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  1. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  2. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors, including cancer Infections or injury Kidney stones Appendicitis ... also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal artery stenosis ...

  3. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  4. Multidetector CT of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Soto, Jorge A; Anderson, Stephan W

    2012-12-01

    The morbidity, mortality, and economic costs resulting from trauma in general, and blunt abdominal trauma in particular, are substantial. The "panscan" (computed tomographic [CT] examination of the head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis) has become an essential element in the early evaluation and decision-making algorithm for hemodynamically stable patients who sustained abdominal trauma. CT has virtually replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for the detection of important injuries. Over the past decade, substantial hardware and software developments in CT technology, especially the introduction and refinement of multidetector scanners, have expanded the versatility of CT for examination of the polytrauma patient in multiple facets: higher spatial resolution, faster image acquisition and reconstruction, and improved patient safety (optimization of radiation delivery methods). In this article, the authors review the elements of multidetector CT technique that are currently relevant for evaluating blunt abdominal trauma and describe the most important CT signs of trauma in the various organs. Because conservative nonsurgical therapy is preferred for all but the most severe injuries affecting the solid viscera, the authors emphasize the CT findings that are indications for direct therapeutic intervention. PMID:23175542

  5. CT of acute abdominal aortic disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Sanjeev; Menias, Christine O; Heiken, Jay P

    2003-11-01

    Aortic aneurysm rupture, aortic dissection, PAU, acute aortic occlusion, traumatic aortic injury, and aortic fistula represent acute abdominal aortic conditions. Because of its speed and proximity to the emergency department, helical CT is the imaging test of choice for these conditions. MR imaging also plays an important role in the imaging of aortic dissection and PAU, particularly when the patient is unable to receive intravenous contrast material. In this era of MDCT, conventional angiography is used as a secondary diagnostic tool to clarify equivocal findings on cross-sectional imaging. Ultrasound is helpful when CT is not readily available and the patient is unable or too unstable to undergo MR imaging. PMID:14661663

  6. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JINGJING; WU, ZENGJIE; SUN, BINBIN; LI, DACHENG; WANG, ZHENGUANG; LIU, FANGJUN; HUA, HUI

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors. PMID:27123106

  7. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  8. Abdominal organ motion measured using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Brandner, Edward D.; Wu, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.wu@jefferson.edu; Chen, Hungcheng; Heron, Dwight; Kalnicki, Shalom; Komanduri, Krishna; Gerszten, Kristina; Burton, Steve; Ahmed, Irfan; Shou, Zhenyu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To measure respiration-induced abdominal organ motion using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning and to examine the organ paths. Methods and Materials: During 4D CT scanning, consecutive CT images are acquired of the patient at each couch position. Simultaneously, the patient's respiratory pattern is recorded using an external marker block taped to the patient's abdomen. This pattern is used to retrospectively organize the CT images into multiple three-dimensional images, each representing one breathing phase. These images are analyzed to measure organ motion between each phase. The displacement from end expiration is compared to a displacement limit that represents acceptable dosimetric results (5 mm). Results: The organs measured in 13 patients were the liver, spleen, and left and right kidneys. Their average superior to inferior absolute displacements were 1.3 cm for the liver, 1.3 cm for the spleen, 1.1 cm for the left kidney, and 1.3 cm for the right kidney. Although the organ paths varied among patients, 5 mm of superior to inferior displacement from end expiration resulted in less than 5 mm of displacement in the other directions for 41 of 43 organs measured. Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT scanning can accurately measure abdominal organ motion throughout respiration. This information may result in greater organ sparing and planning target volume coverage.

  9. Evaluation of five image registration tools for abdominal CT: pitfalls and opportunities with soft anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  10. Spleen volume on CT and the effect of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Romero, Cinthia; Agarwal, Sheela; Abujudeh, Hani H; Thrall, James; Hahn, Peter F

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the magnitude of change in spleen volume on CT in subjects sustaining blunt abdominal trauma without hemorrhage relative to patients without disease and how the spleen volumes are distributed. Sixty-seven subjects with blunt abdominal trauma and 101 control subjects were included in this retrospective single-center, IRB-approved, and HIPAA-compliant study. Patients with an injured spleen were excluded. Using a semiautomatic segmentation program, two readers computed spleen volumes from CT. Spleen volume distribution in male and female trauma and control cohorts were compared nonparametrically. Spleen volume plotted against height, weight, and age were analyzed by linear regression. The number of females and males are, respectively, 35 and 32 in trauma subjects and 69 and 32 among controls. Female trauma patients (49.6 years) were older than males (39.8 years) (p = 0.02). Distributions of spleen volume were not normal, skewed above their means, requiring a nonparametric comparison. Spleen volumes in trauma patients were smaller than those in controls with medians of 230 vs 294 mL in males(p < 0.006) and 163 vs 191 mL in females(p < 0.04). Spleen volume correlated positively with weight in females and with height in male controls, and negatively with age in male controls (p < 0.01). Variation in reproducibility and repeatability was acceptable at 1.5 and 4.9 %, respectively. Reader variation was 1.7 and 4.6 % for readers 1 and 2, respectively. The mean spleen volume in controls was 245 mL, the largest ever reported. Spleen volume decreases in response to blunt abdominal trauma. Spleen volumes are not normally distributed. Our population has the largest spleen volume reported in the literature, perhaps a consequence of the obesity epidemic. PMID:27166964

  11. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation. PMID:16445250

  12. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Kamel, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    A clinical trial was designed to test whether a significantly lower radiation dose technique could be used for pediatric abdominal CT scanning without loss of diagnostic image quality. The study included pediatric patients referred to radiology from the Children's Hospital and clinics at The University of Michigan. Seventy-eight cases were included in the study, 36 cases in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Patient characteristics in both groups were comparable in every respect except for the technical factors used to expose the pelvis. Patients in the experimental group were scanned with a technique using 80 mAs while those in the control group were scanned with the conventional technique of 240 mAs. Therefore, the radiation dose to the pelvis was three times higher in the control group than in the experimental group. Scans were evaluated by two experienced pediatric radiologists who assessed anatomical details, image resolution and the degree of confidence in reaching a diagnosis. The low-mAs technique did not result in reduction of diagnostic image quality or the confidence in reaching a diagnosis. In conclusion, the radiation dose resulting from pediatric CT of the pelvis may be reduced by a factor of three with equivalent medical benefit.

  13. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  14. Effects of Dual-Energy CT with Non-Linear Blending on Abdominal CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaoqin; Jiang, Xiaochen; Xu, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether non-linear blending technique for arterial-phase dual-energy abdominal CT angiography (CTA) could improve image quality compared to the linear blending technique and conventional 120 kVp imaging. Materials and Methods This study included 118 patients who had accepted dual-energy abdominal CTA in the arterial phase. They were assigned to Sn140/80 kVp protocol (protocol A, n = 40) if body mass index (BMI) < 25 or Sn140/100 kVp protocol (protocol B, n = 41) if BMI ≥ 25. Non-linear blending images and linear blending images with a weighting factor of 0.5 in each protocol were generated and compared with the conventional 120 kVp images (protocol C, n = 37). The abdominal vascular enhancements, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and radiation dose were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test, independent t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results Mean vascular attenuation, CNR, SNR and subjective image quality score for the non-linear blending images in each protocol were all higher compared to the corresponding linear blending images and 120 kVp images (p values ranging from < 0.001 to 0.007) except for when compared to non-linear blending images for protocol B and 120 kVp images in CNR and SNR. No significant differences were found in image noise among the three kinds of images and the same kind of images in different protocols, but the lowest radiation dose was shown in protocol A. Conclusion Non-linear blending technique of dual-energy CT can improve the image quality of arterial-phase abdominal CTA, especially with the Sn140/80 kVp scanning. PMID:25053901

  15. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum: A Case Report of MRI, CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-02-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum.A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved.This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH. PMID:26871848

  16. Computed tomography (CT) of bowel and mesenteric injury in blunt abdominal trauma: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian; Mohamed, Siti Kamariah Che

    2012-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is currently the diagnostic modality of choice in the evaluation of clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, including the assessment of blunt bowel and mesenteric injuries. CT signs of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries are bowel wall defect, free air, oral contrast material extravasation, extravasation of contrast material from mesenteric vessels, mesenteric vascular beading, abrupt termination of mesenteric vessels, focal bowel wall thickening, mesenteric fat stranding, mesenteric haematoma and intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal fluid. This pictorial essay illustrates CT features of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Pitfalls in interpretation of images are emphasized in proven cases. PMID:23082464

  17. Percutaneous Transhepatic Drainage of Inaccessible Abdominal Abscesses Following Abdominal Surgery Under Real-Time CT-Fluoroscopic Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-15

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 {+-} 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 {+-} 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  18. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  19. New technique for treating abdominal surgical site infection using CT woundgraphy and NPWT: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Eisaku; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakashima, Keigo; Suzuki, Norihiko; Imakita, Tomonori; Tsutsui, Nobuhiro; Ohdaira, Hironori; Kitajima, Masaki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for abdominal surgical site infection (SSI) is becoming increasingly common, although enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) has been reported as a complication. To avoid ECF, we used computed tomography (CT) woundgraphy to evaluate the relationship between the wound and the intestine, and then safely treated the abdominal SSI with NPWT. Case presentation Following a laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal neuroendocrine tumor and covering ileostomy, a 59-year-old woman underwent stoma closure. Six days after surgery, we diagnosed SSI. We suspected ECF, because the wound was deep and the pus resembled enteric fluid. However, CT woundgraphy showed that the wound was separated from the abdominal cavity and the intestine by the abdominal rectus muscle. Accordingly, we performed NPWT. SSI was cured and the wound was well granulated. Twenty-three days after surgery, the patient was discharged. Eventually, the wound was completely epithelialized. Discussion Although successful NPWT has been reported for open abdominal wounds, ECF is a common complication. ECF can be prevented by separating the wound from the intestine by the omentum or muscle fascia, protecting the intestinal serosa during surgery, and applying low vacuum pressure. The relationships among the wound, the fascia, and the intestine must be evaluated before abdominal SSI treatment. One good method is CT woundgraphy, which evaluates wound extent and depth, closure of muscle fascia, and the relationship between the wound and the intestine. Conclusion We report a case of CT woundgraphy before NPWT for abdominal SSI. CT woundgraphy is a good candidate for evaluating wound condition. PMID:27002290

  20. Emerging Techniques for Dose Optimization in Abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Joel F.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M.; Maturen, Katherine E.; Wasnik, Ashish P.; Pandya, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in computed tomographic (CT) scanning technique such as automated tube current modulation (ATCM), optimized x-ray tube voltage, and better use of iterative image reconstruction have allowed maintenance of good CT image quality with reduced radiation dose. ATCM varies the tube current during scanning to account for differences in patient attenuation, ensuring a more homogeneous image quality, although selection of the appropriate image quality parameter is essential for achieving optimal dose reduction. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage is best suited for evaluating iodinated structures, since the effective energy of the x-ray beam will be closer to the k-edge of iodine, resulting in a higher attenuation for the iodine. The optimal kilovoltage for a CT study should be chosen on the basis of imaging task and patient habitus. The aim of iterative image reconstruction is to identify factors that contribute to noise on CT images with use of statistical models of noise (statistical iterative reconstruction) and selective removal of noise to improve image quality. The degree of noise suppression achieved with statistical iterative reconstruction can be customized to minimize the effect of altered image quality on CT images. Unlike with statistical iterative reconstruction, model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms model both the statistical noise and the physical acquisition process, allowing CT to be performed with further reduction in radiation dose without an increase in image noise or loss of spatial resolution. Understanding these recently developed scanning techniques is essential for optimization of imaging protocols designed to achieve the desired image quality with a reduced dose. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24428277

  1. FDG PET/CT Findings in Abdominal Fat Necrosis After Treatment for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Julien; Moreau, Aurélie; Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Skanjeti, Andrea; Salles, Gilles; Giammarile, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    FDG PET/CT is now validated in non-Hodgkin lymphoma for response assessment in interim and posttreatment lymphoma. We report the case of a 62-year-old man followed by FDG PET/CT for a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with initial stage III. The interim FDG PET/CT examination concluded in complete metabolic and morphological response of subdiaphragmatic lymphadenopathy but a persistent abnormal subdiaphragmatic uptake (SUVmax at 9 and Deauville 5-point scale at 5). Therefore, an abdominal biopsy of the corresponding nodules was conducted with a final diagnosis of diffuse fat necrosis. PMID:26825213

  2. Incidentalomas associated with abdominal and pelvic CT angiograms for abdominal-based breast free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Olivia A; Bagher, Shaghayegh; Jaskolka, Jeff; Tan, Marcus; Butler, Kate; O'Neill, Anne C; Zhong, Toni; Hofer, Stefan O

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is routinely performed prior to breast reconstruction using deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps to provide better surgical planning and improve preoperative decision making. These investigations occasionally result in unexpected findings in otherwise asymptomatic women. Unexpected findings on imaging in a population of women with previous breast cancer or strong breast cancer risk factors can lead to undue stress and anxiety. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of unexpected findings in preoperative CT angiograms and to correlate these with patient and breast cancer characteristics. A retrospective chart review from May 2008 to December 2012 was performed reviewing all patients who underwent DIEP flap breast reconstruction. Radiology reports of their preoperative CT angiograms, details of unexpected findings, patients' past medical and cancer history, additional radiological investigations, outcomes, and interventions were reviewed. In total, 360 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. Sixty-four percent of the patients who underwent CTA imaging had incidental findings. Further imaging was suggested in 48% of this group. The most common incidentalomas were hepatic (47%), bone (24%), and renal (20%). "Incidentalomas" were associated with patients' underlying comorbidities (p = 0.001) and age (p = 0.01). "Radiographically suspicious incidentalomas" were associated with the underlying comorbidities (p = 0.001). The radiologists most commonly suggested investigation methods such as ultrasound (41%), another CT (28%), bone scan (21%), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 14%). No incidentalomas were found to be malignant on further recommended investigation in this study and no breast cancer reconstruction was delayed as a result of the discovery of incidentalomas or their subsequent investigations. It is important to counsel patients of the possibility of incidental findings and the

  3. Can lab data be used to reduce abdominal computed tomography (CT) usage in young adults presenting to the emergency department with nontraumatic abdominal pain?

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Mahadevia, Soham; Stein, Evan G; Freeman, Katherine; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine whether laboratory parameters could be found, predictive of a negative abdominal CT scan in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Following institutional review board approval, we evaluated CT reports of 522 patients, aged 21-35 years old, who presented to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Bivariate analyses relating ten laboratory parameters to whether the CT detected a cause for abdominal pain were conducted. A multivariate logistic regression model was then derived, with all variables in the final model significant at p < 0.05. Variables were dichotomized to yield odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 522 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 45% had a cause for pain demonstrated by CT. Predictors of a negative CT in men were normal hematocrit and negative urine blood (p = 0.045, p = 0.016, respectively), and in women normal hematocrit, granulocyte percent, and alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.023, p = 0.039, p < 0.0001, respectively). When standard normal values were used to calculate descriptive statistics, only granulocyte percent in women had a significant confidence interval (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.6-4.0). Among the 208 women with normal granulocyte percent, the final clinical diagnosis was appendicitis, cholecystitis, and diverticulitis, in three, three, and two cases, respectively (4% combined). In summary, no laboratory test was sufficient to offer reassurance that a CT is not necessary in a young adult patient with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Alternative strategies should be considered to decrease the use of CT, and its associated radiation exposure, in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:20306104

  4. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  5. [Rectal prolapse revealing a tumor: The role of abdominal ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Bequet, E; Stiennon, L; Lhomme, A; Piette, C; Hoyoux, C; Rausin, L; Guidi, O

    2016-07-01

    Rectal prolapse is rare in children and usually benign. However, there are various diseases that can be associated with it, such as cystic fibrosis or other causes of increased abdominal pressure. Here, we review the various underlying conditions that pediatricians or pediatric gastroenterologists should consider in the case of rectal prolapse. We report on three cases of children with a rectal prolapse and intra-abdominal tumors. Current recommendations and practice do not include a systematic check via abdominal imaging in cases of rectal prolapse. However, in some situations, imaging is indicated to detect a possible expansive process. Thus, in the presence of recurrent prolapse or of associated urinary or neurological signs, imaging is justified so as to allow for an early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms. Given its lack of radiation exposure and good sensitivity in children, ultrasound imaging is the first choice. PMID:27265581

  6. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  7. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  8. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  9. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  10. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  11. CT-SPECT fusion to correlate radiolabeled monoclonal antibody uptake with abdominal CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Noz, M.E.; Sanger, J.J.; Megibow, A.J.; Maguire, G.Q. )

    1989-09-01

    To enhance the information provided by computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed with radiolabeled, anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the authors performed fusion of these types of images from eight subjects with suspected colorectal adenocarcinoma. Section thickness and pixel size of the two studies were matched, coordinates of corresponding points from each study were identified, and CT sections were translated, rotated, and reprojected to match the corresponding SPECT scans. The CT-SPECT fusion enabled identification of anatomic sites of tumor-specific MoAb accumulation in four cases, showed non-specific MoAb accumulation in two, and helped confirm information only suggested by the two studies separately in one.

  12. [Meloxicam-induced colitis revealed by acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Seddik, H; Rabhi, M

    2013-03-01

    Whether intestinal toxicity of preferential or selective COX-2 inhibitors is reduced compared with that of standard NSAIDs is controversial. A 26-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea a few days after beginning meloxicam treatment. Endoscopic examination of the colon showed erythematous and ulcerative lesions involving 15 cm of the left colon. No aetiology has been found for colitis. Diarrhea disappeared 1 week after meloxicam was stopped. Total colonoscopy 3 months and 2 years later was normal. The role of meloxicam in the etiology of colitis was considered plausible. This report and a few other cases in the literature suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug inhibitor toxicity should be investigated in case of unexplained acute colitis. PMID:23537413

  13. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  14. A 54-Year-Old Man Presenting With an Abnormal Abdominal CT Scan 8 Months After Double Lung Transplant.

    PubMed

    Mistrot, Daniel P; Gemma, Vincent A; Gagliano, Ronald A; Omar, Ashraf; Panchabhai, Tanmay S

    2016-05-01

    A 54-year-old man who had undergone bilateral sequential lung transplant for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation of an abnormal abdominal CT scan. Three months previously a gastrojejunostomy tube had been placed after he was found to have evidence of silent aspiration with oral intake. At a recent clinic visit, he denied abdominal pain or problems with the feeding tube. He described frequent diarrhea since placement of the feeding tube. PMID:27157231

  15. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  16. Development of automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, Sanne D.; Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Belder, Ruben; Klaase, Joost M.; Bezooijen, Roland; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    This contribution describes a novel algorithm for the automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans of patients referred for colorectal resection. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes can accurately be measured with errors of 1.2 and 0.5%, respectively. Also the reproducibility of CT measurements is good; a disadvantage is the amount of radiation. In this study the diagnostic CT scans in the work - up of (colorectal) cancer were used. This implied no extra radiation. For the purpose of segmentation alone, a low dose protocol can be applied. Obesity is a well known risk factor for complications in and after surgery. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted indicator of obesity, but it is not specific for risk assessment of colorectal surgery. We report on an automated method to quantify visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes as a basic step in a clinical research project concerning preoperative risk assessment. The outcomes are to be correlated with the surgery results. The hypothesis is that the balance between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue together with the presence of calcifications in the major bloodvessels, is a predictive indicator for post - operatieve complications such as anastomotic leak. We start with four different computer simulated humanoid abdominal volumes with tissue values in the appropriate Hounsfield range at different dose levels. With satisfactory numerical results for this test, we have applied the algorithm on over a 100 patient scans and have compared results with manual segmentations by an expert for a smaller pilot group. The results are within a 5% difference. Compared to other studies reported in the literature, reliable values are obtained for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas.

  17. Efficient Abdominal Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT with SIMPLE Context Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining. PMID:25914506

  18. Efficient abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  19. Comparative analysis of the radiation shield effect in an abdominal CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Joon-Seok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lim, Chang-Seon

    2014-03-01

    This study measured and compared the dose on the eyeballs and the thyroid with and without the use of a shield by applying the abdominal examination protocol used in an actual examination to a 64-channel computed tomography (CT) scan. A dummy phantom manufactured from acryl was used to measure the dose to the eyeballs and the thyroid of a patient during a thoraco-abdominal CT scan. The dose was measured using three dosimeters (optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and photoluminescence dosimeter (PLD)) attached to the surfaces of three parts (left and right eyeballs and thyroid) in a phantom with and without the use of a shield for the eyeballs and the thyroid. Two types of shields (1-mm barium shielding sheet and 1-mm tungsten shielding sheet) were used for the measurements. The goggles and the lead shield, which are normally used in clinical practice, were used to compare the shield ratios of the shields. According to the results of the measurements made by using the OSLD, the shield ratios of the barium and the tungsten sheets were in the range of 34-36%. The measurements made by using the TLD showed that the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 6.25% higher than that of the tungsten sheet. When the PLD was used for the measurement, the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 33.34%, which was equivalent to that of the tungsten sheet. These results confirmed that the cheap barium sheet had a better shielding effect than the expensive tungsten sheet.

  20. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks. Clin. Anat. 29:165-174, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26032163

  1. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    PubMed Central

    Ng, E. Y. K.; Loong, T. H.; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10−3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β), saccular index (γ), deformation diameter ratio (χ), and tortuosity index (ε)) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation. PMID:23864906

  2. A new method for detecting colonic polyps based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Nakada, Yuichi; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Takayama, Tetsuji; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Nawano, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for detecting colonic polyps from abdominal CT images based on Hessian matrix analysis. Recently, virtual colonoscopy (VC) has widely received attention as a new and less-invasive colon diagnostic method. A physician diagnoses the inside of the colon using a virtual colonoscopy system. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, a physician has to change viewpoints and viewing directions of the virtual camera many times while diagnosing. Lesions behind haustra may be overlooked. Thus this paper proposes an automated colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images. Colonic polyps are located on the colonic wall, and their CT values are higher than colonic lumen regions. In addition, CT values inside polyps tend to gradually increase from outward to inward (blob-like structure). We employ a blob structure enhancement filter based on the eigenvalues of a Hessian matrix to detect polyps with the above blob-shaped characteristics. For reducing FPs, we eliminate polyp candidate regions in which the maximum output value of the blob structure enhancement filter is smaller than given threshold values. Also small regions are removed from candidates. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of abdominal CT images. Overall, 74.4% of the polyps were detected with 3.8 FPs per case.

  3. Abdominal Imaging with Contrast-enhanced Photon-counting CT: First Human Experience.

    PubMed

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Symons, Rolf; Sandfort, Veit; Mallek, Marissa; Fuld, Matthew K; Henderson, Gregory; Jones, Elizabeth C; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Folio, Les R; Bluemke, David A

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of a prototype photon-counting detector (PCD) computed tomography (CT) system for abdominal CT in humans and to compare the results with a conventional energy-integrating detector (EID). Materials and Methods The study was HIPAA-compliant and institutional review board-approved with informed consent. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (seven men; mean age, 58.2 years ± 9.8 [standard deviation]) were prospectively enrolled between September 2 and November 13, 2015. Radiation dose-matched delayed contrast agent-enhanced spiral and axial abdominal EID and PCD scans were acquired. Spiral images were scored for image quality (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) in five regions of interest by three radiologists blinded to the detector system, and the axial scans were used to assess Hounsfield unit accuracy in seven regions of interest (paired t test). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess reproducibility. PCD images were also used to calculate iodine concentration maps. Spatial resolution, noise-power spectrum, and Hounsfield unit accuracy of the systems were estimated by using a CT phantom. Results In both systems, scores were similar for image quality (median score, 4; P = .19), noise (median score, 3; P = .30), and artifact (median score, 1; P = .17), with good interrater agreement (image quality, noise, and artifact ICC: 0.84, 0.88, and 0.74, respectively). Hounsfield unit values, spatial resolution, and noise-power spectrum were also similar with the exception of mean Hounsfield unit value in the spinal canal, which was lower in the PCD than the EID images because of beam hardening (20 HU vs 36.5 HU; P < .001). Contrast-to-noise ratio of enhanced kidney tissue was improved with PCD iodine mapping compared with EID (5.2 ± 1.3 vs 4.0 ± 1.3; P < .001). Conclusion The performance of PCD showed no statistically significant difference compared with EID when the abdomen was evaluated in a conventional scan mode. PCD provides

  4. Three-Dimensional Ultrasound-Based Navigation Combined with Preoperative CT During Abdominal Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaspersen, J.H. Sjolie, E.; Wesche, J.; Asland, J.; Lundbom, J.; Odegard, A.; Lindseth, F.; Nagelhus Hernes, T.A.

    2003-08-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D)intraoperative ultrasound may be easier to interpret when used in combination with less noisy preoperative image data such as CT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of preoperative image data in a 3D ultrasound-based navigation system specially designed for minimally invasive abdominal surgery. A prototype system has been tested in patients with aortic aneurysms undergoing clinical assessment before and after abdominal aortic stent-graft implantation. Methods: All patients were first imaged by spiral CT followed by 3D ultrasound scanning. The CT volume was registered to the patient using fiducial markers. This enabled us to compare corresponding slices from 3D ultrasound and CT volumes. The accuracy of the patient registration was evaluated both using the external fiducial markers (artificial landmarks glued on the patient's skin) and using intraoperative 3D ultrasound as a measure of the true positioning of anatomic landmarks inside the body. Results: The mean registration accuracy on the surface was found to be 7.1 mm, but increased to 13.0 mm for specific landmarks inside the body. CT and ultrasound gave supplementary information of surrounding structures and position of the patient's anatomy. Fine-tuning the initial patient registration of the CT data with a multimodal CT to intraoperative 3D ultrasound registration (e.g., mutual information), as well as ensuring no movements between this registration and image guidance, may improve the registration accuracy. Conclusion: Preoperative CT in combination with 3D ultrasound might be helpful for guiding minimal invasive abdominal interventions.

  5. Abdominal and pancreatic motion correlation using 4D CT, 4D transponders, and a gating belt.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Ricardo; Zou, Wei; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Teo, Boon-Keng; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    The correlation between the pancreatic and external abdominal motion due to respiration was investigated on two patients. These studies utilized four dimensional computer tomography (4D CT), a four dimensional (4D) electromagnetic transponder system, and a gating belt system. One 4D CT study was performed during simulation to quantify the pancreatic motion using computer tomography images at eight breathing phases. The motion under free breathing and breath-hold were analyzed for the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system during treatment. A linear curve was fitted for all data sets and correlation factors were evaluated between the 4D electromagnetic transponder system and the gating belt system data. The 4D CT study demonstrated a modest correlation between the external marker and the pancreatic motion with R-square values larger than 0.8 for the inferior-superior (inf-sup). Then, the relative pressure from the belt gating system correlated well with the 4D electromagnetic transponder system's motion in the anterior-posterior (ant-post) and the inf-post directions. These directions have a correlation value of -0.93 and 0.76, while the lateral only had a 0.03 correlation coefficient. Based on our limited study, external surrogates can be used as predictors of the pancreatic motion in the inf-sup and the ant-post directions. Although there is a low correlation on the lateral direction, its motion is significantly shorter. In conclusion, an appropriate treatment delivery can be used for pancreatic cancer when an internal tracking system, such as the 4D electromagnetic transponder system, is unavailable. PMID:23652242

  6. Computerized organ localization in abdominal CT volume with context-driven generalized Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Fast localization of organs is a key step in computer-aided detection of lesions and in image guided radiation therapy. We developed a context-driven Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for robust localization of organ-of-interests (OOIs) in a CT volume. Conventional GHT locates the center of an organ by looking-up center locations of pre-learned organs with "matching" edges. It often suffers from mislocalization because "similar" edges in vicinity may attract the prelearned organs towards wrong places. The proposed method not only uses information from organ's own shape but also takes advantage of nearby "similar" edge structures. First, multiple GHT co-existing look-up tables (cLUT) were constructed from a set of training shapes of different organs. Each cLUT represented the spatial relationship between the center of the OOI and the shape of a co-existing organ. Second, the OOI center in a test image was determined using GHT with each cLUT separately. Third, the final localization of OOI was based on weighted combination of the centers obtained in the second stage. The training set consisted of 10 CT volumes with manually segmented OOIs including liver, spleen and kidneys. The method was tested on a set of 25 abdominal CT scans. Context-driven GHT correctly located all OOIs in the test image and gave localization errors of 19.5±9.0, 12.8±7.3, 9.4±4.6 and 8.6±4.1 mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively. Conventional GHT mis-located 8 out of 100 organs and its localization errors were 26.0±32.6, 14.1±10.6, 30.1±42.6 and 23.6±39.7mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively.

  7. Interaction of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm with surrounding tissue: Retrospective CT image studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sebastian T.; Burek, William; Dupay, Alexander C.; Farsad, Mehdi; Baek, Seungik; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that rupture have a high mortality rate. Rupture occurs when local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of an AAA, so stress profiles such as those from finite element analysis (FEA) are useful. The role and effect of surrounding tissues, like the vertebral column, which have not been extensively studied, are examined in this paper. Methods Longitudinal CT scans from ten patients with AAAs were studied to see the effect of surrounding tissues on AAAs. Segmentation was performed to distinguish the AAA from other tissues and we studied how these surrounding tissues affected the shape and curvature of the AAA. Previously established methods by Veldenz et al. were used to split the AAA into 8 sections and examine the specific effects of surrounding tissues on these sections [1]. Three-dimensional models were created to better examine these effects over time. Registration was done in order to compare AAAs longitudinally. Results The vertebral column and osteophytes were observed to have been affecting the shape and the curvature of the AAA. Interaction with the spine caused focal flattening in certain areas of the AAA. In 16 of the 41 CT scans, the right posterior dorsal section (section 5), had the highest radius of curvature, which was by far the section that had the maximum radius for a specified CT scan. Evolution of the growing AAA showed increased flattening in this section when comparing the last CT scan to the first scan. Conclusion Surrounding tissues have a clear influence on the geometry of an AAA, which may in turn affect the stress profile of AAA. Incorporating these structures in FEA and G&R models will provide a better estimate of stress. Clinical Relevance Currently, size is the only variable considered when deciding whether to undergo elective surgery to repair AAA since it is an easy enough measure for clinicians to utilize. However, this may not be the best indicator of rupture risk

  8. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution's standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented. PMID:26389637

  9. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  10. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Look before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Nellensteijn, David R; Greuter, Marcel J; El Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new information obtained by CT. CT scans for suspected pediatric abdominal injury performed in our accident and emergency department were retrieved from the radiology registry and analyzed for: injury and hemodynamic parameters, changes in therapy, and radiological interventions. The dose length product (DLP) was used to calculate the effective dose (ED) and with the BEIR VII report we calculated the estimated induced lifetime tumor and mortality risk. Seventy-two patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for suspicion of abdominal injury and eight patients were excluded for hemodynamic instability, leaving 64 hemodynamically stable patients. Four patients died (6%). On the remaining 60 patients, only one laparotomy was performed for suspicion of duodenal perforation. Only in three out of the 64 hemodynamically stable cases (5%), a CT scan brought forward an indication for intervention or change in management. One patient was suspected of a duodenal perforation and underwent a laparotomy. A grade II hepatic laceration, but no duodenal, injury was found. Two patients underwent embolization of the splenic artery. One for an arterial blush caused by splenic laceration as was observed on the contrast enhanced-CT. Patient remained stable and during the angiogram the blush had disappeared. The second patient underwent (prophylactic) selective arterial embolization for having sustained a grade V splenic injury. The median radiation dosage was 11.43 mSv (range 1.19-23.76 mSv) in our patients. The use of the BEIR VII methodology results in an estimated increase in the lifetime tumor incidence of 0.17% (range, 0.05-0.67%) and an estimated increase in lifetime tumor incidence of 0.08% (0

  11. A Novel Multiinstance Learning Approach for Liver Cancer Recognition on Abdominal CT Images Based on CPSO-SVM and IO

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Dehui

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy. PMID:24368931

  12. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative. PMID:26632714

  13. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Wacker, Frank Klaus

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volume data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.

  14. Abdominal multi-organ CT segmentation using organ correlation graph and prediction-based shape and location priors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal CT data. We propose a framework of multi-organ segmentation which is adaptable to any imaging conditions without using intensity information in manually traced training data. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) the organ correlation graph (OCG) is introduced, which encodes the spatial correlations among organs inherent in human anatomy; (2) the patient-specific organ shape and location priors obtained using OCG enable the estimation of intensity priors from only target data and optionally a number of untraced CT data of the same imaging condition as the target data. The proposed methods were evaluated through segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidney, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 86 CT data obtained by four imaging conditions at two hospitals. The performance was comparable to the state-of-the-art method using intensity priors constructed from manually traced data. PMID:24505771

  15. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  16. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  17. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  18. CT in ovarian cancer staging: how to review and report with emphasis on abdominal and pelvic disease for surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Sahdev, Anju

    2016-01-01

    CT of the abdomen and pelvis is the first line imaging modality for staging, selecting treatment options and assessing disease response in ovarian cancer. The staging CT provides disease distribution, disease burden and is the imaging surrogate for surgico-pathological FIGO staging. Optimal cyto-reductive surgery offers patients' the best chance for disease control or cure, but sub-optimal resection confers no advantage over chemotherapy and adversely increases the risk of post surgical complications. Although there is extensive literature comparing performance of CT against laparoscopy and surgery, for the staging abdominal and pelvic CT, there are currently no accepted guidelines for interpretation or routinely used minimum data set templates for reporting these complex CT scans often with extensive radiological findings. This review provides a systematic approach for identifying the important radiological findings and highlighting important sites of disease within the abdomen and pelvis, which may alter or preclude surgery at presentation or after adjuvant chemotherapy. The distribution of sites and volume of disease can be used to categorize patients as suitable, probably suitable or not suitable for optimal cyto-reductive surgery. This categorization can potentially assist oncological surgeons and oncologists as a semi objective assessment tool useful for selecting patient treatment, streamlining multi disciplinary discussion and improving the reproducibility and correlation of CT with surgical findings. The review also highlights sites of disease and complications of ovarian cancer which should be included as part of the radiological report as these may require additional surgical input from non gynaecological surgeons or influence treatment selection. PMID:27484100

  19. Automated segmentation of upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT data using hierarchical statistical modeling of organ interrelations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, S.; Otake, Y.; Okada, T.; Hori, M.; Tomiyama, N.; Sato, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have been studying the automatic segmentation of multi-organ region from abdominal CT images. In previous work, we proposed an approach using a hierarchical statistical modeling using a relationship between organs. In this paper, we have proposed automatic segmentation of the upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT using previously segmented multiple organs. We compared segmentation accuracy of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum between our proposed method using hierarchical statistical modeling and a conventional statistical atlas method. Additionally, preliminary experiment was performed which added the region representing gas to the candidate region at the segmentation step. The segmentation results were evaluated quantitatively by Dice coefficient, Jaccard index and the average symmetric surface distance of the segmented region and correct region data. Percentage of the average of Dice coefficient of esophagus, stomach and duodenum were 58.7, 68.3, and 38.6 with prediction-based method and 23.7, 51.1, and 24.4 with conventional atlas method.

  20. Effect of Reducing Abdominal Compression during Prone CT Colonography on Ascending Colonic Rotation during Supine-to-Prone Positional Change

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong Keon; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of reduced abdominal compression in prone position on ascending colonic movement during supine-to-prone positional change during CT colonography (CTC). Materials and Methods Eighteen consecutive patients who had undergone prone CTC scanning with cushion blocks placed under the chest and hip/thigh to reduce abdominal compression and had confirmed sessile polyps ≥ 6 mm in the well-distended, straight, mid-ascending colon, were included. Radial location along the ascending colonic luminal circumference (°) was measured for 24 polyps and 54 colonic teniae on supine and prone CTC images. The supine-to-prone change ranging between -180° and +180° (- and + for internal and external colonic rotations, respectively), was determined. In addition, possible causes of any ascending colonic rotations were explored. Results Abdominal compression during prone CTC scanning completely disappeared with the use of cushion blocks in 17 of 18 patients. However, some degrees of ascending colonic rotation were still observed, with the radial location changes of -22° to 61° (median, 13.9°) for the polyps and similar degrees for teniae. Fifty-four percent and 56% of polyps and teniae, respectively, showed changes > 10°. The radial location change of the polyps was significantly associated with the degree of anterior shift of the small bowel and mesentery (r = 0.722, p < 0.001) and the degree of posterior displacement of the ascending colon (r = 0.566, p = 0.004) during supine-to-prone positional change. Conclusion Ascending colonic rotation upon supine-to-prone positional change during CTC, mostly in the form of external rotation, is not eliminated by removing abdominal compression in prone position. PMID:26798215

  1. An Abdominal CT may be Safe in Selected Hypotensive Trauma Patients with Positive FAST Exam

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mackenzie R.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) and hypotension often indicates urgent surgery. An abdomen/pelvis CT (apCT) may allow less invasive management but the delay may be associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Patients in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study with hypotension and a positive FAST (HF+) who underwent a CT (apCT+) were compared to those who did not. Results Of the 92 HF+ identified, 32(35%) underwent apCT during initial evaluation and apCT was associated with decreased odds of an emergency operation, OR 0.11 95% CI (0.001–0.116) and increased odds of angiographic intervention, OR 14.3 95% CI (1.5–135). There was no significant difference in 30 day mortality or need for dialysis. Conclusion An apCt in HF+ patients is associated with reduced odds of emergency surgery, but not mortality. Select HF+ patients can safely undergo apCT to obtain clinically useful information. PMID:25805456

  2. Pearls and pitfalls in interpretation of abdominal and pelvic PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Blake, Michael A; Singh, Ajay; Setty, Bindu N; Slattery, James; Kalra, Mannudeep; Maher, Michael M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Fischman, Alan J; Mueller, Peter R

    2006-01-01

    The interpretation of images obtained in the abdomen and pelvis can be challenging, and the coregistration of positron emission tomographic (PET) and computed tomographic (CT) scans may be especially valuable in the evaluation of these anatomic areas. PET-CT represents a major technologic advance, consisting of generally complementary modalities whose combined strength tends to overcome their respective weaknesses. However, this combined functional-structural imaging approach raises a number of controversial questions and presents some unique interpretative challenges. Accurate PET-CT scan interpretation requires awareness of the various pitfalls associated with the imaging components, both individually and in combination. The results of recent PET-CT studies have been very encouraging, but larger prospective studies will be needed to establish optimal hybrid scanning protocols. Applying sound imaging principles, paying attention to detail, and staying abreast of advances in this exciting new modality are necessary for harnessing the full diagnostic power of abdominopelvic PET-CT. PMID:16973768

  3. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  4. Assessing the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings in senior patients presenting to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Meshki, Malek; Monteiro, Sandra; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings for patients 65 years of age and older, when compared with all other scanned adult Emergency Department (ED) patients, at a single tertiary care hospital. Our hypothesis was that there is an increased prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal/pelvic CT findings in senior patients. A research ethics board-approved retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent an emergency CT of the abdomen and pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal and/or pelvic signs and symptoms was performed. Two thousand one hundred two patients between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013, were reviewed. Six hundred thirty-one patients were included in the <65 group (298 men and 333 women; mean age 46, age range 18-64), and 462 were included in the >65 group (209 men and 253 women; mean age 77.6, age range 65-99). Overall, there were more positive CT findings for patients <65 (389 positive cases, 61.6 %) compared with the >65 group (257 positive cases, 55.6 %), which was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.03). Moreover, with the exception of complicated appendicitis cases, which were more common in the >65 group, there were no statistically significant differences in the clinical/surgical relevance of the positive CT findings between the two groups. The findings of our retrospective study therefore refute our hypothesis that there is an increased prevalence of positive abdominal CT findings in patients >65. This may be related to ED physicians at our institution being more hesitant to order CT examinations for the younger population, presumably due to radiation concerns. However, older patients in our series were more likely to present with complicated appendicitis, and a lower threshold for ordering CT examinations of the abdomen and pelvis in this patient population should therefore be considered. PMID

  5. Maximizing Iodine Contrast-to-Noise Ratios in Abdominal CT Imaging through Use of Energy Domain Noise Reduction and Virtual Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT1

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for abdominal computed tomography (CT) when using energy domain noise reduction and virtual monoenergetic dual-energy (DE) CT images and to compare the CNR to that attained with single-energy CT at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Materials and Methods This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board with waiver of informed consent. A syringe filled with diluted iodine contrast material was placed into 30-, 35-, and 45-cm-wide water phantoms and scanned with a dual-source CT scanner in both DE and single-energy modes with matched scanner output. Virtual monoenergetic images were generated, with energies ranging from 40 to 110 keV in 10-keV steps. A previously developed energy domain noise reduction algorithm was applied to reduce image noise by exploiting information redundancies in the energy domain. Image noise and iodine CNR were calculated. To show the potential clinical benefit of this technique, it was retrospectively applied to a clinical DE CT study of the liver in a 59-year-old male patient by using conventional and iterative reconstruction techniques. Image noise and CNR were compared for virtual monoenergetic images with and without energy domain noise reduction at each virtual monoenergetic energy (in kiloelectron volts) and phantom size by using a paired t test. CNR of virtual monoenergetic images was also compared with that of single-energy images acquired with 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Results Noise reduction of up to 59% (28.7/65.7) was achieved for DE virtual monoenergetic images by using an energy domain noise reduction technique. For the commercial virtual monoenergetic images, the maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 70 keV and was 18.6, 16.6, and 10.8 for the 30-, 35-, and 45-cm phantoms. After energy domain noise reduction, maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 40 keV and increased to 30.6, 25.4, and 16.5. These CNRs represented improvement of up to 64% (12.0/18.6) with

  6. Segmentation of abdominal organs from CT using a multi-level, hierarchical neural network strategy.

    PubMed

    Selver, M Alper

    2014-03-01

    Precise measurements on abdominal organs are vital prior to the important clinical procedures. Such measurements require accurate segmentation of these organs, which is a very challenging task due to countless anatomical variations and technical difficulties. Although, several features with various classifiers have been designed to overcome these challenges, abdominal organ segmentation via classification is still an emerging field in order to reach desired precision. Recent studies on multiple feature-classifier combinations show that hierarchical systems outperform composite feature-single classifier models. In this study, how hierarchical formations can translate to improved accuracy, when large size feature spaces are involved, is explored for the problem of abdominal organ segmentation. As a result, a semi-automatic, slice-by-slice segmentation method is developed using a novel multi-level and hierarchical neural network (MHNN). MHNN is designed to collect complementary information about organs at each level of the hierarchy via different feature-classifier combinations. Moreover, each level of MHNN receives residual data from the previous level. The residual data is constructed to preserve zero false positive error until the last level of the hierarchy, where only most challenging samples remain. The algorithm mimics analysis behaviour of a radiologist by using the slice-by-slice iteration, which is supported with adjacent slice similarity features. This enables adaptive determination of system parameters and turns into the advantage of online training, which is done in parallel to the segmentation process. Proposed design can perform robust and accurate segmentation of abdominal organs as validated by using diverse data sets with various challenges. PMID:24480371

  7. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  8. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  9. What is the preferred strength setting of the sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in abdominal CT imaging?

