventional CAD with deep learning techniques. Specifically, we introduced models of a deep belief network and a convolutional neural network in the context of nodule classification in computed tomography images. Two baseline methods with feature computing steps were implemented for comparison. The experimental results suggest that deep learning methods could achieve better discriminative results and hold promise in the CAD application domain.

  5. Computed tomography of partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection in adults.

    PubMed

    Haramati, Linda B; Moche, Ilana E; Rivera, Vivian T; Patel, Pavni V; Heyneman, Laura; McAdams, H Page; Issenberg, Henry J; White, Charles S

    2003-01-01

    To systematically describe the imaging features and clinical correlates of a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) in adults. Twenty-nine adults with a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection on CT were retrospectively identified. There were 19 women and 10 men, with a mean age of 53 (range: 19-83) years. Four cases were identified by review of 1825 consecutive chest CT reports from July 2000-July 2001, and 25 cases were culled from chest radiology teaching files at 3 institutions. Inclusion criteria were availability of CT images and medical charts. Chest radiographs (25 of 29 cases) were reviewed for mediastinal contour abnormalities, heart size, and pulmonary vascular pattern. Chest CT scans were reviewed for location, size, and drainage site of the anomalous vein; presence or absence of a pulmonary vein in the normal location; cardiac size and configuration; and pulmonary vasculature. Charts were reviewed for evidence of pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, history of congenital heart disease, and results of other cardiac imaging. The prevalence of a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection was 0.2% (4 of 1825 chest CT reports). Seventy-nine percent (23 of 29 patients) had an anomalous left upper lobe vein connecting to a persistent left vertical vein, only 5% (1 of 23 patients) of whom had a left upper lobe vein in the normal location. Seventeen percent (5 of 29 patients) had an anomalous right upper lobe vein draining into the superior vena cava, 60% (3 of 5 patients) of whom also had a right upper lobe pulmonary vein in the normal location. One patient (3%) had an anomalous right lower lobe vein draining into the suprahepatic inferior vena cava. Chest radiographic findings were abnormal left mediastinal contour in 64% (15 of 25 patients), abnormal right mediastinal contour in 8% (2 of 25 patients), and cardiomegaly in 24% (6 of 25 patients). Computed tomography findings were cardiomegaly in 48% (14 of

  6. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano, E-mail: mistrangelo@katamail.com; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectalmore » examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.« less

  7. Computational Growth and Remodeling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Constrained by the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Farsad, Mehdi; Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) evolve over time, and the vertebral column, which acts as an external barrier, affects their biomechanical properties. Mechanical interaction between AAAs and the spine is believed to alter the geometry, wall stress distribution, and blood flow, although the degree of this interaction may depend on AAAs specific configurations. In this study, we use a growth and remodeling (G&R) model, which is able to trace alterations of the geometry, thus allowing us to computationally investigate the effect of the spine for progression of the AAA. Medical image-based geometry of an aorta is constructed along with the spine surface, which is incorporated into the computational model as a cloud of points. The G&R simulation is initiated by local elastin degradation with different spatial distributions. The AAA–spine interaction is accounted for using a penalty method when the AAA surface meets the spine surface. The simulation results show that, while the radial growth of the AAA wall is prevented on the posterior side due to the spine acting as a constraint, the AAA expands faster on the anterior side, leading to higher curvature and asymmetry in the AAA configuration compared to the simulation excluding the spine. Accordingly, the AAA wall stress increases on the lateral, posterolateral, and the shoulder regions of the anterior side due to the AAA–spine contact. In addition, more collagen is deposited on the regions with a maximum diameter. We show that an image-based computational G&R model not only enhances the prediction of the geometry, wall stress, and strength distributions of AAAs but also provides a framework to account for the interactions between an enlarging AAA and the spine for a better rupture potential assessment and management of AAA patients. PMID:26158885

  8. Computational Growth and Remodeling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Constrained by the Spine.

    PubMed

    Farsad, Mehdi; Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Choi, Jongeun; Baek, Seungik

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) evolve over time, and the vertebral column, which acts as an external barrier, affects their biomechanical properties. Mechanical interaction between AAAs and the spine is believed to alter the geometry, wall stress distribution, and blood flow, although the degree of this interaction may depend on AAAs specific configurations. In this study, we use a growth and remodeling (G&R) model, which is able to trace alterations of the geometry, thus allowing us to computationally investigate the effect of the spine for progression of the AAA. Medical image-based geometry of an aorta is constructed along with the spine surface, which is incorporated into the computational model as a cloud of points. The G&R simulation is initiated by local elastin degradation with different spatial distributions. The AAA-spine interaction is accounted for using a penalty method when the AAA surface meets the spine surface. The simulation results show that, while the radial growth of the AAA wall is prevented on the posterior side due to the spine acting as a constraint, the AAA expands faster on the anterior side, leading to higher curvature and asymmetry in the AAA configuration compared to the simulation excluding the spine. Accordingly, the AAA wall stress increases on the lateral, posterolateral, and the shoulder regions of the anterior side due to the AAA-spine contact. In addition, more collagen is deposited on the regions with a maximum diameter. We show that an image-based computational G&R model not only enhances the prediction of the geometry, wall stress, and strength distributions of AAAs but also provides a framework to account for the interactions between an enlarging AAA and the spine for a better rupture potential assessment and management of AAA patients.

  9. Computer-based quantitative computed tomography image analysis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Hirotsugu; Nakagawa, Hiroaki; Niimi, Akio

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the most common type of progressive idiopathic interstitial pneumonia in adults. Many computer-based image analysis methods of chest computed tomography (CT) used in patients with IPF include the mean CT value of the whole lungs, density histogram analysis, density mask technique, and texture classification methods. Most of these methods offer good assessment of pulmonary functions, disease progression, and mortality. Each method has merits that can be used in clinical practice. One of the texture classification methods is reported to be superior to visual CT scoring by radiologist for correlation with pulmonary function and prediction of mortality. In this mini review, we summarize the current literature on computer-based CT image analysis of IPF and discuss its limitations and several future directions. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of multidetector-row computed tomography in propeller flap planning.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shimpei; Chung, Kevin C; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Rei; Takami, Yoshihiro; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2011-02-01

    The propeller flap is defined as (1) being island-shaped, (2) having an axis that includes the perforators, and (3) having the ability to be rotated around an axis. The advantage of the propeller flap is that it is a pedicle flap that can be applied to cover defects located at the distal ends of the extremities. The specific aims of the authors' study were (1) to evaluate the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography in the planning of propeller flaps and (2) to present a clinical case series of propeller flap reconstructions that were planned preoperatively using multidetector-row computed tomography. The authors retrospectively analyzed all cases between April of 2007 and April of 2010 at Nippon Medical School Hospital in Tokyo, where multidetector-row computed tomography was used preoperatively to plan surgical reconstructions using propeller flaps. Thirteen patients underwent 16 flaps using the propeller flap technique. The perforators were identified accurately by multidetector-row computed tomography preoperatively in all cases. This is the first report describing the application of multidetector-row computed tomography in the planning of propeller flaps. Multidetector-row computed tomography is superior to other imaging methods because it demonstrates more precisely the perforator's position and subcutaneous course using high-resolution three-dimensional images. By using multidetector-row computed tomography to preoperatively identify a flap's perforators, the surgeon can better plan the flap design to efficiently conduct the flap surgery.

  11. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F.; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre–Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM

  12. Clinical significance of computed tomography assessment for third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Kenji; Tomihara, Kei; Noguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Surgical extraction of the third molar is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the clinical practice of oral surgery. Third molar surgery is warranted when there is inadequate space for eruption, malpositioning, or risk for cyst or odontogenic tumor formation. Preoperative assessment should include a detailed morphologic analysis of the third molar and its relationship to adjacent structures and surrounding tissues. Due to developments in medical engineering technology, computed tomography (CT) now plays a critical role in providing the clear images required for adequate assessment prior to third molar surgery. Removal of the maxillary third molar is associated with a risk for maxillary sinus perforation, whereas removal of the mandibular third molar can put patients at risk for a neurosensory deficit from damage to the lingual nerve or inferior alveolar nerve. Multiple factors, including demographic, anatomic, and treatment-related factors, influence the incidence of nerve injury during or following removal of the third molar. CT assessment of the third molar prior to surgery can identify some of these risk factors, such as the absence of cortication between the mandibular third molar and the inferior alveolar canal, prior to surgery to reduce the risk for nerve damage. This topic highlight presents an overview of the clinical significance of CT assessment in third molar surgery. PMID:25071882

  13. Predicting deep neck space abscess using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joseph L; Hsu, Jack M; Chang, Jakwei

    2006-01-01

    To investigate objective measures that could increase the positive predictive value of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing deep neck space infections (DNSIs). A retrospective analysis of patients surgically treated at a tertiary care hospital for DNSIs for more than 2 years were reviewed. Patients who had had CT with contrast scanning suggestive of deep neck space abscess within 24 hours before surgery were included. The average Hounsfield units for each abscess were calculated. Based on the intraoperative finding of pus, the patients were divided into groups. Student t tests compared the average Hounsfield units, white blood cell count, and maximum temperature between the groups. Outcomes were measured by comparing overall length of hospital stay, length of postoperative stay, and complications. Of the 32 patients surgically drained, 24 (75%) had discreet collections of pus, whereas 12 (25%) did not. Hounsfield unit measurement was not reliable in distinguishing abscess from phlegmon. None of the other clinical variables studied to distinguish abscess from phlegmon were statistically different either. A statistical difference between the 2 groups was not identified. Although CT with contrast plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of DNSIs, the decision for surgical drainage of an abscess should be made clinically. A negative exploration rate of nearly 25% despite careful selection criteria should be expected.

  14. Automated breast segmentation in ultrasound computer tomography SAFT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, T.; You, W.; Zapf, M.; Tan, W. Y.; Gemmeke, H.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT) is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis. An essential step before further processing is to remove the water background from the reconstructed images. In this paper we present a fully-automated image segmentation method based on three-dimensional active contours. The active contour method is extended by applying gradient vector flow and encoding the USCT aperture characteristics as additional weighting terms. A surface detection algorithm based on a ray model is developed to initialize the active contour, which is iteratively deformed to capture the breast outline in USCT reflection images. The evaluation with synthetic data showed that the method is able to cope with noisy images, and is not influenced by the position of the breast and the presence of scattering objects within the breast. The proposed method was applied to 14 in-vivo images resulting in an average surface deviation from a manual segmentation of 2.7 mm. We conclude that automated segmentation of USCT reflection images is feasible and produces results comparable to a manual segmentation. By applying the proposed method, reproducible segmentation results can be obtained without manual interaction by an expert.

  15. Spatial smoothing coherence factor for ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Cuijuan; Xu, Mengling; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, many research studies have been carried out on ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) for its application prospect in early diagnosis of breast cancer. This paper applies four kinds of coherence-factor-like beamforming methods to improve the image quality of synthetic aperture focusing method for USCT, including the coherence-factor (CF), the phase coherence factor (PCF), the sign coherence factor (SCF) and the spatial smoothing coherence factor (SSCF) (proposed in our previous work). The performance of these methods was tested with simulated raw data which were generated by the ultrasound simulation software PZFlex 2014. The simulated phantom was set to be water of 4cm diameter with three nylon objects of different diameters inside. The ring-type transducer had 72 elements with a center frequency of 1MHz. The results show that all the methods can reveal the biggest nylon circle with the radius of 2.5mm. SSCF gets the highest SNR among the proposed methods and provides a more homogenous background. None of these methods can reveal the two smaller nylon circles with the radius of 0.75mm and 0.25mm. This may be due to the small number of elements.

  16. Review methods for image segmentation from computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, Nurwahidah; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik

    Image segmentation is a challenging process in order to get the accuracy of segmentation, automation and robustness especially in medical images. There exist many segmentation methods that can be implemented to medical images but not all methods are suitable. For the medical purposes, the aims of image segmentation are to study the anatomical structure, identify the region of interest, measure tissue volume to measure growth of tumor and help in treatment planning prior to radiation therapy. In this paper, we present a review method for segmentation purposes using Computed Tomography (CT) images. CT images has their own characteristics that affectmore » the ability to visualize anatomic structures and pathologic features such as blurring of the image and visual noise. The details about the methods, the goodness and the problem incurred in the methods will be defined and explained. It is necessary to know the suitable segmentation method in order to get accurate segmentation. This paper can be a guide to researcher to choose the suitable segmentation method especially in segmenting the images from CT scan.« less

  17. Computer assisted axial tomography (Emi scan) in neurologic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.K.; Baker, H.L.; Laws, E.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Cerebral angiography, pneumoencephalography, and radioisotope brain scan with their differing diagnostic abilities have provided the neurologist and neurosurgeon with extremely valuable diagnostic techniques. It is doubtful, however, if any of these now conventional methods had the enormous impact on the practice of neurology that computer assisted axial tomography (C.A.T.) is beginning to have. Here, for the first time, is a test which, without significant risk or discomfort, can demonstrate some normal intracranial (and intraorbital) structures, can demonstrate some normal intracranial pathology and, in many cases, can make the potentially dangerous contrast studies unnecessary. After only a few months experience withmore » C.A.T. in a clinical setting, it has become obvious that there will have to be a reappraisal of the accepted investigative work-up of many conditions. While it is too early to have formulated strict criteria for the use of C.A.T., this paper is an attempt to show how the technique is proving useful in the investigation of many conditions.« less

  18. Comparison Study of Regularizations in Spectral Computed Tomography Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehjahromi, Morteza; Zhang, Yanbo; Yu, Hengyong

    2018-12-01

    The energy-resolving photon-counting detectors in spectral computed tomography (CT) can acquire projections of an object in different energy channels. In other words, they are able to reliably distinguish the received photon energies. These detectors lead to the emerging spectral CT, which is also called multi-energy CT, energy-selective CT, color CT, etc. Spectral CT can provide additional information in comparison with the conventional CT in which energy integrating detectors are used to acquire polychromatic projections of an object being investigated. The measurements obtained by X-ray CT detectors are noisy in reality, especially in spectral CT where the photon number is low in each energy channel. Therefore, some regularization should be applied to obtain a better image quality for this ill-posed problem in spectral CT image reconstruction. Quadratic-based regularizations are not often satisfactory as they blur the edges in the reconstructed images. As a result, different edge-preserving regularization methods have been adopted for reconstructing high quality images in the last decade. In this work, we numerically evaluate the performance of different regularizers in spectral CT, including total variation, non-local means and anisotropic diffusion. The goal is to provide some practical guidance to accurately reconstruct the attenuation distribution in each energy channel of the spectral CT data.

  19. Computed tomography predictors of hepatocellular carcinoma tumour necrosis after chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Mary K; Dorn, David P; Zarzour, Jessica; Smith, J Kevin; Redden, David T; Saddekni, Souheil; Aal, Ahmed Kamel Abdel; Gray, Stephen H; Eckhoff, Devin E; DuBay, Derek A

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiographical features associated with a favourable response to trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE) are poorly defined for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods From 2008 to 2012, all first TACE interventions for HCC performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients with a pre-TACE and a post-TACE computed tomography (CT) scan were included in the analyses (n = 115). HCC tumour response to TACE was quantified via the the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) criteria. Univariate and multivariable analyses were constructed. Results The index HCC tumours experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis in 59/115 (51%) of patients after the first TACE intervention. On univariate analysis, smaller tumour size, peripheral tumour location and arterial enhancement were associated with a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis, whereas, only smaller tumour size [odds ratio (OR) 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48, 0.81] and peripheral location (OR 6.91; 95% CI 1.75, 27.29) were significant on multivariable analysis. There was a trend towards improved survival in the patients that experienced a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis (P = 0.08). Conclusions Peripherally located smaller HCC tumours are most likely to experience a > 90% or complete tumour necrosis after TACE. Surprisingly, arterial-phase enhancement and portal venous-phase washout were not significantly predictive of TACE-induced tumour necrosis. The TACE response was not statistically associated with improved survival. PMID:23980917

  20. Variation of canine vertebral bone architecture in computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Byunggyu; Park, Seungjo; Lee, Sang-kwon; Park, Jun-Gyu; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2018-01-01

    Focal vertebral bone density changes were assessed in vertebral computed tomography (CT) images obtained from clinically healthy dogs without diseases that affect bone density. The number, location, and density of lesions were determined. A total of 429 vertebral CT images from 20 dogs were reviewed, and 99 focal vertebral changes were identified in 14 dogs. Focal vertebral bone density changes were mainly found in thoracic vertebrae (29.6%) as hyperattenuating (86.9%) lesions. All focal vertebral changes were observed at the vertebral body, except for a single hyperattenuating change in one thoracic transverse process. Among the hyperattenuating changes, multifocal changes (53.5%) were more common than single changes (46.5%). Most of the hypoattenuating changes were single (92.3%). Eight dogs, 40% of the 20 dogs in the study and 61.6% of the 13 dogs showing focal vertebral changes in the thoracic vertebra, had hyperattenuating changes at the 7th or 8th thoracic vertebra. Our results indicate that focal changes in vertebral bone density are commonly identified on vertebral CT images in healthy dogs, and these changes should be taken into consideration on interpretation of CT images. PMID:28693309

  1. Quantification of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis using computed tomography and histology.

    PubMed

    Coxson, H O; Hogg, J C; Mayo, J R; Behzad, H; Whittall, K P; Schwartz, D A; Hartley, P G; Galvin, J R; Wilson, J S; Hunninghake, G W

    1997-05-01

    We used computed tomography (CT) and histologic analysis to quantify lung structure in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). CT scans were obtained from IPF and control patients and lung volumes were estimated from measurements of voxel size, and X-ray attenuation values of each voxel. Quantitative estimates of lung structure were obtained from biopsies obtained from diseased and normal CT regions using stereologic methods. CT density was used to calculate the proportion of tissue and air, and this value was used to correct the biopsy specimens to the level of inflation during the CT scan. The data show that IPF is associated with a reduction in airspace volume with no change in tissue volume or weight compared with control lungs. Lung surface area decreased two-thirds (p < 0.001) and mean parenchymal thickness increased tenfold (p < 0.001). An exudate of fluid and cells was present in the airspace of the diseased lung regions and the number of inflammatory cells, collagen, and proteoglycans was increased per 100 g of tissue in IPF. We conclude that IPF reorganized lung tissue content causing a loss of airspace and surface area without increasing the total lung tissue.

  2. Computed Tomography Findings of Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Lara M; Maddox, Thomas W; Meiring, Thelma; Wustefeld-Janssens, Brandan; Comerford, Eithne J

    2018-06-04

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign and usually monoarticular neoplastic lesion arising from the synovium, bursae and tendon sheaths in humans, horses and dogs. Categorization for PVNS in humans includes localized and diffuse forms of PVNS and tenosynovial giant cell tumour (TGCT), although histologically they are the same. The localized form is characterized by discrete nodular lesions, the diffuse form is often intra-articular, infiltrative, affecting the entire synovium with more aggressive behaviour and TGCT occurs along tendon sheaths. Computed tomography (CT) of PVNS is well described in humans but not documented in the veterinary literature. Pigmented villonodular synovitis is not a straightforward diagnosis and CT is useful to further characterize radiographic findings. A representative open surgical biopsy of the synovium is essential to obtaining the diagnosis and ruling out malignancy. Currently, there are no guidelines for the diagnosis of PVNS in dogs or long-term follow-up of these cases. This case report describes the presentation, diagnostic findings, treatment and long-term outcome of a 4-year-old male Labrador Retriever with confirmed PVNS. Clinical outcome was considered fair with the dog's lameness and symptoms remaining stable with medical management 3 years following the initial diagnosis. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  3. Cone-beam micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast.