    PubMed

    Hardie, Andrew D; Nelson, Rachel M; Egbert, Robert; Rieter, William J; Tipnis, Sameer V

    2015-01-01

    Our primary objective in this study was to determine the preferred strength setting for the sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm (SAFIRE) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) imaging. Sixteen consecutive clinical CT scans of the abdomen were reconstructed by use of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and 5 SAFIRE strengths: S1-S5. Six readers of differing experience were asked to rank the images on preference for overall diagnostic quality. The contrast-to-noise ratio was not significantly different between SAFIRE S1 and FBP, but increased with increasing SAFIRE strength. For pooled data, S2 and S3 were preferred equally but both were preferred over all other reconstructions. S5 was the least preferred, with FBP the next least preferred. This represents a marked disparity between the image quality based on quantitative parameters and qualitative preference. Care should be taken to factor in qualitative in addition to quantitative aspects of image quality when one is optimizing iterative reconstruction images. PMID:25164978

  10. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  11. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  12. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. PMID:26922785

  13. Large Abdominal Wall Endometrioma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borncamp, Erik; Mehaffey, Philip; Rotman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common condition in women that affects up to 45% of patients in the reproductive age group by causing pelvic pain. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and is rarely found subcutaneously or in abdominal incisions, causing it to be overlooked in patients with abdominal pain. Methods: A 45-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain 2 years following a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. She was found to have incidental cholelithiasis and a large abdominal mass suggestive of a significant ventral hernia on CT scan. Results: Due to the peculiar presentation, surgical intervention took place that revealed a large 9cm×7.6cm×6.2cm abdominal wall endometrioma. Conclusion: Although extrapelvic endometriosis is rare, it should be entertained in the differential diagnosis for the female patient who presents with an abdominal mass and pain and has a previous surgical history. PMID:21902990

  14. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  15. Repeatability of Radiotracer Uptake in Normal Abdominal Organs with 111In-Pentetreotide Quantitative SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Vicente, Esther; Anizan, Nadège; Wang, Hao; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Lodge, Martin A.; Frey, Eric C.; Wahl, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on quantitation of SPECT imaging and its use in dosimetry to guide therapies, it is desirable to understand the repeatability in normal-organ SPECT uptake values (SPECT-UVs). We investigated the variability of normal abdominal organ uptake in repeated 111In-pentetreotide SPECT studies. Methods Nine patients with multiple 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT studies for clinical purposes were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn for the abdominal organs and applied to SPECT-UVs. The variability of those values was assessed. Results The average SPECT-UV for the liver (1.7 ± 0.6) was much lower than for the kidneys (right, 8.0 ± 2.4; left, 7.5 ± 1.7). Interpatient and intrapatient variability was similar (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.40–0.59) for all organs. The average coefficients of variation for each organ for each patient were obtained and averaged across all patients (0.26 for liver, 0.22 for right kidney, and 0.20 for left kidney). The coefficients of variation for the organs across all scans were 0.33 (liver), 0.30 (right kidney), and 0.22 (left kidney). Conclusion Variability across all patients and all scans for the liver was higher than reported with 18F-FDG PET, though left kidney variability was similar to PET liver variability and left kidney uptake may be able to serve as an internal metric for determining the quantifiability of an 111In-pentetreotide SPECT study. PMID:25977467

  16. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  17. Association of Intraluminal Thrombus, Hemodynamic Forces, and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion Using Longitudinal CT Images.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Byron A; Gharahi, Hamidreza; Lim, ChaeYoung; Jaberi, Farhad A; Choi, Jongeun; Lee, Whal; Baek, Seungik

    2016-05-01

    While hemodynamic forces and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) are believed to play important roles on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), it has been suggested that hemodynamic forces and ILT also interact with each other, making it a complex problem. There is, however, a pressing need to understand relationships among three factors: hemodynamics, ILT accumulation, and AAA expansion for AAA prognosis. Hence this study used longitudinal computer tomography scans from 14 patients and analyzed the relationship between them. Hemodynamic forces, represented by wall shear stress (WSS), were obtained from computational fluid dynamics; ILT accumulation was described by ILT thickness distribution changes between consecutives scans, and ILT accumulation and AAA expansion rates were estimated from changes in ILT and AAA volume. Results showed that, while low WSS was observed at regions where ILT accumulated, the rate at which ILT accumulated occurred at the same rate as the aneurysm expansion. Comparison between AAAs with and without thrombus showed that aneurysm with ILT recorded lower values of WSS and higher values of AAA expansion than those without thrombus. Findings suggest that low WSS may promote ILT accumulation and submit the idea that by increasing WSS levels ILT accumulation may be prevented. PMID:26429788

  18. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  19. The ubiquitous umbilicus. What it can reveal about intra-abdominal disease.

    PubMed

    Raymond, P L

    1990-02-01

    With ready access to noninvasive methods of assessing abdominal processes, physicians may forget the first step of physical examination: observation. Physical signs, often neglected or discarded (and felt to be of importance only in trivia quizzes), can quickly direct patient examination in a cost-effective way. In this article, Dr Raymond discusses various periumbilical signs and the conditions linked to them. PMID:2405369

  20. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat Reveals Differences between Modern Commercial Broiler Chickens with High and Low Feed Efficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Zhu; Lamont, Susan J.; Lee, William R.; Abasht, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    For economic and environmental reasons, chickens with superior feed efficiency (FE) are preferred in the broiler chicken industry. High FE (HFE) chickens typically have reduced abdominal fat, the major adipose tissue in chickens. In addition to its function of energy storage, adipose tissue is a metabolically active organ that also possesses endocrine and immune regulatory functions. It plays a central role in maintaining energy homeostasis. Comprehensive understanding of the gene expression in the adipose tissue and the biological basis of FE are of significance to optimize selection and breeding strategies. Through gene expression profiling of abdominal fat from high and low FE (LFE) commercial broiler chickens, the present study aimed to characterize the differences of gene expression between HFE and LFE chickens. mRNA-seq analysis was carried out on the total RNA of abdominal fat from 10 HFE and 12 LFE commercial broiler chickens, and 1.48 billion of 75-base sequence reads were generated in total. On average, 11,565 genes were expressed (>5 reads/gene/sample) in the abdominal fat tissue, of which 286 genes were differentially expressed (DE) at q (False Discover Rate) < 0.05 and fold change > 1.3 between HFE and LFE chickens. Expression levels from RNA-seq were confirmed with the NanoString nCounter analysis system. Functional analysis showed that the DE genes were significantly (p < 0.01) enriched in lipid metabolism, coagulation, and immune regulation pathways. Specifically, the LFE chickens had higher expression of lipid synthesis genes and lower expression of triglyceride hydrolysis and cholesterol transport genes. In conclusion, our study reveals the overall differences of gene expression in the abdominal fat from HFE and LFE chickens, and the results suggest that the divergent expression of lipid metabolism genes represents the major differences. PMID:26295149

  1. Classification of visual signs in abdominal CT image figures in biomedical literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    "Imaging signs" are a critical part of radiology's language. They not only are important for conveying diagnosis, but may also aid in indexing radiology literature and retrieving relevant cases and images. Here we report our work towards representing and categorizing imaging signs of abdominal abnormalities in figures in the radiology literature. Given a region-of-interest (ROI) from a figure, our goal was to assign a correct imaging sign label to that ROI from the following seven: accordion, comb, ring, sandwich, small bowel feces, target, or whirl. As training and test data, we created our own "gold standard" dataset of regions containing imaging signs. We computed 2997 feature attributes to represent imaging sign characteristics for each ROI in training and test sets. Following feature selection they were reduced to 70 attributes and were input to a Support Vector Machine classifier. We applied image-enhancement methods to compensate for variable quality of the images in radiology articles. In particular we developed a method for automatic detection and removal of pointers/markers (arrows, arrowheads, and asterisk symbols) on the images. These pointers/markers are valuable for approximately locating ROIs; however, they degrade the classification because they are often (partially) included in the training ROIs. On a test set of 283 ROIs, our method achieved an overall accuracy of 70% in labeling the seven signs, which we believe is a promising result for using imaging signs to search/retrieve radiology literature. This work is also potentially valuable for the creation of a visual ontology of biomedical imaging entities.

  2. Extra-abdominal lumbar abscesses caused by retroperitoneal gastrointestinal perforations through the lumbar triangle of Petit: report of two cases diagnosed by CT.

    PubMed

    Coulier, Bruno; Gogoase, Monica; Ramboux, Adrien; Pierard, Frederic

    2012-12-01

    Extra-abdominal abscesses of gastrointestinal origin developing within the lumbar subcutaneous tissues are extremely rare. We report two cases of retroperitoneal bowel perforation presenting spontaneously at admission with a lumbar abscess trespassing the lumbar triangle of Petit, a classical "locus of minus resistencia" of the posterior abdominal wall. The first case was caused by perforation of a retrocecal appendicitis--being concomitantly responsible of a necrotizing fasciitis of the thigh--and in the second case perforation was caused by left colonic diverticulitis. In both cases, the full diagnosis was made with abdominal CT. The patients were threatened by a two-step surgical approach comprising a direct posterior percutaneous drainage of the abscess followed by classical laparotomy. PMID:22270582

  3. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  4. Tearing of the left iliac vessels in lumbar surgery revealed by multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA).

    PubMed

    Vilariño Villaverde, Raquel; Bruguier, Christine; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; De Froidmont, Sébastien; Grabherr, Silke

    2016-05-01

    Lumbar surgery is regularly applied in cases of discal hernia and acquired lumbar stenosis. In this report, we present a case of a laceration in the left common iliac artery and iliac vein during a lumbar surgery and discuss the literature concerning this kind of event. In the present case, the surgical procedure was followed by a sudden decrease in blood pressure, and the surgeon discovered an intra-abdominal haemorrhage that led to the patient's death. Postmortem investigation confirmed the intra-abdominal haemorrhage and revealed a laceration of the proximal portion of the left common iliac artery and left iliac vein. The source of bleeding could be detected especially thanks to multi-phase postmortem CT angiography (MPMCTA), which was performed prior to autopsy. We also found a haemorrhagic path through the intervertebral disc between the L4-L5 vertebrae, caused by the surgeon's instrument (pituitary rongeur). To date, a few cases have been described of iatrogenic death resulting from a tear in the iliac vessels during lumbar surgery, but not from the postmortem perspective. Such investigations have recently been modernized thanks to the introduction of forensic imaging. In particular, MPMCTA offers new possibilities in postmortem investigations and can be considered the new gold standard for investigating deaths related to medical intervention. Here we describe the first case of a death during lumbar surgery using this new method. PMID:27161923

  5. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  6. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  7. Measuring abdominal circumference and skeletal muscle from a single cross-sectional CT image: a step-by-step guide for clinicians using National Institutes of Health ImageJ

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Perez, Sandra L.; Haus, Jacob M; Sheean, Patricia; Patel, Bimal; Mar, Winnie; Chaudhry, Vivek; McKeever, Liam; Braunschweig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans provide numerous opportunities for body composition analysis including quantification of abdominal circumference, abdominal adipose tissues (subcutaneous, visceral and intermuscular) and skeletal muscle (SM). CT scans are commonly performed for diagnostic purposes in clinical settings and methods for estimating abdominal circumference and whole-body SM mass from them have been reported. A supine abdominal circumference is a valid measure of waist circumference (WC). The valid correlation between a single cross sectional CT image (slice) at third lumbar (L3) for abdominal SM and whole body SM is also well established. Sarcopenia refers to the age-associated decreased in muscle mass and function. A single dimensional definition of sarcopenia using CT images that includes only assessment of low whole body SM has been validated in clinical populations and significantly associated with negative outcomes. However, despite the availability and precision of SM data from CT scans and the relationship between these measurements and clinical outcomes, they have not become a routine component of clinical nutrition assessment. Lack of time, training, and expense are potential barriers that prevent clinicians from fully embracing this technique. This tutorial presents a systematic, step-by-step guide to quickly quantify abdominal circumference as a proxy for WC and SM using a cross-sectional CT image from a regional diagnostic CT scan for clinical identification of sarcopenia. Multiple software options are available, however this tutorial utilizes ImageJ, a free public domain software developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). PMID:26392166

  8. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden. PMID:26453370

  9. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Servaes, Sabah; Naranjo, Arlene; Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. Materials and methods The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. Results The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P=0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P=1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P=0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P=1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. Conclusion CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco–regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. PMID:25135711

  10. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  11. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  12. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  13. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  14. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  15. Burkitt Lymphoma Presented as Acute Lower Back Pain and Revealed by 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenlu; Chen, Yue; Huang, Zhanwen; Cai, Liang

    2016-05-01

    A 15-year-old man with acute lower back pain for 7 days underwent F-NaF PET/CT to determine the cause of his symptoms. The PET images revealed irregularly increased F activity in the L1 vertebral body without definite sclerotic changes on CT. However, the corresponding CT images revealed an adjacent paravertebral mass extending into the vertebral foramen without elevated activity on PET. A diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma was made after pathological examination. PMID:26825214

  16. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  17. 18F-DOPA PET/CT but not 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the underlying cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Ahonen, Aapo; Seppänen, Marko

    2012-09-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT but not Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome in a 61-year-old man. The patient presented with rapid weight gain, swollen legs, and sleep disturbances. Plasma potassium level was 2.7 mM (reference range, 3.3-4.9 mM), 24-hour urinary cortisol level was 13,124 nmol (reference range, 30-144 nmol), and plasma adrenocorticotropin level was 61 ng/L (reference range, <48 g/L). CT demonstrated prominent lymph nodes in the left lung hilus and hyperplastic adrenals but no primary tumor. Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, which is recommended as the first-line PET imaging, was performed, but it was not diagnostic. Imaging with F-DOPA PET/CT revealed the underlying cause. PMID:22889786

  18. Detection of abdominal aortic graft infection: comparison of CT and In-labeled white blood cell scans

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.S.; McCarthy, S.M.; Moss, A.A.; Price, D.

    1985-02-01

    Aortic graft infections are a rare but potentially lethal complication of aortic graft surgery. The diagnosis and assessment of the extent of a graft infection is difficult on clinical grounds. A prospective study compared CT and indium-labeled white blood cell (In-WBC) scans in the diagnosis of aortic graft infection. Five patients with aortic graft infection and three patients without aortic graft infection were studied by both methods. CT correctly detected the retroperitoneal extension of the infection in three patients with groin infection; In-WBC scans diagnosed the extension only in one patient. Both CT and In-WBC were positive in two patients with aortic graft infection but no groin infection. Both studies were negative in the three patients without evidence of aortic graft infection. The study suggests that CT is more sensitive than In-WBC in evaluating the extent of aortic graft infection and should be the imaging method of choice.

  19. Estimation of CT-Derived Abdominal Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Depots from Anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V.; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Willis, Joseph; Godsland, Ian F.; Forouhi, Nita; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D.; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2013-01-01

    Background South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry. Objective We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT. Design 669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70±7 years) underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means. Results South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference), model fit was better in men (R2 range 0.59-0.71) than women (range 0.35-0.59). Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference) improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R2 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively). For basic SAT equations, R2 was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%. Conclusion We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available. PMID:24069381

  20. COMPARISON OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASIR™) AND MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (VEO™) FOR PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: AN OBSERVER PERFORMANCE STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY.

    PubMed

    Hultenmo, Maria; Caisander, Håkan; Mack, Karsten; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The diagnostic image quality of 75 paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations reconstructed with two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms-adaptive statistical IR (ASiR™) and model-based IR (Veo™)-was compared. Axial and coronal images were reconstructed with 70 % ASiR with the Soft™ convolution kernel and with the Veo algorithm. The thickness of the reconstructed images was 2.5 or 5 mm depending on the scanning protocol used. Four radiologists graded the delineation of six abdominal structures and the diagnostic usefulness of the image quality. The Veo reconstruction significantly improved the visibility of most of the structures compared with ASiR in all subgroups of images. For coronal images, the Veo reconstruction resulted in significantly improved ratings of the diagnostic use of the image quality compared with the ASiR reconstruction. This was not seen for the axial images. The greatest improvement using Veo reconstruction was observed for the 2.5 mm coronal slices. PMID:26873711

  1. Multislice CT Angiography of Fenestrated Endovascular Stent Grafting for Treating Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: a Pictorial Review of the 2D/3D Visualizations

    PubMed Central

    Mwipatayi, Bibombe P; Allen, Yvonne B; Hartley, David E; Lawrence-Brown, Michael M

    2009-01-01

    Fenestrated endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm has been developed to treat patients with a short or complicated aneurysm neck. Fenestration involves creating an opening in the graft fabric to accommodate the orifice of the vessel that is targeted for preservation. Fixation of the fenestration to the renal arteries and the other visceral arteries can be done by implanting bare or covered stents across the graft-artery ostia interfaces so that a portion of the stent protrudes into the aortic lumen. Accurate alignment of the targeted vessels in a longitudinal aspect is hard to achieve during stent deployment because rotation of the stent graft may take place during delivery from the sheath. Understanding the 3D relationship of the aortic branches and the fenestrated vessel stents following fenestration will aid endovascular specialists to evaluate how the stent graft is situated within the aorta after placement of fenestrations. The aim of this article is to provide the 2D and 3D imaging appearances of the fenestrated endovascular grafts that were implanted in a group of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms, based on the multislice CT angiography. The potential applications of each visualization technique were explored and compared with the 2D axial images. PMID:19412517

  2. Treatment options for traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the paravisceral abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sonny; Rowe, Vincent L; Rao, Rajeev; Hood, Douglas B; Harrell, Donald; Weaver, Fred A

    2005-09-01

    Penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the abdominal aorta are frequently lethal. Alternative management options for treatment of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta are illustrated by three patient case histories. Patient A sustained two GSWs to the abdomen (midepigastrium, right subcostal region). He was hypotensive in the field. Emergent laparotomy was undertaken with suture ligature of a celiac injury and distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy for a pancreatic injury. Postoperative abdominal CT for an intraabdominal infection with leukocytosis revealed a 4 cm traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta that extended from the suprarenal aorta to the level of the renal arteries. Six weeks later, he underwent an open repair. Patient B sustained multiple GSWs to his right arm and right upper quadrant. He was hemodynamically stable. He underwent abdominal exploration for a grade 3 liver laceration. Postoperative abdominal CT revealed a supraceliac abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm. An aortogram demonstrated a 1.5 cm defect in the aortic wall above the celiac trunk communicating with the inferior vena cava (IVC). He underwent endovascular repair with covered aortic stent graft. Patient C sustained multiple thoracoabdominal GSWs. He was hemodynamically stable. Emergent laparotomy revealed multiple left colonic perforations, two duodenal lacerations, and an unsalvageable left kidney laceration. Postoperatively, he developed a duodenal-cutaneous fistula with multiple intraabdominal abscesses. Serial CT scans revealed an enlarging infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm. He underwent angiographic coil embolization and intraarterial injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysm sac. The average time from injury to surgical treatment was 46 days (range 29-67). Postoperatively, none of the patients developed paraplegia. Advances in endovascular techniques have provided options to deal with traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta. In a hemodynamically stable

  3. Automatic segmentation of the liver using multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yujin; Hong, Helen; Chung, Jin Wook; Yoon, Young Ho

    2012-02-01

    We propose an effective technique for the extraction of liver boundary based on multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images. Our method is composed of four main steps. First, for extracting an optimal volume circumscribing a liver, lower and side boundaries are defined by positional information of pelvis and rib. An upper boundary is defined by separating the lungs and heart from CT images. Second, for extracting an initial liver volume, optimal liver volume is smoothed by anisotropic diffusion filtering and is segmented using adaptively selected threshold value. Third, for removing neighbor organs from initial liver volume, morphological opening and connected component labeling are applied to multiple planes. Finally, for refining the liver boundaries, deformable surface model is applied to a posterior liver surface and missing left robe in previous step. Then, probability summation map is generated by calculating regional information of the segmented liver in coronal plane, which is used for restoring the inaccurate liver boundaries. Experimental results show that our segmentation method can accurately extract liver boundaries without leakage to neighbor organs in spite of various liver shape and ambiguous boundary.

  4. Transcriptional analysis of abdominal fat in genetically fat and lean chickens reveals adipokines, lipogenic genes and a link between hemostasis and leanness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This descriptive study of the abdominal fat transcriptome takes advantage of two experimental lines of meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus), which were selected over seven generations for a large difference in abdominal (visceral) fatness. At the age of selection (9 wk), the fat line (FL) and lean line (LL) chickens exhibit a 2.5-fold difference in abdominal fat weight, while their feed intake and body weight are similar. These unique avian models were originally created to unravel genetic and endocrine regulation of adiposity and lipogenesis in meat-type chickens. The Del-Mar 14K Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for a time-course analysis of gene expression in abdominal fat of FL and LL chickens during juvenile development (1–11 weeks of age). Results Microarray analysis of abdominal fat in FL and LL chickens revealed 131 differentially expressed (DE) genes (FDR≤0.05) as the main effect of genotype, 254 DE genes as an interaction of age and genotype and 3,195 DE genes (FDR≤0.01) as the main effect of age. The most notable discoveries in the abdominal fat transcriptome were higher expression of many genes involved in blood coagulation in the LL and up-regulation of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in FL chickens. Many of these DE genes belong to pathways controlling the synthesis, metabolism and transport of lipids or endocrine signaling pathways activated by adipokines, retinoid and thyroid hormones. Conclusions The present study provides a dynamic view of differential gene transcription in abdominal fat of chickens genetically selected for fatness (FL) or leanness (LL). Remarkably, the LL chickens over-express a large number of hemostatic genes that could be involved in proteolytic processing of adipokines and endocrine factors, which contribute to their higher lipolysis and export of stored lipids. Some of these changes are already present at 1 week of age before the divergence in fatness. In contrast, the FL chickens have

  5. A case of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma revealed with limitation of PET-CT in the diagnosis of thoracic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Saraya, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Takuma; Ishii, Haruyuki; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Tsujimoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Yukari; Sohara, Erei; Nakajima, Akira; Inui, Toshiya; Sayuki, Hiraoka; Fujiwara, Masachika; Oka, Teruaki; Kawachi, Riken; Goya, Tomoyuki; Takizawa, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a 2-month history of dry cough, 2-kg weight loss, and a feeling of abdominal fullness. The PET-CT scan depicts the intense standard uptake values (SUVs) of the anterior and subphrenic lymphnodes, and intraperitoneal cavity, especially in the omentum, while, no uptake was found in the pleural cavity. Based on the pathological findings of the open lung biopsy specimens, he was diagnosed with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma of epithelioid type with thoracic metastasis. The present case demonstrated the some of the limitations of PET-CT in the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma, which failed to detect pleural involvement despite aggressive invasion by this tumor. PMID:23372960

  6. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  7. Abdominal Aortic Intimal Flap Motion Characterization in Acute Aortic Dissection: Assessed with Retrospective ECG-Gated Thoracoabdominal Aorta Dual-Source CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shifeng; Li, Xia; Chao, Baoting; Wu, Lebin; Cheng, Zhaoping; Duan, Yanhua; Wu, Dawei; Zhan, Yiqiang; Chen, Jiuhong; Liu, Bo; Ji, Xiaopeng; Nie, Pei; Wang, Ximing

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the feasibility of dose-modulated retrospective ECG-gated thoracoabdominal aorta CT angiography (CTA) assessing abdominal aortic intimal flap motion and investigate the motion characteristics of intimal flap in acute aortic dissection (AAD). Materials and Methods 49 patients who had thoracoabdominal aorta retrospective ECG-gated CTA scan were enrolled. 20 datasets were reconstructed in 5% steps between 0 and 95% of the R-R interval in each case. The aortic intimal flap motion was assessed by measuring the short axis diameters of the true lumen and false lumen 2 cm above of celiac trunk ostium in different R-R intervals. Intimal flap motion and configuration was assessed by two independent observers. Results In these 49 patients, 37 had AAD, 7 had intramural hematoma, and 5 had negative result for acute aortic disorder. 620 datasets of 31 patients who showed double lumens in abdominal aorta were enrolled in evaluating intimal flap motion. The maximum and minimum true lumen diameter were 12.2±4.1 mm (range 2.6∼17.4) and 6.7±4.1 mm (range 0∼15.3) respectively. The range of intimal flap motion in all patients was 5.5±2.6 mm (range 1.8∼10.2). The extent of maximum true lumen diameter decreased during a cardiac cycle was 49.5%±23.5% (range 12%∼100%). The maximum motion phase of true lumen diameter was in systolic phase (5%∼40% of R-R interval). Maximum and minimum intimal flap motion was at 15% and 75% of the R-R interval respectively. Intimal flap configuration had correlation with the phase of cardiac cycle. Conclusions Abdominal intimal flap position and configuration varied greatly during a cardiac cycle. Retrospective ECG-gated thoracoabdominal aorta CTA can reflect the actual status of the true lumen and provide more information about true lumen collapse. This information may be helpful to diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dynamic abstraction. PMID:24503676

  8. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  9. Detection and visualization of endoleaks in CT data for monitoring of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Egger, J.; Wimmer, A.; Großkopf, S.; Freisleben, B.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an efficient algorithm for the segmentation of the inner and outer boundary of thoratic and abdominal aortic aneurysms (TAA & AAA) in computed tomography angiography (CTA) acquisitions. The aneurysm segmentation includes two steps: first, the inner boundary is segmented based on a grey level model with two thresholds; then, an adapted active contour model approach is applied to the more complicated outer boundary segmentation, with its initialization based on the available inner boundary segmentation. An opacity image, which aims at enhancing important features while reducing spurious structures, is calculated from the CTA images and employed to guide the deformation of the model. In addition, the active contour model is extended by a constraint force that prevents intersections of the inner and outer boundary and keeps the outer boundary at a distance, given by the thrombus thickness, to the inner boundary. Based upon the segmentation results, we can measure the aneurysm size at each centerline point on the centerline orthogonal multiplanar reformatting (MPR) plane. Furthermore, a 3D TAA or AAA model is reconstructed from the set of segmented contours, and the presence of endoleaks is detected and highlighted. The implemented method has been evaluated on nine clinical CTA data sets with variations in anatomy and location of the pathology and has shown promising results.

  10. Common and unexpected findings in mummies from ancient Egypt and South America as revealed by CT.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, Christian; Bolliger, Stephan; Thali, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has proved to be a valuable investigative tool for mummy research and is the method of choice for examining mummies. It allows for noninvasive insight, especially with virtual endoscopy, which reveals detailed information about the mummy's sex, age, constitution, injuries, health, and mummification techniques used. CT also supplies three-dimensional information about the scanned object. Mummification processes can be summarized as "artificial," when the procedure was performed on a body with the aim of preservation, or as "natural," when the body's natural environment resulted in preservation. The purpose of artificial mummification was to preserve that person's morphologic features by delaying or arresting the decay of the body. The ancient Egyptians are most famous for this. Their use of evisceration followed by desiccation with natron (a compound of sodium salts) to halt putrefaction and prevent rehydration was so effective that their embalmed bodies have survived for nearly 4500 years. First, the body was cleaned with a natron solution; then internal organs were removed through the cribriform plate and abdomen. The most important, and probably the most lengthy, phase was desiccation. After the body was dehydrated, the body cavities were rinsed and packed to restore the body's former shape. Finally, the body was wrapped. Animals were also mummified to provide food for the deceased, to accompany the deceased as pets, because they were seen as corporal manifestations of deities, and as votive offerings. Artificial mummification was performed on every continent, especially in South and Central America. PMID:18794321

  11. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  12. Studies on the application of a low-voltage peak to the postsurgical follow-up CT scan in abdominal cancer patients in order to reduce the exposure of patients to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H. J.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the radiation dose, computed tomography (CT) number, contrast and image quality of patients requiring periodic follow-up abdominal CT examinations at various tube voltages. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients who underwent a clinical analysis and the other group was a phantom one. Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Twenty patients who underwent a periodic follow-up examination by CT were selected randomly. The tube current was fixed to 150 mA, and the tube voltage was adjusted according to the appropriate value of each examination. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values were measured. The CT number of each organ was measured by setting up a 1 cm diameter return on investment (ROI) in the abdominal organs at the same height of the first lumbar vertebra using images of the arterial phase. Two radiologists in consensus graded the quality of the abdominal images into three groups. An abdomen-shaped acrylic phantom was used in the phantom study. An ion chamber was inserted into the holes located at the center and periphery of the phantom, where the radiation dose was automatically displayed on the reader. Tube voltages of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were applied to the phantom (diluted contrast medium with water at 1:10 ratio) and the phantom was scanned. The CT number was measured from a 1 cm diameter ROI at the center of the image. The CTDI value decreased by 36% at 100 kVp (7.50 mGy) compared with that at 120 kVp (11.70 mGy). According to the radiologists' evaluation, there were 17 equivalent, 3 acceptable and 0 unacceptable levels in the group of 20 subjects. The radiation dose in the phantom study decreased with increasing tube voltages from 80 to 140 kVp. The peripheral and central doses decreased by 38% and 41%, respectively. The CT numbers at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were 1365.9±4.4, 1046.1±3.7, 862.8±3.2 and 737.5±3.0 HU, respectively. In conclusion, in a follow

  13. IV Leiomyomatosis on FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaona; Li, Fang; Lu, Zhaohui; Cheng, Wuying

    2016-07-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of right lower extremity edema. Clinical examination only showed right lower limb swelling. Routine laboratory examination revealed no abnormal results. Abdominal ultrasonography identified uterine leiomyoma and soft tissue masses. An abdominal CT demonstrated a continuous mass extending from the right internal and external iliac vein into the common iliac vein and inferior vena cava. To distinguish the mass from malignancy, the patient underwent PET/CT scan which showed increased FDG activity in the mass. However, histopathological examination proved the mass to be IV leiomyomatosis. PMID:26914578

  14. Subtle Radiological Features of Splenic Avulsion following Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, S. A.; Dagash, H.; Godbole, P. P.; Raghavan, A.; Murthi, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    Splenic trauma in children following blunt abdominal injury is usually treated by nonoperative management (NOM). Splenectomy following abdominal trauma is rare in children. NOM is successful as in the majority of instances the injury to the spleen is contained within its capsule or a localised haematoma. Rarely, the spleen may suffer from an avulsion injury that causes severe uncontrollable bleeding and necessitates an emergency laparotomy and splenectomy. We report two cases of children requiring splenectomy following severe blunt abdominal injury. In both instances emergency laparotomy was undertaken for uncontrollable bleeding despite resuscitation. The operating team was unaware of the precise source of bleeding preoperatively. Retrospective review of the computed tomography (CT) scans revealed subtle radiological features that indicate splenic avulsion. We wish to highlight these radiological features of splenic avulsion as they can help to focus management decisions regarding the need/timing for a laparotomy following blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:21209813

  15. A mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a patient with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jesper Damsgaard; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with HIV infection presented with acute severe abdominal pain radiating to the back. A CT scan revealed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and an aortobifemoral bypass was undertaken. Subsequently, tissue specimens from the aortic wall grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient received 8 weeks of intravenous antibiotic treatment followed by oral sulfotrim as secondary prophylaxis and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:24443338

  16. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved. This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH. PMID:26871848

  17. Isolated cholangiolitis revealed by 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a patient with fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, Ion; Zhuang, Hongming

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiolitis, inflammation of the cholangioles, is difficult to diagnose by conventional imaging modalities. We report a case of cholangiolitis revealed by fluorine-18 fluoro desoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computerized tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) after about 9 months of recurrent fevers. A 20 years old girl with a history of recurrent fevers and repeated workups at different hospitals, which didn't diagnosed the source of fever, was admitted with a recent episode of fever. An (18)F-FDG-PET/CT was requested, which demonstrated focal hypermetabolic activity in the lateral segment of the left lobe of the liver. A liver biopsy showed inflammation of small biliary ducts consistent of cholangiolitis. Enterococcus casseliflavus was found on performed cultures. This represents the first case of cholangiolitis revealed by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT imaging. PMID:21512668

  18. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  19. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  20. Unexpected Pregnancy Revealed on 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Chen, Yue; Huang, Zhanwen; Cai, Liang; Zhang, Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old illiterate woman who is congenitally deaf and mute underwent F-NaF PET/CT study to evaluate bone metastases from newly diagnosed breast cancer. Unexpectedly, a fetus in early second trimester was noted on CT images. In addition, subtle F-NaF uptake by the fetus could also be observed. PMID:26359575

  1. Conservative management of an abdominal gunshot injury with a peritoneal breach: wisdom or absurdity?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salma; Pardhan, Amyn; Bawa, Tufail; Haroon, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical exploration has been the standard of care for abdominal gunshot injuries. The authors report a case of a 28-year-old man who sustained a transabdominal gunshot injury, which entered the anterior abdominal wall and exited adjacent to the T12 vertebra posteriorly with a tangential trajectory. On presentation, the patient was haemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Based on trajectory of the bullet, intra-abdominal injury was suspected. Therefore a CT scan abdomen with intravenous and rectal contrast was performed. The CT scan revealed no extravasation of the rectal contrast but showed free air specks behind the descending colon. Delayed renal images of the left ureter were also normal. Based on the clinical findings, the patient was managed non-operatively with nothing per oral, intravenous antibiotics and frequent abdominal assessments. He made an uneventful recovery without necessitating laparotomy. PMID:24272989

  2. Unusual Adrenal and Brain Metastases From Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Revealed by 131I SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Guo-hua; Liu, Bin; Kuang, An-ren

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. Metastatic involvement of both adrenal and brain in the same patient from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. Here, we described an unusual case with iodine-avid lung, bone, adrenal, liver, and brain metastases from follicular thyroid carcinoma confirmed by 131I SPECT/CT. The utilization of SPECT/CT in thyroid cancer patients can detect the presence of metastases and also exclude potential false-positive lesions. Our case demonstrates that SPECT/CT is helpful in localizing and confirming metastatic lesions from differentiated thyroid carcinoma in rare and unusual sites. PMID:26018699

  3. Coexpression Network Analysis in Abdominal and Gluteal Adipose Tissue Reveals Regulatory Genetic Loci for Metabolic Syndrome and Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Min, Josine L.; Nicholson, George; Halgrimsdottir, Ingileif; Almstrup, Kristian; Petri, Andreas; Barrett, Amy; Travers, Mary; Rayner, Nigel W.; Mägi, Reedik; Pettersson, Fredrik H.; Broxholme, John; Neville, Matt J.; Wills, Quin F.; Cheeseman, Jane; Allen, Maxine; Holmes, Chris C.; Spector, Tim D.; Fleckner, Jan; McCarthy, Mark I.; Karpe, Fredrik; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Zondervan, Krina T.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent and has considerable public health impact, but its underlying genetic factors remain elusive. To identify gene networks involved in MetS, we conducted whole-genome expression and genotype profiling on abdominal (ABD) and gluteal (GLU) adipose tissue, and whole blood (WB), from 29 MetS cases and 44 controls. Co-expression network analysis for each tissue independently identified nine, six, and zero MetS–associated modules of coexpressed genes in ABD, GLU, and WB, respectively. Of 8,992 probesets expressed in ABD or GLU, 685 (7.6%) were expressed in ABD and 51 (0.6%) in GLU only. Differential eigengene network analysis of 8,256 shared probesets detected 22 shared modules with high preservation across adipose depots (DABD-GLU = 0.89), seven of which were associated with MetS (FDR P<0.01). The strongest associated module, significantly enriched for immune response–related processes, contained 94/620 (15%) genes with inter-depot differences. In an independent cohort of 145/141 twins with ABD and WB longitudinal expression data, median variability in ABD due to familiality was greater for MetS–associated versus un-associated modules (ABD: 0.48 versus 0.18, P = 0.08; GLU: 0.54 versus 0.20, P = 7.8×10−4). Cis-eQTL analysis of probesets associated with MetS (FDR P<0.01) and/or inter-depot differences (FDR P<0.01) provided evidence for 32 eQTLs. Corresponding eSNPs were tested for association with MetS–related phenotypes in two GWAS of >100,000 individuals; rs10282458, affecting expression of RARRES2 (encoding chemerin), was associated with body mass index (BMI) (P = 6.0×10−4); and rs2395185, affecting inter-depot differences of HLA-DRB1 expression, was associated with high-density lipoprotein (P = 8.7×10−4) and BMI–adjusted waist-to-hip ratio (P = 2.4×10−4). Since many genes and their interactions influence complex traits such as MetS, integrated analysis of genotypes and

  4. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. Materials and Methods 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. Results As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. Conclusion The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol. PMID:26079259

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  6. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  7. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you have: Artificial heart valves Brain aneurysm clips Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) ... which the test may be performed: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Carcinoma of the renal pelvis ...

  8. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  9. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  10. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  11. Lung Metastasis From Prostate Cancer Revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT Without Osseous Metastasis on Bone Scan.

    PubMed

    Su, Hung-Yi; Chen, Meng-Lin; Hsieh, Ping-Ju; Hsieh, Teh-Sheng; Chao, Ing-Ming

    2016-05-01

    A 54-year-old man, a case of prostate cancer, underwent radical prostatectomy and hormone therapy. Elevated prostate-specific antigen level developed 7 years later, but pelvic MRI and bone scan revealed negative results. Radiotherapy was performed under the suspicion of local recurrence but in vain. F-FDG PET/CT performed 1 more year later showed 3 FDG-avid lesions in the right lung and mediastinum. Lung and lymph node metastases were proved with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Bone scan remained negative at that time. PMID:26859201

  12. Differences in regional homogeneity between patients with Crohn's disease with and without abdominal pain revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chun-Hui; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hui-Rong; Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Si-Yao; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Ye; Zeng, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Li-Li; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Calhoun, Vince D; Tian, Jie; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system may be related to abdominal pain in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in resting-state brain activity in patients with CD in remission and its relationship with the presence of abdominal pain. Twenty-five patients with CD and with abdominal pain, 25 patients with CD and without abdominal pain, and 32 healthy subjects were scanned using a 3.0-T functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to assess resting-state brain activity. Daily pain scores were collected 1 week before functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that patients with abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the insula, middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and supplementary motor area and higher ReHo values in the temporal pole. In contrast, patients without abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the hippocampal/parahippocampal cortex and higher ReHo values in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (all P < 0.05, corrected). The ReHo values of the insula and MCC were significantly negatively correlated with daily pain scores for patients with abdominal pain (r = -0.53, P = 0.008 and r = -0.61, P = 0.002, respectively). These findings suggest that resting-state brain activities are different between remissive patients with CD with and without abdominal pain and that abnormal activities in insula and MCC are closely related to the severity of abdominal pain. PMID:26761381

  13. Ultrafast Spectroscopy Reveals Frenkel-CT Mixed Excitonic States in Copper Phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younts, Robert; McAfee, Terry; Gautam, Bhoj; Dougherty, Daniel; Ade, Harald; Gundogdu, Kenan

    In organic semiconducting systems, intermolecular charge transport and energy diffusion take place along the π- π stacking direction, which is beneficial for opto-electronic devices. Therefore it is essential to study electronic state structure in the π- π stacking direction in organic solids. We studied a model quasi-one-dimensional molecular crystal copper phthalocyanine, which has strong intermolecular coupling along the π- π stack. In this work, we used polarization resolved transient absorption spectroscopy and identified the coupling of low-lying singlet Frenkel (intramolecular) excitons with CT (intermolecular) excitons. Our study shows an evolution between localized and delocalized excitations which can be utilized to tune charge transport properties in molecular crystals. These studies provide fundamental understanding of electronic state structures, which will be essential for tailoring electronic properties of desired applications.

  14. PET/CT Imaging Reveals Unrivaled Placental Avidity for Glucose Compared to Other Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzke, Alexander B.; Norris, Andrew W.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Walsh, Susan A.; Acevedo, Michael R.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Wang, Chunlin; Sunderland, John J.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to define the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood to placenta to fetus using real time imaging. Methods Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to temporally and spatially define, in vivo, the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood into placentae and fetuses, in the late gestational gravid rat. Computed tomography (CT), with intravenous contrast, co-registered to the PET images allowed anatomic differentiation of placentae from fetal and maternal tissues. Results FDG was rapidly taken up by placentae and subsequently appeared in fetuses with minimal temporal lag. FDG standardized uptake values in placentae and fetuses approached that of maternal brain. In both anesthetized and awake dams, one quarter of the administered FDG ultimately was accrued in the collective fetuses and placentae. Accordingly, kinetic modeling demonstrated that the placentae had very high avidity for FDG, 2-fold greater than that of the fetus and maternal brain, when accounting for the fact that fetal FDG necessarily must first be taken up by placentae. Consistent with this, placental expression of glucose transporter 1 exceeded that of all other tissues. Discussion Fetal and placental tissues place a substantial glucose metabolic burden on the mother, owing to very high avidity of placentae for glucose coupled with the large relative mass of fetal and placental tissues. Conclusions The placenta has a tremendous capacity to uptake and transport glucose. PET/CT imaging is an ideal means to study metabolite transport kinetics in the fetoplacental unit. PMID:25555498

  15. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  16. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  17. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  18. Jujitsu kick to the abdomen: a case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in hematochezia and transient ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Hans; Beck, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is a common presentation to the emergency department. Ischemic colitis is a rare complication of this and its possible sequelae are important for an emergency physician to recognize. A 21-year-old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and hourly episodes of bright red blood per rectum shortly after being kicked in the stomach at his jujitsu class. He had no significant medical history, and results of his systems review were otherwise unremarkable. On examination, he appeared well, with normal vital signs. He had mild lower abdominal tenderness, but there were no peritoneal signs present. There was blood on the digital rectal examination. His hemoglobin, platelet, and international normalized ratio levels were normal and his abdominal radiograph was unremarkable. The gastroenterology service was contacted because of the hematochezia and a flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed. The sigmoidoscopy showed erythema, ulceration, and edema of a segment in the left colon, consistent with ischemic colitis. This was later confirmed on biopsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was conducted, which revealed left colonic inflammation consistent with colonic ischemia. There was no mesenteric vascular thrombosis or mesenteric hematoma found on CT. His hematochezia and abdominal pain subsided spontaneously, and he was discharged home. This case illustrates transient ischemic colitis as a potential presentation of blunt abdominal trauma, and emergency physicians should consider this uncommon diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting after abdominal trauma. PMID:21392850

  19. Increasing utilization of abdominal CT in the Emergency Department of a secondary care center: does it produce better outcomes in caring for pediatric surgical patients?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younglim; Kang, Gu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The use of abdominal computed tomography (ACT) utilization is increasing to a remarkable extent in the pediatric Emergency Department (ED), but the clinical benefit of increased use of ACT for pediatric surgical patients remains uncertain. Methods A retrospective review was conducted to investigate if, for patients who had visited pediatric ED during the last 5 years, increasing utilization of ACT would increase the detection rate of acute appendicitis, increase the detection rate of surgical conditions other than appendicitis, and decrease the hospital admission rate for surgical conditions. Results During the study period, there were 37,918 ED visits; of these, 3,274 (8.6%) were for abdominal pain, 844 (2.2%) had ACT performed. The annual proportional increase of the ACT was statistically significant (1.56% to 2.46%, P = 0.00), but the detection rate of acute appendicitis (3.3% to 5.1%) or other surgical conditions (1.7% to 2.8%) showed no statistically significant changes. Hospital admission rates (5.6% to 6.8%) also showed no significant changes during the study period. Conclusion Increasing utilization of ACT does not lead to the improved outcomes in caring for pediatric surgical patients visiting the pediatric ED. Careful evaluation for the indication for ACT is needed in the pediatric ED. PMID:25368849

  20. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. PMID:27229900

  1. Abdominal exploration

    MedlinePlus

    ... these are aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), vitamin E, warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or ticlopidine (Ticlid). Ask your ... Biopsy Cancer Chronic pancreatitis CT scan Diverticulitis Ectopic pregnancy Endometriosis Hodgkin lymphoma Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) Peritonitis - ...

  2. Invisible fat on CT: making it visible by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Presence of fat in a lesion significantly narrows the differential diagnosis. Small quantities of macroscopic fat and intracellular fat are invisible on computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal any fatty change in a lesion and can also differentiate macroscopic fat from intracellular and intravoxel fat. Hypodensity on CT may be a sign of invisible fat and MRI can help to diagnose even minute amounts of fat in liver, pancreas, adrenal, musculoskeletal, and omental pseudolesions and lesions. This article will review the superiority of MRI over CT in demonstrating fat in abdominal lesions. PMID:26782156

  3. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  5. Abdominal Wall Metastasis of Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma in a Post-Menopausal Woman: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is an aggressive form of endometrial cancer characterized by a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old post-menopausal woman with an abdominal wall metastasis in stage IA UPSC. After surgical staging, she did not receive additional adjuvant therapy. An egg sized palpable mass developed in the right lower abdomen after 8 months. Both Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed a metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall. Hence, surgical excision was performed. The pathological findings showed metastatic UPSC with clear resection margin. After the diagnosis of UPSC metastasis in the abdominal wall, she received chemotherapy utilizing paclitaxel and carboplatin. After 3 years, no evidence of recurrence was found. Therefore, we suggest that even when UPSC is confined to the endometrium without lymph node metastasis and without lymphovascular invasion, chemotherapy should be considered as a postoperative adjuvant therapy. PMID:25371890

  6. Abdominal wall metastasis of uterine papillary serous carcinoma in a post-menopausal woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Woo; Hwang, Sung-Ook

    2014-04-01

    Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is an aggressive form of endometrial cancer characterized by a high recurrence rate and poor prognosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old post-menopausal woman with an abdominal wall metastasis in stage IA UPSC. After surgical staging, she did not receive additional adjuvant therapy. An egg sized palpable mass developed in the right lower abdomen after 8 months. Both Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed a metastatic lesion in the abdominal wall. Hence, surgical excision was performed. The pathological findings showed metastatic UPSC with clear resection margin. After the diagnosis of UPSC metastasis in the abdominal wall, she received chemotherapy utilizing paclitaxel and carboplatin. After 3 years, no evidence of recurrence was found. Therefore, we suggest that even when UPSC is confined to the endometrium without lymph node metastasis and without lymphovascular invasion, chemotherapy should be considered as a postoperative adjuvant therapy. PMID:25371890

  7. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  8. [The different genotypes of MTHFR 1298A>C and PON1 -108C>T polymorphisms confer the increased risk of the abdominal aortic aneurysm in the smoking and nonsmoking persons].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Andrzej L

    2005-01-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) both the etiology and the pathogenesis are of the multifactorial character. The genetic component in the determination of this disease is proven by its familial occurrence. Smoking represents the best recognized risk factor of the AAA development. Increased concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) in plasma are the common finding in these patients. It is assumed that the Hcy thiolactone, the most reactive metabolite of Hcy, may participate in the aortic wall destruction in AAA. The polymorphic variants of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T and 1298A>C) influence tissue concentrations of the Hcy. Paraoxonase (PON1), the enzyme associated in plasma with the HDL fraction, as lactonase detoxicates the Hcy thiolactone. The promotor polymorphism of PON1 - 108C>T gene may determine the lower activity of this enzyme. In the case-control study of 106 patients with AAA and 97 healthy persons, the effects of selected genetic and nongenetic risk factors on development of AAA were assessed, considering the possibilities of interaction between them. It was found, that the arterial hypertension, cigarette smoking and the lower HDL fraction are independent risk factors of AAA. The arterial hypertension was a risk factor both in the smoking and the nonsmoking males, whereas the lower HDL fraction has been the risk factor only for the smoking men. By the multivariate analysis in the nonsmoking males the MTHFR 1298 AC and CC genotypes increased the risk of AAA development 4,8-fold in relation to the MTHFR 1298 AA nonsmoking males. In reference to the genotypes of the expected high impact on the metabolism of Hcy and of Hcy thiolactone, the genotypes of MTHFR 677TT and PON1 -108CT and TT were more frequent in smoking ones, but the difference was not significant. This observation fits with the assumption that the influence of smoking on the occurrence of AAA prevails over that of genetic variability. When the patients age was considered

  9. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy R; Johnson, Philip L; Meyer, Mark C

    2002-04-15

    Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), accurate diagnosis and preoperative evaluation are essential for improved patient outcomes. Ultrasonography is the standard method of screening and monitoring AAAs that have not ruptured. In the past, aortography was commonly used for preoperative planning in the repair of AAAs. More recently, computed tomography (CT) has largely replaced older, more invasive methods. Recent advances in CT imaging technology, such as helical CT and CT angiography, offer significant advantages over traditional CT. These methods allow for more rapid scans and can produce three-dimensional images of the AAA and important adjacent vascular structures. Use of endovascular stent grafts has increased recently and is less invasive for the repair of AAAs in selected cases. Aortography and CT angiography can precisely determine the size and surrounding anatomy of the AAA to identify appropriate candidates for the use of endovascular stent grafts. Helical CT and CT angiography represent an exciting future in the preoperative evaluation of AAAs. However, this technology is not the standard of care because of the lack of widespread availability, the cost associated with obtaining new equipment, and the lack of universal protocols necessary for acquisition and reconstruction of these images. PMID:11989632

  10. Metasomatic Diamond Formation revealed by X-Ray CT Scanning of Diamondiferous Eclogites from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, S. H.; Kahle, R. L.; Shaw-Kahle, B.; Gurney, J. J.; du Plessis, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a private collection of diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths has been made available for non-destructive investigation. All samples have at least one diamond visible. The samples are predominantly sourced from the Excelsior and Newlands mines (South Africa), with additional samples from Roberts Victor mine (South Africa) and Orapa (Botswana). 3D volume models of the samples were created using X-ray tomography. The 3D images reveal abundant secondary veining that is clearly younger than the eclogite. Diamonds are located in fluid pathways and occur in both altered garnet and altered clinopyroxene. Most of the veining is unrelated to the spatial positioning of diamond in the samples. In some instances, early veining has annealed or partially annealed, suggesting a range in timing of at least some of the several metasomatic events that have affected the rock. Importantly, in the most graphic examples, a clear distinction can be seen between diamond-bearing and non-diamond-bearing veins, even where sulphide is present in abundance in the non-diamond-bearing veins. The amount of diamond detected in the xenoliths varies from a single crystal to well over 50 diamonds forming more than 9% of the rock. This extreme value contrasts with the diamond recovery from currently viable diamond mines of less than 2ppm or 0.0002%. The morphology of the diamonds includes step-faced flat-faced octahedra, single crystals and aggregates. This is particularly a feature of diamonds in the Excelsior specimens. In the samples from Newlands and Orapa, in contrast, diamond surfaces reflect resorption processes such as rounding and corrosion of the diamonds. The following conclusions can be drawn from this study: Diamonds in this collection, sourced from within the Kalahari craton, appear to have formed by a metasomatic process during which fluids infiltrated pre-existing mantle-derived eclogite; Several metasomatic events have occurred during the residence of the eclogite in the

  11. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  13. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses in patients with major trauma: the use of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, N.O.; Shatney, C.H.

    1983-04-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing abdominal abscesses was evaluated prospectively in 69 septic patients who had suffered massive trauma. For the 82 abdominal CT scans obtained, the accuracy rate was 84%, the sensitivity was 92%, and the specificity was 79%. With the use of abdominal CT, 32 patients were spared a ''blind'' laparotomy in the search for the focus of infection. It is concluded that CT is of significant value in the diagnosis of abdominal abscess in the septic trauma patient.

  14. Bubble gum simulating abdominal calcifications.

    PubMed

    Geller, E; Smergel, E M

    1992-01-01

    CT examination of the abdomens of two children demonstrated sites of high attenuation in the stomach, which were revealed to be bubble gum. Investigation of the CT appearance of samples of chewing gum showed that it consistently has high attenuation (178-345 HU). The attenuation of gum base, which contains calcium carbonate, was 476 HU. In addition, examination of a volunteer who had swallowed bubble gum confirmed the CT appearance. PMID:1523059

  15. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  16. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  17. (18)F-FDG PET/CT versus bone scintigraphy in the follow-up of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sollini, M; Calabrese, L; Zangheri, B; Erba, P A; Gramaglia, A; Gasparini, M

    2016-01-01

    A 53-year-old patient underwent a positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in the suspicious of gastric tumor recurrence (mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes). PET/CT identified only an area of (18)F-FDGuptake in the twelfth thoracic vertebrae. Unexpectedly, a bone scintigraphy revealed many "hot" spots changing the diagnosis (single metastasis versus plurimetastatic disease) and impacting on patient's management. PMID:26653282

  18. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  19. Flow behaviour of supercritical CO2 and brine in Berea sandstone during drainage and imbibition revealed by medical X-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Nishizawa, Osamu; Kiyama, Tamotsu; Chiyonobu, Shun; Xue, Ziqiu

    2014-06-01

    We injected Berea sandstone with supercritical CO2 and imaged the results with a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. The images were acquired by injecting CO2 into a core of brine-saturated sandstone (drainage), and additional images were acquired during reinjection of brine (imbibition) after drainage. We then analysed the temporal variations of CO2 saturation maps obtained from the CT images. The experiments were performed under a confining pressure of 12 MPa, a pore pressure of 10 MPa and a temperature of 40 °C. Porosity and CO2 saturation were calculated for each image voxel of the rock on the basis of the Hounsfield unit values (CT numbers) measured at three states of saturation: dry, full brine saturation and full CO2 saturation. The saturation maps indicated that the distributions of CO2 and brine were controlled by the sub-core-scale heterogeneities which consisted of a laminated structure (bedding) with high- and low-porosity layers. During drainage, CO2 preferentially flowed through the high-porosity layers where most of the CO2 was entrapped during low flow-rate imbibition. The entrapped CO2 was flushed out when high flow-rate imbibition commenced. Plots of the voxel's CT number against porosity revealed the relationship between fluid replacement and porosity. By reference to the CT numbers at the full brine-saturated stage, differential CT numbers were classified into three bins corresponding to voxel porosity: high, medium and low porosity. Distributions of the differential CT number for the three porosity bins were bimodal and in order with respect to the porosity bins during both drainage and imbibitions; however, the order differed between the two stages. This difference suggested that different replacement mechanisms operated for the two processes. Spatial autocorrelation of CO2 saturation maps on sections perpendicular to the flow direction revealed remarkable changes during passage of the replacement fronts during both drainage and

  20. Widespread Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma Shown by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Soydal, Cigdem; Ozkan, Elgin; Yerlikaya, Halis; Utkan, Gungor; Kucuk, Ozlem Nuriye

    2016-06-01

    We present the F-FDG and Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT images of a 61-year-old patient with a newly diagnosed prostate carcinoma (4 + 4 Gleason score) and high serum prostate-specific antigen levels (460 ng/mL). In F-FDG PET/CT, minimal uptake was demonstrated in the prostatic mass without any accompanying pathological uptake. However, Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT revealed multiple pathological uptake in the lung nodules, mediastinal nodes, abdominal-pelvic lymph nodes, bone lesions, and prostatic mass. PMID:26909710

  1. Applications of dual energy computed tomography in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lestra, T; Mulé, S; Millet, I; Carsin-Vu, A; Taourel, P; Hoeffel, C

    2016-06-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique based on data acquisition at two different energy settings. Recent advances in CT have allowed data acquisition and almost simultaneously analysis of two spectra of X-rays at different energy levels resulting in novel developments in the field of abdominal imaging. This technique is widely used in cardiovascular imaging, especially for pulmonary embolism work-up but is now also increasingly developed in the field of abdominal imaging. With dual-energy CT it is possible to obtain virtual unenhanced images from monochromatic reconstructions as well as attenuation maps of different elements, thereby improving detection and characterization of a variety of renal, adrenal, hepatic and pancreatic abnormalities. Also, dual-energy CT can provide information regarding urinary calculi composition. This article reviews and illustrates the different applications of dual-energy CT in routine abdominal imaging. PMID:26993967

  2. [Abdominal CSF pseudocyst recurrence in a 14-year-old patient with ventricular-peritoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Laurent, P; Hennecker, J-L; Schillaci, A; Scordidis, V

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare complication of ventricular-peritoneal shunt (VPS) but needs to be considered in every patient with abdominal complaints or signs of intracranial hypertension (IH). The pathogenesis of pseudocysts remains unclear. Diverse predisposing factors have been proposed such as previous abdominal surgeries, multiple VPS revisions, infections, history of necrotizing enterocolitis, and nonspecific inflammatory processes. We report the case of a 14-year-old patient, known to have a VPS as intraventricular hemorrhage treatment, presenting cephalalgia, vomiting, apathy, and an indurate abdominal mass without fever. The first abdominal CSF pseudocyst diagnosis had been established 3 months earlier. Abdominal ultrasounds confirmed a large homogeneous cyst with the shunt tip within the pseudocyst. Cerebral CT revealed an increased ventricular size. An exploratory laparotomy with cyst aspiration, lysis of adhesions, excision of cystic walls, and repositioning of the peritoneal catheter was performed. No antibiotics were initiated given that the cultures were negative. Ultrasonography proved to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of VPS abdominal complications, especially CSF pseudocyst. CT can also reliably confirm the pseudocyst. In case of IH signs, a cerebral CT scan can be performed to evaluate the ventricular distension and to check the shunt position. Various methods to process the cyst have been described in the medical literature, but the recurrence rate remains elevated (25-100%). Then the probability of an infection without any clinical sign has to be considered. In case of suspected infection, the VPS is removed and replaced by an external ventricular drain. Antibiotics are started and adjusted to the results of the CSF culture. If there is no direct sign of infection, only the distal catheter is externalized and antibiotics are introduced until infection is treated. Depending on the peritoneal absorption state

  3. Electrophysiological characterization of human and mouse sodium-dependent citrate transporters (NaCT/SLC13A5) reveal species differences with respect to substrate sensitivity and cation dependence.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Ruud; Peeva, Polina M; Rong, James X; Sher, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    The citric acid cycle intermediate citrate plays a crucial role in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, glucose metabolism, and β-oxidation. Citrate is imported from the circulation across the plasma membrane into liver cells mainly by the sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT; SLC13A5). Deletion of NaCT from mice led to metabolic changes similar to caloric restriction; therefore, NaCT has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we expressed mouse and human NaCT into Xenopus oocytes and examined some basic functional properties of those transporters. Interestingly, striking differences were found between mouse and human NaCT with respect to their sensitivities to citric acid cycle intermediates as substrates for these transporters. Mouse NaCT had at least 20- to 800-fold higher affinity for these intermediates than human NaCT. Mouse NaCT is fully active at physiologic plasma levels of citrate, but its human counterpart is not. Replacement of extracellular sodium by other monovalent cations revealed that human NaCT was markedly less dependent on extracellular sodium than mouse NaCT. The low sensitivity of human NaCT for citrate raises questions about the translatability of this target from the mouse to the human situation and raises doubts about the validity of this transporter as a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic diseases in humans. PMID:26324167

  4. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    OTOMARU, Konosuke; FUJIKAWA, Takuro; SAITO, Yasuo; ANDO, Takaaki; OBI, Takeshi; MIURA, Naoki; KUBOTA, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery. PMID:25924971

  5. A Novel μCT Analysis Reveals Different Responses of Bioerosion and Secondary Accretion to Environmental Variability

    PubMed Central

    Silbiger, Nyssa J.; Guadayol, Òscar; Thomas, Florence I. M.; Donahue, Megan J.

    2016-01-01

    Corals build reefs through accretion of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) skeletons, but net reef growth also depends on bioerosion by grazers and borers and on secondary calcification by crustose coralline algae and other calcifying invertebrates. However, traditional field methods for quantifying secondary accretion and bioerosion confound both processes, do not measure them on the same time-scale, or are restricted to 2D methods. In a prior study, we compared multiple environmental drivers of net erosion using pre- and post-deployment micro-computed tomography scans (μCT; calculated as the % change in volume of experimental CaCO3 blocks) and found a shift from net accretion to net erosion with increasing ocean acidity. Here, we present a novel μCT method and detail a procedure that aligns and digitally subtracts pre- and post-deployment μCT scans and measures the simultaneous response of secondary accretion and bioerosion on blocks exposed to the same environmental variation over the same time-scale. We tested our method on a dataset from a prior study and show that it can be used to uncover information previously unattainable using traditional methods. We demonstrated that secondary accretion and bioerosion are driven by different environmental parameters, bioerosion is more sensitive to ocean acidity than secondary accretion, and net erosion is driven more by changes in bioerosion than secondary accretion. PMID:27074001

  6. A Novel μCT Analysis Reveals Different Responses of Bioerosion and Secondary Accretion to Environmental Variability.

    PubMed

    Silbiger, Nyssa J; Guadayol, Òscar; Thomas, Florence I M; Donahue, Megan J

    2016-01-01

    Corals build reefs through accretion of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) skeletons, but net reef growth also depends on bioerosion by grazers and borers and on secondary calcification by crustose coralline algae and other calcifying invertebrates. However, traditional field methods for quantifying secondary accretion and bioerosion confound both processes, do not measure them on the same time-scale, or are restricted to 2D methods. In a prior study, we compared multiple environmental drivers of net erosion using pre- and post-deployment micro-computed tomography scans (μCT; calculated as the % change in volume of experimental CaCO3 blocks) and found a shift from net accretion to net erosion with increasing ocean acidity. Here, we present a novel μCT method and detail a procedure that aligns and digitally subtracts pre- and post-deployment μCT scans and measures the simultaneous response of secondary accretion and bioerosion on blocks exposed to the same environmental variation over the same time-scale. We tested our method on a dataset from a prior study and show that it can be used to uncover information previously unattainable using traditional methods. We demonstrated that secondary accretion and bioerosion are driven by different environmental parameters, bioerosion is more sensitive to ocean acidity than secondary accretion, and net erosion is driven more by changes in bioerosion than secondary accretion. PMID:27074001

  7. [A Case of Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumor with Abacterial Peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Sumiyama, Fusao; Inada, Ryo; Nakamura, Fumiko; Ryota, Hironori; Miki, Hirokazu; Oishi, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Mukaide, Yumi; Ozaki, Takeshi; Michiura, Taku; Inoue, Kentaro; Kon, Masanori; Miyasaka, Chika; Uemura, Yoshiko; Hamada, Madoka

    2016-03-01

    A woman in her 50s visited our hospital in February 2015 with a complaint of dull abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant. She had a medical history of appendectomy for appendicitis in her 20s. Computed tomography(CT)revealed a tumor 90 mm in diameter near the ileocecum. Elective surgery was planned under the suspicion of gastrointestinal tumor, malignant lymphoma, or ileal cancer. She was emergently hospitalized 1 day earlier than scheduled because of high fever and severe abdominal pain. CT revealed that the tumor had increased to 120 mm in diameter without free air. Her white blood cell count was not elevated, and her symptoms improved readily with medical treatment. Thus, we performed the operation as scheduled. A tumor with a dark red recess on the surface had invaded the transverse colon intraoperatively, and a small amount of purulent ascites was present at the pouch of Douglas. We performed ileocecal resection with partial transverse colectomy. Histopathological examination led to the diagnosis of desmoid tumor in the mesentery of the terminal ileum. The surgical margins were negative for tumor cells. The tumor surface around the recess showed peritonitis, and the ascites showed no bacteria or tumor cells. The patient had been doing well without recurrence after discharge. Some cases of desmoid tumor with peritonitis have been reported, but most were caused by tumor penetration into the intestinal tract. We report herein a rare case of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor with abacterial peritonitis. PMID:27067862

  8. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  9. Benign Cystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma Revealed by Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bray Madoué, Kaimba; Boniface, Moifo; Annick Laure, Edzimbi; Pierre, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Benign cystic peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare tumor which frequently occurs in women of reproductive age. Abdominal pain associated with pelvic or abdominal mass is the common clinical presentation. We report the case of a 22-year-old woman with a pathological proved benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum revealed by a small bowel obstruction and a painful left-sided pelvic mass with signs of psoitis. Contrast enhanced abdominal CT-scan demonstrated a large pelvic cystic mass with mass effect on rectosigmoid and pelvic organs. The patient underwent surgical removal of the tumor. Pathological examination revealed the diagnosis of benign cystic mesothelioma of the peritoneum. The outcome was excellent with a 12-month recoil. PMID:27066288

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  11. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal pain Acute cholecystitis Acute kidney failure Addison disease Adenomyosis Annular pancreas Aplastic anemia Appendicitis Ascariasis Atheroembolic renal disease Biliary atresia Blind loop syndrome Cholangitis Chronic ...

  12. Monoparesis after graft replacement of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hitoshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Saito, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2006-10-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Preoperative CT revealed cylindrical calcification of the abdominal aorta and the patent internal iliac arteries (IIAs). At the elective surgery, a cylinder-shaped and severely calcified intimal layer was found, and the lumbar arteries were totally occluded. Hypotension caused by the loose iliac clamp due to severe calcification continued for 15 minutes and long-time cross clamp was necessary. Monoparesis of the left lower extremity and dysuria occurred postoperatively. Spinal MRI revealed small infarction at the Th10 level. Symptoms improved and he could walk with a cane and within a few months no uninary catheter support was needed. Thoracic spinal cord infarction after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and a severely calcified abdominal aorta indicated the importance of the blood flow in the IIA as the significant source of spinal blood supply. To prevent spinal cord injury (SCI) which is rare but significant complication of AAA surgery, understanding of the spinal blood supply, quick surgery, and complete revascularization of pelvic arteries are important. PMID:17095985

  13. Gallbladder Tuberculosis: CT Findings with Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiu-Fang; Qiu, Ling-Ling; Shen, Jian; Dong, Fei; Chen, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Objective We wanted to describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of gallbladder tuberculosis (TB) and to correlate them with pathologic findings. Materials and Methods There were seven patients (M:F = 3:4; mean age, 46.3 years; age range, 32 to 78 years) in whom gallbladder TB was eventually diagnosed. All of them underwent cross-sectional imaging with CT, a pathologic examination and a retrospective review. CT imaging evaluation was done in each case, including the findings of a mass versus nodule, wall thickening (uniform or irregular) and the enhancement patterns (homogeneous or heterogeneous). Results All the cases of gallbladder TB revealed the following three different CT findings: micronodular lesion of the gallbladder wall (n = 1), a thickened wall (n = 4) and a gallbladder mass (n = 2). There were three cases of homogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including homogeneous enhancement with nodular lesion, homogeneous uniform thickness enhancement and homogeneous thickness enhancement in one case each, and these cases pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with a little caseating necrosis in one case and tuberculous granuloma with rich fibrous tissue, but little or no evident caseating necrosis in two cases. Four cases of heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions, including heterogeneous uniform-thickness enhancement in two cases, heterogeneous enhancement with a local mass lesion in one case and heterogeneous enhancement with a mass that replaced the gallbladder in one case; in these cases, pathology showed tuberculous granuloma with marked caseation or liquefaction necrosis in three cases and tuberculous granuloma by fibrous and calcifications accompanied by caseating necrosis in one case. Among the seven cases of gallbladder TB, six cases were accompanied by abdominal extra-gallbladder TB, including abdominal lymph node TB in five cases and hepatic TB in four cases. Conclusion Gallbladder TB has various CT manifestations, and the enhanced CT findings

  14. Abdominal Compartment Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maluso, Patrick; Olson, Jody; Sarani, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare but potentially morbid diagnoses. Clinical index of suspicion for these disorders should be raised following massive resuscitation, abdominal wall reconstruction/injury, and in those with space-occupying disorders in the abdomen. Gold standard for diagnosis involves measurement of bladder pressure, with a pressure greater than 12 mm Hg being consistent with IAH and greater than 25 mm Hg being consistent with ACS. Decompressive laparotomy is definitive therapy but paracentesis can be equally therapeutic in properly selected patients. Left untreated, ACS can lead to multisystem organ failure and death. PMID:27016163

  15. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  16. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Christine K; Galanty, Yaron; Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2015-11-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumorigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2 enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. With a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3 ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  17. Systematic E2 screening reveals a UBE2D-RNF138-CtIP axis promoting DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Sczaniecka-Clift, Matylda; Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Demir, Mukerrem; Cornwell, Matthew; Beli, Petra; Jackson, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is crucial for proper cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). If unrepaired, these highly cytotoxic lesions cause genome instability, tumourigenesis, neurodegeneration or premature ageing. Here, we conduct a comprehensive, multilayered screen to systematically profile all human ubiquitin E2-enzymes for impacts on cellular DSB responses. Applying a widely applicable approach, we use an exemplary E2 family, UBE2Ds, to identify ubiquitylation-cascade components downstream of E2s. Thus, we uncover the nuclear E3-ligase RNF138 as a key homologous recombination (HR)-promoting factor that functions with UBE2Ds in cells. Mechanistically, UBE2Ds and RNF138 accumulate at DNA-damage sites and act at early resection stages by promoting CtIP ubiquitylation and accrual. This work supplies insights into regulation of DSB repair by HR. Moreover, it provides a rich information resource on E2s that can be exploited by follow-on studies. PMID:26502057

  18. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion

    PubMed Central

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D.; Ramsay, Jason B.; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A.

    2013-01-01

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays. PMID:23445952

  19. Jaws for a spiral-tooth whorl: CT images reveal novel adaptation and phylogeny in fossil Helicoprion.

    PubMed

    Tapanila, Leif; Pruitt, Jesse; Pradel, Alan; Wilga, Cheryl D; Ramsay, Jason B; Schlader, Robert; Didier, Dominique A

    2013-04-23

    New CT scans of the spiral-tooth fossil, Helicoprion, resolve a longstanding mystery concerning the form and phylogeny of this ancient cartilaginous fish. We present the first three-dimensional images that show the tooth whorl occupying the entire mandibular arch, and which is supported along the midline of the lower jaw. Several characters of the upper jaw show that it articulated with the neurocranium in two places and that the hyomandibula was not part of the jaw suspension. These features identify Helicoprion as a member of the stem holocephalan group Euchondrocephali. Our reconstruction illustrates novel adaptations, such as lateral cartilage to buttress the tooth whorl, which accommodated the unusual trait of continuous addition and retention of teeth in a predatory chondrichthyan. Helicoprion exemplifies the climax of stem holocephalan diversification and body size in Late Palaeozoic seas, a role dominated today by sharks and rays. PMID:23445952

  20. Paediatric case of a large gastric rupture after a blunt abdominal trauma: Report of a case in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pafitanis, Georgios; Koulas, Spiros; Bikos, Stavros; Tsimoyiannis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated gastric rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is rare. In current literature gastric rupture from blunt abdominal trauma ranges between 0.02% and 1.7%. This document reports the first non-motor-vehicle case of an isolated gastric rapture after blunt abdominal injury, which repaired after early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 14-year-old boy attended our emergency surgical department after sustained a blunt abdominal trauma following a fall from his bicycle. He presented with pain and left para-umbilical abdominal ecchymoses. Examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema and a palpable abdominal wall dimple. DISCUSSION Radiological examination with CT scan determined the need for exploratory laparotomy. Operation revealed, extensive rupture of the left lateral border of the rectus abdominus muscle, free intra-peritoneal position of the nasogastric tube with gross spillage of gastric contents and pneumo-peritoneum observed with 7-8cm full thickness rupture of anterior stomach wall, from the lesser towards the greater curvature. Primary, two-layer closure was performed. On the 5th post-operative day he developed gastrorrhagia. He was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. CONCLUSION We present this case report focusing on the paediatric patient to illustrate isolated gastric injury in terms of mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and immediate surgical management. PMID:23295382

  1. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Józsa, Gergő; Mohay, Gabriella; Pintér, András; Vástyán, Attila

    2015-09-13

    19 children were diagnosed with abdominal cysts of different origin in the Surgical Unit of the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary between 2010 and 2013. The authors discuss the details of representative cases of a parovarial cyst, an intestinal duplication, and an omental cyst with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, diagnostic tools, and surgical interventions. The authors conclude that abdominal cysts often cause mild symptoms only, and they are discovered accidentally by ultrasound imaging performed for other reasons. In some cases, the cyst can cause severe complaints or even acute abdomen requiring emergency surgery. Laporoscopy may be a valuable method both in diagnosis and surgical therapy. Abdominal CT or MRI are not required in the majority of the patients. PMID:26552027

  2. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease. PMID:17580053

  3. Abdominal trauma. Emphasis on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Raptopoulos, V

    1994-09-01

    CT scans have been the champion in the diagnosis and management of abdominal injuries, and their use has decreased the number of negative exploratory laparotomies. Traditional areas for the use of CT scans include the assessment of injuries to the spleen and the liver and to signs of organ rupture into the peritoneal cavity. New technologic advances and increased experience have expanded the value of this modality to less than hemodynamically stable patients as well as to less common and more difficult to diagnose injuries of the pancreas, bowel, and the mesentery. PMID:8085007

  4. Micro-CT Imaging Reveals Mekk3 Heterozygosity Prevents Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Ccm2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaesung P.; Foley, Matthew; Zhou, Zinan; Wong, Weng-Yew; Gokoolparsadh, Naveena; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Li, Dean Y.; Zheng, Xiangjian

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in CCM1 (aka KRIT1), CCM2, or CCM3 (aka PDCD10) gene cause cerebral cavernous malformation in humans. Mouse models of CCM disease have been established by deleting Ccm genes in postnatal animals. These mouse models provide invaluable tools to investigate molecular mechanism and therapeutic approaches for CCM disease. However, the full value of these animal models is limited by the lack of an accurate and quantitative method to assess lesion burden and progression. In the present study we have established a refined and detailed contrast enhanced X-ray micro-CT method to measure CCM lesion burden in mouse brains. As this study utilized a voxel dimension of 9.5μm (leading to a minimum feature size of approximately 25μm), it is therefore sufficient to measure CCM lesion volume and number globally and accurately, and provide high-resolution 3-D mapping of CCM lesions in mouse brains. Using this method, we found loss of Ccm1 or Ccm2 in neonatal endothelium confers CCM lesions in the mouse hindbrain with similar total volume and number. This quantitative approach also demonstrated a rescue of CCM lesions with simultaneous deletion of one allele of Mekk3. This method would enhance the value of the established mouse models to study the molecular basis and potential therapies for CCM and other cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:27513872

  5. Hereditary angio-edema involving the gastrointestinal tract: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, N; Van Daele, D; Hainaux, B; Engelholm, L; Michel, O

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of hereditary angio-edema in a young man presenting with recurrent abdominal pain for many years. The diagnosis was suspected on the basis of abdominal CT performed during an abdominal attack and was then confirmed by the measurement of serum concentration of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of the hereditary form of angio-edema with isolated abdominal pain and in which the diagnosis was suggested by abdominal CT findings. PMID:11194925

  6. Recurrent head and neck desmoplastic melanoma with perineural spread along the nervus mandibularis revealed by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Balink, H; de Visscher, J G A M; van der Meij, E H

    2014-08-01

    This report describes a rare case of recurrent head and neck desmoplastic neurotropic melanoma with perineural spread along the nervus mandibularis. An 87-year-old male presented with a rapidly growing mass on the right side of the chin, 4 years after surgical excision of a desmoplastic non-melanotic melanoma of the tip of the chin, with lymphadenectomy of the right side submental and submandibular areas. A panoramic X-ray showed extensive widening of the mandibular canal compatible with perineural tumour growth. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images revealed intense pathological uptake in the recurrent tumour mass located in the right lower buccal fold, and linear pathological uptake in the mandibular canal. Although magnetic resonance imaging is considered the standard of reference, recognition of perineural spread on (18)F-FDG PET/CT is important, as it usually leads to a change in patient management from cure to palliation and may avert further diagnostic procedures. PMID:24811290

  7. Integration of comprehensive 3D microCT and signaling analysis reveals differential regulatory mechanisms of craniofacial bone development.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thach-Vu; Iwata, Junichi; Ho, Hoang Anh; Grimes, Weston C; Park, Shery; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2015-04-15

    Growth factor signaling regulates tissue-tissue interactions to control organogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Specifically, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling plays a crucial role in the development of cranial neural crest (CNC) cell-derived bone, and loss of Tgfbr2 in CNC cells results in craniofacial skeletal malformations. Our recent studies indicate that non-canonical TGFβ signaling is activated whereas canonical TGFβ signaling is compromised in the absence of Tgfbr2 (in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice). A haploinsufficiency of Tgfbr1 (aka Alk5) (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)) largely rescues craniofacial deformities in Tgfbr2 mutant mice by reducing ectopic non-canonical TGFβ signaling. However, the relative involvement of canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling in regulating specific craniofacial bone formation remains unclear. We compared the size and volume of CNC-derived craniofacial bones (frontal bone, premaxilla, maxilla, palatine bone, and mandible) from E18.5 control, Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre, and Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+)mice. By analyzing three dimensional (3D) micro-computed tomography (microCT) images, we found that different craniofacial bones were restored to different degrees in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre;Alk5(fl/+) mice. Our study provides comprehensive information on anatomical landmarks and the size and volume of each craniofacial bone, as well as insights into the extent that canonical and non-canonical TGFβ signaling cascades contribute to the formation of each CNC-derived bone. Our data will serve as an important resource for developmental biologists who are interested in craniofacial morphogenesis. PMID:25722190

  8. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  9. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  10. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in differential diagnosis between leiomyoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasumitus; Kaida, Hayato; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kurata, Seiji; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Abe, Toshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 49 years old woman a large abdominal tumor was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) showed a large tumor with minute calcification and poor contrast enhancement in the left abdominal cavity. The fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) scan showed low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in the tumor. The SUV max (early image) was 1.90, and that of the delayed image was 2.86. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was suspected. Tumor resection revealed that it was a leiomyoma originating in the major curvature of the stomach. In conclusion, the findings of low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake on ¹⁸F-FDG PET and poor contrast enhancement on CECT in a gastric submucosal tumor suggested of a gastric leiomyoma rather than GIST. PMID:26574696

  11. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  12. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  13. Role of Computed Tomography in Pediatric Abdominal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Anu; Gibikote, Sridhar

    2016-07-01

    In the pediatric patient, computed tomography (CT) scan as an imaging modality for evaluation of the abdomen is to be used judiciously. The use of correct scanning protocols, single phase scanning, scanning only when required are key factors to minimize radiation doses to the child, while providing diagnostic quality. CT is the preferred modality in the evaluation of trauma, to assess extent of solid organ or bowel injury. It is also useful in several inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases and acute pancreatitis. CT also has an important role in evaluating intra-abdominal tumors, although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as an alternative to CT. PMID:26964550

  14. Renal applications of dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Ravi K; Platt, Joel F

    2016-06-01

    Dual-energy CT is being increasingly used for abdominal imaging due to its incremental benefit of material characterization without significant increase in radiation dose. Knowledge of the different dual-energy CT acquisition techniques and image processing algorithms is essential to optimize imaging protocols and understand potential limitations while using dual-energy CT renal imaging such as urinary calculi characterization, assessment of renal masses and in CT urography. This review article provides an overview of the current dual-energy CT techniques and use of dual-energy CT in renal imaging. PMID:27010938

  15. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls. PMID:26562229

  16. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis caused by paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, G; Bucciarelli, V; Bisceglia, N; Totaro, G; Scotti, L; Aceto, A; Martini, F; Gallina, S; Bucciarelli, T; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis is a rare and potential fatal event, which occurs in adult subjects. We present the case of a 72-year-old-man, who referred to the emergency Department of our hospital because of persistent severe abdominal and perineal pain. Doppler ultrasounds and computerized tomography angiography revealed the acute thrombosis of the abdominal aorta. Immediate revascularization through aortic thrombo-endoarterectomy resolved the disease. PMID:23830410

  17. Immunoglobulin G4-related large thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of immunoglobulin G4-related large thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 38-year old man. Preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed that the mid-descending thoracic aorta was extremely enlarged and the maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 92 mm. The patient underwent thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement through a thoraco-abdominal incision under left heart bypass. The postoperative pathological examination diagnosed immunoglobulin G4-related aortic aneurysm. PMID:27059069

  18. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  19. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  20. Abdominal exploration - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical exploration of the abdomen, also called an exploratory laparotomy, may be recommended when there is abdominal ... blunt trauma"). Diseases that may be discovered by exploratory laparotomy include: inflammation of the appendix (acute appendicitis) ...