    PubMed

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Cesarelli, Mario; Bifulco, Paolo; Russo, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We developed a scanner for micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast (BµCT) with a high resolution flat-panel detector and a microfocus X-ray tube. We evaluated the system spatial resolution via the 3D modulation transfer function (MTF). In addition to conventional absorption-based X-ray imaging, such a prototype showed capabilities for propagation-based phase-contrast and related edge enhancement effects in 3D imaging. The system limiting spatial resolution is 6.2mm -1 (MTF at 10%) in the vertical direction and 3.8mm -1 in the radial direction, values which compare favorably with the spatial resolution reached by mini focus breast CT scanners of other groups. The BµCT scanner was able to detect both microcalcification clusters and masses in an anthropomorphic breast phantom at a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. The use of a breast holder is proposed in order to have 1-2min long scan times without breast motion artifacts. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Frontal sinus parameters in computed tomography and sex determination.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mitra; Bakhtavar, Khadijeh; Moarefdoost, Jhale; Kamali, Artin; Rafeifar, Shahram

    2016-03-01

    The frontal sinus is a sturdy part of the skull that is likely to be retrieved for forensic investigations. We evaluated frontal sinus parameters in paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) images for sex determination. The study was conducted on 200 normal paranasal sinus CT images of 100 men and 100 women of Persian origin. We categorized the studied population into three age groups of 20-34, 35-49 and ⩾ 50 years. The number of partial septa in the right frontal sinus and the maximum height and width were significantly different between the two sexes. The highest precision for sex determination was for the maximum height of the left frontal sinus (61.3%). In the 20-34 years age-group, height and width of the frontal sinus were significantly different between the two sexes and the height of the left sinus had the highest precision (60.8%). In the 35-49 years age-group, right anterior-posterior diameter had a sex determination precision of 52.3%. No frontal sinus parameter reached a statistically significant level for sex determination in the ⩾ 50 years age-group. The number of septa and scallopings were not useful in sex determination. Frontal sinus parameters did not have a high precision in sex determination among Persian adults. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Quantitative computed tomography assessment of transfusional iron overload.

    PubMed

    Wood, John C; Mo, Ashley; Gera, Aakansha; Koh, Montre; Coates, Thomas; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) has been proposed for iron quantification for more than 30 years, however there has been little clinical validation. We compared liver attenuation by QCT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived estimates of liver iron concentration (LIC) in 37 patients with transfusional siderosis. MRI and QCT measurements were performed as clinically indicated monitoring of LIC and vertebral bone-density respectively, over a 6-year period. Mean time difference between QCT and MRI studies was 14 d, with 25 studies performed on the same day. For liver attenuation outside the normal range, attenuation values rose linearly with LIC (r(2) = 0·94). However, intersubject variability in intrinsic liver attenuation prevented quantitation of LIC <8 mg/g dry weight of liver, and was the dominant source of measurement uncertainty. Calculated QCT and MRI accuracies were equivalent for LIC values approaching 22 mg/g dry weight, with QCT having superior performance at higher LIC's. Although not suitable for monitoring patients with good iron control, QCT may nonetheless represent a viable technique for liver iron quantitation in patients with moderate to severe iron in regions where MRI resources are limited because of its low cost, availability, and high throughput. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Pulmonary thromboembolism on unenhanced postmortem computed tomography: Feasibility and findings.

    PubMed

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Held, Ulrike; Ruder, Thomas D; Ross, Steffen G; Schweitzer, Wolf; Fornaro, Juergen; Franckenberg, Sabine; Thali, Michael J; Flach, Patricia M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diagnosing fatal pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) with unenhanced postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). Twelve cases with autopsy confirmed PTE and matched controls (n=19) were retrospectively examined for PTE signs on PMCT. The following variables were evaluated: edema of the lower extremities (areal and Hounsfield Unit measurements) and observer dependent patterns of the morphology of the sedimentation in the pulmonary arteries and trunk. The median absolute difference between the areal measurements of the right and left lower leg and thigh and the attenuation of the popliteal adipose tissue did not differ significantly between the groups. In contrast, the categorical assessment of soft tissue edema in the lower extremities was significantly different. A statistically significant difference could also be found in the shape of the vascular content within the pulmonary trunk and arteries. PTE may be assessed on unenhanced PMCT using diagnostic clues such as a distinct pattern of the pulmonary artery content and the presence of perivascular edema in the lower extremities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The transesophageal echocardiography simulator based on computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Piórkowski, Adam; Kempny, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    Simulators are a new tool in education in many fields, including medicine, where they greatly improve familiarity with medical procedures, reduce costs, and, importantly, cause no harm to patients. This is so in the case of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), in which the use of a simulator facilitates spatial orientation and helps in case studies. The aim of the project described in this paper is to simulate an examination by TEE. This research makes use of available computed tomography data to simulate the corresponding echocardiographic view. This paper describes the essential characteristics that distinguish these two modalities and the key principles of the wave phenomena that should be considered in the simulation process, taking into account the conditions specific to the echocardiography. The construction of the CT2TEE (Web-based TEE simulator) is also presented. The considerations include ray-tracing and ray-casting techniques in the context of ultrasound beam and artifact simulation. An important aspect of the interaction with the user is raised.

  8. Cochlear anatomy using micro computed tomography (μCT) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namkeun; Yoon, Yongjin; Steele, Charles; Puria, Sunil

    2008-02-01

    A novel micro computed tomography (μCT) image processing method was implemented to measure anatomical features of the gerbil and chinchilla cochleas, taking into account the bent modailosis axis. Measurements were made of the scala vestibule (SV) area, the scala tympani (SV) area, and the basilar membrane (BM) width using prepared cadaveric temporal bones. 3-D cochlear structures were obtained from the scanned images using a process described in this study. It was necessary to consider the sharp curvature of mododailosis axis near the basal region. The SV and ST areas were calculated from the μCT reconstructions and compared with existing data obtained by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM), showing both qualitative and quantitative agreement. In addition to this, the width of the BM, which is the distance between the primary and secondary osseous spiral laminae, is calculated for the two animals and compared with previous data from the MRM method. For the gerbil cochlea, which does not have much cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina, the μCT-based BM width measurements show good agreement with previous data. The chinchilla BM, which contains more cartilage in the osseous spiral lamina than the gerbil, shows a large difference in the BM widths between the μCT and MRM methods. The SV area, ST area, and BM width measurements from this study can be used in building an anatomically based mathematical cochlear model.

  9. Continuous analog of multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateishi, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Yusaku; Abou Al-Ola, Omar M.; Kojima, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a hybrid dynamical system as a continuous analog to the block-iterative multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (BI-MART), which is a well-known iterative image reconstruction algorithm for computed tomography. The hybrid system is described by a switched nonlinear system with a piecewise smooth vector field or differential equation and, for consistent inverse problems, the convergence of non-negatively constrained solutions to a globally stable equilibrium is guaranteed by the Lyapunov theorem. Namely, we can prove theoretically that a weighted Kullback-Leibler divergence measure can be a common Lyapunov function for the switched system. We show that discretizing the differential equation by using the first-order approximation (Euler's method) based on the geometric multiplicative calculus leads to the same iterative formula of the BI-MART with the scaling parameter as a time-step of numerical discretization. The present paper is the first to reveal that a kind of iterative image reconstruction algorithm is constructed by the discretization of a continuous-time dynamical system for solving tomographic inverse problems. Iterative algorithms with not only the Euler method but also the Runge-Kutta methods of lower-orders applied for discretizing the continuous-time system can be used for image reconstruction. A numerical example showing the characteristics of the discretized iterative methods is presented.

  10. Computed tomography and patient risk: Facts, perceptions and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Power, Stephen P; Moloney, Fiachra; Twomey, Maria; James, Karl; O’Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1970s, computed tomography (CT) has revolutionized diagnostic decision-making. One of the major concerns associated with the widespread use of CT is the associated increased radiation exposure incurred by patients. The link between ionizing radiation and the subsequent development of neoplasia has been largely based on extrapolating data from studies of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped in Japan in 1945 and on assessments of the increased relative risk of neoplasia in those occupationally exposed to radiation within the nuclear industry. However, the association between exposure to low-dose radiation from diagnostic imaging examinations and oncogenesis remains unclear. With improved technology, significant advances have already been achieved with regards to radiation dose reduction. There are several dose optimization strategies available that may be readily employed including omitting unnecessary images at the ends of acquired series, minimizing the number of phases acquired, and the use of automated exposure control as opposed to fixed tube current techniques. In addition, new image reconstruction techniques that reduce radiation dose have been developed in recent years with promising results. These techniques use iterative reconstruction algorithms to attain diagnostic quality images with reduced image noise at lower radiation doses. PMID:28070242

  11. Validation of a Prototype Optical Computed Tomography System

    PubMed Central

    Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Molazadeh, Mikaeil; Takavar, Abbas; Shirazi, Alireza; Mesbahi, Asghar; Zeinali, Ahad

    2015-01-01

    In radiation cancer treatments, the most of the side effects could be minimized using a proper dosimeter. Gel dosimeter is the only three-dimensional dosimeter and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard method for gel dosimeter readout. Because of hard accessibility and high cost of sample reading by MRI systems, some other alternative methods were developed. The optical computed tomography (OCT) method could be considered as the most promising alternative method that has been studied widely. In the current study, gel dosimeter scanning using a prototype optical scanner and validation of this optical scanner was performed. Optical absorbance of the irradiated gel samples was determined by both of conventional spectrophotometer and the fabricated OCT system at 632 nm. Furthermore, these irradiated vials were scanned by a 1.5 T MRI. The slope of the curves was extracted as the dose-response sensitivity. The R2-dose sensitivity measured by MRI method was 0.1904 and 0.113 for NIPAM and PAGAT gels, respectively. The optical dose sensitivity obtained by conventional spectrophotometer and the fabricated optical scanner was 0.0453 and 0.0442 for NIPAM gels and 0.0244 and 0.0242 for PAGAT gels, respectively. The scanning results of the absorbed dose values showed that the new OCT and conventional spectrophotometer were in fair agreement. From the results, it could be concluded that the fabricated system is able to quantize the absorbed dose values in polymer gel samples with acceptable accuracy. PMID:26120572

  12. Design of functionalized gold nanoparticle probes for computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Zambelli, Vanessa; Ferretti, Anna M; Salerno, Domenico; Bellani, Giacomo; Polito, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The development of new molecules able to efficiently act as long-circulating computed tomography (CT) contrast agents is one of the most crucial topics in the biomedical field. In the last years, the chance to manipulate materials at the nano-size level gave new boost to this research, with the specific aim to design innovative nanoprobes. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have showed unique X-rays attenuation properties which, combined with their easy surface functionalization, makes them ideal candidates for the next generation of contrast agents. In this paper, we present a rational and facile approach to synthesize engineered and water-stable AuNPs, achieving concentrated colloidal solution with high Hounsfield Units (HU). An accurate control of reagents ratio allowed us to design AuNPs with different shapes, from symmetrical to anisotropic morphology, in a convenient 'one-pot' fashion. Their activity as efficient and reliable CT contrast agents has been evaluated and compared. Moreover, glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles have been developed ([Au] = 31.20 mg/mL; HU = 2453), in order to obtain a CT contrast agent able to combine spatial resolution with metabolic information. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) and disaster victim identification.

    PubMed

    Brough, A L; Morgan, B; Rutty, G N

    2015-09-01

    Radiography has been used for identification since 1927, and established a role in mass fatality investigations in 1949. More recently, postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) has been used for disaster victim identification (DVI). PMCT offers several advantages compared with fluoroscopy, plain film and dental X-rays, including: speed, reducing the number of on-site personnel and imaging modalities required, making it potentially more efficient. However, there are limitations that inhibit the international adoption of PMCT into routine practice. One particular problem is that due to the fact that forensic radiology is a relatively new sub-speciality, there are no internationally established standards for image acquisition, image interpretation and archiving. This is reflected by the current INTERPOL DVI form, which does not contain a PMCT section. The DVI working group of the International Society of Forensic Radiology and Imaging supports the use of imaging in mass fatality response and has published positional statements in this area. This review will discuss forensic radiology, PMCT, and its role in disaster victim identification.

  14. Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Education on Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Allison; Thachil, Karan; Haggard, Chris; Kalathingal, Sajitha

    2017-12-01

    As the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in dentistry continues to grow, questions related to appropriate radiation safety, training, and interpretation arise. Recognizing this need, the American Dental Association published an advisory statement for the safe use of CBCT in dentistry and recommended that guidelines for appropriate training be established. The purpose of this study was to assess radiation safety concerns related to CBCT and identify voids in current education on CBCT for the predoctoral dental curriculum and continuing dental education. A survey was mailed to general practitioners, oral surgeons, and periodontists in the Georgia Dental Association (n = 415). One hundred twenty-one surveys were received for a response rate of 29%. Sixty-eight percent of practitioners reported using CBCT, with 89% having used it for over 2 years. Few (12.4%) had experience with CBCT in dental school. Interest in continuing dental education on CBCT was reported at 59.8% and 43.6% for current users and nonusers of CBCT, respectively. Approximately 50% reported using precautionary radiation safety measures, and the methods used were varied. Although a higher survey return rate would allow for stronger evidence, this project identified some areas of education voids including radiation safety and the factors that contribute to patient dose; CBCT basics including instruction on the limitations of CBCT; CBCT anatomy and pathology with additional time dedicated to the paranasal sinuses; and interpretation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive coronary artery angiography using electron beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumberger, John A.; Rensing, Benno J.; Reed, Judd E.; Ritman, Erik L.; Sheedy, Patrick F., II

    1996-04-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT), also known as ultrafast-CT or cine-CT, uses a unique scanning architecture which allows for multiple high spatial resolution electrocardiographic triggered images of the beating heart. A recent study has demonstrated the feasibility of qualitative comparisons between EBCT derived 3D coronary angiograms and invasive angiography. Stenoses of the proximal portions of the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries were readily identified, but description of atherosclerotic narrowing in the left circumflex artery (and distal epicardial disease) was not possible with any degree of confidence. Although these preliminary studies support the notion that this approach has potential, the images overall were suboptimal for clinical application as an adjunct to invasive angiography. Furthermore, these studies did not examine different methods of EBCT scan acquisition, tomographic slice thicknesses, extent of scan overlap, or other segmentation, thresholding, and interpolation algorithms. Our laboratory has initiated investigation of these aspects and limitations of EBCT coronary angiography. Specific areas of research include defining effects of cardiac orientation; defining the effects of tomographic slice thickness and intensity (gradient) versus positional (shaped based) interpolation; and defining applicability of imaging each of the major epicardial coronary arteries for quantitative definition of vessel size, cross-sectional area, taper, and discrete vessel narrowing.

  16. Computed Tomography Enterography for Evaluation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Jung

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography enterography (CTE) has become a main modality for the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It simultaneously offers visualization of the small bowel and extraintestinal status, which is helpful for diagnosing IBD. Crohn disease has long segmental enhancing wall thickening related with the eccentric longitudinal distribution. In addition, mural stratification, fibrofatty proliferation, positive comb sign by increased mesenteric vascularity and internal/perianal fistula are characteristics of Crohn disease and can be identified on CTE. Short segmental inflammatory wall thickening and the central low attenuated lymph nodes are favorable CT finding of intestinal tuberculosis. A geographic, relatively large, and deep penetrating ulcer with bowel wall thickening and mural hyperenhancement in ileocecal area are characteristics of intestinal Behcet disease. Each of CTE findings for the IBDs is helpful for differential diagnosis. The main disadvantage of this technique is the requisite radiation exposure of patients, particularly in young patients. However, recent development of advanced CT techniques is promising for radiation dose reduction without compromising diagnostic image quality. PMID:23964329

  17. Computed tomography analysis of third webspace injections for interdigital neuroma.

    PubMed

    Hembree, W Chad; Groth, Adam T; Schon, Lew C; Guyton, Gregory P

    2013-04-01

    Injection for interdigital neuroma (IDN) may not selectively target the common digital nerve. We investigated the anatomical localization and extent of extravasation with injection for IDN. Two fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons injected radiopaque contrast into the third webspace of 49 cadaveric specimens (29 with 2 mL and 20 with 1 mL). Computed tomography scan of each specimen was obtained. An independent blinded foot and ankle surgeon analyzed the scans. All injections were accurate. Contrast was found in the second (greater than 70%) and fourth (greater than 30%) webspaces in both injection volume groups. No contrast was found within the third metatarsophalangeal joint. Extravasation extent was significantly greater with 2 mL versus 1 mL of solution in the medial to lateral (27.9 [7.8] mm vs 23.7 [6.0] mm; P = .05) and distal to proximal (52.1 [13.7] mm vs 40.4 [16.1] mm; P = .01) planes. No differences were observed in extravasation extent between surgeons. Injection for IDN was accurate, and extravasation extended into adjacent webspaces in a large percentage of specimens with both solution volumes. Lower extent of extravasation with 1 mL of solution did not indicate better selectivity of injection. Steroid injections for interdigital neuroma were accurate for therapeutic purposes but not diagnostic, except potentially for distinguishing webspace pain from joint pain.

  18. Automatic Solitary Lung Nodule Detection in Computed Tomography Images Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentana, I. W. B.; Jawas, N.; Asri, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Lung nodule is an early indicator of some lung diseases, including lung cancer. In Computed Tomography (CT) based image, nodule is known as a shape that appears brighter than lung surrounding. This research aim to develop an application that automatically detect lung nodule in CT images. There are some steps in algorithm such as image acquisition and conversion, image binarization, lung segmentation, blob detection, and classification. Data acquisition is a step to taking image slice by slice from the original *.dicom format and then each image slices is converted into *.tif image format. Binarization that tailoring Otsu algorithm, than separated the background and foreground part of each image slices. After removing the background part, the next step is to segment part of the lung only so the nodule can localized easier. Once again Otsu algorithm is use to detect nodule blob in localized lung area. The final step is tailoring Support Vector Machine (SVM) to classify the nodule. The application has succeed detecting near round nodule with a certain threshold of size. Those detecting result shows drawback in part of thresholding size and shape of nodule that need to enhance in the next part of the research. The algorithm also cannot detect nodule that attached to wall and Lung Chanel, since it depend the searching only on colour differences.

  19. The computed tomography appearance of recurrent and chronic appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rao, P M; Rhea, J T; Novelline, R A; McCabe, C J

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine computed tomography (CT) appearance of recurrent and chronic appendicitis. In 100 consecutive appendiceal CT examinations of proven appendicitis, 18 patients met criteria for recurrent (multiple discrete episodes) or chronic (continuous symptoms > 3 weeks, pathological findings) appendicitis. CT findings were reviewed. Ten patients had recurrent appendicitis, 3 had chronic appendicitis, 3 had both, and 2 had pathological chronic appendicitis. CT findings in 18 recurrent/chronic cases were identical to 82 acute appendicitis cases, including pericecal stranding (both 100%), dilated (> 6 mm) appendix (88.9% versus 93.9%), apical thickening (66.7% versus 69.5%), adenopathy (66.7% versus 61.0%), appendolith(s) (50% versus 42.7%), arrowhead (27.8% versus 22.0%), abscess (11.1% versus 11.0%), phlegmon (11.1% versus 6.1%), and fluid (5.6% versus 19.5%). CT findings in recurrent and chronic appendicitis are the same as those in acute appendicitis. Appendiceal CT can be beneficial for evaluating patients with suspected recurrent or chronic appendicitis.

  20. Multiple single-element transducer photoacoustic computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalva, Sandeep Kumar; Hui, Zhe Zhi; Pramanik, Manojit

    2018-02-01

    Light absorption by the chromophores (hemoglobin, melanin, water etc.) present in any biological tissue results in local temperature rise. This rise in temperature results in generation of pressure waves due to the thermoelastic expansion of the tissue. In a circular scanning photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system, these pressure waves can be detected using a single-element ultrasound transducer (SUST) (while rotating in full 360° around the sample) or using a circular array transducer. SUST takes several minutes to acquire the PA data around the sample whereas the circular array transducer takes only a fraction of seconds. Hence, for real time imaging circular array transducers are preferred. However, these circular array transducers are custom made, expensive and not easily available in the market whereas SUSTs are cheap and readily available in the market. Using SUST for PACT systems is still cost effective. In order to reduce the scanning time to few seconds instead of using single SUST (rotating 360° ), multiple SUSTs can be used at the same time to acquire the PA data. This will reduce the scanning time by two-fold in case of two SUSTs (rotating 180° ) or by four-fold and eight-fold in case of four SUSTs (rotating 90° ) and eight SUSTs (rotating 45° ) respectively. Here we show that with multiple SUSTs, similar PA images (numerical and experimental phantom data) can be obtained as that of PA images obtained using single SUST.

  1. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans.more » In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.« less

  2. Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Computed Tomography: A Focus on Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Cormode, David P.; Naha, Pratap C.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an X-ray based whole body imaging technique that is widely used in medicine. Clinically approved contrast agents for CT are iodinated small molecules or barium suspensions. Over the past seven years there has been a great increase in the development of nanoparticles as CT contrast agents. Nanoparticles have several advantages over small molecule CT contrast agents, such as long blood-pool residence times, and the potential for cell tracking and targeted imaging applications. Furthermore, there is a need for novel CT contrast agents, due to the growing population of renally impaired patients and patients hypersensitive to iodinated contrast. Micelles and lipoproteins, a micelle-related class of nanoparticle, have notably been adapted as CT contrast agents. In this review we discuss the principles of CT image formation and the generation of CT contrast. We discuss the progress in developing non-targeted, targeted and cell tracking nanoparticle CT contrast agents. We feature agents based on micelles and used in conjunction with spectral CT. The large contrast agent doses needed will necessitate careful toxicology studies prior to clinical translation. However, the field has seen tremendous advances in the past decade and we expect many more advances to come in the next decade. PMID:24470293

  3. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT.

  4. Multi-Mounted X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Liu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Jingzheng

    2016-01-01

    Most existing X-ray computed tomography (CT) techniques work in single-mounted mode and need to scan the inspected objects one by one. It is time-consuming and not acceptable for the inspection in a large scale. In this paper, we report a multi-mounted CT method and its first engineering implementation. It consists of a multi-mounted scanning geometry and the corresponding algebraic iterative reconstruction algorithm. This approach permits the CT rotation scanning of multiple objects simultaneously without the increase of penetration thickness and the signal crosstalk. Compared with the conventional single-mounted methods, it has the potential to improve the imaging efficiency and suppress the artifacts from the beam hardening and the scatter. This work comprises a numerical study of the method and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a developed multi-mounted X-ray CT prototype system. We believe that this technique is of particular interest for pushing the engineering applications of X-ray CT. PMID:27073911

  5. Value of coronary computed tomography as a prognostic tool.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Tahmeed; Parekh, Maansi; Ahmed, Shameer; Martinez, Matthew W

    2012-08-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has become an important part of our armamentarium for noninvasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Emerging technologies have produced lower radiation dose, improved spatial and temporal resolution, as well as information about coronary physiology. Although the prognostic role of coronary artery calcium scoring is known, similar evidence for CCTA has only recently emerged. Initial, small studies in various patient populations have indicated that CCTA-identified CAD may have a prognostic value. These findings were confirmed in a recent analysis of the international, prospective Coronary CT Angiography Evaluation For Clinical Outcomes: An International Multicenter (CONFIRM) registry. An incremental increase in mortality was found with a worse severity of CAD on a per-patient, per-vessel, and per-segment basis. In addition, age-, sex-, and ethnicity-based differences in mortality were also found. Whether changing our management algorithms based on these findings will affect outcomes is unclear. Large prospective studies utilizing targeted management strategies for obstructive and nonobstructive CAD are required to incorporate these recent findings into our daily practice. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. X-ray computed tomography for additive manufacturing: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Maskery, I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the use of x-ray computed tomography (XCT) is examined, identifying the requirement for volumetric dimensional measurements in industrial verification of additively manufactured (AM) parts. The XCT technology and AM processes are summarised, and their historical use is documented. The use of XCT and AM as tools for medical reverse engineering is discussed, and the transition of XCT from a tool used solely for imaging to a vital metrological instrument is documented. The current states of the combined technologies are then examined in detail, separated into porosity measurements and general dimensional measurements. In the conclusions of this review, the limitation of resolution on improvement of porosity measurements and the lack of research regarding the measurement of surface texture are identified as the primary barriers to ongoing adoption of XCT in AM. The limitations of both AM and XCT regarding slow speeds and high costs, when compared to other manufacturing and measurement techniques, are also noted as general barriers to continued adoption of XCT and AM.

  7. Simple trigonometry on computed tomography helps in planning renal access.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Cenk Yücel; Koçak, Burak; Kitirci, Gürcan; Danaci, Murat; Sarikaya, Saban

    2007-08-01

    To retrospectively assess the usefulness of the measurements on preoperative computed tomography (CT) of patients with urinary stone disease for planning the access site using vertical angulation of the C-arm. Of the patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy from November 2001 to October 2006, 41 patients with superior calix access had undergone preoperative CT. The depth of the target stone (y) and the vertical distance from that point to the first rib free slice (x) were measured on CT. The limit of the ratio of x over y was accepted as 0.58, with ratios below that indicating that infracostal access could be achieved by vertical angulation of the C-arm. We achieved an approach to the superior calix through an infracostal access in 28 patients. The preoperative trigonometric study on CT predicted 24 of them. The stone-free rate was 92.6%, and no chest-related complications developed. Simple trigonometry on CT of the patients with complex stones could help endourologists in planning renal access.

  8. Motion artifact detection in four-dimensional computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouilhol, G.; Ayadi, M.; Pinho, R.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.

    2014-03-01

    Motion artifacts appear in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images because of suboptimal acquisition parameters or patient breathing irregularities. Frequency of motion artifacts is high and they may introduce errors in radiation therapy treatment planning. Motion artifact detection can be useful for image quality assessment and 4D reconstruction improvement but manual detection in many images is a tedious process. We propose a novel method to evaluate the quality of 4DCT images by automatic detection of motion artifacts. The method was used to evaluate the impact of the optimization of acquisition parameters on image quality at our institute. 4DCT images of 114 lung cancer patients were analyzed. Acquisitions were performed with a rotation period of 0.5 seconds and a pitch of 0.1 (74 patients) or 0.081 (40 patients). A sensitivity of 0.70 and a specificity of 0.97 were observed. End-exhale phases were less prone to motion artifacts. In phases where motion speed is high, the number of detected artifacts was systematically reduced with a pitch of 0.081 instead of 0.1 and the mean reduction was 0.79. The increase of the number of patients with no artifact detected was statistically significant for the 10%, 70% and 80% respiratory phases, indicating a substantial image quality improvement.

  9. Adaptive noise correction of dual-energy computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Maia, Rafael Simon; Jacob, Christian; Hara, Amy K; Silva, Alvin C; Pavlicek, William; Mitchell, J Ross

    2016-04-01

    Noise reduction in material density images is a necessary preprocessing step for the correct interpretation of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) images. In this paper we describe a new method based on a local adaptive processing to reduce noise in DECT images An adaptive neighborhood Wiener (ANW) filter was implemented and customized to use local characteristics of material density images. The ANW filter employs a three-level wavelet approach, combined with the application of an anisotropic diffusion filter. Material density images and virtual monochromatic images are noise corrected with two resulting noise maps. The algorithm was applied and quantitatively evaluated in a set of 36 images. From that set of images, three are shown here, and nine more are shown in the online supplementary material. Processed images had higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than the raw material density images. The average improvements in SNR and CNR for the material density images were 56.5 and 54.75%, respectively. We developed a new DECT noise reduction algorithm. We demonstrate throughout a series of quantitative analyses that the algorithm improves the quality of material density images and virtual monochromatic images.

  10. The application of computed tomography in wound ballistics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiatis, Nick; Moraitis, Konstantinos; Papadodima, Stavroula; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Kelekis, Alexis; Kelesis, Christos; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Kordolaimi, Sofia; Ploussi, Agapi

    2015-09-01

    In wound ballistics research there is a relationship between the data that characterize a bullet and the injury resulted after shooting when it perforates the human body. The bullet path in the human body following skin perforation as well as the damaging effect cannot always be predictable as they depend on various factors such as the bullet's characteristics (velocity, distance, type of firearm and so on) and the tissue types that the bullet passes through. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight the contribution of Computed Tomography (CT) in wound ballistics research. Using CT technology and studying virtual “slices” of specific areas on scanned human bodies, allows the evaluation of density and thickness of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, the muscles, the vital organs and the bones. Density data taken from Hounsfield units can be converted in g/ml by using the appropriate software. By evaluating the results of this study, the anatomy of the human body utilizing ballistic gel will be reproduced in order to simulate the path that a bullet follows. The biophysical analysis in wound ballistics provides another application of CT technology, which is commonly used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines.

  11. Localization accuracy of sphere fiducials in computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobler, Jan-Philipp; Díaz Díaz, Jesus; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Lexow, G. Jakob; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, bone-attached robots and microstereotactic frames have attracted increasing interest due to the promising targeting accuracy they provide. Such devices attach to a patient's skull via bone anchors, which are used as landmarks during intervention planning as well. However, as simulation results reveal, the performance of such mechanisms is limited by errors occurring during the localization of their bone anchors in preoperatively acquired computed tomography images. Therefore, it is desirable to identify the most suitable fiducials as well as the most accurate method for fiducial localization. We present experimental results of a study focusing on the fiducial localization error (FLE) of spheres. Two phantoms equipped with fiducials made from ferromagnetic steel and titanium, respectively, are used to compare two clinically available imaging modalities (multi-slice CT (MSCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT)), three localization algorithms as well as two methods for approximating the FLE. Furthermore, the impact of cubic interpolation applied to the images is investigated. Results reveal that, generally, the achievable localization accuracy in CBCT image data is significantly higher compared to MSCT imaging. The lowest FLEs (approx. 40 μm) are obtained using spheres made from titanium, CBCT imaging, template matching based on cross correlation for localization, and interpolating the images by a factor of sixteen. Nevertheless, the achievable localization accuracy of spheres made from steel is only slightly inferior. The outcomes of the presented study will be valuable considering the optimization of future microstereotactic frame prototypes as well as the operative workflow.

  12. Cyst-based measurements for assessing lymphangioleiomyomatosis in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, P., E-mail: pechinlo@mednet.edu.ucla; Brown, M. S.; Kim, H.

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of a new family of measurements made on individual pulmonary cysts extracted from computed tomography (CT) for assessing the severity of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Methods: CT images were analyzed using thresholding to identify a cystic region of interest from chest CT of LAM patients. Individual cysts were then extracted from the cystic region by the watershed algorithm, which separates individual cysts based on subtle edges within the cystic regions. A family of measurements were then computed, which quantify the amount, distribution, and boundary appearance of the cysts. Sequential floating feature selection was used to select amore » small subset of features for quantification of the severity of LAM. Adjusted R{sup 2} from multiple linear regression and R{sup 2} from linear regression against measurements from spirometry were used to compare the performance of our proposed measurements with currently used density based CT measurements in the literature, namely, the relative area measure and the D measure. Results: Volumetric CT data, performed at total lung capacity and residual volume, from a total of 49 subjects enrolled in the MILES trial were used in our study. Our proposed measures had adjusted R{sup 2} ranging from 0.42 to 0.59 when regressing against the spirometry measures, with p < 0.05. For previously used density based CT measurements in the literature, the best R{sup 2} was 0.46 (for only one instance), with the majority being lower than 0.3 or p > 0.05. Conclusions: The proposed family of CT-based cyst measurements have better correlation with spirometric measures than previously used density based CT measurements. They show potential as a sensitive tool for quantitatively assessing the severity of LAM.« less

  13. Computed tomography-guided tissue engineering of upper airway cartilage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bryan N; Siebenlist, Nicholas J; Cheetham, Jonathan; Ducharme, Norm G; Rawlinson, Jeremy J; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2014-06-01

    Normal laryngeal function has a large impact on quality of life, and dysfunction can be life threatening. In general, airway obstructions arise from a reduction in neuromuscular function or a decrease in mechanical stiffness of the structures of the upper airway. These reductions decrease the ability of the airway to resist inspiratory or expiratory pressures, causing laryngeal collapse. We propose to restore airway patency through methods that replace damaged tissue and improve the stiffness of airway structures. A number of recent studies have utilized image-guided approaches to create cell-seeded constructs that reproduce the shape and size of the tissue of interest with high geometric fidelity. The objective of the present study was to establish a tissue engineering approach to the creation of viable constructs that approximate the shape and size of equine airway structures, in particular the epiglottis. Computed tomography images were used to create three-dimensional computer models of the cartilaginous structures of the larynx. Anatomically shaped injection molds were created from the three-dimensional models and were seeded with bovine auricular chondrocytes that were suspended within alginate before static culture. Constructs were then cultured for approximately 4 weeks post-seeding and evaluated for biochemical content, biomechanical properties, and histologic architecture. Results showed that the three-dimensional molded constructs had the approximate size and shape of the equine epiglottis and that it is possible to seed such constructs while maintaining 75%+ cell viability. Extracellular matrix content was observed to increase with time in culture and was accompanied by an increase in the mechanical stiffness of the construct. If successful, such an approach may represent a significant improvement on the currently available treatments for damaged airway cartilage and may provide clinical options for replacement of damaged tissue during treatment of

  14. Simulation-based artifact correction (SBAC) for metrological computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Joscha; Leinweber, Carsten; Sawall, Stefan; Stoschus, Henning; Ballach, Frederic; Müller, Tobias; Hammer, Michael; Christoph, Ralf; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a valuable tool for the metrolocical assessment of industrial components. However, the application of CT to the investigation of highly attenuating objects or multi-material components is often restricted by the presence of CT artifacts caused by beam hardening, x-ray scatter, off-focal radiation, partial volume effects or the cone-beam reconstruction itself. In order to overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to calculate a correction term that compensates for the contribution of artifacts and thus enables an appropriate assessment of these components using CT. Therefore, we make use of computer simulations of the CT measurement process. Based on an appropriate model of the object, e.g. an initial reconstruction or a CAD model, two simulations are carried out. One simulation considers all physical effects that cause artifacts using dedicated analytic methods as well as Monte Carlo-based models. The other one represents an ideal CT measurement i.e. a measurement in parallel beam geometry with a monochromatic, point-like x-ray source and no x-ray scattering. Thus, the difference between these simulations is an estimate for the present artifacts and can be used to correct the acquired projection data or the corresponding CT reconstruction, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated using simulated as well as measured data of single and multi-material components. Our approach yields CT reconstructions that are nearly free of artifacts and thereby clearly outperforms commonly used artifact reduction algorithms in terms of image quality. A comparison against tactile reference measurements demonstrates the ability of the proposed approach to increase the accuracy of the metrological assessment significantly.

  15. Anatomical variation of celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, and hepatic artery: Evaluation with multidetector computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Farghadani, Maryam; Momeni, Mohammad; Hekmatnia, Ali; Momeni, Fateme; Baradaran Mahdavi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    The celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and hepatic artery are the most important branches of abdominal aorta due to their vascularization field. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of different anatomical variation of celiac axis, SMA, hepatic artery, and its branches with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of upper abdomen arteries. MDCT of 607 kidney donor and traumatic patients that referred to MDCT unit at Al Zahra Hospital in Isfahan from 2012 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. We excluded patients with history of abdominal vascular surgery and hepatic or pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography images of the patient were obtained with 64-row MDCT scanner and anatomical variations were analyzed. Three hundred and eighty-eight (63.9%) of the 607 patients had classic arterial anatomy and 219 (36.1%) patients had variant types. The most common type of variation was the origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from SMA (9.6%), and the next common variation was the origin of the left hepatic artery (LHA) from the left gastric artery (6.9%). Variations in the origin of the common hepatic artery (CHA) were seen in 16 (2.6%) patients. Buhler arc was identified in two patients. The RHA originated from the celiac axis in 11 (1.8%) patients and from the aorta in 8 (1.3%) patients. Trifurcation of CHA into gastroduodenal artery, RHA, and LHA was detected in 11 (1.8%) patients. The results of the present study showed that anatomical variation occurs in a high percentage of patients. Detection of these variations can guide surgical and radiological interventional planning.

  16. Utility of Quantitative Parameters from Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography in Patients with Destructive Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji Hyun; Moon, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Min; Oh, Tae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hwa; So, Young

    2018-01-01

    Objective Quantitative parameters from Tc-99m pertechnetate single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) are emerging as novel diagnostic markers for functional thyroid diseases. We intended to assess the utility of SPECT/CT parameters in patients with destructive thyroiditis. Materials and Methods Thirty-five destructive thyroiditis patients (7 males and 28 females; mean age, 47.3 ± 13.0 years) and 20 euthyroid patients (6 males and 14 females; mean age, 45.0 ± 14.8 years) who underwent Tc-99m pertechnetate quantitative SPECT/CT were retrospectively enrolled. Quantitative parameters from the SPECT/CT (%uptake, standardized uptake value [SUV], thyroid volume, and functional thyroid mass [SUVmean × thyroid volume]) and thyroid hormone levels were investigated to assess correlations and predict the prognosis for destructive thyroiditis. The occurrence of hypothyroidism was the outcome for prognosis. Results All the SPECT/CT quantitative parameters were significantly lower in the 35 destructive thyroiditis patients compared to the 20 euthyroid patients using the same SPECT/CT scanner and protocol (p < 0.001 for all parameters). T3 and free T4 did not correlate with any SPECT/CT parameters, but thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) significantly correlated with %uptake (p = 0.004), SUVmean (p < 0.001), SUVmax (p = 0.002), and functional thyroid mass (p < 0.001). Of the 35 destructive thyroiditis patients, 16 progressed to hypothyroidism. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only T3 levels were associated with the later occurrence of hypothyroidism (p = 0.002, exp(β) = 1.022, 95% confidence interval: 1.008 – 1.035). Conclusion Novel quantitative SPECT/CT parameters could discriminate patients with destructive thyroiditis from euthyroid patients, suggesting the robustness of the quantitative SPECT/CT approach. However, disease progression of destructive thyroiditis could not be predicted using the parameters, as these only correlated

  17. Clinical cone beam computed tomography compared to high-resolution peripheral computed tomography in the assessment of distal radius bone.