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  2. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  3. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  5. Imaging the pregnant patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graham W; Davis, Melissa A; Semelka, Richard C; Fielding, Julia R

    2012-10-01

    Imaging of pregnant patients with non-obstetric abdominal pain is reviewed, with an accompanying pictorial essay of cases with concentration on magnetic resonance imaging. Non-obstetric causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy are similar to those of non-pregnant patients. The most common causes are appendicitis and cholecystitis. Other causes are myriad and include biliary, gastrointestinal, infectious, inflammatory, and malignant etiologies, among others. The approach to imaging in pregnant patient is unique, as it is imperative to minimize potentially harmful radiation exposures to the fetus. Ultrasound and MRI are the primary modalities for evaluation of the pregnant patient with abdominal pain. The use of intravenous contrast is discouraged, except in highly-selected patients where there is no other way to obtain vital diagnostic information. CT is still used as the mainstay of evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma and is commonly used for diagnosis of small bowel obstruction, stone disease, and work-up of malignancy during pregnancy. A discussion of test selection and underlying rationale is presented. PMID:22160283

  6. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  7. Multiple 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Scans Showing Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishimura, Masanori; Nakamura, Kunihide; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain unclear, aortic wall inflammation has been implicated in AAA development. Several studies have reported the use of fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the nature of AAA.We present a case of 77-year-old Japanese male with juxta-anastomotic AAA who was followed up with multiple F-FDG-PET/CT scans over 7 years. The scans revealed chronological changes in aortic wall inflammation leading to progress and eventual rupture.This case supports a notion that aortic wall inflammation plays a role in AAA progression and rupture. PMID:27175690

  8. Spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst into the peritoneum causing only mild abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Kemal

    2007-02-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic disease in certain areas of the world. It is located mostly in the liver. Spontaneous rupture of the hydatid cyst into the peritoneum is a rare condition, which is accompanied by serious morbidity and mortality generally. We present herein a case with a spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hidatid disease into the peritoneum without any serious symptoms. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency room with a mild abdominal pain lasting for a day. Physical examination revealed only mild abdominal tenderness. There was no history of trauma or complaints related to hydatid diseases. Ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid and a cystic lesion with irregular borders in the liver. He was operated on. Postoperative albendazol therapy was given for 2 mo. No recurrence or secondary hydatidosis was seen on CT investigation in the 3rd, 6th and 12th mo following surgery. PMID:17278209

  9. [A case of Hamman's syndrome associated with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kosaku; Muro, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Kyo; Kobayashi, Sayo; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Nawa, Toru; Ueki, Toru; Yabushita, Kazuhisa; Shimoe, Toshinari

    2015-05-01

    A 21-year-old female presented at an emergency department with abdominal pain and nausea. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen revealed a small amount of mediastinal emphysema in the precardiac area, but the underlying cause could not be identified. On admission, her plasma glucose was 371 mg/dl, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was 14.0%, and blood pH was 6.91. These findings supported a diagnosis of Hamman's syndrome associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Her diabetic ketoacidosis was managed with insulin and fluid therapy, and the mediastinal emphysema disappeared spontaneously by the time of discharge. Presence of free air of the chest and abdominal cavity must warrant a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation; however, when the free air is accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis, it is not necessary to perform urgent endoscopy. PMID:25947021

  10. Paraneoplastic pemphigus as a first sign of metastatic retroperitoneal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings.

    PubMed

    Dhull, V S; Passah, A; Rana, N; Arora, S; Mallick, S; Kumar, R

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of erosive stomatitis and bullous lesions, along with recurrent episodes of abdominal pain. She was found to have a retroperitoneal lump in left lumbar region. Skin biopsy revealed bullous disorder. CT guided biopsy of the retroperitoneal mass was suggestive of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). She was started on oral steroids and supportive care, and surgery was being planned when she developed respiratory failure. CT chest revealed vertebral metastases. PET/CT for whole body work up revealed a left para-aortic mass along with multiple skeletal metastases. The patient was kept on conservative management. After 3 months, the patient has shown clinical improvement, and an exploratory laparotomy is now being planned for the excision of the tumor, followed by chemotherapy. This case of retroperitoneal IMT is rare in terms of skeletal metastases with paraneoplastic pemphigus. PMID:26740314

  11. A case of abdominal aortic injury caused by a traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Kutsukata, Noriyoshi; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Hara, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Takei, Kenkichi; Saito, Nobuyuki

    2008-12-01

    A 30-year-old man was injured when the large motorcycle he was riding crashed into a power pole. Upon arrival at our institution, the patient complained of abdominal pain; blood pressure at admission was 160/70 mmHg, and the heart rate was 112 bpm. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a small collection of fluid in Morrison's pouch. A chest X-ray film showed a right rib fracture. Multidetector computed tomography (MD-CT) revealed pleural effusion, a hepatic lesion, and a dissection of the abdominal aorta distal to the renal artery. Because of the complicated intraluminal injuries, the insertion of a stent graft was difficult. On the 34th day after injury, elective surgery was performed. Because dissection of the lumen was observed, the vessel was replaced with an artificial graft. Medial degeneration of the aorta wall was not observed upon pathological examination, and no degenerative disorders have occurred. The postoperative progress was favorable, and the patient was discharged from hospital. PMID:19155570

  12. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  13. Peripheral embolisation after an abdominal massage.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sandeep; Tak, Shubhanjali; Gupta, Alok

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with a history of acute onset pain in toes of the right foot immediately after an abdominal massage by a 'local healer'. General physical examination and systemic examination were normal except for discolouration of the fourth and fifth toes and cold toes. Investigations including complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, renal function tests, liver profile, lipid profile, antinuclear antibody, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, ECG, chest X-ray, ultrasound abdomen, cardiac echocardiography, lower limb Doppler and CT scan of the abdomen were normal. The patient was treated with regular heparin infusion, aspirin and tramadol. Recovery was complete in 5 days. PMID:24928926

  14. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  15. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  16. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  17. Migration of a retained temporary epicardial pacing wire into an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Imoto, Yutaka

    2015-07-01

    A 69-year old male was referred to our hospital for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Preoperative computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a giant tumour of the left kidney. He underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) prior to aneurysmectomy and nephrectomy. Temporary epicardial pacing wires (TEPWs) were placed on the right atrium and right ventricle. The bipolar ventricular wire was removed and the unipolar atrial wire was cut flush with the skin surface on postoperative day 5. CT 7 days after the OPCAB procedure revealed a retained TEPW sutured to the right atrial wall. One month later, the patient underwent a repair of the AAA and left nephrectomy. We found that a TEPW had migrated inside the AAA intraoperatively. The retained TEPW was thus no longer observed on postoperative CT. Migration of the atrial pacing wire through the aortic lumen was suspected, although the detailed mechanism is unknown. This is the first reported case of a migrated temporary pacing wire into the aorta under noninfectious conditions. PMID:25173602

  18. Use of prediction equations to determine the accuracy of whole-body fat and fat-free mass and appendicular skeletal muscle mass measurements from a single abdominal image using computed tomography in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Robert D; Cardiff, Katrina; Rosenthall, Leonard; Lucar, Enriqueta; Trutschnigg, Barbara; Vigano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and single abdominal images from computed tomography (CT) in advanced cancer patients (ACP) have important diagnostic and prognostic value. The question arises as to whether CT scans can serve as surrogates for DXA in terms of whole-body fat-free mass (FFM), whole-body fat mass (FM), and appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) mass. Predictive equations to estimate body composition for ACP from CT images have been proposed (Mourtzakis et al. 2008; Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metabol. 33(5): 997-1006); however, these equations have yet to be validated in an independent cohort of ACP. Thus, this study evaluated the accuracy of these equations in estimating FFM, FM, and ASM mass using CT images at the level of the third lumbar vertebrae and compared these values with DXA measurements. FFM, FM, and ASM mass were estimated from the prediction equations proposed by Mourtzakis and colleagues (2008) using single abdominal CT images from 43 ACP and were compared with whole-body DXA scans using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman analyses. Despite a moderate to high correlation between the actual (DXA) and predicted (CT) values for FM (rho = 0.93; p ≤ 0.001), FFM (rho = 0.78; p ≤ 0.001), and ASM mass (rho = 0.70; p ≤ 0.001), Bland-Altman analyses revealed large range-of-agreement differences between the 2 methods (29.39 kg for FFM, 15.47 kg for FM, and 3.99 kg for ASM mass). Based on the magnitude of these differences, we concluded that prediction equations using single abdominal CT images have poor accuracy, cannot be considered as surrogates for DXA, and may have limited clinical utility. PMID:26695688

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm--the forgotten diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Contini, S.; McMaster, P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of all cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting to Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, in a 4-year period revealed that there were 118 such patients and confirmed the relatively low operative mortality for elective aneurysmal surgery (6.6%) compared with the high mortality (66.6%) for ruptured or leaking abdominal aneurysm. In only 50% of the cases was the correct diagnosis made during the lifetime of the patient; nor was the correct diagnosis always made after admission to hospital. The need for an early and accurate diagnosis of abdominal aneurysms is stressed and an increased awareness of this condition, based on well established clinical features, would undoubtedly reduce the overall mortality. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393787

  20. Ab initio structural modeling of and experimental validation for Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT296 reveal structural similarity to Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zhang, Yang; Hefty, P. Scott

    2012-02-13

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a medically important pathogen that encodes a relatively high percentage of proteins with unknown function. The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be very informative regarding the protein's functional characteristics; however, determining protein structures experimentally can be very challenging. Computational methods that model protein structures with sufficient accuracy to facilitate functional studies have had notable successes. To evaluate the accuracy and potential impact of computational protein structure modeling of hypothetical proteins encoded by Chlamydia, a successful computational method termed I-TASSER was utilized to model the three-dimensional structure of a hypothetical protein encoded by open reading frame (ORF) CT296. CT296 has been reported to exhibit functional properties of a divalent cation transcription repressor (DcrA), with similarity to the Escherichia coli iron-responsive transcriptional repressor, Fur. Unexpectedly, the I-TASSER model of CT296 exhibited no structural similarity to any DNA-interacting proteins or motifs. To validate the I-TASSER-generated model, the structure of CT296 was solved experimentally using X-ray crystallography. Impressively, the ab initio I-TASSER-generated model closely matched (2.72-{angstrom} C{alpha} root mean square deviation [RMSD]) the high-resolution (1.8-{angstrom}) crystal structure of CT296. Modeled and experimentally determined structures of CT296 share structural characteristics of non-heme Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes, although key enzymatic residues are not conserved, suggesting a unique biochemical process is likely associated with CT296 function. Additionally, functional analyses did not support prior reports that CT296 has properties shared with divalent cation repressors such as Fur.

  1. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  2. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  3. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  4. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  5. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  6. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  7. Negative predictive value of preoperative computed tomography in determining pathologic local invasion, nodal disease, and abdominal metastases in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, D.J.; Frankul, F.; El-Sedfy, A.; McGregor, C.; Elmi, M.; Zagorski, B.; Dixon, M.E.; Mahar, A.L.; Vasilevska-Ristovska, J.; Helyer, L.; Rowsell, C.; Swallow, C.J.; Law, C.H.; Coburn, N.G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Before undergoing curative-intent resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (ga), most patients undergo abdominal computed tomography (ct) imaging to determine contraindications to resection (local invasion, distant metastases). However, the ability to detect contraindications is variable, and the literature is limited to single-institution studies. We sought to assess, on a population level, the clinical relevance of preoperative ct in evaluating the resectability of ga tumours in patients undergoing surgery. Methods In a provincial cancer registry, 2414 patients with ga diagnosed during 2005–2008 at 116 institutions were identified, and a primary chart review of radiology, operative, and pathology reports was performed for all patients. Preoperative abdominal ct reports were compared with intraoperative findings and final pathology reports (reference standard) to determine the negative predictive value (npv) of ct in assessing local invasion, nodal involvement, and intra-abdominal metastases. Results Among patients undergoing gastrectomy, the npv of ct imaging in detecting local invasion was 86.9% (n = 536). For nodal metastasis, the npv of ct was 43.3% (n = 450). Among patients undergoing surgical exploration, the npv of ct for intra-abdominal metastases was 52.3% (n = 407). Conclusions Preoperative abdominal ct imaging reported as negative is most accurate in determining local invasion and least accurate in nodal assessment. The poor npv of ct should be taken into account when selecting patients for staging laparoscopy. PMID:27536178

  8. Quantitative anatomical labeling of the anterior abdominal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wade M.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Ventral hernias (VHs) are abnormal openings in the anterior abdominal wall that are common side effects of surgical intervention. Repair of VHs is the most commonly performed procedure by general surgeons worldwide, but VH repair outcomes are not particularly encouraging (with recurrence rates up to 43%). A variety of open and laparoscopic techniques are available for hernia repair, and the specific technique used is ultimately driven by surgeon preference and experience. Despite routine acquisition of computed tomography (CT) for VH patients, little quantitative information is available on which to guide selection of a particular approach and/or optimize patient-specific treatment. From anecdotal interviews, the success of VH repair procedures correlates with hernia size, location, and involvement of secondary structures. Herein, we propose an image labeling protocol to segment the anterior abdominal area to provide a geometric basis with which to derive biomarkers and evaluate treatment efficacy. Based on routine clinical CT data, we are able to identify inner and outer surfaces of the abdominal walls and the herniated volume. This is the first formal presentation of a protocol to quantify these structures on abdominal CT. The intra- and inter rater reproducibilities of this protocol are evaluated on 4 patients with suspected VH (3 patients were ultimately diagnosed with VH while 1 was not). Mean surfaces distances of less than 2mm were achieved for all structures.

  9. Abdominal computed tomographic scan-merits and demerits over ultrasonography: evaluation of 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Ogunseyinde, A O; Agunloye, A M

    2002-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and Ultrasonography (USS) are commonly used to ascertain the cause of abdominal symptoms. In a retrospective study of 70 Nigerian patients who had abdominal ultrasonography prior to abdominal CT scans, the most frequent clinical feature was abdominal pain, which was reported in 20.8% of the patients. The prevalent ultrasonographic finding was hepatomegaly (12.2%) while bowel displacement was the most frequently reported CT finding (18.3%). There was no correlation between USS and CT findings in 11 patients (15.7%). There was some agreement in the findings of both tests in 75.7% of cases. Additional findings were noted in 38 (54.3%) of the latter group of patients on CT scans. Hundred percent agreement was reported in both imaging techniques in 5 radiological findings namely: dilated gall bladder, renal cysts, ascites, adrenal mass and utero-cervical mass. These findings suggest a high yield of diagnostic accuracy from abdominal sonography and increased diagnostic details provided by CT imaging. Our overall impression is that the diagnostic information provided by the two techniques are complimentary. PMID:12518911

  10. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078–1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323–5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003–1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489–0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC. PMID:26904670

  11. Aberrant heartworm migration to the abdominal aorta and systemic arteriolitis in a dog presenting with vomiting and hemorrhagic diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Janet A.; Scott, Katherine D.; Edwards, John F.

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year-old Dachshund was presented for vomiting and diarrhea. Abdominal ultrasound revealed Dirofilaria immitis in the abdominal aorta and an avascular segment of small intestine. The dog was euthanized. Necropsy revealed D. immitis in the abdominal aorta and widespread necrotizing arteriolitis. This is a unique presentation of aberrant migration of D. immitis. PMID:26740703

  12. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  13. [Crepitant abdominal cellulitis: a rare clinical presentation of sigmoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Chaib, E; Leal, M C; Onofrio, P L; Nahas, P; de Mello, J B

    1990-01-01

    Unusual infections associated with colorectal tumors may, in some instances, be the sole clue to presence of malignancy. The infections are either related to invasion of tissues or organs in close proximity to the tumor or secondary to distant seeding by transient bacteremia arising from necrotic tumors. The authors present one case of spontaneous crepitant cellulitis in the lower abdominal wall, associated with sigmoid tumor. The patient had abdominal pain in the left iliaca fossa, fever and skin necrosis of the lower abdominal wall in the last 4 hours. At surgery they performed debridement and excision of necrotic tissue (lower abdominal wall) and partial sigmoidectomy with sigmoid colostomy. The patient died 9 months after initial surgery. A study of tumor mass revealed an adenocarcinoma. The presence of crepitant cellulitis in a lower abdominal wall should result in a search for bowel perforation. PMID:2151244

  14. CT -- Body

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses special x-ray ... Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  15. Endovascular Repair of an Actively Hemorrhaging Stab Wound Injury to the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Qasim; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge

    2008-09-15

    Traumatic injury of the abdominal aorta is rare and potentially lethal (Yeh et al., J Vasc Surg 42(5):1007-1009, 2005; Chicos et al., Chirurgia (Bucur) 102(2):237-240, 2007) as it can result in major retroperitoneal hemorrhage, requiring an urgent open surgery. In case of concomitant bowel injury or other conditions of hostile abdomen, endovascular repair can be an alternative treatment. This case report deals with a 50-year-old man presenting at the emergency ward with three stab wounds: two in the abdomen and one in the chest. During explorative laparotomy, liver laceration and bowel perforation were repaired. One day later, abdominal CT-scan revealed an additional retroperitoneal hematoma associated with an aortic pseudoaneurysm, located anteriorly 3 cm above the aortic bifurcation. Because of the risk of graft infection, an endovascular repair of the aortic injury using a Gore excluder stent-graft was performed. Radiological and clinical follow-up revealed a gradual shrinkage of the pseudo-aneurysm and no sign of graft infection at two years' follow-up.

  16. Multi-Atlas Segmentation for Abdominal Organs with Gaussian Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter/white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation. PMID:25914508

  17. Multi-atlas segmentation for abdominal organs with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid / gray matter / white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  18. A Giant Intra Abdominal Mass Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Presentation of Renal Angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; Rahman, M A; Kaisar, I; Islam, M F; Salam, M A

    2016-07-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor commonly found in kidney than extra renal sites. Most of the small renal angiomyolipomas are diagnosed incidentally on ultrasound and other imaging studies. Some renal AMLs present clinically when become very big, giant renal angiomyolipoma. Although almost all cases are benign, a relatively rare variant of epitheloid angiomyolipoma has got malignant potential and can even metastasize. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI scan are usually used for diagnosis of angiomyolipoma with high level of accuracy; even though some lesions may be confused as renal cell carcinoma on imaging studies. Here, a 48 year old man presented with a large intra-abdominal mass preoperatively diagnosed as a case of right renal cell carcinoma and radical nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed epitheloid angiomyolipoma (EAML). PMID:27612907

  19. The Norovirus epidemic...or just a stone? Revising the diagnosis with an abdominal radiograph.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Siegfried K; Remoundos, Dionysios D; Abdulla, Muaad

    2013-01-01

    During an acute outbreak of Norovirus in the local area, a 77-year-old woman was admitted with a short history of diarrhoea and vomiting. A working diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis complicated by acute renal failure, secondary to dehydration, was made. Despite judicious fluid resuscitation and regular antiemetics, the patient's symptoms persisted with only mild improvement in her renal function. An abdominal radiograph revealed evidence of significant small bowel obstruction and subsequent CT of the abdomen and pelvis identified a 1.5 cm intraluminal density at a transition point raising the suspicion of gallstone ileus. An urgent laparotomy with stone removal was carried out without complications. The patient recovered well postoperatively and was discharged home after 3 days. PMID:23771969

  20. Spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hydatıd cyst into the peritoneum causing only mild abdominal pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Kemal

    2007-01-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic disease in certain areas of the world. It is located mostly in the liver. Spontaneous rupture of the hydatid cyst into the peritoneum is a rare condition, which is accompanied by serious morbidity and mortality generally. We present herein a case with a spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hidatid disease into the peritoneum without any serious symptoms. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency room with a mild abdominal pain lasting for a day. Physical examination revealed only mild abdominal tenderness. There was no history of trauma or complaints related to hydatid diseases. Ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid and a cystic lesion with irregular borders in the liver. He was operated on. Postoperative albendazol therapy was given for 2 mo. No recurrence or secondary hydatidosis was seen on CT investigation in the 3rd, 6th and 12th mo following surgery. PMID:17278209

  1. The vanishing giant abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, Lian; Halak, Moshe; Schneiderman, Jacob; Silverberg, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Spontaneous sac size regression of a giant abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a rare event that has not been previously described. We report a case of an 89-year-old woman with a known 9-cm AAA, which was diagnosed in 2003. The patient had refused any kind of treatment at that time. Recent imaging studies obtained 7 years later revealed an AAA of 4 cm diameter. This is the first recorded case of significant spontaneous AAA sac shrinkage. PMID:21444348

  2. Dose management in CT facility

    PubMed Central

    Tsapaki, V; Rehani, M

    2007-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) examinations have rapidly increased in number over the last few years due to recent advances such as the spiral, multidetector-row, CT fluoroscopy and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-CT technology. This has resulted in a large increase in collective radiation dose as reported by many international organisations. It is also stated that frequently, image quality in CT exceeds the level required for confident diagnosis. This inevitably results in patient radiation doses that are higher than actually required, as also stressed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the CT exposure of paediatric and small adult patients. However, the wide range in exposure parameters reported, as well as the different CT applications reveal the difficulty in standardising CT procedures. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic CT principles, outline the recent technological advances and their impact in patient radiation dose and finally suggest methods of radiation dose optimisation. PMID:21614279

  3. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  4. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures.

  5. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  6. Pediatric Abdominal Organ Transplantation: Current Indications, Techniques, and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, A Luana; Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Chang, Patricia T; Lee, Edward Y; Phillips, Grace S

    2016-03-01

    The anatomy, normal postoperative radiological appearance, and imaging features of common postoperative complications of pediatric abdominal transplants are reviewed, including renal, liver, and intestinal transplants. Doppler ultrasound is the mainstay of imaging after transplantation. Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography, MR imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, MR cholangiopancreatography, conventional angiography, and nuclear medicine imaging may be used for problem-solving in pediatric transplant patients. Accurate and timely radiological diagnosis of transplant complications facilitates appropriate treatment and minimizes morbidity and mortality. PMID:26896225

  7. Imaging of Chest and Abdominal Trauma in Children.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Susie J; Flanagan, Sean G; McDonald, Kirsteen

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of death in children over a year old. The injuries sustained and management of these children differs to adults, due to differences in anatomy and physiology. Careful thought must also be given to exposing children to radiation, and CT scans should be performed only in select patients. This article reviews these important points and explains the imaging findings in chest and abdominal trauma. PMID:26219741

  8. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  9. CT differentiation between tubo-ovarian and appendiceal origin of right lower quadrant abscess: CT, clinical, and laboratory correlation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Nurith; Fux, Tal; Finkelstein, Anna; Mezeh, Haggi; Simanovsky, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    To investigate which clinical, laboratory, and CT findings potentially facilitate the differential diagnosis between tubo-ovarian abscess (TOA) and periappendicular abscess (PAA), we retrospectively reviewed abdominal CT examinations and medical records for all women who presented to our medical center with unilateral right pelvic abscess formation who underwent CT evaluation from 2004-2014. A wide spectrum of clinical data and imaging findings were recorded. CT diagnoses were made in consensus by two experienced body radiologists blinded to the final diagnosis. Findings associated with the infections were compared using the chi-square (χ(2)) or the Fisher exact test. Ninety-one patients were included; 58 with PAA (mean age 46 years) and 33 with TOA (mean age 37 years). Pain on cervical motion (67 %) and vaginal discharge (21 %) were significantly more common in TOA; other clinical signs were similar. The presence of right ovarian vein entering the mass on CT had 100 % specificity and 94 % sensitivity to TOA. Distended right fallopian tube (79 %), mass posterior to mesovarium (76 %), contralateral pelvic fat stranding (55 %), and thickening of sacrouterine ligaments (55 %) were significantly more common in TOA. Positive "arrowhead sign" (91 %), mesenteric lymphadenopathy (85 %), small bowel wall thickening (55 %), fluid in the right paracolic gutter (50 %), and cecal wall thickening (48 %) were significantly more common in PAA;internal gas was revealed only in PAA (33 %). Distinct CT features can increase diagnostic certainty regarding the origin of right lower quadrant abscess in women. PMID:26719159

  10. Hepatoblastoma evaluated by 18F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bieze, Matthanja; van Gulik, Thomas M; Bennink, Roelof J

    2013-02-01

    Hepatoblastoma is a rare carcinoma mostly seen in children. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection and adjuvant chemotherapy is the optimal treatment. We present the case of an 18-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, and fatigue. MRI showed 3 hepatic lesions with high signal intensity on arterial phase T1-weighted images and slight washout on the late phase, suggestive for hepatocellular carcinoma. Laboratory examinations revealed plasma α-feto-protein of 114,245 μg/L. Subsequent baseline and posttreatment F-fluoromethyl choline PET/CT were performed to possibly evaluate extent of the disease and assess disease response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23334143

  11. FDG PET/CT in Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Gallbladder With Chondroid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Dong, Hui; Jing, Wei; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-08-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the gallbladder, composed of epithelial and sarcomatous components, is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. A 61-year-old man was admitted because of abdominal distention for 2 weeks. Enhanced CT showed a large gallbladder tumor with central necrosis. The tumor measuring 18 cm in maximum diameter showed intense peripheral FDG uptake with SUVmax of 15.4. The specimen of the resected tumor revealed tubular adenocarcinoma and sarcomatoid tissue with chondroid differentiation. Immunohistochemical staining showed the sarcomatoid tissue was positive for EMA, CD10, and VIM, with proliferation index of 80%. These pathologic findings were consistent with sarcomatoid carcinoma. PMID:26859217

  12. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  13. Discriminative dictionary learning for abdominal multi-organ segmentation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tong; Wolz, Robin; Wang, Zehan; Gao, Qinquan; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Mori, Kensaku; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    An automated segmentation method is presented for multi-organ segmentation in abdominal CT images. Dictionary learning and sparse coding techniques are used in the proposed method to generate target specific priors for segmentation. The method simultaneously learns dictionaries which have reconstructive power and classifiers which have discriminative ability from a set of selected atlases. Based on the learnt dictionaries and classifiers, probabilistic atlases are then generated to provide priors for the segmentation of unseen target images. The final segmentation is obtained by applying a post-processing step based on a graph-cuts method. In addition, this paper proposes a voxel-wise local atlas selection strategy to deal with high inter-subject variation in abdominal CT images. The segmentation performance of the proposed method with different atlas selection strategies are also compared. Our proposed method has been evaluated on a database of 150 abdominal CT images and achieves a promising segmentation performance with Dice overlap values of 94.9%, 93.6%, 71.1%, and 92.5% for liver, kidneys, pancreas, and spleen, respectively. PMID:25988490

  14. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice

    PubMed Central

    Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  15. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  16. A numerical investigation of the healthy abdominal wall structures.

    PubMed

    Pachera, P; Pavan, P G; Todros, S; Cavinato, C; Fontanella, C G; Natali, A N

    2016-06-14

    The present work aims to assess, via numerical modeling, the global passive mechanical behavior of the healthy abdominal wall under the action of pressures that characterize different daily tasks and physiological functions. The evaluation of a normal range of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) during activities of daily living is fundamental because pressure alterations can cause several adverse effects. At this purpose, a finite element model is developed from literature histomorphometric data and from diagnostic images of Computed Tomography (CT), detailing the different anatomical regions. Numerical simulations cover an IAP up to the physiological limit of 171 (0.0223MPa) mmHg reached while jumping. Numerical results are in agreement with evidences on physiological abdomens when evaluating the local deformations along the craniocaudal direction, the transversal load forces in different regions and the increase of the abdominal area at a IAP of 12mmHg. The developed model can be upgraded for the investigation of the abdominal hernia repair and the assessment of prostheses mechanical compatibility, correlating stiffness and tensile strength of the abdominal tissues with those of surgical meshes. PMID:27133659

  17. A New Rat Model for Orthotopic Abdominal Wall Allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lao, William W.; Wang, Yen-Ling; Ramirez, Alejandro E.; Cheng, Hui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall, one of the most commonly transplanted composite tissues, is less researched and lacking animal models. Its clinical necessities were emphasized in multiple case series to reconstruct large abdominal defects. Previous animal models have only studied components of the abdominal wall transplant. We describe findings from a new model that more likely reflect clinical transplantation. Methods: Full-thickness hemiabdominal wall flap was procured from Brown Norway (BN) rats and transplanted to an orthotopic defect on Lewis rats. Three groups were studied: group 1: Lewis to Lewis syngeneic; group 2: BN to Lewis control; and group 3: BN to Lewis with postoperative cyclosporine. Vascular imaging and cross vessel section were performed along with full-thickness abdominal wall. Immune cell profiling with flow cytometry at different time points was studied in all groups. Results: Syngeneic group had no rejection. Control group consistently showed rejection around postoperative day 6. With cyclosporine treatment, however, transplant and recipient tissue integration was observed. Flow cytometry revealed that innate immunity is responsible for the initial inflammatory events following abdominal wall engraftment. Adaptive immunity cells, specifically interferon-γ-producing T helper (Th) 1 and interleukin-17-producing Th17 cells, dramatically and positively correlate with rejection progression of abdominal wall transplants. Conclusions: Technical, histological, and immunological aspects of a new rat model are described. These results give clues to what occurs in human abdominal wall transplantation. In addition, Th1, a proinflammatory cell, was found to be a potential biomarker for allograft rejection. PMID:25289329

  18. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  19. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominalPa in inCh ildre n What is functional abdominal pain, and why does it happen? Most otherwise-healthy ... stomachaches for two months or more have functional abdominal pain. The term “functional” refers to the fact that ...

  20. Comparison of Fusion Imaging Using a Combined SPECT/CT System and Intra-arterial CT: Assessment of Drug Distribution by an Implantable Port System in Patients Undergoing Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Kusunoki, Shinichiroh; Nakaura, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Shinya; Kawanaka, Kouichi; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takamori, Hiroshi; Chikamoto, Akira; Kanemitsu, Keiichiro

    2006-06-15

    Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is effective for treating primary and metastatic carcinoma of the liver. We compared the perfusion patterns of HAI chemotherapy on intra-arterial port-catheter computed tomography (iapc-CT) and fused images obtained with a combined single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) system. We studied 28 patients with primary or metastatic carcinoma of the liver who bore an implantable HAI port system. All underwent abdominal SPECT using Tc-99m-MAA (185 Mbq); the injection rate was 1 mL/min, identical to the chemotherapy infusion rate, and 0.5 mL/sec for iapc-CT. Delivery was through an implantable port. We compared the intrahepatic perfusion (IHP) and extrahepatic perfusion (EHP) patterns of HAI chemotherapy on iapc-CT images and fused images obtained with a combined SPECT/CT system. In 23 of 28 patients (82%), IHP patterns on iapc-CT images and fused images were identical. In 5 of the 28 patients (18%), IHP on fusion images was different from IHP on iapc-CT images. EHP was seen on fused images in 12 of the 28 patients (43%) and on iapc-CT images in 8 patients (29%). In 17 patients (61%), upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. EHP was revealed on fused images in 10 of these patients; 9 of them manifested gastroduodenal toxicity at the time of subsequent HAI chemotherapy. Fusion imaging using the combined SPECT/CT system reflects the actual distribution of the infused anticancer agent. This information is valuable not only for monitoring adequate drug distribution but also for avoiding potential extrahepatic complications.