    PubMed

    de Charry, C; Boutroy, S; Ellouz, R; Duboeuf, F; Chapurlat, R; Follet, H; Pialat, J B

    2016-10-01

    Clinical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was compared to high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) for the assessment of ex vivo radii. Strong correlations were found for geometry, volumetric density, and trabecular structure. Using CBCT, bone architecture assessment was feasible but compared to HR-pQCT, trabecular parameters were overestimated whereas cortical ones were underestimated. HR-pQCT is the most widely used technique to assess bone microarchitecture in vivo. Yet, this technology has been only applicable at peripheral sites, in only few research centers. Clinical CBCT is more widely available but quantitative assessment of the bone structure is usually not performed. We aimed to compare the assessment of bone structure with CBCT (NewTom 5G, QR, Verona, Italy) and HR-pQCT (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical AG, Brüttisellen, Switzerland). Twenty-four distal radius specimens were scanned with these two devices with a reconstructed voxel size of 75 μm for Newtom 5G and 82 μm for XtremeCT, respectively. A rescaling-registration scheme was used to define the common volume of interest. Cortical and trabecular compartments were separated using a semiautomated double contouring method. Density and microstructure were assessed with the HR-pQCT software on both modality images. Strong correlations were found for geometry parameters (r = 0.98-0.99), volumetric density (r = 0.91-0.99), and trabecular structure (r = 0.94-0.99), all p < 0.001. Correlations were lower for cortical microstructure (r = 0.80-0.89), p < 0.001. However, absolute differences were observed between modalities for all parameters, with an overestimation of the trabecular structure (trabecular number, 1.62 ± 0.37 vs. 1.47 ± 0.36 mm(-1)) and an underestimation of the cortical microstructure (cortical porosity, 3.3 ± 1.3 vs. 4.4 ± 1.4 %) assessed on CBCT images compared to HR-pQCT images. Clinical CBCT devices are able to

  18. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  19. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography in suspected lesions in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, G. M.; Hadley, D. M.; Lawrence, A.; Bone, I.; Burton, H.; Grant, R.; Condon, B.; Macpherson, P.; Rowan, J.

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in investigating patients suspected of having a lesion in the posterior cranial fossa. DESIGN--Randomised allocation of newly referred patients to undergo either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging; the alternative investigation was performed subsequently only in response to a request from the referring doctor. SETTING--A regional neuroscience centre serving 2.7 million. PATIENTS--1020 Patients recruited between April 1986 and December 1987, all suspected by neurologists, neurosurgeons, or other specialists of having a lesion in the posterior fossa and referred for neuroradiology. The groups allocated to undergo computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging were well matched in distributions of age, sex, specialty of referring doctor, investigation as an inpatient or an outpatient, suspected site of lesion, and presumed disease process; the referring doctor's confidence in the initial clinical diagnosis was also similar. INTERVENTIONS--After the patients had been imaged by either computed tomography or magnetic resonance (using a resistive magnet of 0.15 T) doctors were given the radiologist's report and a form asking if they considered that imaging with the alternative technique was necessary and, if so, why; it also asked for their current diagnoses and their confidence in them. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of requests for the alternative method of investigation. Assessment of characteristics of patients for whom further imaging was requested and lesions that were suspected initially and how the results of the second imaging affected clinicians' and radiologists' opinions. RESULTS--Ninety three of the 501 patients who initially underwent computed tomography were referred subsequently for magnetic resonance imaging whereas only 28 of the 493 patients who initially underwent magnetic resonance imaging were referred subsequently for computed tomography. Over the study the

  20. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomographycomputed tomography for staging lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Biz, Aline Navega; Caetano, Rosângela

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET) in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT) exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used. RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD) million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD) million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD) million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD) and 600 BRL (372.8 USD) million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD) and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD) million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated. PMID:26274871

  1. False Positive Positron Emission Tomography / Computed Tomography Scans in Treated Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Michael K; Ong, Shawn Y; Goyal, Uma; Wertheim, Betsy C; Hsu, Charles C

    2017-01-01

    Objective Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for head and neck cancers (HNC) is commonly utilized for post-treatment assessment. Though PET/CT in this setting has been reported to have high negative predictive values (> 90%), positive predictive values have been reported at approximately 50%, leading to high rates of false positivity (FP) and troubling management decisions for both patient and practitioner. The objective of this study was to identify patient, disease, treatment and imaging factors that might be associated with a higher likelihood of FP on initial post-treatment PET/CT imaging for patients treated for HNC.  Materials and methods A retrospective chart review was performed on 84 patients treated for HNC who received radiation therapy (RT) as part of their overall management from October 2005 to August 2013. Of the patients screened, 19 were found to have mucosally based squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) with positive initial post-treatment PET/CT studies (23%). Fisher’s exact test was used to analyze the association between categorical variables and FP, including patient's gender, disease laterality, primary tumor site and stage, nodal and overall stage, high dose RT fraction size, number of RT fractions completed, total RT dose, biologically effective dose and timing of PET/CT acquisition. Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to analyze the association between continuous variables and FP, including patient age, total elapsed days of RT, an amount of infused fluorodeoxyglucose 18F-FDG, pre-PET/CT serum glucose levels, and maximum standardized uptake value SUVmax. Statistically significant findings were those that were deemed p <0.05. Results Among patients with positive initial post-treatment PET/CT scans for treated HNC, there was a lower proportion of higher primary disease stage associated with FP versus true positivity (T-stage 3-4: 20 vs 78%, respectively, p=0.023). We also discovered that 50% of patients that underwent

  2. Does positron emission tomography/computed tomography aid the diagnosis of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis?

    PubMed

    Balmforth, Damian; Chacko, Jacob; Uppal, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) aids the diagnosis of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE)? A total of 107 publications were found using the reported search, of which 6 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The reported outcome of all studies was a final diagnosis of confirmed endocarditis on follow-up. All the six studies were non-randomized, single-centre, observational studies and thus represented level 3 evidence. The diagnostic capability of PET/CT for PVE was compared with that of the modified Duke Criteria and echocardiography, and reported in terms of sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values. All studies demonstrated an increased sensitivity for the diagnosis of PVE when PET/CT was combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission. A higher SUVmax on PET was found to be significantly associated with a confirmed diagnosis of endocarditis and an additional diagnostic benefit of PET/CT angiography over conventional PET/non-enhanced CT is reported due to improved anatomical resolution. However, PET/CT was found to be unreliable in the early postoperative period due to its inability to distinguish between infection and residual postoperative inflammatory changes. PET/CT was also found to be poor at diagnosing cases of native valve endocarditis. We conclude that PET/CT aids in the diagnosis of PVE when combined with the modified Duke Criteria on admission by increasing the diagnostic sensitivity. The diagnostic ability of PET/CT can be potentiated by the use of PET/CTA; however, its use may be unreliable in the early postoperative period or in native valve endocarditis. © The Author 2016. Published by

  3. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  4. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography in temporal bone imaging for surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Erovic, Boban M; Chan, Harley H L; Daly, Michael J; Pothier, David D; Yu, Eugene; Coulson, Chris; Lai, Philip; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging is the standard imaging technique for temporal bone diseases, whereas cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is a very fast imaging tool with a significant less radiation dose compared with conventional CT. We hypothesize that a system for intraoperative cone-beam CT provides comparable image quality to diagnostic CT for identifying temporal bone anatomical landmarks in cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study. University tertiary care facility. Twenty cadaveric temporal bones were affixed into a head phantom and scanned with both a prototype cone-beam CT C-arm and multislice helical CT. Imaging performance was evaluated by 3 otologic surgeons and 1 head and neck radiologist. Participants were presented images in a randomized order and completed landmark identification questionnaires covering 21 structures. CBCT and multislice CT have comparable performance in identifying temporal structures. Three otologic surgeons indicated that CBCT provided statistically equivalent performance for 19 of 21 landmarks, with CBCT superior to CT for the chorda tympani and inferior for the crura of the stapes. Subgroup analysis showed that CBCT performed superiorly for temporal bone structures compared with CT. The radiologist rated CBCT and CT as statistically equivalent for 18 of 21 landmarks, with CT superior to CBCT for the crura of stapes, chorda tympani, and sigmoid sinus. CBCT provides comparable image quality to conventional CT for temporal bone anatomical sites in cadaveric specimens. Clinical applications of low-dose CBCT imaging in surgical planning, intraoperative guidance, and postoperative assessment are promising but require further investigation.

  5. Preoperative computed tomography angiography for planning DIEP flap breast reconstruction reduces operative time and overall complications

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, Warren Matthew; Chowdhry, Muhammad; Band, Bassam; Ramakrishnan, Venkat V.; Griffiths, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background The approach and operative techniques associated with breast reconstruction have steadily been refined since its inception, with abdominal perforator-based flaps becoming the gold standard reconstructive option for women undergoing breast cancer surgery. The current study comprises a cohort of 632 patients, in whom specific operative times are recorded by a blinded observer, and aims to address the potential benefits seen with the use of computer tomography (CT) scanning preoperatively on operative outcomes, complications and surgical times. Methods A prospectively recorded, retrospective review was undertaken of patients undergoing autologous breast reconstruction with a DIEP flap at the St Andrews Centre over a 4-year period from 2010 to 2014. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) scanning of patients began in September 2012 and thus 2 time periods were compared: 2 years prior to the use of CTA scans and 2 years afterwards. For all patients, key variables were collected including patient demographics, operative times, flap harvest time, pedicle length, surgeon experience and complications. Results In group 1, comprising patients within the period prior to CTA scans, 265 patients underwent 312 flaps; whilst in group 2, the immediately following 2 years, 275 patients had 320 flaps. The use of preoperative CTA scans demonstrated a significant reduction in flap harvest time of 13 minutes (P<0.013). This significant time saving was seen in all flap modifications: unilateral, bilateral and bipedicled DIEP flaps. The greatest time saving was seen in bipedicle flaps, with a 35-minute time saving. The return to theatre rate significantly dropped from 11.2% to 6.9% following the use of CTA scans, but there was no difference in the total failure rate. Conclusions The study has demonstrated both a benefit to flap harvest time as well as overall operative times when using preoperative CTA. The use of CTA was associated with a significant reduction in complications

  6. Trunk muscle quality assessed by computed tomography: Association with adiposity indices and glucose tolerance in men.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Alexandre; Alméras, Natalie; Lemieux, Isabelle; Tremblay, Angelo; Bergeron, Jean; Poirier, Paul; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2018-04-12

    Thigh muscle attenuation measured by computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be a reliable and useful index of skeletal muscle fat infiltration. Thigh muscle fat content assessed by CT has been linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes and is a correlate of insulin resistance in sedentary individuals. However, as measurement of mid-thigh fat content requires the assessment of another region of interest beyond the usual abdominal scan required to measure levels of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, this study aimed at testing the hypothesis that skeletal muscle fat measured from a single abdominal scan (L 4 -L 5 ) would also provide information relevant to the estimation of muscle fat infiltration as it relates to cardiometabolic risk. Abdominal (L 4 -L 5 ) and mid-thigh CT scans were performed in a sample of 221 sedentary men covering a wide range of adiposity values. Trunk muscles on the L 4 -L 5 scan were classified into 2 groups: 1) psoas and 2) core muscles. The two scans were segmented to calculate muscle areas, mean attenuation values as well as low-attenuation muscle (LAM) areas, the latter being considered as an index of skeletal muscle fat infiltration. Body mass index (BMI), body composition and waist circumference were assessed and a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Mid-thigh, psoas and core LAM areas were all significantly associated with body composition indices (0.46 ≤ r ≤ 0.71, p < 0.0001) whereas trunk muscle indices were more strongly associated with visceral adiposity and waist circumference (0.54 ≤ r ≤ 0.79, p < 0.0001) than were mid-thigh muscle variables (0.44 ≤ r ≤ 0.62, p < 0.0001). Mid-thigh LAM area as well as psoas and core LAM areas were significantly associated with fasting glucose, 2-h plasma glucose levels, the glucose area under the curve and with the HOMA-IR index (mid-thigh LAM area: 0.18 ≤ r ≤ 0.25, p < 0.01; psoas LAM area: 0

  7. Clinical value of whole body fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongyi; Pan, Lingling; Cheng, Jingyi; Hu, Silong; Xu, Junyan; Ye, Dingwei; Zhang, Yingjian

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the value of whole-body fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for the detection of metastatic bladder cancer. From December 2006 to August 2010, 60 bladder cancer patients (median age 60.5 years old, range 32-96) underwent whole body positron emission tomography/computed tomography positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The diagnostic accuracy was assessed by performing both organ-based and patient-based analyses. Identified lesions were further studied by biopsy or clinically followed for at least 6 months. One hundred and thirty-four suspicious lesions were identified. Among them, 4 primary cancers (2 pancreatic cancers, 1 colonic and 1 nasopharyngeal cancer) were incidentally detected, and the patients could be treated on time. For the remaining 130 lesions, positron emission tomography/computed tomography detected 118 true positive lesions (sensitivity = 95.9%). On the patient-based analysis, the overall sensitivity and specificity resulted to be 87.1% and 89.7%, respectively. There was no difference of sensitivity and specificity in patients with or without adjuvant treatment in terms of detection of metastatic sites by positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Compared with conventional imaging modality, positron emission tomography/computed tomography correctly changed the management in 15 patients (25.0%). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography has excellent sensitivity and specificity in the detection of metastatic bladder cancer and it provides additional diagnostic information compared to standard imaging techniques. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Multiscale and multimodality computed tomography for cortical bone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, A.; Peyrin, F.; Gouttenoire, P. J.; Laredo, J. D.; DeVernejoul, M. C.; Cohen Solal, M.; Chappard, C.

    2016-12-01

    In clinical studies, high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is used to separately evaluate cortical bone and trabecular bone with an isotropic voxel of 82 µm3, and typical cortical parameters are cortical density (D.comp), thickness (Ct.Th), and porosity (Ct.Po). In vitro, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to explore the internal cortical bone micro-structure with isotropic voxels and high resolution synchrotron radiation (SR); micro-CT is considered the ‘gold standard’. In 16 tibias and 8 femurs, HR-pQCT measurements were compared to conventional micro-CT measurements. To test modality effects, conventional micro-CT measurements were compared to SR micro-CT measurements at 7.5 µm3 SR micro-CT measurements were also tested at different voxel sizes for the femurs, specifically, 7.5 µm3 versus 2.8 µm3. D.comp (r  =  -0.88, p  <  10-3) was the parameter best correlated with porosity (Po.V/TV). The correlation was not affected by the removal of pores under 130 µm. Ct.Th was also significantly highly correlated (r  =  -0.89 p  <  10-3), while Ct.Po was correlated with its counterpart Po.V/TV (r  =  0.74, p  <  10-3). From SR micro-CT and conventional micro-CT at 7.5 µm3 in matching areas, Po.V/TV and pore diameter were underestimated in conventional micro-CT with mean  ±  standard deviation (SD) biases of  -2.5  ±  1.9% and  -0.08  ±  0.08 mm, respectively. In contrast, pore number (Po.N) and pore separation (Po.Sp) were overestimated with mean  ±  SD biases of  +0.03  ±  0.04 mm-1 and  +0.02  ±  0.04 mm, respectively. The results from the tibia and femur were similar when the results of SR micro-CT at 7.5 µm3 and 2.8 µm3 were compared. Po.V/TV, specific surface of pores (Po.S/Po.V), and Po.N were underestimated with mean biases of  -1.7  ±  0.9%, -4.6  ±  4.4 mm-1, and

  9. Ischemic stroke enhancement in computed tomography scans using a computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Allan F. F.; Pavan, Ana L. M.; Jennane, Rachid; Miranda, José R. A.; Freitas, Carlos C. M.; Abdala, Nitamar; Pina, Diana R.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a novel approach was proposed to enhance the visual perception of ischemic stroke in computed tomography scans. Through different image processing techniques, we enabled less experienced physicians, to reliably detect early signs of stroke. A set of 40 retrospective CT scans of patients were used, divided into two groups: 25 cases of acute ischemic stroke and 15 normal cases used as control group. All cases were obtained within 4 hours of symptoms onset. Our approach was based on the variational decomposition model and three different segmentation methods. A test determined observers' performance to correctly diagnose stroke cases. The Expectation Maximization method provided the best results among all observers. The overall sensitivity of the observer's analysis was 64% and increased to 79%. The overall specificity was 67% and increased to 78%. These results show the importance of a computational tool to assist neuroradiology decisions, especially in critical situations such as the diagnosis of ischemic stroke.

  10. Usefulness of Tc99m-mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula.

    PubMed

    Parghane, Rahul Vithalrao; Phulsunga, Rohit Kumar; Gupta, Rajesh; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-01-01

    Bronchobiliary fistula (BBF), a rare complication of liver disease, is an abnormal communication between the biliary tract and bronchial tree. BBF may occur as a consequence of local liver infections such as hydatid or amebic disease, pyogenic liver abscess or trauma to the liver, obstruction of biliary tract, and tumor. As such management of liver disease with BBF is very difficult and often associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, timely diagnosis of BBF is imperative. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy along with hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography using Tc99m-mebrofenin is a very useful noninvasive imaging modality, in the diagnosis of BBF.

  11. Usefulness of Tc99m-mebrofenin Hepatobiliary Scintigraphy and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Parghane, Rahul Vithalrao; Phulsunga, Rohit Kumar; Gupta, Rajesh; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-01-01

    Bronchobiliary fistula (BBF), a rare complication of liver disease, is an abnormal communication between the biliary tract and bronchial tree. BBF may occur as a consequence of local liver infections such as hydatid or amebic disease, pyogenic liver abscess or trauma to the liver, obstruction of biliary tract, and tumor. As such management of liver disease with BBF is very difficult and often associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, timely diagnosis of BBF is imperative. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy along with hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography using Tc99m-mebrofenin is a very useful noninvasive imaging modality, in the diagnosis of BBF. PMID:29033682

  12. Quantification of image contrast of infarcts on computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Gomolka, R S; Chrzan, R M; Urbanik, A; Kazmierski, R; Grzanka, A D; Nowinski, W L

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Accurate identification of infarcts in non-contrast computed tomography (NC-CT) scans of the brain is fundamental in the diagnosis and management of patients with stroke. Quantification of image contrast properties at the boundaries of ischemic infarct regions in NC-CT can contribute to a more precise manual or automatic delineation of these regions. Here we explore these properties quantitatively. Methods We retrospectively investigated 519 NC-CT studies of 425 patients with clinically confirmed ischemic strokes. The average and standard deviation (SD) of patients' age was 67.5 ± 12.4 years and the average(median)±SD time from symptoms onset to NC-CT examination was 27.4(12)±35.7 h. For every scan with an ischemic lesion identified by experts, the image contrast of the lesion vs. normal surrounding parenchyma was calculated as a difference of mean Hounsfield Unit (HU) of 1-5 consecutive voxels (the contrast window width) belonging to the lesion and to the parenchyma. This contrast was calculated at each single voxel of ischemic lesion boundaries (previously delineated by the experts) in horizontal and vertical directions in each image. The distributions of obtained horizontal, vertical and both contrasts combined were calculated among all 519 NC-CTs. Results The highest applicative contrast window width was identified as 5 voxels. The ischemic infarcts were found to be characterized by 6.60 HU, 8.28 HU and 7.55 HU mean values for distributions of horizontal, vertical and combined contrasts. Approximately 40-50% of the infarct boundary voxels were found to refer to the image contrast below 5 HU. Conclusion Low image contrast of ischemic lesions prevents accurate delineation of the infarcts in NC-CT.

  13. Pulmonary emphysema subtypes on computed tomography: the MESA COPD study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Benjamin M; Austin, John H M; Newell, John D; D'Souza, Belinda M; Rozenshtein, Anna; Hoffman, Eric A; Ahmed, Firas; Barr, R Graham

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is divided into 3 major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of emphysema subtypes on CT are not well defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and controls ages 50-79 years with ≥ 10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal, and panlobular emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had emphysema on CT. Interrater reliability of emphysema subtype was substantial (K: 0.70). Compared with participants without emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with paraseptal emphysema were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular, but not panlobular or paraseptal, emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years P <.001). Panlobular, but not other types of emphysema, was associated with reduced body mass index (-5 kg/m(2); P = .01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular emphysema, but not paraseptal emphysema, have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  14. Pulmonary Emphysema Subtypes on Computed Tomography in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin M.; Austin, John H.M.; Newell, John D.; D’Souza, Belinda M.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Hoffman, Eric A.; Ahmed, Firas; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary emphysema is divided into three major subtypes at autopsy: centrilobular, paraseptal and panlobular emphysema. These subtypes can be defined by visual assessment on computed tomography (CT); however, clinical characteristics of emphysema subtypes on CT are not well-defined. We developed a reliable approach to visual assessment of emphysema subtypes on CT and examined if emphysema subtypes have distinct characteristics. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis COPD Study recruited smokers with COPD and controls age 50–79 years with ≥10 pack-years. Participants underwent CT following a standardized protocol. Definitions of centrilobular, paraseptal and panlobular emphysema were obtained by literature review. Six-minute walk distance and pulmonary function were performed following guidelines. Results Twenty-seven percent of 318 smokers had emphysema on CT. Inter-rater reliability of emphysema subtype was substantial (K:0.70). Compared to participants without emphysema, individuals with centrilobular or panlobular emphysema had greater dyspnea, reduced walk distance, greater hyperinflation, and lower diffusing capacity. In contrast, individuals with PSE were similar to controls, except for male predominance. Centrilobular but not panlobular or paraseptal emphysema was associated with greater smoking history (+21 pack-years P<0.001). Panlobular but not other types of emphysema was associated with reduced body mass index (−5 kg/m2;P=0.01). Other than for dyspnea, these findings were independent of the forced expiratory volume in one second. Seventeen percent of smokers without COPD on spirometry had emphysema, which was independently associated with reduced walk distance. Conclusions Emphysema subtypes on CT are common in smokers with and without COPD. Centrilobular and panlobular emphysema but not paraseptal emphysema have considerable symptomatic and physiological consequences. PMID:24384106

  15. Computed Tomography Measurement of Rib Cage Morphometry in Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Colombi, Davide; Randi, Giorgia; Pavarani, Antonio; Silva, Mario; Walsh, Simon L.; Pistolesi, Massimo; Alfieri, Veronica; Chetta, Alfredo; Vaccarezza, Mauro; Vitale, Marco; Pastorino, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    Background Factors determining the shape of the human rib cage are not completely understood. We aimed to quantify the contribution of anthropometric and COPD-related changes to rib cage variability in adult cigarette smokers. Methods Rib cage diameters and areas (calculated from the inner surface of the rib cage) in 816 smokers with or without COPD, were evaluated at three anatomical levels using computed tomography (CT). CTs were analyzed with software, which allows quantification of total emphysema (emphysema%). The relationship between rib cage measurements and anthropometric factors, lung function indices, and %emphysema were tested using linear regression models. Results A model that included gender, age, BMI, emphysema%, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)%, and forced vital capacity (FVC)% fit best with the rib cage measurements (R2 = 64% for the rib cage area variation at the lower anatomical level). Gender had the biggest impact on rib cage diameter and area (105.3 cm2; 95% CI: 111.7 to 98.8 for male lower area). Emphysema% was responsible for an increase in size of upper and middle CT areas (up to 5.4 cm2; 95% CI: 3.0 to 7.8 for an emphysema increase of 5%). Lower rib cage areas decreased as FVC% decreased (5.1 cm2; 95% CI: 2.5 to 7.6 for 10 percentage points of FVC variation). Conclusions This study demonstrates that simple CT measurements can predict rib cage morphometric variability and also highlight relationships between rib cage morphometry and emphysema. PMID:23935872

  16. Computed Tomography Evaluation of Esophagogastric Necrosis After Caustic Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Chirica, Mircea; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Zagdanski, Anne Marie; Bruzzi, Matthieu; Bouda, Damien; Roland, Eric; Sabatier, François; Bouhidel, Fatiha; Bonnet, Francine; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Marc Gornet, Jean; Sarfati, Emile; Cattan, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopy is the standard of care for emergency patient evaluation after caustic ingestion. However, the inaccuracy of endoscopy in determining the depth of intramural necrosis may lead to inappropriate decision-making with devastating consequences. Our aim was to evaluate the use of computed tomography (CT) for the emergency diagnostic workup of patients with caustic injuries. In a prospective study, we used a combined endoscopy-CT decision-making algorithm. The primary outcome was pathology-confirmed digestive necrosis. The respective utility of CT and endoscopy in the decision-making process were compared. Transmural endoscopic necrosis was defined as grade 3b injuries; signs of transmural CT necrosis included absence of postcontrast gastric/ esophageal-wall enhancement, esophageal-wall blurring, and periesophageal-fat blurring. We included 120 patients (59 men, median age 44 years). Emergency surgery was performed in 24 patients (20%) and digestive resection was completed in 16. Three patients (3%) died and 28 patients (23%) experienced complications. Pathology revealed transmural necrosis in 9/11 esophagectomy and 16/16 gastrectomy specimens. Severe oropharyngeal injuries (P = 0.015), increased levels of blood lactate (P = 0.007), alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.027), bilirubin (P = 0.005), and low platelet counts (P > 0.0001) were predictive of digestive necrosis. Decision-making relying on CT alone or on a combined CT-endoscopy algorithm was similar and would have spared 19 unnecessary esophagectomies and 16 explorative laparotomies compared with an endoscopy-alone algorithm. Endoscopy did never rectify a wrong CT decision. Emergency decision-making after caustic injuries can rely on CT alone.

  17. Computed tomography of ball pythons (Python regius) in curled recumbency.

    PubMed

    Hedley, Joanna; Eatwell, Kevin; Schwarz, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia and tube restraint methods are often required for computed tomography (CT) of snakes due to their natural tendency to curl up. However, these restraint methods may cause animal stress. The aim of this study was to determine whether the CT appearance of the lungs differs for ball pythons in a curled position vs. tube restraint. Whole body CT was performed on ten clinically healthy ball pythons, first in curled and then in straight positions restrained in a tube. Curved multiplanar reformatted (MPR) lung images from curled position scans were compared with standard MPR lung images from straight position scans. Lung attenuation and thickness were measured at three locations for each scan. Time for positioning and scanning was 12 ± 5 min shorter for curled snakes compared to tube restraint. Lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation declined from cranial to caudal on both straight and curled position images. Mean lung parenchyma thickness was greater in curled images at locations 1 (P = 0.048) and 3 (P = 0.044). Mean lung parenchyma thickness decreased between location 1 and 2 by 86-87% (straight: curled) and between location 1 and 3 by 51-50% (straight: curled). Mean lung attenuation at location 1 was significantly greater on curled position images than tube restraint images (P = 0.043). Findings indicated that CT evaluation of the lungs is feasible for ball pythons positioned in curled recumbency if curved MPR is available. However, lung parenchyma thickness and attenuation in some locations may vary from those acquired using tube restraint. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Development of optimized segmentation map in dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Keisuke; Ueki, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) has been widely used in clinical practice and has been particularly effective for tissue diagnosis. In DECT the difference of two attenuation coefficients acquired by two kinds of X-ray energy enables tissue segmentation. One problem in conventional DECT is that the segmentation deteriorates in some cases, such as bone removal. This is due to two reasons. Firstly, the segmentation map is optimized without considering the Xray condition (tube voltage and current). If we consider the tube voltage, it is possible to create an optimized map, but unfortunately we cannot consider the tube current. Secondly, the X-ray condition is not optimized. The condition can be set empirically, but this means that the optimized condition is not used correctly. To solve these problems, we have developed methods for optimizing the map (Method-1) and the condition (Method-2). In Method-1, the map is optimized to minimize segmentation errors. The distribution of the attenuation coefficient is modeled by considering the tube current. In Method-2, the optimized condition is decided to minimize segmentation errors depending on tube voltagecurrent combinations while keeping the total exposure constant. We evaluated the effectiveness of Method-1 by performing a phantom experiment under the fixed condition and of Method-2 by performing a phantom experiment under different combinations calculated from the total exposure constant. When Method-1 was followed with Method-2, the segmentation error was reduced from 37.8 to 13.5 %. These results demonstrate that our developed methods can achieve highly accurate segmentation while keeping the total exposure constant.

  19. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Heußer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form ofmore » a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.« less

  20. Comparison of custom to standard TKA instrumentation with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vincent Y; Arnott, Lindsay; Li, Jia; Hopkins, Ronald; Lewis, Jamie; Sutphen, Sean; Nicholson, Lisa; Reader, Douglas; McShane, Michael A

    2014-08-01

    There is conflicting evidence whether custom instrumentation for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) improves component position compared to standard instrumentation. Studies have relied on long-limb radiographs limited to two-dimensional (2D) analysis and subjected to rotational inaccuracy. We used postoperative computed tomography (CT) to evaluate preoperative three-dimensional templating and CI to facilitate accurate and efficient implantation of TKA femoral and tibial components. We prospectively evaluated a single-surgeon cohort of 78 TKA patients (51 custom, 27 standard) with postoperative CT scans using 3D reconstruction and contour-matching technology to preoperative imaging. Component alignment was measured in coronal, sagittal and axial planes. Preoperative templating for custom instrumentation was 87 and 79 % accurate for femoral and tibial component size. All custom components were within 1 size except for the tibial component in one patient (2 sizes). Tourniquet time was 5 min longer for custom (30 min) than standard (25 min). In no case was custom instrumentation aborted in favour of standard instrumentation nor was original alignment of custom instrumentation required to be adjusted intraoperatively. There were more outliers greater than 2° from intended alignment with standard instrumentation than custom for both components in all three planes. Custom instrumentation was more accurate in component position for tibial coronal alignment (custom: 1.5° ± 1.2°; standard: 3° ± 1.9°; p = 0.0001) and both tibial (custom: 1.4° ± 1.1°; standard: 16.9° ± 6.8°; p < 0.0001) and femoral (custom: 1.2° ± 0.9°; standard: 3.1° ± 2.1°; p < 0.0001) rotational alignment, and was similar to standard instrumentation in other measurements. When evaluated with CT, custom instrumentation performs similar or better to standard instrumentation in component alignment and accurately templates component size. Tourniquet time was mildly increased for custom compared

  1. Iterative reconstruction with boundary detection for carbon ion computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Deepak; Qin, Nan; Zhang, You; Kalantari, Faraz; Niu, Shanzhou; Jia, Xun; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Wang, Jing

    2018-03-01

    In heavy ion radiation therapy, improving the accuracy in range prediction of the ions inside the patient’s body has become essential. Accurate localization of the Bragg peak provides greater conformity of the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. We investigated the use of carbon ions directly for computed tomography (carbon CT) to create the relative stopping power map of a patient’s body. The Geant4 toolkit was used to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the carbon ion trajectories, to study their lateral and angular deflections and the most likely paths, using a water phantom. Geant4 was used to create carbonCT projections of a contrast and spatial resolution phantom, with a cone beam of 430 MeV/u carbon ions. The contrast phantom consisted of cranial bone, lung material, and PMMA inserts while the spatial resolution phantom contained bone and lung material inserts with line pair (lp) densities ranging from 1.67 lp cm-1 through 5 lp cm-1. First, the positions of each carbon ion on the rear and front trackers were used for an approximate reconstruction of the phantom. The phantom boundary was extracted from this approximate reconstruction, by using the position as well as angle information from the four tracking detectors, resulting in the entry and exit locations of the individual ions on the phantom surface. Subsequent reconstruction was performed by the iterative algebraic reconstruction technique coupled with total variation minimization (ART-TV) assuming straight line trajectories for the ions inside the phantom. The influence of number of projections was studied with reconstruction from five different sets of projections: 15, 30, 45, 60 and 90. Additionally, the effect of number of ions on the image quality was investigated by reducing the number of ions/projection while keeping the total number of projections at 60. An estimation of carbon ion range using the carbonCT image resulted in improved range prediction compared to the range calculated using a

  2. Factors Affecting Prostate Volume Estimation in Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Cheng-Hsiu; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how apex-localizing methods and the computed tomography (CT) slice thickness affected the CT-based prostate volume estimation. Twenty-eight volunteers underwent evaluations of prostate volume by CT, where the contour segmentations were performed by three observers. The bottom of ischial tuberosities (ITs) and the bulb of the penis were used as reference positions to locate the apex, and the distances to the apex were recorded as 1.3 and 2.0 cm, respectively. Interobserver variations to locate ITs and the bulb of the penis were, on average, 0.10 cm (range 0.03-0.38 cm) and 0.30 cm (rangemore » 0.00-0.98 cm), respectively. The range of CT slice thickness varied from 0.08-0.48 cm and was adopted to examine the influence of the variation on volume estimation. The volume deviation from the reference case (0.08 cm), which increases in tandem with the slice thickness, was within {+-} 3 cm{sup 3}, regardless of the adopted apex-locating reference positions. In addition, the maximum error of apex identification was 1.5 times of slice thickness. Finally, based on the precise CT films and the methods of apex identification, there were strong positive correlation coefficients for the estimated prostate volume by CT and the transabdominal ultrasonography, as found in the present study (r > 0.87; p < 0.0001), and this was confirmed by Bland-Altman analysis. These results will help to identify factors that affect prostate volume calculation and to contribute to the improved estimation of the prostate volume based on CT images.« less

  3. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: multidetector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Celikyay, Fatih; Yilmaz, Ayse; Arslan, Sule; Inanir, Ahmet; Inonu, Handan; Deniz, Caglar

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common and encompasses a large spectrum of disease with different treatment options and prognoses. Therefore, assessment of these patients with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is vital. To evaluate the MDCT pulmonary findings of patients with RA and to compare these findings with the clinical status. Chest MDCT scans of 85 patients with RA between 2006-2012 were assessed. One patient with a pulmonary infection was excluded from the study. MDCT findings and distribution of the CT findings were examined, and patients were classified according to the predominant CT pattern. The pulmonary function test (PFT) results and categories, demographic characteristics, and clinical status of some of the patients for whom the results were obtained were evaluated, and the CT findings, PFT results, demographic characteristics, and clinical status were compared. The study group consisted of 20 men (mean age, 58.1 years ± 13.1; range, 15-77 years) and 64 women (mean age, 55.3 years ± 11.5; range, 30-84 years). The most frequent findings were nodules (78.6%) and pleural thickening (48.8%). The most common CT patterns were follicular bronchiolitis (FB) in 28 (33.3%) patients and nodular disease (ND) in 12 (14.3%) others. There was no statistically significant difference between the CT findings and PFT results, and no statistically significant difference was noted in the CT findings between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. In addition, there were some patients who exhibited no symptoms and/or had abnormal PFT results but had abnormal CT findings. Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with a high frequency of CT findings and CT patterns, with nodules and pleural thickening being the most common CT findings and FB and ND being the most common CT patterns. MDCT identification of patients with RA may be helpful in the evaluation of pulmonary disease, even in patients without symptoms and PFT abnormalities.

  4. Image quality of mixed convolution kernel in thoracic computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Jakob; Spira, Eva Maria; Strube, Juliane; Langer, Mathias; Voss, Christian; Kotter, Elmar

    2016-11-01

    The mixed convolution kernel alters his properties geographically according to the depicted organ structure, especially for the lung. Therefore, we compared the image quality of the mixed convolution kernel to standard soft and hard kernel reconstructions for different organ structures in thoracic computed tomography (CT) images.Our Ethics Committee approved this prospective study. In total, 31 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced thoracic CT studies were included after informed consent. Axial reconstructions were performed with hard, soft, and mixed convolution kernel. Three independent and blinded observers rated the image quality according to the European Guidelines for Quality Criteria of Thoracic CT for 13 organ structures. The observers rated the depiction of the structures in all reconstructions on a 5-point Likert scale. Statistical analysis was performed with the Friedman Test and post hoc analysis with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test.Compared to the soft convolution kernel, the mixed convolution kernel was rated with a higher image quality for lung parenchyma, segmental bronchi, and the border between the pleura and the thoracic wall (P < 0.03). Compared to the hard convolution kernel, the mixed convolution kernel was rated with a higher image quality for aorta, anterior mediastinal structures, paratracheal soft tissue, hilar lymph nodes, esophagus, pleuromediastinal border, large and medium sized pulmonary vessels and abdomen (P < 0.004) but a lower image quality for trachea, segmental bronchi, lung parenchyma, and skeleton (P < 0.001).The mixed convolution kernel cannot fully substitute the standard CT reconstructions. Hard and soft convolution kernel reconstructions still seem to be mandatory for thoracic CT.