  1. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  2. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  3. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  4. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established. PMID:25616589

  5. Solid organ abdominal ischemia, part I: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings, and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Stein, Marjorie W; Kaul, Bindu; Flusberg, Milana; Chernyak, Victoria; Rozenblit, Alla M; Mazzariol, Fernanda A

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ abdominal ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and often requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, most solid organ ischemia is due to arterial or venous occlusion and, less frequently, a low-flow state. Radiologic diagnosis is critical, as clinical presentations are often nonspecific. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice (except in adnexal torsion) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) useful in equivocal cases or follow-up of ischemic disease. This article will provide a pictorial review of the CT and MRI features of solid abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, etiology, and management. PMID:27317217

  6. Abdominal Lymphonodular Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Child

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Mehjabeen; Qureshi, Sonia; Shakoor, Sadia; Fatima, Saira; Mir, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience with an apparently immunocompetent child presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin without focal signs. Investigations revealed lymphadenopathy at lung hila, mesentery, and porta hepatis. The child had received at least two months of empiric antituberculous therapy (ATT) before she came to us. A CT-guided biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation. PAS stain showed yeasts which stained blue with Alcian blue, suggesting C. neoformans. PMID:26649217

  7. Abdominal Injuries in Belt-Positioning Booster Seats

    PubMed Central

    Arbogast, Kristy B.; Ghati, Yoganand

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that booster seats reduce the risk of abdominal injuries by improving the fit of the seat belt on young children and encouraging better posture and compatibility with the vehicle seat. Recently, several studies have reported cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children questioning the protective effects of these restraints. The objective of this study was to examine cases of abdominal injuries in booster seated children through parametric modeling to gain a thorough understanding of the injury causation scenarios. The Partners for Child Passenger Safety and CIREN in-depth crash investigation databases were queried to identify children in belt-positioning booster seats with abdominal injuries. The injury causation scenarios for these injuries were delineated using the CIREN Biotab method. The cases were modeled, using MADYMO with variations in key parameters, to determine the ranges of loads and loading rates for the abdomen and thorax. A parametric study was completed examining the influence of pretensioners and load limiters on the injury metrics obtained. Query of the two databases revealed three cases involving abdominal injuries to booster seated children. Children in two of the cases sustained a thoracic injury (AIS 3/AIS 4) in addition to their abdominal injuries (AIS 2) and review of these cases pointed to the role of shoulder belt loading in the injury causation. Modeling of these cases revealed chest compressions and accelerations of 30–53 mm and 41–89 g, respectively and abdominal deflection and velocity of 7.0–13.3 mm and 1.2–2.2 m/s, respectively. Parametric study suggested that coupling shoulder belt load limiting and lap belt buckle pretensioning resulted in improved chest and abdominal metrics while reducing head excursion, indicating that these technologies may provide injury reduction potential to pediatric rear seat occupants. PMID:20184845

  8. Hyperacute abdominal compartment syndrome: an unrecognized complication of massive intraoperative resuscitation for extra-abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Edgar B; Malhotra, Ajai K; Chhitwal, Reena; Aboutanos, Michel B; Duane, Therese M; Ivatury, Rao R

    2005-11-01

    Primary and secondary abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are well-recognized entities after trauma. The current study describes a "hyperacute" form of secondary ACS (HACS) that develops intraoperatively while repair of extra-abdominal injuries is being carried out simultaneous with massive resuscitation for shock caused by those injuries. The charts of patients requiring abdominal decompression (AD) for HACS at time of extra-abdominal surgery at our level I trauma center were reviewed. The following data was gathered: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism, resuscitation details, time to AD, time to abdominal closure, and outcome. All continuous data are presented as mean +/- standard error of mean. Hemodynamic and ventilatory data pre- and post-AD was compared using paired t test with significance set at P < 0.05. Five (0.13%) of 3,750 trauma admissions developed HACS during the 15-month study period ending February 2004. Mean age was 32 +/- 7 years, and mean ISS was 19 +/- 2. Four of five patients arrived in hemorrhagic shock (blunt subclavian artery injury, 1; chest gunshot, 1; gunshot to brachial artery, 1; stab transection of femoral vessels, 1) and were immediately operated upon. One of five patients (70% burn) developed HACS during burn wound excision on day 2. HACS developed after massive crystalloid (15 +/- 1.7 L) and blood (11 +/- 0.4 units) resuscitation during prolonged surgery (4.8 +/- 0.8 hours). Pre- versus post-AD comparisons revealed significant (P < 0.05) improvements in mean arterial pressure (55 +/- 6 vs 88 +/- 3 mm Hg), peak airway pressure (44 +/- 5 vs 31 +/- 2 mm Hg), tidal volume (432 +/- 96 vs 758 +/- 93 mL), arterial pH (7.16 +/- 0.0 vs 7.26 +/- 0.04), and PaCO2 (52 +/- 6 vs 45 +/- 6 mm Hg). There was no mortality among the group, and all patients underwent abdominal closure by fascial reapproximation in 2-5 days. Two (40%) of the five patients required extremity fasciotomy for compartment syndrome. HACS is a rare complication of

  9. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  10. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  11. Comparison of image quality from filtered back projection, statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in abdominal computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu; Lin, Yi-Yang; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiou, Yi-You; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the image noise-reducing abilities of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) with those of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) images This institutional review board-approved retrospective study enrolled 103 patients; informed consent was waived. Urinary bladder (n = 83) and renal cysts (n = 44) were used as targets for evaluating imaging quality. Raw data were retrospectively reconstructed using FBP, statistical IR, and IMR. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Subjective image quality was evaluated and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test with Bonferroni correction. Objective analysis revealed a reduction in image noise for statistical IR compared with that for FBP, with no significant differences in SNR. In the urinary bladder group, IMR achieved up to 53.7% noise reduction, demonstrating a superior performance to that of statistical IR. IMR also yielded a significantly superior SNR to that of statistical IR. Similar results were obtained in the cyst group. Subjective analysis revealed reduced image noise for IMR, without inferior margin delineation or diagnostic confidence. IMR reduced noise and increased SNR to greater degrees than did FBP and statistical IR. Applying the IMR technique to abdominal CT imaging has potential for reducing the radiation dose without sacrificing imaging quality. PMID:27495078

  12. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  13. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  14. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  15. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  16. Emergency abdominal MRI: current uses and trends.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hei S; Gupta, Avneesh; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina

    2016-05-01

    When evaluating the abdomen in the emergency setting, CT and ultrasound are the imaging modalities of choice, mainly because of accessibility, speed and lower relative cost. CT has the added benefit of assessing the whole abdomen for a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal disease, whereas ultrasound has the benefit of avoiding ionizing radiation. MRI is another tool that has demonstrated increasing utility in the emergency setting and also avoids the use of ionizing radiation. MRI also has the additional advantage of excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, widespread use of MRI in the emergency setting is limited by availability and relative cost. Despite such limitations, advances in MRI technology, including improved pulse sequences and coil technology and increasing clinician awareness of MRI, have led to an increased demand in abdominal MRI in the emergency setting. This is particularly true in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis; choledocholithiasis with or without cholecystitis; acute appendicitis, particularly in pregnant patients; and, in some cases, Crohn's disease. In cases of pancreatitis and Crohn's disease, MRI also plays a role in subsequent follow-up examinations. PMID:26514590

  17. CT and MR Imaging Findings of Pancreatic Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Xu, Shunliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies on pancreatic paraganglioma, a rare neoplasm, have primarily reported its ultrasound and routine and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence findings of pancreatic paraganglioma. A male patient, ages 41 years, was admitted to our hospital due to a pancreatic space-occupying lesion that had been present for more than 10 days. The patient had no obvious discomfort. He had a history of hypertension and hyperthyroidism. Physical examination revealed upper abdominal tenderness without a palpable mass. Routine and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a soft tissue mass at the pancreatic head/uncinate process, with patchy calcification within the lesion. On a contrast-enhanced CT scan, severe enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase was noted, as was slightly reduced but still marked enhancement in the venous phase. The celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery segment were wrapped by the tumor. Thickened, tortuous vessels were observed at the lesion edges, around which there were multiple enlarged lymph nodes. The main pancreatic duct was markedly dilated. Routine and contrast-enhanced pancreatic MRI demonstrated an abnormal nodular signal in the pancreatic head/uncinate process that was approximately 4.3 × 6.4 cm2 in size. T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) revealed hypointensity, whereas T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) revealed nonhomogeneous, slight hyperintensity. Patchy hypointensity on both T1WI and T2WI was observed within the lesion. DWI showed slight hyperintensity. Grossly heterogeneous enhancement of the mass was observed on a contrast-enhanced MRI scan, with the tumor wrapped around the adjacent vasculature, and multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed peripherally. After preoperative preparation, the patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathology and

  18. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma. PMID:11796898

  19. Longitudinal In Vivo SPECT/CT Imaging Reveals Morphological Changes and Cardiopulmonary Apoptosis in a Rodent Model of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Paffett, Michael L.; Hesterman, Jacob; Candelaria, Gabriel; Lucas, Selita; Anderson, Tamara; Irwin, Daniel; Hoppin, Jack; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Campen, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has a complex pathogenesis involving both heart and lungs. Animal models can reflect aspects of the human pathology and provide insights into the development and underlying mechanisms of disease. Because of the variability of most animal models of PAH, serial in vivo measurements of cardiopulmonary function, morphology, and markers of pathology can enhance the value of such studies. Therefore, quantitative in vivo SPECT/CT imaging was performed to assess cardiac function, morphology and cardiac perfusion utilizing 201Thallium (201Tl) in control and monocrotaline-treated rats. In addition, lung and heart apoptosis was examined with 99mTc-Annexin V (99mTc-Annexin) in these cohorts. Following baseline imaging, rats were injected with saline or monocrotaline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and imaged weekly for 6 weeks. To assess a therapeutic response in an established pulmonary hypertensive state, a cohort of rats received resveratrol in drinking water (3 mg/kg/day) on days 28–42 post-monocrotaline injection to monitor regression of cardiopulmonary apoptosis. PAH in monocrotaline-treated rats was verified by conventional hemodynamic techniques on day 42 (right ventricular systolic pressure (RSVP) = 66.2 mmHg in monocrotaline vs 28.8 mmHg in controls) and in terms of right ventricular hypertrophy (RV/LVS = 0.70 in monocrotaline vs 0.32 in controls). Resveratrol partially reversed both RVSP (41.4 mmHg) and RV/LVS (0.46), as well as lung edema and RV contractility +dP/dtmax. Serial 99mTc-Annexin V imaging showed clear increases in pulmonary and cardiac apoptosis when compared to baseline, which regressed following resveratrol treatment. Monocrotaline induced modest changes in whole-heart perfusion as assessed by 201TI imaging and cardiac morphological changes consistent with septal deviation and enlarged RV. This study demonstrates the utility of functional in vivo SPECT/CT imaging in rodent models of PAH and further confirms the

  20. COMPARISON OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF CANINE MECHANICAL INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod; Green, Eric M; Zekas, Lisa J; Aarnes, Turi K; Su, Lillian; Habing, Gregory G

    2016-07-01

    Vomiting, often caused by mechanical intestinal obstruction, is common in dogs. Equivocal radiographic signs often necessitate repeat radiographs or additional imaging procedures. For our prospective, case-controlled, accuracy study, we hypothesized the following: (1) using computed tomography (CT), radiologists will be more sensitive and specific for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery compared to using radiographs; and (2) using measurements, radiologists will be more sensitive and specific using radiographs or CT for detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery. Twenty dogs had abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT. Seventeen dogs had abdominal surgery and three dogs were not obstructed based on clinical follow-up. Confidence levels (five-point scale) of three experienced radiologists for mechanical intestinal obstruction and recommending surgery were recorded before and after making selected measurements. Eight dogs had surgically confirmed mechanical intestinal obstruction, and 12 dogs did not have obstruction. For detecting mechanical intestinal obstruction, CT was more sensitive (95.8% vs. 79.2%) and specific (80.6% vs. 69.4%) compared to radiographs, but the difference was not statistically significant. For recommending surgery, radiography was more sensitive (91.7% vs. 83.3%) and specific (83.3% vs. 72.2%) than using CT, but differences were not statistically significant. We reported objective CT measurements for predicting small mechanical intestinal obstruction. By incorporating these objective data, the diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction changed in five of 120 instances (radiographs and CT). In no instance (0/120), did the objective data change the recommendation for surgery. Using CT or abdominal radiographs for the detection of canine mechanical intestinal obstruction is sensitive and specific when evaluated by experienced veterinary radiologists. PMID:27038072

  1. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  2. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  3. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  4. DIEP breast reconstruction following multiple abdominal liposuction procedures

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Simon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Akali, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Previous abdominal wall surgery is viewed as a contraindication to abdominal free tissue transfer. We present two patients who underwent multiple abdominal liposuction procedures, followed by successful free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We review the literature pertaining to reliability of abdominal free flaps in those with previous abdominal surgery. Methods: Review of case notes and radiological investigations of two patients, and a PubMed search using the terms “DIEP”, “deep inferior epigastric”, “TRAM”, “transverse rectus abdominis”, “perforator” and “laparotomy”, “abdominal wall”, “liposuction”, “liposculpture”, “fat graft”, “pfannenstiel”, with subsequent appraisal of relevant papers by the first and second authors. Results: Patient 1 had 3 episodes of liposuction from the abdomen for fat grafting to a reconstructed breast. Subsequent revision reconstruction of the same breast with DIEP flap was preceded by CT angiography, which demonstrated normal perforator anatomy. The reconstruction healed well with no ischaemic complications. Patient 2 had 5 liposuction procedures from the abdomen to graft fat to a wide local excision defect. Recurrence of cancer led to mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with free DIEP flap. Preoperative MR angiography demonstrated a large perforator right of the umbilicus, with which the intraoperative findings were consistent. The patient had an uneventful recovery and good healing with no fat necrosis or wound dehiscence. Conclusions: We demonstrate that DIEP flaps can safely be raised without perfusion-related complications following multiple liposuction procedures to the abdomen. The safe interval between procedures is difficult to quantify, but we demonstrate successful free flap after 16 months. PMID:25671046

  5. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  6. Relevant incidental findings at abdominal multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography: A collateral screening?

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Muzzupappa, Claudia; Poloni, Alessandro; Bandirali, Michele; Esseridou, Anastassia; Tritella, Stefania; Secchi, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of relevant incidental findings (RIFs) detected during routine abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CeCT). METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the reports of a consecutive series of abdominal CeCT studies performed between January and May 2013. For each report, patients’ age and sex, admission as inpatient or outpatient, clinical suspicion as indicated by the requesting physician, availability of a previous abdominal examination, and name of the reporting radiologist were recorded. Based on the clinical suspicion, the presence and features of any RIFs (if needing additional workup) was noted. RESULTS: One thousand forty abdominal CeCT were performed in 949 patients (528 males, mean age 66 ± 14 years). No significant difference was found between inpatients and outpatients age and sex distribution (P > 0.472). RIFs were found in 195/1040 (18.8%) CeCT [inpatients = 108/470 (23.0%); outpatients = 87/570 (15.2%); P = 0.002]. RIFs were found in 30/440 (6.8%) CeCT with a previous exam and in 165/600 (27.5%) without a previous exam (P < 0.001). Radiologists’ distribution between inpatients or outpatients was significantly different (P < 0.001). RIFs prevalence increased with aging, except for a peak in 40-49 year group. Most involved organs were kidneys, gallbladder, and lungs. CONCLUSION: A RIF is detected in 1/5 patients undergoing abdominal CeCT. Risk of overdiagnosis should be taken into account. PMID:26516432

  7. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  8. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

  9. Evaluation of an initiative to reduce radiation exposure from CT to children in a non-pediatric-focused facility.

    PubMed

    Blumfield, Einat; Zember, Jonathan; Guelfguat, Mark; Blumfield, Amit; Goldman, Harold

    2015-12-01

    We would like to share our experience of reducing pediatric radiation exposure. Much of the recent literature regarding successes of reducing radiation exposure has come from dedicated children's hospitals. Nonetheless, over the past two decades, there has been a considerable increase in CT imaging of children in the USA, predominantly in non-pediatric-focused facilities where the majority of children are treated. In our institution, two general hospitals with limited pediatric services, a dedicated initiative intended to reduce children's exposure to CT radiation was started by pediatric radiologists in 2005. The initiative addressed multiple issues including eliminating multiphase studies, decreasing inappropriate scans, educating referring providers, training residents and technologists, replacing CT with ultrasound or MRI, and ensuring availability of pediatric radiologists for consultation. During the study period, the total number of CT scans decreased by 24 %. When accounting for the number of scans per visit to the emergency department (ED), the numbers of abdominal and head CT scans decreased by 37.2 and 35.2 %, respectively. For abdominal scans, the average number of phases per scan decreased from 1.70 to 1.04. Upon surveying the pediatric ED staff, it was revealed that the most influential factors on ordering of scans were daily communication with pediatric radiologists, followed by journal articles and lectures by pediatric radiologists. We concluded that a non-pediatric-focused facility can achieve dramatic reduction in CT radiation exposure to children; however, this is most effectively achieved through a dedicated, multidisciplinary process led by pediatric radiologists. PMID:26263878

  10. Giant adrenal hemangioma: Unusual cause of huge abdominal mass

    PubMed Central

    Tarchouli, Mohamed; Boudhas, Adil; Ratbi, Moulay Brahim; Essarghini, Mohamed; Njoumi, Noureddine; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is an extremely rare benign and non-functioning neoplasm of the adrenal gland. We report a case of a 71-year-old woman admitted for intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distension associated with vomiting and chronic constipation for 5 years. Physical examination revealed a large abdominal mass. Both computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging suggested hemangioma in the right lobe of the liver. Laboratory examinations and tumour markers were within normal limits, except for hypochromic microcytic anemia. The mass was removed intact by conventional surgery and histopathology revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland with no signs of malignancy. Surgical resection was curative, with no recurrence at the 2-year follow-up. PMID:26600897

  11. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    PubMed Central

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy. PMID:27299142

  12. Added value of lung window in detecting drug mules on non-contrast abdominal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Vakilian, Fatemeh; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Pourghorban, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the added value of lung window in non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of suspected body packers or stuffers. Forty suspected drug mules who were referred to our tertiary toxicology center were included. The final diagnosis of drug mule was based on the detection of packs in stool examination or surgery. Non-contrast CT scans were retrospectively interpreted by two blinded radiologists in consensus before and after reviewing the lung window images. The diagnostic performance of abdominal window scans alone and scans in both abdominal and lung windows were subsequently compared. Seven body packers and 21 body stuffers were identified. The sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of scans in detection of drug mules (either drug packers or stuffers) raised from 60.7, 52.1, and 72.5 to 64.2, 54.5, and 75.0 %, respectively, with a more number of packs being detected (114 vs. 105 packs). In the body packers group, the diagnostic performance of both abdominal windows scans and combined abdominal and lung windows scans were 100 %. In the body stuffers group, the sensitivity, NPV, and diagnostic accuracy of scans increased from 47.6, 52.1, and 55.0 to 52.3, 54.5, and 57.5 %, respectively, after the addition of lung windows. Reviewing the lung window on non-contrast abdominal CT can be helpful in detection of drug mules. PMID:26830789

  13. [Abdominal gunshot wound: description of 86 cases in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, J; Masso-Misse, P; Essomba, A; Takongmo, S; Ngo-Nonga, B; Ngo-Nyeki, A R; Sosso, M; Malong, E

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal gunshot wound (AGSW) is a trauma emergency. The purpose of this report is to describe our experience with managing AGSW largely without modem investigational modalities. Data was collected retrospectively by reviewing the surgical reports and clinical charts of patients admitted to live hospitals dealing with AGSW over a 5-year period. Incomplete files and wounds not involving the abdomen were not included. A total of 86 files were analyzed. Patients ranged in age from 10 to 63 years ivith mean age of 32 years and a sex ratio of 5.5. Most patients (87%) underwent surgical exploration. Laboratory revealed no lesions in 22.5% of cases, minor lesions in 9.5% and major lesions justifying surgical repair in 68%. A total of 86 visceral lesions were found in the patients who underwent surgical exploration. The lesion involved the small intestine in 31.5% of case, colon in 24.5%, liver in 23.5%, spleen in 7%, stomach in 6%, and uterus in 2%. The kidney, pancreas, mesenteries, large momentum, and transverse mescaline each accounted for 1% of lesions. Conventional operative techniques were used with a mortality of 5.5% and morbidity of 4%. Based on our findings we conclude that when investigational tools (CT-scan, peritoneal lavage and laparoscopy) are unavailable prolonged watchful waiting increases the risk of mortality and morbidity in patients presenting AGSW associated with suspicious clinical signs. Prompt surgical treatment improves prognosis but is associated with a high rate of cases showing no lesions. PMID:16555515

  14. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  15. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-15

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved.

  16. Entrapped ovarian cyst. An unusual case of persistent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hederström, E; Forsberg, L

    1990-05-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain in the left fossa often mimicking attacks of subileus is described in a woman aged 48 with extensive adhesions caused by multiple surgical procedures. Repeated examinations with conventional abdominal radiography and barium meals were negative with regard to mechanical intestinal obstruction. A cystic lesion varying in size from 2 to 8 cm in diameter was seen adjacent to the left ovary on repeat US examinations and also on CT. Pain episodes were sometimes correlated to increasing size of the lesion which was finally thought to be either a peritoneal inclusion cyst (fluid trapped between pelvic adhesions) or, as was finally confirmed at surgery, a true ovarian cyst (corpus luteum cyst) similarly trapped. PMID:2201330

  17. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children. PMID:23902930

  18. Rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm after spine surgery in the patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Im, Jung Sik; Lim, Yun-Hee; Park, Jung Sun; Lee, Sang Seok; Kim, Kye-Min

    2010-06-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited disorder of the connective tissue that is characterized by hyperextensible skin, hypermobile joints and abnormalities of the cardiovascular system. A 15-year-old girl with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome underwent thoracolumbar surgery for deformity correction. After surgery, an abdominal aortic rupture occurred, and she complained of abdominal distension had an abdominal circumference of 80 cm. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a pseudoaneurysm and a large hematoma at the retroperitoneum. She died of a massive hemorrhage during subsequent abdominal aortic surgery. PMID:20589181

  19. Prospective evaluation of hand-held focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Sirois, Marco; Laupland, Kevin B.; Goldstein, Leanelle; Brown, David Ross; Simons, Richard K.; Dulchavsky, Scott; Boulanger, Bernard R.

    2005-01-01

    Background Ultrasonography (US) has become indispensable in assessing the status of the injured patient. Although hand-held US equipment is now commercially available and may expand the availability and speed of US in assessing the trauma patient, it has not been subjected to controlled evaluation in early trauma care. Methods A 2.4-kg hand-held (HH) US device was used to perform focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) on blunt trauma victims at 2 centres. Results were compared with the “truth” as determined through formal FAST examinations (FFAST), CT, operative findings and serial examination. The ability of HHFAST to detect free fluid, intra-abdominal injuries and injuries requiring therapeutic interventions was assessed. Results HHFAST was positive in 80% of 313 patients who needed surgery or angiography. HHFAST test performances (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios of positive and negative test results) were 77%, 99%, 96%, 94%, 95%, 95 and 0.2, respectively, for free fluid, and 64%, 99%, 96%, 89%, 90%, 74 and 0.4, respectively, for documented injuries. HHFAST missed or gave an indeterminate result in 8 (3%) of 270 patients with injuries who required therapeutic intervention and 25 (9%) of 270 patients who did not require intervention. FFAST performance was comparable. Conclusions HHFAST performed by clinicians detects intraperitoneal fluid with a high degree of accuracy. All FAST examinations are valuable tests when positive. They will miss some injuries, but the majority of the injuries missed do not require therapy. HHFAST provides an early extension of the physical examination but should be complemented by the selective use of CT, rather than formal repeat US. PMID:16417051

  20. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  1. Sterile abdominal abscess resulting from remnant laparoscopic clips after sigmoidectomy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Kawai, Ryosuke; Osawa, Takaaki; Kawakami, Jiro; Asano, Tomonari; Iwata, Yoshinori; Kurahashi, Shintaro; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-01

    The occurrence of intra-abdominal sterile abscesses due to remnant clips after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy is rare. Here, we report one such case in a 74-year-old woman. Two years after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, abdominal CT indicated an area of fluid accumulation approximately 5 cm in diameter and located in the middle of the abdominal cavity that contained a cluster of clips. Fine-needle aspiration of the fluid was performed through the wall of the sigmoid colon. The luminal fluid was found not to contain cancer cells on histological examination. After 1 year, abdominal surgery was performed. The abscess was located in the mesorectum at the anastomosis site; it was incised and a significant quantity of ivory-white viscous solution containing a cluster of clips was extracted. This case emphasizes the importance of reducing the number of clips used in laparoscopic surgery. PMID:25131325

  2. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Modern spiral scanners can perform the exam without stopping. A computer ...

  3. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  4. Familial aggregation of abdominal visceral fat level: results from the Quebec family study.

    PubMed

    Pérusse, L; Després, J P; Lemieux, S; Rice, T; Rao, D C; Bouchard, C

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of familial aggregation in abdominal visceral fat (AVF) level as assessed by computed tomography (CT). Four measures of abdominal adipose tissue, obtained from an abdominal scan between the fourth and fifth Lumbar vertebrae (L4-L5) taken in 366 adult subjects from 100 French-Canadian nuclear families, were considered in this study. Total abdominal fat, AVF, subcutaneous abdominal fat, obtained by computing the difference between total and AVF tissue areas, and the visceral to total abdominal fat ratio were measured. Spouses, parent-offspring, and sibling correlations were computed by maximum likelihood methods after adjustment of the four phenotypes for age and for age and total fat mass (FM) derived from underwater weighing. Significant familial aggregation was found for all phenotypes, whether adjusted or not for body FM. However, after adjustment of data for body FM, in addition to age, all spouse correlations became nonsignificant, suggesting that the familial aggregation of abdominal fat is primarily genetic. Heritability estimates reached 42% and 56% for subcutaneous fat and AVF, respectively. These results suggest that genetic factors are major determinants of the familial aggregation observed in the amount of abdominal fat, irrespective of total body fat content, and that AVF seems more influenced by genetic factors than abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. These findings imply that some individuals are more at risk than others to exhibit the various metabolic complications associated with upper-body obesity because of their inherited tendency to store abdominal fat in the visceral depot rather than in the subcutaneous depot. PMID:8606647

  5. Abdominal bloating: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, A Young; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  6. Abdominal pain with a twist

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Malrotation in children is due to either an incomplete or non-rotation of the foetal mid-gut during perinatal development. Presentation is usually in the first few weeks of life, often with life-threatening volvulus and ischaemia. However, it can be a rare cause of abdominal pain in older children and young adults. We present such a case, as a reminder to emergency physicians that malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or chronic abdominal pain not only in children but also in adolescents. PMID:21635723

  7. Ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M; Moosa, I; Hussein, F M; Qurttom, M A; Behbehani, A I

    1999-05-01

    Sonographic findings were retrospectively analysed in 39 patients with proven abdominal tuberculosis (TB). The patients were treated over 15 years at a major teaching hospital, Mubarak Al-Kabber Hospital, in Kuwait. The findings included clear or complex ascites with fine strands, loculations and debris. The other findings were lymphadenopathy, bowel wall thickening, omental mass, focal lesions in the liver and spleen and psoas abscess. The sonographic findings in abdominal TB are not specific but may give valuable information to prevent unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:10901897

  8. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  9. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  10. Unenhanced Computed Tomography to Visualize Hollow Viscera and/or Mesenteric Injury After Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xu-Yang; Wei, Ming-Tian; Jin, Cheng-Wu; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify and describe the major features of unenhanced computed tomography (CT) images of blunt hollow viscera and/or mesenteric injury (BHVI/MI) and to determine the value of unenhanced CT in the diagnosis of BHVI/MI. This retrospective study included 151 patients who underwent unenhanced CT before laparotomy for blunt abdominal trauma between January 2011 and December 2013. According to surgical observations, patients were classified as having BHVI/MI (n = 73) or not (n = 78). Sensitivity, specificity, P values, and likelihood ratios were calculated by comparing CT findings between the 2 groups. Six significant CT findings (P < 0.05) for BHVI/MI were identified and their sensitivity and specificity values determined, as follows: bowel wall thickening (39.7%, 96.2%), mesentery thickening (46.6%, 88.5%), mesenteric fat infiltration (12.3%, 98.7%), peritoneal fat infiltration (31.5%, 87.1%), parietal peritoneum thickening (30.1%, 85.9%), and intra- or retro-peritoneal air (34.2%, 96.2%). Unenhanced CT scan was useful as an initial assessment tool for BHVI/MI after blunt abdominal trauma. Six key features on CT were correlated with BHVI/MI. PMID:26945375

  11. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  12. A Traumatic Abdominal Wall Hernia Repair: A Laparoscopic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kenneth L.; Rosser, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Traumatic abdominal wall hernias from blunt trauma usually occur as a consequence of motor vehicle collisions where the force is tangential, sudden, and severe. Although rare, these hernias can go undetected due to preservation of the skin overlying the hernia defect. Open repairs can be challenging and unsuccessful due to avulsion of muscle directly from the iliac crest, with or without bone loss. A laparoscopic approach to traumatic abdominal wall hernia can aid in the delineation of the hernia and allow for a safe and effective repair. Case Description: A 36-year-old female was admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with a traumatic abdominal wall hernia located in the right flank near the iliac crest after being involved in a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen revealed the presence of an abdominal wall defect that was unapparent on physical examination. The traumatic abdominal wall hernia in the right flank was successfully repaired laparoscopically. One-year follow-up has shown no sign of recurrence. Discussion: A traumatic abdominal wall hernia rarely presents following blunt trauma, but should be suspected following a high-impact motor vehicle collision. Frequently, repair is complicated by the need to have fixation of mesh to bony landmarks (eg, iliac crest). In spite of this challenge, the laparoscopic approach with tension-free mesh repair of a traumatic abdominal wall hernia can be accomplished successfully using an approach similar to that taken for laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. PMID:23477181

  13. Evidence for the conformational rigidity of triplex d(C +T) 8-d(AG) 8·d(CT) 8 on silver electrode revealed by Fourier transform Raman scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ye; Bai, Chunli; Wang, Ting; Zhong, Faping; Tang, Youqi; Lin, S. B.; Kan, Lou-sing

    1996-03-01

    Fourier transform surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy (FT-SERS) has been first applied to characterize the triple stranded helix d(C +T) 8-d(AG) 8·d(CT) 8 (pH 4.5) (triplex) and its corresponding double-stranded helix d(AG) 8·d(CT) 8 (pH 7.0) (duplex) at an ex situ roughened silver electrode polarized at between 0.0 and -1.0 V vs. {Ag}/{AgCl}. The triplex adsorbed on the silver electrode yields five intense and one weak SERS bands located at 241, 839, 1189, 1293, 1643, and 1530 cm -1, respectively. These bands are not seen in the FT-SERS spectrum of the duplex, which showed a pattern similar to that of an oligo-DNA duplex observed by Koglin and Sequaries (Top. Curr. Chem., 134 (1989) 1). In the case of the triplex, the occurrence of the 839 cm -1 band with concomitant disappearance of the adsorbed adenine ring-breathing band at 734 cm -1 of the duplex indicates that the helical structure of the triplex near the surface of the silver electrode is well preserved and exhibits conformational rigidity. We observed a desorption process of the triplex from the silver electrode when the electrode approached -0.9 V (potential of zero charge of the triplex) vs. {Ag}/{AgCl}. This indicates that the highly negatively charged triplex shows a more favorable absorption on a highly positively charged silver surface. The structure of the triplex has also been studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. The vibrational spectra obtained clearly revealed that the conformation of the sugar moiety of the purine strand and one pyrimidine strand in the triplex is C 2'-endo/anti, whereas that of the other pyrimidine strand is C 3'-endo/anti.

  14. Uncontrollable intra-abdominal bleeding necessitating low anterior resection of the rectum after stapled hemorrhoidopexy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Blouhos, Konstantinos; Vasiliadis, Konstantinos; Tsalis, Konstantinos; Botsios, Dimitrios; Vrakas, Xenos

    2007-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) has become a widely accepted surgical procedure for hemorrhoids; however, one of the most serious complications of this technique is severe bleeding. We report a case of extensive hemoperitoneum after SH for third-degree hemorrhoids. On postoperative day (POD) 1, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain and clinical signs of peritonitis soon became evident. Computed tomography (CT) showed blood in the abdomen. We performed an emergency exploratory laparotomy, which revealed extensive hemoperitoneum, and a devitalized, edematous rectum with a tense hematoma, approximately 1 cm above the staple line and extending up to the level of the peritoneal reflection. We also found a small seromuscular laceration in the anterior aspect of the rectum just above the peritoneal reflection. This small laceration was bleeding actively. Thus, we performed a low anterior resection and the patient was discharged from hospital 10 days later. We report this case to raise awareness of the possibility of life-threatening intra-abdominal complications without evidence of typical rectal bleeding. PMID:17342370

  15. [A Case in Which a Patient Was Operated for Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors after Total Colectomy in FAP].

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Minako; Ikeda, Kimimasa; Higashiguchi, Kimiya; Kobayashi, Teruyuki; Sakai, Kenji; Koyama, Taichi; Doi, Takasi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Murakami, Masakazu; Kurokawa, Eiji; Nakamichi, Itsuko

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 22-year-old woman with FAP, who had undergone laparoscopic total colectomy 3 years previously. She presented to our hospital with a high fever and abdominal pain. Large hard tumors were palpated in the right lower abdomen and pelvis. Blood examination showed an inflammatory response. CT scan revealed 17 cm diameter solid tumors. At surgery, 2 tumors arising from the mesentery of the small intestine were found, neither of which invaded any organs. We performed tumor extirpation with partial resection of the duodenum, ileum, right fallopian tube and rectum. A jejunal stoma was formed, leaving a length of remnant intestine of about 120 cm. The histopathological diagnosis was given as desmoid tumor with infection. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 9th postoperative day. Desmoid tumor is the second most common cause of death in FAP patients. Although desmoids can also occur in the extremities, most FAP patients develop intra-abdominal tumors. Despite being histologically benign, they are locally infiltrative and can cause death through invasion and destruction of adjacent vital structures and organs. Here, we report a case of desmoid tumors with FAP with reference to the literature. PMID:26805225

  16. The effect of abdominal fat parameters on percutaneous nephrolithotomy success

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Ozgur; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cimen, Sertac; Ekin, Rahmi Gokhan; Akarken, Ilker; Oztekin, Ozgur; Can, Ertan; Suelozgen, Tufan; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Obesity has been suggested to lower the success of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, the relationship between abdominal fat parameters, such as visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, and PCNL success remained unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of abdominal fat parameters on PCNL success. Methods: A total of 150 patients who underwent PCNL were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Group 1 consisted of patients who had no residual stones or residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter while group 2 included patients with residual stone fragments ≥3 mm. PCNL procedure was defined as successful if all stones were eliminated or if there were residual stone fragments <3 mm in diameter confirmed by non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT) performed postoperatively. Preoperative NCCT was used to determine abdominal fat parameters. Results: Group 1 consisted of 117 (78.0%) patients while group 2 included 33 (22.0%) patients. On univariate analysis, stone number, stone surface area (SSA), visceral fat area (VFA), abdominal circumference on computerized tomography (ACCT), and duration of procedure were found to be predictive factors affecting PCNL success. Logistic regression analysis revealed that ACCT and SSA were independent prognostic factors for PCNL success. Conclusions: PCNL success was not affected by VFA, subcutaneous fat area (SFA) and body mass index (BMI) in our series. However, ACCT and SSA had negative associations with PCNL success. We conclude that both ACCT and SSA can be used as tools for predicting PCNL outcomes. PMID:27330587

  17. INFLAMMATORY ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM--A FORM OF CHRONIC PERIAORTITIS.

    PubMed

    Pop, Corina; Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Jantea, Petruţa; Tomescu, Alina; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2015-01-01

    Chronic periaortitis represents a unique pathogenic concept for three entities: Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Idiopathic Retroperitoneal Fibrosis and Perianeurysmal Retroperitoneal Fibrosis. The fundamental meaning of an inflammatory reaction to advanced atherosclerosis has been developed on the bottom of clinical and histological features. The triad of abdominal pain, weight loss and elevated inflammatory markers: erythrocyte sedimentation rate/C-reactive protein in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms revealed on contrast-enhanced computer tomography is highly suggestive for inflammatory aneurysm. We report a case of a heavy-smoker adult male presented with suddenly abdominal symptoms suggestive for mesenteric ischemia which have proved to be due to inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm. The most favorable management of patients with inflammatory aneurysm is ambiguous. Surgical approach seems reasonable even supposing inflammatory aneurysm emerges less likely to rupture than the atherosclerotic variant. Corticosteroids are used in inoperable inflammatory aneurysm, even if is well known that this treatment does not change the long-term outcome of the disease. Surgical-open or Endovascular Repair of the aneurysm is the elective treatment. PMID:26793850

  18. Investigation of optimal feature value set in false positive reduction process for automated abdominal lymph node detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an investigation of optimal feature value set in false positive reduction process for the automated method of enlarged abdominal lymph node detection. We have developed the automated abdominal lymph node detection method to aid for surgical planning. Because it is important to understand the location and the structure of an enlarged lymph node in order to make a suitable surgical plan. However, our previous method was not able to obtain the suitable feature value set. This method was able to detect 71.6% of the lymph nodes with 12.5 FPs per case. In this paper, we investigate the optimal feature value set in the false positive reduction process to improve the method for automated abdominal lymph node detection. By applying our improved method by using the optimal feature value set to 28 cases of abdominal 3D CT images, we detected about 74.7% of the abdominal lymph nodes with 11.8 FPs/case.

  19. Co-incidence of acute appendicitis and appendiceal transection after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, Sam; Forootan, Hamid Reza; Tahamtan, Maryam

    2013-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy with a history of bicycle handlebar injury to the left side of his abdomen was brought to the Emergency Department of our center. On admission, his vital signs were stable and abdominal examination revealed ecchymosis and tenderness of the injured areas. Mild to moderate free fluid and two small foci of free air in the anterior aspect of the abdomen, in favor of pneumoperitoneum, were detected in abdominopelvic sonography and CT-scan, respectively. In less than 6 hours, the patient developed generalized peritonitis. Therefore, exploratory laparotomy was promptly performed, which revealed appendiceal transection and rupture of the small bowel mesentery. Appendectomy and small bowel mesoplasty were done, with pathological diagnosis of acute appendicitis and periappendicitis. After surgery, the patient had a non-complicated hospital course. This rare case highlights the significance of the early management of appendiceal traumatic injuries in order to prevent further complicated events, especially in patients who are much more exposed to this risk due to their traumatic background. PMID:24293790

  20. An Unusual Case of Ascending Pancreatitis with Mediastinal Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare, Ernesto; Di Sibio, Alessandra; Gennarelli, Antonio; Felli, Valentina; Vellucci, Valentina; Casazza, Ines; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Fluid collections are common findings of pancreatitis and spread, more often, along preferential drainage pathways in the abdomen. In some rare cases, fluid collections may spread towards extra-abdominal sites like the mediastinum leading to the formation of mediastinal collections. We present the case of a 52-years-old man with pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen and mid-epigastrium lasting for some hours. Laboratory tests suggested a diagnosis of pancreatitis. CT and subsequent MRI revealed changes consistent with acute exacerbation on chronic pancreatitis spreading to the mediastinum and to the greater omentum. The patient received medical treatment and reported gradual improvement in his laboratory results and CT findings. PMID:24955277

  1. Patient doses from CT examinations in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ataç, Gökçe Kaan; Parmaksız, Aydın; İnal, Tolga; Bulur, Emine; Bulgurlu, Figen; Öncü, Tolga; Gündoğdu, Sadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to establish the first diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for computed tomography (CT) examinations in adult and pediatric patients in Turkey and compare these with international DRLs. METHODS CT performance information and examination parameters (for head, chest, high-resolution CT of the chest [HRCT-chest], abdominal, and pelvic protocols) from 1607 hospitals were collected via a survey. Dose length products and effective doses for standard patient sizes were calculated from the reported volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). RESULTS The median number of protocols reported from the 167 responding hospitals (10% response rate) was 102 across five different age groups. Third quartile CTDIvol values for adult pelvic and all pediatric body protocols were higher than the European Commission standards but were comparable to studies conducted in other countries. CONCLUSION The radiation dose indicators for adult patients were similar to those reported in the literature, except for those associated with head protocols. CT protocol optimization is necessary for adult head and pediatric chest, HRCT-chest, abdominal, and pelvic protocols. The findings from this study are recommended for use as national DRLs in Turkey. PMID:26133189

  2. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  3. Coronary vasospasm during CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Toyama, Takuji; Tsushima, Yoshito; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    A 71-year-old man, a heavy smoker, was admitted for evaluation of "chest oppression" after every dinner. Cardiac CT with a beta-blocker showed coronary stenosis in the left circumflex. Although adenosine triphosphate-stress perfusion single-photon emission CT revealed no ischemia, Holter electrocardiography belatedly indicated an ST elevation associated with his symptoms while smoking. He was diagnosed to have vasospastic angina. Cardiac CT without a beta-blocker showed thin diffuse plaque and negative remolding without any significant stenosis at the same site. Asian patients have a tendency to develop vasospastic angina. Although beta-blockers are recommended for cardiac CT, the routine administration of beta-blockers in cardiac CT may have some risk for such cases. PMID:25065860

  4. An unusual duplication of the inferior vena cava in a patient with endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Szubert, Wojciech; Topol, Mirosław; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Caucasian male, with sensation of abdominal pulsation was admitted to our hospital. In multidetector 64-row computed tomography (CT) angiography, an abdominal aortic aneurysm was observed. Endovascular aortic repair was performed. Control CT confirmed prosperity with stent graft fixation and absence of any vascular complications. Investigation also showed asymmetrical duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Right (RIVC) and left (LIVC) inferior vena cava arose from the confluence of the right and left iliac veins. The LIVC continued as left renal vein. PMID:26429190

  5. Lymphangiogenesis and Angiogenesis in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Masaki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Sakabe, Junichi; Ogawa, Mikako; Baba, Satoshi; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroki; Inuzuka, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Naoto; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sato, Kohji; Konno, Hiroyuki; Unno, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized to be inflammation-associated degeneration of vascular wall. Neovascularization is regularly found in human AAA and considered to play critical roles in the development and rupture of AAA. However, little is known about lymphangiogenesis in AAA. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in AAA. Abdominal aortic tissue was harvested either from autopsy (control group) and during open-repair surgery for AAA (AAA group). Adventitial lymphatic vasa vasorum was observed in both groups, but seemed to be no significant morphological changes in AAA. Immunohistochemical studies identified infiltration of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE) −1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9-positive macrophages and podoplanin and Prox-1-positive microvessels in the intima/media in AAA wall, where hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF)-1α was expressed. VEGF-C and MMP-9 were not expressed in macrophages infiltrating in the adventitia. Intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence lymphography revealed lymph stasis in intima/medial in AAA. Fluorescence microscopy of the collected samples also confirmed the accumulation of lymph in the intima/media but not in adventitia. These results demonstrate that infiltration of macrophages in intima/media is associated with lymphangiogenesis and angiogenesis in AAA. Lymph-drainage appeared to be insufficient in the AAA wall. PMID:24651519

  6. Molecular Imaging of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Aneesh K.; Hamilton, Mark; Joshi, Rucha V.; Kline, Benjamin P.; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Goergen, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Current laboratory research in the field of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease often utilizes small animal experimental models induced by genetic manipulation or chemical application. This has led to the use and development of multiple high-resolution molecular imaging modalities capable of tracking disease progression, quantifying the role of inflammation, and evaluating the effects of potential therapeutics. In vivo imaging reduces the number of research animals used, provides molecular and cellular information, and allows for longitudinal studies, a necessity when tracking vessel expansion in a single animal. This review outlines developments of both established and emerging molecular imaging techniques used to study AAA disease. Beyond the typical modalities used for anatomical imaging, which include ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), previous molecular imaging efforts have used magnetic resonance (MR), near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF), bioluminescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Mouse and rat AAA models will hopefully provide insight into potential disease mechanisms, and the development of advanced molecular imaging techniques, if clinically useful, may have translational potential. These efforts could help improve the management of aneurysms and better evaluate the therapeutic potential of new treatments for human AAA disease. PMID:23737735

  7. Assessment of sub-milli-sievert abdominal computed tomography with iterative reconstruction techniques of different vendors

    PubMed Central

    Padole, Atul; Sainani, Nisha; Lira, Diego; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess diagnostic image quality of reduced dose (RD) abdominal computed tomography (CT) with 9 iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) from 4 different vendors to the standard of care (SD) CT. METHODS: In an Institutional Review Board approved study, 66 patients (mean age 60 ± 13 years, 44 men, and 22 women) undergoing routine abdomen CT on multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners from vendors A, B, and C (≥ 64 row CT scanners) (22 patients each) gave written informed consent for acquisition of an additional RD CT series. Sinogram data of RD CT was reconstructed with two vendor-specific and a vendor-neutral IRTs (A-1, A-2, A-3; B-1, B-2, B-3; and C-1, C-2, C-3) and SD CT series with filtered back projection. Subjective image evaluation was performed by two radiologists for each SD and RD CT series blinded and independently. All RD CT series (198) were assessed first followed by SD CT series (66). Objective image noise was measured for SD and RD CT series. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank, kappa, and analysis of variance tests. RESULTS: There were 13/50, 18/57 and 9/40 missed lesions (size 2-7 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Missed lesions includes liver cysts, kidney cysts and stone, gall stone, fatty liver, and pancreatitis. There were also 5, 4, and 4 pseudo lesions (size 2-3 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Lesions conspicuity was sufficient for clinical diagnostic performance for 6/24 (RD-A-1), 10/24 (RD-A-2), and 7/24 (RD-A-3) lesions for vendor A; 5/26 (RD-B-1), 6/26 (RD-B-2), and 7/26 (RD-B-3) lesions for vendor B; and 4/20 (RD-C-1) 6/20 (RD-C-2), and 10/20 (RD-C-3) lesions for vendor C (P = 0.9). Mean objective image noise in liver was significantly lower for RD A-1 compared to both RD A-2 and RD A-3 images (P < 0.001). Similarly, mean objective image noise lower for RD B-2 (compared to RD B-1, RD B-3) and RD C-3 (compared to RD C-1 and C-2) (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Regardless of IRTs and MDCT vendors

  8. [Omental infarction: CT findings (case report)].

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Seçil; Atasoy, Cetin; Yağci, Cemil; Akyar, Serdar

    2004-06-01

    Omental infarction, the end result of impaired perfusion of the greater omentum, is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. Because its clinical symptoms are nonspecific, it is usually confused with more common conditions such as appendicitis or cholecystitis. Consequently, the diagnosis is generally made intraoperatively. However, computed tomography shows characteristic findings and allows a reliable preoperative diagnosis, preventing unnecessary laparotomy. We report two cases of omental infarction, and describe typical CT findings of this rare entitiy. PMID:15236134

  9. Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, Pierre Otal, Philippe; Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice; Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve

    2007-06-15

    Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

  10. Paget sarcoma of the pelvic bone with widespread metastatic disease on radiography, CT, MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael A; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Thompson, Rebecca B; Avery, Ryan J; Taljanovic, Mihra S

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of Paget sarcoma of the left superior pubic ramus and disseminated metastatic disease in a 70-year-old man. Paget disease of the left hemipelvis with malignant degeneration in the region of the left superior pubic ramus was initially diagnosed on radiographs. Subsequent CT, MRI, PET/CT imaging, and CT-guided biopsy confirmed the diagnosis and showed extensive left-sided pelvic and abdominal lymphadenopathy with widespread metastatic disease to liver, spleen, and lungs. PMID:24566398

  11. The Accuracy of Urinalysis in Predicting Intra-Abdominal Injury Following Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Shirvani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of blunt abdominal traumas, predicting the possible intra-abdominal injuries is still a challenge for the physicians involved with these patients. Therefore, this study was designed, to evaluate the accuracy of urinalysis in predicting intra-abdominal injuries. Methods: Patients aged 15 to 65 years with blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted to emergency departments were enrolled. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous contrast and urinalysis were requested for all the included patients. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, the results of urinalysis, and the results of abdominopelvic CT scan were gathered. Finally, the correlation between the results of abdominopelvic CT scan, and urinalysis was determined. Urinalysis was considered positive in case of at least one positive value in gross appearance, blood in dipstick, or red blood cell count. Results: 325 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to the emergency departments (83% male with the mean age of 32.63±17.48 years). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of urinalysis, were 77.9% (95% CI: 69.6-84.4), 58.5% (95% CI: 51.2-65.5), 56% (95% CI: 48.5-63.3), 79.6% (95% CI: 71.8-85.7), 1.27% (95% CI: 1.30-1.57), and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.18-0.36), respectively. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of urinalysis in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-abdominal injuries is low and it seems that it should be considered as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, in conjunction with other sources such as clinical findings and imaging. PMID:26862543

  12. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  13. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:27075018

  14. Multiple giant intra abdominal lipomas: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Ashok Y.; Nangare, Nitin R.; Gupta, Vaibhav; Vekariya, Mayank A.; Patankar, Ritvij; Mahna, Abhishek; Wader, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Solitary or multiple lipomas, composed of mature fat, represents by far the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm occurring throughout the whole body, but they rarely originate in the intestinal mesentery. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old male presented with left sided abdominal distension and pain since 4 months, ultrasonography and computerized tomography abdomen was suggestive of multiple well-defined fat density lesions in the lower abdomen and pelvis. USG guided fine needle aspiration cytology was conclusive of a spindle cell lesion. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and multiple major fat tissue swellings were excised. Histopathology confirmed it to be spindle cell type of lipoma. DISCUSSION Because of the silent nature the exact prevalence of lipomas is unknown. It can arise in any location in which fat is normally present, reported intra abdominal lipomas have been very rare. Clinical manifestations depend on the size and location of the growth. In most patients, symptoms are few or absent. USG and CT scan abdomen are used for the diagnosis. Complete surgical excision being the only treatment. CONCLUSION Intra abdominal lipoma is a very rare entity, and many cases might be ignored due to their silent nature. They might or might not present with any symptoms. Complete surgical excision being the only treatment, with a very good prognosis. PMID:24862028

  15. Pathologic aerophagia: a rare cause of chronic abdominal distension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Cestari, Ana Beatriz C.S.S.; da Silva, Orli Carvalho; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Firme, Livia Honorato

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adolescent with pathologic aerophagia, a rare condition caused by excessive and inappropriate swallowing of air and to review its treatment and differential diagnoses. Case description: An 11-year-old mentally impaired blind girl presenting serious behavior problems and severe developmental delay with abdominal distension from the last 8 months. Her past history included a Nissen fundoplication. Abdominal CT and abdominal radiographs showed diffuse gas distension of the small bowel and colon. Hirschsprung's disease was excluded. The distention was minimal at the moment the child awoke and maximal at evening, and persisted after control of constipation. Audible repetitive and frequent movements of air swallowing were observed. The diagnosis of pathologic aerophagia associated to obsessive-compulsive disorder and developmental delay was made, but pharmacological treatment was unsuccessful. The patient was submitted to an endoscopic gastrostomy, permanently opened and elevated relative to the stomach. The distention was resolved, while maintaining oral nutrition. Comments: Pathologic aerophagia is a rare self-limiting condition in normal children exposed to high levels of stress and may be a persisting problem in children with psychiatric or neurologic disease. In this last group, the disease may cause serious complications. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments are ill-defined. Severe cases may demand surgical strategies, mainly decompressive gastrostomy. PMID:26100594

  16. Principles of CT and CT technology.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lee W

    2007-09-01

    This article provides a review of the basic principles of CT within the context of the evolution of CT. Modern CT technology can be understood as a natural progression of improvements and innovations in response to both engineering problems and clinical requirements. Detailed discussions of multislice CT, CT image quality evaluation, and radiation doses in CT will be presented in upcoming articles in this series. PMID:17823453

  17. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  18. Thoracic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... table that slides into the center of the scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. ... than 300 pounds, have your doctor contact the scanner operator before the exam. CT scanners have a ...

  19. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  20. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated. PMID:15219082

  1. Significance of bacterial flora in abdominal irradiation-induced inhibition of lung metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1988-06-01

    We have previously reported that abdominal irradiation prior to i.v. injection of syngeneic tumor cells reduced metastases in lung. Our report described an investigation of the significance of intestinal organisms in the radiation effect. We found that eliminating intestinal organisms with antibiotics totally abolished the radiation effect. Monoassociation of germ-free mice revealed that the radiation effect was observable only for Enterobacter cloacae, never for Streptococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium adlesentis, or Escherichia coli. After abdominal irradiation of regular mice, E. cloacae multiplied in cecal contents, adhered to mucous membranes, invaded the cecal wall, and translocated to mesenteric lymph nodes. Intravenous administration of E. cloacae in place of abdominal irradiation inhibited metastases. E. cloacae-monoassociated mice developed fewer metastases than germ-free mice, and the reduction was further enhanced by abdominal irradiation. We concluded that abdominal irradiation caused the invasion of E. cloacae from the mucous membrane of the intestine and inhibited formation of lung metastases.

  2. Eccrine Porocarcinoma presenting as an abdominal wall mass in a patient with ulcerative colitis—A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Narendrasinh; Mohamed, Mohamed; Elmoghrabi, Adel; McCann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Eccrine porocarcinoma (EPC) is a rare malignancy of eccrine sweat glands. It is often seen during the sixth to eighth decades of life. We report the first case of eccrine porocarcinoma arising on the abdomen of a 21-year-old patient with ulcerative colitis. Case presentation A 21-Year-old female presented to emergency department with a one month history of an enlarging mass over left lower abdomen. Abdominal examination revealed a slightly erythematous, nodular and non-mobile firm mass in left lower quadrant. There was superficial ulceration with slight serous discharge. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis with contrast revealed a superficial cystic lesion over the anterior abdominal wall, provisionally diagnosed as sebaceous cyst. Incision and drainage were performed and on follow-up, no signs of healing were observed and the patient subsequently underwent surgical excision. Histopathological examination revealed an eccrine porocarcinoma. Discussion EPC is a rare and aggressive tumor. It may occur de novo or as a result of malignant transformation of an eccrine poroma. A long period of clinical history is often encountered. It usually occurs on the lower extremities followed by the, trunk, head and neck, and upper extremities. The clinical picture usually consists of a painless nodule or papule. Treatment is wide local excision. No strong evidence exists for adjuvant therapy. The risk of local recurrence is about 20%. Conclusion High index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of EPC. Early diagnosis is achieved by histopathological examination and early definitive surgical excision leads to excellent results. PMID:27085107

  3. A Mimic of Intra-abdominal Malignancy: Physiological Urinary Excretion of FDG in the Rare Adult Vesicourachal Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Te-Chun; Sun, Shung-Shung; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Wu, Yu-Chin; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Urachal remnant anomalies are rare, and vesicourachal diverticulum is the most uncommon subtype of these anomalies. We present such a rare case of vesicourachal diverticulum that is incidentally discovered during the staging surveillance of a known esophageal cancer with F-FDG PET/CT. The physiological urinary excretion of radiopharmaceutical in the vesicourachal diverticulum mimics intra-abdominal malignancy, which resolves spontaneously in the follow-up FDG PET/CT. PMID:26825197

  4. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  5. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  6. [Development of real-time CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Katada, K; Anno, H; Takeshita, G; Ogura, Y; Koga, S; Ida, Y; Nonomura, K; Kanno, T; Ohashi, A; Sata, S

    1994-10-25

    A new CT system that permits real-time monitoring of CT images was developed. Phantom and volunteer studies revealed that the images were displayed at a rate of six per second with a delay time of 0.83 second with clinically sufficient resolution (256 x 256) using the newly developed fast image processor and partial-reconstruction algorithm. The clinical trial of stereotactic aspiration of intracerebral hematoma was successful. The initial trial with CT fluoroscopy revealed potential usefulness of the system in biopsy and other CT-guided interventions. PMID:9261196

  7. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  8. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  9. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  10. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  11. [CT fluoroscopy].

    PubMed

    Rogalla, P; Juran, R

    2004-07-01

    Percutaneous biopsy of pulmonary nodules requires precise needle placement, with the goal of attaining a secure position of the needle for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes as quickly as possible and with minimal tissue damage along the access route. The requirements from the image guidance system during the intervention are, in addition to universal applicability, a quick reaction time and a user-friendly interface. CT fluoroscopy fulfils these requirements, although radiation protection for the patient and radiologist becomes an important issue. PMID:15232690

  12. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis: PET/CT for initial workup and treatment response evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Neil J; Hankins, Jordan H

    2015-02-01

    A 40-year-old man underwent pan-endoscopy owing to abdominal pain. Biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract demonstrated diffuse Langerhans cell histiocytosis. PET/CT was done, with CT demonstrating classic pulmonary manifestations of Langerhans cell histiocytosis that had association with intense FDG uptake on PET. Bowel appeared normal. Treatment was initiated with smoking cessation and 6 cycles of cytarabine. Follow-up PET/CT after initial treatment demonstrated improvement of parenchymal abnormalities seen on CT, with resolution of hypermetabolic activity. Maintenance chemotherapy was initiated. PET/CT is increasingly being used for initial staging and treatment response assessment in this rare disorder. PMID:24999688

  13. MR Evaluation of the Nontraumatic Acute Abdomen with CT Correlation.

    PubMed

    Bannas, Peter; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sectional imaging plays a crucial role in the triage of patients with acute abdominal pain. Ionizing radiation exposure is a recognized drawback of computed tomography (CT), the primary imaging technique. MR imaging is a promising alternative to CT; it provides excellent image quality with high-contrast resolution without the disadvantages of ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast. This article provides a basic overview of the typical MR findings of the most frequent disease entities encountered in the setting of the nontraumatic acute abdomen, including direct comparison with CT findings to familiarize the readers with these same findings on MR. PMID:26526441

  14. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  15. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Vikas; Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  16. Urinary Bladder Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to the Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case with Cytohistologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Mithra

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma metastatic to the abdominal wall in a 71-year-old man with a history of primary bladder adenocarcinoma. CT-guided core biopsy was performed; imprints and histologic sections showed malignant glands lined by tumor cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli, infiltrating through skeletal muscle. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for CK7, membranous/cytoplasmic β-catenin, caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2 (CDX2), and α-methylacyl coenzyme A racemase and negativity for CK20, p63, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP). These findings were interpreted as metastatic adenocarcinoma, consistent with bladder primary. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy arising within glandular metaplasia and is associated with cystitis cystica and cystitis glandularis. Predisposing factors include bladder exstrophy, schistosomiasis, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation. This tumor is divided into intestinal, clear cell, and signet ring cell subtypes. Treatment involves radical cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection, and prognosis is unfavorable. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma should be differentiated from urachal adenocarcinoma, which arises from urachal remnants near the bladder dome, and secondary adenocarcinoma, or vesical involvement by adenocarcinoma from a different primary. CK7, CK20, CDX2, thrombomodulin, and β-catenin can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from colonic adenocarcinoma; PSA and PSAP can help distinguish primary bladder adenocarcinoma from prostate adenocarcinoma. PMID:27006847

  17. ABDOMINAL SUBCUTANEOUS ADIPOSE TISSUE (SAT) AND VICERAL ADIPOSE TISSUE (VAT) MEASUREMENTS IN HIV+ ADULTS: INFLUENCES OF MEASUREMENT SITE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of SAT and an increase in VAT are common with HIV lipodystrophy. Excess abdominal VAT is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Computerized axial tomography (CT) can be used to measure SAT and VAT areas in cross-sectional images of the abdomen. The ideal site(s) and number of abdomina...

  18. Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine: Impact of a Simple Educational Intervention on Appropriate Abdominal Imaging at a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Matthew F.; Agan, Donna L.; Liu, Yang; Johnson, John O.; Shaw, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising costs pose a major threat to US health care. Residency programs are being asked to teach residents how to provide cost-conscious medical care. Methods An educational intervention incorporating the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria with lectures on cost-consciousness and on the actual hospital charges for abdominal imaging was implemented for residents at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, CA. We hypothesized that residents would order fewer abdominal imaging examinations for patients with complaints of abdominal pain after the intervention. We analyzed the type and number of abdominal imaging studies completed for patients admitted to the inpatient teaching service with primary abdominal complaints for 18 months before (738 patients) and 12 months following the intervention (632 patients). Results There was a significant reduction in mean abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans per patient (1.7–1.4 studies per patient, P < .001) and total abdominal radiology studies per patient (3.1–2.7 studies per patient, P  =  .02) following the intervention. The avoidance of charges solely due to the reduction in abdominal CT scans following the intervention was $129 per patient or $81,528 in total. Conclusions A simple educational intervention appeared to change the radiologic test-ordering behavior of internal medicine residents. Widespread adoption of similar interventions by residency programs could result in significant savings for the health care system. PMID:24404274

  19. Rare presentation of multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoyan; Zou, Yang; Yin, Chenghong

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid disease, which is also known as cystic echinococcosis, is a zoonotic infection caused by the cestode tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus and rarely by Echinococcus multilocularis. In this report we describe an unusual case of a 19-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography revealed multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis. The patient recovered after undergoing surgery to excise the cyst. The diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and prevention in this case of multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis are discussed, in light of the relevant literature. PMID:26617932

  20. Large abdominal photopenic area on 99mTc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Jennifer; Spaulding, John; Zack, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    (99m)Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging is frequently performed in conjunction with exercise or pharmacologic stress testing for evaluation of coronary heart disease. Interpretation of these studies includes systematic review of unprocessed rotating projectional images for evaluation of cardiac size as well as the presence of motion or attenuation artifacts. Occasionally, incidental noncardiac findings are detected on review of the projectional images. We report a case of a patient with a history of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who was found to have a large abdominal photopenic area on the projectional images. The photopenic area corresponded to the location of large intraabdominal cysts on abdominal CT and was consistent with hepatic cysts associated with the patient's known polycystic kidney disease. We review the differential diagnosis of large abdominal photopenic regions identified on myocardial projectional images and the importance of routinely analyzing these images for incidental noncardiac findings. PMID:22997275

  1. Delayed presentation of a sigmoid colon injury following blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The low incidence of colon injury due to blunt abdominal trauma and the lack of a definitive diagnostic method for the same can lead to delays in diagnosis and treatment, subsequently resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Case presentation A 66-year-old woman with sigmoid colon injury was admitted to our emergency department after sustaining blunt abdominal trauma. Her physical examination findings and laboratory results led to a decision to perform a laparotomy; exploration revealed a sigmoid colon injury that was treated by sigmoid loop colostomy. Conclusions Surgical abdominal exploration revealed gross fecal contamination and a perforation site. Intra-abdominal irrigation and a sigmoid loop colostomy were performed. Our patient was discharged on post-operative day six without any problems. Closure of the sigmoid loop colostomy was performed three months after the initial surgery. PMID:22905731

  2. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-M, E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Dies, P.

    2010-12-07

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at ''Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez'' in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}), the volumetric dose index (C{sub vol}) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the C{sub w}(31.1 mGy) and C{sub vol}(11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for C{sub w} and 5.5 mGy for C{sub vol}. However, this protocol presented the highest value for P{sub KL,CT}(282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  3. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-M, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at "Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez" in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (Cw), the volumetric dose index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the Cw (31.1 mGy) and Cvol (11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for Cw and 5.5 mGy for Cvol. However, this protocol presented the highest value for PKL,CT (282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  4. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J

    1993-06-01

    The growing popularity of nonoperative treatment of children with splenic injuries has seduced some physicians into a false sense of security regarding care of the injured child. Although it has been established that hemodynamically stable children with splenic, hepatic, and even renal injuries can safely be treated "expectantly," this concept cannot be applied indiscriminately. Accurate diagnosis and effective care of the child with blunt abdominal trauma is an exercise of clinical precision that demands attention to detail and thorough evaluation. This review addresses this process in light of recent advances in diagnostic imaging and in consideration of recent reports analyzing different protocols for therapeutic decision making. PMID:8374651

  5. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  6. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  7. Hollow organ abdominal ischemia, part II: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Mazzariol, Fernanda S; Kaul, Bindu; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Stein, Marjorie W; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2016-01-01

    Acute hollow organ ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and almost always requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, ischemia is commonly due to low flow states but can also be due to arterial and venous occlusion. Radiologic diagnosis is critical as many present with nonspecific symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred in suspected appendicitis in pregnant patients and is superior in biliary necrosis. This article provides a pictorial review of the CT/MRI features of hollow abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, pathogenesis, and management. PMID:27317221

  8. Endovascular repair of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta secondary to translumbar aortography.

    PubMed

    Mir, Naheed; De Nunzio, Mario; Pollock, John G

    2006-01-01

    This report describes an incidental finding of a pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta on a computed tomography (CT) renal angiogram during investigation of chronic renal failure in a 73-year-old man. The patient had undergone a translumbar aortogram 20 years previously. An increase in the size of the aneurysm by 7 mm over 6 months prompted treatment and the aneurysm underwent successful endovascular repair with a custom-made stent-graft. PMID:16184323

  9. Abdominal wall reconstruction with implantable meshes.

    PubMed

    Masden, Derek; Felder, John M; Iorio, Matthew L; Bhanot, Parag; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects present a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Over the years, numerous implantable materials have becomes available to aid the surgeon in recreating the abdominal wall. This spectrum of implants includes permanent synthetic meshes, absorbable meshes, composite meshes and biomaterials. This review includes the pros and cons for the commercially available abdominal wall implants as well as a review of the literature regarding outcomes for each material. This review will provide the surgeon with current evidence-based information on implantable abdominal materials to be able to make a more informed decision about which implant to use. PMID:21663579

  10. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:22882988

  11. The role of computed tomography in evaluating body composition and the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gibson, D J; Burden, S T; Strauss, B J; Todd, C; Lal, S

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that there were 3.45 million new cases and 1.75 million deaths from cancer in Europe in 2012. Colorectal cancer was one of the most common cancers, accounting for 13% of new cases and 12.2% of all deaths. Conditions causing reduced muscle mass, such as sarcopenia, can increase the morbidity and mortality of people with cancer. Computed tomography (CT) scans can provide accurate, high-quality information on body composition, including muscle mass. To date, there has been no systematic review on the role of CT scans in identifying sarcopenia in abdominal cancer. This review aimed to examine the role of CT scans in determining the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal cancer. A systematic review of English-language articles published in 2000 or later was conducted. Articles included cohort, randomised controlled trials and validation studies. Participants were people diagnosed with abdominal cancer who had undergone a CT scan. Data extraction and critical appraisal were undertaken. Ten cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies demonstrated that low muscle mass was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome, with six specifically demonstrating reduced survival rates. Eight studies demonstrated that a greater number of patients (27.3-66.7%) were identified as sarcopenic using CT scans compared with numbers identified as malnourished using body mass index. CT scans can identify reduced muscle mass and predict negative cancer outcomes in people with abdominal malignancies, where traditional methods of assessment are less effective. PMID:25782424

  12. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    of tumor motion. However, in most of the authors’ patients, the use of abdominal compression seemed to increase the interfraction variation in tumor position, despite reducing lung tumor motion. The daily tumor position deviated more systematically from the tumor position in the planning CT scan in the lateral and longitudinal directions in patients treated with abdominal compression compared to those treated without compression. Therefore, target matching is required to correct or minimize the interfraction variation.

  13. Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital - a descriptive study from northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital. Methods This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009. Results The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1–57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT < 60 min after emergency room arrival. Penetrating trauma caused injuries in seven patients. Solid organ injuries constituted 78% of abdominal injuries. Non-operative management succeeded in 82 patients. Surgery was performed for 28 patients, either immediately (n = 17) as result of operative management or later (n = 11), due to non-operative management failure; the latter mainly occurred with hollow viscus injuries. Patients with multiple abdominal injuries, whether associated with multiple trauma or an isolated abdominal trauma, had significantly more non-operative failures than patients with a single abdominal injury. One death occurred within 30 days. Conclusions Non-operative management of patients with abdominal injuries, except for hollow viscus injuries, was highly

  14. Abdominal muscle paralysis associated with herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Gottschau, P; Trojaborg, W

    1991-10-01

    We describe a 77-year-old women with cutaneous herpes zoster in the area of the right T9-T11 dermatomes complicated by abdominal muscle paralysis. Four months after onset of paralysis, stimulation of appropriate intercostal nerves failed to evoke responses from the corresponding segments of the rectus abdominis muscle. Three months later EMG of these muscle segments revealed profuse denervation activity and spontaneous long-lasting burst of high frequency discharges. Magnetic stimulation applied transcranially and peripherally at T10 evoked responses from the left, but not from the right paralytic rectus abdominis muscle. Electric stimulation of right T10 elicited a markedly delayed, prolonged and polyphasic response in the transverse abdominis muscle and EMG revealed polyphasia and increased motor unit potential duration in muscle segments underlying herpes zoster eruption. One and a half years after onset, the paralysis of the rectus abdominis muscle was still present. A survey of the literature concerning this rare type of zoster paralysis is presented. PMID:1837649

  15. The association between abdominal obesity and serum cholesterol level

    PubMed Central

    Veghari, Gholamreza; Sedaghat, Mehdi; Maghsodlo, Siavash; Banihashem, Samieh; Moharloei, Pooneh; Angizeh, Abdolhamid; Tazik, Ebrahim; Moghaddami, Abbas; Joshaghani, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main aim of this study is to evaluate the association between serum cholesterol level and abdominal obesity in adult men and women in the north of Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and analytical study was conducted on the 1956 subjects (990 men and 966 women) between 25 and 65 years old chosen by cluster sampling. Plasma cholesterol was measured in the morning after a 12 h fast and determined by auto-analyzer. Hypercholesterolemia (HC) was defined by a total plasma cholesterol level over 200 mg/dl. Waist circumference ≥102 cm and ≥88 cm in men and women were defined as abdominal obesity. SPSS 16.0 software was used for statistical analysis and P < 0.05 considered as statistical significance. Results: Averagely, the mean of age was 44.2 years and mean ± standard deviation of plasma total cholesterol level was 203 ± 11.3 mg/dl. The HC was seen in 50.8% of subjects with a more common in women than in men. Compared with normal subjects, in abdominal obese people, the odds ratio (OR) of HC was (OR = 4.208 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.939–9.130]) and (OR = 3.956 [95% CI: 1.821–8.592]) in men aged 25–35 and 35–45 years, respectively. In women aged 25–35 years, it was (OR = 3.444 [95% CI: 1.959–6.056]) in abdominal obese compared with normal subjects. Conclusion: Hypercholesterolemia was revealed as a major health problem among adults, and it was associated with abdominal obesity especially in the early middle-age in the north of Iran. This association was not significant in men and women after the age of 45 and 35, respectively. PMID:26097812

  16. Unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrisome abdominal mass: Pedunculated GISTs☆

    PubMed Central

    Baskiran, Adil; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin; Kayaalp, Cuneyt

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Discovery of abdominal masses often poses significant diagnostic difficulties. GISTs are mesenchymal masses, with specific histological features. Dimensions may vary from millimeters to giant tumours. We would like to present our case, which had an unexpectedly easy operative course which was easily handled with a simple surgical excision with a short operative duration. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 38 years old female patient was diagnosed to have an abdominal heterogen mass of 15 cm × 12 cm × 10 cm in dimension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the solid mass between the stomach and pancreas corpus and tail, possibly orginating from the pancreas. With the preoperative diagnosis of locally invasive distal pancreas cancer the patient underwent laparotomy, following the dissection, the mass was observed to be originating from the posterior gastric Wall, extending exophytically with a peduncle of 5 cm in width, without any visual evidence for peritoneal invasion and metastasis. The tumour and the peduncle was resected with stapler device. Total operation time was 30 min. Postoperative course was uneventful. Pathologic diagnosis was gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). DISCUSSION Pedunculated large GISTs are not frequent and they can enlarge as 15 cm in diameter and compress the neighbouring organs. When they were huge, it is difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. GISTs should be considered in differential diagnosis of giant abdominal masses. CONCLUSION When GISTs are huge and pedunculated, it can be difficult to differentiate the origin of the masses. This case report presents unexpectedly ease surgery for a worrysome abdominal mass. PMID:23999120

  17. Imaging diagnosis-ultrasonographic and CT findings in a gray seal (Halichoerus grypus) with hepatic cirrhosis, pyelonephritis, and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    de Swarte, Marie; Bryan, Jill; Zarelli, Micaela; Huuskonen, Vihelmiina; Schneeweiss, Wilfried; McAllister, Hester

    2013-01-01

    An immature gray seal was presented with lethargy, weight loss, vomiting and hematuria. Hepatic disease and urinary tract infection were suspected. Abdominal ultrasound showed hyperechoic structures with marked acoustic shadowing spread throughout both kidneys, but incomplete visualization of the liver. Abdominal CT showed mineral densities scattered throughout both kidneys and poor delineation of the liver. Due to the poor quality of life, the seal was euthanized. Postmortem examination showed ammonium urate nephroliths, pyelonephritis, and hepatic cirrhosis. This case report emphasizes the difficulty of characterizing liver disease with conventional 2D-ultrasound and CT in a deep-chested animal with minimal intra-abdominal fat. PMID:23578275

  18. A Kinect™ camera based navigation system for percutaneous abdominal puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Deqiang; Luo, Huoling; Jia, Fucang; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Yong; Guo, Xuejun; Cai, Wei; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Zheng, Huimin; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-08-01

    Percutaneous abdominal puncture is a popular interventional method for the management of abdominal tumors. Image-guided puncture can help interventional radiologists improve targeting accuracy. The second generation of Kinect™ was released recently, we developed an optical navigation system to investigate its feasibility for guiding percutaneous abdominal puncture, and compare its performance on needle insertion guidance with that of the first-generation Kinect™. For physical-to-image registration in this system, two surfaces extracted from preoperative CT and intraoperative Kinect™ depth images were matched using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. A 2D shape image-based correspondence searching algorithm was proposed for generating a close initial position before ICP matching. Evaluation experiments were conducted on an abdominal phantom and six beagles in vivo. For phantom study, a two-factor experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of the operator’s skill and trajectory on target positioning error (TPE). A total of 36 needle punctures were tested on a Kinect™ for Windows version 2 (Kinect™ V2). The target registration error (TRE), user error, and TPE are 4.26  ±  1.94 mm, 2.92  ±  1.67 mm, and 5.23  ±  2.29 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences in TPE regarding operator’s skill and trajectory are observed. Additionally, a Kinect™ for Windows version 1 (Kinect™ V1) was tested with 12 insertions, and the TRE evaluated with the Kinect™ V1 is statistically significantly larger than that with the Kinect™ V2. For the animal experiment, fifteen artificial liver tumors were inserted guided by the navigation system. The TPE was evaluated as 6.40  ±  2.72 mm, and its lateral and longitudinal component were 4.30  ±  2.51 mm and 3.80  ±  3.11 mm, respectively. This study demonstrates that the navigation accuracy of the proposed system is acceptable

  19. Computed tomography diagnosis of a primary aortoduodenal fistula in a patient with a partially thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Shree, Divya; Jeppu, Sandeep; Puneet, Pulak; Rani, Kanchan

    2010-08-01

    Primary aortoenteric fistula is a rare but fatal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and requires urgent intervention. A high index of clinical suspicion in conjunction with imaging is required because a favorable outcome relies on prompt diagnosis. The primary forms of aortoduodenal fistulas are nearly always associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, mostly atherosclerotic. Technological advances in imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT), play a pivotal role in the preoperative detection of these fistulas. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large abdominal aortic aneurysm with associated contained rupture and suggestion of an aortoduodenal fistula on CT. This case demonstrated the effectiveness, ease, and low cost of the preoperative evaluation and documentation of a primary aortoduodenal fistula using CT scans. PMID:20799019

  20. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children. PMID:24511408

  1. Mechanical small bowel obstruction following a blunt abdominal trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zirak-Schmidt, Samira; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal obstruction following abdominal trauma has previously been described. However, in most reported cases pathological finding was intestinal stenosis. Presentation of the case A 51-year-old male was admitted after a motor vehicle accident. Initial focused abdominal sonogram for trauma and enhanced computerized tomography were normal, however there was a fracture of the tibia. Three days later, he complained of abdominal pain, constipation, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy showed bleeding from the omentum and mechanical small bowel obstruction due to a fibrous band. Discussion The patient had prior abdominal surgery, but clinical and radiological findings indicate that the impact of the motor vehicle accident initiated his condition either by causing rotation of a bowel segment around the fibrous band, or by formation of a fibrous band secondary to minimal bleeding from the omentum. Conclusion High index of suspicion of intestinal obstruction is mandatory in trauma patients presenting with complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation despite uneventful CT scan. PMID:26566436

  2. Radiotherapy of abdomen with precise renal assessment with SPECT/CT imaging (RAPRASI): design and methodology of a prospective trial to improve the understanding of kidney radiation dose response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The kidneys are a principal dose-limiting organ in radiotherapy for upper abdominal cancers. The current understanding of kidney radiation dose response is rudimentary. More precise dose-volume response models that allow direct correlation of delivered radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function may improve radiotherapy treatment planning for upper-abdominal tumours. Our current understanding of kidney dose response and tolerance is limited and this is hindering efforts to introduce advanced radiotherapy techniques for upper-abdominal cancers, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to utilise radiotherapy and combined anatomical/functional imaging data to allow direct correlation of radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function. The data can then be used to develop a more precise dose-volume response model which has the potential to optimise and individualise upper abdominal radiotherapy plans. Methods/design The Radiotherapy of Abdomen with Precise Renal Assessment with SPECT/CT Imaging (RAPRASI) is an observational clinical research study with participating sites at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Perth, Australia and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC) in Melbourne, Australia. Eligible patients are those with upper gastrointestinal cancer, without metastatic disease, undergoing conformal radiotherapy that will involve incidental radiation to one or both kidneys. For each patient, total kidney function is being assessed before commencement of radiotherapy treatment and then at 4, 12, 26, 52 and 78 weeks after the first radiotherapy fraction, using two procedures: a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) measurement using the 51Cr-ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) clearance; and a regional kidney perfusion measurement assessing renal uptake of 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), imaged with a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography / Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT

  3. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  4. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  5. Size-specific dose estimates: Localizer or transverse abdominal computed tomography images?

    PubMed Central

    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Saini, Akshay; Blake, Michael A; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effect of body dimensions obtained from localizer radiograph and transverse abdominal computed tomography (CT) images on Size Specific Dose Estimate. METHODS: This study was approved by Institutional Review Board and was compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Fifty patients with abdominal CT examinations (58 ± 13 years, Male:Female 28:22) were included in this study. Anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (Lat) diameters were measured at 5 cm intervals from the CT exam localizer radiograph (simple X-ray image acquired for planning the CT exam before starting the scan) and transverse CT images. Average of measured AP and Lat diameters, as well as maximum, minimum and mid location AP and Lat were measured on both image sets. In addition, off centering of patients from the gantry iso-center was calculated from the localizers. Conversion factors from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report 204 were obtained for AP, Lat, AP + Lat, and effective diameter (√ AP * Lat) to determine size specific dose estimate (SSDE) from the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) recorded from the dose reports. Data were analyzed using SPSS v19. RESULTS: Total number of 5376 measurements was done. In some patients entire body circumference was not covered on either projection radiograph or transverse CT images; hence accurate measurement of AP and Lat diameters was not possible in 11% (278/2488) of locations. Forty one patients were off-centered with mean of 1.9 ± 1.8 cm (range: 0.4-7 cm). Conversion factors for attained diameters were not listed on AAPM look-up tables in 3% (80/2488) of measurements. SSDE values were significantly different compared to CTDIvol, ranging from 32% lower to 74% greater than CTDIvol. CONCLUSION: There is underestimation and overestimation of dose comparing SSDE values to CTDIvol. Localizer radiographs are associated with overestimation of patient size and therefore underestimation of SSDE. PMID

  6. A Large Pleural Effusion following Abdominal Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramsaran, Vinoo K.; Seeram, Vandana K.; Cury, James; Shujaat, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Chylous ascites and coexistent chylothorax is a rare but important complication following retroperitoneal abdominal surgery. We report a 70-year-old male who developed gradual abdominal distension, chest tightness, and dyspnea five months after having an uncomplicated aortobifemoral bypass performed. Physical examination was consistent with a large right sided effusion and ascites which were confirmed by computed tomography. Thoracentesis yielded an opaque milky fluid with analysis consistent with a chylothorax with a paracentesis revealing fluid that was similar in both appearance and biochemistry. The patient failed initial conservative management so a chest tube was placed followed by chemical pleurodesis. We review the literature of the pathophysiology and treatment approach to such a pleural effusion. PMID:26635989

  7. Autotransfusion utilization in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Barker, D E; Burns, R P

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to investigate the utility of autotransfusion in trauma patients in the past 3 years. A retrospective review was conducted of the charts for whom the Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device (Haemonetics Corp., Natick, MA) was utilized between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1995. The estimated blood loss and quantity of blood transfused were noted for abdominal trauma patients. Costs of autotransfusion were then compared to estimated blood bank costs for this group. The Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device was requested for 592 cases from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 1995. Nonorthopedic trauma cases comprised 25 per cent of all autotransfusion cases. One hundred twenty-six patients had isolated abdominal trauma and had a mean estimated blood loss of 4864 +/- 6070 cc. The average volume of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood transfused (autotransfusion) per patient was 1547 +/- 2359 cc, or a bank blood equivalent of 6.9 units of packed red blood cells. The total cost of autotransfusion in these patients was $63,252.00. Had bank blood been used instead of salvaged autologous blood, the cost would have been $114,523.00; thus, autotransfusion resulted in a savings of $51,271.00. The use of salvaged autologous blood comprised 45 per cent of total blood transfused. On a case-by-case basis, 75 per cent of cases were cost-effective compared to blood bank costs for an equivalent transfusion. Transfusion of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood (autotransfusion) is a cost-effective, efficient way to provide blood products to operative trauma patients. PMID:8985070

  8. The Risk of Abdominal Obesity according to the Degree of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been reported as a cardiometabolic risk factor, the effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver is yet to be clarified on abdominal obesity. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the longitudinal relationship of non-alcoholic fatty liver on the development of abdominal obesity. The study participants were composed of 11,212 Korean men without abdominal obesity. They were followed up from 2005 to 2010 to be monitored for the development of abdominal obesity according to their degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (normal, mild, and moderate to severe). Cox-proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios for abdominal obesity according to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While the average incidence was 15.5%, the incidence of abdominal obesity increased according to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver (normal: 11.6%, mild: 25.2%, moderate to severe: 41.0%, P < 0.001). Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for abdominal obesity independently increased proportionally to the degree of NAFLD (mild [1.07; 0.94-1.23], moderate to severe [1.58; 1.11-2.26], P for trend < 0.001). The risk of abdominal obesity increased proportionally to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This finding guarantees further studies to reveal the incidental relationship of abdominal obesity with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26955242

  9. [Management of adult abdominal pain in the Emergency Room].