  5. Investigating different computed tomography techniques for internal target volume definition.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, S A; Maria Das, K J; Subramanian, V Siva; Raj, D Gowtham; Agarwal, Arpita; Kumar, Shaleen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the various computed tomography (CT) techniques such as fast CT, slow CT, breath-hold (BH) CT, full-fan cone beam CT (FF-CBCT), half-fan CBCT (HF-CBCT), and average CT for delineation of internal target volume (ITV). In addition, these ITVs were compared against four-dimensional CT (4DCT) ITVs. Three-dimensional target motion was simulated using dynamic thorax phantom with target insert of diameter 3 cm for ten respiration data. CT images were acquired using a commercially available multislice CT scanner, and the CBCT images were acquired using On-Board-Imager. Average CT was generated by averaging 10 phases of 4DCT. ITVs were delineated for each CT by contouring the volume of the target ball; 4DCT ITVs were generated by merging all 10 phases target volumes. Incase of BH-CT, ITV was derived by boolean of CT phases 0%, 50%, and fast CT target volumes. ITVs determined by all CT and CBCT scans were significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than the 4DCT ITV, whereas there was no significant difference between average CT and 4DCT ITVs (P = 0.17). Fast CT had the maximum deviation (-46.1% ± 20.9%) followed by slow CT (-34.3% ± 11.0%) and FF-CBCT scans (-26.3% ± 8.7%). However, HF-CBCT scans (-12.9% ± 4.4%) and BH-CT scans (-11.1% ± 8.5%) resulted in almost similar deviation. On the contrary, average CT had the least deviation (-4.7% ± 9.8%). When comparing with 4DCT, all the CT techniques underestimated ITV. In the absence of 4DCT, the HF-CBCT target volumes with appropriate margin may be a reasonable approach for defining the ITV.

  6. Stratified computed tomography findings improve diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon; Lee, Sang Chul; Choi, Byung-Jo; Kim, Say-June

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients with symptoms and signs of appendicitis, but without confirmative computed tomography (CT) findings. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the database of 224 patients who had been operated on for the suspicion of appendicitis, but whose CT findings were negative or equivocal for appendicitis. The patient population was divided into two groups: a pathologically proven appendicitis group (n = 177) and a non-appendicitis group (n = 47). The CT images of these patients were re-evaluated according to the characteristic CT features as described in the literature. The re-evaluations and baseline characteristics of the two groups were compared. RESULTS: The two groups showed significant differences with respect to appendiceal diameter, and the presence of periappendiceal fat stranding and intraluminal air in the appendix. A larger proportion of patients in the appendicitis group showed distended appendices larger than 6.0 mm (66.3% vs 37.0%; P < 0.001), periappendiceal fat stranding (34.1% vs 8.9%; P = 0.001), and the absence of intraluminal air (67.6% vs 48.9%; P = 0.024) compared to the non-appendicitis group. Furthermore, the presence of two or more of these factors increased the odds ratio to 6.8 times higher than baseline (95%CI: 3.013-15.454; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Appendiceal diameter and wall thickening, fat stranding, and absence of intraluminal air can be used to increased diagnostic accuracy for appendicitis with equivocal CT findings. PMID:25320531

  7. Computed Tomography Window Blending: Feasibility in Thoracic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Jacob C; Wortman, Jeremy R; Rocha, Tatiana C; Folio, Les R; Andriole, Katherine P; Khurana, Bharti

    2018-02-07

    This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of processing computed tomography (CT) images with a custom window blending algorithm that combines soft-tissue, bone, and lung window settings into a single image; to compare the time for interpretation of chest CT for thoracic trauma with window blending and conventional window settings; and to assess diagnostic performance of both techniques. Adobe Photoshop was scripted to process axial DICOM images from retrospective contrast-enhanced chest CTs performed for trauma with a window-blending algorithm. Two emergency radiologists independently interpreted the axial images from 103 chest CTs with both blended and conventional windows. Interpretation time and diagnostic performance were compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar test, respectively. Agreement with Nexus CT Chest injury severity was assessed with the weighted kappa statistic. A total of 13,295 images were processed without error. Interpretation was faster with window blending, resulting in a 20.3% time saving (P < .001), with no difference in diagnostic performance, within the power of the study to detect a difference in sensitivity of 5% as determined by post hoc power analysis. The sensitivity of the window-blended cases was 82.7%, compared to 81.6% for conventional windows. The specificity of the window-blended cases was 93.1%, compared to 90.5% for conventional windows. All injuries of major clinical significance (per Nexus CT Chest criteria) were correctly identified in all reading sessions, and all negative cases were correctly classified. All readers demonstrated near-perfect agreement with injury severity classification with both window settings. In this pilot study utilizing retrospective data, window blending allows faster preliminary interpretation of axial chest CT performed for trauma, with no significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to conventional window settings. Future studies would be required to assess the

  8. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  9. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  10. Ultrasonic computed tomography imaging of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Azhari, Haim

    2017-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are becoming increasingly used and intensively investigated in the field of medical imaging. They are currently FDA approved for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and it would be highly desirable to visualize them by ultrasound as well. Previous reports using the conventional ultrasound B-scan (pulse-echo) imaging technique have shown very limited detectability of these particles. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of imaging IONPs using the through-transmission ultrasound methodology and demonstrate their detectability using ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT). Commercially available IONPs were acoustically analysed to quantify their effect on the speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic attenuation as a function of concentration. Next, through-transmission projection and UCT imaging were performed on a breast mimicking phantom and on an ex vivo tissue model, to which IONPs were injected. Finally, an MRI scan was performed to verify that the same particles examined in the ultrasound experiment can be imaged by magnetic resonance, using the same clinically relevant concentrations. The results have shown a consistent concentration dependent speed of sound increase (1.86 \\text{m}{{\\text{s}}^{-1}} rise per 100 µg · ml-1 IONPs). Imaging based on this property has shown a substantial contrast-to-noise ratio improvement (up to 5 fold, p  <  0.01). The SOS-related effect generated a well discernible image contrast and allowed the detection of the particles existence and location, in both raster-scan projection and UCT imaging. Conversely, no significant change in the acoustic attenuation coefficient was noted. Based on these findings, it is concluded that IONPs can be used as an effective SOS-based contrast agent, potentially useful for ultrasonic breast imaging. Furthermore, the particle offers the capacity of significantly enhancing diagnosis accuracy using multimodal MRI-ultrasound imaging capabilities.

  11. [High-resolution computed tomography in stapes surgery].

    PubMed

    Oberascher, G; Grobovschek, M

    1987-06-01

    Early and delayed complications in the inner or middle ear may follow stapedectomy or stapedotomy and may require revision surgery. Nowadays high resolution middle ear computed tomography (HR-MCT) using a special interpolation technique can demonstrate the smallest structures of the middle ear space, such as the long process of the incus and stapes. Stapes prostheses can also be seen in this way, but to identify the prothesis exactly it is necessary to determine the position of the piston hook in relation to the incus and of the piston shaft to the foot plate and scala vestibuli. Two points were of particular interest to us: HR-MCT identification of various metal and plastic pistons. Clinical significance of HR-MCT in complications following surgery. As the result of our experimental research on cadaver temporal bones, pistons must still be divided into four groups based on their demonstration by HR-MCT: Group I (e.g. Stainless Steel Cup Piston): whole piston visible. Group II (e.g. McGee Stainless Steel Piston): only piston shaft. Group III (Fisch Teflon-Platinum Piston): only hook visible. Group IV (e.g. Fisch Teflon-Wire Piston): piston hardly visible or not at all. In groups I-III it is possible to discover whether the piston is too long or too short, whether it is dislocated or has slipped. Group IV pistons, hooks from group II and the shaft from group III must be changed to allow detection by x-rays. With plastic pistons it might be possible to add an x-ray agent.2+ improvements in manufacture appear to be necessary, dislocation of various prostheses can now be shown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. SparseBeads data: benchmarking sparsity-regularized computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Jakob S.; Coban, Sophia B.; Lionheart, William R. B.; McDonald, Samuel A.; Withers, Philip J.

    2017-12-01

    Sparsity regularization (SR) such as total variation (TV) minimization allows accurate image reconstruction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) from fewer projections than analytical methods. Exactly how few projections suffice and how this number may depend on the image remain poorly understood. Compressive sensing connects the critical number of projections to the image sparsity, but does not cover CT, however empirical results suggest a similar connection. The present work establishes for real CT data a connection between gradient sparsity and the sufficient number of projections for accurate TV-regularized reconstruction. A collection of 48 x-ray CT datasets called SparseBeads was designed for benchmarking SR reconstruction algorithms. Beadpacks comprising glass beads of five different sizes as well as mixtures were scanned in a micro-CT scanner to provide structured datasets with variable image sparsity levels, number of projections and noise levels to allow the systematic assessment of parameters affecting performance of SR reconstruction algorithms6. Using the SparseBeads data, TV-regularized reconstruction quality was assessed as a function of numbers of projections and gradient sparsity. The critical number of projections for satisfactory TV-regularized reconstruction increased almost linearly with the gradient sparsity. This establishes a quantitative guideline from which one may predict how few projections to acquire based on expected sample sparsity level as an aid in planning of dose- or time-critical experiments. The results are expected to hold for samples of similar characteristics, i.e. consisting of few, distinct phases with relatively simple structure. Such cases are plentiful in porous media, composite materials, foams, as well as non-destructive testing and metrology. For samples of other characteristics the proposed methodology may be used to investigate similar relations.

  13. Phenotyping of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Meenakshi; Jones, Jeryl C; Holásková, Ida; Raylman, Raymond; Meade, Jean

    2017-09-01

    Deep phenotyping tools for characterizing preclinical morphological conditions are important for supporting genetic research studies. Objectives of this retrospective, cross-sectional, methods comparison study were to describe and compare qualitative and quantitative deep phenotypic characteristics of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers using computed tomography (CT). Lumbosacral CT scans and medical records were retrieved from data archives at three veterinary hospitals. Using previously published qualitative CT diagnostic criteria, a board-certified veterinary radiologist assigned dogs as either lumbosacral stenosis positive or lumbosacral stenosis negative at six vertebral locations. A second observer independently measured vertebral canal area, vertebral fat area, and vertebral body area; and calculated ratios of vertebral canal area/vertebral body area and vertebral fat area/vertebral body area (fat area ratio) at all six locations. Twenty-five dogs were sampled (lumbosacral stenosis negative, 11 dogs; lumbosacral stenosis positive, 14 dogs). Of the six locations, cranial L6 was the most affected by lumbosacral stenosis (33%). Five of six dogs (83%) with clinical signs of lumbosacral pain were lumbosacral stenosis positive at two or more levels. All four quantitative variables were significantly smaller at the cranial aspects of the L6 and L7 vertebral foramina than at the caudal aspects (P < 0.0001). Fat area ratio was a significant predictor of lumbosacral stenosis positive status at all six locations with cranial L6 having the greatest predictive value (R 2 = 0.43) and range of predictive probability (25-90%). Findings from the current study supported the use of CT as a deep phenotyping tool for future research studies of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  14. Multiple pinhole collimator based X-ray luminescence computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Lun, Michael; Li, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality, which is able to improve the spatial resolution of optical imaging to hundreds of micrometers for deep targets by using superfine X-ray pencil beams. However, due to the low X-ray photon utilization efficiency in a single pinhole collimator based XLCT, it takes a long time to acquire measurement data. Herein, we propose a multiple pinhole collimator based XLCT, in which multiple X-ray beams are generated to scan a sample at multiple positions simultaneously. Compared with the single pinhole based XLCT, the multiple X-ray beam scanning method requires much less measurement time. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the multiple X-ray beam scanning method. In one numerical simulation, we used four X-ray beams to scan a cylindrical object with 6 deeply embedded targets. With measurements from 6 angular projections, all 6 targets have been reconstructed successfully. In the phantom experiment, we generated two X-ray pencil beams with a collimator manufactured in-house. Two capillary targets with 0.6 mm edge-to-edge distance embedded in a cylindrical phantom have been reconstructed successfully. With the two beam scanning, we reduced the data acquisition time by 50%. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity of targets is 85.11% and the distance error between two targets is less than 3%. We have measured the radiation dose during XLCT scan and found that the radiation dose, 1.475 mSv, is in the range of a typical CT scan. We have measured the changes of the collimated X-ray beam size and intensity at different distances from the collimator. We have also studied the effects of beam size and intensity in the reconstruction of XLCT. PMID:27446686

  15. Radiography versus computed tomography for displacement assessment in calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Brent K; Charlton, Timothy P; Thordarson, David B

    2009-10-01

    Coronal computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly used in fracture classification systems for calcaneus fractures. However, they may not accurately reflect the amount of fracture displacement. The purpose of this paper was to determine whether lateral radiographs provide superior assessment of the displacement of the posterior facet compared to coronal CT scans. Lateral radiographs of calcaneus fractures were compared with CT coronal images of the posterior facet in 30 displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures. The average patient age was 39 years old. Using a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), measurements were obtained to quantify the amount of displacement on the lateral radiograph and compared with the amount of depression on corresponding coronal CT scans. On lateral radiographs, the angle of the depressed portion of the posterior facet relative to the undersurface of the calcaneus averaged 28.2 degrees; Bohler's angle averaged 12.7 degrees. These numbers were poorly correlated (r = 0.25). In corresponding CT images from posterior to anterior, the difference in the amount of displacement of the lateral portion of the displaced articular facet versus the nondisplaced medial, constant fragment, was minimal and consistently underestimated the amount of displacement. Underestimation of the amount of depression and rotation of the posterior facet fragment was seen on the coronal CT scan. We attribute this finding to the combined rotation and depression of the posterior facet which may not be measured accurately with the typical semicoronal CT orientation. While sagittal reconstructed images would show this depression better, if they are unavailable we recommend using lateral radiographs to better gauge the amount of fracture displacement.

  16. Differences between postmortem computed tomography and conventional autopsy in a stabbing murder case

    PubMed Central

    Zerbini, Talita; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Ferro, Antonio Carlos Gonçalves; Kay, Fernando Uliana; Junior, Edson Amaro; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto Gonçalves; do Nascimento Saldiva, Paulo Hilario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present work is to analyze the differences and similarities between the elements of a conventional autopsy and images obtained from postmortem computed tomography in a case of a homicide stab wound. METHOD: Comparison between the findings of different methods: autopsy and postmortem computed tomography. RESULTS: In some aspects, autopsy is still superior to imaging, especially in relation to external examination and the description of lesion vitality. However, the findings of gas embolism, pneumothorax and pulmonary emphysema and the relationship between the internal path of the instrument of aggression and the entry wound are better demonstrated by postmortem computed tomography. CONCLUSIONS: Although multislice computed tomography has greater accuracy than autopsy, we believe that the conventional autopsy method is fundamental for providing evidence in criminal investigations. PMID:25518020

  17. [Computed tomography semiotics of osteonecrosis and sequestration in chronic hematogenic osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    D'iachkova, G V; Mitina, Iu L

    2007-01-01

    Based on the data of computed tomography, radiography and densitometry in 39 patients the authors describe in detail the signs of osteonecrosis and sequestration of different localization and extension.

  18. APPLICATION OF COMPUTER AIDED TOMOGRAPHY (CAT) TO THE STUDY OF MARINE BENTIC COMMUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment cores were imaged using a Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) scanner at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. Procedures were developed, using the attenuation of X-rays, to differentiate between sediment and the water contained in macrobenthic...

  19. Petamenophis (Padiamenemipet), an Egyptian Child Mummy Protected for Eternity: Revelation by Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria Cristina; Cesarani, Federico; Boano, Rosa; Fiore Marochetti, Elisa; Gandini, Giovanni

    The objective of our work was to report the most recent findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography of a child mummy from the Roman period (119-123 CE) housed at the Egyptian Museum in Turin, Italy. Multidetector computed tomography and postprocessing were applied to understand the embalming techniques, the nature of a foreign object, and anthropometrical values. The information was compared with that from other mummies that were buried in the same tomb, but today housed in different museums. New information regarding the embalming technique was revealed. Multidetector computed tomography allowed the identification of a knife-like metallic object, probably an amulet for the child's protection in the afterlife. Multidetector computed tomography and image postprocessing confirm their valuable role in noninvasive studies in ancient mummies and provided evidence of a unique cultural practice in the late history of Ancient Egypt such as placing a knife possibly as an amulet.

  20. Colovesical fistula causing an uncommon reason for failure of computed tomography colonography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Neroladaki, Angeliki; Breguet, Romain; Botsikas, Diomidis; Terraz, Sylvain; Becker, Christoph D; Montet, Xavier

    2012-07-23

    Computed tomography colonography, or virtual colonoscopy, is a good alternative to optical colonoscopy. However, suboptimal patient preparation or colon distension may reduce the diagnostic accuracy of this imaging technique. We report the case of an 83-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a five-month history of pneumaturia and fecaluria and an acute episode of macrohematuria, leading to a high clinical suspicion of a colovesical fistula. The fistula was confirmed by standard contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Optical colonoscopy was performed to exclude the presence of an underlying colonic neoplasm. Since optical colonoscopy was incomplete, computed tomography colonography was performed, but also failed due to inadequate colon distension. The insufflated air directly accumulated within the bladder via the large fistula. Clinicians should consider colovesical fistula as a potential reason for computed tomography colonography failure.

  1. Donor-Site Morbidity After DIEAP Flap Breast Reconstruction—A 2-Year Postoperative Computed Tomography Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Gerhard; Mynarek, Georg Karl; Berg, Thomas; Tindholdt, Tyge Tind; Tønseth, Kim Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background: The study was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of donor-site morbidity following the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEAP) flap harvest in breast reconstruction. Most studies evaluating this subject have been performed using ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) might provide valuable information. Methods: In 14 patients who were reconstructed with a DIEAP flap, donor-site morbidity was assessed by comparing routine preoperative CT abdomen with CT abdomen performed 2 years postoperatively. The anteroposterior diameter and transverse diameter (TD) of the rectus muscle were measured bilaterally within 4 standardized zones. Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) was measured in the same zones. The abdominal wall was assessed for hernias, bulging, and seromas. Results: The operated rectus muscle had a significantly increased anteroposterior diameter in 2 zones and decreased TD in 1 zone compared with preoperative measurements. Comparing the operated and nonoperated rectus muscles, the former had a significantly decreased TD in 1 zone. Supraumbilical DRA was significantly decreased with surgery, whereas infraumbilical DRA was significantly increased. No new hernias or bulging were found. Two patients had seroma formation in the abdominal wall. Conclusions: Symmetry of the 2 hemiabdomens is well preserved after DIEAP flap harvest; however, significant changes to the rectus muscles and DRA were observed. Hernia formation does not seem to be a postoperative complication of importance. The study indicates that DIEAP flaps result in limited donor-site morbidity, which for most patients does not outweigh the benefits of free perforator flap breast reconstruction. PMID:28831346

  2. Computed tomography is not justified in every pediatric blunt trauma patient with a suspicious mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Hershkovitz, Yehuda; Zoarets, Itai; Stepansky, Albert; Kozer, Eran; Shapira, Zahar; Klin, Baruch; Halevy, Ariel; Jeroukhimov, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become an important tool for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal and chest injuries in patients with blunt trauma. The role of CT in conscious asymptomatic patients with a suspicious mechanism of injury remains controversial. This controversy intensifies in the management of pediatric blunt trauma patients, who are much more susceptible to radiation exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of abdominal and chest CT imaging in asymptomatic pediatric patients with a suspicious mechanism of injury. Forty-two pediatric patients up to 15 years old were prospectively enrolled. All patients presented with a suspicious mechanism of blunt trauma and multisystem injury. They were neurologically intact and had no signs of injury to the abdomen or chest. Patients underwent CT imaging of the chest and abdomen as part of the initial evaluation. Thirty-one patients (74%) had a normal CT scan. Two patients of 11 with an abnormal CT scan required a change in management and were referred for observation in the Intensive Care Unit. None of the patients required surgical intervention. The routine use of CT in asymptomatic pediatric patients with a suspicious mechanism of blunt trauma injury is not justified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intraoperative computed tomography with integrated navigation system in spinal stabilizations.