    PubMed

    Chiche, L; Roupie, E; Delassus, P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a commonplace reason for surgical consultation in the emergency department and is the the most common symptom which the digestive surgeon on-call must evaluate. He must understand the pathophysiologic basis of visceral pain and referred pain in order to appreciate its diverse manifestations. Abdominal pain can stem from many causes intestinal and non-intestinal, medical and surgical. Evaluation and management in the emergency department must be rapid and pragmatic; clinical history and physical examination should define the gravity of the case, direct the first diagnostic procedures and complementary examinations, and guide the therapeutic direction. Ultrasonography is a quick and effective diagnostic procedure in the diagnosis of biliary, urologic, and gynecologic pathologies; it can be useful for other digestive problems as well. The new generation spiral CT scanner gives excellent definition of digestive and vascular pathologies. The initial evaluation and management of the acute abdomen may determine the prognosis of the patient; it should lead to prompt symptomatic relief and to a well-directed treatment appropriate to the diagnosis. PMID:16609646

  10. Locating the kidneys on CT to guide nephrotomography.

    PubMed

    Chen, M Y; Gelfand, D W; Spangler, K; Dyer, R B; Zagoria, R J; Ott, D J

    1997-01-01

    Tomography of the kidneys is a routine procedure performed during intravenous urography. Precisely locating the kidneys, however, can be difficult. This article describes a study performed to determine a simple and accurate measurement for kidney location as a guide to obtaining initial nephrotomographic sections. The authors measured the distance from the midplane of the kidney to the posterior skin line on abdominal CT images in 26 patients. This distance averaged one-third the thickness of the abdominal region. The best depth for the nephrotomographic cut was found to be one-third the thickness of the abdomen plus the thickness of any table pad. PMID:9085416

  11. Viable abdominal pregnancy: a case report in Yaoundé (Cameroon)

    PubMed Central

    Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Fouogue, Jovanny Tsuala; Fouedjio, Jeanne Hortence; Sando, Zacharie

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal pregnancy managed in Yaounde (Cameroon). The 33 year old G5P2022 woman was referred to our setting for management of an abdominal pregnancy of 34 weeks diagnosed during the first routine obstetrical ultrasonography done two days earlier. This ultrasonography revealed a live foetus within intestinal loops with a severe oligoamnios. After two days of lung maturation, laparotomy was carried out and the live male baby weighed 2 600 grammes. The placenta was left on its implantation sites: omentun, uterine fundus and intestinal loops. The mother did well post-operatively and the resorption of the placenta took 11 months. The newborn presented compression deformities and died three days later of respiratory distress. This case illustrates that intra-abdominal fetuses can reach viability. Though rare, abdominal pregnancy remains a threat to mothers. Practitioners should therefore know the traps in its management. PMID:25419308

  12. Isolated abdominal wound recurrence after lymph-node dissection for appendiceal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishimaru, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with acute abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant underwent an appendectomy via McBurney's incision. Postoperative histology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in the appendix that invaded the submucosa along with lymphatic involvement. Forty-three days later, an ileocecal resection with radical lymph node dissection was performed through a midline incision. Three of the 30 resected lymph nodes were found to have adenocarcinoma metastasis. Five years later, an isolated abdominal wall recurrence occurred within the wound scar of the midline incision. A complete excision of the tumor and the invaded portion of the ileum was performed. To date, the patient has been well, with no evidence of recurrence for 5 years since the resection. The mechanism of abdominal wound recurrence is considered the leakage of carcinoma cells from transected lymph vessels during lymph node dissection, followed by the implantation of these cells into the abdominal wound. PMID:19837396

  13. X-Ray Dose Reduction in Abdominal Computed Tomography Using Advanced Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peigang; Zhu, Shaocheng; Shi, Dapeng; Guo, Ying; Sun, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims to explore the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms in reducing computed tomography (CT) radiation dosages in abdominal imaging. Methods CT scans on a standard male phantom were performed at different tube currents. Images at the different tube currents were reconstructed with the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% ASiR and MBIR algorithms and compared. The CT value, image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of the reconstructed abdominal images were measured. Volumetric CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) were recorded. Results At different tube currents, 50% ASiR and MBIR significantly reduced image noise and increased the CNR when compared with FBP. The minimal tube current values required by FBP, 50% ASiR, and MBIR to achieve acceptable image quality using this phantom were 200, 140, and 80 mA, respectively. At the identical image quality, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced the radiation dose by 35.9% and 59.9% respectively when compared with FBP. Conclusions Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques are able to reduce image noise and increase image CNRs. Compared with FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced radiation doses by 35.9% and 59.9%, respectively. PMID:24664174

  14. Delay in diagnosis and lessons learnt from a case of abdominal wall abscess caused by fishbone perforation

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, V; Badrinath, K; Dube, M; Panto, P

    2015-01-01

    Complications following foreign body (FB) ingestion are an uncommon clinical problem. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of left iliac fossa pain and 1 episode of dark red blood mixed with stools. Inflammatory markers were elevated, and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed an ill defined abdominal wall inflammatory collection in close contact with the small bowel loops. He was treated with antibiotics, and follow-up CT, colonoscopy and small bowel enema were mostly unremarkable. The patient presented again ten months later with left iliac fossa cellulitis and fever. Multiplanar CT (the patient’s fourth scan) demonstrated a 10cm abdominal wall collection with a linear hyperdense structure in the collection. The radiologists suspected a FB and on close scrutiny of the previous scans, they noted it to have been present on all of them. A targeted incision led to the removal of a 3cm fishbone from the collection. This case highlights the need to consider the possibility of a FB being the underlying cause in any unexplained intra-abdominal or abdominal wall inflammatory process so that the diagnosis is made in a timely manner. PMID:26263825

  15. Peritoneal Breach as an Indication for Exploratory Laparotomy in Penetrating Abdominal Stab Injury: Operative Findings in Haemodynamically Stable Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Victor; Martin, Kate; Varma, Dinesh; Fitzgerald, Mark; Pilgrim, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Management of haemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal injuries varies from nonoperative to operative management. The aim was to investigate whether peritoneal breach when used as an indication for exploratory laparotomy appropriately identified patients with intra-abdominal visceral injury. Methods. We conducted retrospective cohort study of all patients presenting with PAI at a major trauma centre from January 2007 to December 2011. We measured the incidence of peritoneal breach and correlated this with intra-abdominal visceral injury diagnosed at surgery. Results. 252 patients were identified with PAI. Of the included patients, 71 were managed nonoperatively and 118 operatively. The operative diagnoses included nonperitoneal-breaching injuries, intraperitoneal penetration without organ damage, or intraperitoneal injury with organ damage. The presenting trauma CT scan was reported as normal in 63%, 34%, and 2% of these groups, respectively. The total negative laparotomy/laparoscopy rate for all patients presented with PAI was 21%, almost half of whom had a normal CT scan. Conclusion. We found that peritoneal breach on its own does not necessarily always equate to intra-abdominal visceral injury. Observation with sequential examination for PAI patients with a normal CT scan may be more important than exclusion of peritoneal breach via laparoscopy. PMID:26064688

  16. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  17. Do Patients with Penetrating Abdominal Stab Wounds Require Laparotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Sanei, Behnam; Mahmoudieh, Mohsen; Talebzadeh, Hamid; Shahabi Shahmiri, Shahab; Aghaei, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal management of hemodynamically stable asymptomatic patients with anterior abdominal stab wounds (AASWs) remains controversial. The goal is to identify and treat injuries in a safe cost-effective manner. Common evaluation strategies are local wound exploration (LWE), diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL), serial clinical assessment (SCAs) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Making a decision about the right time to operate on a patient with a penetrating abdominal stab wound, especially those who have visceral evisceration, is a continuing challenge. Objectives Until the year 2010, our strategy was emergency laparotomy in patients with penetrating anterior fascia and those with visceral evisceration. This survey was conducted towards evaluating the results of emergency laparotomy. So, better management can be done in patients with penetrating abdominal stab wounds. Patients and Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on patients with abdominal penetrating trauma who referred to Al- Zahra hospital in Isfahan, Iran from October 2000 to October 2010. It should be noted that patients with abdominal blunt trauma, patients under 14 years old, those with lateral abdomen penetrating trauma and patients who had unstable hemodynamic status were excluded from the study. Medical records of patients were reviewed and demographic and clinical data were collected for all patients including: age, sex, mechanism of trauma and the results of LWE and laparotomy. Data were analyzed with PASW v.20 software. All data were expressed as mean ± SD. The distribution of nominal variables was compared using the Chi-squared test. Also, diagnostic index for LWE were calculated. A two-sided P value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results During the 10 year period of the study, 1100 consecutive patients with stab wounds were admitted to Al-Zahra hospital Isfahan, Iran. In total, about 150 cases had penetrating traumas in

  18. 3D dynamic roadmapping for abdominal catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Bender, Frederik; Groher, Martin; Khamene, Ali; Wein, Wolfgang; Heibel, Tim Hauke; Navab, Nassir

    2008-01-01

    Despite rapid advances in interventional imaging, the navigation of a guide wire through abdominal vasculature remains, not only for novice radiologists, a difficult task. Since this navigation is mostly based on 2D fluoroscopic image sequences from one view, the process is slowed down significantly due to missing depth information and patient motion. We propose a novel approach for 3D dynamic roadmapping in deformable regions by predicting the location of the guide wire tip in a 3D vessel model from the tip's 2D location, respiratory motion analysis, and view geometry. In a first step, the method compensates for the apparent respiratory motion in 2D space before backprojecting the 2D guide wire tip into three dimensional space, using a given projection matrix. To countervail the error connected to the projection parameters and the motion compensation, as well as the ambiguity caused by vessel deformation, we establish a statistical framework, which computes a reliable estimate of the guide wire tip location within the 3D vessel model. With this 2D-to-3D transfer, the navigation can be performed from arbitrary viewing angles, disconnected from the static perspective view of the fluoroscopic sequence. Tests on a realistic breathing phantom and on synthetic data with a known ground truth clearly reveal the superiority of our approach compared to naive methods for 3D roadmapping. The concepts and information presented in this paper are based on research and are not commercially available. PMID:18982662

  19. Anal avulsion caused by abdominal crush injury.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, G; Rossetto, A; Kocjancic, E; Rossitti, P; Bresadola, V

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a pelvic and lower abdomen crushing trauma in 37-year-old male patient. The patient had an open lumbar wound, laceration of the psoas muscle, pelvic fracture, a ruptured urogenital diaphragm, and extensive urogenital lacerations. An emergency laparotomy was performed with debridment, urethral reconstruction, and osteosynthesis of the pubic bone. The mobilization of the patient revealed a deep gap, about 8 × 8 cm, in the perineum, with the anus and rectum displaced from their original site. Anal reimplantation was performed, suturing the median raphe, inserting two pelvic drainage tubes, and fashioning a loop transverse colostomy. Closed rectal traumas account for only 4-11% of all rectal traumas. Crushing of the pelvis causes a sudden reduction in its anteroposterior diameter and a corresponding increase in its latero-lateral diameter, together with an abrupt rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The anus is pushed out of the perineal plane due to the divarication of the levator muscles. As suggested in the literature, the standard treatment is wound debridement with immediate or deferred repair, fashioning a diversion colostomy, and repair of the rectum, wherever possible. PMID:21556880

  20. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect

    Nattenmüller, Johanna Filsinger, Matthias Bryant, Mark Stiller, Wolfram Radeleff, Boris Grenacher, Lars Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich Hosch, Waldemar

    2013-06-19

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  1. [Performance evaluation for CT-AEC(CT automatic exposure control)systems].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Shu; Osawa, Kazuaki; Sekine, Ryo; Niwa, Nobuyuki; Terada, Masami; Keat, Nicholas; Miyazaki, Shigeru

    2007-05-20

    Although many current CT scanners incorporate CT-AEC, performance evaluation is not standardized. This study evaluates the performance of the latest CT-AEC of each manufacturer with the aim of establishing a standard CT-AEC performance evaluation method. The design of the phantoms was based upon the operation characteristics of different CT-AECs. A cone, an ellipse, a variable-shaped ellipse, stepped phantoms, and their analysis software were devised and carried out the field test. The targets were LightSpeed VCT 64 with 2D and 3D Auto mA(GE), Aquilion 64M with Real-EC and Volume-EC(Toshiba), Sensation 64 with CARE Dose and CARE Dose 4D(Siemens), and Bulliance 16P with Dose Right(Philips). Data was acquired while varying the typical abdominal CT(with CT-AEC)scanning conditions (120 kV, 5 mm slice, standard function for abdomen, scanning range 200 mm). The acquired images were converted to the DICOM format and image noise(SD) was calculated using dedicated software. All 4 CT-AECs reduced exposure dose. For GE and Toshiba, image noise was constant and met the target. For Siemens, noise was independent of phantom shape but varied uniformly with phantom size. For Philips, noise varied with phantom size and shape, and variation degree depended on phantom thickness in scanogram direction. The results reflect the basic concept and performance characteristics of the methods. Standardization of CT-AEC performance evaluation is possible using these phantoms. PMID:17538218

  2. [The patient with intra-abdominal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sakka, Samir G

    2016-01-01

    An intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) defined as a pathological increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is commonly found on ICU admission or during the ICU stay. Several studies confirmed that an IAH is an independent predictor for mortality of critically ill patients. The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) which is defined as a sustained IAP>20 mmHg (with or without an abdominal perfusion pressure [APP]<60mmHg) that is associated with new organ dysfunction or failure has a mortality of up to 60%. In general, an IAH may be induced by several intra-abdominal as well as extra-abdominal conditions. Reduced abdominal wall compliance, intra-abdominal pathologies (either of the peritoneal space or parenchymateous organs) may lead to an IAH. Most commonly, intra-abdominal infections and/or sepsis and severe trauma or burns are predisposing for an IAH. An early sign may be a decrease in urinary output. The effects of an increased IAP on cardiovascular function are well recognized and include negative effects on preload, afterload and contractility. However, all other compartments of the body may be affected by an IAH. Thus, by an increase of the respective compartment pressure, e.g. intracranial pressure, a poly-compartment syndrome may result. Adequate prevention, a forward-looking strategy, and objective techniques for measurement of IAP are required to avoid or early detect an IAH or ACS. Finally, an immediate and consequent interdisciplinary management using conservative, interventional and operative options are necessary to solve an IAH or ACS. PMID:26863642

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  4. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  5. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  6. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  7. [Diagnostic laparocentesis in closed abdominal injury].

    PubMed

    Berkutov, A N; Deriabin, I I; Zakurdaev, V E

    1976-09-01

    To improve the diagnosis of closed abdominal trauma since 1966 the authors have been widely employing laparocentesis. The results of using abdominal punctures an 260 patients are reported. The method proved to be reliable in 97.7%. The use of laparocentesis enabled the authors to reduce the number of errors by 7.3 times, to shorten the terms of establishing the diagnosis by 4 times as compared with the control group of patients (190 subjects in whom the recognition of abdominal injuries is based on common clinical symptoms). PMID:136785

  8. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  9. Advances in determining abdominal aortic aneurysm size and growth

    PubMed Central

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Lioudaki, Stella; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common pathology in the aging population of the developed world which carries a significant mortality in excess of 80% in case of rupture. Aneurysmal disease probably represents the only surgical condition in which size is such a critical determinant of the need for intervention and therefore the ability to accurately and reproducibly record aneurysm size and growth over time is of outmost importance. In the same time that imaging techniques may be limited by intra- and inter-observer variability and there may be inconsistencies due to different modalities [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT)], rapid technologic advancement have taken aortic imaging to the next level. Digital imaging, multi-detector scanners, thin slice CT and most- importantly the ability to perform 3-dimensional reconstruction and image post-processing have currently become widely available rendering most of the imaging modalities used in the past out of date. The aim of the current article is to report on various imaging methods and current state of the art techniques used to record aneurysm size and growth. Moreover we aim to emphasize on the future research directions and report on techniques which probably will be widely used and incorporated in clinical practice in the near future. PMID:26981224

  10. Advances in determining abdominal aortic aneurysm size and growth.

    PubMed

    Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Lioudaki, Stella; Pantidis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George; Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Ioannou, Christos V

    2016-02-28

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common pathology in the aging population of the developed world which carries a significant mortality in excess of 80% in case of rupture. Aneurysmal disease probably represents the only surgical condition in which size is such a critical determinant of the need for intervention and therefore the ability to accurately and reproducibly record aneurysm size and growth over time is of outmost importance. In the same time that imaging techniques may be limited by intra- and inter-observer variability and there may be inconsistencies due to different modalities [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT)], rapid technologic advancement have taken aortic imaging to the next level. Digital imaging, multi-detector scanners, thin slice CT and most- importantly the ability to perform 3-dimensional reconstruction and image post-processing have currently become widely available rendering most of the imaging modalities used in the past out of date. The aim of the current article is to report on various imaging methods and current state of the art techniques used to record aneurysm size and growth. Moreover we aim to emphasize on the future research directions and report on techniques which probably will be widely used and incorporated in clinical practice in the near future. PMID:26981224

  11. A navigation system for flexible endoscopes using abdominal 3D ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, R; Kaar, M; Bathia, Amon; Bathia, Amar; Lampret, A; Birkfellner, W; Hummel, J; Figl, M

    2014-09-21

    A navigation system for flexible endoscopes equipped with ultrasound (US) scan heads is presented. In contrast to similar systems, abdominal 3D-US is used for image fusion of the pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) to the endoscopic US. A 3D-US scan, tracked with an optical tracking system (OTS), is taken pre-operatively together with the CT scan. The CT is calibrated using the OTS, providing the transformation from CT to 3D-US. Immediately before intervention a 3D-US tracked with an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) is acquired and registered intra-modal to the preoperative 3D-US. The endoscopic US is calibrated using the EMTS and registered to the pre-operative CT by an intra-modal 3D-US/3D-US registration. Phantom studies showed a registration error for the US to CT registration of 5.1 mm±2.8 mm. 3D-US/3D-US registration of patient data gave an error of 4.1 mm compared to 2.8 mm with the phantom. From this we estimate an error on patient experiments of 5.6 mm. PMID:25170913

  12. Both pelvic radiography and lateral abdominal radiography correlate well with coronary artery calcification measured by computed tomography in hemodialysis patients: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Daqing; Ruan, Yizhe; Pu, Lei; Zhong, Xiang; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Deng, Fei; Yang, Hongling; Li, Guisen; Wang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Lateral abdominal radiograph is suggested as an alternative to coronary artery computed tomography (CT) in evaluating vascular calcification. Simple scoring systems including pelvic radiograph scoring and abdominal scoring system were utilized to study their correlation with coronary artery calcification. Methods In 106 MHD patients, coronary artery CT, lateral abdominal, and pelvic radiograph were taken. The Agatston scoring system was applied to evaluate the degree of coronary artery calcification which was categorized according to Agatston coronary artery calcification score (CACS) ≥ 30, ≥100, ≥400, and ≥1000. Abdominal aortic calcification was scored by 4-scored and 24-scored systems. Pelvic artery calcification was scored by a 4-scored system. Sensitivities and specificities of abdominal aortic calcification scores and pelvic artery calcification scores to predict different categories of coronary artery calcification were analyzed. We studied the diagnostic capability of abdominal aorta calcification and pelvic artery calcification to predict different CACS categories by calculating likelihood ratios. Receiver operator characteristic curves were used to determine the area under the curve for each of these testing procedures. Findings The prevalence was 48(45.3%), 15 (14.2%), 11 (10.4%), 11 (10.4%), and 11 (10.4%) for CACs > 0, ≥30, ≥100, ≥400, and ≥1000, respectively. The degree of CACs was positively correlated with patient age, prevalence of diabetes, abdominal aorta scores, and pelvic calcification scores. The areas under the curves for different CACS by all X-ray scoring systems were above 0.70 except pelvic 4-scored system for diagnosing CACS ≥30, without significant difference (P > 0.05). Discussion Both lateral abdominal and pelvic plain radiographs were demonstrated as acceptable alternatives to CT in evaluating vascular calcification. PMID:26932162

  13. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  15. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... this kind of pain when they have a stomach virus, indigestion, gas, or when they become constipated. ...

  16. Familial abdominal chemodectomas with associated cutaneous angiolipomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Nicholson, G I; Hitchcock, G

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of cutaneous angiolipomas and intra-abdominal retroperitoneal chemodectomas in two brothers is described. Both died from malignant dissemination of the chemodectomas. It is possible but speculative that two other brothers suffered from the same syndrome. PMID:195258

  17. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Cleva, Roberto; de Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C.; Filho, Wilson Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 56±13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6±0.6 L) and FVC (2.0±0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8±0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p = 0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery. PMID:25029580

  18. The association between cardiorespiratory fitness and abdominal adiposity in postmenopausal, physically inactive South Asian women.

    PubMed

    Lesser, I A; Dick, T J M; Guenette, J A; Hoogbruin, A; Mackey, D C; Singer, J; Lear, S A

    2015-01-01

    In South Asians, a unique obesity phenotype of high abdominal fat is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with abdominal fat and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether CRF as assessed by VO2 peak, in post-menopausal South Asian women, was associated with body fat distribution and abdominal fat. Physically inactive post-menopausal South Asian women (n = 55) from the Greater Vancouver area were recruited and assessed from January to August 2014. At baseline, VO2 peak was measured with the Bruce Protocol, abdominal fat with CT imaging, and body composition with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. ANOVA was used to assess differences in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and total abdominal adipose tissue (TAAT) between tertiles of CRF. Bivariate correlation and multiple linear regression analyses explored the association between VO2 peak with SAAT, VAT, TAAT and body composition. Models were further adjusted for body fat and body mass index (BMI). Compared to women in the lowest tertile of VO2 peak (13.8-21.8 mL/kg/min), women in the highest tertile (25.0-27.7 mL/kg/min) had significantly lower waist circumference, BMI, total body fat, body fat percentage, lean mass, SAAT, VAT and TAAT (p < 0.05). We found VO2 peak to be negatively associated with SAAT, VAT and TAAT, independent of age and body fatness but not independent of BMI. Further research is necessary to assess whether exercise and therefore improvements in CRF would alter SAAT, VAT and TAAT in post-menopausal South Asian women. PMID:26844150

  19. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  20. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  1. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug resistant infections such as

  2. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by tension pneumoperitoneum in a scuba diver

    PubMed Central

    Bunni, J; Bryson, PJ; Higgs, SM

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency caused by a raised intra-abdominal pressure, which may lead to respiratory, cardiovascular and renal compromise. It is most commonly seen in post-operative and trauma patients and it has a variety of causes. Tension pneumoperitoneum (TP) is a rare cause of abdominal compartment syndrome most often seen after gastrointestinal endoscopy with perforation. We present the case of a fit 52-year-old experienced female diver who developed TP and shock following a routine training dive to 27m. Following accidental inhalation of water, she had an unstaged ascent and, on reaching the surface, developed severe acute abdominal pain and distension. She was brought to our emergency department by air ambulance for assessment. Clinical and radiological examination revealed a shocked patient with dramatic free intra-abdominal gas and signs of abdominal compartment syndrome, which was treated with needle decompression. Symptoms and signs resolved quickly with no need for further surgical intervention. TP is a surgical emergency where surgery can be avoided with prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23131212

  3. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  4. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  5. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The 18F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative.

  6. Hepatosplenic Candidiasis Detected by (18)F-FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Albano, Domenico; Bosio, Giovanni; Bertoli, Mattia; Petrilli, Giulia; Bertagna, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosplenic candidiasis is a fungal infection, which mostly affects patients with hematologic malignancies such as leukemia. The pathogenesis of this infection is not clear yet, and the liver is the most commonly affected organ. Diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis can be only established via biopsy, since computed tomography (CT) scan, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yield non-specific results. The role of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography /computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) in diagnosis of hepatosplenic candidiasis remains undetermined, considering a few evidences in the literature. In this case report, we present the case of a 47-year-old patient, affected by acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, resulting in the development of neutropenia and fever following the last cycle. The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan showed some foci of intense FDG uptake in the liver and spleen. The subsequent diagnostic investigations (i.e., abdominal CT scan and biopsy) were suggestive of hepatosplenic candidiasis. The patient was started on antifungal treatment with fluconazole. After one month, the clinical conditions were resolved, and the subsequent abdominal CT scan was negative. PMID:27408899

  7. Reversed Halo Sign on CT as a Presentation of Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Marcus D; Grajo, Joseph R; Karamsadkar, Neel D; Steffensen, Thora S; Hazelton, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    A 52 year-old African American female with a past medical history of symptomatic uterine fibroids and increasing abdominal circumference underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) as part of her workup. Because of an abnormality in the left lower lobe, CT of the chest was subsequently performed and showed a focal region of discontinuous crescentic consolidation with central ground glass opacification in the right lower lobe, suggestive of the reversed halo sign. The patient underwent percutaneous CT-guided core biopsy of the lesion, which demonstrated lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, a benign lymphoproliferative disease characterized histologically by small lymphocytes and plasma cells. This case report describes the first histologically confirmed presentation of lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia with the reversed halo sign on CT. PMID:24421923

  8. Readjustment of abdominal computed tomography protocols in a university hospital: impact on radiation dose*

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Bekhor, Daniel; Caldana, Rogério Pedreschi; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the reduction of estimated radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography following the implementation of new scan protocols on the basis of clinical suspicion and of adjusted images acquisition parameters. Materials and Methods Retrospective and prospective review of reports on radiation dose from abdominal CT scans performed three months before (group A – 551 studies) and three months after (group B – 788 studies) implementation of new scan protocols proposed as a function of clinical indications. Also, the images acquisition parameters were adjusted to reduce the radiation dose at each scan phase. The groups were compared for mean number of acquisition phases, mean CTDIvol per phase, mean DLP per phase, and mean DLP per scan. Results A significant reduction was observed for group B as regards all the analyzed aspects, as follows: 33.9%, 25.0%, 27.0% and 52.5%, respectively for number of acquisition phases, CTDIvol per phase, DLP per phase and DLP per scan (p < 0.001). Conclusion The rational use of abdominal computed tomography scan phases based on the clinical suspicion in conjunction with the adjusted images acquisition parameters allows for a 50% reduction in the radiation dose from abdominal computed tomography scans. PMID:26543280

  9. The relationship between wall shear stress distributions and intimal thickening in the human abdominal aorta

    PubMed Central

    Bonert, Michael; Leask, Richard L; Butany, Jagdish; Ethier, C Ross; Myers, Jerry G; Johnston, K Wayne; Ojha, Matadial

    2003-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this work was to determine wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the human abdominal aorta and to compare these patterns to measurements of intimal thickness (IT) from autopsy samples. Methods The WSS was experimentally measured using the laser photochromic dye tracer technique in an anatomically faithful in vitro model based on CT scans of the abdominal aorta in a healthy 35-year-old subject. IT was quantified as a function of circumferential and axial position using light microscopy in ten human autopsy specimens. Results The histomorphometric analysis suggests that IT increases with age and that the distribution of intimal thickening changes with age. The lowest WSS in the flow model was found on the posterior wall inferior to the inferior mesenteric artery, and coincided with the region of most prominent IT in the autopsy samples. Local geometrical features in the flow model, such as the expansion at the inferior mesenteric artery (common in younger individuals), strongly influenced WSS patterns. The WSS was found to correlate negatively with IT (r2 = 0.3099; P = 0.0047). Conclusion Low WSS in the abdominal aorta is co-localized with IT and may be related to atherogenesis. Also, rates of IT in the abdominal aorta are possibly influenced by age-related geometrical changes. PMID:14641919

  10. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up. PMID:26431148

  11. Longitudinal micro-CT provides biomarkers of lung disease that can be used to assess the effect of therapy in preclinical mouse models, and reveal compensatory changes in lung volume

    PubMed Central

    Vande Velde, Greetje; Poelmans, Jennifer; De Langhe, Ellen; Hillen, Amy; Vanoirbeek, Jeroen; Himmelreich, Uwe; Lories, Rik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo lung micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is being increasingly embraced in pulmonary research because it provides longitudinal information on dynamic disease processes in a field in which ex vivo assessment of experimental disease models is still the gold standard. To optimize the quantitative monitoring of progression and therapy of lung diseases, we evaluated longitudinal changes in four different micro-CT-derived biomarkers [aerated lung volume, lung tissue (including lesions) volume, total lung volume and mean lung density], describing normal development, lung infections, inflammation, fibrosis and therapy. Free-breathing mice underwent micro-CT before and repeatedly after induction of lung disease (bleomycin-induced fibrosis, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis) and therapy (imatinib). The four lung biomarkers were quantified. After the last time point, we performed pulmonary function tests and isolated the lungs for histology. None of the biomarkers remained stable during longitudinal follow-up of adult healthy mouse lungs, implying that biomarkers should be compared with age-matched controls upon intervention. Early inflammation and progressive fibrosis led to a substantial increase in total lung volume, which affects the interpretation of aerated lung volume, tissue volume and mean lung density measures. Upon treatment of fibrotic lung disease, the improvement in aerated lung volume and function was not accompanied by a normalization of the increased total lung volume. Significantly enlarged lungs were also present in models of rapidly and slowly progressing lung infections. The data suggest that total lung volume changes could partly reflect a compensatory mechanism that occurs during disease progression in mice. Our findings underscore the importance of quantifying total lung volume in addition to aerated lung or lesion volumes to accurately document growth and potential compensatory mechanisms in mouse models of

  12. Clinical application of Patlak plot CT-GFR in animals with upper urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kate; Dunn, Marilyn; Carmel, Eric Norman; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), an important parameter of renal function, is difficult to assess clinically. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen measurements lack sensitivity, whereas radionuclide determination of GFR is not always available and requires postinjection patient isolation. GFR can be determined using computed tomography (CT), most commonly via Patlak plot analysis. Four adult cats, two adult dogs, and a foal underwent abdominal CT under general anesthesia for various diseases of the upper urinary tract. CT-GFR was measured with a single-slice dynamic acquisition and Patlak plot analysis. In five animals, the total CT-GFR appeared to be below normal, corresponding with mild (two animals) and moderate (two animals) increases of serum creatinine in four. In the two animals with normal or increased CT-GFR, serum creatinine was within the reference values. A significant negative logarithmic relationship was found between CT-GFR and serum creatinine values (P = 0.008; r2 = 0.75). No complications occurred during or following CT-GFR. CT examination provided clinically relevant information in 3/5 patients with possible ureteral obstruction and in 3/3 patients with suspected ureteral calculi. Single-slice dynamic CT-GFR was practical and provided clinically useful information in this small series of patients undergoing CT of the upper urinary tract. There was a significant relationship between CT-GFR and serum creatinine values, which supports the clinical potential of CT-GFR and justifies further investigation of this technique. PMID:20806874

  13. Automatic Liver Segmentation from CT Images Using Single-Block Linear Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Automatic liver segmentation not only plays an important role in the analysis of liver disease, but also reduces the cost and humanity's impact in segmentation. In addition, liver segmentation is a very challenging task due to countless anatomical variations and technical difficulties. Many methods have been designed to overcome these challenges, but these methods still need to be improved to obtain the desired segmentation precision. In this paper, a fast algorithm is proposed for liver extraction from CT images with single-block linear detection. The proposed method does not require iteration; thus, the computational time and complexity are decreased enormously. In addition, the initialization is not crucial in the algorithm, so the algorithm's robustness and specificity are improved. The experimental evaluation of the proposed method revealed effective segmentation in normal and abnormal (liver hemangioma and liver cancer) abdominal CT images. The average sensitivity, accuracy, and specificity for liver cancer are 96.59%, 98.65%, and 99.03%, respectively. The results of image segmentation approximate the manual segmentation results by the technical doctor. Moreover, our method shows superior flexibility to newly published method with comparable performance. The advantage of our method is verified with experimental results, which is described in detail.

  14. Measuring Abdominal Circumference and Skeletal Muscle From a Single Cross-Sectional Computed Tomography Image: A Step-by-Step Guide for Clinicians Using National Institutes of Health ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Perez, Sandra L; Haus, Jacob M; Sheean, Patricia; Patel, Bimal; Mar, Winnie; Chaudhry, Vivek; McKeever, Liam; Braunschweig, Carol

    2016-03-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans provide numerous opportunities for body composition analysis, including quantification of abdominal circumference, abdominal adipose tissues (subcutaneous, visceral, and intermuscular), and skeletal muscle (SM). CT scans are commonly performed for diagnostic purposes in clinical settings, and methods for estimating abdominal circumference and whole-body SM mass from them have been reported. A supine abdominal circumference is a valid measure of waist circumference (WC). The valid correlation between a single cross-sectional CT image (slice) at third lumbar (L3) for abdominal SM and whole-body SM is also well established. Sarcopenia refers to the age-associated decreased in muscle mass and function. A single dimensional definition of sarcopenia using CT images that includes only assessment of low whole-body SM has been validated in clinical populations and significantly associated with negative outcomes. However, despite the availability and precision of SM data from CT scans and the relationship between these measurements and clinical outcomes, they have not become a routine component of clinical nutrition assessment. Lack of time, training, and expense are potential barriers that prevent clinicians from fully embracing this technique. This tutorial presents a systematic, step-by-step guide to quickly quantify abdominal circumference as a proxy for WC and SM using a cross-sectional CT image from a regional diagnostic CT scan for clinical identification of sarcopenia. Multiple software options are available, but this tutorial uses ImageJ, a free public-domain software developed by the National Institutes of Health. PMID:26392166

  15. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  16. Angiography and embolisation for solid abdominal organ injury in adults - a current perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there has been a shift towards non-operative management (NOM) for haemodynamically stable patients with abdominal trauma. Embolisation can achieve haemostasis and salvage organs without the morbidity of surgery, and the development and refinement of embolisation techniques has widened the indications for NOM in the management of solid organ injury. Advances in computed tomography (CT) technology allow faster scanning times with improved image quality. These improvements mean that whilst surgery is still usually recommended for patients with penetrating injuries, multiple bleeding sites or haemodynamic instability, the indications for NOM are expanding. We present a current perspective on angiography and embolisation in adults with blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma with illustrative examples from our practice including technical advice. PMID:20584325

  17. Spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Sivarajah, Surendra; Fiscus, Valena; York, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease who presented to the emergency department with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, flank pain with nausea and no history of preceding trauma. The patient had finished a course of azithromycin and oral methylprednisolone 1 day prior to presentation. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan identified changes suggestive of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. The patient did not show signs of acute adrenal insufficiency but was started on steroid replacement therapy because of concerns about possible disease progression. All recognised causes of adrenal haemorrhage were excluded suggesting this was a case of spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage, a rarely reported phenomenon in the literature. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement following 6 days in hospital, taking oral steroid replacement. PMID:27166002

  18. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies. PMID:26039773

  19. Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer of the Abdominal Aorta Involving the Celiac Trunk Origin and Superior Mesenteric Artery Occlusion: Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Petrocelli, Francesco; Seitun, Sara; Robaldo, Alessandro; Mazzei, Raffaele

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of endovascular treatment in a 64-year-old woman affected by a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the abdominal aorta with a 26-mm pseudoaneurysm involving the celiac trunk (CT) origin and with superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion in the first 30 mm. The patient underwent stenting to treat the SMA occlusion and subsequent deployment of a custom-designed fenestrated endovascular stent-graft to treat the PAU involving the CT origin. Follow-up at 6 months after device placement demonstrated no complications, and there was complete thrombosis of the PAU and patency of the two branch vessels.

  20. Falx Cerebri Ossification: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Natsis, K; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, K; Tarazi, L; Chondromatidou, S; Papapostolou, P; Papastergiou, C; Emmanouilidou, M

    2006-11-30

    During the last three years, CT and MRI brain scans of 40 patients revealed falx cerebri partial ossification as an incidental finding. The patients had been admitted for brain CT and MRI for several reasons. In most cases, there was no problem in the differential diagnosis of falx cerebri ossification during interpretation of the cases. In a few cases, the lesion should be distinguished from calcified meningioma, small hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure and in one case there was also meningeal infiltration of breast cancer. In these cases both CT and MRI scans of the brain were evaluated and a definite diagnosis was made. PMID:24351265

  1. CT of osteomyelitis of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Golimbu, C.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed in 17 adults with osteomyelitis of the spine. The dominant features were paravertebral soft-tissue swelling, abscess formation, and bone erosion. In two patients there were no findings indicative of osteomyelitis on conventional radiographs, but CT revealed paravertebral abscesses and bone lysis, helping to establish the diagnosis of osteomyelitis, chiefly because of its ability to detect early erosion of spongy vertabral bone, disk involvement, paravertebral soft-tissue swelling or abscess, and extension of the pathology into the spinal canal. Furthermore, CT facilitated closed-needle biopsy, helping to establish the pathologic diagnosis.

  2. Head CT (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  3. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  4. CT appearance of splenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  5. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-21

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  6. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-04

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  7. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  8. Role of radiological-assisted cytology in intra-abdominal lesions: A 3 years’ experience in a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Dosi, Shilpi; Gupta, Garima; Kawatra, Mallika; Chakrabarti, Preeti Rihal; Agrawal, Purti; Jain, Mukul Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fine needle aspiration (FNA) with assistance of radiological tools such as ultrasonography (USG) and computed tomography (CT) is an effective and safe technique for diagnosing intra-abdominal neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. Aims and Objectives: (1) To assess the utility of image-guided cytology in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal lesions. (2) To categorize various intra-abdominal lesions according to their site of occurrence and study their cytomorphological features. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the Department of Pathology between January 2012 and January 2015. A total of 174 cases with intra-abdominal lesions were included in the study. Results: In our study, diagnostic yield was 84.5%. The mean age was found to be 52 years with M: F ratio 1.1:1. We found that 92 (52.87%) cases were in hepatobiliary region, 33 (18.96%) in adnexa, 13 (7.47%) in pancreatic-ampullary region, 14 (8.04%) in unknown abdominal lumps, 8 (4.6%) in lymph nodes, 6 (3.4%) in renal, 5 (2.87%) in retroperitoneum, 2 (1.1%) in omental nodules, and 1 (0.5%) in splenic mass. Of total 174 cases, 106 (61%) cases were malignant, 10 (5.7%) benign, 16 (9.1%) inflammatory, 27 (15.5%) inadequate, and 15 (8.7%) suspicious for malignancy. Conclusion: Ultrasound and CT-guided FNA cytology had a significant role in diagnosis of palpable and nonpalpable intra-abdominal lesions. Being a relatively quick and safe method, it also avoids invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:27127738

  9. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  10. Functional dissection of the Hox protein Abdominal-B in Drosophila cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Zongzhao; Yang, Xingke; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 CRM was identified to be the posterior spiracle enhancer of gene cut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ct340 is under the direct transcriptional control of Hox protein Abd-B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An efficient cloning system was developed to assay protein-DNA interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. -- Abstract: Hox transcription factors regulate the morphogenesis along the anterior-posterior (A/P) body axis through the interaction with small cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) of their target gene, however so far very few Hox CRMs are known and have been analyzed in detail. In this study we have identified a new Hox CRM, ct340, which guides the expression of the cell type specification gene cut (ct) in the posterior spiracle under the direct control of the Hox protein Abdominal-B (Abd-B). Using the ct340 enhancer activity as readout, an efficient cloning system to generate VP16 activation domain fusion protein was developed to unambiguously test protein-DNA interaction in Drosophila cell culture. By functionally dissecting the Abd-B protein, new features of Abd-B dependent target gene regulation were detected. Due to its easy adaptability, this system can be generally used to map functional domains within sequence-specific transcriptional factors in Drosophila cell culture, and thus provide preliminary knowledge of the protein functional domain structure for further in vivo analysis.

  11. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving {>=}10 Gy (V{sub 10}), 15 Gy (V{sub 15}), and 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, and V{sub 20} were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Sessa, Barbara; Trinci, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Baseline ultrasound is essential in the early assessment of patients with a huge haemoperitoneum undergoing an immediate abdominal surgery; nevertheless, even with a highly experienced operator, it is not sufficient to exclude parenchymal injuries. More recently, a new ultrasound technique using second generation contrast agents, named contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been developed. This technique allows all the vascular phase to be performed in real time, increasing ultrasound capability to detect parenchymal injuries, enhancing some qualitative findings, such as lesion extension, margins and its relationship with capsule and vessels. CEUS has been demonstrated to be almost as sensitive as contrast-enhanced CT in the detection of traumatic injuries in patients with low-energy isolated abdominal trauma, with levels of sensitivity and specificity up to 95%. Several studies demonstrated its ability to detect lesions occurring in the liver, spleen, pancreas and kidneys and also to recognize active bleeding as hyperechoic bands appearing as round or oval spots of variable size. Its role seems to be really relevant in paediatric patients, thus avoiding a routine exposure to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, CEUS is strongly operator dependent, and it has some limitations, such as the cost of contrast media, lack of panoramicity, the difficulty to explore some deep regions and the poor ability to detect injuries to the urinary tract. On the other hand, it is timesaving, and it has several advantages, such as its portability, the safety of contrast agent, the lack to ionizing radiation exposure and therefore its repeatability, which allows follow-up of those traumas managed conservatively, especially in cases of fertile females and paediatric patients. PMID:26607647

  13. Imaging patterns with 99mTc-PIPIDA in evaluating abdominal pain

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.F.; Gordon, L.; Selby, J.B. Sr.

    1983-11-01

    A random retrospective review of hepatobiliary scans on 86 adult patients with abdominal pain revealed four distinct imaging patterns: normal, cystic duct obstruction, obstructive, and sick liver pattern. A normal pattern was found to exclude acute cholecystitis and was the pattern most frequently observed.

  14. CT imaging signs of surgically proven bowel trauma.

    PubMed

    LeBedis, Christina A; Anderson, Stephan W; Bates, David D B; Khalil, Ramy; Matherly, David; Wing, Heidi; Burke, Peter A; Soto, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and interobserver agreement of individual CT findings as well as the bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) in surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was IRB approved and consent was waived. All patients 14 years or older who sustained surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma between 1/1/2004 and 6/30/2015 were included. Admission trauma MDCT scans were independently interpreted by two abdominal fellowship-trained radiologists who recorded the following CT findings: intraperitoneal fluid, mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding, bowel wall thickening/hematoma, active intravenous contrast extravasation, free intraperitoneal air, bowel wall discontinuity, and focal bowel hypoenhancement. Subsequently, the electronic medical records of the included patients, admission abdominal physical exam results, admission white blood cell count, and findings at exploratory laparotomy of the included patients were recorded. Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The incidence and interobserver agreement of the CT findings were as follows: intraperitoneal fluid 93.9 %, kappa = 0.784 (good); mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding 84.8 %, kappa = 0.718 (good); bowel wall thickening/hematoma 42.4 %, kappa = 0.491 (moderate); active IV contrast extravasation 36.3 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); free intraperitoneal air 21.2 %, kappa = 0.904 (very good), bowel wall discontinuity 6.1 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); and focal bowel hypoenhancement 6.1 %, kappa = 0.468 (moderate). An absence of the specified CT findings was encountered in 9.1 % with surgically proven bowel injuries (kappa = 1.00, perfect). In our study, 9/16 patients or 56.3 % had a bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) of 2 or more as defined by McNutt et al. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg 78(1):105-111, 2014). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid and

  15. Low-dose Computed Tomography in a Pregnant Woman with a Ruptured Pseudoaneurysm of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Ramac, Jelena Popić; Vidjak, Vinko; Skegro, Dinko; Duić, Zeljko; Blasković, Darko; Erdelez, Lidija; Skopljanac-Macina, Andrija; Suknaić, Slaven; Slavica, Marko; Leder, Nikola Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Imaging the pregnant patient presents a unique challenge to radiologist due to the risk of radiation to the conceptus (embryo/fetus). A rare case of a successfully recognized and treated pseudoaneurysm (PA) of the abdominal aorta is to be presented. The pseudoaneurysm occurred in the third trimester and had a favorable outcome for the mother and the baby. Emergent abdominal ultrasound (US) is the first modality in diagnostic algorithm for the rupture of aortic aneurysm in a pregnant woman. It provides the most rapid diagnostic information, although intestinal gas and abdominal tenderness may limit its accuracy. To confirm the findings, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or CT angiography (CTA) can be used. In our case, the diagnosis was established using a color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdomen and was later confirmed by a low dose CT scan of the abdominal aorta. MRA in such cases have some disadvantages. At many health centers, the monitoring of patients with acute ruptures is more difficult in the MR suite than at the CT scanner. MRA angiographic images are also subject to degradation by multiple artifacts and the visualization of the distal vasculature is suboptimal and inferior to the one done by CTA. Due to fetal movements, a small quantity of fresh blood can be overlooked by MR. MRA is often not available on a 24-hours basis, and the time required for making a diagnosis can preclude the use of MRA in an unstable patient. For this reason, we used a low dose CTA protocol to confirm the diagnosis. Low dose scanning protocols in CT can obtain sufficient diagnostic information while reducing the risk of radiation. A particular focus is put on the outline of new concepts for dose management and optimization. We used new approaches based on tube current modulation. The birth was induced by an urgent Caesarean section followed by a resection of a pseudoaneurysm and a reconstruction of the aorta with an end-to-end vascular prosthesis. PMID:26898082

  16. [Abdominal splenosis: an often underdiagnosed entity].

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Bello-Arqués, P; Pelegrí-Martínez, L; Hervás-Benito, I; Loaiza-Góngora, J L; Falgas-Lacueva, M; Ruiz-Llorca, C; Pérez-Velasco, R; Mateo-Navarro, A

    2011-01-01

    Splenosis is defined as the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue because of a ruptured spleen due to trauma or surgery. It is a benign and incidental finding, although imaging tests may sometimes orient toward malignancy simulating renal tumors, abdominal lymphomas, endometriosis, among other. We report the case of a 42-year old male in whom a MRI was performed after a study due to abdominal pain. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed in the abdomen, suggestive of lymphoproliferative disease. As an important background, splenectomy was carried out due to abdominal trauma at age 9. After several studies, it was decided to perform a (99m)Tc-labeled heat-damaged red blood cell scintigraphy that showed multiple pathological deposits distributed throughout the abdomen, and even the pelvis, being consistent with splenosis. PMID:20570413

  17. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  18. Flap Coverage of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Justin M.; Broyles, Justin M.; Baumann, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex defects of the anterior abdomen is both challenging and technically demanding for reconstructive surgeons. Advancements in the use of pedicle and free tissue transfer along with the use of bioprosthetic and synthetic meshes have provided for novel approaches to these complex defects. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of abdominal wall and lower extremity anatomy in combination with insight into the design, implementation, and limitations of various flaps is essential to solve these complex clinical problems. Although these defects can be attributed to a myriad of etiologic factors, the objectives in abdominal wall reconstruction are consistent and include the restoration of abdominal wall integrity, protection of intraabdominal viscera, and the prevention of herniation. In this article, the authors review pertinent anatomy and the various local, regional, and distant flaps that can be utilized in the reconstruction of these complex clinical cases of the anterior abdomen. PMID:23372457

  19. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    PubMed

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  20. Intra-abdominal textiloma. A retained surgical sponge mimicking a gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Noriyuki; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Uemura, Mamoru; Nishitani, Akiko; Souma, Yoshihito; Nishida, Toshirou

    2008-01-01

    We describe a unique case of intra-abdominal textiloma (granuloma due to a retained foreign body), which mimicked a gastric tumor on preoperative imaging studies. A 78-year-old asymptomatic patient with a past history of a gastrectomy was referred for evaluation of an intra-abdominal mass lesion, which was incidentally observed on a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repeated CT with a higher resolution demonstrated a 5-cm heterogeneously enhanced mass with a distinct feeding artery. These findings were all compatible with a tumorous lesion originating in the gastric remnant, most likely gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor. A diagnosis of textiloma was immediately made during surgery, and it was confirmed pathologically postoperatively. The feeding artery that appeared on CT images, which was a major reason for the false diagnosis, was considered to have resulted from a slow but continuous inflammation reaction around the retained surgical sponge. Surgeons should therefore always take the possibility of textilomas into consideration even with typical tumorous characteristics on preoperative imaging studies, especially in patients with a history of prior abdominal surgery. PMID:18516538

  1. Crossed Renal Ectopia without Fusion: An Uncommon Cause of Abdominal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ratola, Ana; Almiro, Maria Miguel; Lacerda Vidal, Rita; Neves, Nuno; Bicho, Adelaide; Figueiredo, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is a rare congenital anomaly usually associated with fused kidneys (90%). Most cases are asymptomatic and remain undiagnosed. We report an unusual case of nonfused crossed renal ectopia. The 11-year-old adolescent female patient was admitted with abdominal pain, anorexia, weight loss, and periumbilical mass. Although the initial clinical suspicion was a tumoral lesion, abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance examination revealed crossed renal ectopia without fusion. The renal ectopy was incidentally diagnosed, as described in 20 to 30% of cases. In this case, the associated nonspecific symptoms were a coincidence. PMID:26290762

  2. [Treatment of pain in advanced-stage intra-abdominal neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Polati, E; Finco, G; Rigo, V; Gottin, L; Pinaroli, A M; Iacono, C; Mangiante, G; Serio, G; Ischia, S

    1993-01-01

    Different types of pain are present in far advanced intra-abdominal cancer, sometimes in the same site too. An accurate semeiological analysis of pain is important because different types of pain often differently respond to the available therapeutical tools. In this paper the results and the complications of the most important methods of pain management in far advanced intra-abdominal cancer are examined. Analysis of the data reveals that the association of more methods, pharmacological and non, should be a rule rather than the exception. PMID:7923502

  3. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kentaro; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After ruling out common causes of recurrent abdominal pain, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was considered as a potential diagnosis. Genetic tests revealed multiple heterozygote mutations, which may be associated with FMF. Patients with Mediterranean fever mutations may present with atypical presentations without fever, like in this case. Astute clinical suspicion is required to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:22505824

  4. Use of In-labeled autologous leukocytes to image an abdominal abscess in a horse

    SciTech Connect

    Koblik, P.D.; Lofstedt, J.; Jakowski, R.M.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-06-15

    Indium 111-labeled autologous leukocytes were used to image an abdominal abscess in a horse with a palpable abdominal mass and history of Streptococcus equi infection. A focal area of radioactivity was identified in the location corresponding to the abscess. Imaging of this focal uptake was optimal 48 hours after injection. Similar scans obtained in 2 clinically normal horses revealed no evidence of focal radioactivity in this region. The cell labeling procedure gave acceptable labeling efficiency (87.5%) but an excessive number of damaged WBC, resulting in persistent lung radioactivity on all images. No adverse effects were noted. Radiation measured in the horse and its excreta were well within acceptable limits.

  5. Small bowel intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum after blunt abdominal trauma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Benjelloun, El Bachir; Ousadden, Abdelmalek; Ibnmajdoub, Karim; Mazaz, Khalid; Taleb, Khalid Ait

    2009-01-01

    Intussusception with the Meckel's diverticulum is a rare but well-known cause of small bowel obstruction in the adult. After blunt abdominal trauma, intussusception is exceedingly rare and has been reported previously only in few cases. We present a case of a previously healthy 28-year-old man developing four days after blunt abdominal trauma signs of small bowel obstruction. Ileo-ileal intussusception was suggested by computed tomography. Exploration revealed ileo-ileal intussusception with Meckel's diverticulum. A diverticulectomy with small bowel resection was performed. PMID:19419572

  6. Delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ferrella, T J

    1992-04-01

    The case of a 46-year-old man complaining of acute abdominal discomfort is presented. The patient fell 3 ft and injured his abdomen in the right upper quadrant four days before his emergency department visit. The complete workup revealed an acutely ruptured middle colic artery. The presenting symptoms, laboratory work, differential diagnosis, computed tomography scan, treatment, and follow-up are reviewed. This case is unusual in that delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma had not been described previously. PMID:1554184

  7. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  8. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  9. Diagnostic Imaging of Fetal and Neonatal Abdominal and Soft Tissue Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Usha D; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and staging of prenatal and neonatal tumors, and is essential in treatment planning. Though obstetrical ultrasound is the first choice prenatally, fetal MRI continues to play an increasing role as experience with this imaging modality increases. In the neonate, in addition to ultrasound and MRI, CT and nuclear medicine studies can also play an important role. We describe the prenatal and neonatal imaging findings of some of the most common congenital abdominal and soft tissue neoplasms including neuroblastoma, renal, liver and soft tissue tumors. PMID:26168940

  10. [Gas-containing gallstones: value of the "Mercedes-Benz" sign at CT examination].

    PubMed

    Delabrousse, E; Bartholomot, B; Narboux, Y; Barrali, E; Chirouze, C; Kastler, B

    2000-11-01

    Gas-containing gallstones are well-known in vitro. The typical triradiate arrangement of fissures filled with gas, first described on abdominal plain films, was named by Meyers the "Mercedes-Benz" sign. This sign is absent of the recent literature. We report a case where gas was the only CT sign suggesting the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder. PMID:11104980

  11. Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Thomas; Thomas, Kotsis; Tympa, Aliki; Aliki, Tympa; Kalinis, Aris; Aris, Kalinis; Vasilopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Vasilopoulos; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Kassiani, Theodoraki

    2011-10-01

    Although the mortality rate after abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture approximates 90% despite the urgent management, a few cases of chronic rupture and delayed repair have been reported in the world literature; anatomic and hemodynamic reasons occasionally allow for the fortunate course of these patients. We report in this article the case of 76-year-old man with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm who was transferred to our facility 4 weeks after his initial hospitalization in a district institution and who finally had a successful open repair. PMID:21620664

  12. [Abdominal migraine as a cause of chronic recurrent abdominal pain in a 9-years-old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Jarosław; Piasecki, Leszek; Kasner, Jacek; Karczewska, Krystyna

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal migraine is a rarely recognized functional intestinal disorder, manifesting as recurrent paroxysmal abdominal pain of neurogenic origin. The authors describe the 9-years old girl referred to the hospital because of chronic paroxysmal abdominal pain. She did not improve after medication used commonly in functional abdominal disorders (drotaverine, mebeverine, trimebutine). On the ground of various investigations organic causes of abdominal pain were excluded. Carefully completed anamnesis, as well as precise description of the clinical picture of abdominal pain attacks, has lead to the diagnosis of abdominal migraine. According to advice of neurologist the treatment with amitriptyline was introduced. Thereafter a significant improvement was observed. Abdominal migraine has to be taken in to account when diagnosing chronic abdominal pain in children. PMID:16245431

  13. CT Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis and its Prognostic Correlation with CT Severity Index

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajesh; Vyas, Mahendra Mohan; Sharma, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatitis is one of most complex and clinically challenging of all abdominal disorders. USG and abdominal CT are the most commonly used diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of pancreas. Computed Tomography (CT) is highly accurate and sensitive than USG in both diagnosing as well as demonstrating the extent. Early assessment of the cause and severity of acute pancreatitis is of utmost importance for prompt treatment and close monitoring of patient with severe disease. CT is the imaging method of choice for assessing the extent of acute pancreatitis and for evaluating complications. Aim To assess prognostic correlation and clinical outcome of acute pancreatitis on the basis of CT severity index. Materials and Methods A prospective study of 50 cases was carried out in the Department of Radio Diagnosis, with complaint suggestive of acute pancreatitis on the basis of clinical/laboratory/ultrasonography findings were evaluated in Siemens somatom 40 slice CT. The severity of pancreatitis was scored using CT severity index, modified severity index and revised Atlanta classification and classified into mild, moderate, severe categories. Clinical follow-up of the patients was done in terms of the following parameters: Length of hospital stay, Need for surgery or percutaneous intervention, Evidence of infection in any organ system, Occurrence of organ failure- respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic and haematological system, death. The clinical outcome was compared with the currently accepted Balthazar’s CTSI and Modified Mortele’s CTSI and revised Atlanta classification in all the cases. Results Gall stone disease was most common aetiological factor seen in 40% cases, it was more common in females than males. Alcohol was second most common aetiological factor seen in 38% cases and was noted only in males. Pleural effusion was the most common extra-pancreatic complication seen in 46% cases. Balthazar grade C was the most common (40

  14. Consistent Surgeon Evaluations of Three-Dimensional Rendering of PET/CT Scans of the Abdomen of a Patient with a Ductal Pancreatic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Wampole, Matthew E.; Kairys, John C.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Ankeny, Martha L.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) are used for diagnosis and evaluation of cancer patients, requiring surgeons to look through multiple planar images to comprehend the tumor and surrounding tissues. We hypothesized that experienced surgeons would consistently evaluate three-dimensional (3D) presentation of CT images overlaid with PET images when preparing for a procedure. We recruited six Jefferson surgeons to evaluate the accuracy, usefulness, and applicability of 3D renderings of the organs surrounding a malignant pancreas prior to surgery. PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT abdominal scans of a patient with a ductal pancreatic mass were segmented into 3D surface renderings, followed by co-registration. Version A used only the PET/CT image, while version B used the contrast-enhanced CT scans co-registered with the PET images. The six surgeons answered 15 questions covering a) the ease of use and accuracy of models, b) how these models, with/without PET, changed their understanding of the tumor, and c) what are the best applications of the 3D visualization, on a scale of 1 to 5. The six evaluations revealed a statistically significant improvement from version A (score 3.6±0.5) to version B (score 4.4±0.4). A paired-samples t-test yielded t(14) = −8.964, p<0.001. Across the surgeon cohort, contrast-enhanced CT fused with PET provided a more lifelike presentation than standard CT, increasing the usefulness of the presentation. The experienced surgeons consistently reported positive reactions to 3D surface renderings of fused PET and contrast-enhanced CT scans of a pancreatic cancer and surrounding organs. Thus, the 3D presentation could be a useful preparative tool for surgeons prior to making the first incision. This result supports proceeding to a larger surgeon cohort, viewing prospective 3D images from multiple types of cancer. PMID:24086475

  15. Consistent surgeon evaluations of three-dimensional rendering of PET/CT scans of the abdomen of a patient with a ductal pancreatic mass.

    PubMed

    Wampole, Matthew E; Kairys, John C; Mitchell, Edith P; Ankeny, Martha L; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) are used for diagnosis and evaluation of cancer patients, requiring surgeons to look through multiple planar images to comprehend the tumor and surrounding tissues. We hypothesized that experienced surgeons would consistently evaluate three-dimensional (3D) presentation of CT images overlaid with PET images when preparing for a procedure. We recruited six Jefferson surgeons to evaluate the accuracy, usefulness, and applicability of 3D renderings of the organs surrounding a malignant pancreas prior to surgery. PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT abdominal scans of a patient with a ductal pancreatic mass were segmented into 3D surface renderings, followed by co-registration. Version A used only the PET/CT image, while version B used the contrast-enhanced CT scans co-registered with the PET images. The six surgeons answered 15 questions covering a) the ease of use and accuracy of models, b) how these models, with/without PET, changed their understanding of the tumor, and c) what are the best applications of the 3D visualization, on a scale of 1 to 5. The six evaluations revealed a statistically significant improvement from version A (score 3.6±0.5) to version B (score 4.4±0.4). A paired-samples t-test yielded t(14) = -8.964, p<0.001. Across the surgeon cohort, contrast-enhanced CT fused with PET provided a more lifelike presentation than standard CT, increasing the usefulness of the presentation. The experienced surgeons consistently reported positive reactions to 3D surface renderings of fused PET and contrast-enhanced CT scans of a pancreatic cancer and surrounding organs. Thus, the 3D presentation could be a useful preparative tool for surgeons prior to making the first incision. This result supports proceeding to a larger surgeon cohort, viewing prospective 3D images from multiple types of cancer. PMID:24086475

  16. Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (abdominal cocoon) associated with liver cirrhosis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Tanimoto, Akihide; Matsuki, Yasumasa; Hisada, Yuji; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    A case of sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) associated with liver cirrhosis (LC) and complicated by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is reported herein. A 49-year-old Japanese man had undergone peritoneo-venous shunt against refractory ascites due to hepatitis C virus-positive uncompensated LC for 2 years. After he received a diagnosis of DLBCL of the left neck lymph node 3 months before his death, palliative care was given because of his poor general condition. He developed severe abdominal distention and pain over 1 week and was found to have marked ascites and whole bowel lumped together on abdominal CT. At autopsy, the peritoneum was covered with a thick white membrane and the bowel could not be distinguished, which was macroscopically characterized by a cocoon-like appearance. Histology indicated a proliferation of diffusely thickened or hyalinized fibrocollagenous tissue in the entire peritoneum with a slight chronic inflammatory infiltrate and without remarkable change of mucosa. A diagnosis of SEP, also known as abdominal cocoon, was established based on these features. Additionally, in the abdominal cavity, a large amount of serous ascites and multiple peritoneal nodules or masses involved by DLBCL were recognized. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case report of SEP associated with LC and complicated by the invasion of DLBCL in the abdominal cavity. PMID:19712139

  17. Multiple Abdominal Cocoons: An Unusual Presentation of Intestinal Obstruction and a Diagnostic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Mohammad Zain; Dala-Ali, Benan; Ali, Shahanoor; Hashmi, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) or abdominal cocoon is a rare acquired condition with an unknown aetiology. It is characterized by encapsulation of the small bowel by a fibrous membrane and can lead to intestinal obstruction. We present the case of a 42-year-old gentleman with a history of hepatitis C, tuberculosis, and previous abdominal surgery, who presented with subacute intestinal obstruction. Surgical exploration of the abdomen revealed that the entire contents were enclosed into three distinct sacs by a dense fibrous membrane. Excision of the sacs was performed followed by adhesiolysis. This is believed to be the first reported case of multiple cocoons within the abdominal cavity. The case is discussed with reference to the literature. PMID:25893128

  18. Laparoscopic resection of an intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Kawano, Fumihiro; Fujita, Shohei; Omori, Satoshi; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki; Sakaguchi, Asumi; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the alimentary tract is a rare congenital malformation that occurs most often in the abdominal region, whereas esophageal duplication cyst develops typically in the thoracic region but occasionally in the neck and abdominal regions. Esophageal duplication cyst is usually diagnosed in early childhood because of symptoms related to bleeding, infection, and displacement of tissue surrounding the lesion. We recently encountered a rare adult case of esophageal duplication cyst in the abdominal esophagus. A 50-year-old man underwent gastroscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging to investigate epigastric pain and dysphagia that started 3 months earlier. Imaging findings suggested esophageal duplication cyst, and the patient underwent laparoscopic resection followed by intraoperative esophagoscopy to reconstruct the esophagus safely and effectively. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed two layers of smooth muscle in the cystic wall, confirming the diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst. PMID:25883826

  19. Lanthanum carbonate has a radiopaque appearance on the plain abdominal radiography.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Pardo, José; Ibáñez Cánovas, Noelia; Abrisqueta Carrión, Jesús; Luján Mompeán, Juan Antonio; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2016-06-01

    An 84-year-old woman presented to her local emergency department for abdominal pain. Her medical history included hemodialysis in the treatment of chronic renal failure, Parkinson's disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, chronic constipation, appendicectomy and cholecystectomy. The patient complained of diffuse abdominal pain for 4 days, associated with nausea and vomiting in the last 24 hours. Physical examination revealed a soft and depressible abdomen, diffusely painful, without signs of peritoneal irritation. A digital rectal exam revealed large amount of stool in the rectal vault without palpable masses. Blood tests showed a creatinine level of 2.7 mg/dl due to chronic renal failure and the plain abdominal radiography revealed a dolichocolon completely contrasted. The patient denied the realization of any medical imaging-proofs with oral or rectal contrast. Reviewing home treatment, the patient was taking lanthanum carbonate (2 tablets of 750 mg per day) since 1 month ago, a drug that contrasts the digestive tract. Appreciating contrast in the colon, intestinal subocclusion was excluded and the clinical picture was attributed to her chronic constipation. In conclusion, it should be noted that lanthanum carbonate contrasts the digestive tract, with radiopaque appearance on the plain abdominal radiography and without any pathological significance. PMID:27324519

  20. Utility of [18F] Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG PET/CT) in the Initial Staging and Response Assessment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hulikal, Narendra; Gajjala, Sivanath Reddy; Kalawat, Teck Chand; Kottu, Radhika; Amancharla Yadagiri, Lakshmi

    2015-12-01

    In India up to 50 % of breast cancer patients still present as locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). The conventional methods of metastatic work up include physical examination, bone scan, chest & abdominal imaging, and biochemical tests. It is likely that the conventional staging underestimates the extent of initial spread and there is a need for more sophisticated staging procedure. The PET/CT can detect extra-axillary and occult distant metastases and also aid in predicting response to chemotherapy at an early point in time. To evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT in initial staging and response assessment of patients with LABC receiving NACT. A prospective study of all biopsy confirmed female patients diagnosed with LABC receiving NACT from April 2013 to May 2014. The conventional work up included serum chemistry, CECT chest and abdomen and bone scan. A baseline whole body PET/CT was done in all patients. A repeat staging evaluation and a whole body PET/CT was done after 2/3rd cycle of NACT in non-responders and after 3/4 cycles in clinical responders. The histopathology report of the operative specimen was used to document the pathological response. The FDG PET/CT reported distant metastases in 11 of 38 patients, where as conventional imaging revealed metastases in only 6. Almost all the distant lesions detected by conventional imaging were detected with PET/CT, which showed additional sites of metastasis in 3 patients. In 2 patients, PET/CT detected osteolytic bone metastasis which were not detected by bone scan. In 5 patients PET CT detected N3 disease which were missed on conventional imaging. A total of 14 patients had second PET/CT done to assess the response to NACT and 11 patients underwent surgery. Two patients had complete pathological response. Of these 1 patient had complete metabolic and morphologic response and other had complete metabolic and partial morphologic response on second PET/CT scan. The 18 FDG PET/CT can detect more number of

  1. Health Outcomes in US Children with Abdominal Pain at Major Emergency Departments Associated with Race and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Methods Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children’s hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Results Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 – 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 – 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Conclusions Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery. PMID:26267816

  2. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period. PMID:23489768

  3. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  4. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  5. Benign osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis: a review of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Belfi, Lily M; Bartolotta, Roger J; Loftus, Michael L; Wladyka, Christopher; Hentel, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become the standard of care for evaluation and follow-up for a wide range of abdominal and pelvic pathology. Many incidental osseous and articular abnormalities of the pelvis are detected on these studies, most of which have a benign etiology. However, most of these studies are interpreted by nonmusculoskeletal radiologists, who may not be familiar with the CT appearances of these benign musculoskeletal abnormalities. Uncertainty often leads to mischaracterization or unnecessary follow-up, resulting in increased health care costs and patient anxiety. This article reviews the CT appearance of the benign musculoskeletal entities that occur in pelvis. PMID:25433854

  6. Primary Liver Carcinosarcoma and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Beilei; Zhang, Yiqiu; Hou, Jun; Yu, Haojun; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-08-01

    Primary liver carcinosarcoma is a very rare, malignant neoplasm that is concomitantly composed of a mixture of sarcomatous and carcinomatous elements. In the present study, an initial staging FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake in a patient with liver carcinosarcoma composed of hepatocellular carcinoma and rhabdomyosarcoma. Two months after surgical resection, a restaging PET/CT showed rapid progression of the disease with abdominal and lung metastases, indicating aggressive feature of the disease. The case shows the importance to repeat a restaging PET/CT at early time after surgery for a patient with liver carcinosarcoma to monitor disease progression. PMID:27280902

  7. The Different Volume Effects of Small-Bowel Toxicity During Pelvic Irradiation Between Gynecologic Patients With and Without Abdominal Surgery: A Prospective Study With Computed Tomography-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.-Y.; Sung, C.-C.; Ko, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J.; Yang, Kuender D.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of abdominal surgery on the volume effects of small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation in patients with gynecologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: From May 2003 through November 2006, 80 gynecologic patients without (Group I) or with (Group II) prior abdominal surgery were analyzed. We used a computed tomography (CT) planning system to measure the small-bowel volume and dosimetry. We acquired the range of small-bowel volume in 10% (V10) to 100% (V100) of dose, at 10% intervals. The onset and grade of diarrhea during whole-pelvic irradiation were recorded as small-bowel toxicity up to 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions. Results: The volume effect of Grade 2-3 diarrhea existed from V10 to V100 in Group I patients and from V60 to V100 in Group II patients on univariate analyses. The V40 of Group I and the V100 of Group II achieved most statistical significance. The mean V40 was 281 {+-} 27 cm{sup 3} and 489 {+-} 34 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.001) in Group I patients with Grade 0-1 and Grade 2-3 diarrhea, respectively. The corresponding mean V100 of Group II patients was 56 {+-} 14 cm{sup 3} and 132 {+-} 19 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.003). Multivariate analyses revealed that V40 (p = 0.001) and V100 (p = 0.027) were independent factors for the development of Grade 2-3 diarrhea in Groups I and II, respectively. Conclusions: Gynecologic patients without and with abdominal surgery have different volume effects on small-bowel toxicity during whole-pelvic irradiation. Low-dose volume can be used as a predictive index of Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients without abdominal surgery. Full-dose volume is more important than low-dose volume for Grade 2 or greater diarrhea in patients with abdominal surgery.

  8. Cardiopulmonary monitoring in intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malbrain, Manu L N G; Ameloot, Koen; Gillebert, Carl; Cheatham, Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary dysfunction and failure are commonly encountered in the patient with intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) or abdominal compartment syndrome. Accurate assessment and optimization of preload, contractility, and afterload in conjunction with appropriate goal-directed resuscitation and assessment of fluid responsiveness are essential to restore end-organ perfusion. In patients with IAH, the traditional "barometric" preload indicators such as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure are erroneously increased. Volumetric monitoring techniques have been proven to be superior in directing the appropriate resuscitation together with targeted abdominal perfusion pressure. If such limitations are not recognized, misinterpretation of the patient's cardiac status is likely, resulting in inappropriate and potentially detrimental therapy. IAH also markedly affects the mechanical properties of the chest wall and consequently also the respiratory function. Altered mechanical properties of the chest wall may limit ventilation, influence the work of breathing, affect the interaction between the respiratory muscles, hasten the development of respiratory failure, and interfere with gas exchange. Pulmonary monitoring is important to understand the relationships between intra-abdominal pressure and chest wall mechanics and the impact of IAH on ventilator-induced lung injury, lung distention, recruitment, and lung edema. PMID:21944448

  9. Intra-abdominal sepsis after hepatic resection.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, R F; Blenkharn, J I; Edwards, W J; Orloff, M; Blumgart, L H; Benjamin, I S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and thirty hepatic resections performed over an 8-year period were reviewed for evidence of postoperative intra-abdominal sepsis. Of 126 patients who survived for more than 24 hours after operation, 36 developed culture positive intra-abdominal collections (28.6%). Significant independent variables associated with the development of intra-abdominal sepsis were diagnoses of trauma or cholangiocarcinoma, and the need for reoperation to control hemorrhage during the postoperative period. Before 1984, infected fluid collections were treated predominantly by operative drainage, but this has largely been replaced by percutaneous methods, which have proven effective in most cases. Eighteen (50%) of the infections were caused by a mixed bacterial culture, with Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli being the most common isolates. Six patients with clinical signs of sepsis had a sterile fluid collection drained with complete relief of symptoms. This review suggests that intra-abdominal sepsis is a frequent complication after hepatic resection, and can often be managed successfully by nonoperative percutaneous drainage. PMID:2493775

  10. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  11. Abdominal injury due to child abuse.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter M; Norton, Catherine M; Dunstan, Frank D; Kemp, Alison M; Yates, David W; Sibert, Jonathan R

    Diagnosis of abuse in children with internal abdominal injury is difficult because of limited published work. We aimed to ascertain the incidence of abdominal injury due to abuse in children age 0-14 years. 20 children (identified via the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit) had abdominal injuries due to abuse and 164 (identified via the Trauma Audit and Research Network) had injuries to the abdomen due to accident (112 by road-traffic accidents, 52 by falls). 16 abused children were younger than 5 years. Incidence of abdominal injury due to abuse was 2.33 cases per million children per year (95% CI 1.43-3.78) in children younger than 5 years. Six abused children died. 11 abused children had an injury to the gut (ten small bowel) compared with five (all age >5 years) who were injured by a fall (relative risk 5.72 [95% CI 2.27-14.4]; p=0.0002). We have shown that small-bowel injuries can arise accidentally as a result of falls and road-traffic accidents but they are significantly more common in abused children. Therefore, injuries to the small bowel in young children need special consideration, particularly if a minor fall is the explanation. PMID:16023514

  12. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. PMID:25666642

  13. Abdominal wall herniae and their underlying pathology

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Emma; Al-Akash, Musallam

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting as a strangulated inguinal hernia. We review the current literature regarding the incidence of underlying pathology in patients presenting with abdominal wall herniae and discuss the need for histological assessment of the hernia sac in selected patients. We highlight the importance of assessing for and being aware of significant underlying pathology in certain patients. PMID:26855074

  14. Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Helicobacter cinaedi

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Takamasa; Tamura, Atsushi; Lefor, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare human pathogen which has various clinical manifestations such as cellulitis, bacteremia, arthritis, meningitis, and infectious endocarditis. We report an abdominal aortic aneurysm infected with Helicobacter cinaedi, treated successfully with surgical repair and long-term antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26885430

  15. An automatic method for colon segmentation in CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Bert, Alberto; Dmitriev, Ivan; Agliozzo, Silvano; Pietrosemoli, Natalia; Mandelkern, Mark; Gallo, Teresa; Regge, Daniele

    2009-06-01

    An automatic method for the segmentation of the colonic wall is proposed for abdominal computed tomography (CT) of the cleansed and air-inflated colon. This multistage approach uses an adaptive 3D region-growing algorithm, with a self-adjusting growing condition depending on local variations of the intensity at the air-tissue boundary. The method was evaluated using retrospectively collected CT scans based on visual segmentation of the colon by expert radiologists. This evaluation showed that the procedure identifies 97% of the colon segments, representing 99.8% of the colon surface, and accurately replicates the anatomical profile of the colonic wall. The parameter settings and performance of the method are relatively independent of the scanner and acquisition conditions. The method is intended for application to the computer-aided detection of polyps in CT colonography. PMID:19304454

  16. Cis and Trans Interactions between the Iab Regulatory Regions and Abdominal-a and Abdominal-B in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, J. E.; Sakonju, S.

    1995-01-01

    The infra-abdominal (iab) elements in the bithorax complex of Drosophila melanogaster regulate the transcription of the homeotic genes abdominal-A (abd-A) and Abdominal-B (Abd-B) in cis. Here we describe two unusual aspects of regulation by the iab elements, revealed by an analysis of an unexpected complementation between mutations in the Abd-B transcription unit and these regulatory regions. First, we find that iab-6 and iab-7 can regulate Abd-B in trans. This iab trans regulation is insensitive to chromosomal rearrangements that disrupt transvection effects at the nearby Ubx locus. In addition, we show that a transposed Abd-B transcription unit and promoter on the Y chromosome can be activated by iab elements located on the third chromosome. These results suggest that the iab regions can regulate their target promoter located at a distant site in the genome in a manner that is much less dependent on homologue pairing than other transvection effects. The iab regulatory regions may have a very strong affinity for the target promoter, allowing them to interact with each other despite the inhibitory effects of chromosomal rearrangements. Second, by generating abd-A mutations on rearrangement chromosomes that break in the iab-7 region, we show that these breaks induce the iab elements to switch their target promoter from Abd-B to abd-A. These two unusual aspects of iab regulation are related by the iab-7 breakpoint chromosomes that prevent iab elements from acting on Abd-B and allow them to act on abd-A. We propose that the iab-7 breaks prevent both iab trans regulation and target specificity by disrupting a mechanism that targets the iab regions to the Abd-B promoter. PMID:7713435

  17. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in abdominal diseases.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Danieli, Roberta; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies of the abdominal region are established in conventional nuclear medicine because of their easy and large availability, even in the most peripheral hospitals. It is well known that SPECT imaging demonstrates function, rather than anatomy. It is useful in the diagnosis of various disorders because of its ability to detect changes caused by disease before identifiable anatomic correlates and clinical manifestations exist. However, SPECT data frequently need anatomic landmarks to precisely depict the site of a focus of abnormal tracer uptake and the structures containing normal activity; the fusion with morphological studies can furnish an anatomical map to scintigraphic findings. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or magnetic resonance images have been demonstrated to be time consuming and not useful for routine clinical employment. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which provide SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images co-registered by means of the hardware, has created a new scenario. The first data have been mainly reported in oncology patients and indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT studies of abdominal diseases, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas located near vascular structures, in precisely detecting and localizing active splenic tissue caused by splenosis in splenectomy patients, in providing important information for therapy optimization in patients submitted to hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy, in accurately identifying the involved bowel segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and in correctly localizing the bleeding sites in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17161039

  18. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  19. ABDOMINAL OBESITY, MUSCLE COMPOSITION, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The independent relationships between visceral and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) depots, muscle composition, and insulin sensitivity were examined in 40 abdominally obese, premenopausal women. Measurements included glucose disposal by euglycemic clamp, muscle composition by computed to...

  20. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    SciTech Connect

    Daneman, A.; Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.