    PubMed

    Zausinger, Stefan; Scheder, Ben; Uhl, Eberhard; Heigl, Thomas; Morhard, Dominik; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: A prospective interventional case-series study plus a retrospective analysis of historical patients for comparison of data. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate workflow, feasibility, and clinical outcome of navigated stabilization procedures with data acquisition by intraoperative computed tomography. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Routine fluoroscopy to assess pedicle screw placement is not consistently reliable. Our hypothesis was that image-guided spinal navigation using an intraoperative CT-scanner can improve the safety and precision of spinal stabilization surgery. METHODS.: CT data of 94 patients (thoracolumbar [n = 66], C1/2 [n = 12], cervicothoracic instability [n = 16]) were acquired after positioning the patient in the final surgical position. A sliding gantry 40-slice CT was used for image acquisition. Data were imported to a frameless infrared-based neuronavigation workstation. Intraoperative CT was obtained to assess the accuracy of instrumentation and, if necessary, the extent of decompression. All patients were clinically evaluated by Odom-criteria after surgery and after 3 months. RESULTS.: Computed accuracy of the navigation system reached <2 mm (0.95 +/- 0.3 mm) in all cases. Additional time necessary for the preoperative image acquisition including data transfer was 14 +/- 5 minutes. The duration of interrupting the surgical process for iCT until resumption of surgery was 9 +/- 2.5 minutes. Control-iCT revealed incorrect screw position >/=2 mm without persistent neurologic or vascular damage in 20/414 screws (4.8%) leading to immediate correction of 10 screws (2.4%). Control-iCT changed the course of surgery in 8 cases (8.5% of all patients). The overall revision rate was 8.5% (4 wound revisions, 2 CSF fistulas, and 2 epidural hematomas). There was no reoperation due to implant malposition. According to Odom-criteria all patients experienced a clinical improvement. A retrospective analysis of 182 patients with navigated thoracolumbar

  4. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms.more » Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.« less

  5. Optimizing Radiation Doses for Computed Tomography Across Institutions: Dose Auditing and Best Practices.

    PubMed

    Demb, Joshua; Chu, Philip; Nelson, Thomas; Hall, David; Seibert, Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John; Krishnam, Mayil; Cagnon, Christopher; Bostani, Maryam; Gould, Robert; Miglioretti, Diana; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Radiation doses for computed tomography (CT) vary substantially across institutions. To assess the impact of institutional-level audit and collaborative efforts to share best practices on CT radiation doses across 5 University of California (UC) medical centers. In this before/after interventional study, we prospectively collected radiation dose metrics on all diagnostic CT examinations performed between October 1, 2013, and December 31, 2014, at 5 medical centers. Using data from January to March (baseline), we created audit reports detailing the distribution of radiation dose metrics for chest, abdomen, and head CT scans. In April, we shared reports with the medical centers and invited radiology professionals from the centers to a 1.5-day in-person meeting to review reports and share best practices. We calculated changes in mean effective dose 12 weeks before and after the audits and meeting, excluding a 12-week implementation period when medical centers could make changes. We compared proportions of examinations exceeding previously published benchmarks at baseline and following the audit and meeting, and calculated changes in proportion of examinations exceeding benchmarks. Of 158 274 diagnostic CT scans performed in the study period, 29 594 CT scans were performed in the 3 months before and 32 839 CT scans were performed 12 to 24 weeks after the audit and meeting. Reductions in mean effective dose were considerable for chest and abdomen. Mean effective dose for chest CT decreased from 13.2 to 10.7 mSv (18.9% reduction; 95% CI, 18.0%-19.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 3.8% to 23.5%. The mean effective dose for abdominal CT decreased from 20.0 to 15.0 mSv (25.0% reduction; 95% CI, 24.3%-25.8%). Reductions at individual medical centers ranged from 10.8% to 34.7%. The number of CT scans that had an effective dose measurement that exceeded benchmarks was reduced considerably by 48% and 54% for chest and abdomen, respectively. After

  6. Evaluation of 3D airway imaging of obstructive sleep apnea with cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takumi; Enciso, Reyes; Memon, Ahmed; Mah, James K; Clark, Glenn T

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of cone-beam Computer Tomography (CT) for imaging the upper airway structure of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) patients. The total airway volume and the anteroposterior dimension of oropharyngeal airway showed significant group differences between OSA and gender-matched controls, so if we increase sample size these measurements may distinguish the two groups. We demonstrate the utility of diagnosis of anatomy with the 3D airway imaging with cone-beam Computed Tomography.

  7. Congruence Between Pulmonary Function and Computed Tomography Imaging Assessment of Cystic Fibrosis Severity.

    PubMed

    Rybacka, Anna; Goździk-Spychalska, Joanna; Rybacki, Adam; Piorunek, Tomasz; Batura-Gabryel, Halina; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna

    2018-05-04

    In cystic fibrosis, pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and computed tomography are used to assess lung function and structure, respectively. Although both techniques of assessment are congruent there are lingering doubts about which PFTs variables show the best congruence with computed tomography scoring. In this study we addressed the issue by reinvestigating the association between PFTs variables and the score of changes seen in computed tomography scans in patients with cystic fibrosis with and without pulmonary exacerbation. This retrospective study comprised 40 patients in whom PFTs and computed tomography were performed no longer than 3 weeks apart. Images (inspiratory: 0.625 mm slice thickness, 0.625 mm interval; expiratory: 1.250 mm slice thickness, 10 mm interval) were evaluated with the Bhalla scoring system. The most frequent structural abnormality found in scans were bronchiectases and peribronchial thickening. The strongest relationship was found between the Bhalla sore and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The Bhalla sore also was related to forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, residual volume (RV), and RV/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio. We conclude that lung structural data obtained from the computed tomography examination are highly congruent to lung function data. Thus, computed tomography imaging may supersede functional assessment in cases of poor compliance with spirometry procedures in the lederly or children. Computed tomography also seems more sensitive than PFTs in the assessment of cystic fibrosis progression. Moreover, in early phases of cystic fibrosis, computed tomography, due to its excellent resolution, may be irreplaceable in monitoring pulmonary damage.

  8. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  9. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  10. Relationship between the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale score and the success rate of 64-slice computed tomography coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Jin, Dan; Qiao, Fang; Chen, Jianchang; Gong, Jianping

    Computed tomography coronary angiography, a key method for obtaining coronary artery images, is widely used to screen for coronary artery diseases due to its noninvasive nature. In China, 64-slice computed tomography systems are now the most common models. As factors that directly affect computed tomography performance, heart rate and rhythm control are regulated by the autonomic nervous system and are highly related to the emotional state of the patient. The aim of this prospective study is to use a pre-computed tomography scan Self-Rating Anxiety Scale assessment to analyze the effects of tension and anxiety on computed tomography coronary angiography success. Subjects aged 18-85 years who were planned to undergo computed tomography coronary angiography were enrolled; 1 to 2 h before the computed tomography scan, basic patient data (gender, age, heart rate at rest, and family history) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale score were obtained. The same group of imaging department doctors, technicians, and nurses performed computed tomography coronary angiography for all the enrolled subjects and observed whether those subjects could finish the computed tomography coronary angiography scan and provide clear, diagnostically valuable images. Participants were divided into successful (obtained diagnostically useful coronary images) and unsuccessful groups. Basic data and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale scores were compared between the groups. The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale standard score of the successful group was lower than that of the unsuccessful group (P = 0.001). As the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale standard score rose, the success rate of computed tomography coronary angiography decreased. The Self-Rating Anxiety Scale score has a negative relationship with computed tomography coronary angiography success. Anxiety can be a disadvantage in computed tomography coronary angiography examination. The pre-computed tomography coronary angiography scan Self-Rating Anxiety Scale

  11. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependentmore » reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI{sub vol}- and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI{sub vol} for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose

  12. Hepatic Hemangiomas Alter Morphometry and Impair Hemodynamics of the Abdominal Aorta and Primary Branches From Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Li, Qiao; Li, Li; Niu, Pei; Cao, Minglu; Guo, Fei; Li, Xuechao; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2018-01-01

    Background: The formation of hepatic hemangiomas (HH) is associated with VEGF and IL-7 that alter conduit arteries and small arterioles. To our knowledge, there are no studies to investigate the effects of HH on the hemodynamics in conduit arteries. The aim of the study is to perform morphometric and hemodynamic analysis in abdominal conduit arteries and bifurcations of HH patients and controls. Methods: Based on morphometry reconstructed from CT images, geometrical models were meshed with prismatic elements for the near wall region and tetrahedral and hexahedral elements for the core region. Simulations were performed for computation of the non-Newtonian blood flow using the Carreau-Yasuda model, based on which multiple hemodynamic parameters were determined. Results: There was an increase of the lumen size, diameter ratio, and curvature in the abdominal arterial tree of HH patients as compared with controls. This significantly increased the surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., SAR-TAWSS [Formula: see text] 100%) (24.1 ± 7.9 vs. 5 ± 6%, 11.6 ± 12.8 vs. < 0.1%, and 44.5 ± 9.2 vs. 21 ± 24% at hepatic bifurcations, common hepatic arteries, and abdominal aortas, respectively, between HH and control patients). Conclusions: Morphometric changes caused by HH significantly deteriorated the hemodynamic environment in abdominal conduit arteries and bifurcations, which could be an important risk factor for the incidence and progression of vascular diseases.

  13. Morphometric analysis - Cone beam computed tomography to predict bone quality and quantity.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, B; Metzger, M C; Kummer, T; Schulze, D

    2011-07-01

    Modified quantitative computed tomography is a method used to predict bone quality and quantify the bone mass of the jaw. The aim of this study was to determine whether bone quantity or quality was detected by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) combined with image analysis. MATERIALS AND PROCEDURES: Different measurements recorded on two phantoms (Siemens phantom, Comac phantom) were evaluated on images taken with the Somatom VolumeZoom (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and the NewTom 9000 (NIM s.r.l., Verona, Italy) in order to calculate a calibration curve. The spatial relationships of six sample cylinders and the repositioning from four pig skull halves relative to adjacent defined anatomical structures were assessed by means of three-dimensional visualization software. The calibration curves for computer tomography (CT) and cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) using the Siemens phantom showed linear correlation in both modalities between the Hounsfield Units (HU) and bone morphology. A correction factor for CBCT was calculated. Exact information about the micromorphology of the bone cylinders was only available using of micro computer tomography. Cone-beam computer tomography is a suitable choice for analysing bone mass, but, it does not give any information about bone quality. 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of canine intranasal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Drees, R; Forrest, L J; Chappell, R

    2009-07-01

    Canine intranasal neoplasia is commonly evaluated using computed tomography to indicate the diagnosis, to determine disease extent, to guide histological sampling location and to plan treatment. With the expanding use of magnetic resonance imaging in veterinary medicine, this modality has been recently applied for the same purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the features of canine intranasal neoplasia using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-one dogs with confirmed intranasal neoplasia underwent both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The images were reviewed retrospectively for the bony and soft tissue features of intranasal neoplasia. Overall computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging performed very similarly. However, lysis of bones bordering the nasal cavity and mucosal thickening was found on computed tomography images more often than on magnetic resonance images. Small amounts of fluid in the nasal cavity were more often seen on magnetic resonance images. However, fluid in the frontal sinuses was seen equally well with both modalities. We conclude that computed tomography is satisfactory for evaluation of canine intranasal neoplasia, and no clinically relevant benefit is gained using magnetic resonance imaging for intranasal neoplasia without extent into the cranial cavity.

  15. Comparison of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of canine intranasal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Drees, R.; Forrest, L. J.; Chappell, R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Canine intranasal neoplasia is commonly evaluated using computed tomography to indicate the diagnosis, to determine disease extent, to guide histological sampling location and to plan treatment. With the expanding use of magnetic resonance imaging in veterinary medicine, this modality has been recently applied for the same purpose. The aim of this study was to compare the features of canine intranasal neoplasia using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Methods Twenty-one dogs with confirmed intranasal neoplasia underwent both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The images were reviewed retrospectively for the bony and soft tissue features of intranasal neoplasia. Results Overall computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging performed very similarly. However, lysis of bones bordering the nasal cavity and mucosal thickening was found on computed tomography images more often than on magnetic resonance images. Small amounts of fluid in the nasal cavity were more often seen on magnetic resonance images. However, fluid in the frontal sinuses was seen equally well with both modalities. Clinical Significance We conclude that computed tomography is satisfactory for evaluation of canine intranasal neoplasia, and no clinically relevant benefit is gained using magnetic resonance imaging for intranasal neoplasia without extent into the cranial cavity. PMID:19508490

  16. Impact of Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) in the Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Case Report.

    PubMed

    Molina-Vicenty, Irma L; Santiago-Sánchez, Michelaldemar; Vélez-Miró, Iván; Motta-Valencia, Keryl

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as damage to the brain resulting from an external force. TBI, a global leading cause of death and disability, is associated with serious social, economic, and health problems. In cases of mild-to-moderate brain damage, conventional anatomical imaging modalities may or may not detect the cascade of metabolic changes that have occurred or are occurring at the intracellular level. Functional nuclear medicine imaging and neurophysiological parameters can be used to characterize brain damage, as the former provides direct visualization of brain function, even in the absence of overt behavioral manifestations or anatomical findings. We report the case of a 30-year-old Hispanic male veteran who, after 2 traumatic brain injury events, developed cognitive and neuropsychological problems with no clear etiology in the presence of negative computed tomography (CT) findings.

  17. The use of computed tomography for the estimation of DIEP flap weights in breast reconstruction: a simple mathematical formula.

    PubMed

    Nanidis, Theodore G; Ridha, Hyder; Jallali, Navid

    2014-10-01

    Estimation of the volume of abdominal tissue is desirable when planning autologous abdominal based breast reconstruction. However, this can be difficult clinically. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, yet reliable method of calculating the deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap weight using the routine preoperative computed tomography angiogram (CTA) scan. Our mathematical formula is based on the shape of a DIEP flap resembling that of an isosceles triangular prism. Thus its volume can be calculated with a standard mathematical formula. Using bony landmarks three measurements were acquired from the CTA scan to calculate the flap weight. This was then compared to the actual flap weight harvested in both a retrospective feasibility and prospective study. In the retrospective group 17 DIEP flaps in 17 patients were analyzed. Average predicted flap weight was 667 g (range 293-1254). The average actual flap weight was 657 g (range 300-1290) giving an average percentage error of 6.8% (p-value for weight difference 0.53). In the prospective group 15 DIEP flaps in 15 patients were analyzed. Average predicted flap weight was 618 g (range 320-925). The average actual flap weight was 624 g (range 356-970) giving an average percentage error of 6.38% (p-value for weight difference 0.57). This formula is a quick, reliable and accurate way of estimating the volume of abdominal tissue using the preoperative CTA scan. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidetector row computed tomography and ultrasound characteristics of caudal vena cava duplication in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giovanna; Diana, Alessia; Cipone, Mario; Drigo, Michele; Caldin, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Caudal vena cava duplication has been rarely reported in small animals. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe characteristics of duplicated caudal vena cava in a large group of dogs. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound databases from two hospitals were searched for canine reports having the diagnosis "double caudal vena cava." One observer reviewed CT images for 71 dogs and two observers reviewed ultrasound images for 21 dogs. In all CT cases, the duplication comprised two vessels that were bilaterally symmetrical and approximately the same calibre (similar to Type I complete duplication in humans). In all ultrasound cases, the duplicated caudal vena cava appeared as a distinct vessel running on the left side of the abdominal segment of the descending aorta and extending from the left common iliac vein to the left renal vein. The prevalence of caudal vena cava duplication was 0.46% for canine ultrasound studies and 2.08% for canine CT studies performed at these hospitals. Median body weight for affected dogs was significantly lower than that of unaffected dogs (P < 0.0001). Breeds with increased risk for duplicated caudal vena cava were Yorkshire Terrier (odds ratio [OR] = 6.41), Poodle (OR = 7.46), West Highland White Terrier (OR = 6.33), and Maltese (OR = 3.87). Presence of a duplicated caudal vena cava was significantly associated with presence of extrahepatic portosystemic shunt(s) (P < 0.004). While uncommon in dogs, caudal vena cava duplication should be differentiated from other vascular anomalies when planning surgeries and for avoiding misdiagnoses. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  19. Determining the Incidence of Gynecoid Pelvis Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Nonpregnant Multiparous Women.

    PubMed

    Salk, Ismail; Cetin, Meral; Salk, Sultan; Cetin, Ali

    2016-01-01

    To determine the incidence of gynecoid pelvis by using classical criteria and measured parameters obtained from three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) pelvimetry in nonpregnant multiparous women who delivered vaginally. Our hospital's picture archiving and communication system was reviewed retrospectively. All adult women who had undergone CT examination with routine abdominal protocols were identified. In the pelvic inlet, midpelvis, and pelvic outlet, classical criteria and measured parameters, both alone and in combination, were used to determine the presence of gynecoid pelvis. 3D CT pelvimetry was performed on 226 women aged 23-65 years without any history of cephalopelvic disproportion and who had at least one delivery of an average fetal size (>2,500 g). The median parity was 4, and the mean (±SD) birth weight was 3,700 ± 498 g. Compared to the classical criteria, measured parameters and their combined use with the classical criteria significantly reduced the frequency of gynecoid pelvis (51.3 and 47.8%, respectively, vs. 71.6%; p = 0.001); however, there was no significant difference between the measured parameters and their combined use with classical criteria with regard to the frequencies of gynecoid pelvis (p > 0.05). With the use of measured parameters of 3D CT pelvimetry, the incidence of gynecoid pelvis reduces to a more acceptable level (51.3%) in accordance with obstetric knowledge. Since there is no considerable decrease with the addition of classical criteria, 3D CT pelvimetry alone has merit for determining a woman's pelvic capacity for obstetric needs after the improvement and standardization of measured parameters. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Determining the Incidence of Gynecoid Pelvis Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography in Nonpregnant Multiparous Women

    PubMed Central

    Salk, Ismail; Cetin, Meral; Salk, Sultan; Cetin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the incidence of gynecoid pelvis by using classical criteria and measured parameters obtained from three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) pelvimetry in nonpregnant multiparous women who delivered vaginally. Subjects and Methods Our hospital's picture archiving and communication system was reviewed retrospectively. All adult women who had undergone CT examination with routine abdominal protocols were identified. In the pelvic inlet, midpelvis, and pelvic outlet, classical criteria and measured parameters, both alone and in combination, were used to determine the presence of gynecoid pelvis. Results 3D CT pelvimetry was performed on 226 women aged 23-65 years without any history of cephalopelvic disproportion and who had at least one delivery of an average fetal size (>2,500 g). The median parity was 4, and the mean (±SD) birth weight was 3,700 ± 498 g. Compared to the classical criteria, measured parameters and their combined use with the classical criteria significantly reduced the frequency of gynecoid pelvis (51.3 and 47.8%, respectively, vs. 71.6%; p = 0.001); however, there was no significant difference between the measured parameters and their combined use with classical criteria with regard to the frequencies of gynecoid pelvis (p > 0.05). Conclusions With the use of measured parameters of 3D CT pelvimetry, the incidence of gynecoid pelvis reduces to a more acceptable level (51.3%) in accordance with obstetric knowledge. Since there is no considerable decrease with the addition of classical criteria, 3D CT pelvimetry alone has merit for determining a woman's pelvic capacity for obstetric needs after the improvement and standardization of measured parameters. PMID:26334957

  1. Texture classification of normal tissues in computed tomography using Gabor filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettori, Lucia; Bashir, Alia; Hasemann, Julie

    2007-03-01

    The research presented in this article is aimed at developing an automated imaging system for classification of normal tissues in medical images obtained from Computed Tomography (CT) scans. Texture features based on a bank of Gabor filters are used to classify the following tissues of interests: liver, spleen, kidney, aorta, trabecular bone, lung, muscle, IP fat, and SQ fat. The approach consists of three steps: convolution of the regions of interest with a bank of 32 Gabor filters (4 frequencies and 8 orientations), extraction of two Gabor texture features per filter (mean and standard deviation), and creation of a Classification and Regression Tree-based classifier that automatically identifies the various tissues. The data set used consists of approximately 1000 DIACOM images from normal chest and abdominal CT scans of five patients. The regions of interest were labeled by expert radiologists. Optimal trees were generated using two techniques: 10-fold cross-validation and splitting of the data set into a training and a testing set. In both cases, perfect classification rules were obtained provided enough images were available for training (~65%). All performance measures (sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy) for all regions of interest were at 100%. This significantly improves previous results that used Wavelet, Ridgelet, and Curvelet texture features, yielding accuracy values in the 85%-98% range The Gabor filters' ability to isolate features at different frequencies and orientations allows for a multi-resolution analysis of texture essential when dealing with, at times, very subtle differences in the texture of tissues in CT scans.

  2. Assessment of liver volume with computed tomography and comparison of findings with ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Bora, Aydın; Alptekin, Cem; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Batur, Abdussamet; Akdemir, Zülküf; Berköz, Mehmet

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis on the liver volume. As investigating hepatic steatosis, we utilized computed tomography (CT) to determine the degree of steatosis and we utilized hepatobiliary ultrasonography (USG) for densitometry and correlation. As hepatosteatosis group, 35 patients over 18 years of age and whose abdominal CT scans were requested by several clinics and performed routinely were included in this study, and as control group, 40 healthy subjects without hepatosteatosis (clinically and radiologically) and correlated with hepatosteatosis group in terms of age and gender were included in this study. CT densitometry and liver attenuation index (LAI) of all individuals who participated in our study were calculated, and contrast images of patients were transferred to CT-Volume Software (Siemens Syngo Multimodality Workplace; Version VE52A). In this study, interactive and automated volume measurement techniques were used together. The volumes were measured separately in patient and control group. In this study for each stage in USG, there was found a direct correlation in terms of LAI and volume, and this correlation was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Furthermore, statistical significance between size and USG stage draws attention (p < 0.05). A significance relationship between USG stage and age could not be determined. As a result, we have reached the conclusion that CT densitometry can be used as an assistive technique along with USG to determine the degree of steatosis in the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and there is a positive linear correlation between the liver size and volume, and liver volume increases in the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  3. Comparison of the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography and medical computed tomography: implications for clinical diagnostics with guided surgery.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Marcus; Calvo-Guirado, Jose Luis; Orentlicher, Gary; Wahl, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and medical-grade CT in the context of evaluating the diagnostic value and accuracy of fiducial marker localization for reference marker-based guided surgery systems. Cadaver mandibles with attached radiopaque gutta-percha markers, as well as glass balls and composite cylinders of known dimensions, were measured manually with a highly accurate digital caliper. The objects were then scanned using a medical-grade CT scanner (Philips Brilliance 64) and five different CBCT scanners (Sirona Galileos, Morita 3D Accuitomo 80, Vatech PaX-Reve3D, 3M Imtech Iluma, and Planmeca ProMax 3D). The data were then imported into commercially available software, and measurements were made of the scanned markers and objects. CT and CBCT measurements were compared to each other and to the caliper measurements. The difference between the CBCT measurements and the caliper measurements was larger than the difference between the CT measurements and the caliper measurements. Measurements of the cadaver mandible and the geometric reference markers were highly accurate with CT. The average absolute errors of the human mandible measurements were 0.03 mm for CT and 0.23 mm for CBCT. The measurement errors of the geometric objects based on CT ranged between 0.00 and 0.12 mm, compared to an error range between 0.00 and 2.17 mm with the CBCT scanners. CT provided the most accurate images in this study, closely followed by one CBCT of the five tested. Although there were differences in the distance measurements of the hard tissue of the human mandible between CT and CBCT, these differences may not be of clinical significance for most diagnostic purposes. The fiducial marker localization error caused by some CBCT scanners may be a problem for guided surgery systems.

  4. Automated Quantitative Computed Tomography Versus Visual Computed Tomography Scoring in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Validation Against Pulmonary Function.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Joseph; Bartholmai, Brian J; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Kokosi, Maria; Nair, Arjun; Karwoski, Ronald; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Hansell, David M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether a novel computed tomography (CT) postprocessing software technique (CALIPER) is superior to visual CT scoring as judged by functional correlations in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). A total of 283 consecutive patients with IPF had CT parenchymal patterns evaluated quantitatively with CALIPER and by visual scoring. These 2 techniques were evaluated against: forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLco), carbon monoxide transfer coefficient (Kco), and a composite physiological index (CPI), with regard to extent of interstitial lung disease (ILD), extent of emphysema, and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. CALIPER-derived estimates of ILD extent demonstrated stronger univariate correlations than visual scores for most pulmonary function tests (PFTs): (FEV1: CALIPER R=0.29, visual R=0.18; FVC: CALIPER R=0.41, visual R=0.27; DLco: CALIPER R=0.31, visual R=0.35; CPI: CALIPER R=0.48, visual R=0.44). Correlations between CT measures of emphysema extent and PFTs were weak and did not differ significantly between CALIPER and visual scoring. Intriguingly, the pulmonary vessel volume provided similar correlations to total ILD extent scored by CALIPER for FVC, DLco, and CPI (FVC: R=0.45; DLco: R=0.34; CPI: R=0.53). CALIPER was superior to visual scoring as validated by functional correlations with PFTs. The pulmonary vessel volume, a novel CALIPER CT parameter with no visual scoring equivalent, has the potential to be a CT feature in the assessment of patients with IPF and requires further exploration.

  5. National survey on dose data analysis in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Heilmaier, Christina; Treier, Reto; Merkle, Elmar Max; Alkhadi, Hatem; Weishaupt, Dominik; Schindera, Sebastian

    2018-05-28

    A nationwide survey was performed assessing current practice of dose data analysis in computed tomography (CT). All radiological departments in Switzerland were asked to participate in the on-line survey composed of 19 questions (16 multiple choice, 3 free text). It consisted of four sections: (1) general information on the department, (2) dose data analysis, (3) use of a dose management software (DMS) and (4) radiation protection activities. In total, 152 out of 241 Swiss radiological departments filled in the whole questionnaire (return rate, 63%). Seventy-nine per cent of the departments (n = 120/152) analyse dose data on a regular basis with considerable heterogeneity in the frequency (1-2 times per year, 45%, n = 54/120; every month, 35%, n = 42/120) and method of analysis. Manual analysis is carried out by 58% (n = 70/120) compared with 42% (n = 50/120) of departments using a DMS. Purchase of a DMS is planned by 43% (n = 30/70) of the departments with manual analysis. Real-time analysis of dose data is performed by 42% (n = 21/50) of the departments with a DMS; however, residents can access the DMS in clinical routine only in 20% (n = 10/50) of the departments. An interdisciplinary dose team, which among other things communicates dose data internally (63%, n = 76/120) and externally, is already implemented in 57% (n = 68/120) departments. Swiss radiological departments are committed to radiation safety. However, there is high heterogeneity among them regarding the frequency and method of dose data analysis as well as the use of DMS and radiation protection activities. • Swiss radiological departments are committed to and interest in radiation safety as proven by a 63% return rate of the survey. • Seventy-nine per cent of departments analyse dose data on a regular basis with differences in the frequency and method of analysis: 42% use a dose management software, while 58% currently perform manual dose data analysis. Of the latter, 43% plan to buy a dose

  6. Quantitative computed tomography applied to interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Obert, Martin; Kampschulte, Marian; Limburg, Rebekka; Barańczuk, Stefan; Krombach, Gabriele A

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate a new image marker that retrieves information from computed tomography (CT) density histograms, with respect to classification properties between different lung parenchyma groups. Furthermore, to conduct a comparison of the new image marker with conventional markers. Density histograms from 220 different subjects (normal = 71; emphysema = 73; fibrotic = 76) were used to compare the conventionally applied emphysema index (EI), 15 th percentile value (PV), mean value (MV), variance (V), skewness (S), kurtosis (K), with a new histogram's functional shape (HFS) method. Multinomial logistic regression (MLR) analyses was performed to calculate predictions of different lung parenchyma group membership using the individual methods, as well as combinations thereof, as covariates. Overall correct assigned subjects (OCA), sensitivity (sens), specificity (spec), and Nagelkerke's pseudo R 2 (NR 2 ) effect size were estimated. NR 2 was used to set up a ranking list of the different methods. MLR indicates the highest classification power (OCA of 92%; sens 0.95; spec 0.89; NR 2 0.95) when all histogram analyses methods were applied together in the MLR. Highest classification power among individually applied methods was found using the HFS concept (OCA 86%; sens 0.93; spec 0.79; NR 2 0.80). Conventional methods achieved lower classification potential on their own: EI (OCA 69%; sens 0.95; spec 0.26; NR 2 0.52); PV (OCA 69%; sens 0.90; spec 0.37; NR 2 0.57); MV (OCA 65%; sens 0.71; spec 0.58; NR 2 0.61); V (OCA 66%; sens 0.72; spec 0.53; NR 2 0.66); S (OCA 65%; sens 0.88; spec 0.26; NR 2 0.55); and K (OCA 63%; sens 0.90; spec 0.16; NR 2 0.48). The HFS method, which was so far applied to a CT bone density curve analysis, is also a remarkable information extraction tool for lung density histograms. Presumably, being a principle mathematical approach, the HFS method can extract valuable health related information also from histograms from complete different areas

  7. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Min, Byungjun; Kwak, Jungwon; Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sungyong; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-02-01

    Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method-projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method-expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed within 1% error. EM

  8. Uses of Computed Tomography in the NASA Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, H. Peter; Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) has proved to be of inestimable use in providing a rapid evaluation of a variety of samples from Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) to electronic materials (Ge-Si alloys) to space grown materials such as meteorites. The system at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), because of its convenient geographical location, is ideal for examining samples immediately after returning to Earth. It also has the advantage of the choice of fluxes, and in particular the use of a radioactive cobalt source, which is basically monochromatic. This permits a reasonable measurement of density to be made from which chemical composition can be determined. Due to the current dearth of long duration space grown materials, the CT instrument has been used to characterize materials in preparation for flight, to determine thermal expansion values, and to examine long duration space grown materials, i.e. meteorites. The work will first describe the establishment of the protocol for obtaining the optimum density readings for any material. This will include both the effects of the hardware or instrumental parameters that can be controlled, and the techniques used to process the CT data. Examples will be given of the compositional variation along single crystals of germanium-silicon alloys. Density variation with temperature has been measured in preparation for future materials science experiments; this involved the fabrication and installation of a single zone furnace incorporating a heat pipe to ensure of high temperature uniformity. At the time of writing the thermal expansion of lead has been measured from room temperature to 900 C. Three methods are available. Digital radiography enable length changes to be determined. Prior to melting the sample is small than the container and the diameter change can be measured. Most critical, however, is the density change in solid, through the melting region, and in the liquid state. These data are needed for engineering purposes to aid

  9. Prior image constrained image reconstruction in emerging computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Stephen T.

    Advances have been made in computed tomography (CT), especially in the past five years, by incorporating prior images into the image reconstruction process. In this dissertation, we investigate prior image constrained image reconstruction in three emerging CT applications: dual-energy CT, multi-energy photon-counting CT, and cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy. First, we investigate the application of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) in dual-energy CT, which has been called "one of the hottest research areas in CT." Phantom and animal studies are conducted using a state-of-the-art 64-slice GE Discovery 750 HD CT scanner to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose reduction in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging. Second, we extend the application of PICCS from dual-energy CT to multi-energy photon-counting CT, which has been called "one of the 12 topics in CT to be critical in the next decade." Numerical simulations are conducted to generate multiple energy bin images for a photon-counting CT acquisition and to investigate the extent to which PICCS can enable radiation dose efficiency improvement. Third, we investigate the performance of a newly proposed prior image constrained scatter correction technique to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT, which, when used in image-guided radiation therapy procedures, can assist in patient localization, and potentially, dose verification and adaptive radiation therapy. Phantom studies are conducted using a Varian 2100 EX system with an on-board imager to investigate the extent to which the prior image constrained scatter correction technique can mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT. Results show that these prior image constrained image reconstruction techniques can reduce radiation dose in dual-energy CT by 50% in phantom and animal studies in material density and virtual monochromatic imaging, can lead to radiation

  10. Intraoperative computed tomography guided neuronavigation: concepts, efficiency, and work flow.

    PubMed

    Matula, C; Rössler, K; Reddy, M; Schindler, E; Koos, W T

    1998-01-01

    Image-guided surgery is currently considered to be of undisputed value in microsurgical and endoscopical neurosurgery, but one of its major drawbacks is the degradation of accuracy during frameless stereotactic neuronavigation due to brain and/or lesion shift. A computed tomography (CT) scanner system (Philips Tomoscan M) developed for the operating room was connected to a pointer device navigation system for image-guided surgery (Philips EasyGuide system) in order to provide an integrated solution to this problem, and the advantages of this combination were evaluated in 20 cases (15 microsurgical and 5 endoscopic). The integration of the scanner into the operating room setup was successful in all procedures. The patients were positioned on a specially developed scanner table, which permitted movement to a scanning position then back to the operating position at any time during surgery. Contrast-enhanced preoperative CCTs performed following positioning and draping were of high quality in all cases, because a radiolucent head fixation technique was used. The accuracy achieved with this combination was significantly better (1.6:1.22.2). The overall concept is one of working in a closed system where everything is done in the same room, and the efficiency of this is clearly proven in different ways. The most important fact is the time saved in the overall treatment process (about 55 h for one operating room over a 6-month period). The combination of an intraoperative CCT scanner with the pointer device neuronavigation system permits not only the intraoperative control of resection of brain tumors, but also (in about 20% of cases) the identification of otherwise invisible residual tumor tissue by intraoperative update of the neuronavigation data set. Additionally, an image update solves the problem of intraoperative brain and/or tumor shifts during image-guided resection. Having the option of making an intraoperative quality check at any time leads to significantly

  11. Experimentally determined spectral optimization for dedicated breast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Prionas, Nicolas D; Huang, Shih-Ying; Boone, John M

    2011-02-01

    The current study aimed to experimentally identify the optimal technique factors (x-ray tube potential and added filtration material/thickness) to maximize soft-tissue contrast, microcalcification contrast, and iodine contrast enhancement using cadaveric breast specimens imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT). Secondarily, the study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of phantom materials as tissue surrogates and to characterize the change in accuracy with varying bCT technique factors. A cadaveric breast specimen was acquired under appropriate approval and scanned using a prototype bCT scanner. Inserted into the specimen were cylindrical inserts of polyethylene, water, iodine contrast medium (iodixanol, 2.5 mg/ml), and calcium hydroxyapatite (100 mg/ml). Six x-ray tube potentials (50, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 kVp) and three different filters (0.2 mm Cu, 1.5 mm Al, and 0.2 mm Sn) were tested. For each set of technique factors, the intensity (linear attenuation coefficient) and noise were measured within six regions of interest (ROIs): Glandular tissue, adipose tissue, polyethylene, water, iodine contrast medium, and calcium hydroxyapatite. Dose-normalized contrast to noise ratio (CNRD) was measured for pairwise comparisons among the six ROIs. Regression models were used to estimate the effect of tube potential and added filtration on intensity, noise, and CNRD. Iodine contrast enhancement was maximized using 60 kVp and 0.2 mm Cu. Microcalcification contrast and soft-tissue contrast were maximized at 60 kVp. The 0.2 mm Cu filter achieved significantly higher CNRD for iodine contrast enhancement than the other two filters (p = 0.01), but microcalcification contrast and soft-tissue contrast were similar using the copper and aluminum filters. The average percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient, across all tube potentials, for polyethylene versus adipose tissue was 1.8%, 1.7%, and 1.3% for 0.2 mm Cu, 1.5 mm Al, and 0.2 mm Sn, respectively. For

  12. Olfactory cleft computed tomography analysis and olfaction in chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Preeti; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Storck, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric analysis of the olfactory cleft by using computed tomography has been associated with olfaction in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). However, existing studies have not comprehensively measured olfaction, and it thus remains unknown whether correlations differ across specific dimensions of odor perception. Objective: To use comprehensive measures of patient-reported and objective olfaction to evaluate the relationship between volumetric olfactory cleft opacification and olfaction. Methods: Olfaction in patients with CRS was evaluated by using “Sniffin' Sticks” tests and a modified version of the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders. Olfactory cleft opacification was quantified by using two- and three-dimensional, computerized volumetric analysis. Correlations between olfactory metrics and olfactory cleft opacification were then calculated. Results: The overall CRS cohort included 26 patients without nasal polyposis (CRSsNP) (68.4%) and 12 patients with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) (31.6%). Across the entire cohort, total olfactory cleft opacification was 82.8%, with greater opacification in the CRSwNP subgroup compared with CRSsNP (92.3 versus 78.4%, p < 0.001). The percent total volume opacification correlated with the total Sniffin' Sticks score (r = −0.568, p < 0.001) as well as individual threshold, discrimination, and identification scores (p < 0.001 for all). Within the CRSwNP subgroup, threshold (r = −0.616, p = 0.033) and identification (r = −0.647, p = 0.023) remained highly correlated with total volume opacification. In patients with CRSsNP, the threshold correlated with total volume scores (r = −0.457, p = 0.019), with weaker and nonsignificant correlations for discrimination and identification. Correlations between total volume opacification and the Questionnaire of Olfactory Disorders were qualitatively similar to objective olfactory findings in both CRSwNP (r = −0.566, p = 0.070) and CRSsNP (r = −0.310, p

  13. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy com