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Sample records for abdominal ct scans

  1. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly very quickly. This test may be used to look ...

  2. Are facilities following best practices of pediatric abdominal CT scans?

    PubMed

    Nosek, Amy E; Hartin, Charles W; Bass, Kathryn D; Glick, Philip L; Caty, Michael G; Dayton, Merril T; Ozgediz, Doruk E

    2013-05-01

    Established guidelines for pediatric abdominal CT scans include reduced radiation dosage to minimize cancer risk and the use of intravenous (IV) contrast to obtain the highest-quality diagnostic images. We wish to determine if these practices are being used at nonpediatric facilities that transfer children to a pediatric facility. Children transferred to a tertiary pediatric facility over a 16-mo period with abdominal CT scans performed for evaluation of possible appendicitis were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, diagnosis, radiation dosage, CT contrast use, and scan quality. If CT scans were repeated, the radiation dosage between facilities was compared using Student t-test. Ninety-one consecutive children transferred from 29 different facilities had retrievable CT scan images and clinical information. Half of CT scans from transferring institutions used IV contrast. Due to poor quality or inconclusive CT scans, 19 patients required a change in management. Children received significantly less radiation at our institution compared to the referring adult facility for the same body area scanned on the same child (9.7 mSv versus 19.9 mSv, P = 0.0079). Pediatric facilities may be using less radiation per CT scan due to a heightened awareness of radiation risks and specific pediatric CT scanning protocols. The benefits of IV contrast for the diagnostic yield of pediatric CT scans should be considered to obtain the best possible image and to prevent additional imaging. Every facility performing pediatric CT scans should minimize radiation exposure, and pediatric facilities should provide feedback and education to other facilities scanning children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Colitis detection on abdominal CT scans by rich feature hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lay, Nathan; Wei, Zhuoshi; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Colitis is inflammation of the colon due to neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn disease), infection and immune compromise. Colitis is often associated with thickening of the colon wall. The wall of a colon afflicted with colitis is much thicker than normal. For example, the mean wall thickness in Crohn disease is 11-13 mm compared to the wall of the normal colon that should measure less than 3 mm. Colitis can be debilitating or life threatening, and early detection is essential to initiate proper treatment. In this work, we apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals to detect potential colitis on CT scans. Our method first generates around 3000 category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using selective search. Then, a fixed-length feature vector is extracted from each region proposal using a CNN. Finally, each region proposal is classified and assigned a confidence score with linear SVMs. We applied the detection method to 260 images from 26 CT scans of patients with colitis for evaluation. The detection system can achieve 0.85 sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  4. Scanning and War: Utility of FAST and CT in the Assessment of Battlefield Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Smith, Iain M; Naumann, David N; Marsden, Max E R; Ballard, Mark; Bowley, Douglas M

    2015-08-01

    To determine utilization and accuracy of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and computed tomography (CT) in a mature military trauma system to inform service provision for future conflicts. FAST and CT scans undertaken by attending radiologists contribute to surgical decision making for battlefield casualties at the Joint Force, Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility at Camp Bastion (R3), Afghanistan. Registry data for abdominally injured casualties treated at R3 from July to November 2012 were matched to radiological and surgical records to determine diagnostic accuracy for FAST and CT and their influence on casualty management. A total of 468 casualties met inclusion criteria, of whom 85.0% underwent FAST and 86.1% abdominal CT; 159 (34.0%) had abdominal injuries. For detection of intra-abdominal injury, FAST sensitivity (Sn) was 0.56, specificity (Sp) 0.98, positive predictive value (PPV) 0.87, negative predictive value (NPV) 0.90, and accuracy (Acc) 0.89. For CT, Sn was 0.99, Sp 0.99, PPV 0.96, NPV 1.00, and Acc 0.99. Forty-six solid organ injuries were identified in 38 patients by CT; 17 were managed nonoperatively. A further 61 patients avoided laparotomy after CT confirmed extra-abdominal wounds only. The negative laparotomy rate was 3.9%. FAST and CT contribute to triage, guide surgical management, and reduce nontherapeutic laparotomy. When imaging is available, these data challenge current doctrine about inadvisability of nonoperative management of abdominal injury after combat trauma.

  5. Relationship between sudden natural death and abdominal fat evaluated on postmortem CT scans.

    PubMed

    Kaichi, Y; Sakane, H; Higashibori, H; Honda, Y; Tatsugami, F; Baba, Y; Iida, M; Awai, K

    2017-06-01

    This study examined the association between sudden natural death and abdominal fat using postmortem computed tomography (CT) scans. Postmortem CT images at the umbilical level of 241 subjects were used to measure abdominal areas of subcutaneous- and visceral fat, the rate of visceral fat and the waist circumference. Of the study subjects, 174 died of sudden natural death (130 men and 44 women), and 67 died of different causes (46 men and 21 women). All were between 40 and 75 years of age. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent abdominal parameters associated with sudden natural death. By univariate analysis, the areas of subcutaneous and visceral fat were significantly larger in sudden natural death than who died of different causes (subcutaneous fat, odds ratio [OR] = 1.004, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.000-1.007, p  = 0.03; visceral fat, OR = 1.008, 95% CI = 1.003-1.013, p  < 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that the area of visceral fat was an independent factor associated with the risk of sudden natural death (OR = 1.008, 95% CI = 1.002-1.015, p  = 0.02). Postmortem CT revealed that sudden natural death was related to abdominal fat deposits.

  6. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  7. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003330.htm CT scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A computed tomography (CT) scan is an imaging method that uses x- ...

  8. Anatomic characteristics of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm on conventional CT scans: Implications for rupture risk.

    PubMed

    Fillinger, Mark F; Racusin, Jessica; Baker, Robert K; Cronenwett, Jack L; Teutelink, Arno; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Zwolak, Robert M; Powell, Richard J; Walsh, Daniel B; Rzucidlo, Eva M

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze anatomic characteristics of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), with conventional two-dimensional computed tomography (CT), including comparison with control subjects matched for age, gender, and size. Records were reviewed to identify all CT scans obtained at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center or referring hospitals before emergency AAA repair performed because of rupture or acute severe pain (RUP group). CT scans obtained before elective AAA repair (ELEC group) were reviewed for age and gender match with patients in the RUP group. More than 40 variables were measured on each CT scan. Aneurysm diameter matching was achieved by consecutively deleting the largest RUP scan and the smallest ELEC scan to prevent bias. CT scans were analyzed for 259 patients with AAAs: 122 RUP and 137 ELEC. Patients were well matched for age, gender, and other demographic variables or risk factors. Maximum AAA diameter was significantly different in comparisons of all patients (RUP, 6.5 +/- 2 cm vs ELEC, 5.6 +/- 1 cm; P <.0001), and mean diameter of ruptured AAAs was 5 mm smaller in female patients (6.1 +/- 2 cm vs 6.6 +/- 2 cm; P =.007). Two hundred patients were matched for diameter, gender, and age (100 from each group; maximum AAA diameter, 6.0 +/- 1 cm vs 6.0 +/- 1 cm). Analysis of diameter-matched AAAs indicated that most variables were statistically similar in the two groups, including infrarenal neck length (17 +/- 1 mm vs 19 +/- 1 mm; P =.3), maximum thrombus thickness (25 +/- 1 mm vs 23 +/- 1 mm, P =.4), and indices of body habitus, such as [(maximum AAA diameter)/(normal suprarenal aorta diameter)] or [(maximum AAA diameter)/(L3 transverse diameter)]. Multivariate analysis controlling for gender indicated that the most significant variables for rupture were aortic tortuosity (odds ratio [OR] 3.3, indicating greater risk with no or mild tortuosity), diameter asymmetry (OR, 3.2 for a 1-cm difference in major

  9. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  11. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Look before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Nellensteijn, David R; Greuter, Marcel J; El Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new information obtained by CT. CT scans for suspected pediatric abdominal injury performed in our accident and emergency department were retrieved from the radiology registry and analyzed for: injury and hemodynamic parameters, changes in therapy, and radiological interventions. The dose length product (DLP) was used to calculate the effective dose (ED) and with the BEIR VII report we calculated the estimated induced lifetime tumor and mortality risk. Seventy-two patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for suspicion of abdominal injury and eight patients were excluded for hemodynamic instability, leaving 64 hemodynamically stable patients. Four patients died (6%). On the remaining 60 patients, only one laparotomy was performed for suspicion of duodenal perforation. Only in three out of the 64 hemodynamically stable cases (5%), a CT scan brought forward an indication for intervention or change in management. One patient was suspected of a duodenal perforation and underwent a laparotomy. A grade II hepatic laceration, but no duodenal, injury was found. Two patients underwent embolization of the splenic artery. One for an arterial blush caused by splenic laceration as was observed on the contrast enhanced-CT. Patient remained stable and during the angiogram the blush had disappeared. The second patient underwent (prophylactic) selective arterial embolization for having sustained a grade V splenic injury. The median radiation dosage was 11.43 mSv (range 1.19-23.76 mSv) in our patients. The use of the BEIR VII methodology results in an estimated increase in the lifetime tumor incidence of 0.17% (range, 0.05-0.67%) and an estimated increase in lifetime tumor incidence of 0.08% (0

  12. CT Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who may have internal injuries from car accidents or other types of trauma. A CT scan can be used to visualize nearly all parts of the body and is used to diagnose disease or injury as well as to plan medical, surgical or radiation treatment. Why it's done Your doctor may recommend ...

  13. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Snow, Aisling; Milliren, Carly E; Graham, Dionne A; Callahan, Michael J; MacDougall, Robert D; Robertson, Richard L; Taylor, George A

    2017-04-01

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children's hospital admission reports were rated

  14. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative.

  15. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... Risks for a CT scan includes: Being exposed to radiation Allergic reaction to contrast dye CT scans expose you to more radiation than regular ...

  16. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to radiation Allergic reaction to contrast dye CT scans do expose you to more radiation ...

  17. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Risks of CT scans include: Being exposed to radiation Allergic reaction to contrast dye Birth defect if done during pregnancy CT scans ...

  18. Pelvic bone asymmetry in 323 study participants receiving abdominal CT scans.

    PubMed

    Badii, Maziar; Shin, Sonya; Torreggiani, William C; Jankovic, Bojana; Gustafson, Paul; Munk, Peter L; Esdaile, John M

    2003-06-15

    Retrospective review of all CT scans of pelvis and abdomen performed at our institution in October and November 2000. To determine the prevalence and extent of radiographic pelvic asymmetry in a population of patients not preselected for having low back pain. Pelvic asymmetry refers to asymmetric positioning of landmarks on the two sides of the pelvis and may have a structural or functional etiology. Pelvic asymmetry can be associated with the presence of true leg length discrepancy, lead to false diagnosis or inaccurate measurement of leg length discrepancy, or itself be independently associated with back pain. Although the prevalence of pelvic asymmetry has been reported in patients with back pain to be 24-91%, its prevalence in the general population is not known. A total of 323 consecutive CT scans of the pelvis/abdomen were assessed for pelvic asymmetry by one of three examiners. Pelvic asymmetry was defined as an unequal distance from the iliac crests to the acetabuli bilaterally, measured on the anteroposterior scout view of the CT scan. Measurements made on 30 randomly selected scans by the three examiners were used to assess interrater reliability of the measurement method. Pelvic asymmetry ranged in magnitude from -11 mm to 7 mm [right pelvis (mm) - left pelvis (mm)]. Pelvic asymmetry was >5 mm in 17 of 323 (5.3%) and >10 mm in 2 of 323 (0.6%) of the subjects; 172 of 323 (53.3%) had a smaller right hemipelvis (mean asymmetry = -3.0 mm). A total of 95 of 323 (29.4%) had a smaller left hemipelvis (mean asymmetry = 2.1 mm). The intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC(2,1)] between the three observers was high (0.91). Pelvic asymmetry of >5 mm was uncommon, with a prevalence of approximately 5% in the population studied. CT scanography was found to be a practical and reliable method for the assessment of suspected pelvic asymmetry.

  19. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  20. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... CT scan makes detailed pictures of the body very quickly. The test may help look for: An abscess ...

  1. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Healing problems or scar tissue following surgery A CT scan may also be used to guide a surgeon ...

  2. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Body Computed tomography (CT) of the body uses ... of CT Scanning of the Body? What is CT Scanning of the Body? Computed tomography, more commonly ...

  3. Cervical spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical spine; Computed tomography scan of cervical spine; CT scan of cervical spine; Neck CT scan ... table that slides into the center of the CT scanner. Once you are inside the scanner, the ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  5. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... CT scans rapidly makes detailed pictures of the lower back. The test may be used to look for: ...

  6. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms ofmore » peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.« less

  7. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  8. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agatston ... table that slides into the center of the CT scanner. You will lie on your back with ...

  9. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  10. CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    CT stands for computerized tomography. In this procedure, a thin X-ray beam is rotated around the ... D image of a section through the body. CT scans are very detailed and provide excellent information ...

  11. Association between Abdominal Fat (DXA) and Its Subcomponents (CT Scan) before and after Weight Loss in Obese Postmenopausal Women: A MONET Study.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Caroline Y; Brochu, Martin; Messier, Virginie; Lavoie, Marie-Ève; Faraj, May; Doucet, Eric; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Dionne, Isabelle J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Subcutaneous fat (ScF) and visceral fat (VF) measurements using CT scan are expensive and may imply significant radiation doses. Cross-sectional studies using CT scan showed that ScF and VF are significantly correlated with abdominal fat measured by DXA (AF-DXA). The association has not been studied after a weight loss. Objective. To determine (1) the associations between AF-DXA and ScF and VF before and after weight loss and (2) the associations between their changes. Methods. 137 overweight/obese postmenopausal women were divided in two groups (1-caloric restriction or 2-caloric restriction + resistance training). AF was assessed using DXA and CT scan. Results. Correlations between AF-DXA and ScF (before: r = 0.87, after; r = 0.87; P < .01) and, AF-DXA and VF (before: r = 0.61, after; r = 0.69; P < .01) are not different before and after the weight loss. Correlations between delta AF-DXA and delta ScF (r = 0.72; P < .01) or delta VF (r = 0.51; P < .01) were found. Conclusion. The use of AF-DXA as a surrogate for VF after weight loss is questionable, but may be interesting for ScF.

  12. Association between Abdominal Fat (DXA) and Its Subcomponents (CT Scan) before and after Weight Loss in Obese Postmenopausal Women: A MONET Study

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Caroline Y.; Brochu, Martin; Messier, Virginie; Lavoie, Marie-Ève; Faraj, May; Doucet, Éric; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Dionne, Isabelle J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Subcutaneous fat (ScF) and visceral fat (VF) measurements using CT scan are expensive and may imply significant radiation doses. Cross-sectional studies using CT scan showed that ScF and VF are significantly correlated with abdominal fat measured by DXA (AF-DXA). The association has not been studied after a weight loss. Objective. To determine (1) the associations between AF-DXA and ScF and VF before and after weight loss and (2) the associations between their changes. Methods. 137 overweight/obese postmenopausal women were divided in two groups (1-caloric restriction or 2-caloric restriction + resistance training). AF was assessed using DXA and CT scan. Results. Correlations between AF-DXA and ScF (before: r = 0.87, after; r = 0.87; P < .01) and, AF-DXA and VF (before: r = 0.61, after; r = 0.69; P < .01) are not different before and after the weight loss. Correlations between delta AF-DXA and delta ScF (r = 0.72; P < .01) or delta VF (r = 0.51; P < .01) were found. Conclusion. The use of AF-DXA as a surrogate for VF after weight loss is questionable, but may be interesting for ScF. PMID:21603261

  13. 4D-CT scans reveal reduced magnitude of respiratory liver motion achieved by different abdominal compression plate positions in patients with intrahepatic tumors undergoing helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yong, E-mail: hu.yong@zs-hospital.sh.cn; Zhou,

    Purpose: While abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients receiving helical tomotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma, the nature and extent of this effect is not well described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in magnitude of three-dimensional liver motion with abdominal compression using four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) images of several plate positions. Methods: From January 2012 to October 2015, 72 patients with intrahepatic carcinoma and divided into four groups underwent 4D-CT scans to assess respiratory liver motion. Of the 72 patients, 19 underwent abdominal compression of the cephalic area betweenmore » the subxiphoid and umbilicus (group A), 16 underwent abdominal compression of the caudal region between the subxiphoid area and the umbilicus (group B), 11 patients underwent abdominal compression of the caudal umbilicus (group C), and 26 patients remained free breathing (group D). 4D-CT images were sorted into ten-image series, according to the respiratory phase from the end inspiration to the end expiration, and then transferred to treatment planning software. All liver contours were drawn by a single physician and confirmed by a second physician. Liver relative coordinates were automatically generated to calculate the liver respiratory motion in different axial directions to compile the 10 ten contours into a single composite image. Differences in respiratory liver motion were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance test of significance. Results: The average respiratory liver motion in the Y axial direction was 4.53 ± 1.16, 7.56 ± 1.30, 9.95 ± 2.32, and 9.53 ± 2.62 mm in groups A, B, C, and D, respectively, with a significant change among the four groups (p < 0.001). Abdominal compression was most effective in group A (compression plate on the subxiphoid area), with liver displacement being 2.53 ± 0.93, 4.53 ± 1.16, and 2.14 ± 0.92 mm on the X-, Y-, and Z

  14. Pediatric CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  15. CT Scans - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tomography) Scan - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section CT ( ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section CT ( ...

  16. Unindicated multiphase CT scans in non-traumatic abdominal emergencies for women of reproductive age: a significant source of unnecessary exposure.

    PubMed

    Giannitto, Caterina; Campoleoni, Mauro; Maccagnoni, Sara; Angileri, Alessio Salvatore; Grimaldi, Maria Carmela; Giannitto, Nino; De Piano, Francesca; Ancona, Eleonora; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Esposito, Andrea Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    To determine the frequency of unindicated CT phases and the resultant excess of absorbed radiation doses to the uterus and ovaries in women of reproductive age who have undergone CT for non-traumatic abdomino-pelvic emergencies. We reviewed all abdomino-pelvic CT examinations in women of reproductive age (40 years or less), between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2015. We evaluated the appropriateness of each CT phase on the basis of clinical indications, according to ACR appropriateness criteria and evidence-based data from the literature. The doses to uterus and ovaries for each phase were calculated with the CTEXPO software, taking into consideration the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) after measuring the size of every single patient. The final cohort was composed of 76 female patients with an average age of 30 (from 19 to 40 years). In total, 197 CT phases were performed with an average of 2.6 phases per patient. Out of these, 93 (47%) were unindicated with an average of 1.2 inappropriate phases per patient. Unindicated scans were most frequent for appendicitis and unlocalized abdominal pain. The excesses of mean radiation doses to the uterus and ovaries due to unindicated phases were, respectively, of 38 and 33 mSv per patient. In our experience, unindicated additional CT phases were numerous with a significant excess radiation dose without an associated clinical benefit. This excess of radiation could have been avoided by widespread adoption of the ACR appropriateness criteria and evidence-based data from the literature.

  17. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  18. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will be asked to remove jewelry and wear a hospital gown during the study. If you weigh more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms), find out if the CT machine has a weight limit. Too much weight can ...

  19. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... take this medicine. Find out if the CT machine has a weight limit if you weigh more than 300 pounds (135 kilograms). Too much weight can cause damage to the scanner. You will be asked to remove jewelry and wear a hospital gown during the study.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast abdominal CT scans performed as follow-up for patients with an established cancer diagnosis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Semaan, Hassan; Bazerbashi, Mohamad F; Siesel, Geoffrey; Aldinger, Paul; Obri, Tawfik

    2018-03-01

    To determine the accuracy and non-detection rate of cancer related findings (CRFs) on follow-up non-contrast-enhanced CT (NECT) versus contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) images of the abdomen in patients with a known cancer diagnosis. A retrospective review of 352 consecutive CTs of the abdomen performed with and without IV contrast between March 2010 and October 2014 for follow-up of cancer was included. Two radiologists independently assessed the NECT portions of the studies. The reader was provided the primary cancer diagnosis and access to the most recent prior NECT study. The accuracy and non-detection rates were determined by comparing our results to the archived reports as a gold standard. A total of 383 CRFs were found in the archived reports of the 352 abdominal CTs. The average non-detection rate for the NECTs compared to the CECTs was 3.0% (11.5/383) with an accuracy of 97.0% (371.5/383) in identifying CRFs. The most common findings missed were vascular thrombosis with a non-detection rate of 100%. The accuracy for non-vascular CRFs was 99.1%. Follow-up NECT abdomen studies are highly accurate in the detection of CRFs in patients with an established cancer diagnosis, except in cases where vascular involvement is suspected.

  1. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  2. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  3. Pseudocalcification on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Tiruvoipati, R; Balasubramanian, S K; Entwisle, J J; Firmin, R K; Peek, G J

    2007-07-01

    Liquid ventilation with perfluorocarbons is used in severe respiratory failure that cannot be managed by conventional methods. Very little is known about the use of liquid ventilation in paediatric patients with respiratory failure and there are no reports describing the distribution and excretion of perfluorocarbons in paediatric patients with severe respiratory failure. The aim of this report is to highlight the prolonged retention of perfluorocarbons in a paediatric patient, mimicking pulmonary calcification and misleading the interpretation of the chest CT scan. A 10-year-old girl was admitted to our intensive care unit with severe respiratory failure due to miliary tuberculosis. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was used to support gas exchange and partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorodecalin was used to aid in oxygenation, lavage the lungs and clear thick secretions. The patient developed a pneumothorax (fluorothorax) on the next day and PLV was discontinued. Multiple bronchoalveolar lavages were performed to clear thick secretions. With no improvement in lung function over the next month a CT scan of the chest was performed. This revealed extensive pulmonary fibrosis and multiple high attenuation lesions suggestive of pulmonary calcification. To exclude perfluorodecalin as the cause for high attenuation lesions, a sample of perfluorodecalin was scanned to estimate the Hounsfield unit density, which was similar to the density of high attenuation lesions on chest CT scan. High-density opacification should be interpreted with caution, especially following liquid ventilation.

  4. Systemic mastocytosis: CT and US features of abdominal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Avila, N A; Ling, A; Worobec, A S; Mican, J M; Metcalfe, D D

    1997-02-01

    To study the imaging findings in patients with systemic mastocytosis and to correlate the findings with the severity of disease on the basis of an established classification system. Pathologic findings, when available, were correlated with imaging findings. Computed tomographic (CT) and ultrasound (US) scans and corresponding pathologic findings, when available, were retrospectively reviewed in 27 patients with systemic mastocytosis. Only five (19%) of the patients in our series had normal abdominal CT and/or US examination results. Common abdominal imaging findings associated with systemic mastocytosis were hepatosplenomegaly, retroperitoneal adenopathy, periportal adenopathy, mesenteric adenopathy, thickening of the omentum and the mesentery, and ascites. Less common findings included hepatofugal portal venous flow, Budd-Chiari syndrome, cavernous transformation of the portal vein, ovarian mass, and complications such as chloroma. The findings were more common in patients with category II and those with category III disease. Abdominal findings at CT and US are common in patients with systemic mastocytosis. Although the findings in patients with systemic mastocytosis are not specific to the disease, they are useful in directing further studies for diagnostic confirmation and in estimating the extent of systemic involvement.

  5. Paediatric blunt abdominal trauma - are we doing too many computed tomography scans?

    PubMed

    Arnold, M; Moore, S W

    2013-02-14

    Blunt abdominal trauma in childhood contributes significantly to both morbidity and mortality. Selective non-operative management of blunt abdominal trauma in children depends on both diagnostic and clinical factors. Computed tomography (CT) scanning is widely used to facilitate better management. Increased availability of CT may, however, result in its overuse in the management of blunt abdominal trauma in children, which carries significant radiation exposure risks. To evaluate the use and value of CT scanning in the overall management and outcome of blunt abdominal trauma in children in the Tygerberg Academic Hospital trauma unit, Parow, Cape Town, South Africa, before and after improved access to CT as a result of installation of a new rapid CT scanner in the trauma management area (previously the scanner had been 4 floors away). Patients aged 0 - 13 years who were referred with blunt abdominal trauma due to vehicle-related accidents before the introduction of the new CT scanner (group 1, n=66, November 2003 - March 2009) were compared with those seen in the 1-year period after the scanner was installed (group 2, n=37, April 2009 - April 2010). Details of clinical presentation, imaging results and their influence on management were retrospectively reviewed. A follow-up group was evaluated after stricter criteria for abdominal CT scanning (viz. prior evaluation by paediatric surgical personnel) were introduced (group 3, n=14, November 2011 - May 2012) to evaluate the impact of this clinical screening on the rate of negative scans. There were 66 patients in group 1 and 37 in group 2. An apparent increase in CT use with increased availability was accompanied by a marked increase in negative CT scans (38.9% compared with 6.2%; p<0.006). Despite a slightly higher prevalence of associated injuries in group 2, as well as a slightly longer length of hospital stay, there was a similar prevalence of intra-abdominal injuries detected in positive scans in the two groups

  6. [Preoperative CT Scan in middle ear cholesteatoma].

    PubMed

    Sethom, Anissa; Akkari, Khemaies; Dridi, Inès; Tmimi, S; Mardassi, Ali; Benzarti, Sonia; Miled, Imed; Chebbi, Mohamed Kamel

    2011-03-01

    To compare preoperative CT scan finding and per-operative lesions in patients operated for middle ear cholesteatoma, A retrospective study including 60 patients with cholesteatoma otitis diagnosed and treated within a period of 5 years, from 2001 to 2005, at ENT department of Military Hospital of Tunis. All patients had computed tomography of the middle and inner ear. High resolution CT scan imaging was performed using millimetric incidences (3 to 5 millimetres). All patients had surgical removal of their cholesteatoma using down wall technic. We evaluated sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of CT-scan comparing otitic damages and CT finding, in order to examine the real contribution of computed tomography in cholesteatoma otitis. CT scan analysis of middle ear bone structures shows satisfaction (with 83% of sensibility). The rate of sensibility decrease (63%) for the tympanic raff. Predictive value of CT scan for the diagnosis of cholesteatoma was low. However, we have noticed an excellent sensibility in the analysis of ossicular damages (90%). Comparative frontal incidence seems to be less sensible for the detection of facial nerve lesions (42%). But when evident on CT scan findings, lesions of facial nerve were usually observed preoperatively (spécificity 78%). Predictive value of computed tomography for the diagnosis of perilymphatic fistulae (FL) was low. In fact, CT scan imaging have showed FL only for four patients among eight. Best results can be obtained if using inframillimetric incidences with performed high resolution computed tomography. Preoperative computed tomography is necessary for the diagnosis and the evaluation of chronic middle ear cholesteatoma in order to show extending lesion and to detect complications. This CT analysis and surgical correlation have showed that sensibility, specificity and predictive value of CT-scan depend on the anatomic structure implicated in cholesteatoma damages.

  7. SU-F-I-33: Estimating Radiation Dose in Abdominal Fat Quantitative CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Yang, K; Liu, B

    Purpose: To compare size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) in abdominal fat quantitative CT with another dose estimate D{sub size,L} that also takes into account scan length. Methods: This study complied with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. At our institution, abdominal fat CT is performed with scan length = 1 cm and CTDI{sub vol} = 4.66 mGy (referenced to body CTDI phantom). A previously developed CT simulation program was used to simulate single rotation axial scans of 6–55 cm diameter water cylinders, and dose integral of the longitudinal dose profile over the central 1 cm length wasmore » used to predict the dose at the center of one-cm scan range. SSDE and D{sub size,L} were assessed for 182 consecutive abdominal fat CT examinations with mean water-equivalent diameter (WED) of 27.8 cm ± 6.0 (range, 17.9 - 42.2 cm). Patient age ranged from 18 to 75 years, and weight ranged from 39 to 163 kg. Results: Mean SSDE was 6.37 mGy ± 1.33 (range, 3.67–8.95 mGy); mean D{sub size,L} was 2.99 mGy ± 0.85 (range, 1.48 - 4.88 mGy); and mean D{sub size,L}/SSDE ratio was 0.46 ± 0.04 (range, 0.40 - 0.55). Conclusion: The conversion factors for size-specific dose estimate in AAPM Report No. 204 were generated using 15 - 30 cm scan lengths. One needs to be cautious in applying SSDE to small length CT scans. For abdominal fat CT, SSDE was 80–150% higher than the dose of 1 cm scan length.« less

  8. Scrub typhus associated hepatic dysfunction and abdominal CT findings

    PubMed Central

    Park, Man Je; Lee, Hyoun Soo; Shim, Sang Goon; Kim, So Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective study investigated abnormal hepatic dysfunction and abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings in scrub typhus. Methods: Three hundred forty nine adult patients were diagnosed with scrub typhus. Ninety four underwent abdominal CT. The CT images were reviewed by the attending radiologist. Patient data of history, symptoms, signs, and results of laboratory tests were collected from the electronic medical records. Results: In 349 patients with scrub typhus, elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (78.5%) and alanine aminotransferase (63.0%) were dominant compared to alkaline phosphatase (27.2%) and total bilirubin (16.1%). Abdominal CT findings of 94 patients were, in descending order of frequency, enlarged lymph node (53.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of liver (47.9%), splenomegaly (46.8%), ascites (28.7%), low attenuation of periportal areas (27.7%), gallbladder wall thickening (17.0%), and splenic infarct (6.4%). Also, the level of aspartate aminotransferase tended to be elevated according to the number of CT findings (P= 0.028) Conclusions: We found that abdominal CT manifestations of scrub typhus with elevated aminotransferases were varied and not specific. However, knowledge of these findings may evoke the recognition of scrub typhus by clinicians in endemic areas. PMID:26101478

  9. Complications in CT-guided procedures: do we really need postinterventional CT control scans?

    PubMed

    Nattenmüller, Johanna; Filsinger, Matthias; Bryant, Mark; Stiller, Wolfram; Radeleff, Boris; Grenacher, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich; Hosch, Waldemar

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans. Retrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only. The complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21). Complications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  10. DICOM structured report to track patient's radiation dose to organs from abdominal CT exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, Craig; Turner, Adam; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Zankl, Maria; Meng, Frank; El-Saden, Suzie

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase of diagnostic imaging capabilities over the past decade has contributed to increased radiation exposure to patient populations. Several factors have contributed to the increase in imaging procedures: wider availability of imaging modalities, increase in technical capabilities, rise in demand by patients and clinicians, favorable reimbursement, and lack of guidelines to control utilization. The primary focus of this research is to provide in depth information about radiation doses that patients receive as a result of CT exams, with the initial investigation involving abdominal CT exams. Current dose measurement methods (i.e. CTDIvol Computed Tomography Dose Index) do not provide direct information about a patient's organ dose. We have developed a method to determine CTDIvol normalized organ doses using a set of organ specific exponential regression equations. These exponential equations along with measured CTDIvol are used to calculate organ dose estimates from abdominal CT scans for eight different patient models. For each patient, organ dose and CTDIvol were estimated for an abdominal CT scan. We then modified the DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) to store the pertinent patient information on radiation dose to their abdominal organs.

  11. Immersive Virtual Reality for Visualization of Abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A; Bodenheimer, Robert E

    2013-03-28

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two-dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  12. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  13. Automated anatomical labeling method for abdominal arteries extracted from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Hoang, Bui Huy; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an automated anatomical labeling method of abdominal arteries. In abdominal surgery, understanding of blood vessel structure concerning with a target organ is very important. Branching pattern of blood vessels differs among individuals. It is required to develop a system that can assist understanding of a blood vessel structure and anatomical names of blood vessels of a patient. Previous anatomical labbeling methods for abdominal arteries deal with either of the upper or lower abdominal arteries. In this paper, we present an automated anatomical labeling method of both of the upper and lower abdominal arteries extracted from CT images. We obtain a tree structure of artery regions and calculate feature values for each branch. These feature values include the diameter, curvature, direction, and running vectors of a branch. Target arteries of this method are grouped based on branching conditions. The following processes are separately applied for each group. We compute candidate artery names by using classifiers that are trained to output artery names. A correction process of the candidate anatomical names based on the rule of majority is applied to determine final names. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of 3D abdominal CT images. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is able to perform nomenclature of entire major abdominal arteries. The recall and the precision rates of labeling are 79.01% and 80.41%, respectively.

  14. Integrated circuit detector technology in abdominal CT: added value in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Morsbach, Fabian; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Rätzer, Susan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess the effect of an integrated circuit (IC) detector for abdominal CT on image quality. In the first study part, an abdominal phantom was scanned with various extension rings using a CT scanner equipped with a conventional discrete circuit (DC) detector and on the same scanner with an IC detector (120 kVp, 150 effective mAs, and 75 effective mAs). In the second study part, 20 patients were included who underwent abdominal CT both with the IC detector and previously at similar protocol parameters (120 kVp tube current-time product and 150 reference mAs using automated tube current modulation) with the DC detector. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection. Image quality in the phantom was higher for images acquired with the IC compared with the DC detector. There was a gradually increasing noise reduction with increasing phantom sizes, with the highest (37% in the largest phantom) at 75 effective mAs (p < 0.001). In patients, noise was overall significantly (p = 0.025) reduced by 6.4% using the IC detector. Similar to the phantom, there was a gradual increase in noise reduction to 7.9% in patients with a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or lower (p = 0.008). Significant correlation was found in patients between noise and abdominal diameter in DC detector images (r = 0.604, p = 0.005), whereas no such correlation was found for the IC detector (r = 0.427, p = 0.060). Use of an IC detector in abdominal CT improves image quality and reduces image noise, particularly in overweight and obese patients. This noise reduction has the potential for dose reduction in abdominal CT.

  15. Abdominal fat volume estimation by stereology on CT: a comparison with manual planimetry.

    PubMed

    Manios, G E; Mazonakis, M; Voulgaris, C; Karantanas, A; Damilakis, J

    2016-03-01

    To deploy and evaluate a stereological point-counting technique on abdominal CT for the estimation of visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous abdominal fat (SAF) volumes. Stereological volume estimations based on point counting and systematic sampling were performed on images from 14 consecutive patients who had undergone abdominal CT. For the optimization of the method, five sampling intensities in combination with 100 and 200 points were tested. The optimum stereological measurements were compared with VAF and SAF volumes derived by the standard technique of manual planimetry on the same scans. Optimization analysis showed that the selection of 200 points along with the sampling intensity 1/8 provided efficient volume estimations in less than 4 min for VAF and SAF together. The optimized stereology showed strong correlation with planimetry (VAF: r = 0.98; SAF: r = 0.98). No statistical differences were found between the two methods (VAF: P = 0.81; SAF: P = 0.83). The 95% limits of agreement were also acceptable (VAF: -16.5%, 16.1%; SAF: -10.8%, 10.7%) and the repeatability of stereology was good (VAF: CV = 4.5%, SAF: CV = 3.2%). Stereology may be successfully applied to CT images for the efficient estimation of abdominal fat volume and may constitute a good alternative to the conventional planimetric technique. Abdominal obesity is associated with increased risk of disease and mortality. Stereology may quantify visceral and subcutaneous abdominal fat accurately and consistently. The application of stereology to estimating abdominal volume fat reduces processing time. Stereology is an efficient alternative method for estimating abdominal fat volume.

  16. Assessment of the accuracy of AortaScan for detection of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA).

    PubMed

    Abbas, A; Smith, A; Cecelja, M; Waltham, M

    2012-02-01

    AortaScan AMI 9700 is a portable 3D ultrasound device that automatically measures the maximum diameter of the abdominal aorta without the need for a trained sonographer. It is designed to rapidly diagnose or exclude an AAA and may have particular use in screening programs. Our objective was to determine its accuracy to detect AAA. Subjects from our AAA screening and surveillance programs were examined. The aorta was scanned using the AortaScan and computed tomography (CT). Ninety-one subjects underwent imaging (44 AAA on conventional ultrasound surveillance and 47 controls). The largest measurement obtained by AortaScan was compared against the CT-aortic measurement. The mean aortic diameter was 2.8 cm. The CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of AAA in 43 subjects. There was one false positive measurement on conventional ultrasound. AortaScan missed the diagnosis of AAA in eight subjects. There were thirteen false positive measurements. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 81%, 72%, 72% and 81% respectively. A device to detect AAA without the need for a trained operator would have potential in a community-based screening programme. The AortaScan, however, lacks adequate sensitivity and significant technical improvement is necessary before it could be considered a replacement for trained screening personnel. Copyright © 2011 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Systematic review on the value of CT scanning in the diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kornmann, Verena N N; Treskes, Nikki; Hoonhout, Lilian H F; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Boerma, Djamila

    2013-04-01

    Timely diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after colorectal surgery and adequate treatment is important to reduce morbidity and mortality. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning is the diagnostic tool of preference, but its value may be questionable in the early postoperative period. The accuracy of CT scanning for the detection of anastomotic leakage and its role in timing of intervention was evaluated. A systematic literature search was performed. Relevant publications were identified from four electronic databases between 1990 and 2011. Inclusion criteria were human studies, studies published in English or Dutch, colorectal surgery with primary anastomosis, and abdominal CT scan with reported outcome for the detection of anastomotic leakage. Exclusion criteria were cohort of fewer than five patients, other gastrointestinal surgery, no anastomosis, and radiological imaging other than CT. Eight studies, including 221 abdominal CT scans, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Overall, the methodological quality of the studies was poor. The overall sensitivity of CT scanning to diagnose leakage was 0.68 (95 % confidence interval 0.59-0.75) for colonic resection. Data on the sequelae of false-negative CT scanning was not available. There is limited good-quality evidence to determine the value of CT scans in the detection of anastomotic leakage. To prevent delay in diagnosis and appropriate treatment of anastomotic leakage, the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning must be taken into account.

  18. Sensitivity and Specificity of Emergency Physicians and Trainees for Identifying Internally Concealed Drug Packages on Abdominal Computed Tomography Scan: Do Lung Windows Improve Accuracy?

    PubMed

    Asha, Stephen Edward; Cooke, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Suspected body packers may be brought to emergency departments (EDs) close to international airports for abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning. Senior emergency clinicians may be asked to interpret these CT scans. Missing concealed drug packages have important clinical and forensic implications. The accuracy of emergency clinician interpretation of abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs is not known. Limited evidence suggests that accuracy for identification of concealed packages can be increased by viewing CT images on "lung window" settings. To determine the accuracy of senior emergency clinicians in interpreting abdominal CT scans for concealed drugs, and to determine if this accuracy was improved by viewing scans on both abdominal and lung window settings. Emergency clinicians blinded to all patient identifiers and the radiology report interpreted CT scans of suspected body packers using standard abdominal window settings and then with the addition of lung window settings. The reference standard was the radiologist's report. Fifty-five emergency clinicians reported 235 CT scans. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of interpretation using abdominal windows was 89.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 83.0-94.7), 81.9% (95% CI 73.7-88.4), and 86.0% (95% CI 81.5-90.4), respectively, and with both window settings was 94.1% (95% CI 88.3-97.6), 76.7% (95% CI 68.0-84.1), 85.5% (95% CI 81.0-90.0), respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was similar regardless of the clinician's experience. Interrater reliability was moderate (kappa 0.46). The accuracy of interpretation of abdominal CT scans performed for the purpose of detecting concealed drug packages by emergency clinicians is not high enough to safely discharge these patients from the ED. The use of lung windows improved sensitivity, but at the expense of specificity. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Full-Body CT Scans - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging Full-Body CT Scans - What You Need to Know Share Tweet ... new service for health-conscious people: "Whole-body CT screening." This typically involves scanning the body from ...

  20. Automated estimation of abdominal effective diameter for body size normalization of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M

    2013-06-01

    Most CT dose data aggregation methods do not currently adjust dose values for patient size. This work proposes a simple heuristic for reliably computing an effective diameter of a patient from an abdominal CT image. Evaluation of this method on 106 patients scanned on Philips Brilliance 64 and Brilliance Big Bore scanners demonstrates close correspondence between computed and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 1.0 cm (error range +2.2 to -0.4 cm). This level of correspondence was also demonstrated for 60 patients on Siemens, General Electric, and Toshiba scanners. A calculated effective diameter in the middle slice of an abdominal CT study was found to be a close approximation of the mean calculated effective diameter for the study, with a mean absolute error of approximately 1.0 cm (error range +3.5 to -2.2 cm). Furthermore, the mean absolute error for an adjusted mean volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol) using a mid-study calculated effective diameter, versus a mean per-slice adjusted CTDIvol based on the calculated effective diameter of each slice, was 0.59 mGy (error range 1.64 to -3.12 mGy). These results are used to calculate approximate normalized dose length product values in an abdominal CT dose database of 12,506 studies.

  1. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect

    Nattenmüller, Johanna, E-mail: johanna.nattenmueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Filsinger, Matthias, E-mail: Matthias_filsinger@web.de; Bryant, Mark, E-mail: mark.bryant@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-06-19

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % inmore » drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.« less

  2. The abdominal technetium scan (a decade of experience)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, D.R.; Duszynski, D.O.; Camboa, E.

    1982-10-01

    Out of 270 children with gastrointestinal symptoms, the indications for technetium scanning were: gastrointestinal tract bleeding (165 patients), abdominal pain (99 patients) and a history of intussusception (6 patients). Thirty children had abnormal findings, while the remaining 240 patients had normal scans. Four of the 30 children with positive scans were not explored, while the others underwent laparotomy. Of the 26 operated patients, 12 (46%) had a Meckel's diverticulum. Nine patients (34%) had other pathologic lesions that were detected by the scan. Five had true false positives as no pathologic lesions were found. Of the 240 children with negative scans,more » 19 were eventually explored because of persistent symptoms or clinical findings. Two of these had a Meckel's diverticulum. Eleven had a negative exploration while six had other surgical lesions. Technitium scan should reliably detect around 80%-90% of Meckel's diverticula. It will also accurately exclude the diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum in over 90% of patients.« less

  3. Fat necrosis after abdominal surgery: A pitfall in interpretation of FDG-PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Tima; Lotan, Eyal; Klang, Eyal; Nissan, Johnatan; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Goshen, Elinor; Ben-Haim, Simona; Apter, Sara; Chikman, Bar

    2018-06-01

    We describe FDG-PET/CT findings of postoperative fat necrosis in patients following abdominal surgery, and evaluate their changes in size and FDG uptake over time. FDG-PET/CT scans from January 2007-January 2016 containing the term 'fat necrosis' were reviewed. Lesions meeting radiological criteria of fat necrosis in patients with prior abdominal surgery were included. Forty-four patients, 30 males, mean age 68.4 ± 11.0 years. Surgeries: laparotomy (n=37; 84.1 %), laparoscopy (n=3; 6.8 %), unknown (n=4; 9.1 %). CTs of all lesions included hyperdense well-defined rims surrounding a heterogeneous fatty core. Sites: peritoneum (n=34; 77 %), omental fat (n=19; 43 %), subcutaneous fat (n=8; 18 %), retroperitoneum (n=2; 5 %). Mean lesion long axis: 33.6±24.9 mm (range: 13.0-140.0). Mean SUVmax: 2.6±1.1 (range: 0.6-5.1). On serial CTs (n=34), lesions decreased in size (p=0.022). Serial FDG-PET/CT (n=24) showed no significant change in FDG-avidity (p=0.110). Mean SUVmax did not correlate with time from surgery (p=0.558) or lesion size (p=0.259). Postsurgical fat necrosis demonstrated characteristic CT features and may demonstrate increased FDG uptake. However, follow-up of subsequent imaging scans showed no increases in size or FDG-avidity. Awareness of this entity is important to avoid misinterpretation of findings as recurrent cancer. • Postsurgical fat necrosis may mimic cancer in FDG-PET/CT. • Follow-up of fat necrosis showed no increase in FDG intensity. • CT follow-up showed a decrease in lesion size. • FDG uptake did not correlate with time lapsed from surgery.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging of Injuries from Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Radhiana; Abd Aziz, Azian

    2010-04-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma can cause multiple internal injuries. However, these injuries are often difficult to accurately evaluate, particularly in the presence of more obvious external injuries. Computed tomography (CT) imaging is currently used to assess clinically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma. CT can provide a rapid and accurate appraisal of the abdominal viscera, retroperitoneum and abdominal wall, as well as a limited assessment of the lower thoracic region and bony pelvis. This paper presents examples of various injuries in trauma patients depicted in abdominal CT images. We hope these images provide a resource for radiologists, surgeons and medical officers, as well as a learning tool for medical students.

  5. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  6. Emerging Techniques for Dose Optimization in Abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Joel F.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M.; Maturen, Katherine E.; Wasnik, Ashish P.; Pandya, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in computed tomographic (CT) scanning technique such as automated tube current modulation (ATCM), optimized x-ray tube voltage, and better use of iterative image reconstruction have allowed maintenance of good CT image quality with reduced radiation dose. ATCM varies the tube current during scanning to account for differences in patient attenuation, ensuring a more homogeneous image quality, although selection of the appropriate image quality parameter is essential for achieving optimal dose reduction. Reducing the x-ray tube voltage is best suited for evaluating iodinated structures, since the effective energy of the x-ray beam will be closer to the k-edge of iodine, resulting in a higher attenuation for the iodine. The optimal kilovoltage for a CT study should be chosen on the basis of imaging task and patient habitus. The aim of iterative image reconstruction is to identify factors that contribute to noise on CT images with use of statistical models of noise (statistical iterative reconstruction) and selective removal of noise to improve image quality. The degree of noise suppression achieved with statistical iterative reconstruction can be customized to minimize the effect of altered image quality on CT images. Unlike with statistical iterative reconstruction, model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms model both the statistical noise and the physical acquisition process, allowing CT to be performed with further reduction in radiation dose without an increase in image noise or loss of spatial resolution. Understanding these recently developed scanning techniques is essential for optimization of imaging protocols designed to achieve the desired image quality with a reduced dose. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:24428277

  7. Evaluation of simethicone-coated cellulose as a negative oral contrast agent for abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Dushyant V; Jhaveri, Kartik S; D'souza, Roy V; Varghese, Jose C; Halpern, Elkan; Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Hahn, Peter F; Saini, Sanjay

    2003-05-01

    Because of the increased clinical use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging the abdominal vasculature and urinary tract, there is a need for negative contrast agents. The authors undertook this study to assess the suitability of simethicone-coated cellulose (SCC), which is approved for use as an oral contrast agent in sonography, for use as a negative oral contrast agent in abdominal CT. This prospective study involved 40 adult patients scheduled to undergo abdominal CT for the evaluation of hematuria. Prior to scanning, 20 subjects received 800 mL of SCC and 20 received 800 mL of water as an oral contrast agent. Imaging was performed with a multi-detector row helical scanner in two phases, according to the abdominal CT protocol used for hematuria evaluation at the authors' institution. The first, "early" phase began an average of 15 minutes after the ingestion of contrast material; the second, "late" phase began an average of 45 minutes after the ingestion of contrast material. Blinded analysis was performed by three abdominal radiologists separately, using a three-point scale (0 = poor, 1 = acceptable, 2 = excellent) to assess the effectiveness of SCC for marking the proximal, middle, and distal small bowel. Average scores for enhancement with SCC and with water were obtained and compared. Statistical analysis was performed with a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. SCC was assigned higher mean scores than water for enhancement in each segment of the bowel, both on early-phase images (0.8-1.35 for SCC vs 0.6-1.1 for water) and on late-phase images (1.1-1.4 vs 0.81-0.96). Bowel marking with SCC, particularly in the jejunum and ileum, also was rated better than that with water in a high percentage of patients. The differences between the scores for water and for SCC, however, were not statistically significant (P > .05). SCC is effective as a negative oral contrast agent for small bowel marking at CT.

  8. Ultrafast CT scanning of an oak log for internal defects

    Treesearch

    Francis G. Wagner; Fred W. Taylor; Douglas S. Ladd; Charles W. McMillin; Fredrick L. Roder

    1989-01-01

    Detecting internal defects in sawlogs and veneer logs with computerized tomographic (CT) scanning is possible, but has been impractical due to the long scanning time required. This research investigated a new scanner able to acquire 34 cross-sectional log scans per second. This scanning rate translates to a linear log feed rate of 85 feet (25.91 m) per minute at one...

  9. Metastatic Neuroblastoma in Adult Patient, Presenting as a Super Scan on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malik, Dharmender; Jois, Abhiram; Singh, Harmandeep; Bora, Girdhar S; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of 23-year-old man who presented with complaints of progressive abdominal distension for the past 3 months along with the loss of appetite and weight and had a large solid cystic mass in the left half of the abdominal cavity revealed on ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Subsequent biopsy and histopathology revealed it to be neuroblastoma. Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scan performed to rule out distant metastasis showed intense radiotracer uptake distributed throughout the skeleton, mimicking a super scan.

  10. Use of the initial trauma CT scan to aid in diagnosis of open pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John A; Wilson, David J; Routt, Milton Lee Chip; Firoozabadi, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Open pelvic disruptions represent high-energy injuries. The prompt identification and management of these injuries decreases their associated morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) scans are routinely obtained in the initial evaluation of patients with pelvic injuries. The purpose of this study is to identify the incidence and source of air densities noted on computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdominal and pelvic region in patients with pelvic fractures and evaluate the use of initial CT imaging as an adjunctive diagnostic tool to identify open injuries. A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database was performed at a single institution. Seven hundred and twenty-two consecutive patients with a pelvic disruption over a two-year period were included. Review of initial injury CT scans was performed using bone and lung viewing algorithms to identify the presence of extra-luminal air. The primary outcome was the presence, location and source of air identified on pre-operative CT scans. Secondary measurements were identification of air by plain radiograph and correlation between identified air densities on CT and clinically diagnosed open pelvic fractures. Ninety-eight patients were identified as having extra-luminal air densities on CT scans. Eighty-one patients were included in the final analysis following application of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Air was noted by the radiologist in forty-five (55.6%) instances. Six patients (7.4%) were clinically diagnosed with an open pelvic ring disruption; in two patients (2.4%) this diagnosis was delayed. In all patients, the CT was able to track air from its origin. In patients with pelvic disruptions, the injury CT should also be evaluated for the presence and source of extra-luminal air. In some patients, this finding may represent an open pelvic ring disruption. A complete physical exam and CT evaluation should be used to decrease the missed or delayed diagnosis of an open pelvic ring

  11. Potential for adult-based epidemiological studies to characterize overall cancer risks associated with a lifetime of CT scans.

    PubMed

    Shuryak, Igor; Lubin, Jay H; Brenner, David J

    2014-06-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that radiation exposure from pediatric CT scanning is associated with small excess cancer risks. However, the majority of CT scans are performed on adults, and most radiation-induced cancers appear during middle or old age, in the same age range as background cancers. Consequently, a logical next step is to investigate the effects of CT scanning in adulthood on lifetime cancer risks by conducting adult-based, appropriately designed epidemiological studies. Here we estimate the sample size required for such studies to detect CT-associated risks. This was achieved by incorporating different age-, sex-, time- and cancer type-dependent models of radiation carcinogenesis into an in silico simulation of a population-based cohort study. This approach simulated individual histories of chest and abdominal CT exposures, deaths and cancer diagnoses. The resultant sample sizes suggest that epidemiological studies of realistically sized cohorts can detect excess lifetime cancer risks from adult CT exposures. For example, retrospective analysis of CT exposure and cancer incidence data from a population-based cohort of 0.4 to 1.3 million (depending on the carcinogenic model) CT-exposed UK adults, aged 25-65 in 1980 and followed until 2015, provides 80% power for detecting cancer risks from chest and abdominal CT scans.

  12. Acquisition, preprocessing, and reconstruction of ultralow dose volumetric CT scout for organ-based CT scan planning

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Zhye, E-mail: yin@ge.com; De Man, Bruno; Yao, Yangyang

    Purpose: Traditionally, 2D radiographic preparatory scan images (scout scans) are used to plan diagnostic CT scans. However, a 3D CT volume with a full 3D organ segmentation map could provide superior information for customized scan planning and other purposes. A practical challenge is to design the volumetric scout acquisition and processing steps to provide good image quality (at least good enough to enable 3D organ segmentation) while delivering a radiation dose similar to that of the conventional 2D scout. Methods: The authors explored various acquisition methods, scan parameters, postprocessing methods, and reconstruction methods through simulation and cadaver data studies tomore » achieve an ultralow dose 3D scout while simultaneously reducing the noise and maintaining the edge strength around the target organ. Results: In a simulation study, the 3D scout with the proposed acquisition, preprocessing, and reconstruction strategy provided a similar level of organ segmentation capability as a traditional 240 mAs diagnostic scan, based on noise and normalized edge strength metrics. At the same time, the proposed approach delivers only 1.25% of the dose of a traditional scan. In a cadaver study, the authors’ pictorial-structures based organ localization algorithm successfully located the major abdominal-thoracic organs from the ultralow dose 3D scout obtained with the proposed strategy. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that images with a similar degree of segmentation capability (interpretability) as conventional dose CT scans can be achieved with an ultralow dose 3D scout acquisition and suitable postprocessing. Furthermore, the authors applied these techniques to real cadaver CT scans with a CTDI dose level of less than 0.1 mGy and successfully generated a 3D organ localization map.« less

  13. Short- and long-term effects of clinical audits on compliance with procedures in CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, Antonio; Howarth, Nigel; Gevenois, Pierre Alain; Tack, Denis

    2016-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that quality clinical audits improve compliance with the procedures in computed tomography (CT) scanning. This retrospective study was conducted in two hospitals, based on 6950 examinations and four procedures, focusing on the acquisition length in lumbar spine CT, the default tube current applied in abdominal un-enhanced CT, the tube potential selection for portal phase abdominal CT and the use of a specific "paediatric brain CT" procedure. The first clinical audit reported compliance with these procedures. After presenting the results to the stakeholders, a second audit was conducted to measure the impact of this information on compliance and was repeated the next year. Comparisons of proportions were performed using the Chi-square Pearson test. Depending on the procedure, the compliance rate ranged from 27 to 88 % during the first audit. After presentation of the audit results to the stakeholders, the compliance rate ranged from 68 to 93 % and was significantly improved for all procedures (P ranging from <0.001 to 0.031) in both hospitals and remained unchanged during the third audit (P ranging from 0.114 to 0.999). Quality improvement through repeated compliance audits with CT procedures durably improves this compliance. • Compliance with CT procedures is operator-dependent and not perfect. • Compliance differs between procedures and hospitals, even within a unified department. • Compliance is improved through audits followed by communication to the stakeholders. • This improvement is sustainable over a one-year period.

  14. Pelvic artery calcification detection on CT scans using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lu, Le; Yao, Jianhua; Bagheri, Mohammadhadi; Summers, Ronald M.

    2017-03-01

    Artery calcification is observed commonly in elderly patients, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease, and may affect coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries. Vascular calcification has been associated with many clinical outcomes. Manual identification of calcification in CT scans requires substantial expert interaction, which makes it time-consuming and infeasible for large-scale studies. Many works have been proposed for coronary artery calcification detection in cardiac CT scans. In these works, coronary artery extraction is commonly required for calcification detection. However, there are few works about abdominal or pelvic artery calcification detection. In this work, we present a method for automatic pelvic artery calcification detection on CT scan. This method uses the recent advanced faster region-based convolutional neural network (R-CNN) to directly identify artery calcification without a need for artery extraction since pelvic artery extraction itself is challenging. Our method first generates category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using region proposal networks (RPN). Then, each region proposal is jointly classified and refined by softmax classifier and bounding box regressor. We applied the detection method to 500 images from 20 CT scans of patients for evaluation. The detection system achieved a 77.4% average precision and a 85% sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  15. Optimizing working space in porcine laparoscopy: CT measurement of the effects of intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Vlot, John; Wijnen, Rene; Stolker, Robert Jan; Bax, Klaas

    2013-05-01

    Several factors may affect volume and dimensions of the working space in laparoscopic surgery. The precise impact of these factors has not been well studied. In a porcine model, we used computed tomographic (CT) scanning for measuring working space volume and distances. In a first series of experiments, we studied the relationship between intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and working space. Eleven 20 kg pigs were studied under standardized anesthesia and volume-controlled ventilation. Cardiorespiratory parameters were monitored continuously, and blood gas samples were taken at different IAP levels. Respiratory rate was increased when ETCO₂ exceeded 7 kPa. Breath-hold CT scans were made at IAP levels of 0, 5, 10, and 15 mmHg. Insufflator volumes were compared to CT-measured volumes. Maximum dimensions of pneumoperitoneum were measured on reconstructed CT images. Respiratory rate had to be increased in three animals. Mild hypercapnia and acidosis occurred at 15 mmHg IAP. Peak inspiratory pressure rose significantly at 10 and 15 mmHg. CT-measured volume increased relatively by 93 % from 5 to 10 mmHg IAP and by 19 % from 10 to 15 mmHg IAP. Comparing CT volumes to insufflator volumes gave a bias of 76 mL. The limits of agreement were -0.31 to +0.47, a range of 790 mL. The internal anteroposterior diameter increased by 18 % by increasing IAP from 5 to 10 mmHg and by 5 % by increasing IAP from 10 to 15 mmHg. At 15 mmHg, the total relative increase of the pubis-diaphragm distance was only 6 %. Abdominal width did not increase. CT allows for precise calculation of the actual CO₂ pneumoperitoneum volume, whereas the volume of CO₂ released by the insufflator does not. Increasing IAP up to 10 mmHg achieved most gain in volume and in internal anteroposterior diameter. At an IAP of 10 mmHg, higher peak inspiratory pressure was significantly elevated.

  16. Multislice CT of the head and body routine scans: Are scanning protocols adjusted for paediatric patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z; Al Ghamdi, KS; Baroum, IH

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the multislice CT scanning protocols of head, chest and abdomen are adjusted according to patient’s age in paediatric patients. Materials and Methods: Multislice CT examination records of paediatric patients undergoing head, chest and abdomen scans from three public hospitals during a one-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were categorised into the following age groups: under 4 years, 5–8 years, 9–12 years and 13–16 years, while the tube current was classified into the following ranges: < 49 mA, 50–99 mA, 100–149 mA, 150–199 mA, > 200 mA and unknown. Results: A total of 4998 patient records, comprising a combination of head, chest and abdomen CT scans, were assessed, with head CT scans representing nearly half of the total scans. Age-based adjusted CT protocols were observed in most of the scans with higher tube current setting being used with increasing age. However, a high tube current (150–199 mA) was still used in younger patients (0–8 years) undergoing head CT scans. In one hospital, CT protocols remained constant across all age groups, indicating potential overexposure to the patients. Conclusion: This analysis shows that paediatric CT scans are adjusted according to the patient’s age in most of the routine CT examinations. This indicates increased awareness regarding radiation risks associated with CT. However, high tube current settings are still used in younger patient groups, thus, optimisation of paediatric CT protocols and implementation of current guidelines, such as age-and weight-based scanning, should be recommended in daily practice. PMID:22970059

  17. A Method for the Automatic Exposure Control in Pediatric Abdominal CT: Application to the Standard Deviation Value and Tube Current Methods by Using Patient's Age and Body Size.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ken; Akiyama, Shinji; Nambu, Atushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hasebe, Yuusuke

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to apply the pediatric abdominal CT protocol of Donnelly et al. in the United States to the pediatric abdominal CT-AEC. Examining CT images of 100 children, we found that the sectional area of the hepatic portal region (y) was strongly correlated with the body weight (x) as follows: y=7.14x + 84.39 (correlation coefficient=0.9574). We scanned an elliptical cone phantom that simulates the human body using a pediatric abdominal CT scanning method of Donnelly et al. in, and measured SD values. We further scanned the same phantom under the settings for adult CT-AEC scan and obtained the relationship between the sectional areas (y) and the SD values. Using these results, we obtained the following preset noise factors for CT-AEC at each body weight range: 6.90 at 4.5-8.9 kg, 8.40 at 9.0-17.9 kg, 8.68 at 18.0-26.9 kg, 9.89 at 27.0-35.9 kg, 12.22 at 36.0-45.0 kg, 13.52 at 45.1-70.0 kg, 15.29 at more than 70 kg. From the relation between age, weight and the distance of liver and tuber ischiadicum of 500 children, we obtained the CTDI vol values and DLP values under the scanning protocol of Donnelly et al. Almost all of DRL from these values turned out to be smaller than the DRL data of IAEA and various countries. Thus, by setting the maximum current values of CT-AEC to be the Donnelly et al.'s age-wise current values, and using our weight-wise noise factors, we think we can perform pediatric abdominal CT-AEC scans that are consistent with the same radiation safety and the image quality as those proposed by Donnelly et al.

  18. Dual scan CT image recovery from truncated projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Shubhabrata; Wahi, Pankaj; Munshi, Prabhat

    2017-12-01

    There are computerized tomography (CT) scanners available commercially for imaging small objects and they are often categorized as mini-CT X-ray machines. One major limitation of these machines is their inability to scan large objects with good image quality because of the truncation of projection data. An algorithm is proposed in this work which enables such machines to scan large objects while maintaining the quality of the recovered image.

  19. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant.

    PubMed

    Kılınçer, Abidin; Akpınar, Erhan; Erbil, Bülent; Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Kaynaroğlu, Volkan; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa

    2017-08-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P < 0.01) in patients without appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. • Normal appendix diameter is significantly smaller in compression CT. • Compression could force contrast material to flow through the appendiceal lumen. • Compression CT may be a CT counterpart of graded compression US.

  20. Predictive value of abdominal CT in evaluating internal herniation after bariatric laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Ederveen, J C; van Berckel, M M G; Nienhuijs, S W; Weber, R J P; Nederend, J

    2018-06-04

    Internal herniation, a serious complication after bariatric surgery, is challenging to diagnose. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of abdominal CT in diagnosing internal herniation. The study included consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery between 1 January 2011 and 1 January 2015 at a bariatric centre of excellence. To select patients suspected of having internal herniation, reports of abdominal CT and reoperations up to 1 January 2017 were screened. CT was presumed negative for internal herniation if no follow-up CT or reoperation was performed within 90 days after the initial CT, or no internal herniation was found during reoperation. The accuracy of abdominal CT in diagnosing internal herniation was calculated using two-way contingency tables. A total of 1475 patients were included (84·7 per cent women, mean age 46·5 years, median initial BMI 41·8 kg/m 2 ). CT and/or reoperation was performed in 192 patients (13·0 per cent) in whom internal herniation was suspected. Internal herniation was proven laparoscopically in 37 of these patients. The incidence of internal herniation was 2·5 per cent. An analysis by complaint included a total of 265 episodes, for which 247 CT scans were undertaken. CT was not used to investigate 18 episodes, but internal herniation was encountered in one-third of these during reoperation. Combining the follow-up and intraoperative findings, the accuracy of CT for internal herniation had a sensitivity of 83·8 (95 per cent c.i. 67·3 to 93·2) per cent, a specificity of 87·1 (81·7 to 91·2) per cent, a positive predictive value of 53·4 (40·0 to 66·5) per cent and a negative predictive value of 96·8 (92·9 to 98·7) per cent. Abdominal CT is an important tool in diagnosing internal herniation, with a high specificity and a high negative predictive value. © 2018 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) Scans and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging procedure that uses special x-ray equipment to create detailed pictures, or scans, of areas ... at the center ( 10 ). In addition, all imaging equipment purchased by NIH must provide data on exposure ...

  2. Application of 80-kVp scan and raw data-based iterative reconstruction for reduced iodine load abdominal-pelvic CT in patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy referred for oncological assessment: effects on radiation dose, image quality and renal function.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Yasunori; Tanoue, Shota; Tsuji, Akinori; Urata, Joji; Furusawa, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Yoshida, Eri; Yoshida, Morikatsu; Kidoh, Masafumi; Tateishi, Machiko; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the image quality, radiation dose, and renal safety of contrast medium (CM)-reduced abdominal-pelvic CT combining 80-kVp and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) in patients with renal dysfunction for oncological assessment. We included 45 patients with renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate  <45 ml per min per 1.73 m 2 ) who underwent reduced-CM abdominal-pelvic CT (360 mgI kg -1 , 80-kVp, SAFIRE) for oncological assessment. Another 45 patients without renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 ml per lmin per 1.73 m 2 ) who underwent standard oncological abdominal-pelvic CT (600 mgI kg -1 , 120-kVp, filtered-back projection) were included as controls. CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Two observers performed subjective image analysis on a 4-point scale. Size-specific dose estimate and renal function 1-3 months after CT were measured. The size-specific dose estimate and iodine load of 80-kVp protocol were 32 and 41%,, respectively, lower than of 120-kVp protocol (p < 0.01). CT attenuation and contrast-to-noise ratio of parenchymal organs and vessels in 80-kVp images were significantly better than those of 120-kVp images (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in quantitative or qualitative image noise or subjective overall quality (p > 0.05). No significant kidney injury associated with CM administration was observed. 80-kVp abdominal-pelvic CT with SAFIRE yields diagnostic image quality in oncology patients with renal dysfunction under substantially reduced iodine and radiation dose without renal safety concerns. Advances in knowledge: Using 80-kVp and SAFIRE allows for 40% iodine load and 32% radiation dose reduction for abdominal-pelvic CT without compromising image quality and renal function in oncology patients at risk of contrast-induced nephropathy.

  3. Role of CT scanning in formation evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bergosh, J.L.; Dibona, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    The use of the computerized tomographic (CT) scanner in formation evaluation of difficult to analyze core samples has moved from the research and development phase to daily, routine use in the core-analysis laboratory. The role of the CT scanner has become increasingly important as geologists try to obtain more representative core material for accurate formation evaluation. The most common problem facing the core analyst when preparing to measure petrophysical properties is the selection of representative and unaltered core samples for routine and special core testing. Recent data have shown that heterogeneous reservoir rock can be very difficult, if not impossible,more » to assess correctly when using standard core examination procedures, because many features, such as fractures, are not visible on the core surface. Another problem is the invasion of drilling mud into the core sample. Flushing formation oil and water from the core can greatly alter the saturation and distribution of fluids and lead to serious formation evaluation problems. Because the quality and usefulness of the core date are directly tied to proper sample selection, it has become imperative that the CT scanner be used whenever possible.« less

  4. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithmsmore » were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.« less

  5. Radiation dose calculations for CT scans with tube current modulation using the approach to equilibrium function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The approach to equilibrium function has been used previously to calculate the radiation dose to a shift-invariant medium undergoing CT scans with constant tube current [Li, Zhang, and Liu, Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. The authors have adapted this method to CT scans with tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: For a scan with variable tube current, the scan range was divided into multiple subscan ranges, each with a nearly constant tube current. Then the dose calculation algorithm presented previously was applied. For a clinical CT scan series that presented tube current per slice, the authors adopted an efficient approachmore » that computed the longitudinal dose distribution for one scan length equal to the slice thickness, which center was at z = 0. The cumulative dose at a specific point was a summation of the contributions from all slices and the overscan. Results: The dose calculations performed for a total of four constant and variable tube current distributions agreed with the published results of Dixon and Boone [Med. Phys. 40, 111920 (14pp.) (2013)]. For an abdomen/pelvis scan of an anthropomorphic phantom (model ATOM 701-B, CIRS, Inc., VA) on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 scanner with 120 kV, N × T = 20 mm, pitch = 1.375, z axis current modulation (auto mA), and angular current modulation (smart mA), dose measurements were performed using two lines of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters, one of which was placed near the phantom center and the other on the surface. Dose calculations were performed on the central and peripheral axes of a cylinder containing water, whose cross-sectional mass was about equal to that of the ATOM phantom in its abdominal region, and the results agreed with the measurements within 28.4%. Conclusions: The described method provides an effective approach that takes into account subject size, scan length, and constant or variable tube current to evaluate CT dose to a shift-invariant medium. For a clinical CT

  6. Experimental study of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate abdominal scans in jejunal intussusception: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    James, A.E. Jr.; Strecker, E.P.; Miller, F.J. Jr.

    1975-07-01

    Recent communications have related the diagnosis of small bowel intussusceptions to abnormal accumulations of the radiopharmaceutical /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate on abdominal scans. Considering the pathophysiological alterations attendant to intussusceptions, we have attempted an experimental model to examine these changes in temporal sequence. This study was initiated to understand the etiology better and to characterize the abnormalities noted on the /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate abdominal scans.

  7. Avoiding CT scans in children with single-suture craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, T; Böhm, H; Meyer-Marcotty, P; Collmann, H; Ernestus, R-I; Krauß, J

    2012-07-01

    During the last decades, computed tomography (CT) has become the predominant imaging technique in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis. In most craniofacial centers, at least one three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic scan is obtained in every case of suspected craniosynostosis. However, with regard to the risk of radiation exposure particularly in young infants, CT scanning and even plain radiography should be indicated extremely carefully. Our current diagnostic protocol in the management of single-suture craniosynostosis is mainly based on careful clinical examination with regard to severity and degree of the abnormality and on ophthalmoscopic surveillance. Imaging techniques consist of ultrasound examination in young infants while routine plain radiographs are usually postponed to the date of surgery or the end of the first year. CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are confined to special diagnostic problems rarely encountered in isolated craniosynostosis. The results of this approach were evaluated retrospectively in 137 infants who were referred to our outpatient clinic for evaluation and/or treatment of suspected single suture craniosynostosis or positional deformity during a 2-year period (2008-2009). In 133 (97.1%) of the 137 infants, the diagnosis of single-suture craniosynostosis (n = 110) or positional plagiocephaly (n = 27) was achieved through clinical analysis only. Two further cases were classified by ultrasound, while the remaining two cases needed additional digital radiographs. In no case was CT scanning retrospectively considered necessary for establishing the diagnosis. Yet in 17.6% of cases, a cranial CT scan had already been performed elsewhere (n = 16) or had been definitely scheduled (n = 8). CT scanning is rarely necessary for evaluation of single-suture craniosynostosis. Taking into account that there is a quantifiable risk of developing cancer in further lifetime, every single CT scan should be carefully indicated.

  8. Automatic Organ Segmentation for CT Scans Based on Super-Pixel and Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Guo, Shuxu; Yang, Bingtao; Ma, Shuzhi; Zhang, Huimao; Li, Jing; Sun, Changjian; Jin, Lanyi; Li, Xueyan; Yang, Qi; Fu, Yu

    2018-04-20

    Accurate segmentation of specific organ from computed tomography (CT) scans is a basic and crucial task for accurate diagnosis and treatment. To avoid time-consuming manual optimization and to help physicians distinguish diseases, an automatic organ segmentation framework is presented. The framework utilized convolution neural networks (CNN) to classify pixels. To reduce the redundant inputs, the simple linear iterative clustering (SLIC) of super-pixels and the support vector machine (SVM) classifier are introduced. To establish the perfect boundary of organs in one-pixel-level, the pixels need to be classified step-by-step. First, the SLIC is used to cut an image into grids and extract respective digital signatures. Next, the signature is classified by the SVM, and the rough edges are acquired. Finally, a precise boundary is obtained by the CNN, which is based on patches around each pixel-point. The framework is applied to abdominal CT scans of livers and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans of lungs. The experimental CT scans are derived from two public datasets (Sliver 07 and a Chinese local dataset). Experimental results show that the proposed method can precisely and efficiently detect the organs. This method consumes 38 s/slice for liver segmentation. The Dice coefficient of the liver segmentation results reaches to 97.43%. For lung segmentation, the Dice coefficient is 97.93%. This finding demonstrates that the proposed framework is a favorable method for lung segmentation of HRCT scans.

  9. Abdominal Imaging with Contrast-enhanced Photon-counting CT: First Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Symons, Rolf; Sandfort, Veit; Mallek, Marissa; Fuld, Matthew K.; Henderson, Gregory; Jones, Elizabeth C.; Malayeri, Ashkan A.; Folio, Les R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of a prototype photon-counting detector (PCD) computed tomography (CT) system for abdominal CT in humans and to compare the results with a conventional energy-integrating detector (EID). Materials and Methods The study was HIPAA-compliant and institutional review board–approved with informed consent. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (seven men; mean age, 58.2 years ± 9.8 [standard deviation]) were prospectively enrolled between September 2 and November 13, 2015. Radiation dose–matched delayed contrast agent–enhanced spiral and axial abdominal EID and PCD scans were acquired. Spiral images were scored for image quality (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) in five regions of interest by three radiologists blinded to the detector system, and the axial scans were used to assess Hounsfield unit accuracy in seven regions of interest (paired t test). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess reproducibility. PCD images were also used to calculate iodine concentration maps. Spatial resolution, noise-power spectrum, and Hounsfield unit accuracy of the systems were estimated by using a CT phantom. Results In both systems, scores were similar for image quality (median score, 4; P = .19), noise (median score, 3; P = .30), and artifact (median score, 1; P = .17), with good interrater agreement (image quality, noise, and artifact ICC: 0.84, 0.88, and 0.74, respectively). Hounsfield unit values, spatial resolution, and noise-power spectrum were also similar with the exception of mean Hounsfield unit value in the spinal canal, which was lower in the PCD than the EID images because of beam hardening (20 HU vs 36.5 HU; P < .001). Contrast-to-noise ratio of enhanced kidney tissue was improved with PCD iodine mapping compared with EID (5.2 ± 1.3 vs 4.0 ± 1.3; P < .001). Conclusion The performance of PCD showed no statistically significant difference compared with EID when the abdomen was evaluated in a conventional scan mode. PCD

  10. Chest CT scan findings in World Trade Center workers.

    PubMed

    de la Hoz, Rafael E; Weber, Jonathan; Xu, Dongming; Doucette, John T; Liu, Xiaoyu; Carson, Deborah A; Celedón, Juan C

    2018-03-15

    We examined the chest CT scans of 1,453 WTC responders using the International Classification of High-resolution CT for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases. Univariate and bivariate analyses of potential work-related pleural abnormalities were performed with pre-WTC and WTC-related occupational exposure data, spirometry, demographics and quantitative CT measurements. Logistic regression was used to evaluate occupational predictors of those abnormalities. Chest CT scans were performed first at a median of 6.8 years after 9/11/2001. Pleural abnormalities were the most frequent (21.1%) across all occupational groups In multivariable analyses, significant pre-WTC occupational asbestos exposure, and work as laborer/cleaner were predictive of pleural abnormalities, with prevalence being highest for the Polish subgroup (n = 237) of our population. Continued occupational lung disease surveillance is warranted in this cohort.

  11. Laser microbeam CT scanning of dosimetry gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryanski, Marek J.; Ranade, Manisha K.

    2001-06-01

    A novel design of an optical tomographic scanner is described that can be used for 3D mapping of optical attenuation coefficient within translucent cylindrical objects with spatial resolution on the order of 100 microns. Our scanner design utilizes the cylindrical geometry of the imaged object to obtain the desired paths of the scanning light rays. A rotating mirror and a photodetector are placed at two opposite foci of the translucent cylinder that acts as a cylindrical lens. A He-Ne laser beam passes first through a focusing lens and then is reflected by the rotating mirror, so as to scan the interior of the cylinder with focused and parallel paraxial rays that are subsequently collected by the photodetector to produce the projection data, as the cylinder rotates in small angle increments between projections. Filtered backprojection is then used to reconstruct planar distributions of optical attenuation coefficient in the cylinder. Multiplanar scans are used to obtain a complete 3D tomographic reconstruction. Among other applications, the scanner can be used in radiation therapy dosimetry and quality assurance for mapping 3D radiation dose distributions in various types of tissue-equivalent gel phantoms that change their optical attenuation coefficients in proportion to the absorbed radiation dose.

  12. Automated image quality assessment for chest CT scans.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Anthony P; Xie, Yiting; Liu, Shuang

    2018-02-01

    Medical image quality needs to be maintained at standards sufficient for effective clinical reading. Automated computer analytic methods may be applied to medical images for quality assessment. For chest CT scans in a lung cancer screening context, an automated quality assessment method is presented that characterizes image noise and image intensity calibration. This is achieved by image measurements in three automatically segmented homogeneous regions of the scan: external air, trachea lumen air, and descending aorta blood. Profiles of CT scanner behavior are also computed. The method has been evaluated on both phantom and real low-dose chest CT scans and results show that repeatable noise and calibration measures may be realized by automated computer algorithms. Noise and calibration profiles show relevant differences between different scanners and protocols. Automated image quality assessment may be useful for quality control for lung cancer screening and may enable performance improvements to automated computer analysis methods. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Isolated free intra-abdominal fluid on CT in blunt trauma: The continued diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Victor Y; Jeetoo, Damon; Naidoo, Leah C; Oosthuizen, George V; Clarke, Damian L

    2015-01-01

    The clinical significance of isolated free fluid (FF) without solid organ injury on computed to- mography (CT) continues to pose significant dilemma in the management of patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). We reviewed the incidence of FF and the clinical outcome amongst patients with blunt abdominal trauma in a metropolitan trauma service in South Africa. We performed a retrospective study of 121 consecutive CT scans over a period of 12 months to determine the incidence of isolated FF and the clinical outcome of patients managed in a large metropolitan trauma service. Of the 121 CTs, FF was identified in 36 patients (30%). Seven patients (6%) had isolated FF. Of the 29 patients who had free fluid and associated organ injuries, 33 organ injuries were identified. 86% (25/ 29) of all 29 patients had a single organ injury and 14% had multiple organ injuries. There were 26 solid organ injuries and 7 hollow organ injuries. The 33 organs injured were: spleen, 12; liver, 8; kidney, 5; pancreas, 2; small bowel, 4; duodenum, 1. Six (21%) patients required operative management for small bowel perforations in 4 cases and pancreatic tail injury in 2 cases. All 7 patients with isolated FF were initially observed, and 3 (43%) were eventually subjected to operative intervention. They were found to have an intra-peritoneal bladder rupture in 1 case, a non-expanding zone 3 haematoma in 1 case, and a negative laparotomy in 1 case. Four (57%) patients were successfully managed without surgical interventions. Isolated FF is uncommon and the clinical significance remains unclear. Provided that reli- able serial physical examination can be performed by experienced surgeons, an initial non-operative approach should be considered.

  14. Unsupervised quantification of abdominal fat from CT images using Greedy Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chirag; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Patel, Aalpen; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Adipose tissue has been associated with adverse consequences of obesity. Total adipose tissue (TAT) is divided into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Intra-abdominal fat (VAT), located inside the abdominal cavity, is a major factor for the classic obesity related pathologies. Since direct measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat is not trivial, substitute metrics like waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) are used in clinical settings to quantify obesity. Abdominal fat can be assessed effectively using CT or MRI, but manual fat segmentation is rather subjective and time-consuming. Hence, an automatic and accurate quantification tool for abdominal fat is needed. The goal of this study is to extract TAT, VAT and SAT fat from abdominal CT in a fully automated unsupervised fashion using energy minimization techniques. We applied a four step framework consisting of 1) initial body contour estimation, 2) approximation of the body contour, 3) estimation of inner abdominal contour using Greedy Snakes algorithm, and 4) voting, to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat. We validated our algorithm on 952 clinical abdominal CT images (from 476 patients with a very wide BMI range) collected from various radiology departments of Geisinger Health System. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on such a large and diverse clinical dataset. Our algorithm obtained a 3.4% error for VAT segmentation compared to manual segmentation. These personalized and accurate measurements of fat can complement traditional population health driven obesity metrics such as BMI and WC.

  15. Justification of CT scans using referral guidelines for imaging.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, G; Rosca-Fartat, G; Stanescu, D

    2015-07-01

    This study analyses the efficiency of the justification of individual computed tomography (CT) procedures using the good practice guide. The conformity of the CT scans with guide's recommendations was retrospectively analysed in a paediatric emergency hospital in Romania. The involved patient doses were estimated. The results show that around one-third of the examinations were not prescribed in conformity with the guide's recommendations, but these results are affected by unclear guide provisions, discussed here. The implications of the provisions of the revised International Atomic Energy Agency's Basic Safety Standards and of the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM were analysed. The education and training courses for medical doctors disseminating the provisions of the good practice guide should be considered as the main support for the justification of the CT scans at the individual level. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [MRI and CT-scan in presumed benign ovarian tumors].

    PubMed

    Thomassin-Naggara, I; Bazot, M

    2013-12-01

    Radiological examinations are required for the assessment of complex or indeterminate ovarian masses, mainly using MRI and CT-scan. MRI provides better tissue characterization than Doppler ultrasound or CT-scan (LE2). Pelvic MRI is recommended in case of an indeterminate or complex ovarian ultrasonographic mass (grade B). The protocol of a pelvic MRI should include morphological T1 and T2 sequences (grade B). In case of solid portion, perfusion and diffusion sequences are recommended (grade C). In case of doubt about the diagnosis of ovarian origin, pelvic MRI is preferred over the CT-scan (grade C). MRI is the technique of choice for the difference between functional and organic ovarian lesion diagnosis (grade C). It can be useful in case of clinical diagnostic uncertainty between polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian hyperstimulation and multilocular ovarian tumor syndrome (grade C). No MRI classification for ovarian masses is currently validated. The establishment of a presumption of risk of malignancy is required in a MRI report of adnexal mass with if possible a guidance on the histological diagnosis. In the absence of clinical or sonographic diagnosis, pelvic CT-scan is recommended in the context of acute painful pelvic mass in non-pregnant patients (grade C). It specifies the anomalies and allows the differential diagnosis with digestive and urinary diseases (LE4). Given the lack of data in the literature, the precautionary principle must be applied to the realization of a pelvic MRI in a pregnant patient. A risk-benefit balance should be evaluated case by case by the clinician and the radiologist and information should be given to the patient. In an emergency situation during pregnancy, pelvic MRI is an alternative to CT-scan for the exploration of acute pelvic pain in case of uncertain sonographic diagnosis (grade C). Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. An automatic approach for 3D registration of CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Saber, Eli; Dianat, Sohail; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Abhyankar, Vishwas

    2012-03-01

    CT (Computed tomography) is a widely employed imaging modality in the medical field. Normally, a volume of CT scans is prescribed by a doctor when a specific region of the body (typically neck to groin) is suspected of being abnormal. The doctors are required to make professional diagnoses based upon the obtained datasets. In this paper, we propose an automatic registration algorithm that helps healthcare personnel to automatically align corresponding scans from 'Study' to 'Atlas'. The proposed algorithm is capable of aligning both 'Atlas' and 'Study' into the same resolution through 3D interpolation. After retrieving the scanned slice volume in the 'Study' and the corresponding volume in the original 'Atlas' dataset, a 3D cross correlation method is used to identify and register various body parts.

  18. [Diagnosis of strangulated Spiegel hernia based on CT scan: about a case].

    PubMed

    Akpo, Geraud; Deme, Hamidou; Badji, Nfally; Niang, Fallou; Toure, Mohamadou; Niang, Ibrahima; Diouf, Malick; Niang, El Hadj

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 86-year old woman with Spiegel hernia complicated by occlusion whose diagnosis was based on CT scan. She was examined in the Emergency Surgery Department for brutal onset of pain in the right iliac fossa associated with vomiting. On physical examination the patient was febrile (38.2° C). It showed hard, sensitive and mobile mass located in the right iliac fossa, with respect to both planes. Abdominal CT scan showed a hernia sac with the neck measuring 13 mm in the right iliac fossa, in front of the aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. It contained fat and a small bowel loop (curved arrow) with two zones of transition giving a double beak-like appearance at the level of the neck. CT scan showed a lack of enhancement of the wall of the loop after administration of contrast material. The diagnosis of strangulated spiegel hernia associated with sign of arterial ischemia of the digestive wall was retained. Surgery was perfomed with simple postoperative management.

  19. Computerized organ localization in abdominal CT volume with context-driven generalized Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Fast localization of organs is a key step in computer-aided detection of lesions and in image guided radiation therapy. We developed a context-driven Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for robust localization of organ-of-interests (OOIs) in a CT volume. Conventional GHT locates the center of an organ by looking-up center locations of pre-learned organs with "matching" edges. It often suffers from mislocalization because "similar" edges in vicinity may attract the prelearned organs towards wrong places. The proposed method not only uses information from organ's own shape but also takes advantage of nearby "similar" edge structures. First, multiple GHT co-existing look-up tables (cLUT) were constructed from a set of training shapes of different organs. Each cLUT represented the spatial relationship between the center of the OOI and the shape of a co-existing organ. Second, the OOI center in a test image was determined using GHT with each cLUT separately. Third, the final localization of OOI was based on weighted combination of the centers obtained in the second stage. The training set consisted of 10 CT volumes with manually segmented OOIs including liver, spleen and kidneys. The method was tested on a set of 25 abdominal CT scans. Context-driven GHT correctly located all OOIs in the test image and gave localization errors of 19.5±9.0, 12.8±7.3, 9.4±4.6 and 8.6±4.1 mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively. Conventional GHT mis-located 8 out of 100 organs and its localization errors were 26.0±32.6, 14.1±10.6, 30.1±42.6 and 23.6±39.7mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively.

  20. CT Scanning in Identification of Sheep Cystic Echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Rui; Qi, Hongzhi; Pei, Lei; Hao, Jie; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Tao; Ainiwaer, Abudula; Shang, Ge; Xu, Lin; Shou, Xi; Zhang, Songan; Wu, Ge; Lu, Pengfei; Bao, Yongxing; Li, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the efficiency of CT in identification of cystic echinococcosis in sheep. Fifty-three sheep with liver cysts confirmed by ultrasonography were subject to CT scan to evaluate the number, size, and type of the cysts in liver and lung, confirmed using necropsy. The correlation of numbers between liver cysts and lung cysts was calculated using Pearson analysis. Necropsy indicated a 98% consensus on size, location, number, and activity compared with CT scan. The viable cysts were 53.1% and 50.6% in the liver and lung, respectively. Among the cysts in liver, 35.5%, 9.5%, 5.7%, 10.2%, and 39.1% were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. The cysts in the lungs, 17.4%, 26.9%, 12.1%, 11.6%, and 32.1%, were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. A significant correlation was noticed between the number of cysts in liver and those in lung ( R = 0.770, P < 0.001). CT scan is a suitable tool in determining the size and type of cystic hydatid cysts in both liver and lung of sheep. A significant correlation was noticed between the numbers in liver and lung, indicating that lung infection was likely due to the expansion of liver cyst burden pressure.

  1. CT Scanning in Identification of Sheep Cystic Echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Rui; Qi, Hongzhi; Pei, Lei; Hao, Jie; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Tao; Ainiwaer, Abudula; Shang, Ge; Xu, Lin; Shou, Xi; Zhang, Songan; Wu, Ge; Lu, Pengfei

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aim to determine the efficiency of CT in identification of cystic echinococcosis in sheep. Methods Fifty-three sheep with liver cysts confirmed by ultrasonography were subject to CT scan to evaluate the number, size, and type of the cysts in liver and lung, confirmed using necropsy. The correlation of numbers between liver cysts and lung cysts was calculated using Pearson analysis. Results Necropsy indicated a 98% consensus on size, location, number, and activity compared with CT scan. The viable cysts were 53.1% and 50.6% in the liver and lung, respectively. Among the cysts in liver, 35.5%, 9.5%, 5.7%, 10.2%, and 39.1% were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. The cysts in the lungs, 17.4%, 26.9%, 12.1%, 11.6%, and 32.1%, were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. A significant correlation was noticed between the number of cysts in liver and those in lung (R = 0.770, P < 0.001). Conclusions CT scan is a suitable tool in determining the size and type of cystic hydatid cysts in both liver and lung of sheep. A significant correlation was noticed between the numbers in liver and lung, indicating that lung infection was likely due to the expansion of liver cyst burden pressure. PMID:29082246

  2. Radiation Dose Reduction via Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction and Automatic Tube Voltage Modulation (CARE kV) in Abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Joo; Lee, Young Han; Choi, Jin-Young; Park, Mi-Suk; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Kim, Ki Whang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and automated kV modulation (CARE kV) in reducing radiation dose without increasing image noise for abdominal CT examination. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 77 patients who received CT imaging with an application of CARE kV with or without SAFIRE and who had comparable previous CT images obtained without CARE kV or SAFIRE, using the standard dose (i.e., reference mAs of 240) on an identical CT scanner and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) within 1 year. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (33 patients, CT scanned with CARE kV); and group B (44 patients, scanned after reducing the reference mAs from 240 to 170 and applying both CARE kV and SAFIRE). CT number, image noise for four organs and radiation dose were compared among the two groups. Results Image noise increased after CARE kV application (p < 0.001) and significantly decreased as SAFIRE strength increased (p < 0.001). Image noise with reduced-mAs scan (170 mAs) in group B became similar to that of standard-dose FBP images after applying CARE kV and SAFIRE strengths of 3 or 4 when measured in the aorta, liver or muscle (p ≥ 0.108). Effective doses decreased by 19.4% and 41.3% for groups A and B, respectively (all, p < 0.001) after application of CARE kV with or without SAFIRE. Conclusion Combining CARE kV, reduction of mAs from 240 to 170 mAs and noise reduction by applying SAFIRE strength 3 or 4 reduced the radiation dose by 41.3% without increasing image noise compared with the standard-dose FBP images. PMID:24265563

  3. Improving Spleen Volume Estimation via Computer Assisted Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Gertz, Adam L.; Burke, Ryan P.; Bansal, Neil; Kang, Hakmook; Landman, Bennett A.; Abramson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Multi-atlas fusion is a promising approach for computer-assisted segmentation of anatomical structures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and time efficiency of multi-atlas segmentation for estimating spleen volumes on clinically-acquired CT scans. MATERIALS AND METHODS Under IRB approval, we obtained 294 deidentified (HIPAA-compliant) abdominal CT scans on 78 subjects from a recent clinical trial. We compared five pipelines for obtaining splenic volumes: Pipeline 1–manual segmentation of all scans, Pipeline 2–automated segmentation of all scans, Pipeline 3–automated segmentation of all scans with manual segmentation for outliers on a rudimentary visual quality check, Pipelines 4 and 5–volumes derived from a unidimensional measurement of craniocaudal spleen length and three-dimensional splenic index measurements, respectively. Using Pipeline 1 results as ground truth, the accuracy of Pipelines 2–5 (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC], Pearson correlation, R-squared, and percent and absolute deviation of volume from ground truth) were compared for point estimates of splenic volume and for change in splenic volume over time. Time cost was also compared for Pipelines 1–5. RESULTS Pipeline 3 was dominant in terms of both accuracy and time cost. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.99, average absolute volume deviation 23.7 cm3, and 1 minute per scan, Pipeline 3 yielded the best results. The second-best approach was Pipeline 5, with a Pearson correlation coefficient 0.98, absolute deviation 46.92 cm3, and 1 minute 30 seconds per scan. Manual segmentation (Pipeline 1) required 11 minutes per scan. CONCLUSION A computer-automated segmentation approach with manual correction of outliers generated accurate splenic volumes with reasonable time efficiency. PMID:27519156

  4. TU-AB-BRA-01: Abdominal Synthetic CT Generation in Support of Liver SBRT Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Bredfeldt, JS; Liu, L; Feng, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate and validate a technique for generating MRI-derived synthetic CT volumes (MRCTs) in support of adaptive liver SBRT. Methods: Under IRB approval, ten hepatocellular carcinoma patients were scanned using a single MR sequence (T1 Dixon-VIBE), yielding inherently-registered water, fat, and T1-weighted images. Air-containing voxels were identified by intensity thresholding. The envelope of the anterior vertebral bodies was segmented from the fat image by fitting a shape model to vertebral body candidate voxels, then using level sets to expand the contour outward. Fuzzy-C-Means (FCM) was then used to classify each non-air voxel in the image as fat, water, bone,more » or marrow. Bone and marrow only were classified within the vertebral body envelope. The MRCT was created by integrating the product of the FCM class probability with the assigned class density for each voxel. The resulting MRCTs were deformably aligned with planning CTs and 2-ARC SBRT VMAT plans were optimized on the MRCT density maps. Fluence was copied onto the CT density grids and dose recalculated. Results: The MRCTs faithfully reproduced most of the features visible in the corresponding CT image volumes, with exceptions of ribs and posterior spinous processes. The liver, vertebral bodies, kidneys, spleen and cord all had median HU differences of less than 75 between MRCT and CT images. PTV D99% values had an average 0.2% difference (standard deviation: 0.46%) between calculations on MRCT and CT density grids. The maximum difference in dose to 0.1cc of the PTV was 0.25% (std:0.49%). OAR dose differences were similarly small (mean:0.03Gy, std:0.26Gy). The largest normal tissue complication percentage (NTCP) difference was 1.48% (mean:0.06%, std:0.54%). Conclusions: MRCTs from a single abdominal imaging sequence are promising for use in SBRT dose calculation. Future work will focus on extending models to better define bones in the upper abdomen. Supported by NIHR01EB016079 and NIH

  5. Use of iDXA spine scans to evaluate total and visceral abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Bea, J W; Hsu, C-H; Blew, R M; Irving, A P; Caan, B J; Kwan, M L; Abraham, I; Going, S B

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal fat may be a better predictor than body mass index (BMI) for risk of metabolically-related diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and some cancers. We sought to validate the percent fat reported on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) regional spine scans (spine fat fraction, SFF) against abdominal fat obtained from total body scans using the iDXA machine (General Electric, Madison, WI), as previously done on the Prodigy model. Total body scans and regional spine scans were completed on the same day (N = 50). In alignment with the Prodigy-based study, the following regions of interest (ROI) were assessed from total body scans and compared to the SFF from regional spine scans: total abdominal fat at (1) lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 and (2) L2-Iliac Crest (L2-IC); (3) total trunk fat; and (4) visceral fat in the android region. Separate linear regression models were used to predict each total body scan ROI from SFF; models were validated by bootstrapping. The sample was 84% female, a mean age of 38.5 ± 17.4 years, and mean BMI of 23.0 ± 3.8 kg/m 2 . The SFF, adjusted for BMI, predicted L2-L4 and L2-IC total abdominal fat (%; Adj. R 2 : 0.90) and total trunk fat (%; Adj. R 2 : 0.88) well; visceral fat (%) adjusted R 2 was 0.83. Linear regression models adjusted for additional participant characteristics resulted in similar adjusted R 2 values. This replication of the strong correlation between SFF and abdominal fat measures on the iDXA in a new population confirms the previous Prodigy model findings and improves generalizability. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Are CT Scans Safe? Is It True That CT Scans May Increase My Risk of Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... products: Computed tomography (CT). U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/Radiation-EmittingProducts/RadiationEmittingProductsandProcedures/MedicalImaging/MedicalX-Rays/ucm115317.htm. Accessed Jan. 19, 2018. Lee C, et al. Radiation-related risks of ...

  7. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Changes on CT scan during acute relapse.

    PubMed

    Modi, G; Campbell, H; Bill, P

    1989-01-01

    A 19-year-old female patient presented in an acute state of akinetic mutism. Serological analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated the presence of antibodies to measles virus. CT scan carried out during this acute phase of relapse demonstrated white matter enhancement affecting the cortical white matter of the frontal lobes and corpus callosum. These features indicate that active demyelination occurs during acute relapse in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and suggest that immunotherapy should be considered during this acute phase.

  8. Patient characteristics associated with differences in radiation exposure from pediatric abdomen-pelvis CT scans: a quantile regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer N; Lodwick, Daniel L; Adler, Brent; Lee, Choonsik; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a widely used diagnostic tool in pediatric medicine. However, due to concerns regarding radiation exposure, it is essential to identify patient characteristics associated with higher radiation burden from CT imaging, in order to more effectively target efforts towards dose reduction. Our objective was to identify the effects of various demographic and clinical patient characteristics on radiation exposure from single abdomen/pelvis CT scans in children. CT scans performed at our institution between January 2013 and August 2015 in patients under 16 years of age were processed using a software tool that estimates patient-specific organ and effective doses and merges these estimates with data from the electronic health record and billing record. Quantile regression models at the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles were used to estimate the effects of patients' demographic and clinical characteristics on effective dose. 2390 abdomen/pelvis CT scans (median effective dose 1.52mSv) were included. Of all characteristics examined, only older age, female gender, higher BMI, and whether the scan was a multiphase exam or an exam that required repeating for movement were significant predictors of higher effective dose at each quantile examined (all p<0.05). The effects of obesity and multiphase or repeat scanning on effective dose were magnified in higher dose scans. Older age, female gender, obesity, and multiphase or repeat scanning are all associated with increased effective dose from abdomen/pelvis CT. Targeted efforts to reduce dose from abdominal CT in these groups should be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Methods: Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. Results: The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0

  10. Contrast Dose and Radiation Dose Reduction in Abdominal Enhanced Computerized Tomography Scans with Single-phase Dual-energy Spectral Computerized Tomography Mode for Children with Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong; Gao, Jun; Liu, Zhi-Min; Zhang, Qi-Feng; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Ling; Peng, Yun

    2017-04-05

    Contrast dose and radiation dose reduction in computerized tomography (CT) scan for adult has been explored successfully, but there have been few studies on the application of low-concentration contrast in pediatric abdominal CT examinations. This was a feasibility study on the use of dual-energy spectral imaging and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) for the reduction of radiation dose and iodine contrast dose in pediatric abdominal CT patients with solid tumors. Forty-five patients with solid tumors who had initial CT (Group B) and follow-up CT (Group A) after chemotherapy were enrolled. The initial diagnostic CT scan (Group B) was performed using the standard two-phase enhanced CT with 320 mgI/ml concentration contrast, and the follow-up scan (Group A) was performed using a single-phase enhanced CT at 45 s after the beginning of the 270 mgI/ml contrast injection using spectral mode. Forty percent ASiR was used for the images in Group B and monochromatic images with energy levels ≥60 keV in Group A. In addition, filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was used for monochromatic images <60 keV in Group A. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, contrast injection speed, and maximum injection pressure were compared between the two groups. The 40 keV and 60 keV spectral CT images of Group A were compared with the images of Group B to evaluate overall image quality. The total radiation dose, total iodine load, injection speed, and maximum injection pressure for Group A were decreased by 19%, 15%, 34.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. The optimal energy level in spectral CT for displaying the abdominal vessels was 40 keV. At this level, the CT values in the abdominal aorta and its three branches, the portal vein and its two branches, and the inferior vena cava were all greater than 340 hounsfield unit (HU). The abdominal organs of Groups A and B had similar degrees of absolute and relative enhancement (t = 0.36 and -1.716 for liver, -0.153 and

  11. Combined endeavor of Neutrosophic Set and Chan-Vese model to extract accurate liver image from CT scan.

    PubMed

    Siri, Sangeeta K; Latte, Mrityunjaya V

    2017-11-01

    Many different diseases can occur in the liver, including infections such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, cancer and over effect of medication or toxins. The foremost stage for computer-aided diagnosis of liver is the identification of liver region. Liver segmentation algorithms extract liver image from scan images which helps in virtual surgery simulation, speedup the diagnosis, accurate investigation and surgery planning. The existing liver segmentation algorithms try to extort exact liver image from abdominal Computed Tomography (CT) scan images. It is an open problem because of ambiguous boundaries, large variation in intensity distribution, variability of liver geometry from patient to patient and presence of noise. A novel approach is proposed to meet challenges in extracting the exact liver image from abdominal CT scan images. The proposed approach consists of three phases: (1) Pre-processing (2) CT scan image transformation to Neutrosophic Set (NS) and (3) Post-processing. In pre-processing, the noise is removed by median filter. The "new structure" is designed to transform a CT scan image into neutrosophic domain which is expressed using three membership subset: True subset (T), False subset (F) and Indeterminacy subset (I). This transform approximately extracts the liver image structure. In post processing phase, morphological operation is performed on indeterminacy subset (I) and apply Chan-Vese (C-V) model with detection of initial contour within liver without user intervention. This resulted in liver boundary identification with high accuracy. Experiments show that, the proposed method is effective, robust and comparable with existing algorithm for liver segmentation of CT scan images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Variation of quantitative emphysema measurements from CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema is a lung disease characterized by destruction of the alveolar air sacs and is associated with long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema, and several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease. In this paper we compare these measures for repeatability over time. The measures of interest in this study are emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentile, and the fractal dimension. To allow for direct comparisons, the measures were normalized to a 0-100 scale. These measures have been computed for a set of 2,027 scan pairs in which the mean interval between scans was 1.15 years (σ: 93 days). These independent pairs were considered with respect to three different scanning conditions (a) 223 pairs where both were scanned with a 5 mm slice thickness protocol, (b) 695 with the first scanned with the 5 mm protocol and the second with a 1.25 mm protocol, and (c) 1109 pairs scanned both times using a 1.25 mm protocol. We found that average normalized emphysema index and histogram percentiles scores increased by 5.9 and 11 points respectively, while the fractal dimension showed stability with a mean difference of 1.2. We also found, a 7 point bias introduced for emphysema index under condition (b), and that the fractal dimension measure is least affected by scanner parameter changes.

  13. Point Organ Radiation Dose in Abdominal CT: Effect of Patient Off-Centering in an Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Ali Khawaja, Ranish Deedar; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Lira, Diego; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Primak, Andrew; Xu, George; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2017-08-01

    To determine the effect of patient off-centering on point organ radiation dose measurements in a human cadaver scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol. A human cadaver (88 years, body-mass-index 20 kg/m2) was scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol on 128-slice dual source MDCT (Definition Flash, Siemens). A total of 18 scans were performed using two scan protocols (a) 120 kV-200 mAs fixed-mA (CTDIvol 14 mGy) (b) 120 kV-125 ref mAs (7 mGy) with automatic exposure control (AEC, CareDose 4D) at three different positions (a) gantry isocenter, (b) upward off-centering and (c) downward off-centering. Scanning was repeated three times at each position. Six thimble (in liver, stomach, kidney, pancreas, colon and urinary bladder) and four MOSFET dosimeters (on cornea, thyroid, testicle and breast) were placed for calculation of measured point organ doses. Organ dose estimations were retrieved from dose-tracking software (eXposure, Radimetrics). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. There was a significant difference between the trends of point organ doses with AEC and fixed-mA at all three positions (p < 0.01). Variation in point doses between fixed-mA and AEC protocols were statistically significant across all organs at all Table positions (p < 0.001). There was up to 5-6% decrease in point doses with upward off-centering and in downward off-centering. There were statistical significant differences in point doses from dosimeters and dose-tracking software (mean difference for internal organs, 5-36% for fixed-mA & 7-48% for AEC protocols; p < 0.001; mean difference for surface organs, >92% for both protocols; p < 0.0001). For both protocols, the highest mean difference in point doses was found for stomach and lowest for colon. Measured absorbed point doses in abdominal CT vary with patient-centering in the gantry isocenter. Due to lack of consideration of patient positioning in the dose estimation on automatic software-over estimation of the

  14. [Adult transient intestinal intussusception: can abdominal CT guide resolution?].

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Telegrafo, Michele; Lorusso, Valentina; Rella, Leonarda; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; La Porta, Michele; Moschetta, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adult transient intestinal intussusceptions on CT before and after the administration of gastrointestinal contrast material. We evaluated two different gastrointestinal contrast materials: hyperdense and hypodense. In all cases the gastrointestinal contrast agent solved the invaginations. In the group of patients treated with hypodense contrast medium relapses occurred in the short and long term; no recurrence was observed in the other group. CT is useful in the recognition of intestinal intussusception. The gastrointestinal contrast agent could define the real transience of intussusceptions and hyperdense contrast agent could be more effective in short and long term resolution.

  15. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  16. Assessing the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings in senior patients presenting to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Meshki, Malek; Monteiro, Sandra; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings for patients 65 years of age and older, when compared with all other scanned adult Emergency Department (ED) patients, at a single tertiary care hospital. Our hypothesis was that there is an increased prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal/pelvic CT findings in senior patients. A research ethics board-approved retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent an emergency CT of the abdomen and pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal and/or pelvic signs and symptoms was performed. Two thousand one hundred two patients between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013, were reviewed. Six hundred thirty-one patients were included in the <65 group (298 men and 333 women; mean age 46, age range 18-64), and 462 were included in the >65 group (209 men and 253 women; mean age 77.6, age range 65-99). Overall, there were more positive CT findings for patients <65 (389 positive cases, 61.6 %) compared with the >65 group (257 positive cases, 55.6 %), which was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.03). Moreover, with the exception of complicated appendicitis cases, which were more common in the >65 group, there were no statistically significant differences in the clinical/surgical relevance of the positive CT findings between the two groups. The findings of our retrospective study therefore refute our hypothesis that there is an increased prevalence of positive abdominal CT findings in patients >65. This may be related to ED physicians at our institution being more hesitant to order CT examinations for the younger population, presumably due to radiation concerns. However, older patients in our series were more likely to present with complicated appendicitis, and a lower threshold for ordering CT examinations of the abdomen and pelvis in this patient population should therefore be considered.

  17. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  18. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  19. Implementation of a CT Scan Practice Guideline for Pediatric Trauma Patients Reduces Unnecessary Scans Without Impacting Outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGrew, Patrick R; Chestovich, Paul J; Fisher, Jay D; Kuhls, Deborah A; Fraser, Douglas R; Patel, Purvi P; Katona, Chad W; Saquib, Syed; Fildes, John J

    2018-05-04

    Computed Tomography (CT) scans are useful in the evaluation of trauma patients, but are costly and pose risks from ionizing radiation in children. Recent literature has demonstrated the utility of CT scan guidelines in the management of pediatric trauma. This study objective is to review our treatment of pediatric blunt trauma patients and evaluate CT utilization before and after CT-guideline implementation. Our Pediatric Level 2 Trauma Center (TC) implemented a CT scan practice guideline for pediatric trauma patients in March 2014. The guideline recommended for or against CT of the head and abdomen/pelvis utilizing published criteria from the Pediatric Emergency Care and Research Network (PECARN). There was no chest CT guideline. We reviewed all pediatric trauma patients for CT scans obtained during initial evaluation before and after guideline implementation, excluding inpatient scans. The Trauma Registry Database was queried to include all pediatric (age<15) trauma patients seen in our TC from 2010-2016, excluding penetrating mechanism and deaths in the TC. Scans were considered positive if organ injury was detected. Primary outcome was the proportion of patients undergoing CT and percent positive CTs. Secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS), readmissions, and mortality. Categorical and continuous variables were analyzed with Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, respectively. P<0.05 was considered significant. We identified 1934 patients: 1106 pre- and 828 post-guideline. Absolute reductions in head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis CT scans were 17.7%, 11.5%, and 18.8% respectively (p<0.001). Percent positive head CTs were equivalent, but percent positive chest and abdomen CT increased after implementation. Secondary outcomes were unchanged. Implementation of a pediatric CT guideline significantly decreases CT utilization, reducing the radiation exposure without a difference in outcome. Trauma centers treating pediatric patients should adopt similar

  20. A new scanning device in CT with dose reduction potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischenko, Oleg; Xu, Yuan; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2006-03-01

    The amount of x-ray radiation currently applied in CT practice is not utilized optimally. A portion of radiation traversing the patient is either not detected at all or is used ineffectively. The reason lies partly in the reconstruction algorithms and partly in the geometry of the CT scanners designed specifically for these algorithms. In fact, the reconstruction methods widely used in CT are intended to invert the data that correspond to ideal straight lines. However, the collection of such data is often not accurate due to likely movement of the source/detector system of the scanner in the time interval during which all the detectors are read. In this paper, a new design of the scanner geometry is proposed that is immune to the movement of the CT system and will collect all radiation traversing the patient. The proposed scanning design has a potential to reduce the patient dose by a factor of two. Furthermore, it can be used with the existing reconstruction algorithm and it is particularly suitable for OPED, a new robust reconstruction algorithm.

  1. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  2. Radionuclide bone scan SPECT-CT: lowering the dose of CT significantly reduces radiation dose without impacting CT image quality

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sandeep Kumar; Trethewey, Scott; Brooker, Bree; Rutherford, Natalie; Diffey, Jenny; Viswanathan, Suresh; Attia, John

    2017-01-01

    The CT component of SPECT-CT is required for attenuation correction and anatomical localization of the uptake on SPECT but there is no guideline about the optimal CT acquisition parameters. In our department, a standard CT acquisition protocol was changed in 2013 to give lower radiation dose to the patient. In this study, we retrospectively compared the effects on patient dose as well as the CT image quality with current versus older CT protocols. Ninety nine consecutive patients [n=51 Standard dose ‘old’ protocol (SDP); n=48 lower dose ‘new’ protocol (LDP)] with lumbar spine SPECT-CT for bone scan were examined. The main differences between the two protocols were that SDP used 130 kVp tube voltage and reference current-time product of 70 mAs whereas the LDP used 110 kVp and 40 mAs respectively. Various quantitative parameters from the CT images were obtained and the images were also rated blindly by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians for bony definition and noise. The mean calculated dose length product of the LDP group (121.5±39.6 mGy.cm) was significantly lower compared to the SDP group patients (266.9±96.9 mGy.cm; P<0.0001). This translated into a significant reduction in the mean effective dose to 1.8 mSv from 4.0 mSv. The physicians reported better CT image quality for the bony structures in LDP group although for soft tissue structures, the SDP group had better image quality. The optimized new CT acquisition protocol significantly reduced the radiation dose to the patient and in-fact improved CT image quality for the assessment of bony structures. PMID:28533938

  3. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80 each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. • Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection provides appropriate scan protocols. • Abdominal CT is feasible using spectral imaging and 300 mgI/kg contrast agent. • 50-keV monochromatic images with 50 % ASIR provide optimal image quality.

  4. Energy Limits in Second Generation High-pitch Dual Source CT - Comparison in an Upper Abdominal Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Beeres, Martin; Bauer, Ralf W; Kerl, Josef M; Vogl, Thomas J; Lee, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of our study was to find out how much energy is applicable in second-generation dual source high-pitch computed tomography (CT) in imaging of the abdomen. Materials and Methods: We examined an upper abdominal phantom using a Somatom Definition Flash CT-Scanner (Siemens, Forchheim, Germany). The study protocol consisted of a scan-series at 100 kV and 120 kV. In each scan series we started with a pitch of 3.2 and reduced it in steps of 0.2, until a pitch of 1.6 was reached. The current was adjusted to the maximum the scanner could achieve. Energy values, image noise, image quality, and radiation exposure were evaluated. Results: For a pitch of 3.2 the maximum applicable current was 142 mAs at 120 kV and in 100 kV the maximum applicable current was 114 mAs. For conventional abdominal imaging, current levels of 200 to 260 mAs are generally used. To achieve similar current levels, we had to decrease the pitch to 1.8 at 100 kV — at this pitch we could perform our imaging at 204 mAs. At a pitch of 2.2 in 120 kV we could apply a current of 206 mAs. Conclusion: We conclude our study by stating that if there is a need for a higher current, we have to reduce the pitch. In a high-pitch dual source CT, we always have to remember where our main focus is, so we can adjust the pitch to the energy we need in the area of the body that has to be imaged, to find answers to the clinical question being raised. PMID:25806137

  5. Low contrast detection in abdominal CT: comparing single-slice and multi-slice tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Alexandre; Racine, Damien; Viry, Anaïs.; Verdun, Francis R.; Schmidt, Sabine; Bochud, François O.

    2017-03-01

    Image quality assessment is crucial for the optimization of computed tomography (CT) protocols. Human and mathematical model observers are increasingly used for the detection of low contrast signal in abdominal CT, but are frequently limited to the use of a single image slice. Another limitation is that most of them only consider the detection of a signal embedded in a uniform background phantom. The purpose of this paper was to test if human observer performance is significantly different in CT images read in single or multiple slice modes and if these differences are the same for anatomical and uniform clinical images. We investigated detection performance and scrolling trends of human observers of a simulated liver lesion embedded in anatomical and uniform CT backgrounds. Results show that observers don't take significantly benefit of additional information provided in multi-slice reading mode. Regarding the background, performances are moderately higher for uniform than for anatomical images. Our results suggest that for low contrast detection in abdominal CT, the use of multi-slice model observers would probably only add a marginal benefit. On the other hand, the quality of a CT image is more accurately estimated with clinical anatomical backgrounds.

  6. Abdominal Pediatric Cancer Surveillance using Serial CT: Evaluation of Organ Absorbed Dose and Effective Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Diana; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; McGahan, John P.; Stern, Robin; Boone, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used extensively in cancer diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, and in active surveillance for cancer reoccurrence. A review of CT technology is provided, at a level of detail appropriate for a busy clinician to review. The basis of x-ray CT dosimetry is also discussed, and concepts of absorbed dose and effective dose are distinguished. Absorbed dose is a physical quantity (measured in milliGray) equal to the x-ray energy deposited in a mass of tissue, whereas effective dose utilizes an organ-specific weighting method which converts organ doses to effective dose measured in milliSieverts. The organ weighting values carry with them a measure of radiation risk, and so effective dose (in mSv) is not a physical dose metric but rather is one that conveys radiation risk. The use of CT in a cancer surveillance protocol was used as an example of a pediatric patient who had kidney cancer, with surgery and radiation therapy. The active use of CT for cancer surveillance along with diagnostic CT scans led to a total of 50 CT scans performed on this child in a 7 year period. It was estimated that the patient received an average organ dose of 431 mGy from these CT scans. By comparison, the radiation therapy was performed and delivered 50.4 Gy to the patient’s abdomen. Thus, the total dose from CT represented only 0.8% of the patients radiation dose. PMID:21362521

  7. Plastinated fetus: 3D CT scan (VRT) evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shilpi; Nandlal, B; Shama Sundar, N M

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this study was to evaluate the effect of plastination on the morphology and structure of stored organs, to find out how much accuracy a plastinated specimen has, and to look into the changes that occurred because of plastination. A human fetus of gestational age 24 weeks was plastinated, and 3D CT scan evaluation of the fetus was done. The results showed normal, well-defined, clearly identifiable organs, with no alteration in morphology and structure of organs. In our opinion, plastinated specimens are better way of visualization of morphology and structure of stored organs, which is a useful tool for teaching as well as for research purposes.

  8. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Adamovics, J.; Cheeseborough, J. C.; Chao, K. S.; Wuu, C. S.

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS" optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  9. CT Scans of Soil Specimen Processed in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view is made from a series of horizontal slices. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  10. CT Scans of Soil Specimen Processed in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    CT scans of the specimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view is made from three orthogonal slices. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder).

  11. CT Scans of Soil Specimen Processed in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. This view depict horizontal slices from top to bottom of a flight specimen. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  12. CT Scans of Soil Specimen Processed in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    CT scans of the spcimens on STS-79 reveal internal cone-shaped features and radial patterns not seen in specimens processed on the ground. The lighter areas are the densest in these images. CT scans produced richly detailed images allowing scientists to build 3D models of the interior of the specimens that can be compared with microscopic examination of thin slices. These views depict vertical slices from side to middle of a flight specimen. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of Colorado at Boulder.

  13. Acquiring 4D Thoracic CT Scans Using Ciné CT Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Daniel

    One method for acquiring 4D thoracic CT scans is to use ciné acquisition. Ciné acquisition is conducted by rotating the gantry and acquiring x-ray projections while keeping the couch stationary. After a complete rotation, a single set of CT slices, the number corresponding to the number of CT detector rows, is produced. The rotation period is typically sub second so each image set corresponds to a single point in time. The ciné image acquisition is repeated for at least one breathing cycle to acquire images throughout the breathing cycle. Once the images are acquired at a single couch position, the couch is moved to the abutting position and the acquisition is repeated. Post-processing of the images sets typically resorts the sets into breathing phases, stacking images from a specific phase to produce a thoracic CT scan at that phase. Benefits of the ciné acquisition protocol include, the ability to precisely identify the phase with respect to the acquired image, the ability to resort images after reconstruction, and the ability to acquire images over arbitrarily long times and for arbitrarily many images (within dose constraints).

  14. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry.

  15. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  16. Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A; Chowdhury, Ananda S; Summers, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D erosion using population historic information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen, and kidneys was applied to multi-phase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance and enhancement, and shape and location on organ segmentation.

  17. [Automated detection and volumetric segmentation of the spleen in CT scans].

    PubMed

    Hammon, M; Dankerl, P; Kramer, M; Seifert, S; Tsymbal, A; Costa, M J; Janka, R; Uder, M; Cavallaro, A

    2012-08-01

    To introduce automated detection and volumetric segmentation of the spleen in spiral CT scans with the THESEUS-MEDICO software. The consistency between automated volumetry (aV), estimated volume determination (eV) and manual volume segmentation (mV) was evaluated. Retrospective evaluation of the CAD system based on methods like "marginal space learning" and "boosting algorithms". 3 consecutive spiral CT scans (thoraco-abdominal; portal-venous contrast agent phase; 1 or 5 mm slice thickness) of 15 consecutive lymphoma patients were included. The eV: 30 cm³ + 0.58 (width × length × thickness of the spleen) and the mV as the reference standard were determined by an experienced radiologist. The aV could be performed in all CT scans within 15.2 (± 2.4) seconds. The average splenic volume measured by aV was 268.21 ± 114.67 cm³ compared to 281.58 ± 130.21 cm³ in mV and 268.93 ± 104.60 cm³ in eV. The correlation coefficient was 0.99 (coefficient of determination (R²) = 0.98) for aV and mV, 0.91 (R² = 0.83) for mV and eV and 0.91 (R² = 0.82) for aV and eV. There was an almost perfect correlation of the changes in splenic volume measured with the new aV and mV (0.92; R² = 0.84), mV and eV (0.95; R² = 0.91) and aV and eV (0.83; R² = 0.69) between two time points. The automated detection and volumetric segmentation software rapidly provides an accurate measurement of the splenic volume in CT scans. Knowledge about splenic volume and its change between two examinations provides valuable clinical information without effort for the radiologist. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Intra-abdominal abscess demonstrating an unusually large intra-abdominal pattern on an indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.R.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; ter Penning, B.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 WBC imaging of a patient with occult septicemia revealed a large focal pattern of radiopharmaceutical distribution within the abdominal cavity at 24 hours post radiopharmaceutical administration. This finding was felt to represent a large intra-abdominal abscess. A five liter peritoneal abscess was found at surgery. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an intra-abdominal abscess.

  19. CT scans for pulmonary surveillance may be overused in lower-grade sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin J; Carmody Soni, Emily E; Reith, John D; Gibbs, C Parker; Scarborough, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Chest CT scans are often used to monitor patients after excision of a sarcoma. Although sensitive, CT scans are more expensive than chest radiographs and are associated with possible health risks from a higher radiation dose. We hypothesized that a program based upon limited CT scans in lower-grade sarcoma could be efficacious and less expensive. We retrospectively assigned patients to a high-risk or low-risk hypothetical protocol. Eighty-three low- or intermediate-grade soft tissue sarcomas met our inclusion criteria. Eight patients had pulmonary metastasis. A protocol based on selective CT scans for high-risk patients would have identified seven out of eight lesions. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for routine CT scans was $731,400. A program based upon selective CT scans for higher-risk patients is accurate, spares unnecessary radiation to many patients, and is less expensive.

  20. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry spine scans to determine abdominal fat in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bea, J W; Blew, R M; Going, S B; Hsu, C-H; Lee, M C; Lee, V R; Caan, B J; Kwan, M L; Lohman, T G

    2016-11-01

    Body composition may be a better predictor of chronic disease risk than body mass index (BMI) in older populations. We sought to validate spine fat fraction (%) from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) spine scans as a proxy for total abdominal fat. Total body DXA scan abdominal fat regions of interest (ROI) that have been previously validated by magnetic resonance imaging were assessed among healthy, postmenopausal women who also had antero-posterior spine scans (n = 103). ROIs were (1) lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 and (2) L2-Iliac Crest (L2-IC), manually selected by two independent raters, and (3) trunk, auto-selected by DXA software. Intra-class correlation coefficients evaluated intra and inter-rater reliability on a random subset (N = 25). Linear regression models, validated by bootstrapping, assessed the relationship between spine fat fraction (%) and total abdominal fat (%) ROIs. Mean age, BMI, and total body fat were 66.1 ± 4.8 y, 25.8 ± 3.8 kg/m 2 and 40.0 ± 6.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences within or between raters. Linear regression models adjusted for several participant and scan characteristics were equivalent to using only BMI and spine fat fraction. The model predicted L2-L4 (Adj. R 2 : 0.83) and L2-IC (Adj. R 2 : 0.84) abdominal fat (%) well; the adjusted R 2 for trunk fat (%) was 0.78. Model validation demonstrated minimal over-fitting (Adj. R 2 : 0.82, 0.83, and 0.77 for L2-L4, L2-IC, and trunk fat, respectively). The strong correlation between spine fat fraction and DXA abdominal fat measures make it suitable for further development in postmenopausal chronic disease risk prediction models. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 28:918-926, 2016. © 2016Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. 3D dosimetry by optical-CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, Mark

    2006-12-01

    The need for an accurate, practical, low-cost 3D dosimetry system is becoming ever more critical as modern dose delivery techniques increase in complexity and sophistication. A recent report from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC) (1), revealed that 38% of institutions failed the head-and-neck IMRT phantom credentialing test at the first attempt. This was despite generous passing criteria (within 7% dose-difference or 4mm distance-to-agreement) evaluated at a half-dozen points and a single axial plane. The question that arises from this disturbing finding is - what percentage of institutions would have failed if a comprehensive 3D measurement had been feasible, rather than measurements restricted to the central film-plane and TLD points? This question can only be adequately answered by a comprehensive 3D-dosimetry system, which presents a compelling argument for its development as a clinically viable low cost dosimetry solution. Optical-CT dosimetry is perhaps the closest system to providing such a comprehensive solution. In this article, we review the origins and recent developments of optical-CT dosimetry systems. The principle focus is on first generation systems known to have highest accuracy but longer scan times.

  2. Predicting need for additional CT scan in children with a non-diagnostic ultrasound for appendicitis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Takuya; Maeda, Shigenobu; Goldman, Ran D; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to determine which children with suspected appendicitis should be considered for a computerized tomography (CT) scan after a non-diagnostic ultrasound (US) in the Emergency Department (ED). We retrospectively reviewed patients 0-18year old, who presented to the ED with complaints of abdominal pain, during 2011-2015 and while in the hospital had both US and CT. We recorded demographic and clinical data and outcomes, and used univariate and multivariate methods for comparing patients who did and didn't have appendicitis on CT after non-diagnostic US. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression to determine what variables were independently associated with appendicitis. A total of 328 patients were enrolled, 257 with non-diagnostic US (CT: 82 had appendicitis, 175 no-appendicitis). Younger children and those who reported vomiting or had right lower abdominal quadrant (RLQ) tenderness, peritoneal signs or White Blood Cell (WBC) count >10,000 in mm 3 were more likely to have appendicitis on CT. RLQ tenderness (Odds Ratio: 2.84, 95%CI: 1.07-7.53), peritoneal signs (Odds Ratio: 11.37, 95%CI: 5.08-25.47) and WBC count >10,000 in mm 3 (Odds Ratio: 21.88, 95%CI: 7.95-60.21) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Considering CT with 2 or 3 of these predictors would have resulted in sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 57% and negative predictive value of 96% for appendicitis. Ordering CT should be considered after non-diagnostic US for appendicitis only when children meet at least 2 predictors of RLQ tenderness, peritoneal signs and WBC>10,000 in mm 3 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accuracy of limited four-slice CT-scan in diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Zojaji, R; Nekooei, S; Naghibi, S; Mazloum Farsi Baf, M; Jalilian, R; Masoomi, M

    2015-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common chronic health condition worldwide. Standard CT-scan is the method of choice for diagnosis of CRS but its high price and considerable radiation exposure have limited its application. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of limited four-slice coronal CT-scan in the diagnosis of CRS. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 46 patients with CRS, for one year, based on American Society of Head and Neck Surgery criteria. All patients received the preoperative standard and four-slice CT-scans, after which endoscopic sinus surgery was performed. Findings of four-slice CT-scans were compared with those of conventional CT-scan and the sensitivity and specificity of four-slice CT-scan and its agreement with conventional CT-scan was calculated. In this study, 46 patients including 32 males (69.6%) and 14 females (30.46%) with a mean age of 33 and standard deviation of 9 years, were evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity of four-slice CT-scan were 97.5% and 100%, respectively. Also, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of four-slice CT was 100% and 85.71%, respectively. There was a strong agreement between four-slice CT and conventional CT findings. Considering the high sensitivity and specificity of four-slice CT-scan and strong agreement with conventional CT-scan in the diagnosis of CRS and the lower radiation exposure and cost, application of this method is suggested for both diagnosis and treatment follow-up in CRS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic blood vessel based-liver segmentation using the portal phase abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Iinuma, Gen

    2018-02-01

    Liver segmentation is the basis for computer-based planning of hepatic surgical interventions. In diagnosis and analysis of hepatic diseases and surgery planning, automatic segmentation of liver has high importance. Blood vessel (BV) has showed high performance at liver segmentation. In our previous work, we developed a semi-automatic method that segments the liver through the portal phase abdominal CT images in two stages. First stage was interactive segmentation of abdominal blood vessels (ABVs) and subsequent classification into hepatic (HBVs) and non-hepatic (non-HBVs). This stage had 5 interactions that include selective threshold for bone segmentation, selecting two seed points for kidneys segmentation, selection of inferior vena cava (IVC) entrance for starting ABVs segmentation, identification of the portal vein (PV) entrance to the liver and the IVC-exit for classifying HBVs from other ABVs (non-HBVs). Second stage is automatic segmentation of the liver based on segmented ABVs as described in [4]. For full automation of our method we developed a method [5] that segments ABVs automatically tackling the first three interactions. In this paper, we propose full automation of classifying ABVs into HBVs and non- HBVs and consequently full automation of liver segmentation that we proposed in [4]. Results illustrate that the method is effective at segmentation of the liver through the portal abdominal CT images.

  5. Childhood CT scans linked to leukemia and brain cancer later in life

    Cancer.gov

    Children and young adults scanned multiple times by computed tomography (CT), a commonly used diagnostic tool, have a small increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors in the decade following their first scan.

  6. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  7. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m(-2) underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19-49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. This study represents the first clinical research experiment to use ASIR-V, the newest version of

  8. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. Methods: 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m−2 underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. Results: At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19–49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Conclusion: Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. Advances in knowledge: This study represents the first

  9. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma causing low abdominal pain, using Tc-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schütz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  10. A fully automatic end-to-end method for content-based image retrieval of CT scans with similar liver lesion annotations.

    PubMed

    Spanier, A B; Caplan, N; Sosna, J; Acar, B; Joskowicz, L

    2018-01-01

    The goal of medical content-based image retrieval (M-CBIR) is to assist radiologists in the decision-making process by retrieving medical cases similar to a given image. One of the key interests of radiologists is lesions and their annotations, since the patient treatment depends on the lesion diagnosis. Therefore, a key feature of M-CBIR systems is the retrieval of scans with the most similar lesion annotations. To be of value, M-CBIR systems should be fully automatic to handle large case databases. We present a fully automatic end-to-end method for the retrieval of CT scans with similar liver lesion annotations. The input is a database of abdominal CT scans labeled with liver lesions, a query CT scan, and optionally one radiologist-specified lesion annotation of interest. The output is an ordered list of the database CT scans with the most similar liver lesion annotations. The method starts by automatically segmenting the liver in the scan. It then extracts a histogram-based features vector from the segmented region, learns the features' relative importance, and ranks the database scans according to the relative importance measure. The main advantages of our method are that it fully automates the end-to-end querying process, that it uses simple and efficient techniques that are scalable to large datasets, and that it produces quality retrieval results using an unannotated CT scan. Our experimental results on 9 CT queries on a dataset of 41 volumetric CT scans from the 2014 Image CLEF Liver Annotation Task yield an average retrieval accuracy (Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain index) of 0.77 and 0.84 without/with annotation, respectively. Fully automatic end-to-end retrieval of similar cases based on image information alone, rather that on disease diagnosis, may help radiologists to better diagnose liver lesions.

  11. Maximizing Iodine Contrast-to-Noise Ratios in Abdominal CT Imaging through Use of Energy Domain Noise Reduction and Virtual Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Fletcher, Joel G; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-08-01

    To determine the iodine contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for abdominal computed tomography (CT) when using energy domain noise reduction and virtual monoenergetic dual-energy (DE) CT images and to compare the CNR to that attained with single-energy CT at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board with waiver of informed consent. A syringe filled with diluted iodine contrast material was placed into 30-, 35-, and 45-cm-wide water phantoms and scanned with a dual-source CT scanner in both DE and single-energy modes with matched scanner output. Virtual monoenergetic images were generated, with energies ranging from 40 to 110 keV in 10-keV steps. A previously developed energy domain noise reduction algorithm was applied to reduce image noise by exploiting information redundancies in the energy domain. Image noise and iodine CNR were calculated. To show the potential clinical benefit of this technique, it was retrospectively applied to a clinical DE CT study of the liver in a 59-year-old male patient by using conventional and iterative reconstruction techniques. Image noise and CNR were compared for virtual monoenergetic images with and without energy domain noise reduction at each virtual monoenergetic energy (in kiloelectron volts) and phantom size by using a paired t test. CNR of virtual monoenergetic images was also compared with that of single-energy images acquired with 80, 100, 120, and 140 kV. Noise reduction of up to 59% (28.7 of 65.7) was achieved for DE virtual monoenergetic images by using an energy domain noise reduction technique. For the commercial virtual monoenergetic images, the maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 70 keV and was 18.6, 16.6, and 10.8 for the 30-, 35-, and 45-cm phantoms. After energy domain noise reduction, maximum iodine CNR was achieved at 40 keV and increased to 30.6, 25.4, and 16.5. These CNRs represented improvement of up to 64% (12.0 of 18.6) with the energy domain noise

  12. Is appendiceal CT scan overused for evaluating patients with right lower quadrant pain?

    PubMed

    Safran, D B; Pilati, D; Folz, E; Oller, D

    2001-05-01

    Reports citing excellent sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy of focused appendiceal computed tomography (CT) and showing an overall reduction in resource use and nontherapeutic laparotomies have led to increasing use of that imaging modality. Diagnostic algorithms have begun to incorporate appendiceal CT for patients presenting to the emergency department with right lower quadrant pain. We present a series of 4 cases in which use of appendiceal CT ultimately led to increased cost, resource use, and complexity in patient care. The results of these cases support an argument against unbridled use of appendiceal CT scanning and reinforce the need for clinical evaluation by the operating surgeon before routine performance of appendiceal CT scan.

  13. Use of PET/CT scanning in cancer patients: technical and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This overview of the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) focuses on the technical aspects and clinical applications of a newer technique: the combination of a PET scanner and a computed tomography (CT) scanner in a single (PET/CT) device. Examples illustrate how PET/CT contributes to patient care and improves upon the previous state-of-the-art method of comparing a PET scan with a separate CT scan. Finally, the author presents some of the results from studies of PET/CT imaging that are beginning to appear in the literature. PMID:16252023

  14. CT Pelvis in Children; Should We Routinely Scan Pelvis for Wilms Tumor and Hepatoblastoma? Implications for Imaging Protocol Development.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran; Aslam, Mubashir; Sajjad, Zafar; Abid, Waqas; Youssef, Talaat; Ali, Arif; Fadoo, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma are the most common intra-abdominal solid organ childhood tumors. CT examination is one of the routinely performed procedures in hospitals for children with these tumors inspite of high radiation exposure associated with CT scans. Sixty patients (Wilms tumor = 45, hepatoblastoma = 16) were evaluated retrospectively. Higher proportion (44.4%) of metastatic disease was identified at presentation in the Wilms tumor subset as compared to hepatoblastoma (6.3%) [p=0.006]. Metastatic disease was noted in 6 patients having Wilms tumor on follow-up while it was also low in hepatoblastoma which was noted in only 2 patients (p > 0.05). No significant difference was identified in pelvic extension of disease at presentation in both studied population (p > 0.05). Pelvic metastasis was noted in 1 patient only with Wilms tumor on follow-up while no pelvic metastasis was seen in the hepatoblastoma patients (p-value > 0.05).

  15. Knowledge Representation Of CT Scans Of The Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, Laurens V.; Burke, M. W.; Rada, Roy

    1984-06-01

    We have been investigating diagnostic knowledge models which assist in the automatic classification of medical images by combining information extracted from each image with knowledge specific to that class of images. In a more general sense we are trying to integrate verbal and pictorial descriptions of disease via representations of knowledge, study automatic hypothesis generation as related to clinical medicine, evolve new mathematical image measures while integrating them into the total diagnostic process, and investigate ways to augment the knowledge of the physician. Specifically, we have constructed an artificial intelligence knowledge model using the technique of a production system blending pictorial and verbal knowledge about the respective CT scan and patient history. It is an attempt to tie together different sources of knowledge representation, picture feature extraction and hypothesis generation. Our knowledge reasoning and representation system (KRRS) works with data at the conscious reasoning level of the practicing physician while at the visual perceptional level we are building another production system, the picture parameter extractor (PPE). This paper describes KRRS and its relationship to PPE.

  16. Pretreatment with diphenoxylate hydrochloride/atropine sulfate (Lomotil) does not decrease physiologic bowel FDG activity on PET/CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert; Doerger, Kirk M; Nathan, Mark A; Lowe, Val J

    2009-01-01

    Physiologic uptake of 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D: -glucose (FDG) by bowel can confound positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) assessment for abdominal pathology, particularly within the bowel itself. We wished to determine if oral administration of the antimotility agent, Lomotil (5 mg diphenoxylate hydrochloride/0.05 mg atropine sulfate; G.D. Searle and Company, a division of Pfizer), prior to PET/CT scanning would reduce physiologic uptake of FDG by the small bowel and colon (lower gastrointestinal [GI] tract). Patients undergoing PET/CT scans for lymphoma were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study and received either 10 mL water (control group) or 10 mL Lomotil (experimental group) orally 30-60 min prior to scanning. Scans were reviewed independently by two blinded experienced readers and scored for the degree of FDG activity in the lower GI tract relative to liver activity. The administration of Lomotil prior to PET/CT scanning did not reduce physiologic FDG activity in the small bowel and colon. In contrast, increased radiotracer uptake by the lower GI tract was observed in the Lomotil group compared to the control group. Pretreatment with Lomotil prior to PET/CT scanning confers no benefit toward the reduction of physiologic FDG uptake by the small bowel and colon.

  17. Is the routine CT head scan justified for psychiatric patients? A prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Gamal, R; Miller, M; Wohl, M; Vandewater, S

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-four psychiatric patients, assessed for a physical illness that was missed during diagnosis, underwent a CT scan. After investigation, the diagnosis of 14 patients changed from a functional to an organic illness. In nine patients, the CT scan was reported to be abnormal, and yet only two were diagnosed as having an organic syndrome. In seven patients, the CT scan was normal but the patients had an undisputed organic brain syndrome. These findings indicate that the use of CT scans should be restricted to cases in which the diagnosis is seriously in question. The clinical findings should dictate the use of CT scans either to clarify or to complement them. PMID:8461285

  18. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5,more » 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image

  19. Automated lung volumetry from routine thoracic CT scans: how reliable is the result?

    PubMed

    Haas, Matthias; Hamm, Bernd; Niehues, Stefan M

    2014-05-01

    Today, lung volumes can be easily calculated from chest computed tomography (CT) scans. Modern postprocessing workstations allow automated volume measurement of data sets acquired. However, there are challenges in the use of lung volume as an indicator of pulmonary disease when it is obtained from routine CT. Intra-individual variation and methodologic aspects have to be considered. Our goal was to assess the reliability of volumetric measurements in routine CT lung scans. Forty adult cancer patients whose lungs were unaffected by the disease underwent routine chest CT scans in 3-month intervals, resulting in a total number of 302 chest CT scans. Lung volume was calculated by automatic volumetry software. On average of 7.2 CT scans were successfully evaluable per patient (range 2-15). Intra-individual changes were assessed. In the set of patients investigated, lung volume was approximately normally distributed, with a mean of 5283 cm(3) (standard deviation = 947 cm(3), skewness = -0.34, and curtosis = 0.16). Between different scans in one and the same patient the median intra-individual standard deviation in lung volume was 853 cm(3) (16% of the mean lung volume). Automatic lung segmentation of routine chest CT scans allows a technically stable estimation of lung volume. However, substantial intra-individual variations have to be considered. A median intra-individual deviation of 16% in lung volume between different routine scans was found. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Immediate total-body CT scanning versus conventional imaging and selective CT scanning in patients with severe trauma (REACT-2): a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sierink, Joanne C; Treskes, Kaij; Edwards, Michael J R; Beuker, Benn J A; den Hartog, Dennis; Hohmann, Joachim; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Luitse, Jan S K; Beenen, Ludo F M; Hollmann, Markus W; Goslings, J Carel

    2016-08-13

    Published work suggests a survival benefit for patients with trauma who undergo total-body CT scanning during the initial trauma assessment; however, level 1 evidence is absent. We aimed to assess the effect of total-body CT scanning compared with the standard work-up on in-hospital mortality in patients with trauma. We undertook an international, multicentre, randomised controlled trial at four hospitals in the Netherlands and one in Switzerland. Patients aged 18 years or older with trauma with compromised vital parameters, clinical suspicion of life-threatening injuries, or severe injury were randomly assigned (1:1) by ALEA randomisation to immediate total-body CT scanning or to a standard work-up with conventional imaging supplemented with selective CT scanning. Neither doctors nor patients were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality, analysed in the intention-to-treat population and in subgroups of patients with polytrauma and those with traumatic brain injury. The χ(2) test was used to assess differences in mortality. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01523626. Between April 22, 2011, and Jan 1, 2014, 5475 patients were assessed for eligibility, 1403 of whom were randomly assigned: 702 to immediate total-body CT scanning and 701 to the standard work-up. 541 patients in the immediate total-body CT scanning group and 542 in the standard work-up group were included in the primary analysis. In-hospital mortality did not differ between groups (total-body CT 86 [16%] of 541 vs standard work-up 85 [16%] of 542; p=0.92). In-hospital mortality also did not differ between groups in subgroup analyses in patients with polytrauma (total-body CT 81 [22%] of 362 vs standard work-up 82 [25%] of 331; p=0.46) and traumatic brain injury (68 [38%] of 178 vs 66 [44%] of 151; p=0.31). Three serious adverse events were reported in patients in the total-body CT group (1%), one in the standard work-up group (<1%), and

  1. Computer-aided Assessment of Regional Abdominal Fat with Food Residue Removal in CT

    PubMed Central

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Caturegli, Giorgio; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Separate quantification of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat regions is essential to understand the role of regional adiposity as risk factor in epidemiological studies. Fat quantification is often based on computed tomography (CT) because fat density is distinct from other tissue densities in the abdomen. However, the presence of intestinal food residues with densities similar to fat may reduce fat quantification accuracy. We introduce an abdominal fat quantification method in CT with interest in food residue removal. Materials and Methods Total fat was identified in the feature space of Hounsfield units and divided into subcutaneous and visceral components using model-based segmentation. Regions of food residues were identified and removed from visceral fat using a machine learning method integrating intensity, texture, and spatial information. Cost-weighting and bagging techniques were investigated to address class imbalance. Results We validated our automated food residue removal technique against semimanual quantifications. Our feature selection experiments indicated that joint intensity and texture features produce the highest classification accuracy at 95%. We explored generalization capability using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with variable k. Losses in accuracy and area under ROC curve between maximum and minimum k were limited to 0.1% and 0.3%. We validated tissue segmentation against reference semimanual delineations. The Dice similarity scores were as high as 93.1 for subcutaneous fat and 85.6 for visceral fat. Conclusions Computer-aided regional abdominal fat quantification is a reliable computational tool for large-scale epidemiological studies. Our proposed intestinal food residue reduction scheme is an original contribution of this work. Validation experiments indicate very good accuracy and generalization capability. PMID:24119354

  2. Computer-aided assessment of regional abdominal fat with food residue removal in CT.

    PubMed

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Caturegli, Giorgio; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    Separate quantification of abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat regions is essential to understand the role of regional adiposity as risk factor in epidemiological studies. Fat quantification is often based on computed tomography (CT) because fat density is distinct from other tissue densities in the abdomen. However, the presence of intestinal food residues with densities similar to fat may reduce fat quantification accuracy. We introduce an abdominal fat quantification method in CT with interest in food residue removal. Total fat was identified in the feature space of Hounsfield units and divided into subcutaneous and visceral components using model-based segmentation. Regions of food residues were identified and removed from visceral fat using a machine learning method integrating intensity, texture, and spatial information. Cost-weighting and bagging techniques were investigated to address class imbalance. We validated our automated food residue removal technique against semimanual quantifications. Our feature selection experiments indicated that joint intensity and texture features produce the highest classification accuracy at 95%. We explored generalization capability using k-fold cross-validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with variable k. Losses in accuracy and area under ROC curve between maximum and minimum k were limited to 0.1% and 0.3%. We validated tissue segmentation against reference semimanual delineations. The Dice similarity scores were as high as 93.1 for subcutaneous fat and 85.6 for visceral fat. Computer-aided regional abdominal fat quantification is a reliable computational tool for large-scale epidemiological studies. Our proposed intestinal food residue reduction scheme is an original contribution of this work. Validation experiments indicate very good accuracy and generalization capability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  4. Efficient multi-atlas abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CT abdominal imaging findings in patients with sickle cell disease: acute vaso-occlusive crisis, complications, and chronic sequelae.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Carly S; Boll, Daniel T; Bhosale, Priya; Jaffe, Tracy A

    2016-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most prevalent hemoglobinopathy. Survival in patients with SCD has improved over the past few decades. These patients experience a lifetime of repeated acute pain crises, which are thought to result from sickling and microvascular occlusions; acute abdominal pain is common. Moreover, repeated crises often lead to organ dysfunction, such as asplenia, hepatic failure, and renal failure. The spleen, liver, biliary system, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract can all be affected. Patients may undergo CT to further direct clinical management. We review the spectrum of CT imaging findings of abdominal manifestations in patients with SCD, from the acute microvascular occlusive pain crisis to the potential complications and chronic sequelae.

  6. CT scanning in stroke patients: meeting the challenge in the remote and rural district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Todd, A W; Anderson, E M

    2009-05-01

    National audit data allow crude comparison between centres and indicate that most Scottish hospitals fail to meet current guidelines for CT scanning of the brain in stroke patients. This study identifies some of the reasons for delay in performing CT scans in a largely rural population. This audit study assesses the delays from onset of symptoms, time of admission and request received to CT scan in stroke patients for three different in-patient groups as well as those managed in the community. The reasons for delay in CT scanning varied between different patient groups but for one group of in-patients, changes in booking procedure and introduction of a second CT scanner increased the proportion scanned within 48 hours of request from 65% to 96%. Further developments including the introduction of Saturday and Sunday routine CT scanning, radiologist reporting from home and additional CT scanners placed in remote hospitals may be expected to improve these figures further. Target times of three hours from onset of symptoms to scan to allow thrombolysis may however be impossible to meet for all stroke patients in rural areas.

  7. SU-F-207-14: Low Contrast Detectability (LCD) at Different Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Abdominal CT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Using diagnostic reference levels (DRL) to optimize CT protocols has potential to reduce radiation dose and meet regulatory requirements. However, DRL’s tend to be misconstrued as dose limits, are typically designed for specific patient populations, and are assumed to have acceptable image quality (AIQ) associated with them. To determine the image quality that is associated with established DRL’s for adult abdominal CT studies, a LCD phantom study was employed. Methods: A CT phantom (CIRS) containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background (HUBB) matrixmore » was scanned with a GE HD750 64 slice scanner. The phantom was scanned at the NEXT 2006 25th CTDIvol of 12 mGy, the NCRP 172 achievable dose (AD) CTDIvol of 17 mGy and 75th CTDIvol of 25 mGy and at the ACR recommended CTDIvol of 25 mGy. It was also scanned at a CTDIvol 20% greater than the AD at 20 mGy and the ACR maximum threshold of 30 mGy. Results: At the NEXT 2006 25th percentile CTDIvol of 12 mGy, a 6.3 mm low contrast lesion was detectable in the 20 HUBB; 6.3 mm in the 10 HUBB and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column. Increasing the CTDIvol to the NCRP 172 AD of 17 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was visualized in the 20 HUBB column. At 20 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was detectable in the 10 HUBB column. No further lesions were visible between 20 and 30 mGy. However, conspicuity of all lesions increased with each additional step up in CTDI. Conclusion: Optimizing radiation dose to achieve AIQ is a critical aspect of any dose optimization committee. Hence, judicious monitoring of radiation exposure to patients has to be balanced with diagnostic image quality.« less

  8. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80,more » 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.« less

  9. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor, E-mail: halva@ciencias.unam.mx; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guidemore » provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.« less

  10. Patient dose estimation from CT scans at the Mexican National Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Sánchez, Héctor; Reynoso-Mejía, Alberto; Casares-Cruz, Katiuzka; Taboada-Barajas, Jesús

    2014-11-01

    In the radiology department of the Mexican National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery, a dedicated institute in Mexico City, on average 19.3 computed tomography (CT) examinations are performed daily on hospitalized patients for neurological disease diagnosis, control scans and follow-up imaging. The purpose of this work was to estimate the effective dose received by hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan using typical effective dose values for all CT types and to obtain the estimated effective dose distributions received by surgical and non-surgical patients. Effective patient doses were estimated from values per study type reported in the applications guide provided by the scanner manufacturer. This retrospective study included all hospitalized patients who underwent a diagnostic CT scan between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012. A total of 8777 CT scans were performed in this two-year period. Simple brain scan was the CT type performed the most (74.3%) followed by contrasted brain scan (6.1%) and head angiotomography (5.7%). The average number of CT scans per patient was 2.83; the average effective dose per patient was 7.9 mSv; the mean estimated radiation dose was significantly higher for surgical (9.1 mSv) than non-surgical patients (6.0 mSv). Three percent of the patients had 10 or more brain CT scans and exceeded the organ radiation dose threshold set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for deterministic effects of the eye-lens. Although radiation patient doses from CT scans were in general relatively low, 187 patients received a high effective dose (>20 mSv) and 3% might develop cataract from cumulative doses to the eye lens.

  11. CT fluoroscopy-assisted puncture of thoracic and abdominal masses: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Johannes; Kickuth, Ralph; Laufer, Ulf; Schilling, Esther Maria; Adams, Stephan; Liermann, Dieter

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the benefit of real-time guidance of interventional punctures by means of computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF) compared with the conventional sequential acquisition guidance. In a prospective randomized trial, 75 patients underwent either CTF-guided (group A, n = 50) or sequential CT-guided (group B, n = 25) punctures of thoracic (n = 29) or abdominal (n = 46) masses. CTF was performed on the CT machine (Somatom Plus 4 Power, Siemens Corp., Forchheim, Germany) equipped with the C.A.R.E. Vision application (tube voltage 120 kV, tube current 50 mA, rotational time 0.75 s, slice thickness 10 mm, 8 frames/s). The average procedure time showed a statistically significant difference between the two study groups (group A: 564 s, group B 795 s, P = 0.0032). The mean total mAs was 7089 mAs for the CTF and 4856 mAs for the sequential image-guided intervention, respectively. The sensitivity was 71% specificity 100% positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 60% for the CTF-guided puncture, and 68, 100, 100 and 50% for sequential CT, respectively. CTF guidance realizes a time-saving but increases the radiation exposure dosage.

  12. VAT=TAAT-SAAT: innovative anthropometric model to predict visceral adipose tissue without resort to CT-Scan or DXA.

    PubMed

    Samouda, Hanen; Dutour, Anne; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Panuel, Michel; Dutour, Olivier; Dadoun, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether a combination of a selected but limited number of anthropometric measurements predicts visceral adipose tissue (VAT) better than other anthropometric measurements, without resort to medical imaging. Abdominal anthropometric measurements are total abdominal adipose tissue indicators and global measures of VAT and SAAT (subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue). Therefore, subtracting the anthropometric measurement the more correlated possible with SAAT while being the least correlated possible with VAT, from the most correlated abdominal anthropometric measurement with VAT while being highly correlated with TAAT, may better predict VAT. BMI participants' range was from 16.3 to 52.9 kg m(-2) . Anthropometric and abdominal adipose tissues data by computed tomography (CT-Scan) were available in 253 patients (18-78 years) (CHU Nord, Marseille) and used to develop the anthropometric VAT prediction models. Subtraction of proximal thigh circumference from waist circumference, adjusted to age and/or BMI, predicts better VAT (Women: VAT = 2.15 × Waist C - 3.63 × Proximal Thigh C + 1.46 × Age + 6.22 × BMI - 92.713; R(2) = 0.836. Men: VAT = 6 × Waist C - 4.41 × proximal thigh C + 1.19 × Age - 213.65; R(2) = 0.803) than the best single anthropometric measurement or the association of two anthropometric measurements highly correlated with VAT. Both multivariate models showed no collinearity problem. Selected models demonstrate high sensitivity (97.7% in women, 100% in men). Similar predictive abilities were observed in the validation sample (Women: R(2) = 76%; Men: R(2) = 70%). Bland and Altman method showed no systematic estimation error of VAT. Validated in a large range of age and BMI, our results suggest the usefulness of the anthropometric selected models to predict VAT in Europides (South of France). Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  13. VAT=TAAT-SAAT: Innovative Anthropometric Model to Predict Visceral Adipose Tissue Without Resort to CT-Scan or DXA

    PubMed Central

    Samouda, Hanen; Dutour, Anne; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Panuel, Michel; Dutour, Olivier; Dadoun, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a combination of a selected but limited number of anthropometric measurements predicts visceral adipose tissue (VAT) better than other anthropometric measurements, without resort to medical imaging. Hypothesis Abdominal anthropometric measurements are total abdominal adipose tissue indicators and global measures of VAT and SAAT (subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue). Therefore, subtracting the anthropometric measurement the more correlated possible with SAAT while being the least correlated possible with VAT, from the most correlated abdominal anthropometric measurement with VAT while being highly correlated with TAAT, may better predict VAT. Design and Methods BMI participants' range was from 16.3 to 52.9 kg m−2. Anthropometric and abdominal adipose tissues data by computed tomography (CT-Scan) were available in 253 patients (18-78 years) (CHU Nord, Marseille) and used to develop the anthropometric VAT prediction models. Results Subtraction of proximal thigh circumference from waist circumference, adjusted to age and/or BMI, predicts better VAT (Women: VAT = 2.15 × Waist C − 3.63 × Proximal Thigh C + 1.46 × Age + 6.22 × BMI − 92.713; R2 = 0.836. Men: VAT = 6 × Waist C − 4.41 × proximal thigh C + 1.19 × Age − 213.65; R2 = 0.803) than the best single anthropometric measurement or the association of two anthropometric measurements highly correlated with VAT. Both multivariate models showed no collinearity problem. Selected models demonstrate high sensitivity (97.7% in women, 100% in men). Similar predictive abilities were observed in the validation sample (Women: R2 = 76%; Men: R2 = 70%). Bland and Altman method showed no systematic estimation error of VAT. Conclusion Validated in a large range of age and BMI, our results suggest the usefulness of the anthropometric selected models to predict VAT in Europides (South of France). PMID:23404678

  14. [Non-operation management of 12 cases with brain abscess demonstrated by CT scan].

    PubMed

    Long, J

    1990-12-01

    This paper reported 12 cases with brain abscess demonstrated by CT scan. Using antibiotic management without surgical intervention, in 10 cases the curative effects were satisfactory. The paper indicated that CT scan was very useful in prompt and correct diagnosis of brain abscess and with sequential CT scan medical therapy was feasible. It is significant in treatment of brain abscess especially for the patients who have a poor general condition, have the brain abscess located in important functional area or have multiple abscesses so that the operation is difficult for them.

  15. Estimating the lifetime risk of cancer associated with multiple CT scans.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Menyaylo, A N; Pryakhin, E A; Tsyb, A F; Mettler, F A

    2014-12-01

    Multiple CT scans are often done on the same patient resulting in an increased risk of cancer. Prior publications have estimated risks on a population basis and often using an effective dose. Simply adding up the risks from single scans does not correctly account for the survival function. A methodology for estimating personal radiation risks attributed to multiple CT imaging using organ doses is presented in this article. The estimated magnitude of the attributable risk fraction for the possible development of radiation-induced cancer indicates the necessity for strong clinical justification when ordering multiple CT scans.

  16. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  17. Effect of emergency department CT on neuroimaging case volume and positive scan rates.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Kader Karli; Yousem, David M; Deluca, Tom; Herskovits, Edward H; Beauchamp, Norman J

    2002-09-01

    The authors performed this study to determine the effect a computed tomographic (CT) scanner in the emergency department (ED) has on neuroimaging case volume and positive scan rates. The total numbers of ED visits and neuroradiology CT scans requested from the ED were recorded for 1998 and 2000, the years before and after the installation of a CT unit in the ED. For each examination type (brain, face, cervical spine), studies were graded for major findings (those that affected patient care), minor findings, and normal findings. The CT utilization rates and positive study rates were compared for each type of study performed for both years. There was a statistically significant increase in the utilization rate after installation of the CT unit (P < .001). The fractions of studies with major findings, minor findings, and normal findings changed significantly after installation of the CT unit for facial examinations (P = .002) but not for brain (P = .12) or cervical spine (P = .24) examinations. In all types of studies, the percentage of normal examinations increased. In toto, there was a significant decrease in the positive scan rate after installation of the CT scanner (P = .004). After installation of a CT scanner in the ED, there was increased utilization and a decreased rate of positive neuroradiologic examinations, the latter primarily due to lower positive rates for facial CT scans.

  18. Aortic valve calcification - a commonly observed but frequently ignored finding during CT scanning of the chest.

    PubMed

    Raju, Prashanth; Sallomi, David; George, Bindu; Patel, Hitesh; Patel, Nikhil; Lloyd, Guy

    2012-06-01

    To describe the frequency and severity of Aortic valve calcification (AVC) in an unselected cohort of patients undergoing chest CT scanning and to assess the frequency with which AVC was being reported in the radiology reports. Consecutive CT scan images of the chest and the radiological reports (December 2009 to May 2010) were reviewed at the district general hospital (DGH). AVC on CT scan was visually graded on a scale ranging from 0 to IV (0 = no calcification, IV = severe calcification). Total of 416 (232 male; 184 female) CT chest scans [Contrast enhanced 302 (72%), unenhanced 114 (28%)] were reviewed. Mean age was 70.55 ± 11.48 years. AVC in CT scans was identified in 95 of the 416 patients (22.83%). AVC classification was as follows: Grade I: 60 (63.15%), Grade II: 22 (23.15%), Grade III: 9 (9.47%), Grade IV: 4 (4.21%). Only one CT report mentioned AVC. Only 31 of 95 AVC had Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). The interval time between CT scan and TTE was variable.   Aortic valve calcification in CT chest scans is a common finding and studies have shown that it is strongly related to the presence and severity of aortic valve disease. As CT scans are considered as a valuable additional screening tool for detection of aortic stenosis, AVC should always be commented upon in the radiology reports. Furthermore, patients with at least Grade III and IV AVC should be sent for TTE. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Calcification detection of abdominal aorta in CT images and 3D visualization in VR devices.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Berna, Jose A; Sanchez-Gomez, Juan M; Hermanns, Judith; Garcia-Mateos, Gines; Fernandez-Aleman, Jose L

    2016-08-01

    Automatic calcification detection in abdominal aorta consists of a set of computer vision techniques to quantify the amount of calcium that is found around this artery. Knowing that information, it is possible to perform statistical studies that relate vascular diseases with the presence of calcium in these structures. To facilitate the detection in CT images, a contrast is usually injected into the circulatory system of the patients to distinguish the aorta from other body tissues and organs. This contrast increases the absorption of X-rays by human blood, making it easier the measurement of calcifications. Based on this idea, a new system capable of detecting and tracking the aorta artery has been developed with an estimation of the calcium found surrounding the aorta. Besides, the system is complemented with a 3D visualization mode of the image set which is designed for the new generation of immersive VR devices.

  20. Few CT Scan Abnormalities Found Even in Neurologically Impaired Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denckla, Martha Bridge; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Most of 32 learning disabled children (seven to 14 years old) with neurological lateralization characteristics marked by right and left hemispheres had a normal CT (computerized tomography) scan. (CL)

  1. CFD modelling of abdominal aortic aneurysm on hemodynamic loads using a realistic geometry with CT.

    PubMed

    Soudah, Eduardo; Ng, E Y K; Loong, T H; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m(3) and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10(-3) Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index ( β ), saccular index ( γ ), deformation diameter ratio ( χ ), and tortuosity index ( ε )) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  2. Dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 for the characterization of urinary stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, L. A.; Asyana, V.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.; Latief, F. D. E.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the composition of urinary stones is an essential part to determine suitable treatments for patients. The aim of this research is to characterize the urinary stones by using dual energy micro CT SkyScan 11173. This technique combines high-energy and low- energy scanning during a single acquisition. Six human urinary stones were scanned in vitro using 80 kV and 120 kV micro CT SkyScan 1173. Projected images were produced by micro CT SkyScan 1173 and then reconstructed using NRecon (in-house software from SkyScan) to obtain a complete 3D image. The urinary stone images were analysed using CT analyser to obtain information of internal structure and Hounsfield Unit (HU) values to determine the information regarding the composition of the urinary stones, respectively. HU values obtained from some regions of interest in the same slice are compared to a reference HU. The analysis shows information of the composition of the six scanned stones obtained. The six stones consist of stone number 1 (calcium+cystine), number 2 (calcium+struvite), number 3 (calcium+cystine+struvite), number 4 (calcium), number 5 (calcium+cystine+struvite), and number 6 (calcium+uric acid). This shows that dual energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 was able to characterize the composition of the urinary stone.

  3. Optimization of the scan protocols for CT-based material extraction in small animal PET/CT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yu, Jhih-An; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effects of scan protocols on CT-based material extraction to minimize radiation dose while maintaining sufficient image information in small animal studies. The phantom simulation experiments were performed with the high dose (HD), medium dose (MD) and low dose (LD) protocols at 50, 70 and 80 kVp with varying mA s. The reconstructed CT images were segmented based on Hounsfield unit (HU)-physical density (ρ) calibration curves and the dual-energy CT-based (DECT) method. Compared to the (HU;ρ) method performed on CT images acquired with the 80 kVp HD protocol, a 2-fold improvement in segmentation accuracy and a 7.5-fold reduction in radiation dose were observed when the DECT method was performed on CT images acquired with the 50/80 kVp LD protocol, showing the possibility to reduce radiation dose while achieving high segmentation accuracy.

  4. Value of repeat CT scans in low back pain and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh E; Barzilay, Yair; Kaplan, Leon; Itshayek, Eyal; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the clinical value of repeat spine CT scan in 108 patients aged 18-60 years who underwent repeat lumbar spine CT scan for low back pain or radiculopathy from January 2008 to December 2010. Patients with a neoplasm or symptoms suggesting underlying disease were excluded from the study. Clinical data was retrospectively reviewed. Index examinations and repeat CT scan performed at a mean of 24.3 ± 11.3 months later were compared by a senior musculoskeletal radiologist. Disc abnormalities (herniation, sequestration, bulge), spinal stenosis, disc space narrowing, and bony changes (osteophytes, fractures, other changes) were documented. Indications for CT scan were low back pain (60 patients, 55%), radiculopathy (46 patients, 43%), or nonspecific back pain (two patients, 2%). A total of 292 spine pathologies were identified in 98 patients (90.7%); in 10 patients (9.3%) no spine pathology was seen on index or repeat CT scan. At repeat CT scan, 269/292 pathologies were unchanged (92.1%); 10/292 improved (3.4%), 8/292 worsened (2.8%, disc herniation or spinal stenosis), and five new pathologies were identified. No substantial therapeutic change was required in patients with worsened or new pathology. Added diagnostic value from repeat CT scan performed within 2-3 years was rare in patients suffering chronic or recurrent low back pain or radiculopathy, suggesting that repeat CT scan should be considered only in patients with progressive neurologic deficits, new neurologic complaints, or signs implying serious underlying conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Micro computed tomography (CT) scanned anatomical gateway to insect pest bioinformatics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An international collaboration to establish an interactive Digital Video Library for a Systems Biology Approach to study the Asian citrus Psyllid and psyllid genomics/proteomics interactions is demonstrated. Advances in micro-CT, digital computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pic...

  6. Dual energy CT with one full scan and a second sparse-view scan using structure preserving iterative reconstruction (SPIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tonghe; Zhu, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Conventional dual-energy CT (DECT) reconstruction requires two full-size projection datasets with two different energy spectra. In this study, we propose an iterative algorithm to enable a new data acquisition scheme which requires one full scan and a second sparse-view scan for potential reduction in imaging dose and engineering cost of DECT. A bilateral filter is calculated as a similarity matrix from the first full-scan CT image to quantify the similarity between any two pixels, which is assumed unchanged on a second CT image since DECT scans are performed on the same object. The second CT image from reduced projections is reconstructed by an iterative algorithm which updates the image by minimizing the total variation of the difference between the image and its filtered image by the similarity matrix under data fidelity constraint. As the redundant structural information of the two CT images is contained in the similarity matrix for CT reconstruction, we refer to the algorithm as structure preserving iterative reconstruction (SPIR). The proposed method is evaluated on both digital and physical phantoms, and is compared with the filtered-backprojection (FBP) method, the conventional total-variation-regularization-based algorithm (TVR) and prior-image-constrained-compressed-sensing (PICCS). SPIR with a second 10-view scan reduces the image noise STD by a factor of one order of magnitude with same spatial resolution as full-view FBP image. SPIR substantially improves over TVR on the reconstruction accuracy of a 10-view scan by decreasing the reconstruction error from 6.18% to 1.33%, and outperforms TVR at 50 and 20-view scans on spatial resolution with a higher frequency at the modulation transfer function value of 10% by an average factor of 4. Compared with the 20-view scan PICCS result, the SPIR image has 7 times lower noise STD with similar spatial resolution. The electron density map obtained from the SPIR-based DECT images with a second 10-view scan has an

  7. Rifaximin suppresses background intestinal 18F-FDG uptake on PET/CT scans.

    PubMed

    Franquet, Elisa; Palmer, Mathew R; Gifford, Anne E; Selen, Daryl J; Chen, Yih-Chieh S; Sedora-Roman, Neda; Joyce, Robin M; Kolodny, Gerald M; Moss, Alan C

    2014-10-01

    Identification of cancer or inflammatory bowel disease in the intestinal tract by PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging can be hampered by physiological uptake of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) in the normal colon. Previous work has localized this F-FDG uptake to the intestinal lumen, predominantly occupied by bacteria. We sought to determine whether pretreatment with an antibiotic could reduce F-FDG uptake in the healthy colon. Thirty patients undergoing restaging PET/CT for nongastrointestinal lymphoma were randomly selected to receive rifaximin 550 mg twice daily for 2 days before their scan (post-rifaximin). Their PET/CT images were compared with those from their prior study (pre-rifaximin). Cecal maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and overall colonic F-FDG uptake were compared between scans. All PET/CT images were blindly scored by a radiologist. The same comparison of sequential scans was also undertaken in 30 patients who did not receive antibiotics. Thirty post-rifaximin scans were compared with 30 pre-rifaximin scans in the same patients. SUVmax in the cecum was significantly lower in the patient's post-rifaximin scans than in their pre-rifaximin scans (P=0.002). The percentage of scans with greater than grade 1 colonic F-FDG uptake was significantly lower in the post-rifaximin scans than in the pre-rifaximin scans (P<0.05). In contrast, there was no significant difference in the paired sequential scans from control patients, nor a reduction in the percentage of scans with greater than grade 1 colonic F-FDG uptake. This pilot study shows that treatment with rifaximin for 2 days before PET/CT scanning can significantly reduce physiological F-FDG uptake in the normal colonic lumen.

  8. Radiation from CT scans in paediatric trauma patients: Indications, effective dose, and impact on surgical decisions.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Michael H; Igric, Ana; Vogt, Kelly; Parry, Neil; Merritt, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effective dose of radiation due to computed tomography (CT) scans in paediatric trauma patients at a level 1 Canadian paediatric trauma centre. We also explored the indications and actions taken as a result of these scans. We performed a retrospective review of paediatric trauma patients presenting to our centre from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. All CT scans performed during the initial trauma resuscitation, hospital stay, and 6 months afterwards were included. Effective dose was calculated using the reported dose length product for each scan and conversion factors specific for body region and age of the patient. 157 paediatric trauma patients were identified during the 2-year study period. Mean Injury Severity Score was 22.5 (range 12-75). 133 patients received at least one CT scan. The mean number of scans per patient was 2.6 (range 0-16). Most scans resulted in no further action (56%) or additional imaging (32%). A decision to perform a procedure (2%), surgery (8%), or withdrawal of life support (2%) was less common. The average dose per patient was 13.5mSv, which is 4.5 times the background radiation compared to the general population. CT head was the most commonly performed type of scan and was most likely to be repeated. CT body, defined as a scan of the chest, abdomen, and/or pelvis, was associated with the highest effective dose. CT is a significant source of radiation in paediatric trauma patients. Clinicians should carefully consider the indications for each scan, especially when performing non-resuscitation scans. There is a need for evidence-based treatment algorithms to assist clinicians in selecting appropriate imaging for patients with severe multisystem trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Are CT scans obtained at referring institutions justified prior to transfer to a pediatric trauma center?

    PubMed

    Benedict, Leo Andrew; Paulus, Jessica K; Rideout, Leslie; Chwals, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether pediatric trauma patients initially evaluated at referring institutions met Massachusetts statewide trauma field triage criteria for stabilization and immediate transfer to a Pediatric Trauma Center (PTC) without pre-transfer CT imaging. A 3-year retrospective cohort study was completed at our level 1 PTC. Patients with CT imaging at referring institutions were classified according to a triage scheme based on Massachusetts statewide trauma field triage criteria. Demographic data and injury profile characteristics were abstracted from patient medical records and our pediatric trauma registry. A total of 262 patients with 413 CT scans were reviewed from 2008 to 2011. 172 patients scanned (66%, 95% CI: 60%, 71%) met criteria for immediate transfer to a pediatric trauma center. Notably, 110 scans (27% of the total performed at referring institutions) were duplicated within four hours upon arrival to our PTC. GCS score <14 (45%) was the most common requirement for transfer, and CT scan of the head was the most frequent scan obtained (53%). The majority of pediatric trauma patients were subjected to CT scans at referring institutions despite meeting Massachusetts trauma triage guidelines that call for stabilization and immediate transfer to a pediatric trauma center without any CT imaging. © 2014.

  10. A comparison of sequential and spiral scanning techniques in brain CT.

    PubMed

    Pace, Ivana; Zarb, Francis

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare image quality and radiation dose of sequential computed tomography (CT) examinations of the brain and spiral CT examinations of the brain imaged on a GE HiSpeed NX/I Dual Slice 2CT scanner. A random sample of 40 patients referred for CT examination of the brain was selected and divided into 2 groups. Half of the patients were scanned using the sequential technique; the other half were scanned using the spiral technique. Radiation dose data—both the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and the dose length product (DLP)—were recorded on a checklist at the end of each examination. Using the European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Computed Tomography, 4 radiologists conducted a visual grading analysis and rated the level of visibility of 6 anatomical structures considered necessary to produce images of high quality. The mean CTDI(vol) and DLP values were statistically significantly higher (P <.05) with the sequential scans (CTDI(vol): 22.06 mGy; DLP: 304.60 mGy • cm) than with the spiral scans (CTDI(vol): 14.94 mGy; DLP: 229.10 mGy • cm). The mean image quality rating scores for all criteria of the sequential scanning technique were statistically significantly higher (P <.05) in the visual grading analysis than those of the spiral scanning technique. In this local study, the sequential technique was preferred over the spiral technique for both overall image quality and differentiation between gray and white matter in brain CT scans. Other similar studies counter this finding. The radiation dose seen with the sequential CT scanning technique was significantly higher than that seen with the spiral CT scanning technique. However, image quality with the sequential technique was statistically significantly superior (P <.05).

  11. Abdominal multi-organ CT segmentation using organ correlation graph and prediction-based shape and location priors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal CT data. We propose a framework of multi-organ segmentation which is adaptable to any imaging conditions without using intensity information in manually traced training data. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) the organ correlation graph (OCG) is introduced, which encodes the spatial correlations among organs inherent in human anatomy; (2) the patient-specific organ shape and location priors obtained using OCG enable the estimation of intensity priors from only target data and optionally a number of untraced CT data of the same imaging condition as the target data. The proposed methods were evaluated through segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidney, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 86 CT data obtained by four imaging conditions at two hospitals. The performance was comparable to the state-of-the-art method using intensity priors constructed from manually traced data.

  12. Incidental findings in children with blunt head trauma evaluated with cranial CT scans.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Alexander J; Maher, Cormac O; Schunk, Jeff E; Quayle, Kimberly; Jacobs, Elizabeth; Lichenstein, Richard; Powell, Elizabeth; Miskin, Michelle; Dayan, Peter; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans are frequently obtained in the evaluation of blunt head trauma in children. These scans may detect unexpected incidental findings. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and significance of incidental findings on cranial CT scans in children evaluated for blunt head trauma. This was a secondary analysis of a multicenter study of pediatric blunt head trauma. Patients <18 years of age with blunt head trauma were eligible, with those undergoing cranial CT scan included in this substudy. Patients with coagulopathies, ventricular shunts, known previous brain surgery or abnormalities were excluded. We abstracted radiology reports for nontraumatic findings. We reviewed and categorized findings by their clinical urgency. Of the 43,904 head-injured children enrolled in the parent study, 15,831 underwent CT scans, and these latter patients serve as the study cohort. On 670 of these scans, nontraumatic findings were identified, with 16 excluded due to previously known abnormalities or surgeries. The remaining 654 represent a 4% prevalence of incidental findings. Of these, 195 (30%), representing 1% of the overall sample, warranted immediate intervention or outpatient follow-up. A small but important number of children evaluated with CT scans after blunt head trauma had incidental findings. Physicians who order cranial CTs must be prepared to interpret incidental findings, communicate with families, and ensure appropriate follow-up. There are ethical implications and potential health impacts of informing patients about incidental findings.

  13. Is there a trend in CT scanning scaphoid nonunions for deformity assessment?-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ten Berg, Paul W L; de Roo, Marieke G A; Maas, Mario; Strackee, Simon D

    2017-06-01

    The effect of scaphoid nonunion deformity on wrist function is uncertain due to the lack of reliable imaging tools. Advanced three-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT)-based imaging techniques may improve deformity assessment by using a mirrored image of the contralateral intact wrist as anatomic reference. The implementation of such techniques depends on the extent to which conventional CT is currently used in standard practice. The purpose of this systematic review of medical literature was to analyze the trend in CT scanning scaphoid nonunions, either unilaterally or bilaterally. Using Medline and Embase databases, two independent reviewers searched for original full-length clinical articles describing series with at least five patients focusing on reconstructive surgery of scaphoid nonunions with bone grafting and/or fixation, from the years 2000-2015. We excluded reports focusing on only nonunions suspected for avascular necrosis and/or treated with vascularized bone grafting, as their workup often includes magnetic resonance imaging. For data analysis, we evaluated the use of CT scans and distinguished between uni- and bilateral, and pre- and postoperative scans. Seventy-seven articles were included of which 16 were published between 2000 and 2005, 19 between 2006 and 2010, and 42 between 2011 and 2015. For these consecutive intervals, the rates of articles describing the use of pre- and postoperative CT scans increased from 13%, to 16%, to 31%, and from 25%, to 32%, to 52%, respectively. Hereof, only two (3%) articles described the use of bilateral CT scans. There is an evident trend in performing unilateral CT scans before and after reconstructive surgery of a scaphoid nonunion. To improve assessment of scaphoid nonunion deformity using 3-D CT-based imaging techniques, we recommend scanning the contralateral wrist as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of Lens Protection Systems: Dependency on Different Cranial CT Scans in The Acute Stroke Setting.

    PubMed

    Guberina, Nika; Forsting, Michael; Ringelstein, Adrian

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the dose-reduction potential with different lens protectors for patients undergoing cranial computed tomography (CT) scans. Eye lens dose was assessed in vitro (α-Al2O3:C thermoluminescence dosemeters) using an Alderson-Rando phantom® in cranial CT protocols at different CT scanners (SOMATOM-Definition-AS+®(CT1) and SOMATOM-Definition-Flash® (CT2)) using two different lens-protection systems (Somatex® (SOM) and Medical Imaging Systems® (MIS)). Summarised percentage of the transmitted photons: (1) CT1 (a) unenhanced CT (nCT) with gantry angulation: SOM = 103%, MIS = 111%; (2) CT2 (a) nCT without gantry angulation: SOM = 81%, MIS = 91%; (b) CT angiography (CTA) with automatic dose-modulation technique: SOM = 39%, MIS = 74%; (c) CTA without dose-modulation technique: SOM = 22%, MIS = 48%; (d) CT perfusion: SOM = 44%, MIS = 69%. SOM showed a higher dose-reduction potential than MIS maintaining equal image quality. Lens-protection systems are most effective in CTA protocols without dose-reduction techniques. Lens-protection systems lower the average eye lens dose during CT scans up to 1/3 (MIS) and 2/3 (SOM), respectively, if the eye lens is exposed to the direct beam of radiation. Considering both the CT protocol and the material of lens protectors, they seem to be mandatory for reducing the radiation exposure of the eye lens. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Automatic multi-label annotation of abdominal CT images using CBIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique to annotate multiple organs shown in 2-D abdominal/pelvic CT images using CBIR. This annotation task is motivated by our research interests in visual question-answering (VQA). We aim to apply results from this effort in Open-iSM, a multimodal biomedical search engine developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Understanding visual content of biomedical images is a necessary step for VQA. Though sufficient annotational information about an image may be available in related textual metadata, not all may be useful as descriptive tags, particularly for anatomy on the image. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a multi-label image annotation method using CBIR. We evaluate our method on two 2-D CT image datasets we generated from 3-D volumetric data obtained from a multi-organ segmentation challenge hosted in MICCAI 2015. Shape and spatial layout information is used to encode visual characteristics of the anatomy. We adapt a weighted voting scheme to assign multiple labels to the query image by combining the labels of the images identified as similar by the method. Key parameters that may affect the annotation performance, such as the number of images used in the label voting and the threshold for excluding labels that have low weights, are studied. The method proposes a coarse-to-fine retrieval strategy which integrates the classification with the nearest-neighbor search. Results from our evaluation (using the MICCAI CT image datasets as well as figures from Open-i) are presented.

  16. Can Abdominal CT Imaging Help Accurately Identify a Dedifferentiated Component in a Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma?

    PubMed Central

    Bhosale, Priya; Wang, Jieqi; Varma, Datla G.K; Jensen, Corey; Patnana, Madhavi; Wei, Wei; Chauhan, Anil; Feig, Barry; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Somaiah, Neeta; Sagebiel, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of CT to differentiate an atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT)/well-differentiated liposarcoma (WDLPS) from a WDLPS with a dedifferentiated component (DDLPS) within it. Materials and Methods Forty-nine untreated patients with abdominal atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas who had undergone contrast-enhanced CT were identified using an institutional database. Three radiologists who were blinded to the pathology findings evaluated all the images independently to determine whether a dedifferentiated component was present within the WDLPS. The CT images were evaluated for fat content (≤25% or >25%); presence of ground-glass density, enhancing and/or necrotic nodules; presence of a capsule surrounding the mass; septations; and presence and pattern of calcifications. A multivariate logistic regression model with generalized estimating equations was used to correlate imaging features with pathology findings. Kappa statistics were calculated to assess agreement between the three radiologists. Results On the basis of pathological findings, 12 patients had been diagnosed with DDLPS within a WDLPS and 37 had been diagnosed with WDLPS. The presence of an enhancing or a centrally necrotic nodule within the atypical lipomatous tumor was associated with dedifferentiated liposarcoma (p = 0.02 and p = 0.0003, respectively). The three readers showed almost perfect agreement in overall diagnosis (kappa r = 0.83; 95% confidence-interval 0.67 to 0.99). Conclusion An enhancing or centrally necrotic nodule may be indicative of a dedifferentiated component in well-differentiated liposarcoma. Ground-glass density nodules may not be indicative of dedifferentiation. PMID:27454788

  17. [Performance evaluation of CT automatic exposure control on fast dual spiral scan].

    PubMed

    Niwa, Shinji; Hara, Takanori; Kato, Hideki; Wada, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    The performance of individual computed tomography automatic exposure control (CT-AEC) is very important for radiation dose reduction and image quality equalization in CT examinations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of CT-AEC in conventional pitch mode (Normal spiral) and fast dual spiral scan (Flash spiral) in a 128-slice dual-source CT scanner. To evaluate the response properties of CT-AEC in the 128-slice DSCT scanner, a chest phantom was placed on the patient table and was fixed at the center of the field of view (FOV). The phantom scan was performed using Normal spiral and Flash spiral scanning. We measured the effective tube current time product (Eff. mAs) of simulated organs in the chest phantom along the longitudinal (z) direction, and the dose dependence (distribution) of in-plane locations for the respective scan modes was also evaluated by using a 100-mm-long pencil-type ionization chamber. The dose length product (DLP) was evaluated using the value displayed on the console after scanning. It was revealed that the response properties of CT-AEC in Normal spiral scanning depend on the respective pitches and Flash spiral scanning is independent of the respective pitches. In-plane radiation dose of Flash spiral was lower than that of Normal spiral. The DLP values showed a difference of approximately 1.7 times at the maximum. The results of our experiments provide information for adjustments for appropriate scanning parameters using CT-AEC in a 128-slice DSCT scanner.

  18. Automated volumetry of temporal horn of lateral ventricle for detection of Alzheimer's disease in CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Ohmura, Tomomi; Matsuyama, Eri; Toyoshima, Hideto

    2018-02-01

    The rapid increase in the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become a critical issue in low and middle income countries. In general, MR imaging has become sufficiently suitable in clinical situations, while CT scan might be uncommonly used in the diagnosis of AD due to its low contrast between brain tissues. However, in those countries, CT scan, which is less costly and readily available, will be desired to become useful for the diagnosis of AD. For CT scan, the enlargement of the temporal horn of the lateral ventricle (THLV) is one of few findings for the diagnosis of AD. In this paper, we present an automated volumetry of THLV with segmentation based on Bayes' rule on CT images. In our method, first, all CT data sets are normalized into an atlas by using linear affine transformation and non-linear wrapping techniques. Next, a probability map of THLV is constructed in the normalized data. Then, THLV regions are extracted based on Bayes' rule. Finally, the volume of the THLV is evaluated. This scheme was applied to CT scans from 20 AD patients and 20 controls to evaluate the performance of the method for detecting AD. The estimated THLV volume was markedly increased in the AD group compared with the controls (P < .0001), and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.921. Therefore, this computerized method may have the potential to accurately detect AD on CT images.

  19. Relationship between Hounsfield unit in CT scan and gray scale in CBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin, Noorshaida; Rajion, Zainul Ahmad; Yusof, Asilah; Aziz, Mohd Ezane

    2016-12-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an imaging system which has advantages over computed tomography (CT). Recently, CBCT has become widely used for oral and maxillofacial imaging. In CT scan, Hounsfield Unit (HU) is proportional to the degree of x-ray attenuation by the tissue. In CBCT, the degree of x-ray attenuation is shown by gray scale (voxel value). The aim of the present (in vitro) study was to investigate the relationship between gray scale in CBCT and HU in CT scan. In this descriptive study, the anthropomorphic head phantom was scanned with CBCT and CT scanner. Gray scales and HUs were detected on images at the crown of the teeth, trabecular and cortical bone of mandible. The images were analyzed to obtain the gray scale value and HU value. The obtained value then used to investigate the relationship between CBCT gray scales and HUs. For the statistical analysis, t-test, Pearson's correlation and regression analysis were used. The differences between the gray scale of CBCT and HU of CT were statistically not significant, whereas the Pearson's correlation coefficients demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between gray scale of CBCT and HU of CT values. Considering the fact that gray scale in CBCT is important in pre assessment evaluation of bone density before implant treatments, it is recommended because of the lower dose and cost compared to CT scan.

  20. Scan-rescan reproducibility of CT densitometric measures of emphysema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, D.; van Rikxoort, E. M.; Kim, H. J.; Goldin, J. G.; Brown, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the reproducibility of HRCT densitometric measures of emphysema in patients scanned twice one week apart. 24 emphysema patients from a multicenter study were scanned at full inspiration (TLC) and expiration (RV), then again a week later for four scans total. Scans for each patient used the same scanner and protocol, except for tube current in three patients. Lung segmentation with gross airway removal was performed on the scans. Volume, weight, mean lung density (MLD), relative area under -950HU (RA-950), and 15th percentile (PD-15) were calculated for TLC, and volume and an airtrapping mask (RA-air) between -950 and -850HU for RV. For each measure, absolute differences were computed for each scan pair, and linear regression was performed against volume difference in a subgroup with volume difference <500mL. Two TLC scan pairs were excluded due to segmentation failure. The mean lung volumes were 5802 +/- 1420mL for TLC, 3878 +/- 1077mL for RV. The mean absolute differences were 169mL for TLC volume, 316mL for RV volume, 14.5g for weight, 5.0HU for MLD, 0.66p.p. for RA-950, 2.4HU for PD-15, and 3.1p.p. for RA-air. The <500mL subgroup had 20 scan pairs for TLC and RV. The R2 values were 0.8 for weight, 0.60 for MLD, 0.29 for RA-950, 0.31 for PD-15, and 0.64 for RA-air. Our results indicate that considerable variability exists in densitometric measures over one week that cannot be attributed to breathhold or physiology. This has implications for clinical trials relying on these measures to assess emphysema treatment efficacy.

  1. CT scans in young people in Northern England: trends and patterns 1993–2002

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Mark S.; Salotti, Jane A.; McHugh, Kieran; Metcalf, Wenhua; Kim, Kwang P.; Craft, Alan W.; Parker, Louise; Ron, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background Although CT can be greatly beneficial, its relatively high radiation doses have caused public health concerns. Objective To assess patterns in CT usage among patients aged less than 22 years in Northern England during the period 1993–2002. Materials and methods Electronic data were obtained from radiology information systems of all nine National Health Service trusts in the region. Results A total of 38,681 scans had been performed in 20,483 patients aged less than 22 years. The number of CT examinations rose, with the steepest increase between 1997 and 2000. The number of patients scanned per year increased less dramatically, with 2.24/1,000 population aged less than 22 years having one scan or more in 1993 compared to 3.54/1,000 in 2002. This reflects an increase in the median number of scans per patient, which rose from 1 in 1993 to 2 by 1999. More than 70% of CT examinations were of the head, with the number of head examinations varying with time and patient age. Conclusion The frequency of CT scans in this population more than doubled during the study period. This is partly, but not wholly, explained by an increase in the number of scans per patient. PMID:21594548

  2. Spotting L3 slice in CT scans using deep convolutional network and transfer learning.

    PubMed

    Belharbi, Soufiane; Chatelain, Clément; Hérault, Romain; Adam, Sébastien; Thureau, Sébastien; Chastan, Mathieu; Modzelewski, Romain

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we present a complete automated system for spotting a particular slice in a complete 3D Computed Tomography exam (CT scan). Our approach does not require any assumptions on which part of the patient's body is covered by the scan. It relies on an original machine learning regression approach. Our models are learned using the transfer learning trick by exploiting deep architectures that have been pre-trained on imageNet database, and therefore it requires very little annotation for its training. The whole pipeline consists of three steps: i) conversion of the CT scans into Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) images, ii) prediction from a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) applied in a sliding window fashion over the MIP image, and iii) robust analysis of the prediction sequence to predict the height of the desired slice within the whole CT scan. Our approach is applied to the detection of the third lumbar vertebra (L3) slice that has been found to be representative to the whole body composition. Our system is evaluated on a database collected in our clinical center, containing 642 CT scans from different patients. We obtained an average localization error of 1.91±2.69 slices (less than 5 mm) in an average time of less than 2.5 s/CT scan, allowing integration of the proposed system into daily clinical routines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry spine scans to determine abdominal fat in post-menopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Bea, J. W.; Blew, R. M.; Going, S. B.; Hsu, C-H; Lee, M. C.; Lee, V. R.; Caan, B.J.; Kwan, M.L.; Lohman, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Body composition may be a better predictor of chronic disease risk than body mass index (BMI) in older populations. Objectives We sought to validate spine fat fraction (%) from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) spine scans as a proxy for total abdominal fat. Methods Total body DXA scan abdominal fat regions of interest (ROI) that have been previously validated by magnetic resonance imaging were assessed among healthy, postmenopausal women who also had antero-posterior spine scans (n=103). ROIs were 1) lumbar vertebrae L2-L4 and 2) L2-Iliac Crest (L2-IC), manually selected by two independent raters, and 3) trunk, auto-selected by DXA software. Intra-class correlation coefficients evaluated intra and inter-rater reliability on a random subset (N=25). Linear regression models, validated by bootstrapping, assessed the relationship between spine fat fraction (%) and total abdominal fat (%) ROIs. Results Mean age, BMI and total body fat were: 66.1 ± 4.8y, 25.8 ± 3.8kg/m2 and 40.0 ± 6.6%, respectively. There were no significant differences within or between raters. Linear regression models adjusted for several participant and scan characteristics were equivalent to using only BMI and spine fat fraction. The model predicted L2-L4 (Adj. R2: 0.83) and L2-IC (Adj.R2:0.84) abdominal fat (%) well; the adjusted R2 for trunk fat (%) was 0.78. Model validation demonstrated minimal over-fitting (Adj. R2: 0.82, 0.83, and 0.77 for L2-L4, L2-IC, and trunk fat respectively). Conclusions The strong correlation between spine fat fraction and DXA abdominal fat measures make it suitable for further development in post-menopausal chronic disease risk prediction models. PMID:27416964

  4. Sensitivity and specificity of CT scanning for determining the number of internally concealed packages in 'body-packers'.

    PubMed

    Asha, Stephen Edward; Higham, Matthew; Child, Peter

    2015-05-01

    If package counts on abdominal CTs of body-packers were known to be accurate, follow-up CTs could be avoided. The objective was to determine the accuracy of CT for the number of concealed packages in body-packers, and the reliability of package counts reported by body-packers who admit to concealing drugs. Suspected body-packers were identified from the emergency departments (ED) database. The medical record and radiology reports were reviewed for package counts determined by CT, patient-reported and physically retrieved. The last method was used as the reference standard. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for CT package count accuracy. Reliability of patient-reported package counts was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There were 50 confirmed body-packers on whom 104 CT scans were performed. Data for the index and reference tests were available for 84 scans. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for CT package count were 63% (95% CI 46% to 77%), 82% (95% CI 67% to 92%), 76% (95% CI 58% to 89%) and 71% (95% CI 56% to 83%) respectively. For CTs with a package count<15, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for CT package count were 96% (95% CI 80% to 99%), 95% (95% CI 82% to 99%), 93% (95% CI 76% to 99%) and 97% (95% CI 86% to 100%), respectively. Correlation between patient-reported package counts and the number of packages retrieved was high (r=0.90, p<0.001, R2=81%). The accuracy of CT for determining the number of concealed packages is poor, although when applied to patients with few concealed packages accuracy is high and is useful as a rule-out test. Among patients who have admitted to drug concealment, the number of packages reported to be concealed is reliable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Journal club: Renal masses detected at abdominal CT: radiologists' adherence to guidelines regarding management recommendations and communication of critical results.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Cleo K; Silverman, Stuart G; Lacson, Ronilda; Khorasani, Ramin

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess radiologists' adherence to published guidelines for managing renal masses detected at abdominal CT at one institution and to a critical results communication policy. A validated natural language processing tool supplemented by manual review was used to randomly assemble a cohort of 97 radiology reports from all abdominal CT reports (n = 11,952) generated from July 2010 to June 2011. Critical renal mass findings warranted consideration for surgery, intervention, or imaging follow-up and required direct, separate, and timely communication to the referrer in addition to the radiology report. Primary outcomes were adherence to guidelines and institutional policy for communicating critical results. Sample size allowed a 95% CI ± 5% for primary outcome. Pearson chi-square test was performed to assess whether radiology subspecialization was predictive of the primary outcome. Of all abdominal CT reports, 35.6% contained at least one renal mass finding (4.3% critical). Guideline adherence was lower for patients with critical than for those with noncritical findings (48/57 [84.2%] vs 40/40 [100%]; p = 0.01). Adherence to critical result communication policy was 73.7% (42/57). For critical findings, abdominal radiologists had higher guideline adherence (40/43 [93.0%] vs 8/14 [57.1%]; p = 0.001) and critical result communication policy adherence (36/43 [83.7%] vs 6/14 [42.9%]; p = 0.002) than nonabdominal radiologists. In reporting renal masses detected at abdominal CT, radiologists largely adhered to management guidelines but did not adhere to the critical results communication policy in one of four reports. Subspecialization improved adherence to both management guidelines and the institution's critical result communication policy.

  6. A comparative study of software programmes for cross-sectional skeletal muscle and adipose tissue measurements on abdominal computed tomography scans of rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Jeroen L A; Levolger, Stef; Gharbharan, Arvind; Koek, Marcel; Niessen, Wiro J; Burger, Jacobus W A; Willemsen, Sten P; de Bruin, Ron W F; IJzermans, Jan N M

    2017-04-01

    The association between body composition (e.g. sarcopenia or visceral obesity) and treatment outcomes, such as survival, using single-slice computed tomography (CT)-based measurements has recently been studied in various patient groups. These studies have been conducted with different software programmes, each with their specific characteristics, of which the inter-observer, intra-observer, and inter-software correlation are unknown. Therefore, a comparative study was performed. Fifty abdominal CT scans were randomly selected from 50 different patients and independently assessed by two observers. Cross-sectional muscle area (CSMA, i.e. rectus abdominis, oblique and transverse abdominal muscles, paraspinal muscles, and the psoas muscle), visceral adipose tissue area (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (SAT) were segmented by using standard Hounsfield unit ranges and computed for regions of interest. The inter-software, intra-observer, and inter-observer agreement for CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements using FatSeg, OsiriX, ImageJ, and sliceOmatic were calculated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman analyses. Cohen's κ was calculated for the agreement of sarcopenia and visceral obesity assessment. The Jaccard similarity coefficient was used to compare the similarity and diversity of measurements. Bland-Altman analyses and ICC indicated that the CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements between the different software programmes were highly comparable (ICC 0.979-1.000, P < 0.001). All programmes adequately distinguished between the presence or absence of sarcopenia (κ = 0.88-0.96 for one observer and all κ = 1.00 for all comparisons of the other observer) and visceral obesity (all κ = 1.00). Furthermore, excellent intra-observer (ICC 0.999-1.000, P < 0.001) and inter-observer (ICC 0.998-0.999, P < 0.001) agreement for all software programmes were found. Accordingly, excellent Jaccard similarity coefficients were found

  7. A comparative study of software programmes for cross‐sectional skeletal muscle and adipose tissue measurements on abdominal computed tomography scans of rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Levolger, Stef; Gharbharan, Arvind; Koek, Marcel; Niessen, Wiro J.; Burger, Jacobus W.A.; Willemsen, Sten P.; de Bruin, Ron W.F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The association between body composition (e.g. sarcopenia or visceral obesity) and treatment outcomes, such as survival, using single‐slice computed tomography (CT)‐based measurements has recently been studied in various patient groups. These studies have been conducted with different software programmes, each with their specific characteristics, of which the inter‐observer, intra‐observer, and inter‐software correlation are unknown. Therefore, a comparative study was performed. Methods Fifty abdominal CT scans were randomly selected from 50 different patients and independently assessed by two observers. Cross‐sectional muscle area (CSMA, i.e. rectus abdominis, oblique and transverse abdominal muscles, paraspinal muscles, and the psoas muscle), visceral adipose tissue area (VAT), and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (SAT) were segmented by using standard Hounsfield unit ranges and computed for regions of interest. The inter‐software, intra‐observer, and inter‐observer agreement for CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements using FatSeg, OsiriX, ImageJ, and sliceOmatic were calculated using intra‐class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland–Altman analyses. Cohen's κ was calculated for the agreement of sarcopenia and visceral obesity assessment. The Jaccard similarity coefficient was used to compare the similarity and diversity of measurements. Results Bland–Altman analyses and ICC indicated that the CSMA, VAT, and SAT measurements between the different software programmes were highly comparable (ICC 0.979–1.000, P < 0.001). All programmes adequately distinguished between the presence or absence of sarcopenia (κ = 0.88–0.96 for one observer and all κ = 1.00 for all comparisons of the other observer) and visceral obesity (all κ = 1.00). Furthermore, excellent intra‐observer (ICC 0.999–1.000, P < 0.001) and inter‐observer (ICC 0.998–0.999, P < 0.001) agreement for all software programmes were

  8. Three-Dimensions Segmentation of Pulmonary Vascular Trees for Low Dose CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jun; Huang, Ying; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Due to the low contrast and the partial volume effects, providing an accurate and in vivo analysis for pulmonary vascular trees from low dose CT scans is a challenging task. This paper proposes an automatic integration segmentation approach for the vascular trees in low dose CT scans. It consists of the following steps: firstly, lung volumes are acquired by the knowledge based method from the CT scans, and then the data are smoothed by the 3D Gaussian filter; secondly, two or three seeds are gotten by the adaptive 2D segmentation and the maximum area selecting from different position scans; thirdly, each seed as the start voxel is inputted for a quick multi-seeds 3D region growing to get vascular trees; finally, the trees are refined by the smooth filter. Through skeleton analyzing for the vascular trees, the results show that the proposed method can provide much better and lower level vascular branches.

  9. The Detection of Focal Liver Lesions Using Abdominal CT: A Comparison of Image Quality Between Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction V and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyun; Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jihan

    2016-12-01

    To investigate image quality characteristics of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) vs currently using applied adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). This institutional review board-approved study included 35 consecutive patients who underwent CT of the abdomen. Among these 35 patients, 27 with focal liver lesions underwent abdomen CT with a 128-slice multidetector unit using the following parameters: fixed noise index of 30, 1.25 mm slice thickness, 120 kVp, and a gantry rotation time of 0.5 seconds. CT images were analyzed depending on the method of reconstruction: ASIR (30%, 50%, and 70%) vs ASIR-V (30%, 50%, and 70%). Three radiologists independently assessed randomized images in a blinded manner. Imaging sets were compared to focal lesion detection numbers, overall image quality, and objective noise with a paired sample t test. Interobserver agreement was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient. The detection of small focal liver lesions (<10 mm) was significantly higher when ASIR-V was used when compared to ASIR (P <0.001). Subjective image noise, artifact, and objective image noise in liver were generally significantly better for ASIR-V compared to ASIR, especially in 50% ASIR-V. Image sharpness and diagnostic acceptability were significantly worse in 70% ASIR-V compared to various levels of ASIR. Images analyzed using 50% ASIR-V were significantly better than three different series of ASIR or other ASIR-V conditions at providing diagnostically acceptable CT scans without compromising image quality and in the detection of focal liver lesions. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction in radiation doses from paediatric CT scans in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Harbron, Richard W; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Although CT scans provide great medical benefits, concerns have been raised about the magnitude of possible associated cancer risk, particularly in children who are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Unnecessary high doses during CT examinations can also be delivered to children, if the scan parameters are not adjusted for patient age and size. We conducted the first survey to directly assess the trends in CT scan parameters and doses for paediatric CT scans performed in Great Britain between 1978 and 2008. We retrieved 1073 CT film sets from 36 hospitals. The patients were 0-19 years old, and CT scans were conducted between 1978 and 2008. We extracted scan parameters from each film including tube current-time product [milliampere seconds (mAs)], tube potential [peak kilovoltage (kVp)] and manufacturer and model of the CT scanner. We estimated the mean mAs for head and trunk (chest and abdomen/pelvis) scans, according to patient age (0-4, 5-9, 10-14 and 15-19 years) and scan year (<1990, 1990-1994, 1995-1999 and ≥2000), and then derived the volumetric CT dose index and estimated organ doses. For head CT scans, mean mAs decreased by about 47% on average from before 1990 to after 2000, with the decrease starting around 1990. The mean mAs for head CTs did not vary with age before 1990, whereas slightly lower mAs values were used for younger patients after 1990. Similar declines in mAs were observed for trunk CTs: a 46% decline on an average from before 1990 to after 2000. Although mean mAs for trunk CTs did not vary with age before 1990, the value varied markedly by age, from 63 mAs for age 0-4 years compared with 315 mAs for those aged >15 years after 2000. No material changes in kVp were found. Estimated brain-absorbed dose from head CT scans decreased from 62 mGy before 1990 to approximately 30 mGy after 2000. For chest CT scans, the lung dose to children aged 0-4 years decreased from 28 mGy before 1990 to 4 mGy after 2000. We found that mAs for

  11. Reduction in radiation doses from paediatric CT scans in Great Britain

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Harbron, Richard W; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although CT scans provide great medical benefits, concerns have been raised about the magnitude of possible associated cancer risk, particularly in children who are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Unnecessary high doses during CT examinations can also be delivered to children, if the scan parameters are not adjusted for patient age and size. We conducted the first survey to directly assess the trends in CT scan parameters and doses for paediatric CT scans performed in Great Britain between 1978 and 2008. Methods: We retrieved 1073 CT film sets from 36 hospitals. The patients were 0–19 years old, and CT scans were conducted between 1978 and 2008. We extracted scan parameters from each film including tube current–time product [milliampere seconds (mAs)], tube potential [peak kilovoltage (kVp)] and manufacturer and model of the CT scanner. We estimated the mean mAs for head and trunk (chest and abdomen/pelvis) scans, according to patient age (0–4, 5–9, 10–14 and 15–19 years) and scan year (<1990, 1990–1994, 1995–1999 and ≥2000), and then derived the volumetric CT dose index and estimated organ doses. Results: For head CT scans, mean mAs decreased by about 47% on average from before 1990 to after 2000, with the decrease starting around 1990. The mean mAs for head CTs did not vary with age before 1990, whereas slightly lower mAs values were used for younger patients after 1990. Similar declines in mAs were observed for trunk CTs: a 46% decline on an average from before 1990 to after 2000. Although mean mAs for trunk CTs did not vary with age before 1990, the value varied markedly by age, from 63 mAs for age 0–4 years compared with 315 mAs for those aged >15 years after 2000. No material changes in kVp were found. Estimated brain-absorbed dose from head CT scans decreased from 62 mGy before 1990 to approximately 30 mGy after 2000. For chest CT scans, the lung dose to children aged 0–4 years decreased from 28 mGy before

  12. Socio-economic variation in CT scanning in Northern England, 1990-2002

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Socio-economic status is known to influence health throughout life. In childhood, studies have shown increased injury rates in more deprived settings. Socio-economic status may therefore be related to rates of certain medical procedures, such as computed tomography (CT) scans. This study aimed to assess socio-economic variation among young people having CT scans in Northern England between 1990 and 2002 inclusive. Methods Electronic data were obtained from Radiology Information Systems of all nine National Health Service hospital Trusts in the region. CT scan data, including sex, date of scan, age at scan, number and type of scans were assessed in relation to quintiles of Townsend deprivation scores, obtained from linkage of postcodes with census data, using χ2 tests and Spearman rank correlations. Results During the study period, 39,676 scans were recorded on 21,089 patients, with 38,007 scans and 19,485 patients (11344 male and 8132 female) linkable to Townsend scores. The overall distributions of both scans and patients by quintile of Townsend deprivation scores were significantly different to the distributions of Townsend scores from the census wards included in the study (p < 0.0001). There was a significant association between type of scan and deprivation quintile (p < 0.0001), primarily due to the higher proportions of head scans in the three most deprived quintiles, and slightly higher proportions of chest scans and abdomen and pelvis scans in the least deprived groups. There was also a significant association (p < 0.0001) between the patient's age at the time of the CT scan and Townsend deprivation quintiles, with slightly increasing proportions of younger children with increasing deprivation. A similar association with age (p < 0.0001) was seen when restricting the data to include only the first scan of each patient. The number of scans per patient was also associated with Townsend deprivation quintiles (p = 0.014). Conclusions Social

  13. SU-F-I-32: Organ Doses from Pediatric Head CT Scan

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Liu, Q; Qiu, J

    Purpose: To evaluate the organ doses of pediatric patients who undergoing head CT scan using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and compare it with measurements in anthropomorphic child phantom.. Methods: A ten years old children voxel phantom was developed from CT images, the voxel size of the phantom was 2mm*2mm*2mm. Organ doses from head CT scan were simulated using MCNPX software, 180 detectors were placed in the voxel phantom to tally the doses of the represented tissues or organs. When performing the simulation, 120 kVp and 88 mA were selected as the scan parameters. The scan range covered from the topmore » of the head to the end of the chain, this protocol was used at CT simulator for radiotherapy. To validate the simulated results, organ doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence (RPL) detectors, placed in the 28 organs of the 10 years old CIRS ATOM phantom. Results: The organ doses results matched well between MC simulation and phantom measurements. The eyes dose was showed to be as expected the highest organ dose: 28.11 mGy by simulation and 27.34 mGy by measurement respectively. Doses for organs not included in the scan volume were much lower than those included in the scan volume, thymus doses were observed more than 10 mGy due the CT protocol for radiotherapy covered more body part than routine head CT scan. Conclusion: As the eyes are superficial organs, they may receive the highest radiation dose during the CT scan. Considering the relatively high radio sensitivity, using shielding material or organ based tube current modulation technique should be encouraged to reduce the eye radiation risks. Scan range was one of the most important factors that affects the organ doses during the CT scan. Use as short as reasonably possible scan range should be helpful to reduce the patient radiation dose. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)« less

  14. WE-EF-207-09: Single-Scan Dual-Energy CT Using Primary Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petrongolo, M; Zhu, L

    Purpose: Compared with conventional CT, dual energy CT (DECT) provides better material differentiation but requires projection data with two different effective x-ray spectra. Current DECT scanners use either a two-scan setting or costly imaging components, which are not feasible or available on open-gantry cone-beam CT systems. We propose a hardware-based method which utilizes primary modulation to enable single-scan DECT on a conventional CT scanner. The CT imaging geometry of primary modulation is identical to that used in our previous method for scatter removal, making it possible for future combination with effective scatter correction on the same CT scanner. Methods: Wemore » insert an attenuation sheet with a spatially-varying pattern - primary modulator-between the x-ray source and the imaged object. During the CT scan, the modulator selectively hardens the x-ray beam at specific detector locations. Thus, the proposed method simultaneously acquires high and low energy data. High and low energy CT images are then reconstructed from projections with missing data via an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm with gradient weighting. Proof-of-concept studies are performed using a copper modulator on a cone-beam CT system. Results: Our preliminary results on the Catphan(c) 600 phantom indicate that the proposed method for single-scan DECT is able to successfully generate high-quality high and low energy CT images and distinguish different materials through basis material decomposition. By applying correction algorithms and using all of the acquired projection data, we can reconstruct a single CT image of comparable image quality to conventional CT images, i.e., without primary modulation. Conclusion: This work shows great promise in using a primary modulator to perform high-quality single-scan DECT imaging. Future studies will test method performance on anthropomorphic phantoms and perform quantitative analyses on image qualities and DECT decomposition accuracy

  15. Estimating local noise power spectrum from a few FBP-reconstructed CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Rongping, E-mail: rongping.zeng@fda.hhs.gov; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Petrick, Nicholas

    Purpose: Traditional ways to estimate 2D CT noise power spectrum (NPS) involve an ensemble average of the power spectrums of many noisy scans. When only a few scans are available, regions of interest are often extracted from different locations to obtain sufficient samples to estimate the NPS. Using image samples from different locations ignores the nonstationarity of CT noise and thus cannot accurately characterize its local properties. The purpose of this work is to develop a method to estimate local NPS using only a few fan-beam CT scans. Methods: As a result of FBP reconstruction, the CT NPS has themore » same radial profile shape for all projection angles, with the magnitude varying with the noise level in the raw data measurement. This allows a 2D CT NPS to be factored into products of a 1D angular and a 1D radial function in polar coordinates. The polar separability of CT NPS greatly reduces the data requirement for estimating the NPS. The authors use this property and derive a radial NPS estimation method: in brief, the radial profile shape is estimated from a traditional NPS based on image samples extracted at multiple locations. The amplitudes are estimated by fitting the traditional local NPS to the estimated radial profile shape. The estimated radial profile shape and amplitudes are then combined to form a final estimate of the local NPS. We evaluate the accuracy of the radial NPS method and compared it to traditional NPS methods in terms of normalized mean squared error (NMSE) and signal detectability index. Results: For both simulated and real CT data sets, the local NPS estimated with no more than six scans using the radial NPS method was very close to the reference NPS, according to the metrics of NMSE and detectability index. Even with only two scans, the radial NPS method was able to achieve a fairly good accuracy. Compared to those estimated using traditional NPS methods, the accuracy improvement was substantial when a few scans were available

  16. Routine postoperative CT-scans after burr hole trepanation for chronic subdural hematoma - better before or after drainage removal?

    PubMed

    Brokinkel, Benjamin; Ewelt, Christian; Holling, Markus; Hesselmann, Volker; Heindel, Walter Leonard; Stummer, Walter; Fischer, Bernhard Robert

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate timing of scheduled CT-scans after burr hole trepanation for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). 131 patients with primary cSDH were included. Scheduled CT-scans were performed after burr hole trepanation and placement of a subdural drain. The influence of CT-scanning with or without indwelling drain was analysed regarding subsequent surgery and CT-scans, duration of hospitalization, short- and middle-term follow up by single factor analyses. Subgroup analyses were performed for patients receiving anticoagulant drugs. Median age was 74 years. Routine CT-scans with indwelling drainage were not shown to be beneficial regarding subsequent burr hole trepanations (p=0.243), craniotomies (p=1.000) and outcome at discharge (p=0.297). Mean duration of hospitalization (11 vs. 8 days, p=0.013) was significantly longer and number of subsequent CT-scans was higher when CT scan was performed with indwelling drain (2.3 vs. 1.4, p=0.001). In middle-term follow-up, beneficial effects of CT-scanning with inlaying drainage could neither be shown. Moreover, advantageous effects of CT-scans with indwelling drains could neither be shown for patients receiving anticoagulant drugs. Scheduled postoperative cranial imaging with indwelling drains was not shown to be beneficial and misses information of intracranial damage inflicted by removal of drains. We thus recommend CT-scanning after drainage removal.

  17. Eye lens radiation exposure and repeated head CT scans: A problem to keep in mind.

    PubMed

    Michel, Morgane; Jacob, Sophie; Roger, Gilles; Pelosse, Béatrice; Laurier, Dominique; Le Pointe, Hubert Ducou; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2012-08-01

    The deterministic character of radiation-induced cataract is being called into question, raising the possibility of a risk in patients, especially children, exposed to ionizing radiation in case of repeated head CT-scans. This study aims to estimate the eye lens doses of a pediatric population exposed to repeated head CTs and to assess the feasibility of an epidemiological study. Children treated for a cholesteatoma, who had had at least one CT-scan of the middle ear before their tenth birthday, were included. Radiation exposure has been assessed from medical records and telephone interviews. Out of the 39 subjects contacted, 32 accepted to participate. A total of 76 CT-scans were retrieved from medical records. At the time of the interview (mean age: 16 years), the mean number of CT per child was 3. Cumulative mean effective and eye lens doses were 1.7mSv and 168mGy, respectively. A relatively high lens radiation dose was observed in children exposed to repeated CT-scans. Due to that exposure and despite the difficulties met when trying to reach patients' families, a large scale epidemiological study should be performed in order to assess the risk of radiation-induced cataracts associated with repeated head CT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergency medicine summary code for reporting CT scan results: implementation and survey results.

    PubMed

    Lam, Joanne; Coughlin, Ryan; Buhl, Luce; Herbst, Meghan; Herbst, Timothy; Martillotti, Jared; Coughlin, Bret

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the emergency department (ED) providers' interest and satisfaction with ED CT result reporting before and after the implementation of a standardized summary code for all CT scan reporting. A summary code was provided at the end of all CTs ordered through the ED from August to October of 2016. A retrospective review was completed on all studies performed during this period. A pre- and post-survey was given to both ED and radiology providers. A total of 3980 CT scans excluding CTAs were ordered with 2240 CTs dedicated to the head and neck, 1685 CTs dedicated to the torso, and 55 CTs dedicated to the extremities. Approximately 74% CT scans were contrast enhanced. Of the 3980 ED CT examination ordered, 69% had a summary code assigned to it. Fifteen percent of the coded CTs had a critical or diagnostic positive result. The introduction of an ED CT summary code did not show a definitive improvement in communication. However, the ED providers are in consensus that radiology reports are crucial their patients' management. There is slightly increased satisfaction with the providers with less than 5 years of experience with the ED CT codes compared to more seasoned providers. The implementation of a user-friendly summary code may allow better analysis of results, practice improvement, and quality measurements in the future.

  19. Investigation of ultra low-dose scans in the context of quantum-counting clinical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, T.; Buzug, T. M.; Flohr, T.; Fung, G. S. K.; Kappler, S.; Stierstorfer, K.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2012-03-01

    In clinical computed tomography (CT), images from patient examinations taken with conventional scanners exhibit noise characteristics governed by electronics noise, when scanning strongly attenuating obese patients or with an ultra-low X-ray dose. Unlike CT systems based on energy integrating detectors, a system with a quantum counting detector does not suffer from this drawback. Instead, the noise from the electronics mainly affects the spectral resolution of these detectors. Therefore, it does not contribute to the image noise in spectrally non-resolved CT images. This promises improved image quality due to image noise reduction in scans obtained from clinical CT examinations with lowest X-ray tube currents or obese patients. To quantify the benefits of quantum counting detectors in clinical CT we have carried out an extensive simulation study of the complete scanning and reconstruction process for both kinds of detectors. The simulation chain encompasses modeling of the X-ray source, beam attenuation in the patient, and calculation of the detector response. Moreover, in each case the subsequent image preprocessing and reconstruction is modeled as well. The simulation-based, theoretical evaluation is validated by experiments with a novel prototype quantum counting system and a Siemens Definition Flash scanner with a conventional energy integrating CT detector. We demonstrate and quantify the improvement from image noise reduction achievable with quantum counting techniques in CT examinations with ultra-low X-ray dose and strong attenuation.

  20. Journal Club: Head CT scans in the emergency department for syncope and dizziness.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Myles M; Yoon, Hyo-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the yield of acutely abnormal findings on head CT scans in patients presenting to the emergency department with dizziness, near-syncope, or syncope and to determine the clinical factors that potentially predicted acutely abnormal head CT findings and hospital admission. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of all patients presenting to an HMO emergency department between July 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, who underwent head CT for a primary complaint of dizziness, syncope, or near-syncope. The primary outcomes were head CT scans with acutely abnormal findings and hospital admission. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association between clinical variables and acute head CT findings and between clinical variables and hospital admission. Of the 253 patients who presented with dizziness, 7.1% had head CT scans with acutely abnormal findings, and 18.6% were admitted. Of the 236 patients who presented with syncope or near-syncope, 6.4% had head CT scans with acutely abnormal findings, and 39.8% were admitted. The following three clinical factors were found to be significantly correlated with acutely abnormal head CT findings: a focal neurologic deficit (p = 0.003), age greater than 60 years (p = 0.011), and acute head trauma (p = 0.026). Our results suggest that most patients presenting with syncope or dizziness to the emergency department may not benefit from head CT unless they are older, have a focal neurologic deficit, or have a history of recent head trauma.

  1. Trends in CT scan rates in children and pregnant women: teaching, private, public and nonprofit facilities.

    PubMed

    Hoshiko, Sumi; Smith, Daniel; Fan, Cathyn; Jones, Carrie R; McNeel, Sandra V; Cohen, Ronald A

    2014-05-01

    Radiation exposure from medical sources now equals or exceeds that from natural background sources, largely attributable to a 20-fold increase in CT use since 1980. Increasing exposure to children and fetuses is of most concern due to their heightened susceptibility. More recently, CT use may be leveling or decreasing, but it is unclear whether this change is widespread or varies by type of institution. We sought to characterize trends in CT utilization in California hospitals and emergency departments among children and pregnant women, looking at different types of facilities, such as teaching, private, public and nonprofit institutions. We examined frequency of CT examinations by year from 229 facilities reporting CT usage in routinely collected California statewide data for 2005-2012. We modeled trends overall and by facility type. CT scans for pediatric and pregnant patient visits in the emergency department increased initially, then started to decline after 2008. Among hospital admissions, rates declined or leveled after 2005. In the emergency department, CT rates varied between types of facilities, with teaching hospitals reducing use sooner and more sharply than other types of facilities. CT utilization in California among children and pregnant women has begun to level or decline. Still, population exposure remains at historically high levels, warranting consideration of potential public health implications. Further examination of reasons for trends among hospital types, particularly how teaching hospitals have reduced rates of CT utilization, may help identify strategies for CT reduction without compromising patient care.

  2. Single energy micro CT SkyScan 1173 for the characterization of urinary stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, L. A.; Asyana, V.; Ridwan, T.; Anwary, F.; Soekersi, H.; Latief, F. D. E.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-08-01

    A urinary stone is a solid piece of material produced from crystallization of excreted substances in the urine. Knowledge of the composition of urinary stones is essential to determine the suitable treatment for the patient. The aim of this research was to characterize urinary stones using single energy micro CT SkyScan 1173. Six human urinary stones were scanned in vitro using 80 kV in micro CT SkyScan 1173. The produced projection, images, were reconstructed using NRecon (in-house software from SkyScan). The images of urinary stones were analyzed using CT Analyser (CT An) to obtain information of the internal structure and the Hounsfield Unit (HU) value to determine the information regarding the composition of the urinary stones, respectively. The average HU values from certain region of interests in the same slice were compared with spectral curves of known materials from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). From the analysis, the composition of the six scanned stones were obtained. Two stones are composed of cystine, two are composed of struvite, two other stones are composed of struvite+cystine. In conclusion, the single energy micro CT with 80 kV can be used identifying cystine and struvite urinary stone.

  3. CT Scans of Cores Metadata, Barrow, Alaska 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katie McKnight; Tim Kneafsey; Craig Ulrich

    2015-03-11

    Individual ice cores were collected from Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska, throughout 2013 and 2014. Cores were drilled along different transects to sample polygonal features (i.e. the trough, center and rim of high, transitional and low center polygons). Most cores were drilled around 1 meter in depth and a few deep cores were drilled around 3 meters in depth. Three-dimensional images of the frozen cores were constructed using a medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. TIFF files can be uploaded to ImageJ (an open-source imaging software) to examine soil structure and densities within each core.

  4. Automatic liver segmentation from abdominal CT volumes using graph cuts and border marching.

    PubMed

    Liao, Miao; Zhao, Yu-Qian; Liu, Xi-Yao; Zeng, Ye-Zhan; Zou, Bei-Ji; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Shih, Frank Y

    2017-05-01

    Identifying liver regions from abdominal computed tomography (CT) volumes is an important task for computer-aided liver disease diagnosis and surgical planning. This paper presents a fully automatic method for liver segmentation from CT volumes based on graph cuts and border marching. An initial slice is segmented by density peak clustering. Based on pixel- and patch-wise features, an intensity model and a PCA-based regional appearance model are developed to enhance the contrast between liver and background. Then, these models as well as the location constraint estimated iteratively are integrated into graph cuts in order to segment the liver in each slice automatically. Finally, a vessel compensation method based on the border marching is used to increase the segmentation accuracy. Experiments are conducted on a clinical data set we created and also on the MICCAI2007 Grand Challenge liver data. The results show that the proposed intensity, appearance models, and the location constraint are significantly effective for liver recognition, and the undersegmented vessels can be compensated by the border marching based method. The segmentation performances in terms of VOE, RVD, ASD, RMSD, and MSD as well as the average running time achieved by our method on the SLIVER07 public database are 5.8 ± 3.2%, -0.1 ± 4.1%, 1.0 ± 0.5mm, 2.0 ± 1.2mm, 21.2 ± 9.3mm, and 4.7 minutes, respectively, which are superior to those of existing methods. The proposed method does not require time-consuming training process and statistical model construction, and is capable of dealing with complicated shapes and intensity variations successfully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Journal club: Acute abdominal pain in elderly patients: effect of radiologist awareness of clinicobiologic information on CT accuracy.

    PubMed

    Millet, Ingrid; Alili, Chakib; Bouic-Pages, Emmanuelle; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Nagot, Nicolas; Taourel, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the availability of clinicobiologic findings would affect the diagnostic performance of CT of elderly emergency department patients with nontraumatic acute abdominal pain. The cases of 333 consecutively registered patients 75 years old or older presenting to the emergency department with acute abdominal pain and who underwent CT were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists blinded or not to the patient's clinicobiologic results. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated according to the level of correctly classified cases in both the entire cohort and a surgical subgroup and was compared between readings performed with and without knowledge of the clinicobiologic findings. Agreement between each reading and the reference diagnosis and interobserver agreement were assessed with kappa statistics. In both the entire cohort (87.4% vs 85.3%, p = 0.07) and the surgical group (94% vs 91%, p = 0.15), there was no significant difference in CT accuracy between diagnoses made when the radiologist was aware and those made when the radiologist was not aware of the clinicobiologic findings. Agreement between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis was excellent whether or not the radiologist was aware of the clinicobiologic findings. In the care of elderly patients, CT is accurate for diagnosing the cause of acute abdominal pain, particularly when it is of surgical origin, regardless of the availability of clinical and biologic findings. Thus CT interpretation should not be delayed until complete clinicobiologic data are available, and the images should be quickly transmitted to the emergency physician so that appropriate therapy can be begun.

  6. Chest CT scans are frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vallipuram, Janaki; Dhalla, Sidika; Bell, Chaim M; Dresser, Linda; Han, Heekyung; Husain, Shahid; Minden, Mark D; Paul, Narinder S; So, Miranda; Steinberg, Marilyn; Vallipuram, Mayuran; Wong, Gary; Morris, Andrew M

    2017-04-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) findings of nodules, ground glass opacities, and consolidations are often interpreted as representing invasive fungal infection in individuals with febrile neutropenia. We assessed whether these CT findings were present in asymptomatic individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at low risk of invasive fungal disease. A retrospective study of consecutive asymptomatic adult patients with newly diagnosed AML over a 2-year period was performed at a tertiary care oncology center. Radiology reports of baseline chest CTs were reviewed. Of 145 CT scans, the majority (88%) had pulmonary abnormalities. Many (70%) had one or both of unspecified opacities (52%) and nodules (49%). Ground glass opacities (18%) and consolidations (12%) occurred less frequently. Radiologists suggested pneumonia as a possible diagnosis in 32% (n = 47) of scans. Chest CT may result in over-diagnosis of invasive fungal disease in individuals with febrile neutropenia if interpreted without correlation to the patients' clinical status.

  7. A CT and MRI scan to MCNP input conversion program.

    PubMed

    Van Riper, Kenneth A

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new program to read a sequence of tomographic scans and prepare the geometry and material sections of an MCNP input file. Image processing techniques include contrast controls and mapping of grey scales to colour. The user interface provides several tools with which the user can associate a range of image intensities to an MCNP material. Materials are loaded from a library. A separate material assignment can be made to a pixel intensity or range of intensities when that intensity dominates the image boundaries; this material is assigned to all pixels with that intensity contiguous with the boundary. Material fractions are computed in a user-specified voxel grid overlaying the scans. New materials are defined by mixing the library materials using the fractions. The geometry can be written as an MCNP lattice or as individual cells. A combination algorithm can be used to join neighbouring cells with the same material.

  8. Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations Are Associated with Adrenal Calcifications on CT Scans: An Imaging Biomarker for a Hereditary Cerebrovascular Condition.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Corinne D; Eberhardt, Steven C; Bartlett, Mary R; Nelson, Jeffrey; Kim, Helen; Morrison, Leslie A; Hart, Blaine L

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To determine if adrenal calcifications seen at computed tomography (CT) are associated with familial cerebral cavernous malformations (fCCMs) in carriers of the CCM1 Common Hispanic Mutation. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. The authors retrospectively reviewed abdominal CT scans in 38 patients with fCCM, 38 unaffected age- and sex-matched control subjects, and 13 patients with sporadic, nonfamilial cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM). The size, number, and laterality of calcifications and the morphologic characteristics of the adrenal gland were recorded. Brain lesion count was recorded from brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with fCCM. The prevalence of adrenal calcifications in patients with fCCM was compared with that in unaffected control subjects and those with sporadic CCM by using the Fisher exact test. Additional analyses were performed to determine whether age and brain lesion count were associated with adrenal findings in patients with fCCM. Results Small focal calcifications (SFCs) (≤5 mm) were seen in one or both adrenal glands in 19 of the 38 patients with fCCM (50%), compared with 0 of the 38 unaffected control subjects (P < .001) and 0 of the 13 subjects with sporadic CCM (P = .001). Adrenal calcifications in patients with fCCM were more frequently left sided, with 17 of 19 patients having more SFCs in the left adrenal gland than the right adrenal gland and 50 of the 61 observed SFCs (82%) found in the left adrenal gland. No subjects had SFCs on the right side only. In patients with fCCM, the presence of SFCs showed a positive correlation with age (P < .001) and number of brain lesions (P < .001). Conclusion Adrenal calcifications identified on CT scans are common in patients with fCCM and may be a clinically silent manifestation of disease. © RSNA, 2017.

  9. Algorithm-enabled partial-angular-scan configurations for dual-energy CT.

    PubMed

    Chen, Buxin; Zhang, Zheng; Xia, Dan; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2018-05-01

    We seek to investigate an optimization-based one-step method for image reconstruction that explicitly compensates for nonlinear spectral response (i.e., the beam-hardening effect) in dual-energy CT, to investigate the feasibility of the one-step method for enabling two dual-energy partial-angular-scan configurations, referred to as the short- and half-scan configurations, on standard CT scanners without involving additional hardware, and to investigate the potential of the short- and half-scan configurations in reducing imaging dose and scan time in a single-kVp-switch full-scan configuration in which two full rotations are made for collection of dual-energy data. We use the one-step method to reconstruct images directly from dual-energy data through solving a nonconvex optimization program that specifies the images to be reconstructed in dual-energy CT. Dual-energy full-scan data are generated from numerical phantoms and collected from physical phantoms with the standard single-kVp-switch full-scan configuration, whereas dual-energy short- and half-scan data are extracted from the corresponding full-scan data. Besides visual inspection and profile-plot comparison, the reconstructed images are analyzed also in quantitative studies based upon tasks of linear-attenuation-coefficient and material-concentration estimation and of material differentiation. Following the performance of a computer-simulation study to verify that the one-step method can reconstruct numerically accurately basis and monochromatic images of numerical phantoms, we reconstruct basis and monochromatic images by using the one-step method from real data of physical phantoms collected with the full-, short-, and half-scan configurations. Subjective inspection based upon visualization and profile-plot comparison reveals that monochromatic images, which are used often in practical applications, reconstructed from the full-, short-, and half-scan data are largely visually comparable except for some

  10. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  11. A study on automated anatomical labeling to arteries concerning with colon from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Bui Huy; Oda, Masahiro; Jiang, Zhengang; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Mori, Kensaku

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an automated anatomical labeling method of arteries extracted from contrasted 3D CT images based on multi-class AdaBoost. In abdominal surgery, understanding of vasculature related to a target organ such as the colon is very important. Therefore, the anatomical structure of blood vessels needs to be understood by computers in a system supporting abdominal surgery. There are several researches on automated anatomical labeling, but there is no research on automated anatomical labeling to arteries concerning with the colon. The proposed method obtains a tree structure of arteries from the artery region and calculates features values of each branch. These feature values are thickness, curvature, direction, and running vectors of branch. Then, candidate arterial names are computed by classifiers that are trained to output artery names. Finally, a global optimization process is applied to the candidate arterial names to determine final names. Target arteries of this paper are nine lower abdominal arteries (AO, LCIA, RCIA, LEIA, REIA, SMA, IMA, LIIA, RIIA). We applied the proposed method to 14 cases of 3D abdominal contrasted CT images, and evaluated the results by leave-one-out scheme. The average precision and recall rates of the proposed method were 87.9% and 93.3%, respectively. The results of this method are applicable for anatomical name display of surgical simulation and computer aided surgery.

  12. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between split-filter dual-energy images and single-energy images in single-source abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Euler, André; Obmann, Markus M; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Mileto, Achille; Zaehringer, Caroline; Falkowski, Anna L; Winkel, David J; Marin, Daniele; Stieltjes, Bram; Krauss, Bernhard; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2018-02-19

    To compare image quality and radiation dose of abdominal split-filter dual-energy CT (SF-DECT) combined with monoenergetic imaging to single-energy CT (SECT) with automatic tube voltage selection (ATVS). Two-hundred single-source abdominal CT scans were performed as SECT with ATVS (n = 100) and SF-DECT (n = 100). SF-DECT scans were reconstructed and subdivided into composed images (SF-CI) and monoenergetic images at 55 keV (SF-MI). Objective and subjective image quality were compared among single-energy images (SEI), SF-CI and SF-MI. CNR and FOM were separately calculated for the liver (e.g. CNR liv ) and the portal vein (CNR pv ). Radiation dose was compared using size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). Results of the three groups were compared using non-parametric tests. Image noise of SF-CI was 18% lower compared to SEI and 48% lower compared to SF-MI (p < 0.001). Composed images yielded higher CNR liv over single-energy images (23.4 vs. 20.9; p < 0.001), whereas CNR pv was significantly lower (3.5 vs. 5.2; p < 0.001). Monoenergetic images overcame this inferiority in CNR pv and achieved similar results compared to single-energy images (5.1 vs. 5.2; p > 0.628). Subjective sharpness was equal between single-energy and monoenergetic images and diagnostic confidence was equal between single-energy and composed images. FOM liv was highest for SF-CI. FOM pv was equal for SEI and SF-MI (p = 0.78). SSDE was significant lower for SF-DECT compared to SECT (p < 0.022). The combined use of split-filter dual-energy CT images provides comparable objective and subjective image quality at lower radiation dose compared to single-energy CT with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 18% lower noise compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 11% lower SSDE compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Spectral shaping of split-filter dual-energy leads to an increased dose-efficiency.

  13. NCICT: a computational solution to estimate organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Bolch, Wesley E; Moroz, Brian E; Folio, Les

    2015-12-01

    We developed computational methods and tools to assess organ doses for pediatric and adult patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations. We used the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference pediatric and adult phantoms combined with the Monte Carlo simulation of a reference CT scanner to establish comprehensive organ dose coefficients (DC), organ absorbed dose per unit volumetric CT Dose Index (CTDIvol) (mGy/mGy). We also developed methods to estimate organ doses with tube current modulation techniques and size specific dose estimates. A graphical user interface was designed to obtain user input of patient- and scan-specific parameters, and to calculate and display organ doses. A batch calculation routine was also integrated into the program to automatically calculate organ doses for a large number of patients. We entitled the computer program, National Cancer Institute dosimetry system for CT(NCICT). We compared our dose coefficients with those from CT-Expo, and evaluated the performance of our program using CT patient data. Our pediatric DCs show good agreements of organ dose estimation with those from CT-Expo except for thyroid. Our results support that the adult phantom in CT-Expo seems to represent a pediatric individual between 10 and 15 years rather than an adult. The comparison of CTDIvol values between NCICT and dose pages from 10 selected CT scans shows good agreements less than 12% except for two cases (up to 20%). The organ dose comparison between mean and modulated mAs shows that mean mAs-based calculation significantly overestimates dose (up to 2.4-fold) to the organs in close proximity to lungs in chest and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans. Our program provides more realistic anatomy based on the ICRP reference phantoms, higher age resolution, the most up-to-date bone marrow dosimetry, and several convenient features compared to previous tools. The NCICT will be available for research purpose in the near future.

  14. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. Themore » phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.« less

  15. Optimizing abdominal CT dose and image quality with respect to x-ray tube voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the x-ray tube voltage that results in optimum performance for abdominal CT imaging for a range of imaging tasks and patient sizes. Theoretical calculations were performed of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for disk shaped lesions of muscle, fat, bone and iodine embedded in a uniform water background. Lesion contrast was the mean Hounsfield Unit value at the effective photon energy, and image noise was determined from the total radiation intensity incident on the CT x-ray detector. Patient size ranging from young infants (10 kg) to oversized adults (120 kg), with CNR values obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Patients of varying sizes were modeled as an equivalent cylinder of water, and the mean section dose (D) was determined for each selected x-ray tube kV value at a constant mAs. For each patient size and lesion type, we identified an optimal kV as the x-ray tube voltage that yields a maximum value of the figure of merit (CNR2/D). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV reduced lesion contrast by 11% for muscle, 21% for fat, 35% for bone and 52% for iodine, and these reductions were approximately independent of patient size. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased a muscle lesion CNR relative to a uniform water background by a factor of 2.6, with similar trends observed for fat (2.3), bone (1.9) and iodine (1.4). The improvement in lesion CNR with increasing x-ray tube voltage was highest for the largest sized patients. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the patient dose by a factor of between 5.0 and 6.2 depending on the patient size. For small sized patients (10 and 30 kg) and muscle lesions, best performance is obtained at 80 kV; however, for adults (70 kg) and oversized adults (120 kg), the best performance would be obtained at 140 kV. Imaging fat lesions was best performed at 80 kV for all patients except for oversized adults

  16. No Association between Radiation Dose from Pediatric CT Scans and Risk of Subsequent Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Journy, Neige; Lee, Choonsik; Morton, Lindsay M; Harbron, Richard W; Stewart, Douglas R; Parker, Louise; Craft, Alan W; McHugh, Kieran; Little, Mark P; Pearce, Mark S

    2017-05-01

    Background: We examined the relationship between estimated radiation dose from CT scans and subsequent Hodgkin lymphoma in the UK pediatric CT scans cohort. Methods: A retrospective, record linkage cohort included patients ages 0 to 21 years who underwent CT scans between 1980 and 2002 and were followed up for cancer or death until 2008. Poisson regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between estimated radiation dose (lagged by 2 years) and incident Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed at least 2 years after the first CT scan. Results: There were 65 incident cases of Hodgkin lymphoma in the cohort of 178,601 patients. Neither estimated red bone marrow dose nor mean lymphocyte dose from CT scans was clearly associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (RR for 20+ mGy vs. <5 mGy = 0.92 (0.38-2.22) P trend > 0.5 and 1.44 (0.60-3.48) P trend > 0.5), respectively. Conclusions: Radiation exposure from pediatric CT scans 2 or more years before diagnosis was not associated with Hodgkin lymphoma in this large UK cohort. Impact: These findings are consistent with the majority of previous studies, which do not support a link between ionizing radiation and Hodgkin lymphoma. The results contrast our previous positive findings in this cohort for brain tumors and leukemia, both of which are known to be strongly linked to radiation exposure during childhood. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(5); 804-6. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Periprosthetic osteolysis after AES total ankle replacement: Conventional radiography versus CT-scan.

    PubMed

    Viste, Anthony; Al Zahrani, Nader; Brito, Nuno; Lienhart, Christophe; Fessy, Michel Henri; Besse, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare conventional X-rays and CT-scan in detecting peri-prosthetic osteolytic lesions, a major concern after total ankle replacement (TAR). We prospectively assessed 50 patients (mean age 56 years), consecutively operated on by the same senior surgeon, between 2003 and 2006 and with a mean follow-up period of 4 years (range, 2-6.2). The component used was AES total ankle replacement. The etiologies for total ankle arthroplasty were: posttraumatic in 50%, osteoarthritis secondary to instability in 36%. Plain radiographs were analyzed by 4 independent observers, using a 10-zone protocol (location) and 5 size categories. At 4-year follow-up, all patients had been CT-scan assessed with the same protocol by 2 independent observers. Plain radiographs showed dramatic progression of severe periprosthetic lyses (>10mm): from 14% to 36% of interface cysts for the tibial component respectively at 2 and 4-year follow-up and from 4% to 30% for the talar implant. The talar component was more accurately assessed by CT-scan (mean frontal and sagittal talar lesion: from 270 mm2 to 288 mm2 for CT-scan versus 133 mm2 to 174 mm2 for X-rays). For tibial cysts, axial views showed larger lesions (313 mm2 than frontal (194 mm2) or sagittal (213.5 mm2) views. At 4-year follow-up, 24% of patients had revision with curetage or arthrodesis, and at 7 years follow-up 38% were revised. These results are similar to recent AES series, justifying withdrawal of this device. CT-scan was more accurate than X-rays for detecting and quantifying periprosthetic osteolysis. We recommend a yearly radiological control and CT-scan in case of lesion on X-rays. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating Radiation Dose Metrics for Patients Undergoing Tube Current Modulation CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kyle Lorin

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been a powerful tool in the diagnosis of disease, identification of tumors and guidance of interventional procedures. With CT examinations comes the concern of radiation exposure and the associated risks. In order to properly understand those risks on a patient-specific level, organ dose must be quantified for each CT scan. Some of the most widely used organ dose estimates are derived from fixed tube current (FTC) scans of a standard sized idealized patient model. However, in current clinical practice, patient size varies from neonates weighing just a few kg to morbidly obese patients weighing over 200 kg, and nearly all CT exams are performed with tube current modulation (TCM), a scanning technique that adjusts scanner output according to changes in patient attenuation. Methods to account for TCM in CT organ dose estimates have been previously demonstrated, but these methods are limited in scope and/or restricted to idealized TCM profiles that are not based on physical observations and not scanner specific (e.g. don't account for tube limits, scanner-specific effects, etc.). The goal of this work was to develop methods to estimate organ doses to patients undergoing CT scans that take into account both the patient size as well as the effects of TCM. This work started with the development and validation of methods to estimate scanner-specific TCM schemes for any voxelized patient model. An approach was developed to generate estimated TCM schemes that match actual TCM schemes that would have been acquired on the scanner for any patient model. Using this approach, TCM schemes were then generated for a variety of body CT protocols for a set of reference voxelized phantoms for which TCM information does not currently exist. These are whole body patient models representing a variety of sizes, ages and genders that have all radiosensitive organs identified. TCM schemes for these models facilitated Monte Carlo-based estimates of fully

  19. Predictive validity of preoperative CT scans and the risk of pedicle screw loosening in spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Bredow, Jan; Boese, C K; Werner, C M L; Siewe, J; Löhrer, L; Zarghooni, K; Eysel, P; Scheyerer, M J

    2016-08-01

    Pedicle screw fixation is the standard technique for the stabilization of the spine, a clinically relevant complication of which is screw loosening. This retrospective study investigates whether preoperative CT scanning can offer a predictor of screw loosening. CT-scan attenuation in 365 patients was evaluated to determine the mean bone density of each vertebral body. Screw loosening or dislocation was determined in CT scans postoperatively using the standard radiological criteria. Forty-five of 365 patients (12.3 %; 24 male, 21 female) suffered postoperative screw loosening (62 of 2038 screws) over a mean follow-up time of 50.8 months. Revision surgeries were necessary in 23 patients (6.3 %). The correlation between decreasing mean CT attenuation in Hounsfield Units (HU) and increasing patient age was significant (p < 0.001). Mean bone density was 116.3 (SD 53.5) HU in cases with screw loosening and 132.7 (SD 41.3) HU in cases in which screws remained fixed. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.003). The determination of bone density with preoperative CT scanning can predict the risk of screw loosening and inform the decision to use cement augmentation to reduce the incidence of screw loosening.

  20. False Positive Uptake in Bilateral Gynecomastia on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Scan.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nair, Bindu P; Pillai, M R A; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old man on hormonal therapy with prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan for biochemical recurrence. Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan detected moderate heterogeneous tracer concentration in bilateral breast parenchyma, in addition to the abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland, right external iliac lymph node, and sclerotic lesion in L4 vertebra. On clinical examination, he was found to have bilateral gynecomastia. Abnormal concentration of Ga-PSMA in breast cancer is now well known, and in this context, it is important to know that tracer localization can occur in gynecomastia as well, as evidenced in this case.

  1. Managing incidental findings on abdominal CT: white paper of the ACR incidental findings committee.

    PubMed

    Berland, Lincoln L; Silverman, Stuart G; Gore, Richard M; Mayo-Smith, William W; Megibow, Alec J; Yee, Judy; Brink, James A; Baker, Mark E; Federle, Michael P; Foley, W Dennis; Francis, Isaac R; Herts, Brian R; Israel, Gary M; Krinsky, Glenn; Platt, Joel F; Shuman, William P; Taylor, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    As multidetector CT has come to play a more central role in medical care and as CT image quality has improved, there has been an increase in the frequency of detecting "incidental findings," defined as findings that are unrelated to the clinical indication for the imaging examination performed. These "incidentalomas," as they are also called, often confound physicians and patients with how to manage them. Although it is known that most incidental findings are likely benign and often have little or no clinical significance, the inclination to evaluate them is often driven by physician and patient unwillingness to accept uncertainty, even given the rare possibility of an important diagnosis. The evaluation and surveillance of incidental findings have also been cited as among the causes for the increased utilization of cross-sectional imaging. Indeed, incidental findings may be serious, and hence, when and how to evaluate them are unclear. The workup of incidentalomas has varied widely by physician and region, and some standardization is desirable in light of the current need to limit costs and reduce risk to patients. Subjecting a patient with an incidentaloma to unnecessary testing and treatment can result in a potentially injurious and expensive cascade of tests and procedures. With the participation of other radiologic organizations listed herein, the ACR formed the Incidental Findings Committee to derive a practical and medically appropriate approach to managing incidental findings on CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. The committee has used a consensus method based on repeated reviews and revisions of this document and a collective review and interpretation of relevant literature. This white paper provides guidance developed by this committee for addressing incidental findings in the kidneys, liver, adrenal glands, and pancreas. Copyright © 2010 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Demand for CT scans increases during transition from paediatric to adult care: an observational study from 2009 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Thurley, Pete; Crookdake, Jonathan; Norwood, Mark; Sturrock, Nigel; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2018-02-01

    Avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure is a clinical priority in children and young adults. We aimed to explore demand for CT scans in a busy general hospital with particular interest in the period of transition from paediatric to adult medical care. We used an observational epidemiological study based in a teaching hospital. Data were obtained on numbers and rates of CT scans from 2009 to 2015. The main outcome was age-stratified rates of receiving a CT scan. There were a total of 262,221 CT scans. There was a large step change in the rate of CT scans over the period of transition from paediatric to adult medical care. Individuals aged 10-15 years experienced 6.7 CT scans per 1000 clinical episodes, while those aged 19-24 years experienced 19.8 CT scans per 1000 clinical episodes (p < 0.001). This difference remained significant for all sensitivity analyses. There is almost a threefold increase in rates of CT scans in the two populations before and after the period of transition from paediatric to adult medical care. While we were unable to adjust for case mix or quantify radiation exposure, paediatricians' diagnostic strategies to minimize radiation exposure may have clinical relevance for adult physicians, and hence enable reductions in ionizing radiation to patients. Advances in knowledge: A large increase in rates of CT scans occurs during adolescence, and considering paediatricians' strategies to minimize radiation exposure may enable reductions to all patients.

  3. Normalization of CT scans reconstructed with different kernels to reduce variability in emphysema measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo Estrella, L.; van Ginneken, B.; van Rikxoort, E. M.

    2013-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a lung disease characterized by progressive air flow limitation caused by emphysema and chronic bronchitis. Emphysema is quantified from chest computed tomography (CT) scans as the percentage of attentuation values below a fixed threshold. The emphysema quantification varies substantially between scans reconstructed with different kernels, limiting the possibilities to compare emphysema quantifications obtained from scans with different reconstruction parameters. In this paper we propose a method to normalize scans reconstructed with different kernels to have the same characteristics as scans reconstructed with a reference kernel and investigate if this normalization reduces the variability in emphysema quantification. The proposed normalization splits a CT scan into different frequency bands based on hierarchical unsharp masking. Normalization is performed by changing the energy in each frequency band to the average energy in each band in the reference kernel. A database of 15 subjects with COPD was constructed for this study. All subjects were scanned at total lung capacity and the scans were reconstructed with four different reconstruction kernels. The normalization was applied to all scans. Emphysema quantification was performed before and after normalization. It is shown that the emphysema score varies substantially before normalization but the variation diminishes after normalization.

  4. Evaluation of Abdominal CT Image Quality Using a New Version of Vendor-Specific Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Corey T.; Telesmanich, Morgan E.; Wagner-Bartak, Nicolaus A.; Liu, Xinming; Rong, John; Szklaruk, Janio; Qayyum, Aliya; Wei, Wei; Chandler, Adam G.; Tamm, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To qualitatively and quantitatively compare abdominal CT images reconstructed with a new version of model-based iterative reconstruction (Veo 3.0; GE Healthcare) to those created with Veo 2.0. Materials & Methods This retrospective study was approved by our IRB and was HIPPA compliant. The raw data from 29 consecutive patients who had undergone CT abdomen scanning was used to reconstruct 4 sets of 3.75mm axial images: Veo 2.0, Veo 3.0 standard, Veo 3.0 5% resolution preference and Veo 3.0 20% resolution preference. A slice thickness optimization of 3.75 mm and texture feature was selected for Veo 3.0 reconstructions. The images were reviewed by three independent readers in a blinded, randomized fashion using a 5-point Likert scale and 5-point comparative scale. Multiple 2D circular regions of interest were defined for noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements. Line profiles were drawn across the 7 lp/cm bar pattern of the CatPhan 600 phantom for spatial resolution evaluation. Results The Veo 3.0 standard image set was scored better than Veo 2.0 in terms of artifacts (mean difference 0.43, 95% CI 0.25-0.6, P<0.0001), overall image quality (mean difference 0.87, 95% CI 0.62-1.13, P<0.0001) and qualitative resolution (mean difference 0.9, 95% CI 0.69-1.1, P<0.0001). While the Veo 3.0 standard and RP05 presets were preferred across most categories, the Veo 3.0 RP20 series ranked best for bone detail. Image noise and spatial resolution increased along a spectrum with Veo 2.0 the lowest and RP20 the highest. Conclusion Veo 3.0 enhances imaging evaluation relative to Veo 2.0; readers preferred Veo 3.0 image appearance despite the associated mild increases in image noise. These results provide suggested parameters to be used clinically and as a basis for future evaluations such as focal lesion detection in the oncology setting. PMID:27529683

  5. Deep neural networks for automatic detection of osteoporotic vertebral fractures on CT scans.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Naofumi; Cheung, Yvonne Y; Hassanpour, Saeed

    2018-07-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures (OVFs) are prevalent in older adults and are associated with substantial personal suffering and socio-economic burden. Early diagnosis and treatment of OVFs are critical to prevent further fractures and morbidity. However, OVFs are often under-diagnosed and under-reported in computed tomography (CT) exams as they can be asymptomatic at an early stage. In this paper, we present and evaluate an automatic system that can detect incidental OVFs in chest, abdomen, and pelvis CT examinations at the level of practicing radiologists. Our OVF detection system leverages a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) to extract radiological features from each slice in a CT scan. These extracted features are processed through a feature aggregation module to make the final diagnosis for the full CT scan. In this work, we explored different methods for this feature aggregation, including the use of a long short-term memory (LSTM) network. We trained and evaluated our system on 1432 CT scans, comprised of 10,546 two-dimensional (2D) images in sagittal view. Our system achieved an accuracy of 89.2% and an F1 score of 90.8% based on our evaluation on a held-out test set of 129 CT scans, which were established as reference standards through standard semiquantitative and quantitative methods. The results of our system matched the performance of practicing radiologists on this test set in real-world clinical circumstances. We expect the proposed system will assist and improve OVF diagnosis in clinical settings by pre-screening routine CT examinations and flagging suspicious cases prior to review by radiologists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incidental detection of colorectal lesions by FDG PET/CT scans in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Young, Christopher J; Zahid, Assad; Choy, Ian; Thompson, John F; Saw, Robyn P M

    2017-11-01

    Increased use of PET/CT scans in oncology patients has raised detection of Colorectal incidentalomas (CIs). The frequency and diagnostic outcomes of identifying these lesions in melanoma patients have not previously been studied. This studies primary objective was to determine the prevalence of CIs found on PET/CT scans in melanoma patients. The secondary objectives were to correlate the PET/CT findings with the pathology found at colonoscopy, and identify which patients were referred for colonoscopy. A retrospective analysis of patients identified from the prospectively collected research database of Melanoma Institute Australia. 2509 patients with melanoma underwent PET/CT scans between 2001 and 2013. The prevalence of CIs, the correlation of lesions, and the survival of patients who underwent colonoscopy versus patients who did not were analyzed. The prevalence of CIs in melanoma patients who had PET/CT scans was 3.2%. Forty-five of the 81 (56%) patients with CIs underwent colonoscopy. Of these, premalignant or malignant disease was found in 58%. Patients with previous metastatic melanoma were significantly less likely to be referred for colonoscopy. Patients undergoing colonoscopy had significantly better survival, as did those without previous distant metastases before the CIs were found, and those without any metastases at the time the CIs were found. These factors were not significant on multivariate analysis. The prevalence of incidental colorectal lesions identified on PET/CT scans in melanoma patients was found to be equivalent to that in the general cancer population. Patients undergoing colonoscopy had better survival than those who did not. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  7. The Impact of Sources of Variability on Parametric Response Mapping of Lung CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Jennifer L.; Bule, Maria; Hoff, Benjamin A.; Chamberlain, Ryan; Lynch, David A.; Stojanovska, Jadranka; Martinez, Fernando J.; Han, Meilan K.; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Ross, Brian D.; Galbán, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Parametric response mapping (PRM) of inspiration and expiration computed tomography (CT) images improves the radiological phenotyping of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PRM classifies individual voxels of lung parenchyma as normal, emphysematous, or nonemphysematous air trapping. In this study, bias and noise characteristics of the PRM methodology to CT and clinical procedures were evaluated to determine best practices for this quantitative technique. Twenty patients of varying COPD status with paired volumetric inspiration and expiration CT scans of the lungs were identified from the baseline COPD-Gene cohort. The impact of CT scanner manufacturer and reconstruction kernels were evaluated as potential sources of variability in PRM measurements along with simulations to quantify the impact of inspiration/expiration lung volume levels, misregistration, and image spacing on PRM measurements. Negligible variation in PRM metrics was observed when CT scanner type and reconstruction were consistent and inspiration/expiration lung volume levels were near target volumes. CT scanner Hounsfield unit drift occurred but remained difficult to ameliorate. Increasing levels of image misregistration and CT slice spacing were found to have a minor effect on PRM measurements. PRM-derived values were found to be most sensitive to lung volume levels and mismatched reconstruction kernels. As with other quantitative imaging techniques, reliable PRM measurements are attainable when consistent clinical and CT protocols are implemented. PMID:26568983

  8. Lung nodule detection from CT scans using 3D convolutional neural networks without candidate selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenuwine, Natalia M.; Mahesh, Sunny N.; Furst, Jacob D.; Raicu, Daniela S.

    2018-02-01

    Early detection of lung nodules from CT scans is key to improving lung cancer treatment, but poses a significant challenge for radiologists due to the high throughput required of them. Computer-Aided Detection (CADe) systems aim to automatically detect these nodules with computer algorithms, thus improving diagnosis. These systems typically use a candidate selection step, which identifies all objects that resemble nodules, followed by a machine learning classifier which separates true nodules from false positives. We create a CADe system that uses a 3D convolutional neural network (CNN) to detect nodules in CT scans without a candidate selection step. Using data from the LIDC database, we train a 3D CNN to analyze subvolumes from anywhere within a CT scan and output the probability that each subvolume contains a nodule. Once trained, we apply our CNN to detect nodules from entire scans, by systematically dividing the scan into overlapping subvolumes which we input into the CNN to obtain the corresponding probabilities. By enabling our network to process an entire scan, we expect to streamline the detection process while maintaining its effectiveness. Our results imply that with continued training using an iterative training scheme, the one-step approach has the potential to be highly effective.

  9. Geometry-constraint-scan imaging for in-line phase contrast micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Yu, Guangyuan; Fan, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) uses the phase shift that x-rays undergo when passing through matter, rather than their attenuation, as the imaging signal and may provide better image quality in soft-tissue and biomedical materials with low atomic number. Here a geometry-constraint-scan imaging technique for in-line phase contrast micro-CT is reported. It consists of two circular-trajectory scans with x-ray detector at different positions, the phase projection extraction method with the Fresnel free-propagation theory and the filter back-projection reconstruction algorithm. This method removes the contact-detector scan and the pure phase object assumption in classical in-line phase contrast Micro-CT. Consequently it relaxes the experimental conditions and improves the image contrast. This work comprises a numerical study of this technique and its experimental verification using a biomedical composite dataset measured at an x-ray tube source Micro-CT setup. The numerical and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the presented method. It will be of interest for a wide range of in-line phase contrast Micro-CT applications in biology and medicine.

  10. A coarse-to-fine approach for pericardial effusion localization and segmentation in chest CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Chellamuthu, Karthik; Lu, Le; Bagheri, Mohammadhadi; Summers, Ronald M.

    2018-02-01

    Pericardial effusion on CT scans demonstrates very high shape and volume variability and very low contrast to adjacent structures. This inhibits traditional automated segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies. Deep neural networks have been widely used for image segmentation in CT scans. In this work, we present a two-stage method for pericardial effusion localization and segmentation. For the first step, we localize the pericardial area from the entire CT volume, providing a reliable bounding box for the more refined segmentation step. A coarse-scaled holistically-nested convolutional networks (HNN) model is trained on entire CT volume. The resulting HNN per-pixel probability maps are then threshold to produce a bounding box covering the pericardial area. For the second step, a fine-scaled HNN model is trained only on the bounding box region for effusion segmentation to reduce the background distraction. Quantitative evaluation is performed on a dataset of 25 CT scans of patient (1206 images) with pericardial effusion. The segmentation accuracy of our two-stage method, measured by Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), is 75.59+/-12.04%, which is significantly better than the segmentation accuracy (62.74+/-15.20%) of only using the coarse-scaled HNN model.

  11. Dual-resolution image reconstruction for region-of-interest CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S. O.; Shin, K. Y.; Yoo, S. K.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, K. H.; Huh, Y.; Lee, S. Y.; Kwon, O.-K.

    2014-07-01

    In ordinary CT scan, so called full field-of-view (FFOV) scan, in which the x-ray beam span covers the whole section of the body, a large number of projections are necessary to reconstruct high resolution images. However, excessive x-ray dose is a great concern in FFOV scan. Region-of-interest (ROI) scan is a method to visualize the ROI in high resolution while reducing the x-ray dose. But, ROI scan suffers from bright-band artifacts which may hamper CT-number accuracy. In this study, we propose an image reconstruction method to eliminate the band artifacts in the ROI scan. In addition to the ROI scan with high sampling rate in the view direction, we get FFOV projection data with much lower sampling rate. Then, we reconstruct images in the compressed sensing (CS) framework with dual resolutions, that is, high resolution in the ROI and low resolution outside the ROI. For the dual-resolution image reconstruction, we implemented the dual-CS reconstruction algorithm in which data fidelity and total variation (TV) terms were enforced twice in the framework of adaptive steepest descent projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS). The proposed method has remarkably reduced the bright-band artifacts at around the ROI boundary, and it has also effectively suppressed the streak artifacts over the entire image. We expect the proposed method can be greatly used for dual-resolution imaging with reducing the radiation dose, artifacts and scan time.

  12. Quality of routine diagnostic abdominal images generated from a novel detector-based spectral CT scanner: a technical report on a phantom and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Van Hedent, Steven; Rassouli, Negin; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Jordan, David; Dhanantwari, Amar; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the image quality of routine diagnostic images generated from a novel detector-based spectral detector CT (SDCT) and compare it with CT images obtained from a conventional scanner with an energy-integrating detector (Brilliance iCT), Routine diagnostic (conventional/polyenergetic) images are non-material-specific images that resemble single-energy images obtained at the same radiation, METHODS: ACR guideline-based phantom evaluations were performed on both SDCT and iCT for CT adult body protocol. Retrospective analysis was performed on 50 abdominal CT scans from each scanner. Identical ROIs were placed at multiple locations in the abdomen and attenuation, noise, SNR, and CNR were measured. Subjective image quality analysis on a 5-point Likert scale was performed by 2 readers for enhancement, noise, and image quality. On phantom studies, SDCT images met the ACR requirements for CT number and deviation, CNR and effective radiation dose. In patients, the qualitative scores were significantly higher for the SDCT than the iCT, including enhancement (4.79 ± 0.38 vs. 4.60 ± 0.51, p = 0.005), noise (4.63 ± 0.42 vs. 4.29 ± 0.50, p = 0.000), and quality (4.85 ± 0.32, vs. 4.57 ± 0.50, p = 0.000). The SNR was higher in SDCT than iCT for liver (7.4 ± 4.2 vs. 7.2 ± 5.3, p = 0.662), spleen (8.6 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 3.5, p = 0.152), kidney (11.1 ± 6.3 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0, p = 0.033), pancreas (6.90 ± 3.45 vs 6.11 ± 2.64, p = 0.303), aorta (14.2 ± 6.2 vs. 11.0 ± 4.9, p = 0.007), but was slightly lower in lumbar-vertebra (7.7 ± 4.2 vs. 7.8 ± 4.5, p = 0.937). The CNR of the SDCT was also higher than iCT for all abdominal organs. Image quality of routine diagnostic images from the SDCT is comparable to images of a conventional CT scanner with energy-integrating detectors, making it suitable for diagnostic purposes.

  13. Multienergy CT acquisition and reconstruction with a stepped tube potential scan

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Le; Xing, Yuxiang, E-mail: xingyx@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    Purpose: Based on an energy-dependent property of matter, one may obtain a pseudomonochromatic attenuation map, a material composition image, an electron-density distribution, and an atomic number image using a dual- or multienergy computed tomography (CT) scan. Dual- and multienergy CT scans broaden the potential of x-ray CT imaging. The development of such systems is very useful in both medical and industrial investigations. In this paper, the authors propose a new dual- and multienergy CT system design (segmental multienergy CT, SegMECT) using an innovative scanning scheme that is conveniently implemented on a conventional single-energy CT system. The two-step-energy dual-energy CT canmore » be regarded as a special case of SegMECT. A special reconstruction method is proposed to support SegMECT. Methods: In their SegMECT, a circular trajectory in a CT scan is angularly divided into several arcs. The x-ray source is set to a different tube voltage for each arc of the trajectory. Thus, the authors only need to make a few step changes to the x-ray energy during the scan to complete a multienergy data acquisition. With such a data set, the image reconstruction might suffer from severe limited-angle artifacts if using conventional reconstruction methods. To solve the problem, they present a new prior-image-based reconstruction technique using a total variance norm of a quotient image constraint. On the one hand, the prior extracts structural information from all of the projection data. On the other hand, the effect from a possibly imprecise intensity level of the prior can be mitigated by minimizing the total variance of a quotient image. Results: The authors present a new scheme for a SegMECT configuration and establish a reconstruction method for such a system. Both numerical simulation and a practical phantom experiment are conducted to validate the proposed reconstruction method and the effectiveness of the system design. The results demonstrate that the

  14. Chest CT scanning for clinical suspected thoracic aortic dissection: beware the alternate diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Thoongsuwan, Nisa; Stern, Eric J

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the study was retrospectively to evaluate the spectrum of chest diseases in patients presenting with clinical suspicion of thoracic aortic dissection in the emergency department. We performed a retrospective medical records review of 86 men and 44 women (ages ranging between 23 and 106 years) with clinically suspected aortic dissection, for CT scan findings and final clinical diagnoses dating between January 1996 and September 2001. All images were obtained by using a standard protocol for aortic dissection. We found aortic dissection in 32 patients (24.6%), 22 of which were Stanford classification type A and 10 Stanford type B. In 70 patients (53.9%), chest pain could not be explained by the CT scan findings. However, in 28 patients (21.5%), CT scanning did reveal an alternate diagnosis that, along with the clinical impression, probably explained the patients' presenting symptoms, including: hiatal hernia (7), pneumonia (5), intrathoracic mass (4), pericardial effusion/hemopericardium (3), esophageal mass/rupture (2), aortic aneurysm without dissection (2), pulmonary embolism (2), pleural effusion (1), aortic rupture (1), and pancreatitis (1). In cases where there is clinical suspicion of aortic dissection, CT scan findings of an alternate diagnosis for the presenting symptoms are only slightly less common than the finding of aortic dissection itself. Although the spectrum of findings will vary depending upon your patient population, beware the alternate diagnosis.

  15. Quantifying the impact of µCT-scanning of human fossil teeth on ESR age results.

    PubMed

    Duval, Mathieu; Martín-Francés, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Fossil human teeth are nowadays systematically CT-scanned by palaeoanthropologists prior to any further analysis. It has been recently demonstrated that this noninvasive technique has, in most cases, virtually no influence on ancient DNA preservation. However, it may have nevertheless an impact on other techniques, like Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) dating, by artificially ageing the apparent age of the sample. To evaluate this impact, we µCT-scanned several modern enamel fragments following the standard analytical procedures employed by the Dental Anthropology Group at CENIEH, Spain, and then performed ESR dose reconstruction for each of them. The results of our experiment demonstrate that the systematic high-resolution µCT-scanning of fossil hominin remains introduces a nonnegligible X-ray dose into the tooth enamel, equivalent to 15-30 Gy depending on the parameters used. This dose may be multiplied by a factor of ∼8 if no metallic filter is used. However, this dose estimate cannot be universally extrapolated to any µCT-scan experiment but has instead to be specifically assessed for each device and set of parameters employed. The impact on the ESR age results is directly dependent on the magnitude of the geological dose measured in fossil enamel but could potentially lead to an age overestimation up to 40% in case of Late Pleistocene samples, if not taken into consideration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Study Finds Small Increase in Cancer Risk after Childhood CT Scans

    Cancer.gov

    A study published in the June 6, 2012, issue of The Lancet shows that radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) scans in childhood results in very small but increased risks of leukemia and brain tumors in the first decade after exposure.

  17. Peritoneal Super Scan on 18F - FDG PET-CT in a Patient of Burkitt's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shambo Guha; Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathy, Sarthak; Singhal, Abhinav; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2017-01-01

    Peritoneal lymphomatosis is seen less frequently, but when seen, it is mostly associated with aggressive variants of malignancies. FDG uptake has been reported in peritoneal lymphomatosis both in DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma. We report a case of Burkitt's lymphoma with involvement of entire peritoneum, which looks like a "peritoneal super scan" on FDG PET-CT.

  18. Thoracic-abdominal imaging with a novel dual-layer spectral detector CT: intra-individual comparison of image quality and radiation dose with 128-row single-energy acquisition.

    PubMed

    Haneder, Stefan; Siedek, Florian; Doerner, Jonas; Pahn, Gregor; Grosse Hokamp, Nils; Maintz, David; Wybranski, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Background A novel, multi-energy, dual-layer spectral detector computed tomography (SDCT) is commercially available now with the vendor's claim that it yields the same or better quality of polychromatic, conventional CT images like modern single-energy CT scanners without any radiation dose penalty. Purpose To intra-individually compare the quality of conventional polychromatic CT images acquired with a dual-layer spectral detector (SDCT) and the latest generation 128-row single-energy-detector (CT128) from the same manufacturer. Material and Methods Fifty patients underwent portal-venous phase, thoracic-abdominal CT scans with the SDCT and prior CT128 imaging. The SDCT scanning protocol was adapted to yield a similar estimated dose length product (DLP) as the CT128. Patient dose optimization by automatic tube current modulation and CT image reconstruction with a state-of-the-art iterative algorithm were identical on both scanners. CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was compared between the SDCT and CT128 in different anatomic structures. Image quality and noise were assessed independently by two readers with 5-point-Likert-scales. Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ), and DLP were recorded and normalized to 68 cm acquisition length (DLP 68 ). Results The SDCT yielded higher mean CNR values of 30.0% ± 2.0% (26.4-32.5%) in all anatomic structures ( P < 0.001) and excellent scores for qualitative parameters surpassing the CT128 (all P < 0.0001) with substantial inter-rater agreement (κ ≥ 0.801). Despite adapted scan protocols the SDCT yielded lower values for CTDI vol (-10.1 ± 12.8%), DLP (-13.1 ± 13.9%), and DLP 68 (-15.3 ± 16.9%) than the CT128 (all P < 0.0001). Conclusion The SDCT scanner yielded better CT image quality compared to the CT128 and lower radiation dose parameters.

  19. SPECT/CT demonstrating 131I retention in Warthin tumor on thyroid cancer survey scan.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuyang; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2013-09-01

    A 48-year-old male patient of papillary thyroid cancer, status post-thyroidectomy and node dissection, was referred to (131)I scan prior to radioiodine treatment. The images showed 1 additional focus of (131)I uptake in the right upper neck outside of the thyroid bed. SPECT/CT demonstrated 2 separate foci of radioiodine uptake in the right parotid gland, instead of neck lymph nodes. Diagnostic CT showed 2 corresponding soft tissue nodules in the right parotid gland which were confirmed latter by fine-needle aspiration to be Warthin tumors. This case illustrates a pivotal role of SPECT/CT in differential diagnosis of abnormal neck uptake on (131)I thyroid cancer scan.

  20. Automatic detection of new tumors and tumor burden evaluation in longitudinal liver CT scan studies.

    PubMed

    Vivanti, R; Szeskin, A; Lev-Cohain, N; Sosna, J; Joskowicz, L

    2017-11-01

    Radiological longitudinal follow-up of liver tumors in CT scans is the standard of care for disease progression assessment and for liver tumor therapy. Finding new tumors in the follow-up scan is essential to determine malignancy, to evaluate the total tumor burden, and to determine treatment efficacy. Since new tumors are typically small, they may be missed by examining radiologists. We describe a new method for the automatic detection and segmentation of new tumors in longitudinal liver CT studies and for liver tumors burden quantification. Its inputs are the baseline and follow-up CT scans, the baseline tumors delineation, and a tumor appearance prior model. Its outputs are the new tumors segmentations in the follow-up scan, the tumor burden quantification in both scans, and the tumor burden change. Our method is the first comprehensive method that is explicitly designed to find new liver tumors. It integrates information from the scans, the baseline known tumors delineations, and a tumor appearance prior model in the form of a global convolutional neural network classifier. Unlike other deep learning-based methods, it does not require large tagged training sets. Our experimental results on 246 tumors, of which 97 were new tumors, from 37 longitudinal liver CT studies with radiologist approved ground-truth segmentations, yields a true positive new tumors detection rate of 86 versus 72% with stand-alone detection, and a tumor burden volume overlap error of 16%. New tumors detection and tumor burden volumetry are important for diagnosis and treatment. Our new method enables a simplified radiologist-friendly workflow that is potentially more accurate and reliable than the existing one by automatically and accurately following known tumors and detecting new tumors in the follow-up scan.

  1. Evaluation of an iterative model-based reconstruction of pediatric abdominal CT with regard to image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Aurumskjöld, Marie-Louise; Söderberg, Marcus; Stålhammar, Fredrik; von Steyern, Kristina Vult; Tingberg, Anders; Ydström, Kristina

    2018-06-01

    Background In pediatric patients, computed tomography (CT) is important in the medical chain of diagnosing and monitoring various diseases. Because children are more radiosensitive than adults, they require minimal radiation exposure. One way to achieve this goal is to implement new technical solutions, like iterative reconstruction. Purpose To evaluate the potential of a new, iterative, model-based method for reconstructing (IMR) pediatric abdominal CT at a low radiation dose and determine whether it maintains or improves image quality, compared to the current reconstruction method. Material and Methods Forty pediatric patients underwent abdominal CT. Twenty patients were examined with the standard dose settings and 20 patients were examined with a 32% lower radiation dose. Images from the standard examination were reconstructed with a hybrid iterative reconstruction method (iDose 4 ), and images from the low-dose examinations were reconstructed with both iDose 4 and IMR. Image quality was evaluated subjectively by three observers, according to modified EU image quality criteria, and evaluated objectively based on the noise observed in liver images. Results Visual grading characteristics analyses showed no difference in image quality between the standard dose examination reconstructed with iDose 4 and the low dose examination reconstructed with IMR. IMR showed lower image noise in the liver compared to iDose 4 images. Inter- and intra-observer variance was low: the intraclass coefficient was 0.66 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.71) for the three observers. Conclusion IMR provided image quality equivalent or superior to the standard iDose 4 method for evaluating pediatric abdominal CT, even with a 32% dose reduction.

  2. Clinical implications of immediate or later periportal edema in MS-CT trauma scans: surrogate parameter of intravenous fluid status and venous congestion.

    PubMed

    Kleber, C; Buschmann, C T

    2013-06-01

    Periportal edema (PPE) of the liver in multislice computed tomography (MS-CT) scans that develops immediately (primary PPE [pPPE]) or later (secondary PPE [sPPE]) is not uncommon in severe trauma patients. Although PPE may serve as a marker for blunt abdominal trauma (22-31 % of cases), distinct causes and clinical implications of PPE are unclear. We analyzed the incidence of pPPE and sPPE in 68 MS-CT scans in severe trauma patients (2007-2009). Exclusion criteria were severely burned patients and patients with preexistent liver diseases predisposing to PPE. We divided PPE+ patients into two subpopulations-either initial/primary PPE (pPPE+) or later/secondary PPE (sPPE+). Further patient data were collected and statistically analyzed. PPE+ was found in 27.9 % (n = 19). Females predominated (p = 0.01), and PPE+ patients presented with a significantly better pH at admission (p = 0.008). The total amount of volume resuscitation (1,983 ± 1,155 ml; p = 0.02) and crystalloids (1,117 ± 796 ml; p = 0.006) administered before MS-CT scans was significantly higher in PPE+, whereas the amount of administered colloids (797 ± 640 ml) showed no significant difference in both groups. PPE+ was not associated with further patient data, i.e., trauma mechanism, injury severity, prognosis-relevant factors, adverse clinical events, or mortality. pPPE+ in MS-CT may serve as a surrogate parameter for intravenous volume load and/or venous congestion, and sPPE+ may also indicate venous congestion and right heart failure after severe trauma. In severe trauma patients with pPPE+/sPPE+ in MS-CT scans, causes of PPE relating to intravenous fluid overload and/or venous congestion should be excluded or treated.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Tumor Size on CT Scan Versus Pathologic Specimen: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic cancer primary tumor size measurements are often discordant between computed tomography (CT) and pathologic specimen after resection. Dimensions of the primary tumor are increasingly relevant in an era of highly conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 97 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic cancer at two Boston hospitals. All patients had CT scans before surgical resection. Primary endpoints were maximum dimension (in millimeters) of the primary tumor in any direction as reported by the radiologist on CT and by the pathologist for the resected gross fresh specimen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings were analyzed if available. Results: Ofmore » the patients, 87 (90%) had preoperative CT scans available for review and 46 (47%) had EUS. Among proximal tumors (n = 69), 40 (58%) had pathologic duodenal invasion, which was seen on CT in only 3 cases. The pathologic tumor size was a median of 7 mm larger compared with CT size for the same patient (range, -15 to 43 mm; p < 0.0001), with 73 patients (84%) having a primary tumor larger on pathology than CT. Endoscopic ultrasound was somewhat more accurate, with pathologic tumor size being a median of only 5 mm larger compared with EUS size (range, -15 to 35 mm; p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Computed tomography scans significantly under-represent pancreatic cancer tumor size compared with pathologic specimens in resectable cases. We propose a clinical target volume expansion formula for the primary tumor based on our data. The high rate of pathologic duodenal invasion suggests a risk of duodenal undercoverage with highly conformal radiotherapy.« less

  4. Coronal CT scan measurements and hearing evolution in enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Issam; Gingras-Charland, Marie-Eve; St-Cyr, Karine; Décarie, Jean-Claude

    2012-04-01

    To assess the correlation between the enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) diameter and (1) the hearing loss level (mild, moderate, severe and profound and (2) the hearing evolution. The secondary objective was to obtain measurement limits on the coronal plane of the temporal bone CT scan for the diagnosis of EVA. Retrospective study in a tertiary pediatric center. Mastoid CT scans were reviewed to measure the VA diameter at its midpoint and operculum on axial and coronal planes in a pathologic and normal population. We used their serial audiograms to assess the evolution of hearing. 101 EVA was identified out of 1812 temporal bones CT scan from our radiologic database in 8 years. Bone conduction was stable after a mean follow-up of 40.9 ± 32.9 months. PTA has been the most affected in time by the EVA (p=0.006). No correlation was identified between impedancemetry and the diameter of the EVA. On the diagnostic audiogram, 61% of hearing loss were in the mild and moderate hearing levels; at the end of the follow-up 64% of hearing loss are still in the mild and moderate hearing levels. The cut-off values for the coronal midpoint and operculum planes on the CT scan to diagnose an EVA are 2.4 mm and 4.34 mm respectively. Conductive or mixed hearing loss might be the first manifestation of EVA. Coronal CT scan cuts can provide additional information to evaluate EVA especially when axial cuts are not conclusive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Audit of demand for after-hours CT scanning services in RANZCR-accredited training departments.

    PubMed

    Goergen, Stacy K; Grimm, Jane; Paul, Eldho; Fabiny, Robert; Lee, Wai Kit; Blome, Steven; Zhou, Kim; Munro, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to measure: (i) the growth in after-hours emergency department--referred CT (ED-CT) performed in accredited training departments between 2011 and 2013; (ii) the growth in ED CT relative to growth in ED presentations at the same hospitals; and (iii) trainee workload resulting from after-hours ED CT. Ethics approval was obtained for all participating sites. Accredited training facilities in Australia and New Zealand with three or more trainees and serving one or more EDs were invited to participate (N = 32). Four nights were surveyed between August and December 2013. For data collection, the number of ED patients having one or more CT scans; ED CT scan total images; non-contrast head CTs; and ED patients (total and categories 1 and 2) attending the ED in the preceding 24 h and first half of calendar year were collected for 2013 and corresponding days in 2012 and 2011. Trainee staffing levels were measured. Eleven of 32 sites provided data for all four nights and 14 of 32 for one or more nights. A 15.7% increase in number of ED CTs between 1700 and 2200 h and 16.8% increase between 2201 and 0730 h occurred in the 2 years between 2011 and 2013 compared with a 6.9% increase in overall ED and 26% increase in categories 1 and 2 presentations over the same period. The number of CT images, however, increased 23%. Growth in demand by EDs for after-hours CT services has implications for service provision and trainee workloads in Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists-accredited training departments. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Variation compensation and analysis on diaphragm curvature analysis for emphysema quantification on whole lung CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Barr, R. Graham; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2010-03-01

    CT scans allow for the quantitative evaluation of the anatomical bases of emphysema. Recently, a non-density based geometric measurement of lung diagphragm curvature has been proposed as a method for the quantification of emphysema from CT. This work analyzes variability of diaphragm curvature and evaluates the effectiveness of a compensation methodology for the reduction of this variability as compared to emphysema index. Using a dataset of 43 scan-pairs with less than a 100 day time-interval between scans, we find that the diaphragm curvature had a trend towards lower overall variability over emphysema index (95% CI:-9.7 to + 14.7 vs. -15.8 to +12.0), and that the variation of both measures was reduced after compensation. We conclude that the variation of the new measure can be considered comparable to the established measure and the compensation can reduce the apparent variation of quantitative measures successfully.

  7. COMPARISON OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASIR™) AND MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (VEO™) FOR PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: AN OBSERVER PERFORMANCE STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY.

    PubMed

    Hultenmo, Maria; Caisander, Håkan; Mack, Karsten; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The diagnostic image quality of 75 paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations reconstructed with two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms-adaptive statistical IR (ASiR™) and model-based IR (Veo™)-was compared. Axial and coronal images were reconstructed with 70 % ASiR with the Soft™ convolution kernel and with the Veo algorithm. The thickness of the reconstructed images was 2.5 or 5 mm depending on the scanning protocol used. Four radiologists graded the delineation of six abdominal structures and the diagnostic usefulness of the image quality. The Veo reconstruction significantly improved the visibility of most of the structures compared with ASiR in all subgroups of images. For coronal images, the Veo reconstruction resulted in significantly improved ratings of the diagnostic use of the image quality compared with the ASiR reconstruction. This was not seen for the axial images. The greatest improvement using Veo reconstruction was observed for the 2.5 mm coronal slices. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. SU-F-I-47: Optimizing Protocols for Image Quality and Dose in Abdominal CT of Large Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L; Yester, M

    Purpose: Newer CT scanners are able to use scout views to adjust mA throughout the scan in order to achieve a given noise level. However, given constraints of radiologist preferences for kVp and rotation time, it may not be possible to achieve an acceptable noise level for large patients. A study was initiated to determine for which patients kVp and/or rotation time should be changed in order to achieve acceptable image quality. Methods: Patient scans were reviewed on two new Emergency Department scanners (Philips iCT) to identify patients over a large range of sizes. These iCTs were set with amore » limit of 500 mA to safeguard against a failure that might cause a CT scan to be (incorrectly) obtained at too-high mA. Scout views of these scans were assessed for both AP and LAT patient width and AP and LAT standard deviation in an ROI over the liver. Effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver were both studied as possible metrics for identifying patients who would need kVp and/or rotation time changed. The mA used for the liver in the CT was compared to these metrics for those patients whose CT scans showed acceptable image quality. Results: Both effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver result in similar predictions for which patients will require the kVp and/or rotation time to be changed to achieve an optimal combination of image quality and dose. Conclusion: Two mechanisms for CT technologists to determine based on scout characteristics what kVp, mA limit, and rotation time to use when DoseRight with our physicians’ preferred kVp and rotation time will not yield adequate image quality are described.« less

  9. Lung texture in serial thoracic CT scans: Assessment of change introduced by image registration1

    PubMed Central

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Labby, Zacariah E.; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Straus, Christopher; Sensakovic, William F.; Ludwig, Michelle; Armato, Samuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of four image registration methods on lung texture features extracted from serial computed tomography (CT) scans obtained from healthy human subjects. Methods: Two chest CT scans acquired at different time points were collected retrospectively for each of 27 patients. Following automated lung segmentation, each follow-up CT scan was registered to the baseline scan using four algorithms: (1) rigid, (2) affine, (3) B-splines deformable, and (4) demons deformable. The registration accuracy for each scan pair was evaluated by measuring the Euclidean distance between 150 identified landmarks. On average, 1432 spatially matched 32 × 32-pixel region-of-interest (ROI) pairs were automatically extracted from each scan pair. First-order, fractal, Fourier, Laws’ filter, and gray-level co-occurrence matrix texture features were calculated in each ROI, for a total of 140 features. Agreement between baseline and follow-up scan ROI feature values was assessed by Bland–Altman analysis for each feature; the range spanned by the 95% limits of agreement of feature value differences was calculated and normalized by the average feature value to obtain the normalized range of agreement (nRoA). Features with small nRoA were considered “registration-stable.” The normalized bias for each feature was calculated from the feature value differences between baseline and follow-up scans averaged across all ROIs in every patient. Because patients had “normal” chest CT scans, minimal change in texture feature values between scan pairs was anticipated, with the expectation of small bias and narrow limits of agreement. Results: Registration with demons reduced the Euclidean distance between landmarks such that only 9% of landmarks were separated by ≥1 mm, compared with rigid (98%), affine (95%), and B-splines (90%). Ninety-nine of the 140 (71%) features analyzed yielded nRoA > 50% for all registration methods, indicating that

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian, E-mail: bernhard.meyer@charite.de; Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volumemore » data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.« less

  11. Comparison of demons deformable registration-based methods for texture analysis of serial thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Fei, Xianhan M.; Tuohy, Rachel E.; Armato, Samuel G.

    2013-02-01

    To determine how 19 image texture features may be altered by three image registration methods, "normal" baseline and follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans from 27 patients were analyzed. Nineteen texture feature values were calculated in over 1,000 32x32-pixel regions of interest (ROIs) randomly placed in each baseline scan. All three methods used demons registration to map baseline scan ROIs to anatomically matched locations in the corresponding transformed follow-up scan. For the first method, the follow-up scan transformation was subsampled to achieve a voxel size identical to that of the baseline scan. For the second method, the follow-up scan was transformed through affine registration to achieve global alignment with the baseline scan. For the third method, the follow-up scan was directly deformed to the baseline scan using demons deformable registration. Feature values in matched ROIs were compared using Bland- Altman 95% limits of agreement. For each feature, the range spanned by the 95% limits was normalized to the mean feature value to obtain the normalized range of agreement, nRoA. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare nRoA values across features for the three methods. Significance for individual tests was adjusted using the Bonferroni method. nRoA was significantly smaller for affine-registered scans than for the resampled scans (p=0.003), indicating lower feature value variability between baseline and follow-up scan ROIs using this method. For both of these methods, however, nRoA was significantly higher than when feature values were calculated directly on demons-deformed followup scans (p<0.001). Across features and methods, nRoA values remained below 26%.

  12. Detection and characterization of lesions on low-radiation-dose abdominal CT images postprocessed with noise reduction filters.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Mannudeep K; Maher, Michael M; Blake, Michael A; Lucey, Brian C; Karau, Kelly; Toth, Thomas L; Avinash, Gopal; Halpern, Elkan F; Saini, Sanjay

    2004-09-01

    To assess the effect of noise reduction filters on detection and characterization of lesions on low-radiation-dose abdominal computed tomographic (CT) images. Low-dose CT images of abdominal lesions in 19 consecutive patients (11 women, eight men; age range, 32-78 years) were obtained at reduced tube currents (120-144 mAs). These baseline low-dose CT images were postprocessed with six noise reduction filters; the resulting postprocessed images were then randomly assorted with baseline images. Three radiologists performed independent evaluation of randomized images for presence, number, margins, attenuation, conspicuity, calcification, and enhancement of lesions, as well as image noise. Side-by-side comparison of baseline images with postprocessed images was performed by using a five-point scale for assessing lesion conspicuity and margins, image noise, beam hardening, and diagnostic acceptability. Quantitative noise and contrast-to-noise ratio were obtained for all liver lesions. Statistical analysis was performed by using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, Student t test, and kappa test of agreement. Significant reduction of noise was observed in images postprocessed with filter F compared with the noise in baseline nonfiltered images (P =.004). Although the number of lesions seen on baseline images and that seen on postprocessed images were identical, lesions were less conspicuous on postprocessed images than on baseline images. A decrease in quantitative image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio for liver lesions was noted with all noise reduction filters. There was good interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.7). Although the use of currently available noise reduction filters improves image noise and ameliorates beam-hardening artifacts at low-dose CT, such filters are limited by a compromise in lesion conspicuity and appearance in comparison with lesion conspicuity and appearance on baseline low-dose CT images. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  13. Diagnosis of bowel infarction: a comparison of plain films and CT scans in 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Smerud, M J; Johnson, C D; Stephens, D H

    1990-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed abdominal CT and plain film findings in 23 proved cases of mesenteric infarction to compare the value of the two techniques. Criteria considered specific for infarction on CT were identified in nine (39%) of 23 patients and comprised pneumatosis in seven patients (30%), mesenteric or portal venous gas in three patients (13%), and focally thick-walled bowel in two patients (9%). Criteria considered specific for bowel infarction on plain films were identified in seven (30%) of 23 patients and comprised focally edematous bowel in six patients (26%) and pneumatosis intestinalis in one patient (4%). Only one patient had specific changes on both CT and plain films, but 15 (65%) of the 23 showed specific changes on at least one study. The results indicate that plain films remain an important tool in patients suspected of mesenteric infarction and can provide information that is complementary to CT. Also, as both studies were nonspecific in eight (35%) of our patients, negative or nonspecific findings should not deter further diagnostic or interventional procedures in patients in whom the clinical suspicion of bowel infarction is high.

  14. Dose responses in a normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel dosimeter using optimal CT scanning parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. H.; Cho, S. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Min, C. K.; Kim, Y. H.; Moon, S. K.; Kim, E. S.; Chang, A. R.; Kwon, S. I.

    2012-05-01

    The dosimetric characteristics of normoxic polymethacrylic acid gels are investigated using optimal CT scanning parameters and the possibility of their clinical application is also considered. The effects of CT scanning parameters (tube voltage, tube current, scan time, slick thickness, field of view, and reconstruction algorithm) are experimentally investigated to determine the optimal parameters for minimizing the amount of noise in images obtained using normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel. In addition, the dose sensitivity, dose response, accuracy, and reproducibility of the normoxic polymethacrylic acid gel are evaluated. CT images are obtained using a head phantom that is fabricated for clinical applications. In addition, IMRT treatment planning is performed using a Tomotherapy radiation treatment planning system. A program for analyzing the results is produced using Visual C. A comparison between the treatment planning and the CT images of irradiated gels is performed. The dose sensitivity is found to be 2.41±0.04 HGy-1. The accuracies of dose evaluation at doses of 2 Gy and 4 Gy are 3.0% and 2.6%, respectively, and their reproducibilities are 2.0% and 2.1%, respectively. In the comparison of gel and Tomotherpay planning, the pass rate of the γ-index, based on the reference values of a dose error of 3% and a DTA of 3 mm, is 93.7%.

  15. Quantitative analysis of titanium-induced artifacts and correlated factors during micro-CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun Yuan; Pow, Edmond Ho Nang; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Cheung, Lim Kwong

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the impact of cover screw, resin embedment, and implant angulation on artifact of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scanning for implant. A total of twelve implants were randomly divided into 4 groups: (i) implant only; (ii) implant with cover screw; (iii) implant with resin embedment; and (iv) implants with cover screw and resin embedment. Implants angulation at 0°, 45°, and 90° were scanned by micro-CT. Images were assessed, and the ratio of artifact volume to total volume (AV/TV) was calculated. A multiple regression analysis in stepwise model was used to determine the significance of different factors. One-way ANOVA was performed to identify which combination of factors could minimize the artifact. In the regression analysis, implant angulation was identified as the best predictor for artifact among the factors (P < 0.001). Resin embedment also had significant effect on artifact volume (P = 0.028), while cover screw had not (P > 0.05). Non-embedded implants with the axis parallel to X-ray source of micro-CT produced minimal artifact. Implant angulation and resin embedment affected the artifact volume of micro-CT scanning for implant, while cover screw did not. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Density Resolution Artifacts Encountered When Scanning Infant Heads With X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Joseph R.; M oore, Robert J.; Hinshaw, David B.; Hasso, Anton N.

    1982-12-01

    Density resolution the accuracy of CT numbers) is generally recognized by radiologists w'ao interpret Children's, CT to be very poor. A CT scanning phantom was made. in order to document the brain attenuation inaccuracies which do occur and also to derive normal brain attenuation values for varying sized heads, given. the skull diameters and thicknesses. In scanning' this phantom, other factors, some of equal importance, to small head size, were found to affect the Hounsfield numbers of brain. The phantom was scanned in order to determine the magnitude of these specific factors, using the GE 8800 model scanner. After head size (412 to 25, H), the variables of the head support (up to 15 H) and centering within the field of view (6-23 H) were of similar importance, for small heads. Kilovoltage, software, and machine drift were less, important, although only kVp settings, of 105 and 120 were employed. Manufacturers may improve CT number accuracy if they recognize the relative, magnitude of the various factors which alter measured attenuation.

  17. Computer assisted detection of abnormal airway variation in CT scans related to paediatric tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Irving, Benjamin J; Goussard, Pierre; Andronikou, Savvas; Gie, Robert; Douglas, Tania S; Todd-Pokropek, Andrew; Taylor, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Airway deformation and stenosis can be key signs of pathology such as lymphadenopathy. This study presents a local airway point distribution model (LA-PDM) to automatically analyse regions of the airway tree in CT scans and identify abnormal airway deformation. In our method, the airway tree is segmented and the centreline identified from each chest CT scan. Thin-plate splines, along with a local mesh alignment method for tubular meshes, are used to register the airways and develop point distribution models (PDM). Each PDM is then used to analyse and classify local regions of the airway. This LA-PDM method was developed using 89 training cases and evaluated on a 90 CT test set, where each set includes paediatric tuberculosis (TB) cases (with airway involvement) and non-TB cases (without airway involvement). The LA-PDM was able to accurately distinguish cases with airway involvement with an AUC of the ROC classification (and 95% confidence interval) of 0.87 (0.77-0.94) for the Trachea-LMB-RMB region and 0.81 (0.68-0.90) for the RMB-RUL-BI region - outperforming a comparison method based on airway cross-sectional features. This has the potential to assist and improve airway analysis from CT scans by detecting involved airways and visualising affected airway regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic detection of axillary lymphadenopathy on CT scans of untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Hua, Jeremy; Chellappa, Vivek; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Farooqui, Mohammed; Marti, Gerald; Wiestner, Adrian; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-03-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have an increased frequency of axillary lymphadenopathy. Pretreatment CT scans can be used to upstage patients at the time of presentation and post-treatment CT scans can reduce the number of complete responses. In the current clinical workflow, the detection and diagnosis of lymph nodes is usually performed manually by examining all slices of CT images, which can be time consuming and highly dependent on the observer's experience. A system for automatic lymph node detection and measurement is desired. We propose a computer aided detection (CAD) system for axillary lymph nodes on CT scans in CLL patients. The lung is first automatically segmented and the patient's body in lung region is extracted to set the search region for lymph nodes. Multi-scale Hessian based blob detection is then applied to detect potential lymph nodes within the search region. Next, the detected potential candidates are segmented by fast level set method. Finally, features are calculated from the segmented candidates and support vector machine (SVM) classification is utilized for false positive reduction. Two blobness features, Frangi's and Li's, are tested and their free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves are generated to assess system performance. We applied our detection system to 12 patients with 168 axillary lymph nodes measuring greater than 10 mm. All lymph nodes are manually labeled as ground truth. The system achieved sensitivities of 81% and 85% at 2 false positives per patient for Frangi's and Li's blobness, respectively.

  19. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/CT Scanning in Diagnosing Vascular Prosthetic Graft Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ben R.; Pol, Robert A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular prosthetic graft infection (VPGI) is a severe complication after vascular surgery. CT-scan is considered the diagnostic tool of choice in advanced VPGI. The incidence of a false-negative result using CT is relatively high, especially in the presence of low-grade infections. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) scanning has been suggested as an alternative for the diagnosis and assessment of infectious processes. Hybrid 18F-FDG PET/CT has established the role of 18F-FDG PET for the assessment of suspected VPGI, providing accurate anatomic localization of the site of infection. However, there are no clear guidelines for the interpretation of the uptake patterns of 18F-FDG as clinical tool for VPGI. Based on the available literature it is suggested that a linear, diffuse, and homogeneous uptake should not be regarded as an infection whereas focal or heterogeneous uptake with a projection over the vessel on CT is highly suggestive of infection. Nevertheless, 18F-FDG PET and 18F-FDG PET/CT can play an important role in the detection of VPGI and monitoring response to treatment. However an accurate uptake and pattern recognition is warranted and cut-off uptake values and patterns need to be standardized before considering the technique to be the new standard. PMID:25210712

  20. SU-F-T-121: Abdominal Compression Effectively Reduces the Interplay Effect and Enables Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Souris, K; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Glick, A

    Purpose: To study if abdominal compression can reduce breathing motion and mitigate interplay effect in pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PBSPT) treatment of liver tumors in order to better spare healthy liver volumes compared with photon therapy. Methods: Ten patients, six having large tumors initially treated with IMRT and four having small tumors treated with SBRT, were replanned for PBSPT. ITV and beam-specific PTVs based on 4D-CT were used to ensure target coverage in PBSPT. The use of an abdominal compression belt and volumetric repainting was investigated to mitigate the interplay effect between breathing motion and PBSPT dynamic delivery. Anmore » in-house Matlab script has been developed to simulate this interplay effect. The dose is computed on each phase individually by sorting all spots according to their simulated delivery timing. The final dose distribution is then obtained by accumulating all dose maps to a reference phase. Results: For equivalent target coverage PBSPT reduced average healthy liver dose by 9.5% of the prescription dose compared with IMRT/SBRT. Abdominal compression of 113.2±42.2 mmHg was effective for all 10 patients and reduced average motion by 2.25 mm. As a result, the average ITV volume decreased from 128.2% to 123.1% of CTV volume. Similarly, the average beam-specific PTV volume decreased from 193.2% to 183.3%. For 8 of the 10 patients, the average motion was reduced below 5 mm, and up to 3 repainting were sufficient to mitigate interplay. For the other two patients with larger residual motion, 4–5 repainting were needed. Conclusion: We recommend evaluation of the 4DCT motion histogram following simulation and the interplay effect following treatment planning in order to personalize the use of compression and volumetric repainting for each patient. Abdominal compression enables safe and more effective PBS treatment of liver tumors by reduction of motion and interplay effect. Kevin Souris is supported by IBA and Televie

  1. Evaluation of the clinical benefit of an electromagnetic navigation system for CT-guided interventional radiology procedures in the thoraco-abdominal region compared with conventional CT guidance (CTNAV II): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rouchy, R C; Moreau-Gaudry, A; Chipon, E; Aubry, S; Pazart, L; Lapuyade, B; Durand, M; Hajjam, M; Pottier, S; Renard, B; Logier, R; Orry, X; Cherifi, A; Quehen, E; Kervio, G; Favelle, O; Patat, F; De Kerviler, E; Hughes, C; Medici, M; Ghelfi, J; Mounier, A; Bricault, I

    2017-07-06

    Interventional radiology includes a range of minimally invasive image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that have become routine clinical practice. Each procedure involves a percutaneous needle insertion, often guided using computed tomography (CT) because of its availability and usability. However, procedures remain complicated, in particular when an obstacle must be avoided, meaning that an oblique trajectory is required. Navigation systems track the operator's instruments, meaning the position and progression of the instruments are visualised in real time on the patient's images. A novel electromagnetic navigation system for CT-guided interventional procedures (IMACTIS-CT®) has been developed, and a previous clinical trial demonstrated improved needle placement accuracy in navigation-assisted procedures. In the present trial, we are evaluating the clinical benefit of the navigation system during the needle insertion step of CT-guided procedures in the thoraco-abdominal region. This study is designed as an open, multicentre, prospective, randomised, controlled interventional clinical trial and is structured as a standard two-arm, parallel-design, individually randomised trial. A maximum of 500 patients will be enrolled. In the experimental arm (navigation system), the procedures are carried out using navigation assistance, and in the active comparator arm (CT), the procedures are carried out with conventional CT guidance. The randomisation is stratified by centre and by the expected difficulty of the procedure. The primary outcome of the trial is a combined criterion to assess the safety (number of serious adverse events), efficacy (number of targets reached) and performance (number of control scans acquired) of navigation-assisted, CT-guided procedures as evaluated by a blinded radiologist and confirmed by an expert committee in case of discordance. The secondary outcomes are (1) the duration of the procedure, (2) the satisfaction of the operator and

  2. Achieving Routine Submillisievert CT Scanning: Report from the Summit on Management of Radiation Dose in CT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang Hong; Kalender, Willi; Leng, Shuai; Samei, Ehsan; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wang, Ge; Yu, Lifeng; Pettigrew, Roderic I.

    2012-01-01

    This Special Report presents the consensus of the Summit on Management of Radiation Dose in Computed Tomography (CT) (held in February 2011), which brought together participants from academia, clinical practice, industry, and regulatory and funding agencies to identify the steps required to reduce the effective dose from routine CT examinations to less than 1 mSv. The most promising technologies and methods discussed at the summit include innovations and developments in x-ray sources; detectors; and image reconstruction, noise reduction, and postprocessing algorithms. Access to raw projection data and standard data sets for algorithm validation and optimization is a clear need, as is the need for new, clinically relevant metrics of image quality and diagnostic performance. Current commercially available techniques such as automatic exposure control, optimization of tube potential, beam-shaping filters, and dynamic z-axis collimators are important, and education to successfully implement these methods routinely is critically needed. Other methods that are just becoming widely available, such as iterative reconstruction, noise reduction, and postprocessing algorithms, will also have an important role. Together, these existing techniques can reduce dose by a factor of two to four. Technical advances that show considerable promise for additional dose reduction but are several years or more from commercial availability include compressed sensing, volume of interest and interior tomography techniques, and photon-counting detectors. This report offers a strategic roadmap for the CT user and research and manufacturer communities toward routinely achieving effective doses of less than 1 mSv, which is well below the average annual dose from naturally occurring sources of radiation. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22692035

  3. Achieving routine submillisievert CT scanning: report from the summit on management of radiation dose in CT.

    PubMed

    McCollough, Cynthia H; Chen, Guang Hong; Kalender, Willi; Leng, Shuai; Samei, Ehsan; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wang, Ge; Yu, Lifeng; Pettigrew, Roderic I

    2012-08-01

    This Special Report presents the consensus of the Summit on Management of Radiation Dose in Computed Tomography (CT) (held in February 2011), which brought together participants from academia, clinical practice, industry, and regulatory and funding agencies to identify the steps required to reduce the effective dose from routine CT examinations to less than 1 mSv. The most promising technologies and methods discussed at the summit include innovations and developments in x-ray sources; detectors; and image reconstruction, noise reduction, and postprocessing algorithms. Access to raw projection data and standard data sets for algorithm validation and optimization is a clear need, as is the need for new, clinically relevant metrics of image quality and diagnostic performance. Current commercially available techniques such as automatic exposure control, optimization of tube potential, beam-shaping filters, and dynamic z-axis collimators are important, and education to successfully implement these methods routinely is critically needed. Other methods that are just becoming widely available, such as iterative reconstruction, noise reduction, and postprocessing algorithms, will also have an important role. Together, these existing techniques can reduce dose by a factor of two to four. Technical advances that show considerable promise for additional dose reduction but are several years or more from commercial availability include compressed sensing, volume of interest and interior tomography techniques, and photon-counting detectors. This report offers a strategic roadmap for the CT user and research and manufacturer communities toward routinely achieving effective doses of less than 1 mSv, which is well below the average annual dose from naturally occurring sources of radiation.

  4. [Creation and Evaluation of Educational Programs for Additional Delayed Scan of FDG-PET/CT].

    PubMed

    Wada, Ryota; Kamiya, Takashi; Fujino, Kouichi; Ueda, Junpei; Isohashi, Kayako; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Hatazawa, Jun

    Generally, FDG-PET/CT image is acquired at the 60th minute after tracer administration. Depending on the clinical case, additional delayed scans may be useful. However, it is difficult to judge whether additional delayed scan is useful or not. The purposes of this study were creation and evaluation of educational programs to help radiological technologists to decide the usefulness of additional delayed scan of FDG-PET/CT. Educational programs consisted of the instructional materials and the judgment test of clinical cases. The instructional materials provided the valuable findings for differentiation between uptake in the wall of the colon and colon content, distinction between uptake in the lymph node and urinary tract, and evaluation of malignancy. The judgment test of clinical cases consisted of 10 cases selected by a nuclear medicine physician (for 5 of that cases additional delayed scan was decided to be useful). Five experienced technologists and five inexperienced technologists scored the volubility of additional delayed scan pre- and post-training using the instructional materials (the full marks of score is 5). After the educational programs using the instructional materials, the score was improved with the significant difference in both experienced (pre: 3.6±1.4, post: 4.0±1.2) and inexperienced (pre: 2.8±1.5, post: 3.7±1.5) groups (p<0.05). According to the educational programs, technologist might be able to decide whether the additional delayed scan is useful or not. The successful results of this study may improve the interpretation or reduce the total exposure dose of the PET/CT scan.

  5. [CT scans in children and adolescents: only when appropriate and when optimized].

    PubMed

    Leiner, Tim; de Jong, Pim A; Nievelstein, Rutger A J

    2013-01-01

    Radiation exposure due to medical imaging has more than doubled in the Netherlands since the early 1990 s. There is increasing evidence that this is not without risk, especially in children and adolescents. A recent study in over 680,000 Australians < 19 years old at the time of imaging provides further evidence that CT scanning may induce excess cancer. In light of these findings it is of paramount importance that physicians dealing with this patient population only request CT studies if imaging is clearly indicated. New technological developments such as iterative reconstruction will ameliorate the risk for low radiation-dose malignancies, but continued vigilance is necessary.

  6. Computed tomography automatic exposure control techniques in 18F-FDG oncology PET-CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Iball, Gareth R; Tout, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) automatic exposure control (AEC) systems are now used in all modern PET-CT scanners. A collaborative study was undertaken to compare AEC techniques of the three major PET-CT manufacturers for fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose half-body oncology imaging. An audit of 70 patients was performed for half-body CT scans taken on a GE Discovery 690, Philips Gemini TF and Siemens Biograph mCT (all 64-slice CT). Patient demographic and dose information was recorded and image noise was calculated as the SD of Hounsfield units in the liver. A direct comparison of the AEC systems was made by scanning a Rando phantom on all three systems for a range of AEC settings. The variation in dose and image quality with patient weight was significantly different for all three systems, with the GE system showing the largest variation in dose with weight and Philips the least. Image noise varied with patient weight in Philips and Siemens systems but was constant for all weights in GE. The z-axis mA profiles from the Rando phantom demonstrate that these differences are caused by the nature of the tube current modulation techniques applied. The mA profiles varied considerably according to the AEC settings used. CT AEC techniques from the three manufacturers yield significantly different tube current modulation patterns and hence deliver different doses and levels of image quality across a range of patient weights. Users should be aware of how their system works and of steps that could be taken to optimize imaging protocols.

  7. Estimation of CT-Derived Abdominal Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Depots from Anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Sophie V.; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Willis, Joseph; Godsland, Ian F.; Forouhi, Nita; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D.; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2013-01-01

    Background South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry. Objective We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT. Design 669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70±7 years) underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means. Results South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference), model fit was better in men (R2 range 0.59-0.71) than women (range 0.35-0.59). Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference) improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R2 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively). For basic SAT equations, R2 was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%. Conclusion We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available. PMID:24069381

  8. Estimation of CT-derived abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots from anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Willis, Joseph; Godsland, Ian F; Forouhi, Nita; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2013-01-01

    South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry. We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT. 669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70 ± 7 years) underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means. South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference), model fit was better in men (R(2) range 0.59-0.71) than women (range 0.35-0.59). Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference) improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R(2) 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively). For basic SAT equations, R(2) was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%. We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available.

  9. Raman and CT scan mapping of chalcogenide glass diffusion generated gradient index profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, G. P.; Berg, R. H.; Deegan, J.; Benson, R.; Salvaggio, P. S.; Gross, N.; Weinstein, B. A.; Gibson, D.; Bayya, S.; Sanghera, J.; Nguyen, V.; Kotov, M.

    2016-05-01

    Metrology of a gradient index (GRIN) material is non-trivial, especially in the realm of infrared and large refractive index. Traditional methods rely on index matching fluids which are not available for indexes as high as those found in the chalcogenide glasses (2.4-3.2). By diffusing chalcogenide glasses of similar composition one can blend the properties in a continuous way. In an effort to measure this we will present data from both x-ray computed tomography scans (CT scans) and Raman mapping scans of the diffusion profiles. Proof of concept measurements on undiffused bonded sheets of chalcogenide glasses were presented previously. The profiles measured will be of axially stacked sheets of chalcogenide glasses diffused to create a linear GRIN profile and nested tubes of chalcogenide glasses diffused to create a radial parabolic GRIN profile. We will show that the x-ray absorption in the CT scan and the intensity of select Raman peaks spatially measured through the material are indicators of the concentration of the diffusion ions and correlate to the spatial change in refractive index. We will also present finite element modeling (FEM) results and compare them to post precision glass molded (PGM) elements that have undergone CT and Raman mapping.

  10. Automatic lung nodule matching for the follow-up in temporal chest CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Helen; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2006-03-01

    We propose a fast and robust registration method for matching lung nodules of temporal chest CT scans. Our method is composed of four stages. First, the lungs are extracted from chest CT scans by the automatic segmentation method. Second, the gross translational mismatch is corrected by the optimal cube registration. This initial registration does not require extracting any anatomical landmarks. Third, initial alignment is step by step refined by the iterative surface registration. To evaluate the distance measure between surface boundary points, a 3D distance map is generated by the narrow-band distance propagation, which drives fast and robust convergence to the optimal location. Fourth, nodule correspondences are established by the pairs with the smallest Euclidean distances. The results of pulmonary nodule alignment of twenty patients are reported on a per-center-of mass point basis using the average Euclidean distance (AED) error between corresponding nodules of initial and follow-up scans. The average AED error of twenty patients is significantly reduced to 4.7mm from 30.0mm by our registration. Experimental results show that our registration method aligns the lung nodules much faster than the conventional ones using a distance measure. Accurate and fast result of our method would be more useful for the radiologist's evaluation of pulmonary nodules on chest CT scans.

  11. Targeted delayed scanning at CT urography: a worthwhile use of radiation?

    PubMed

    Hack, Kalesha; Pinto, Patricia A; Gollub, Marc J

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether ureteral segments not filled with contrast material at computed tomographic (CT) urography ever contain tumor detectable only by filling these segments with contrast material. In this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent, databases were searched for all patients who underwent heminephroureterectomy or ureteroscopy between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2009, with available CT urography findings in the 12 months prior to surgery or biopsy and patients who had undergone at least two CT urography procedures with a minimum 5-year follow-up between studies. One of two radiologists blinded to results of pathologic examination recorded location of unfilled segments, time of scan, subsequent filling, and pathologic or 5-year follow-up CT urography results. Tumors were considered missed in an unfilled segment if tumor was found at pathologic examination or follow-up CT urography in the same one-third of the ureter and there were no secondary signs of a mass with other index CT urography sequences. Estimated radiation dose for additional delayed sequences was calculated with a 32-cm phantom. In 59 male and 33 female patients (mean age, 66 years) undergoing heminephroureterectomy, 27 tumors were present in 41 partially nonopacified ureters in 20 patients. Six tumors were present in nonopacified segments (one multifocal, none bilateral); all were identifiable by means of secondary signs present with earlier sequences. Among 182 lesions biopsied at ureteroscopy in 124 male and 53 female patients (mean age, 69 years), 28 tumors were present in nonopacified segments in 25 patients (four multifocal, none bilateral), all with secondary imaging signs detectable without delayed scanning. In 64 male and 29 female patients (mean age, 69 years) who underwent 5-year follow-up CT urography, three new tumors were revealed in three patients; none occurred in the unfilled ureter at index CT urography

  12. Estimation of the total effective dose from low-dose CT scans and radiopharmaceutical administrations delivered to patients undergoing SPECT/CT explorations.

    PubMed

    Montes, Carlos; Tamayo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Gomez-Caminero, Felipe; García, Sofia; Martín, Carlos; Rosero, Angela

    2013-08-01

    Hybrid imaging, such as SPECT/CT, is used in routine clinical practice, allowing coregistered images of the functional and structural information provided by the two imaging modalities. However, this multimodality imaging may mean that patients are exposed to a higher radiation dose than those receiving SPECT alone. The study aimed to determine the radiation exposure of patients who had undergone SPECT/CT examinations and to relate this to the Background Equivalent Radiation Time (BERT). 145 SPECT/CT studies were used to estimate the total effective dose to patients due to both radiopharmaceutical administrations and low-dose CT scans. The CT contribution was estimated by the Dose-Length Product method. Specific conversion coefficients were calculated for SPECT explorations. The radiation dose from low-dose CTs ranged between 0.6 mSv for head and neck CT and 2.6 mSv for whole body CT scan, representing a maximum of 1 year of background radiation exposure. These values represent a decrease of 80-85% with respect to the radiation dose from diagnostic CT. The radiation exposure from radiopharmaceutical administration varied from 2.1 mSv for stress myocardial perfusion SPECT to 26 mSv for gallium SPECT in patients with lymphoma. The BERT ranged from 1 to 11 years. The contribution of low-dose CT scans to the total radiation dose to patients undergoing SPECT/CT examinations is relatively low compared with the effective dose from radiopharmaceutical administration. When a CT scan is only acquired for anatomical localization and attenuation correction, low-dose CT scan is justified on the basis of its lower dose.

  13. Study of CT Scan Flooding System at High Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    CT scan flooding experiment can scan micro-pore in different flooding stages by the use of CT scan technology, without changing the external morphology and internal structure of the core, and observe the distribution characterization in pore medium of different flooding fluid under different pressure.thus,it can rebuilt the distribution images of oil-water distribution in different flooding stages. However,under extreme high pressure and temperature conditions,the CT scan system can not meet the requirements. Container of low density materials or thin shell can not resist high pressure,while high density materials or thick shell will cause attenuation and scattering of X-ray. The experiment uses a simple Ct scanning systems.X ray from a point light source passing trough a micro beryllium shell on High pressure stainless steal container,continuously irradiates the core holder that can continuously 360° rotate along the core axis. A rare earth intensifying screen behind the core holder emitting light when irradiated with X ray can show the core X ray section image. An optical camera record the core X ray images through a transparency high pressure glazing that placed on the High pressure stainless steal container.Thus,multiple core X ray section images can reconstruct the 3D core reconstruction after a series of data processing.The experiment shows that both the micro beryllium shell and rare earth intensifying screen can work in high temperature and high pressure environment in the stainless steal container. This way that X-ray passes through a thin layer of micro beryllium shell , not high pressure stainless steal shell,avoid the attenuation and scattering of X-ray from the container shell,while improving the high-pressure experiment requirements.

  14. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  15. TU-F-18A-06: Dual Energy CT Using One Full Scan and a Second Scan with Very Few Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T; Zhu, L

    Purpose: The conventional dual energy CT (DECT) requires two full CT scans at different energy levels, resulting in dose increase as well as imaging errors from patient motion between the two scans. To shorten the scan time of DECT and thus overcome these drawbacks, we propose a new DECT algorithm using one full scan and a second scan with very few projections by preserving structural information. Methods: We first reconstruct a CT image on the full scan using a standard filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm. We then use a compressed sensing (CS) based iterative algorithm on the second scan for reconstruction frommore » very few projections. The edges extracted from the first scan are used as weights in the Objectives: function of the CS-based reconstruction to substantially improve the image quality of CT reconstruction. The basis material images are then obtained by an iterative image-domain decomposition method and an electron density map is finally calculated. The proposed method is evaluated on phantoms. Results: On the Catphan 600 phantom, the CT reconstruction mean error using the proposed method on 20 and 5 projections are 4.76% and 5.02%, respectively. Compared with conventional iterative reconstruction, the proposed edge weighting preserves object structures and achieves a better spatial resolution. With basis materials of Iodine and Teflon, our method on 20 projections obtains similar quality of decomposed material images compared with FBP on a full scan and the mean error of electron density in the selected regions of interest is 0.29%. Conclusion: We propose an effective method for reducing projections and therefore scan time in DECT. We show that a full scan plus a 20-projection scan are sufficient to provide DECT images and electron density with similar quality compared with two full scans. Our future work includes more phantom studies to validate the performance of our method.« less

  16. Leukemia and brain tumors among children after radiation exposure from CT scans: design and methodological opportunities of the Dutch Pediatric CT Study.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Johanna M; Ronckers, Cécile M; Smets, Anne M J B; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Jahnen, Andreas; Lee, Choonsik; Kieft, Mariëtte; Laméris, Johan S; van Herk, Marcel; Greuter, Marcel J W; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; van Straten, Marcel; Visser, Otto; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hauptmann, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans are indispensable in modern medicine; however, the spectacular rise in global use coupled with relatively high doses of ionizing radiation per examination have raised radiation protection concerns. Children are of particular concern because they are more sensitive to radiation-induced cancer compared with adults and have a long lifespan to express harmful effects which may offset clinical benefits of performing a scan. This paper describes the design and methodology of a nationwide study, the Dutch Pediatric CT Study, regarding risk of leukemia and brain tumors in children after radiation exposure from CT scans. It is a retrospective record-linkage cohort study with an expected number of 100,000 children who received at least one electronically archived CT scan covering the calendar period since the introduction of digital archiving until 2012. Information on all archived CT scans of these children will be obtained, including date of examination, scanned body part and radiologist's report, as well as the machine settings required for organ dose estimation. We will obtain cancer incidence by record linkage with external databases. In this article, we describe several approaches to the collection of data on archived CT scans, the estimation of radiation doses and the assessment of confounding. The proposed approaches provide useful strategies for data collection and confounder assessment for general retrospective record-linkage studies, particular those using hospital databases on radiological procedures for the assessment of exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.

  17. CT scan exposure in Spanish children and young adults by socioeconomic status: Cross-sectional analysis of cohort data.

    PubMed

    Bosch de Basea, Magda; Espinosa, Ana; Gil, Mariona; Figuerola, Jordi; Pardina, Marina; Vilar, José; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Recent publications reported that children in disadvantaged areas undergo more CT scanning than others. The present study is aimed to assess the potential differences in CT imaging by socioeconomic status (SES) in Spanish young scanned subjects and if such differences vary with different indicators or different time point SES measurements. The associations between CT scanning and SES, and between the CT scan rate per patient and SES were investigated in the Spanish EPI-CT subcohort. Various SES indicators were studied to determine whether particular SES dimensions were more closely related to the probability of undergoing one or multiple CTs. Comparisons were made with indices based on 2001 and 2011 censuses. We found evidence of socio-economic variation among young people, mainly related to autonomous communities of residence. A slightly higher rate of scans per patient of multiple body parts in the less affluent categories was observed, possibly reflecting a higher rate of accidents and violence in these groups. The number of CT scans per patient was higher both in the most affluent and the most deprived categories and somewhat lower in the intermediate groups. This relation varied with the SES indicator used, with lower CT scans per patients in categories of high unemployment and temporary work, but not depending on categories of unskilled work or illiteracy. The relationship between these indicators and number of CTs in 2011 was different than that seen with the 2001 census, with the number of CTs increasing with higher unemployment. Overall we observed some differences in the SES distribution of scanned patients by Autonomous Community in Spain. There was, however, no major differences in the frequency of CT scans per patient by SES overall, based on the 2001 census. The use of different indicators and of SES data collected at different time points led to different relations between SES and frequency of CT scans, outlining the difficulty of adequately

  18. CT scan exposure in Spanish children and young adults by socioeconomic status: Cross-sectional analysis of cohort data

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Ana; Gil, Mariona; Figuerola, Jordi; Pardina, Marina; Vilar, José; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Recent publications reported that children in disadvantaged areas undergo more CT scanning than others. The present study is aimed to assess the potential differences in CT imaging by socioeconomic status (SES) in Spanish young scanned subjects and if such differences vary with different indicators or different time point SES measurements. The associations between CT scanning and SES, and between the CT scan rate per patient and SES were investigated in the Spanish EPI-CT subcohort. Various SES indicators were studied to determine whether particular SES dimensions were more closely related to the probability of undergoing one or multiple CTs. Comparisons were made with indices based on 2001 and 2011 censuses. We found evidence of socio-economic variation among young people, mainly related to autonomous communities of residence. A slightly higher rate of scans per patient of multiple body parts in the less affluent categories was observed, possibly reflecting a higher rate of accidents and violence in these groups. The number of CT scans per patient was higher both in the most affluent and the most deprived categories and somewhat lower in the intermediate groups. This relation varied with the SES indicator used, with lower CT scans per patients in categories of high unemployment and temporary work, but not depending on categories of unskilled work or illiteracy. The relationship between these indicators and number of CTs in 2011 was different than that seen with the 2001 census, with the number of CTs increasing with higher unemployment. Overall we observed some differences in the SES distribution of scanned patients by Autonomous Community in Spain. There was, however, no major differences in the frequency of CT scans per patient by SES overall, based on the 2001 census. The use of different indicators and of SES data collected at different time points led to different relations between SES and frequency of CT scans, outlining the difficulty of adequately

  19. Reconstruction of a time-averaged midposition CT scan for radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients using deformable registration.

    PubMed

    Wolthaus, J W H; Sonke, J J; van Herk, M; Damen, E M F

    2008-09-01

    lower lobe lung tumors move with amplitudes of up to 2 cm due to respiration. To reduce respiration imaging artifacts in planning CT scans, 4D imaging techniques are used. Currently, we use a single (midventilation) frame of the 4D data set for clinical delineation of structures and radiotherapy planning. A single frame, however, often contains artifacts due to breathing irregularities, and is noisier than a conventional CT scan since the exposure per frame is lower. Moreover, the tumor may be displaced from the mean tumor position due to hysteresis. The aim of this work is to develop a framework for the acquisition of a good quality scan representing all scanned anatomy in the mean position by averaging transformed (deformed) CT frames, i.e., canceling out motion. A nonrigid registration method is necessary since motion varies over the lung. 4D and inspiration breath-hold (BH) CT scans were acquired for 13 patients. An iterative multiscale motion estimation technique was applied to the 4D CT scan, similar to optical flow but using image phase (gray-value transitions from bright to dark and vice versa) instead. From the (4D) deformation vector field (DVF) derived, the local mean position in the respiratory cycle was computed and the 4D DVF was modified to deform all structures of the original 4D CT scan to this mean position. A 3D midposition (MidP) CT scan was then obtained by (arithmetic or median) averaging of the deformed 4D CT scan. Image registration accuracy, tumor shape deviation with respect to the BH CT scan, and noise were determined to evaluate the image fidelity of the MidP CT scan and the performance of the technique. Accuracy of the used deformable image registration method was comparable to established automated locally rigid registration and to manual landmark registration (average difference to both methods < 0.5 mm for all directions) for the tumor region. From visual assessment, the registration was good for the clearly visible features (e

  20. Reproducibility of geometrical acquisition of intra-thoracic organs of children on CT scans.

    PubMed

    Coulongeat, François; Jarrar, Mohamed-Salah; Serre, Thierry; Thollon, Lionel

    2011-08-01

    This paper analyses geometry of intra-thoracic organs from computed tomography (CT) scans performed on 20 children aged from 4 months to 16 years. A set of two measurements on lungs and heart were performed by the same observer. A third set was performed by a second observer. Thus, the intra- and inter-observer relative deviation of measurements was analysed. Multiple regressions were used in order to study the relationship between the CT properties (scanner, voltage, dose, pixel size, slice increment) and the relative deviation of measurements. There is a very low systematic intra- and inter-observer bias in measurements except for the volume of the heart. None of the CT data properties has a significant influence on the relative deviation of measurement. In the present paper, the measurements and 3D reconstruction protocol described can be applied to characterise the growth of the intra-thoracic organs.

  1. Automatic segmentation and quantification of the cardiac structures from non-contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Rahil; Bos, Daniel; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Pellikaan, Karlijn; Niessen, Wiro J.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Walsum, Theo

    2017-05-01

    Early structural changes to the heart, including the chambers and the coronary arteries, provide important information on pre-clinical heart disease like cardiac failure. Currently, contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is the preferred modality for the visualization of the cardiac chambers and the coronaries. In clinical practice not every patient undergoes a CCTA scan; many patients receive only a non-contrast-enhanced calcium scoring CT scan (CTCS), which has less radiation dose and does not require the administration of contrast agent. Quantifying cardiac structures in such images is challenging, as they lack the contrast present in CCTA scans. Such quantification would however be relevant, as it enables population based studies with only a CTCS scan. The purpose of this work is therefore to investigate the feasibility of automatic segmentation and quantification of cardiac structures viz whole heart, left atrium, left ventricle, right atrium, right ventricle and aortic root from CTCS scans. A fully automatic multi-atlas-based segmentation approach is used to segment the cardiac structures. Results show that the segmentation overlap between the automatic method and that of the reference standard have a Dice similarity coefficient of 0.91 on average for the cardiac chambers. The mean surface-to-surface distance error over all the cardiac structures is 1.4+/- 1.7 mm. The automatically obtained cardiac chamber volumes using the CTCS scans have an excellent correlation when compared to the volumes in corresponding CCTA scans, a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of 0.95 is obtained. Our fully automatic method enables large-scale assessment of cardiac structures on non-contrast-enhanced CT scans.

  2. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P., E-mail: thessa@isi.uu.nl; Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling resultsmore » can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation

  3. Relationship of Coronary Calcium on Standard Chest CT Scans With Mortality.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Dominguez, Arturo; Allison, Matthew A; Wassel, Christina L; Rifkin, Dena E; Morgan, Cindy G; Daniels, Michael R; Ikram, Umaira; Knox, Jessica B; Wright, C Michael; Criqui, Michael H; Ix, Joachim H

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores on 3 mm electrocardiography (ECG)-gated computed tomography (CT) scans and standard 6 mm chest CT scans, and to compare relative strength of associations of CAC on each scan type with mortality risk. Coronary artery calcification predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality, and is typically measured on ECG-gated 3 mm CT scans. Patients undergo standard 6 mm chest CTs for various clinical indications much more frequently, but CAC is not usually quantified. To better understand the usefulness of standard chest CTs to quantify CAC, we conducted a case-control study among persons who had both scan types. Between 2000 and 2003, 4,544 community-living individuals self- or physician-referred for "whole-body" CT scans, had 3 mm ECG-gated CTs and standard 6 mm chest CTs, and were followed for mortality through 2009. In this nested case-control study, we identified 157 deaths and 494 controls frequency matched (1:3) on age and sex. The Agatston method quantified CAC on both scan types. Unconditional logistic regression determined associations with mortality, accounting for CVD risk factors. Participants were 68 ± 11 years of age and 63% male. The Spearman correlation of CAC scores between the 2 scan types was 0.93 (p < 0.001); median CAC scores were lower on 6 mm CTs compared to 3 mm CTs (22 vs.104 Agatston units, p < 0.001). Adjusted for traditional CVD risk factors, each standard deviation higher CAC score on 6 mm CTs was associated with 50% higher odds of death (odds ratio: 1.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 1.9), similar to 50% higher odds on the 3 mm ECG-gated CTs (odds ratio: 1.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 1.9). CAC scores on standard 6 mm chest CTs are strongly correlated with 3 mm ECG-gated CTs and similarly predict mortality in community-living individuals. Chest CTs performed for other clinical indications may provide an

  4. Significance of clinical examination, CT and MRI scan in the diagnosis of posterior pelvic ring fractures.

    PubMed

    Nüchtern, J V; Hartel, M J; Henes, F O; Groth, M; Jauch, S Y; Haegele, J; Briem, D; Hoffmann, M; Lehmann, W; Rueger, J M; Großterlinden, L G

    2015-02-01

    Patients with a fracture in the anterior pelvic ring often simultaneously demonstrate pain in the posterior pelvic ring. The aim of the present prospective study was to assess the sensitivity of CT, MRI and clinical examination in the detection of fractures in the posterior pelvic ring in patients with fractures of the anterior pelvic ring diagnosed in conventional radiographs. Sixty patients with radiographic signs of an anterior pelvic ring injury were included in this prospective analysis. Following a focused clinical examination of the posterior pelvis, all patients underwent both a CT and then a MRI scan of their pelvis. Two board certified radiologists evaluated the CT and MRI scans independently. To estimate the presence of osteoporosis the Hounsfield units of the vertebral body of L5 were measured in each case. Fifty-three women and seven men, with a mean age of 74.7+/-15.6 years were included into the study. A fracture of the posterior pelvic ring was found in fourty-eight patients (80%) patients using MRI. Fractures of the posterior pelvic ring would have been missed in eight cases (17%), if only CT had been used. Eighty-five percent of the patients with a posterior fracture had an osteoporosis. The majority of the cases suffered from a low energy trauma. Thirty-eight patients (83%) with positive clinical signs at the posterior pelvic ring actually had a fracture of the posterior pelvic ring in the MRI. The clinical examination proved to be equally effective to CT in detecting posterior pelvic ring fractures. The significance of both, clinical examination and CT was confirmed in the detection of fractures in the posterior pelvic ring. MRI examination of the pelvis however, was found to be superior in detecting undislocated fractures in a cohort of patients with a high incidence of osteoporosis. Using MRI may be beneficial in select cases, especially when reduced bone density is suspected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated Agatston score computation in non-ECG gated CT scans using deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Espinosa, Carlos; González, Germán.; Washko, George R.; Cazorla, Miguel; San José Estépar, Raúl

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: The Agatston score is a well-established metric of cardiovascular disease related to clinical outcomes. It is computed from CT scans by a) measuring the volume and intensity of the atherosclerotic plaques and b) aggregating such information in an index. Objective: To generate a convolutional neural network that inputs a non-contrast chest CT scan and outputs the Agatston score associated with it directly, without a prior segmentation of Coronary Artery Calcifications (CAC). Materials and methods: We use a database of 5973 non-contrast non-ECG gated chest CT scans where the Agatston score has been manually computed. The heart of each scan is cropped automatically using an object detector. The database is split in 4973 cases for training and 1000 for testing. We train a 3D deep convolutional neural network to regress the Agatston score directly from the extracted hearts. Results: The proposed method yields a Pearson correlation coefficient of r = 0.93; p <= 0.0001 against manual reference standard in the 1000 test cases. It further stratifies correctly 72.6% of the cases with respect to standard risk groups. This compares to more complex state-of-the-art methods based on prior segmentations of the CACs, which achieve r = 0.94 in ECG-gated pulmonary CT. Conclusions: A convolutional neural network can regress the Agatston score from the image of the heart directly, without a prior segmentation of the CACs. This is a new and simpler paradigm in the Agatston score computation that yields similar results to the state-of-the-art literature.

  6. Does head CT scan pathology predict outcome after mild traumatic brain injury?

    PubMed

    Lannsjö, M; Backheden, M; Johansson, U; Af Geijerstam, J L; Borg, J

    2013-01-01

    More evidence is needed to forward our understanding of the key determinants of poor outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A large, prospective, national cohort of patients was studied to analyse the effect of head CT scan pathology on the outcome. One-thousand two-hundred and sixty-two patients with MTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score 15) at 39 emergency departments completed a study protocol including acute head CT scan examination and follow-up by the Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire and the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) at 3 months after MTBI. Binary logistic regression was used for the assessment of prediction ability. In 751 men (60%) and 511 women (40%), with a mean age of 30 years (median 21, range 6-94), we observed relevant or suspect relevant pathologic findings on acute CT scan in 52 patients (4%). Patients aged below 30 years reported better outcome both with respect to symptoms and GOSE as compared to patients in older age groups. Men reported better outcome than women as regards symptoms (OR 0.64, CI 0.49-0.85 for ≥3 symptoms) and global function (OR 0.60, CI 0.39-0.92 for GOSE 1-6). Pathology on acute CT scan examination had no effect on self-reported symptoms or global function at 3 months after MTBI. Female gender and older age predicted a less favourable outcome. The findings support the view that other factors than brain injury deserve attention to minimize long-term complaints after MTBI. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  7. Childhood CT scans and cancer risk: impact of predisposing factors for cancer on the risk estimates.

    PubMed

    Journy, N; Roué, T; Cardis, E; Le Pointe, H Ducou; Brisse, H; Chateil, J-F; Laurier, D; Bernier, M-O

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the role of cancer predisposing factors (PFs) on the associations between paediatric computed tomography (CT) scan exposures and subsequent risk of central nervous system (CNS) tumours and leukaemia. A cohort of children who underwent a CT scan in 2000-2010 in 23 French radiology departments was linked with the national childhood cancers registry and national vital status registry; information on PFs was retrieved through hospital discharge databases. In children without PF, hazard ratios of 1.07 (95% CI 0.99-1.10) for CNS tumours (15 cases) and 1.16 (95% CI 0.77-1.27) for leukaemia (12 cases) were estimated for each 10 mGy increment in CT x-rays organ doses. These estimates were similar to those obtained in the whole cohort. In children with PFs, no positive dose-risk association was observed, possibly related to earlier non-cancer mortality in this group. Our results suggest a modifying effect of PFs on CT-related cancer risks, but need to be confirmed by longer follow-up and other studies.

  8. Development of automated extraction method of biliary tract from abdominal CT volumes based on local intensity structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Hirose, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Nagino, Masato; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated biliary tract extraction method from abdominal CT volumes. The biliary tract is the path by which bile is transported from liver to the duodenum. No extraction method have been reported for the automated extraction of the biliary tract from common contrast CT volumes. Our method consists of three steps including: (1) extraction of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) candidate regions, (2) extraction of intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) candidate regions, and (3) combination of these candidate regions. The IHBD has linear structures and intensities of the IHBD are low in CT volumes. We use a dark linear structure enhancement (DLSE) filter based on a local intensity structure analysis method using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix for the IHBD candidate region extraction. The EHBD region is extracted using a thresholding process and a connected component analysis. In the combination process, we connect the IHBD candidate regions to each EHBD candidate region and select a bile duct region from the connected candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 22 cases of CT volumes. An average Dice coefficient of extraction result was 66.7%.

  9. A comparison between intrastomal 3D ultrasonography, CT scanning and findings at surgery in patients with stomal complaints.

    PubMed

    Näsvall, P; Wikner, F; Gunnarsson, U; Rutegård, J; Strigård, K

    2014-10-01

    Since there are no reliable investigative tools for imaging parastomal hernia, new techniques are needed. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of intrastomal three-dimensional ultrasonography (3D) as an alternative to CT scanning for the assessment of stomal complaints. Twenty patients with stomal complaints, indicating surgery, were examined preoperatively with a CT scan in the supine position and 3D intrastomal ultrasonography in the supine and erect positions. Comparison with findings at surgery, considered to be the true state, was made. Both imaging methods, 3D ultrasonography and CT scanning, showed high sensitivity (ultrasound 15/18, CT scan 15/18) and specificity (ultrasound 2/2, CT scan 1/2) when judged by a dedicated radiologist. Corresponding values for interpretation of CT scans in routine clinical practice was for sensitivity 17/18 and for specificity 1/2. 3D ultrasonography has a high validity and is a promising alternative to CT scanning in the supine position to distinguish a bulge from a parastomal hernia.

  10. Classification of pulmonary emphysema from chest CT scans using integral geometry descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; Goldin, J. G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, M.; Brown, M. S.

    2011-03-01

    To gain insight into the underlying pathways of emphysema and monitor the effect of treatment, methods to quantify and phenotype the different types of emphysema from chest CT scans are of crucial importance. Current standard measures rely on density thresholds for individual voxels, which is influenced by inspiration level and does not take into account the spatial relationship between voxels. Measures based on texture analysis do take the interrelation between voxels into account and therefore might be useful for distinguishing different types of emphysema. In this study, we propose to use Minkowski functionals combined with rotation invariant Gaussian features to distinguish between healthy and emphysematous tissue and classify three different types of emphysema. Minkowski functionals characterize binary images in terms of geometry and topology. In 3D, four Minkowski functionals are defined. By varying the threshold and size of neighborhood around a voxel, a set of Minkowski functionals can be defined for each voxel. Ten chest CT scans with 1810 annotated regions were used to train the method. A set of 108 features was calculated for each training sample from which 10 features were selected to be most informative. A linear discriminant classifier was trained to classify each voxel in the lungs into a subtype of emphysema or normal lung. The method was applied to an independent test set of 30 chest CT scans with varying amounts and types of emphysema with 4347 annotated regions of interest. The method is shown to perform well, with an overall accuracy of 95%.

  11. The effects of misinterpretation of an artefact on multidetector row CT scans in children.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Anne-Marie; Theron, Salomine; Andronikou, Savvas

    2009-02-01

    Artefacts reflect problems with radiographic technique rather than true pathology. These may be misinterpreted as pathology with serious consequences. An artefact caused such problems in one paediatric imaging department. To determine the incidence, and consequences of misinterpretation, of a CT artefact in a paediatric imaging department. A retrospective review of images and reports of paediatric CT scans over a set period with a known artefact was performed. Reports were correlated with reviewers' evaluation of the presence of artefact and reviewed for correct identification of artefact, misinterpretation as pathology, and action taken as a result. A total of 74 CT scans had been performed over the study period and an artefact detected by reviewers on 32 (43%). Six (18.75%) of these were misinterpreted as pathology, of which three (9.4%) were reported as tuberculous granulomas, two (6.2%) as haemorrhages and one (3.1%) as an unknown hyperdensity. Two patients (6.2%) had subsequent MRI studies performed, and treatment for tuberculosis was continued in one patient (3.1%). No initial report identified the artefact. One-fifth of the scans with the artefact were misinterpreted as pathology and half of these misinterpretations led to further action. Artefacts result in false diagnoses and unnecessary investigations; vigilance is needed.

  12. Edge guided image reconstruction in linear scan CT by weighted alternating direction TV minimization.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ailong; Wang, Linyuan; Zhang, Hanming; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Xi, Xiaoqi; Li, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Linear scan computed tomography (CT) is a promising imaging configuration with high scanning efficiency while the data set is under-sampled and angularly limited for which high quality image reconstruction is challenging. In this work, an edge guided total variation minimization reconstruction (EGTVM) algorithm is developed in dealing with this problem. The proposed method is modeled on the combination of total variation (TV) regularization and iterative edge detection strategy. In the proposed method, the edge weights of intermediate reconstructions are incorporated into the TV objective function. The optimization is efficiently solved by applying alternating direction method of multipliers. A prudential and conservative edge detection strategy proposed in this paper can obtain the true edges while restricting the errors within an acceptable degree. Based on the comparison on both simulation studies and real CT data set reconstructions, EGTVM provides comparable or even better quality compared to the non-edge guided reconstruction and adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets method. With the utilization of weighted alternating direction TV minimization and edge detection, EGTVM achieves fast and robust convergence and reconstructs high quality image when applied in linear scan CT with under-sampled data set.

  13. Carotid plaque characterization using CT and MRI scans for synergistic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzin, Matthew; Xu, Yiqin; Rao, Arhant; Madi, Saaussan; Bahadur, Ali; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive determination of plaque vulnerability has been a holy grail of medical imaging. Despite advances in tomographic technologies , there is currently no effective way to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used, but neither provides sufficient information of plaque properties. Thus, we are motivated to combine CT and MRI imaging to determine if the composite information can better reflect the histological determination of plaque vulnerability. Two human endarterectomy specimens (1 symptomatic carotid and 1 stable femoral) were imaged using Scanco Medical Viva CT40 and Bruker Pharmascan 16cm 7T Horizontal MRI / MRS systems. μCT scans were done at 55 kVp and tube current of 70 mA. Samples underwent RARE-VTR and MSME pulse sequences to measure T1, T2 values, and proton density. The specimens were processed for histology and scored for vulnerability using the American Heart Association criteria. Single modality-based analyses were performed through segmentation of key imaging biomarkers (i.e. calcification and lumen), image registration, measurement of fibrous capsule, and multi-component T1 and T2 decay modeling. Feature differences were analyzed between the unstable and stable controls, symptomatic carotid and femoral plaque, respectively. By building on the techniques used in this study, synergistic CT+MRI analysis may provide a promising solution for plaque characterization in vivo.

  14. Six-Minute Walk Distance Predictors, Including CT Scan Measures, in the COPDGene Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rambod, Mehdi; Porszasz, Janos; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exercise tolerance in COPD is only moderately well predicted by airflow obstruction assessed by FEV1. We determined whether other phenotypic characteristics, including CT scan measures, are independent predictors of 6-min walk distance (6MWD) in the COPDGene cohort. Methods: COPDGene recruits non-Hispanic Caucasian and African American current and ex-smokers. Phenotyping measures include postbronchodilator FEV1 % predicted and inspiratory and expiratory CT lung scans. We defined % emphysema as the percentage of lung voxels < −950 Hounsfield units on the inspiratory scan and % gas trapping as the percentage of lung voxels < −856 Hounsfield units on the expiratory scan. Results: Data of the first 2,500 participants of the COPDGene cohort were analyzed. Participant age was 61 ± 9 years; 51% were men; 76% were non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 24% were African Americans. Fifty-six percent had spirometrically defined COPD, with 9.3%, 23.4%, 15.0%, and 8.3% in GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stages I to IV, respectively. Higher % emphysema and % gas trapping predicted lower 6MWD (P < .001). However, in a given spirometric group, after adjustment for age, sex, race, and BMI, neither % emphysema nor % gas trapping, or their interactions with FEV1 % predicted, remained a significant 6MWD predictor. In a given spirometric group, only 16% to 27% of the variance in 6MWD could be explained by age, male sex, Caucasian race, and lower BMI as significant predictors of higher 6MWD. Conclusions: In this large cohort of smokers in a given spirometric stage, phenotypic characteristics were only modestly predictive of 6MWD. CT scan measures of emphysema and gas trapping were not predictive of 6MWD after adjustment for other phenotypic characteristics. PMID:21960696

  15. Six-minute walk distance predictors, including CT scan measures, in the COPDGene cohort.

    PubMed

    Rambod, Mehdi; Porszasz, Janos; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Casaburi, Richard

    2012-04-01

    Exercise tolerance in COPD is only moderately well predicted by airflow obstruction assessed by FEV(1). We determined whether other phenotypic characteristics, including CT scan measures, are independent predictors of 6-min walk distance (6MWD) in the COPDGene cohort. COPDGene recruits non-Hispanic Caucasian and African American current and ex-smokers. Phenotyping measures include postbronchodilator FEV(1) % predicted and inspiratory and expiratory CT lung scans. We defined % emphysema as the percentage of lung voxels < -950 Hounsfield units on the inspiratory scan and % gas trapping as the percentage of lung voxels < -856 Hounsfield units on the expiratory scan. Data of the first 2,500 participants of the COPDGene cohort were analyzed. Participant age was 61 ± 9 years; 51% were men; 76% were non-Hispanic Caucasians, and 24% were African Americans. Fifty-six percent had spirometrically defined COPD, with 9.3%, 23.4%, 15.0%, and 8.3% in GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stages I to IV, respectively. Higher % emphysema and % gas trapping predicted lower 6MWD (P < .001). However, in a given spirometric group, after adjustment for age, sex, race, and BMI, neither % emphysema nor % gas trapping, or their interactions with FEV(1) % predicted, remained a significant 6MWD predictor. In a given spirometric group, only 16% to 27% of the variance in 6MWD could be explained by age, male sex, Caucasian race, and lower BMI as significant predictors of higher 6MWD. In this large cohort of smokers in a given spirometric stage, phenotypic characteristics were only modestly predictive of 6MWD. CT scan measures of emphysema and gas trapping were not predictive of 6MWD after adjustment for other phenotypic characteristics.

  16. Hierarchical pictorial structures for simultaneously localizing multiple organs in volumetric pre-scan CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montillo, Albert; Song, Qi; Das, Bipul; Yin, Zhye

    2015-03-01

    Parsing volumetric computed tomography (CT) into 10 or more salient organs simultaneously is a challenging task with many applications such as personalized scan planning and dose reporting. In the clinic, pre-scan data can come in the form of very low dose volumes acquired just prior to the primary scan or from an existing primary scan. To localize organs in such diverse data, we propose a new learning based framework that we call hierarchical pictorial structures (HPS) which builds multiple levels of models in a tree-like hierarchy that mirrors the natural decomposition of human anatomy from gross structures to finer structures. Each node of our hierarchical model learns (1) the local appearance and shape of structures, and (2) a generative global model that learns probabilistic, structural arrangement. Our main contribution is twofold. First we embed the pictorial structures approach in a hierarchical framework which reduces test time image interpretation and allows for the incorporation of additional geometric constraints that robustly guide model fitting in the presence of noise. Second we guide our HPS framework with the probabilistic cost maps extracted using random decision forests using volumetric 3D HOG features which makes our model fast to train and fast to apply to novel test data and posses a high degree of invariance to shape distortion and imaging artifacts. All steps require approximate 3 mins to compute and all organs are located with suitably high accuracy for our clinical applications such as personalized scan planning for radiation dose reduction. We assess our method using a database of volumetric CT scans from 81 subjects with widely varying age and pathology and with simulated ultra-low dose cadaver pre-scan data.

  17. A CT scan protocol for the detection of radiographic loosening of the glenoid component after total shoulder arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose It is difficult to evaluate glenoid component periprosthetic radiolucencies in total shoulder arthroplasties (TSAs) using plain radiographs. This study was performed to evaluate whether computed tomography (CT) using a specific patient position in the CT scanner provides a better method for assessing radiolucencies in TSA. Methods Following TSA, 11 patients were CT scanned in a lateral decubitus position with maximum forward flexion, which aligns the glenoid orientation with the axis of the CT scanner. Follow-up CT scanning is part of our routine patient care. Glenoid component periprosthetic lucency was assessed according to the Molé score and it was compared to routine plain radiographs by 5 observers. Results The protocol almost completely eliminated metal artifacts in the CT images and allowed accurate assessment of periprosthetic lucency of the glenoid fixation. Positioning of the patient within the CT scanner as described was possible for all 11 patients. A radiolucent line was identified in 54 of the 55 observed CT scans and osteolysis was identified in 25 observations. The average radiolucent line Molé score was 3.4 (SD 2.7) points with plain radiographs and 9.5 (SD 0.8) points with CT scans (p = 0.001). The mean intra-observer variance was lower in the CT scan group than in the plain radiograph group (p = 0.001). Interpretation The CT scan protocol we used is of clinical value in routine assessment of glenoid periprosthetic lucency after TSA. The technique improves the ability to detect and monitor radiolucent lines and, therefore, possibly implant loosening also. PMID:24286563

  18. SU-F-I-40: Impact of Scan Length On Patient Dose in Abdomen/pelvis CT Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I; Song, J; Kim, K

    Purpose: To analysis the impact of scan length on patient doses in abdomen/pelvis CT diagnosis of each hospital. Methods: Scan length of 7 hospitals from abdomen/pelvis CT diagnosis was surveyed in Korea. Surveyed scan lengths were additional distance above diaphragm and distance below pubic symphysis except for standard scan range between diaphragm and pubic symphysis. Patient dose was estimated for adult male and female according to scan length of each hospital. CT-Expo was used to estimate the patient dose under identical equipment settings (120 kVp, 100 mAs, 10 mm collimation width, etc.) except scan length. Effective dose was calculated bymore » using tissue weighting factor of ICRP 103 recommendation. Increase rate of effective dose was calculated comparing with effective dose of standard scan range Results: Scan lengths of abdomen/pelvis CT diagnosis of each hospital were different. Also effective dose was increased with increasing the scan length. Generally increasing the distance above diaphragm caused increase of effective dose of male and female, but increasing the distance below pubic symphysis caused increase of effective dose of male. Conclusion: We estimated the patient dose according to scan length of each hospital in abdomen/pelvis CT diagnosis. Effective dose was increased by increasing the scan length because dose of organs with high tissue weighting factor such as lung, breast, testis were increased. Scan length is important factor on patient dose in CT diagnosis. If radiologic technologist interested in patient dose, decreasing the unnecessary scan length will decrease the risk of patients from radiation. This research was supported by a grant of the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), funded by the Ministry of Health & Welfare, Republic of Korea (grant number: HI13C0004).« less

  19. Functional imaging in differentiating bronchial masses: an initial experience with a combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Jindal, Tarun; Dutta, Roman; Kumar, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the role of combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in differentiating bronchial tumors observed in contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of chest. Prospective observational study. Place of study: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. 7 patients with bronchial mass detected in computed tomography scan of the chest were included in this study. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan, (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan and fiberoptic bronchoscope guided biopsy followed by definitive surgical excision. The results of functional imaging studies were analyzed and the results are correlated with the final histopathology of the tumor. Histopathological examination of 7 bronchial masses revealed carcinoid tumors (2 typical, 1 atypical), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (1), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (1), hamartoma (1), and synovial cell sarcoma (1). The typical carcinoids had mild (18)F-FDG uptake and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Atypical carcinoid had moderate uptake of (18)F-FDG and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor showed high uptake of (18)F-FDG and no uptake of (68)Ga DOTA-TOC. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma showed mild (18)F-FDG uptake and no (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Hamartoma showed no uptake on either scans. Synovial cell sarcoma showed moderate (18)F-FDG uptake and mild focal (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. This initial experience with the combined use of (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan reveals different uptake patterns in various bronchial tumors. Bronchoscopic biopsy will continue to be the gold standard; however, the interesting observations made in this study merits further evaluation of the utility of the combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in larger number of patients with bronchial masses.

  20. Quantitative CT scans of lung parenchymal pathology in premature infants ages 0-6 years.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, David R; Walkup, Laura L; Stein, Jill M; Crotty, Eric J; Rattan, Mantosh S; Hossain, Md Monir; Brody, Alan S; Woods, Jason C

    2018-03-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common, heterogeneous disease in premature infants. We hypothesized that quantitative CT techniques could assess lung parenchymal heterogeneity in BPD patients across a broad age range and demonstrate how pathologies change over time. A cross-sectional, retrospective study of children age 0-6 years with non-contrast chest CT scans was conducted. BPD subjects met NICHD/NHLBI diagnostic criteria for BPD and were excluded for congenital lung/airway abnormalities or other known/suspected pulmonary diagnoses; control subjects were not premature and had normal CT scan findings. Radiologic opacities, lucencies, and spatial heterogeneity were quantified via: 1) thresholding using CT-attenuation (HU); 2) manual segmentation; and 3) Ochiai reader-scoring system. Clinical outcomes included BPD severity by NICHD/NHLBI criteria, respiratory support at NICU discharge, wheezing, and respiratory exacerbations. Heterogeneity (standard deviation) of lung attenuation in BPD was significantly greater than in controls (difference 36.4 HU [26.1-46.7 HU], P < 0.001); the difference between the groups decreased 0.58 HU per month of age (0.08-1.07 HU per month, P = 0.02). BPD patients had greater amounts of opacities and lucencies than controls except with automated quantification of lucencies. Cross-sectionally, lucencies per Ochiai score and opacities per manual segmentation decreased with time. No approach measured a statistically significant relationship to BPD clinical severity. Opacities, lucencies, and overall heterogeneity of lungs via quantitative CT can distinguish BPD patients from healthy controls, and these abnormalities decrease with age across BPD patients. Defining BPD severity by clinical outcomes such as respiratory support at several time points (vs a single time point, per current guidelines) may be meaningful. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model (GSM) for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology. PMID:28079526

  2. A measurement-based generalized source model for Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Liu, Ransheng; Yang, Chengwen; Zhou, Li; Zhai, Hezheng; Deng, Jun

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a generalized source model for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of CT scans based solely on the measurement data without a priori knowledge of scanner specifications. The proposed generalized source model consists of an extended circular source located at x-ray target level with its energy spectrum, source distribution and fluence distribution derived from a set of measurement data conveniently available in the clinic. Specifically, the central axis percent depth dose (PDD) curves measured in water and the cone output factors measured in air were used to derive the energy spectrum and the source distribution respectively with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The in-air film measurement of fan-beam dose profiles at fixed gantry was back-projected to generate the fluence distribution of the source model. A benchmarked Monte Carlo user code was used to simulate the dose distributions in water with the developed source model as beam input. The feasibility and accuracy of the proposed source model was tested on a GE LightSpeed and a Philips Brilliance Big Bore multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners available in our clinic. In general, the Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs in water and dose profiles along lateral and longitudinal directions agreed with the measurements within 4%/1 mm for both CT scanners. The absolute dose comparison using two CTDI phantoms (16 cm and 32 cm in diameters) indicated a better than 5% agreement between the Monte Carlo-simulated and the ion chamber-measured doses at a variety of locations for the two scanners. Overall, this study demonstrated that a generalized source model can be constructed based only on a set of measurement data and used for accurate Monte Carlo dose simulations of patients’ CT scans, which would facilitate patient-specific CT organ dose estimation and cancer risk management in the diagnostic and therapeutic radiology.

  3. Abdominal multi-organ segmentation from CT images using conditional shape–location and unsupervised intensity priors

    PubMed Central

    Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal computed tomography (CT) data. The aim of our study is to develop methods to effectively construct the conditional priors and use their prediction power for more accurate segmentation as well as easy adaptation to various imaging conditions in CT images, as observed in clinical practice. We propose a general framework of multi-organ segmentation which effectively incorporates interrelations among multiple organs and easily adapts to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) A method for modeling conditional shape and location (shape–location) priors, which we call prediction-based priors, is developed to derive accurate priors specific to each subject, which enables the estimation of intensity priors without the need for supervised intensity information. (2) Organ correlation graph is introduced, which defines how the conditional priors are constructed and segmentation processes of multiple organs are executed. In our framework, predictor organs, whose segmentation is sufficiently accurate by using conventional single-organ segmentation methods, are pre-segmented, and the remaining organs are hierarchically segmented using conditional shape–location priors. The proposed framework was evaluated through the segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidneys, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 134 CT data from 86 patients obtained under six imaging conditions at two hospitals. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed prediction-based priors and the applicability to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. Average Dice coefficients for the liver, spleen, and kidneys were more than 92%, and were around 73% and 67% for the pancreas and gallbladder, respectively. PMID:26277022

  4. Abdominal multi-organ segmentation from CT images using conditional shape-location and unsupervised intensity priors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Toshiyuki; Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2015-12-01

    This paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal computed tomography (CT) data. The aim of our study is to develop methods to effectively construct the conditional priors and use their prediction power for more accurate segmentation as well as easy adaptation to various imaging conditions in CT images, as observed in clinical practice. We propose a general framework of multi-organ segmentation which effectively incorporates interrelations among multiple organs and easily adapts to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) A method for modeling conditional shape and location (shape-location) priors, which we call prediction-based priors, is developed to derive accurate priors specific to each subject, which enables the estimation of intensity priors without the need for supervised intensity information. (2) Organ correlation graph is introduced, which defines how the conditional priors are constructed and segmentation processes of multiple organs are executed. In our framework, predictor organs, whose segmentation is sufficiently accurate by using conventional single-organ segmentation methods, are pre-segmented, and the remaining organs are hierarchically segmented using conditional shape-location priors. The proposed framework was evaluated through the segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidneys, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 134 CT data from 86 patients obtained under six imaging conditions at two hospitals. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed prediction-based priors and the applicability to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. Average Dice coefficients for the liver, spleen, and kidneys were more than 92%, and were around 73% and 67% for the pancreas and gallbladder, respectively. Copyright © 2015

  5. A new CT collimator for producing two simultaneous overlapping slices from one scan. [for biomedical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwoh, Y. S.; Glenn, W. V., Jr.; Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    A new CT collimator is developed which is capable of producing two simultaneous successive overlapping images from a single scan. The collimator represents a modification of the standard EMI 5005 collimator achieved by alternately masking one end or portions of both ends of the X-ray detectors at a 13-mm beamwidth so that a set of 540 filtered projections is obtained for each scan which can be separated into two sets of interleaved projections corresponding to views 3 mm apart. Tests have demonstrated that the quality of the images produced from these two projections almost equals the quality of those produced by the standard collimator from two separate scans. The new collimator may thus be used to achieve a speed improvement in the generation of overlapping sections as well as a reduction in X-ray dosage.

  6. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin dosesmore » were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply

  7. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Liu, Tianyu; Shi, Jim Q.; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Methods: Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. Results: The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8% − 25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2 ± 3.3 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the

  8. In vitro dose measurements in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da; Padole, Atul; Li, Xinhua; Singh, Sarabjeet; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Lira, Diego; Liu, Tianyu; Shi, Jim Q; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Xu, X George; Liu, Bob

    2014-09-01

    To present a study of radiation dose measurements with a human cadaver scanned on a clinical CT scanner. Multiple point dose measurements were obtained with high-accuracy Thimble ionization chambers placed inside the stomach, liver, paravertebral gutter, ascending colon, left kidney, and urinary bladder of a human cadaver (183 cm in height and 67.5 kg in weight) whose abdomen/pelvis region was scanned repeatedly with a multidetector row CT. The flat energy response and precision of the dosimeters were verified, and the slight differences in each dosimeter's response were evaluated and corrected to attain high accuracy. In addition, skin doses were measured for radiosensitive organs outside the scanned region with OSL dosimeters: the right eye, thyroid, both nipples, and the right testicle. Three scan protocols were used, which shared most scan parameters but had different kVp and mA settings: 120-kVp automA, 120-kVp 300 mA, and 100-kVp 300 mA. For each protocol three repeated scans were performed. The tube starting angle (TSA) was found to randomly vary around two major conditions, which caused large fluctuations in the repeated point dose measurements: for the 120-kVp 300 mA protocol this angle changed from approximately 110° to 290°, and caused 8%-25% difference in the point dose measured at the stomach, liver, colon, and urinary bladder. When the fluctuations of the TSA were small (within 5°), the maximum coefficient of variance was approximately 3.3%. The soft tissue absorbed doses averaged from four locations near the center of the scanned region were 27.2±3.3 and 16.5±2.7 mGy for the 120 and 100-kVp fixed-mA scans, respectively. These values were consistent with the corresponding size specific dose estimates within 4%. The comparison of the per-100-mAs tissue doses from the three protocols revealed that: (1) dose levels at nonsuperficial locations in the TCM scans could not be accurately deduced by simply scaling the fix-mA doses with local mA values; (2

  9. A Fast Experimental Scanner for Proton CT: Technical Performance and First Experience with Phantom Scans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert P; Bashkirov, Vladimir; DeWitt, Langley; Giacometti, Valentina; Hurley, Robert F; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Plautz, Tia E; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F-W; Schubert, Keith; Schulte, Reinhard; Schultze, Blake; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy

    2016-02-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and first tests of a tomographic scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) of head-sized objects. After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. The scanner consists of two silicon-strip telescopes that track individual protons before and after the phantom, and a novel multistage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton, from which we derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and the associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360° angular scan are processed by an iterative, parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on modern GP-GPU hardware. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed tests with 200 MeV protons from the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center and the IBA cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. Our first objective was calibration of the instrument, including tracker channel maps and alignment as well as the WEPL calibration. Then we performed the first CT scans on a series of phantoms. The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 10 minutes, and reconstruction of a CATPHAN 404 phantom verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power in a variety of materials.

  10. A Fast Experimental Scanner for Proton CT: Technical Performance and First Experience With Phantom Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert P.; Bashkirov, Vladimir; DeWitt, Langley; Giacometti, Valentina; Hurley, Robert F.; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Plautz, Tia E.; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F.-W.; Schubert, Keith; Schulte, Reinhard; Schultze, Blake; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy

    2016-02-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and first tests of a tomographic scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) of head-sized objects. After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. The scanner consists of two silicon-strip telescopes that track individual protons before and after the phantom, and a novel multistage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton, from which we derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and the associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360 ° angular scan are processed by an iterative, parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on modern GP-GPU hardware. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed tests with 200 MeV protons from the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center and the IBA cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. Our first objective was calibration of the instrument, including tracker channel maps and alignment as well as the WEPL calibration. Then we performed the first CT scans on a series of phantoms. The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360 ° scan to be completed in less than 10 minutes, and reconstruction of a CATPHAN 404 phantom verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power in a variety of materials.

  11. Automatic classication of pulmonary function in COPD patients using trachea analysis in chest CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rikxoort, E. M.; de Jong, P. A.; Mets, O. M.; van Ginneken, B.

    2012-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is characterized by airflow limitation. COPD is clinically diagnosed and monitored using pulmonary function testing (PFT), which measures global inspiration and expiration capabilities of patients and is time-consuming and labor-intensive. It is becoming standard practice to obtain paired inspiration-expiration CT scans of COPD patients. Predicting the PFT results from the CT scans would alleviate the need for PFT testing. It is hypothesized that the change of the trachea during breathing might be an indicator of tracheomalacia in COPD patients and correlate with COPD severity. In this paper, we propose to automatically measure morphological changes in the trachea from paired inspiration and expiration CT scans and investigate the influence on COPD GOLD stage classification. The trachea is automatically segmented and the trachea shape is encoded using the lengths of rays cast from the center of gravity of the trachea. These features are used in a classifier, combined with emphysema scoring, to attempt to classify subjects into their COPD stage. A database of 187 subjects, well distributed over the COPD GOLD stages 0 through 4 was used for this study. The data was randomly divided into training and test set. Using the training scans, a nearest mean classifier was trained to classify the subjects into their correct GOLD stage using either emphysema score, tracheal shape features, or a combination. Combining the proposed trachea shape features with emphysema score, the classification performance into GOLD stages improved with 11% to 51%. In addition, an 80% accuracy was achieved in distinguishing healthy subjects from COPD patients.

  12. A Fast Experimental Scanner for Proton CT: Technical Performance and First Experience with Phantom Scans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert P.; Bashkirov, Vladimir; DeWitt, Langley; Giacometti, Valentina; Hurley, Robert F.; Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Plautz, Tia E.; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F.-W.; Schubert, Keith; Schulte, Reinhard; Schultze, Blake; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and first tests of a tomographic scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) of head-sized objects. After extensive preclinical testing, pCT is intended to be employed in support of proton therapy treatment planning and pre-treatment verification in patients undergoing particle-beam therapy. The scanner consists of two silicon-strip telescopes that track individual protons before and after the phantom, and a novel multistage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton, from which we derive the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and the associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360° angular scan are processed by an iterative, parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on modern GP-GPU hardware. In order to assess the performance of the scanner, we have performed tests with 200 MeV protons from the synchrotron of the Loma Linda University Medical Center and the IBA cyclotron of the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. Our first objective was calibration of the instrument, including tracker channel maps and alignment as well as the WEPL calibration. Then we performed the first CT scans on a series of phantoms. The very high sustained rate of data acquisition, exceeding one million protons per second, allowed a full 360° scan to be completed in less than 10 minutes, and reconstruction of a CATPHAN 404 phantom verified accurate reconstruction of the proton relative stopping power in a variety of materials. PMID:27127307

  13. Analysis of calibration materials to improve dual-energy CT scanning for petrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyalasomavaiula, K.; McIntyre, D.; Jain, J.

    2011-01-01

    Dual energy CT-scanning is a rapidly emerging imaging technique employed in non-destructive evaluation of various materials. Although CT (Computerized Tomography) has been used for characterizing rocks and visualizing and quantifying multiphase flow through rocks for over 25 years, most of the scanning is done at a voltage setting above 100 kV for taking advantage of the Compton scattering (CS) effect, which responds to density changes. Below 100 kV the photoelectric effect (PE) is dominant which responds to the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), which is directly related to the photo electric factor. Using the combination of the two effects helps inmore » better characterization of reservoir rocks. The most common technique for dual energy CT-scanning relies on homogeneous calibration standards to produce the most accurate decoupled data. However, the use of calibration standards with impurities increases the probability of error in the reconstructed data and results in poor rock characterization. This work combines ICP-OES (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy) and LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy) analytical techniques to quantify the type and level of impurities in a set of commercially purchased calibration standards used in dual-energy scanning. The Zeff data on the calibration standards with and without impurity data were calculated using the weighted linear combination of the various elements present and used in calculating Zeff using the dual energy technique. Results show 2 to 5% difference in predicted Zeff values which may affect the corresponding log calibrations. The effect that these techniques have on improving material identification data is discussed and analyzed. The workflow developed in this paper will translate to a more accurate material identification estimates for unknown samples and improve calibration of well logging tools.« less

  14. TH-C-18A-11: Investigating the Minimum Scan Parameters Required to Generate Free-Breathing Fast-Helical CT Scans Without Motion-Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; Neylon, J; Dou, T

    Purpose: A recently proposed 4D-CT protocol uses deformable registration of free-breathing fast-helical CT scans to generate a breathing motion model. In order to allow accurate registration, free-breathing images are required to be free of doubling-artifacts, which arise when tissue motion is greater than scan speed. This work identifies the minimum scanner parameters required to successfully generate free-breathing fast-helical scans without doubling-artifacts. Methods: 10 patients were imaged under free breathing conditions 25 times in alternating directions with a 64-slice CT scanner using a low dose fast helical protocol. A high temporal resolution (0.1s) 4D-CT was generated using a patient specific motionmore » model and patient breathing waveforms, and used as the input for a scanner simulation. Forward projections were calculated using helical cone-beam geometry (800 projections per rotation) and a GPU accelerated reconstruction algorithm was implemented. Various CT scanner detector widths and rotation times were simulated, and verified using a motion phantom. Doubling-artifacts were quantified in patient images using structural similarity maps to determine the similarity between axial slices. Results: Increasing amounts of doubling-artifacts were observed with increasing rotation times > 0.2s for 16×1mm slice scan geometry. No significant increase in doubling artifacts was observed for 64×1mm slice scan geometry up to 1.0s rotation time although blurring artifacts were observed >0.6s. Using a 16×1mm slice scan geometry, a rotation time of less than 0.3s (53mm/s scan speed) would be required to produce images of similar quality to a 64×1mm slice scan geometry. Conclusion: The current generation of 16 slice CT scanners, which are present in most Radiation Oncology departments, are not capable of generating free-breathing sorting-artifact-free images in the majority of patients. The next generation of CT scanners should be capable of at least 53mm

  15. Growth characterisation of intra-thoracic organs of children on CT scans.

    PubMed

    Coulongeat, François; Jarrar, Mohamed-Salah; Thollon, Lionel; Serre, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the geometry of intra-thoracic organs from computed tomography (CT) scans performed on 20 children aged from 4 months to 16 years. The aim is to find the most reliable measurements to characterise the growth of heart and lungs from CT data. Standard measurements available on chest radiographies are compared with original measurements only available on CT scans. These measurements should characterise the growth of organs as well as the changes in their position relative to the thorax. Measurements were considered as functions of age. Quadratic regression models were fitted to the data. Goodness of fit of the models was then evaluated. Positions of organs relative to the thorax have a high variability compared with their changes with age. The length and volume of the heart and lungs as well as the diameter of the thorax fit well to the models of growth. It could be interesting to study these measurements with a larger sample size in order to define growth standards.

  16. BODY SIZE-SPECIFIC EFFECTIVE DOSE CONVERSION COEFFICIENTS FOR CT SCANS.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Anna; Folio, Les; Lamart, Stephanie; Simon, Steven L; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-12-01

    Effective dose from computed tomography (CT) examinations is usually estimated using the scanner-provided dose-length product and using conversion factors, also known as k-factors, which correspond to scan regions and differ by age according to five categories: 0, 1, 5, 10 y and adult. However, patients often deviate from the standard body size on which the conversion factor is based. In this study, a method for deriving body size-specific k-factors is presented, which can be determined from a simple regression curve based on patient diameter at the centre of the scan range. Using the International Commission on Radiological Protection reference paediatric and adult computational phantoms paired with Monte Carlo simulation of CT X-ray beams, the authors derived a regression-based k-factor model for the following CT scan types: head-neck, head, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis, abdomen-pelvis (AP) and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP). The resulting regression functions were applied to a total of 105 paediatric and 279 adult CT scans randomly sampled from patients who underwent chest, AP and CAP scans at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. The authors have calculated and compared the effective doses derived from the conventional age-specific k-factors with the values computed using their body size-specific k-factor. They found that by using the age-specific k-factor, paediatric patients tend to have underestimates (up to 3-fold) of effective dose, while underweight and overweight adult patients tend to have underestimates (up to 2.6-fold) and overestimates (up to 4.6-fold) of effective dose, respectively, compared with the effective dose determined from their body size-dependent factors. The authors present these size-specific k-factors as an alternative to the existing age-specific factors. The body size-specific k-factor will assess effective dose more precisely and on a more individual level than the conventional age-specific k-factors and, hence, improve

  17. Dose profile variation with voltage in head CT scans using radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourão, A. P.; Alonso, T. C.; DaSilva, T. A.

    2014-02-01

    The voltage source used in an X-ray tube is an important part of defining the generated beam spectrum energy profile. The X-ray spectrum energy defines the X-ray beam absorption as well as the characteristics of the energy deposition in an irradiated object. Although CT scanners allow one to choose between four different voltage values, most of them employ a voltage of 120 kV in their scanning protocols, regardless of the patient characteristics. Based on this fact, this work investigated the deposited dose in a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylindrical head phantom. The entire volume was irradiated twice. Two CT scanning protocols were used with two different voltage values: 100 and 120 kV. The phantom volume was irradiated, and radiochromic films were employed to record dose profiles. Measurements were conducted with a calibrated pencil ionization chamber, which was positioned in the center and in four peripheral bores of the head PMMA phantom, to calibrate the radiochromic films. The central slice was then irradiated. This procedure allowed us to find the conversion factors necessary to obtain dose values recorded in the films. The data obtained allowed us to observe the dose variation profile inside the phantom head as well as in the peripheral and central regions. The peripheral region showed higher dose values than those of the central region for scans using both voltage values: approximately 31% higher for scanning with 120 kV and 25% higher with 100 kV. Doses recorded with the highest voltage are significantly higher, approximately 50% higher in the peripheral region and 40% higher in the central region. A longitudinal variation could be observed, and the maximum dose was recorded at the peripheral region, at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The obtained results will most likely contribute to the dissemination of proper procedure as well as to optimize dosimetry and tests of quality control in CT because the choice of protocols with different voltage

  18. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984more » pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.« less

  19. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  20. A Multiatlas Segmentation Using Graph Cuts with Applications to Liver Segmentation in CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An atlas-based segmentation approach is presented that combines low-level operations, an affine probabilistic atlas, and a multiatlas-based segmentation. The proposed combination provides highly accurate segmentation due to registrations and atlas selections based on the regions of interest (ROIs) and coarse segmentations. Our approach shares the following common elements between the probabilistic atlas and multiatlas segmentation: (a) the spatial normalisation and (b) the segmentation method, which is based on minimising a discrete energy function using graph cuts. The method is evaluated for the segmentation of the liver in computed tomography (CT) images. Low-level operations define a ROI around the liver from an abdominal CT. We generate a probabilistic atlas using an affine registration based on geometry moments from manually labelled data. Next, a coarse segmentation of the liver is obtained from the probabilistic atlas with low computational effort. Then, a multiatlas segmentation approach improves the accuracy of the segmentation. Both the atlas selections and the nonrigid registrations of the multiatlas approach use a binary mask defined by coarse segmentation. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach performs better than atlas selections and nonrigid registrations in the entire ROI. The segmentation results are comparable to those obtained by human experts and to other recently published results. PMID:25276219

  1. Evaluation of diagnostic value of CT scan, physical examination and ultrasound based on pathological findings in patients with pelvic masses.

    PubMed

    Firoozabadi, Razieh Dehghani; Karimi Zarchi, Mojgan; Mansurian, Hamid Reza; Moghadam, Bita Rafiei; Teimoori, Soraya; Naseri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Because benign and malignant cervical and ovarian masses occur with different percentages in different age groups, the importance of primary diagnosis and selection of a suitable surgical procedure is underlined. Diagnosis of pelvic masses is carried out using ultrasound, physical examination, CT scan and MRI. The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of CT scan in pelvic masses in comparison with physical examination-ultrasound based on pathology of the lesion in patients undergoing laparotomic surgery. This analytic-descriptive study focused on age, sonographic findings, physical examinations, CT scan and pathological findings in 139 patients with pelvic mass, gathered with questionnaires and statistically analayzed using the SPSS software programme. Of 139 patients with pelvic mass (patients aged from 17 to 75 years old), 62 (44%) cases were diagnosed as benign and 77 (55.4%) as malignant; among them malignant tratoma serocyst adenocarsinoma with 33 (23.7%) cases and benign myoma with 21 (15.2%) cases comprised the most frequent cases. The sensitivity and specificity of sonography-physical examination were 51.9% and 87.9% respectively and the sensitivity and specificity of CT scan images were 79.2% and 91.6% respectively. It was shown that CT scan images were more consistant with pathological findings in predicting appropriate surgical procedures than do sonography-physical examinations. The sensitivity of CT scan is far higher than that of sonography-physical examination in the diagnosis of pelvic mass malignancy.

  2. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients (REACT-2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computed tomography (CT) scanning has become essential in the early diagnostic phase of trauma care because of its high diagnostic accuracy. The introduction of multi-slice CT scanners and infrastructural improvements made total-body CT scanning technically feasible and its usage is currently becoming common practice in several trauma centers. However, literature provides limited evidence whether immediate total-body CT leads to better clinical outcome then conventional radiographic imaging supplemented with selective CT scanning in trauma patients. The aim of the REACT-2 trial is to determine the value of immediate total-body CT scanning in trauma patients. Methods/design The REACT-2 trial is an international, multicenter randomized clinical trial. All participating trauma centers have a multi-slice CT scanner located in the trauma room or at the Emergency Department (ED). All adult, non-pregnant, severely injured trauma patients according to predefined criteria will be included. Patients in whom direct scanning will hamper necessary cardiopulmonary resuscitation or who require an immediate operation because of imminent death (both as judged by the trauma team leader) are excluded. Randomization will be computer assisted. The intervention group will receive a contrast-enhanced total-body CT scan (head to pelvis) during the primary survey. The control group will be evaluated according to local conventional trauma imaging protocols (based on ATLS guidelines) supplemented with selective CT scanning. Primary outcome will be in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes are differences in mortality and morbidity during the first year post trauma, several trauma work-up time intervals, radiation exposure, general health and quality of life at 6 and 12 months post trauma and cost-effectiveness. Discussion The REACT-2 trial is a multicenter randomized clinical trial that will provide evidence on the value of immediate total-body CT scanning during the primary

  3. Automatic segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda tympani in pediatric CT scans.

    PubMed

    Reda, Fitsum A; Noble, Jack H; Rivas, Alejandro; McRackan, Theodore R; Labadie, Robert F; Dawant, Benoit M

    2011-10-01

    Cochlear implant surgery is used to implant an electrode array in the cochlea to treat hearing loss. The authors recently introduced a minimally invasive image-guided technique termed percutaneous cochlear implantation. This approach achieves access to the cochlea by drilling a single linear channel from the outer skull into the cochlea via the facial recess, a region bounded by the facial nerve and chorda tympani. To exploit existing methods for computing automatically safe drilling trajectories, the facial nerve and chorda tympani need to be segmented. The goal of this work is to automatically segment the facial nerve and chorda tympani in pediatric CT scans. The authors have proposed an automatic technique to achieve the segmentation task in adult patients that relies on statistical models of the structures. These models contain intensity and shape information along the central axes of both structures. In this work, the authors attempted to use the same method to segment the structures in pediatric scans. However, the authors learned that substantial differences exist between the anatomy of children and that of adults, which led to poor segmentation results when an adult model is used to segment a pediatric volume. Therefore, the authors built a new model for pediatric cases and used it to segment pediatric scans. Once this new model was built, the authors employed the same segmentation method used for adults with algorithm parameters that were optimized for pediatric anatomy. A validation experiment was conducted on 10 CT scans in which manually segmented structures were compared to automatically segmented structures. The mean, standard deviation, median, and maximum segmentation errors were 0.23, 0.17, 0.18, and 1.27 mm, respectively. The results indicate that accurate segmentation of the facial nerve and chorda tympani in pediatric scans is achievable, thus suggesting that safe drilling trajectories can also be computed automatically.

  4. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; Koo, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been carried out in South Korea. The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiation dose in pediatric CT examinations performed throughout South Korea. From 512 CT (222 brain CT, 105 chest CT, and 185 abdominopelvic CT) scans that were referred to our tertiary hospital, a dose report sheet was available for retrospective analysis of CT scan protocols and dose, including the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). At 55.2%, multiphase CT was the most frequently performed protocol for abdominopelvic CT. Tube current modulation was applied most often in abdominopelvic CT and chest CT, accounting for 70.1% and 62.7%, respectively. Regarding the CT dose, the interquartile ranges of the CTDIvol were 11.1 to 22.5 (newborns), 16.6 to 39.1 (≤1 year), 14.6 to 41.7 (2–5 years), 23.5 to 44.1 (6–10 years), and 31.4 to 55.3 (≤15 years) for brain CT; 1.3 to 5.7 (≤1 year), 3.9 to 6.8 (2–5 years), 3.9 to 9.3 (6–10 years), and 7.7 to 13.8 (≤15 years) for chest CT; and 4.0 to 7.5 (≤1 year), 4.2 to 8.9 (2–5 years), 5.7 to 12.4 (6–10 years), and 7.6 to 16.6 (≤15 years) for abdominopelvic CT. The SSDE and CTDIvol were well correlated for patients <5 years old, whereas the CTDIvol was lower in patients ≥6 years old. Our study describes the various parameters and dosimetry metrics of pediatric CT in South Korea. The CTDIvol, DLP, and effective dose were generally lower than in German and UK

  5. Radiation Dose in the Thyroid and the Thyroid Cancer Risk Attributable to CT Scans for Pediatric Patients in One General Hospital of China

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yin-Ping; Niu, Hao-Wei; Chen, Jun-Bo; Fu, Ying-Hua; Xiao, Guo-Bing; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the radiation dose in the thyroid attributable to different CT scans and to estimate the thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients. Methods: The information about pediatric patients who underwent CT scans was abstracted from the radiology information system in one general hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The radiation doses were calculated using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of thyroid cancer incidence was estimated based on the National Academies Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII model. Results: The subjects comprised 922 children, 68% were males, and received 971 CT scans. The range of typical radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 0.61–0.92 mGy for paranasal sinus CT scans, 1.10–2.45 mGy for head CT scans, and 2.63–5.76 mGy for chest CT scans. The LAR of thyroid cancer were as follows: for head CT, 1.1 per 100,000 for boys and 8.7 per 100,000 for girls; for paranasal sinus CT scans, 0.4 per 100,000 for boys and 2.7 per 100,000 for girls; for chest CT scans, 2.1 per 100,000 for boys and 14.1 per 100,000 for girls. The risk of thyroid cancer was substantially higher for girls than for the boys, and from chest CT scans was higher than that from head or paransal sinus CT scans. Conclusions: Chest CT scans caused higher thyroid dose and the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, compared with paransal sinus or head CT scans. Therefore, physicians should pay more attention to protect the thyroid when children underwent CT scans, especially chest CT scans. PMID:24608902

  6. Radiation dose in the thyroid and the thyroid cancer risk attributable to CT scans for pediatric patients in one general hospital of China.

    PubMed

    Su, Yin-Ping; Niu, Hao-Wei; Chen, Jun-Bo; Fu, Ying-Hua; Xiao, Guo-Bing; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2014-03-07

    To quantify the radiation dose in the thyroid attributable to different CT scans and to estimate the thyroid cancer risk in pediatric patients. The information about pediatric patients who underwent CT scans was abstracted from the radiology information system in one general hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The radiation doses were calculated using the ImPACT Patient Dosimetry Calculator and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of thyroid cancer incidence was estimated based on the National Academies Biologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation VII model. The subjects comprised 922 children, 68% were males, and received 971 CT scans. The range of typical radiation dose to the thyroid was estimated to be 0.61-0.92 mGy for paranasal sinus CT scans, 1.10-2.45 mGy for head CT scans, and 2.63-5.76 mGy for chest CT scans. The LAR of thyroid cancer were as follows: for head CT, 1.1 per 100,000 for boys and 8.7 per 100,000 for girls; for paranasal sinus CT scans, 0.4 per 100,000 for boys and 2.7 per 100,000 for girls; for chest CT scans, 2.2 per 100,000 for boys and 14.2 per 100,000 for girls. The risk of thyroid cancer was substantially higher for girls than for the boys, and from chest CT scans was higher than that from head or paransal sinus CT scans. Chest CT scans caused higher thyroid dose and the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, compared with paransal sinus or head CT scans. Therefore, physicians should pay more attention to protect the thyroid when children underwent CT scans, especially chest CT scans.

  7. Semi-automated method to measure pneumonia severity in mice through computed tomography (CT) scan analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Ansh; Schimel, Daniel; Noguchi, Audrey; Hsu, Lewis L.

    2010-03-01

    Imaging is a crucial clinical tool for diagnosis and assessment of pneumonia, but quantitative methods are lacking. Micro-computed tomography (micro CT), designed for lab animals, provides opportunities for non-invasive radiographic endpoints for pneumonia studies. HYPOTHESIS: In vivo micro CT scans of mice with early bacterial pneumonia can be scored quantitatively by semiautomated imaging methods, with good reproducibility and correlation with bacterial dose inoculated, pneumonia survival outcome, and radiologists' scores. METHODS: Healthy mice had intratracheal inoculation of E. coli bacteria (n=24) or saline control (n=11). In vivo micro CT scans were performed 24 hours later with microCAT II (Siemens). Two independent radiologists scored the extent of airspace abnormality, on a scale of 0 (normal) to 24 (completely abnormal). Using the Amira 5.2 software (Mercury Computer Systems), a histogram distribution of voxel counts between the Hounsfield range of -510 to 0 was created and analyzed, and a segmentation procedure was devised. RESULTS: A t-test was performed to determine whether there was a significant difference in the mean voxel value of each mouse in the three experimental groups: Saline Survivors, Pneumonia Survivors, and Pneumonia Non-survivors. It was found that the voxel count method was able to statistically tell apart the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Survivors, the Saline Survivors from the Pneumonia Non-survivors, but not the Pneumonia Survivors vs. Pneumonia Non-survivors. The segmentation method, however, was successfully able to distinguish the two Pneumonia groups. CONCLUSION: We have pilot-tested an evaluation of early pneumonia in mice using micro CT and a semi-automated method for lung segmentation and scoring system. Statistical analysis indicates that the system is reliable and merits further evaluation.

  8. The impact of the introduction of PECARN head CT rules on the utilisation of head CT scans in a private tertiary hospital in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Isaac O; Qureshi, Mahmoud M; Hassan, Saidi; Oluoch-Olunya, David L

    2017-12-01

    The decision to order head CT scans to rule out clinically significant traumatic brain injury in mild head injury in children is made on the basis of clinical decision rules of which the Paediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) CT head rules have been found to be most sensitive. The purpose of this study is to determine the proportion of head CT scans done for children with mild head injury and to determine disposition of patients from casualty after the introduction of PECARN head CT rules compared to the period before. The research question is "will introduction of the PECARN CT head rules reduce the proportion of head CT scans requested for children under 18 years with mild head injury at the AKUHN?" A before and after quasi experimental study with a study population including all children under 18 years presenting to the AKUHN with mild head injury and a Glasgow coma scale of 14 and above on presentation. Sample size was 85. A total of 42 patients files were analysed in the before study while 43 patients were selected for the after study. The median age was 5 years. The proportion of head CT scans reduced from 56% in the before group to 33% in the after group with no missed clinically significant traumatic brain injury. More patients were discharged home after evaluation in the after group (81%) than in the before group (58%). The number of head CT scans ordered reduced without missing any clinically significant traumatic brain injury.

  9. Contribution of CT scan and CT-guided aspiration in the management of retropharyngeal abscess in children based on a series of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Martin, C A; Gabrillargues, J; Louvrier, C; Saroul, N; Mom, T; Gilain, L

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to analyse the contribution of CT scan to the management of retropharyngeal abscess in children and the place of CT-guided percutaneous aspiration as an alternative to surgical drainage. Retrospective study including 18 children with a mean age of 38 months [range: 5-67 months] presenting with retropharyngeal infection between 2006 and 2011. All cases were initially assessed by contrast-enhanced CT scan of the neck. Clinical, radiological treatment and bacteriological data were collected. Radiological results were correlated with surgical and percutaneous aspiration findings (presence or absence of an abscess). The initial CT scan detected 14 abscesses, 3 cases of non-suppurative lymphadenitis and one case of retropharyngeal oedema. One case of non-suppurative lymphadenitis progressed to abscess after failure of antibiotic therapy and was treated surgically. Surgical drainage revealed a purulent collection in 11 cases and no collection in 3 cases. Four CT-guided percutaneous aspirations were successfully performed. Three cases were treated by antibiotics alone (2 cases of lymphadenitis and 1 case of retropharyngeal oedema). Bacteriological examinations revealed the presence of Streptococcus pyogenes in 78.5% of cases. The positive predictive value of the initial CT scan was 78.8% in our series. Contrast-enhanced neck CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of retropharyngeal abscess and the indication for surgical drainage. It must be performed urgently, on admission. When it is decided to treat the patient with antibiotics alone, follow-up imaging should be performed in the absence of improvement 24 to 48 hours after starting antibiotics. CT-guided percutaneous aspiration is both a diagnostic modality confirming abscess formation of an inflammatory lesion of the retropharyngeal space as well as a therapeutic tool, sometimes avoiding the need for surgical drainage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-21

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  11. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Gao, Linfeng; Ge, Chaoyong; Zheng, Junzheng; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli

    2014-09-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations.

  12. Determining the lymphadenopathy characteristics of the mediastinum in lung CT scan of children with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrian, Payam; Moghaddam, Amin Momeni; Tavakkol, Elham; Amini, Afshin; Moghimi, Mehrdad; Kabir, Ali; Velayati, Aliakbar

    2016-09-01

    Most tuberculosis cases in children are primary infection, with difficult and imprecise diagnosis mainly based on the existence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Here, we investigated the characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy in lung computed tomography (CT) scans of children with tuberculosis. This cross-sectional study was performed on 75 children with tuberculosis referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2013. Their medical records were investigated, and CT-scan characteristics were extracted by a radiologist. Mean±standard deviation age of cases was 11.2±4.6years. CT-scan results indicated 94.7% of cases had lymphadenopathy, with lower paratracheal, upper paratracheal, hilar, and subcarinal forms observed in 81.7%, 69.1%, 53.5%, and 47.9% of cases as the most involved stations in lymph nodes, respectively. In 74.6% of patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, perilymph node fat inflammation (matting) was observed, with 52.11% exhibiting conglomeration. Bronchial pressure was observed in 4.23% of children with tuberculosis, and bilateral-, right-, and left-parenchymal involvement was observed in 42.7%, 25.3%, and 8% of these cases, respectively. Left- and right-pleural effusion and calcification was reported in 6.7%, 12%, and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Additionally, nearly 80% of patients exhibited mediastinal lymphadenopathy and lung-parenchyma involvement simultaneously. Lung-parenchyma involvement was significantly correlated with subcarinal (p<.001), hilar (p<.001), subaortic (p=.030), lower paratracheal (p=.037), and axillary (p=.006) stations. Situation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy and its synchronicity with lung-parenchyma involvement can help in differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis from other lung diseases. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative assessment of emphysema from whole lung CT scans: comparison with visual grading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Apanosovich, Tatiyana V.; Wang, Jianwei; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    Emphysema is a disease of the lungs that destroys the alveolar air sacs and induces long-term respiratory dysfunction. CT scans allow for imaging of the anatomical basis of emphysema and for visual assessment by radiologists of the extent present in the lungs. Several measures have been introduced for the quantification of the extent of disease directly from CT data in order to add to the qualitative assessments made by radiologists. In this paper we compare emphysema index, mean lung density, histogram percentiles, and the fractal dimension to visual grade in order to evaluate the predictability of radiologist visual scoring of emphysema from low-dose CT scans through quantitative scores, in order to determine which measures can be useful as surrogates for visual assessment. All measures were computed over nine divisions of the lung field (whole lung, individual lungs, and upper/middle/lower thirds of each lung) for each of 148 low-dose, whole lung scans. In addition, a visual grade of each section was also given by an expert radiologist. One-way ANOVA and multinomial logistic regression were used to determine the ability of the measures to predict visual grade from quantitative score. We found that all measures were able to distinguish between normal and severe grades (p<0.01), and between mild/moderate and all other grades (p<0.05). However, no measure was able to distinguish between mild and moderate cases. Approximately 65% prediction accuracy was achieved from using quantitative score to predict visual grade, with 73% if mild and moderate cases are considered as a single class.

  14. Relative location prediction in CT scan images using convolutional neural networks.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiajia; Du, Hongwei; Zhu, Jianyue; Yan, Ting; Qiu, Bensheng

    2018-07-01

    Relative location prediction in computed tomography (CT) scan images is a challenging problem. Many traditional machine learning methods have been applied in attempts to alleviate this problem. However, the accuracy and speed of these methods cannot meet the requirement of medical scenario. In this paper, we propose a regression model based on one-dimensional convolutional neural networks (CNN) to determine the relative location of a CT scan image both quickly and precisely. In contrast to other common CNN models that use a two-dimensional image as an input, the input of this CNN model is a feature vector extracted by a shape context algorithm with spatial correlation. Normalization via z-score is first applied as a pre-processing step. Then, in order to prevent overfitting and improve model's performance, 20% of the elements of the feature vectors are randomly set to zero. This CNN model consists primarily of three one-dimensional convolutional layers, three dropout layers and two fully-connected layers with appropriate loss functions. A public dataset is employed to validate the performance of the proposed model using a 5-fold cross validation. Experimental results demonstrate an excellent performance of the proposed model when compared with contemporary techniques, achieving a median absolute error of 1.04 cm and mean absolute error of 1.69 cm. The time taken for each relative location prediction is approximately 2 ms. Results indicate that the proposed CNN method can contribute to a quick and accurate relative location prediction in CT scan images, which can improve efficiency of the medical picture archiving and communication system in the future. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Using Micro CT Scanning to Assess Pteropod Shells in the Modern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, R. L.; Urbanski, J. M.; Bralower, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    Anthropogenic activities are causing fundamental changes to ocean chemistry. Calcareous plankton and nekton are predicted to be affected by these chemical changes, especially by ocean acidification. These groups are at the base of the marine food chain and therefore their demise will have a strong effect on the marine ecosystem as a whole. One challenge moving forward is to find a method to assess how chemical changes manifest themselves in plankton and nekton shells. Recent advancements in computed tomographic (CT) scanning technology allows for organisms to be imaged in three dimensions at micrometer resolution. CT data enables quantitative measurements of properties such as shell thickness, volume, and morphology. We apply this method to look at pteropods, nektonic molluscs which make their shells from the more soluble form of calcium carbonate, aragonite. Their shell mineralogy, and the fact that some groups live in polar and upwelling waters, place them at high risk for ocean acidification. We have scanned over 70 pteropods from 5 different locations globally. Analysis shows that there is a significant difference in pteropod shell thickness in different ocean basins with the thinnest shells being found off the coast of Washington. Changes in shell thickness may affect pteropod swimming efficiency, predation, and rate of sinking. Shell volume does not seem to vary with shell thickness suggesting that changes will impact pteropods at all ontogenetic stages. We are working towards a geometric morphometric analysis of these shells to see if the shape differs in areas with different ocean conditions. This initial set of CT scans of pteropods can be used as a baseline to which future changes can be compared. Furthermore, this technique has the potential to be easily transferred to other organisms as a method of assessing shell change in response to ocean acidification and associated factors.

  16. Feasibility Study of Using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) for Reducing Radiation and Iodine Contrast Dose in Abdominal CT Patients with High BMI Values.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zheng; Zhao, Xin-ming; Zhao, Yan-feng; Wang, Xiao-yi; Zhou, Chun-wu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively investigate the effect of using Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for reducing radiation and iodine contrast dose in abdominal CT patients with high BMI values. 26 patients (weight > 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) underwent abdominal CT using GSI mode with 300mgI/kg contrast material as study group (group A). Another 21 patients (weight ≤ 65kg and BMI ≥ 22) were scanned with a conventional 120 kVp tube voltage for noise index (NI) of 11 with 450mgI/kg contrast material as control group (group B). GSI images were reconstructed at 60keV with 50%ASIR and the conventional 120kVp images were reconstructed with FBP reconstruction. The CT values, standard deviation (SD), signal-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) of 26 landmarks were quantitatively measured and image quality qualitatively assessed using statistical analysis. As for the quantitative analysis, the difference of CNR between groups A and B was all significant except for the mesenteric vein. The SNR in group A was higher than B except the mesenteric artery and splenic artery. As for the qualitative analysis, all images had diagnostic quality and the agreement for image quality assessment between the reviewers was substantial (kappa = 0.684). CT dose index (CTDI) values for non-enhanced, arterial phase and portal phase in group A were decreased by 49.04%, 40.51% and 40.54% compared with group B (P = 0.000), respectively. The total dose and the injection rate for the contrast material were reduced by 14.40% and 14.95% in A compared with B. The use of GSI and ASIR provides similar enhancement in vessels and image quality with reduced radiation dose and contrast dose, compared with the use of conventional scan protocol.

  17. Clinical Decision Rules for Paediatric Minor Head Injury: Are CT Scans a Necessary Evil?

    PubMed

    Thiam, Desmond Wei; Yap, Si Hui; Chong, Shu Ling

    2015-09-01

    High performing clinical decision rules (CDRs) have been derived to predict which head-injured child requires a computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We set out to evaluate the performance of these rules in the Singapore population. This is a prospective observational cohort study of children aged less than 16 who presented to the emergency department (ED) from April 2014 to June 2014 with a history of head injury. Predictor variables used in the Canadian Assessment of Tomography for Childhood Head Injury (CATCH), Children's Head Injury Algorithm for the Prediction of Important Clinical Events (CHALICE) and Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) CDRs were collected. Decisions on CT imaging and disposition were made at the physician's discretion. The performance of the CDRs were assessed and compared to current practices. A total of 1179 children were included in this study. Twelve (1%) CT scans were ordered; 6 (0.5%) of them had positive findings. The application of the CDRs would have resulted in a significant increase in the number of children being subjected to CT (as follows): CATCH 237 (20.1%), CHALICE 282 (23.9%), PECARN high- and intermediate-risk 456 (38.7%), PECARN high-risk only 45 (3.8%). The CDRs demonstrated sensitivities of: CATCH 100% (54.1 to 100), CHALICE 83.3% (35.9 to 99.6), PECARN 100% (54.1 to 100), and specificities of: CATCH 80.3% (77.9 to 82.5), CHALICE 76.4% (73.8 to 78.8), PECARN high- and intermediate-risk 61.6% (58.8 to 64.4) and PECARN high-risk only 96.7% (95.5 to 97.6). The CDRs demonstrated high accuracy in detecting children with positive CT findings but direct application in areas with low rates of significant traumatic brain injury (TBI) is likely to increase unnecessary CT scans ordered. Clinical observation in most cases may be a better alternative.

  18. Evaluation of acute ischemic stroke using quantitative EEG: a comparison with conventional EEG and CT scan.

    PubMed

    Murri, L; Gori, S; Massetani, R; Bonanni, E; Marcella, F; Milani, S

    1998-06-01

    The sensitivity of quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG) was compared with that of conventional EEG in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. In addition, a correlation between quantitative EEG data and computerized tomography (CT) scan findings was carried out for all the areas of lesion in order to reassess the actual role of EEG in the evaluation of stroke. Sixty-five patients were tested with conventional and quantitative EEG within 24 h from the onset of neurological symptoms, whereas CT scan was performed within 4 days from the onset of stroke. EEG was recorded from 19 electrodes placed upon the scalp according to the International 10-20 System. Spectral analysis was carried out on 30 artefact-free 4-sec epochs. For each channel absolute and relative power were calculated for the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and such data were successively represented in colour-coded maps. Ten patients with extensive lesions documented by CT scan were excluded. The results indicated that conventional EEG revealed abnormalities in 40 of 55 cases, while EEG mapping showed abnormalities in 46 of 55 cases: it showed focal abnormalities in five cases and nonfocal abnormalities in one of six cases which had appeared to be normal according to visual inspection of EEG. In a further 11 cases, where the conventional EEG revealed abnormalities in one hemisphere, the quantitative EEG and maps allowed to further localize abnormal activity in a more localized way. The sensitivity of both methods was higher for frontocentral, temporal and parieto-occipital cortical-subcortical infarctions than for basal ganglia and internal capsule lesions; however, quantitative EEG was more efficient for all areas of lesion in detecting cases that had appeared normal by visual inspection and was clearly superior in revealing focal abnormalities. When we considered the electrode related to which the maximum power of the delta frequency band is recorded, a fairly close correlation was found

  19. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  20. Interpretation of Brain CT Scans in the Field by Critical Care Physicians in a Mobile Stroke Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zakariassen, Erik; Lindner, Thomas; Nome, Terje; Bache, Kristi G.; Røislien, Jo; Gleditsch, Jostein; Solyga, Volker; Russell, David; Lund, Christian G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In acute stroke, thromboembolism or spontaneous hemorrhage abruptly reduces blood flow to a part of the brain. To limit necrosis, rapid radiological identification of the pathological mechanism must be conducted to allow the initiation of targeted treatment. The aim of the Norwegian Acute Stroke Prehospital Project is to determine if anesthesiologists, trained in prehospital critical care, may accurately assess cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans in a mobile stroke unit (MSU). METHODS In this pilot study, 13 anesthesiologists assessed unselected acute stroke patients with a cerebral CT scan in an MSU. The scans were simultaneously available by teleradiology at the receiving hospital and the on‐call radiologist. CT scan interpretation was focused on the radiological diagnosis of acute stroke and contraindications for thrombolysis. The aim of this study was to find inter‐rater agreement between the pre‐ and in‐hospital radiological assessments. A neuroradiologist evaluated all CT scans retrospectively. Statistical analysis of inter‐rater agreement was analyzed with Cohen's kappa. RESULTS Fifty‐one cerebral CT scans from the MSU were included. Inter‐rater agreement between prehospital anesthesiologists and the in‐hospital on‐call radiologists was excellent in finding radiological selection for thrombolysis (kappa .87). Prehospital CT scans were conducted in median 10 minutes (7 and 14 minutes) in the MSU, and median 39 minutes (31 and 48 minutes) before arrival at the receiving hospital. CONCLUSION This pilot study shows that anesthesiologists trained in prehospital critical care may effectively assess cerebral CT scans in an MSU, and determine if there are radiological contraindications for thrombolysis. PMID:28766306

  1. Cortical and diencephalic lesions in Korsakoff's syndrome: a clinical and CT scan study.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, R R; Lishman, W A

    1990-02-01

    Twenty-five male alcoholic Korsakoff patients were compared with age and sex-matched non-Korsakoff chronic alcoholics and healthy volunteers on clinical and CT brain scan parameters. The scans were assessed by planimetry, visual grading procedures and computerized analysis. Reliable measures of third ventricular size were developed. The Korsakoff patients had wider third ventricles, larger lateral ventricles and wider interhemispheric fissures than the comparison groups; but sulcal and Sylvian fissure widths were equivalent in Korsakoff and non-Korsakoff alcoholics. The results suggest that, in addition to their well-established diencephalic lesions, many Korsakoff patients have sustained widespread cerebral damage. Shrinkage in the frontal brain regions appears to be especially pronounced. The implications for a dual aetiology of alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome involving thiamine deficiency and features associated with alcoholism, probably direct alcohol neurotoxicity, are discussed.

  2. The pros and cons of intraoperative CT scan in evaluation of deep brain stimulation lead implantation: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Servello, Domenico; Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Pacchetti, Claudio; Porta, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and tremor. The efficacy of DBS depends on the correct lead positioning. The commonly adopted postoperative radiological evaluation is performed with computed tomography (CT) scan and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: We conducted a retrospective study on 202 patients who underwent DBS from January 2009 to October 2013. DBS indications were PD, progressive supranuclear palsy, tremor, dystonia, Tourette syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and Huntington's disease. Preoperatively, all patients underwent brain MRI and brain CT scan with the stereotactic frame positioned. The lead location was confirmed intraoperatively with CT. The CT images were subsequently transferred to the Stealth Station Medtronic and merged with the preoperative planning. On the first or second day after, implantation we performed a brain MRI to confirm the correct position of the lead. Results: In 14 patients, leads were in suboptimal position after intraoperative CT scan positioning. The cases with alteration in the Z-axis were corrected immediately under fluoroscopic guidance. In all the 14 patients, an immediate repositioning was done. Conclusions: Based on our data, intraoperative CT scan is fast, safe, and a useful tool in the evaluation of the position of the implanted lead. It also reduces the patient's discomfort derived from the transfer of the patient from the operating room to the radiological department. However, intraoperative CT should not be considered as a substitute for postoperative MRI. PMID:27583182

  3. [Combined use of wide-detector and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique in abdominal CT with low radiation dose].

    PubMed

    Wang, H X; Lü, P J; Yue, S W; Chang, L Y; Li, Y; Zhao, H P; Li, W R; Gao, J B

    2017-12-05

    Objective: To investigate the image quality and radiation dose with wide-detector(80 mm) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V (ASIR-V) technique at abdominal contrast enhanced CT scan. Methods: In the first phantom experiment part, the percentage of ASIR-V for half dose of combined wide detector with ASIR-V technique as compared with standard-detector (40 mm) technique was determined. The human experiment was performed based on the phantom study, 160 patients underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT scan were prospectively collected and divided into the control group ( n =40) with image reconstruction using 40% ASIR (group A) and the study group ( n =120) with random number table. According to pre-ASIR-V percentage, the study group was assigned into three groups[40 cases in each group, group B: 0 pre-ASIR-V scan with image reconstruction of 0-100% post-ASIR-V (interval 10%, subgroups B0-B10); group C: 20% pre-ASIR-V with 20%, 40% and 60% post-ASIR-V (subgroups C1-C3); group D: 40%pre-ASIR-V with 40% and 60% post-ASIR-V (subgroups D1-D2)]. Image noise, CT attenuation values and CNR of the liver, pancreas, aorta and portal vein were compared by using two sample t test and One-way ANOVA. Qualitative visual parameters (overall image quality as graded on a 5-point scale) was compared by Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis H test. Results: The phantom experiment showed that the percentage of pre-ASIR-V for half dose was 40%. With the 40% pre-ASIR-V, radiation dose in the study group was reduced by 35.5% as compared with the control group. Image noise in the subgroups of B2-B10, C2-C3 and D1-D2 were lower ( t =-14.681--3.046, all P <0.05) while CNR in the subgroups of B4-B10, C2-3 and D1-D2 were higher( t =2.048-9.248, all P <0.05)than those in group A, except the CNR of liver in the arterial phase (AP) in C2, D1 and D2 and the CNR of pancreas in AP in D1 ( t =0.574-1.327, all P >0.05). The subjective image quality scores increased gradually in the range

  4. High dose microCT does not contribute towards improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and can limit longitudinal scanning of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDougald, Wendy A.; Collins, Richard; Green, Mark; Tavares, Adriana A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2) to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters. Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA) software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU) in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC), uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured. Results: Only less than 2% and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < -80 and air HU values < -840, respectively. Four out of eleven CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration. Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed towards improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  5. Image reconstruction and scan configurations enabled by optimization-based algorithms in multispectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buxin; Zhang, Zheng; Sidky, Emil Y.; Xia, Dan; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2017-11-01

    Optimization-based algorithms for image reconstruction in multispectral (or photon-counting) computed tomography (MCT) remains a topic of active research. The challenge of optimization-based image reconstruction in MCT stems from the inherently non-linear data model that can lead to a non-convex optimization program for which no mathematically exact solver seems to exist for achieving globally optimal solutions. In this work, based upon a non-linear data model, we design a non-convex optimization program, derive its first-order-optimality conditions, and propose an algorithm to solve the program for image reconstruction in MCT. In addition to consideration of image reconstruction for the standard scan configuration, the emphasis is on investigating the algorithm’s potential for enabling non-standard scan configurations with no or minimum hardware modification to existing CT systems, which has potential practical implications for lowered hardware cost, enhanced scanning flexibility, and reduced imaging dose/time in MCT. Numerical studies are carried out for verification of the algorithm and its implementation, and for a preliminary demonstration and characterization of the algorithm in reconstructing images and in enabling non-standard configurations with varying scanning angular range and/or x-ray illumination coverage in MCT.

  6. A hybrid 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis-based automatic abdominal blood vessel segmentation through contrast enhanced CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Iinuma, Gen

    2017-03-01

    In abdominal disease diagnosis and various abdominal surgeries planning, segmentation of abdominal blood vessel (ABVs) is a very imperative task. Automatic segmentation enables fast and accurate processing of ABVs. We proposed a fully automatic approach for segmenting ABVs through contrast enhanced CT images by a hybrid of 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis. The proposed method comprises three stages. First, candidates of bone, kidneys, ABVs and heart are segmented by an auto-adapted threshold. Second, bone is auto-segmented and classified into spine, ribs and pelvis. Third, ABVs are automatically segmented in two sub-steps: (1) kidneys and abdominal part of the heart are segmented, (2) ABVs are segmented by a hybrid approach that integrates a 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis. Results are compared with two conventional methods. Results show that the proposed method is very promising in segmenting and classifying bone, segmenting whole ABVs and may have potential utility in clinical use.

  7. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  8. [The application of multi-slice CT dynamic enhancement scan in the diagnosis and treatment of colonic lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-ming; Wu, Le-bin; Zhang, Yun-ting; Li, Zhen-jia; Liu, Chen

    2006-11-01

    To discuss the value of multi-slice CT dynamic enhancement scan in the diagnosis and treatment of colonic lymphomas. 16 patients with colonic lymphomas underwent multi-slice CT dynamic enhancement scans, images of axial and reconstructive images of VR, MPR and CTVE were analyzed, patients were respectively diagnosed. Appearances of primary colorectal lymphomas were categorized into focal and diffuse lesions. Focal and diffuse lesions were 6 and 10 patients, respectively. The accuracy rate of diagnosis was 87.5%. MSCT dynamic scan has distinctive superiority in diagnosis and treatment of colonic lymphomas.

  9. Non-Invasive Transcranial Brain Therapy Guided by CT Scans: an In Vivo Monkey Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Tanter, M.; Boch, A.-L.; Kujas, M.; Seilhean, D.; Fink, M.

    2007-05-01

    Brain therapy using focused ultrasound remains very limited due to the strong aberrations induced by the skull. A minimally invasive technique using time-reversal was validated recently in-vivo on 20 sheeps. But such a technique requires a hydrophone at the focal point for the first step of the time-reversal procedure. A completely noninvasive therapy requires a reliable model of the acoustic properties of the skull in order to simulate this first step. 3-D simulations based on high-resolution CT images of a skull have been successfully performed with a finite differences code developed in our Laboratory. Thanks to the skull porosity, directly extracted from the CT images, we reconstructed acoustic speed, density and absorption maps and performed the computation. Computed wavefronts are in good agreement with experimental wavefronts acquired through the same part of the skull and this technique was validated in-vitro in the laboratory. A stereotactic frame has been designed and built in order to perform non invasive transcranial focusing in vivo. Here we describe all the steps of our new protocol, from the CT-scans to the therapy treatment and the first in vivo results on a monkey will be presented. This protocol is based on protocols already existing in radiotherapy.

  10. Arthroscopic and 3D CT Scan Evaluation of Femoral Footprint of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament in Chronic ACL Deficient Knees.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Yadav, C S; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Pandey, R M; Mittal, Ravi

    2018-06-13

    The outcome of single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction depends largely on the anatomic placement of bone tunnel. The lateral intercondylar ridge (LIR) and bifurcate ridge (BR) are useful bony landmarks for femoral tunnel placement. The purpose of our study was to compare the bony landmarks of ACL footprint on femur by three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) scan and arthroscopy in chronic ACL-deficient knees. Fifty patients above 18 years of age who were diagnosed of having ACL tear were selected for the study. All the cases were more than 6 months old since the injury. Preoperative 3D CT scan of the affected knee was obtained for each of them. They underwent single-bundle anatomic ACL reconstruction. Measurements were done on the preoperative 3D CT and arthroscopy to quantify the position of the LIR and BR. The proximodistal distance of lateral femoral condyle was 21.41+/-2.5 mm on CT scan and 22.02+/-2.02 mm on arthroscopy. On preoperative 3D CT scan, the midpoint of the LIR was found to be located at a mean distance of 11.17±2.11 mm from the proximal margin of the lateral femoral condyle. On arthroscopy, it was at 10.18+/-1.52 mm from the proximal margin the lateral femoral condyle. The "bifurcate ridge"(BR) was not visible in any of the cases during arthroscopy or CT scan. We concluded that LIR is an easily identifiable bony landmark on arthroscopy in all cases. It can also be identified on CT scans. BR is not identified both on arthroscopy and CT scans in chronic ACL tears. The arthroscopic measurements of bony landmarks are quite close to those of CT scan. Midpoint of LIR is at 52.185% of the proximodistal distance on CT scan evaluation and it is at 46.21% on arthroscopic evaluation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan images using canny method and morphological operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noviana, Rina; Febriani, Rasal, Isram; Lubis, Eva Utari Cintamurni

    2017-08-01

    Segmentation is a very important topic in digital image process. It is found simply in varied fields of image analysis, particularly within the medical imaging field. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan is beneficial in designation of abnormalities and surgery planning. It will do to ascertain every section within the lungs. The results of the segmentation are accustomed discover the presence of nodules. The method which utilized in this analysis are image cropping, image binarization, Canny edge detection and morphological operation. Image cropping is done so as to separate the lungs areas, that is the region of interest. Binarization method generates a binary image that has 2 values with grey level, that is black and white (ROI), from another space of lungs CT scan image. Canny method used for the edge detection. Morphological operation is applied to smoothing the lungs edge. The segmentation methodology shows an honest result. It obtains an awfully smooth edge. Moreover, the image background can also be removed in order to get the main focus, the lungs.

  12. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: incidental finding on routine ct scan following car accident

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare hereditary disease. Pathogenesis of the syndrome is attributed to abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 9 (q22.3-q31) and loss or mutations of human patched gene (PTCH1 gene). Multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, skeletal abnormalities, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, intracranial ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri and facial dysmorphism are considered the main clinical features. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and ideally confirmed by DNA analysis. Because of the different systems affected, a multidisciplinary approach team of various experts is required for a successful management. Case presentation We report the case of a 19 year-old female who was involved in a car accident and found to present imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome during a routine whole body computed tomography (CT) scan in order to exclude traumatic injuries. Conclusion Radiologic findings of the syndrome are easily identifiable on CT scans and may prompt to early verification of the disease, which is very important for regular follow-up and better survival rates from the co-existent diseases. PMID:20062724

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: incidental finding on routine ct scan following car accident.

    PubMed

    Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Zampakis, Petros; Kazantzi, Santra; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Mastronikolis, Nicholas S

    2009-11-25

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare hereditary disease. Pathogenesis of the syndrome is attributed to abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 9 (q22.3-q31) and loss or mutations of human patched gene (PTCH1 gene). Multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), odontogenic keratocysts, skeletal abnormalities, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, intracranial ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri and facial dysmorphism are considered the main clinical features. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and ideally confirmed by DNA analysis. Because of the different systems affected, a multidisciplinary approach team of various experts is required for a successful management. We report the case of a 19 year-old female who was involved in a car accident and found to present imaging findings of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome during a routine whole body computed tomography (CT) scan in order to exclude traumatic injuries. Radiologic findings of the syndrome are easily identifiable on CT scans and may prompt to early verification of the disease, which is very important for regular follow-up and better survival rates from the co-existent diseases.

  14. The Preoperative CT-Scan Can Help to Predict Postoperative Complications after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Femke F.; de Graaff, Feike; Bouman, Donald E.; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Slump, Kees H.; Klaase, Joost M.

    2015-01-01

    After pancreatoduodenectomy, complication rates are up to 40%. To predict the risk of developing postoperative pancreatic fistula or severe complications, various factors were evaluated. 110 consecutive patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy at our institute between January 2012 and September 2014 with complete CT scan were retrospectively identified. Pre-, per-, and postoperative patients and pathological information were gathered. The CT-scans were analysed for the diameter of the pancreatic duct, attenuation of the pancreas, and the visceral fat area. All data was statistically analysed for predicting POPF and severe complications by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The POPF rate was 18%. The VFA measured at umbilicus (OR 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00–1.02; P = 0.011) was an independent predictor for POPF. The severe complications rate was 33%. Independent predictors were BMI (OR 1.24; 95% CI = 1.10–1.42; P = 0.001), ASA class III (OR 17.10; 95% CI = 1.60–182.88; P = 0.019), and mean HU (OR 0.98; 95% CI = 0.96–1.00; P = 0.024). In conclusion, VFA measured at the umbilicus seems to be the best predictor for POPF. BMI, ASA III, and the mean HU of the pancreatic body are independent predictors for severe complications following PD. PMID:26605340

  15. Sensitivity calibration procedures in optical-CT scanning of BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2010-02-15

    The dose response of the BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeter (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) was studied using the OCTOPUS laser CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT). Six 17 cm diameter and 12 cm high Barex cylinders, and 18 small glass vials were used to house the gel. The gel phantoms were irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons, as well as 12 and 16 MeV electrons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Three calibration methods were used to obtain the dose response curves: (a) Optical density measurements on the 18 glass vials irradiated with graded doses from 0 tomore » 4 Gy using 6 or 10 MV large field irradiations; (b) optical-CT scanning of Barex cylinders irradiated with graded doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy) from four adjacent 4x4 cm{sup 2} photon fields or 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron fields; and (c) percent depth dose (PDD) comparison of optical-CT scans with ion chamber measurements for 6x6 cm{sup 2}, 12 and 16 MeV electron fields. The dose response of the BANG 3 gel was found to be linear and energy independent within the uncertainties of the experimental methods (about 3%). The slopes of the linearly fitted dose response curves (dose sensitivities) from the four field irradiations (0.0752{+-}3%, 0.0756{+-}3%, 0.0767{+-}3%, and 0.0759{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) and the PDD matching methods (0.0768{+-}3% and 0.0761{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) agree within 2.2%, indicating a good reproducibility of the gel dose response within phantoms of the same geometry. The dose sensitivities from the glass vial approach are different from those of the cylindrical Barex phantoms by more than 30%, owing probably to the difference in temperature inside the two types of phantoms during gel formation and irradiation, and possible oxygen contamination of the glass vial walls. The dose response curve obtained from the PDD matching approach with 16 MeV electron field was used to calibrate the gel phantom irradiated with the 12 MeV, 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron field. Three-dimensional dose

  16. Three-dimensional dosimetry of small megavoltage radiation fields using radiochromic gels and optical CT scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; McNiven, Andrea; Battista, Jerry; Jordan, Kevin

    2009-04-01

    The dosimetry of small fields as used in stereotactic radiotherapy, radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy can be challenging and inaccurate due to partial volume averaging effects and possible disruption of charged particle equilibrium. Consequently, there exists a need for an integrating, tissue equivalent dosimeter with high spatial resolution to avoid perturbing the radiation beam and artificially broadening the measured beam penumbra. In this work, radiochromic ferrous xylenol-orange (FX) and leuco crystal violet (LCV) micelle gels were used to measure relative dose factors (RDFs), percent depth dose profiles and relative lateral beam profiles of 6 MV x-ray pencil beams of diameter 28.1, 9.8 and 4.9 mm. The pencil beams were produced via stereotactic collimators mounted on a Varian 2100 EX linear accelerator. The gels were read using optical computed tomography (CT). Data sets were compared quantitatively with dosimetric measurements made with radiographic (Kodak EDR2) and radiochromic (GAFChromic® EBT) film, respectively. Using a fast cone-beam optical CT scanner (Vista™), corrections for diffusion in the FX gel data yielded RDFs that were comparable to those obtained by minimally diffusing LCV gels. Considering EBT film-measured RDF data as reference, cone-beam CT-scanned LCV gel data, corrected for scattered stray light, were found to be in agreement within 0.5% and -0.6% for the 9.8 and 4.9 mm diameter fields, respectively. The validity of the scattered stray light correction was confirmed by general agreement with RDF data obtained from the same LCV gel read out with a laser CT scanner that is less prone to the acceptance of scattered stray light. Percent depth dose profiles and lateral beam profiles were found to agree within experimental error for the FX gel (corrected for diffusion), LCV gel (corrected for scattered stray light), and EBT and EDR2 films. The results from this study reveal that a three-dimensional dosimetry method

  17. Cross-Disciplinary Analysis of Lymph Node Classification in Lung Cancer on CT Scanning.

    PubMed

    El-Sherief, Ahmed H; Lau, Charles T; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Mehta, Atul C; Rice, Thomas W; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and consistent regional lymph node classification is an important element in the staging and multidisciplinary management of lung cancer. Regional lymph node definition sets-lymph node maps-have been created to standardize regional lymph node classification. In 2009, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) introduced a lymph node map to supersede all preexisting lymph node maps. Our aim was to study if and how lung cancer specialists apply the IASLC lymph node map when classifying thoracic lymph nodes encountered on CT scans during lung cancer staging. From April 2013 through July 2013, invitations were distributed to all members of the Fleischner Society, Society of Thoracic Radiology, General Thoracic Surgical Club, and the American Association of Bronchology and Interventional Pulmonology to participate in an anonymous online image-based and text-based 20-question survey regarding lymph node classification for lung cancer staging on CT imaging. Three hundred thirty-seven people responded (approximately 25% participation). Respondents consisted of self-reported thoracic radiologists (n = 158), thoracic surgeons (n = 102), and pulmonologists who perform endobronchial ultrasonography (n = 77). Half of the respondents (50%; 95% CI, 44%-55%) reported using the IASLC lymph node map in daily practice, with no significant differences between subspecialties. A disparity was observed between the IASLC definition sets and their interpretation and application on CT scans, in particular for lymph nodes near the thoracic inlet, anterior to the trachea, anterior to the tracheal bifurcation, near the ligamentum arteriosum, between the bronchus intermedius and esophagus, in the internal mammary space, and adjacent to the heart. Use of older lymph node maps and inconsistencies in interpretation and application of definitions in the IASLC lymph node map may potentially lead to misclassification of stage and suboptimal management of lung

  18. Accuracy of cancellous bone volume fraction measured by micro-CT scanning.

    PubMed

    Ding, M; Odgaard, A; Hvid, I

    1999-03-01

    Volume fraction, the single most important parameter in describing trabecular microstructure, can easily be calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions of micro-CT images. This study sought to quantify the accuracy of this measurement. One hundred and sixty human cancellous bone specimens which covered a large range of volume fraction (9.8-39.8%) were produced. The specimens were micro-CT scanned, and the volume fraction based on Archimedes' principle was determined as a reference. After scanning, all micro-CT data were segmented using individual thresholds determined by the scanner supplied algorithm (method I). A significant deviation of volume fraction from method I was found: both the y-intercept and the slope of the regression line were significantly different from those of the Archimedes-based volume fraction (p < 0.001). New individual thresholds were determined based on a calibration of volume fraction to the Archimedes-based volume fractions (method II). The mean thresholds of the two methods were applied to segment 20 randomly selected specimens. The results showed that volume fraction using the mean threshold of method I was underestimated by 4% (p = 0.001), whereas the mean threshold of method II yielded accurate values. The precision of the measurement was excellent. Our data show that care must be taken when applying thresholds in generating 3-D data, and that a fixed threshold may be used to obtain reliable volume fraction data. This fixed threshold may be determined from the Archimedes-based volume fraction of a subgroup of specimens. The threshold may vary between different materials, and so it should be determined whenever a study series is performed.

  19. Vomiting--is this a good indication for CT head scans in patients with minor head injury?

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, J; Khirwadkar, H; Hourihan, M D

    2012-02-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence head injury guidelines advise CT imaging within 1 h if there is more than one episode of vomiting post-head injury in adults and three or more episodes in children. Since the guideline publication, studies have found that, following head injury, vomiting alone is associated with an abnormal CT head scan in 13-45% of cases. CT head scan requests referred from the emergency department between 1 May 2009 and 30 April 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with vomiting as the sole indication for an "immediate" CT head scan performed within 1 h were included in the study. Reports produced by experienced neuroradiologists were reviewed and the detection of significant head injury was noted. There were 1264 CT head scans performed during our study period. 151 (124 adults, 27 children) were indicated owing to vomiting following head injury. 5 of the 124 adult scans and 1 of the 27 paediatric scans showed an abnormal finding, giving positive predictive values (PPV) of 4% and 3.7%, respectively. None of these patients required either acute or delayed neurosurgical intervention. In our experience, vomiting alone has a PPV of 4% for significant head injury in adults. However, none of these injuries were serious enough to warrant acute or delayed intervention. Given these findings, vomiting following head injury is a reasonable indication for a CT head scan; however, as none of the patients required acute intervention, we suggest that these scans do not usually need to be performed within 1 h of request.

  20. TU-F-BRF-03: Effect of Radiation Therapy Planning Scan Registration On the Dose in Lung Cancer Patient CT Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Cunliffe, A; Contee, C; White, B

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of deformable registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60Gy, 2Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pre-therapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map calculated in Pinnacle were collected. To establish baseline correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pre-therapy scans were co-registered with planning scans (and associated dose maps)more » using the Plastimatch demons and Fraunhofer MEVIS deformable registration algorithms. Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from both registration algorithms. The absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) between manually and automatically mapped landmark points was calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of the distance between manually and automatically matched points (registration error, E), the dose standard deviation (SD-dose) in the eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: 52–92 landmark point pairs (median: 82) were identified in each patient's scans. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.66Gy (range: 1.2–7.2Gy). |ΔD| was significantly reduced by 0.53Gy using Plastimatch demons compared with Fraunhofer MEVIS. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of E (0.39Gy/mm) and SD-dose (2.23Gy/Gy). Conclusion: An average error of <4Gy in radiation dose was introduced when points were mapped between CT scan pairs using deformable registration. Dose differences following registration were significantly increased when the Fraunhofer MEVIS registration algorithm was

  1. Spiral CT scanning technique in the detection of aspiration of LEGO foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Applegate, K E; Dardinger, J T; Lieber, M L; Herts, B R; Davros, W J; Obuchowski, N A; Maneker, A

    2001-12-01

    Radiolucent foreign bodies (FBs) such as plastic objects and toys remain difficult to identify on conventional radiographs of the neck and chest. Children may present with a variety of respiratory complaints, which may or may not be due to a FB. To determine whether radiolucent FBs such as plastic LEGOs and peanuts can be seen in the tracheobronchial tree or esophagus using low-dose spiral CT, and, if visible, to determine the optimal CT imaging technique. Multiple spiral sequences were performed while varying the CT parameters and the presence and location of FBs in either the trachea or the esophagus first on a neck phantom and then a cadaver. Sequences were rated by three radiologists blinded to the presence of a FB using a single scoring system. The LEGO was well visualized in the trachea by all three readers (both lung and soft-tissue windowing: combined sensitivity 89 %, combined specificity 89 %) and to a lesser extent in the esophagus (combined sensitivity 31 %, combined specificity 100 %). The peanut was not well visualized (combined sensitivity < 35 %). The optimal technique for visualizing the LEGO was 120 kV, 90 mA, 3-mm collimation, 0.75 s/revolution, and 2.0 pitch. This allowed for coverage of the cadaver tracheobronchial tree (approximately 11 cm) in about 18 s. Although statistical power was low for detecting significant differences, all three readers noted higher average confidence ratings with lung windowing among 18 LEGO-in-trachea scans. Rapid, low-dose spiral CT may be used to visualize LEGO FBs in the airway or esophagus. Peanuts were not well visualized.

  2. Quantitative image feature variability amongst CT scanners with a controlled scan protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ger, Rachel B.; Zhou, Shouhao; Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda; Goff, David L.; Zhang, Lifei; Lee, Hannah J.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Li, Heng; Stafford, R. Jason; Court, Laurence E.; Mackin, Dennis S.

    2018-02-01

    Radiomics studies often analyze patient computed tomography (CT) images acquired from different CT scanners. This may result in differences in imaging parameters, e.g. different manufacturers, different acquisition protocols, etc. However, quantifiable differences in radiomics features can occur based on acquisition parameters. A controlled protocol may allow for minimization of these effects, thus allowing for larger patient cohorts from many different CT scanners. In order to test radiomics feature variability across different CT scanners a radiomics phantom was developed with six different cartridges encased in high density polystyrene. A harmonized protocol was developed to control for tube voltage, tube current, scan type, pitch, CTDIvol, convolution kernel, display field of view, and slice thickness across different manufacturers. The radiomics phantom was imaged on 18 scanners using the control protocol. A linear mixed effects model was created to assess the impact of inter-scanner variability with decomposition of feature variation between scanners and cartridge materials. The inter-scanner variability was compared to the residual variability (the unexplained variability) and to the inter-patient variability using two different patient cohorts. The patient cohorts consisted of 20 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 30 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients. The inter-scanner standard deviation was at least half of the residual standard deviation for 36 of 49 quantitative image features. The ratio of inter-scanner to patient coefficient of variation was above 0.2 for 22 and 28 of the 49 features for NSCLC and HNSCC patients, respectively. Inter-scanner variability was a significant factor compared to patient variation in this small study for many of the features. Further analysis with a larger cohort will allow more thorough analysis with additional variables in the model to truly isolate the interscanner difference.

  3. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    SciTech Connect

    Toftegaard, Jakob, E-mail: jaktofte@rm.dk; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of amore » marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and

  4. NOTE: Optimization of megavoltage CT scan registration settings for thoracic cases on helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Van Dyk, Jake

    2007-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the settings that provide optimum registration accuracy when registering megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies acquired on tomotherapy with planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) studies of patients with lung cancer. For each experiment, the systematic difference between the actual and planned positions of the thorax phantom was determined by setting the phantom up at the planning isocenter, generating and registering an MVCT study. The phantom was translated by 5 or 10 mm, MVCT scanned, and registration was performed again. A root-mean-square equation that calculated the residual error of the registration based on the known shift and systematic difference was used to assess the accuracy of the registration process. The phantom study results for 18 combinations of different MVCT/kVCT registration options are presented and compared to clinical registration data from 17 lung cancer patients. MVCT studies acquired with coarse (6 mm), normal (4 mm) and fine (2 mm) slice spacings could all be registered with similar residual errors. No specific combination of resolution and fusion selection technique resulted in a lower residual error. A scan length of 6 cm with any slice spacing registered with the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution will result in a low residual error most of the time. On average, large corrections made manually by clinicians to the automatic registration values are infrequent. Small manual corrections within the residual error averages of the registration process occur, but their impact on the average patient position is small. Registrations using the full image fusion selection technique and fine resolution of 6 cm MVCT scans with coarse slices have a low residual error, and this strategy can be clinically used for lung cancer patients treated on tomotherapy. Automatic registration values are accurate on average, and a quick verification on a sagittal MVCT slice should be enough to detect registration outliers.

  5. Accurate Measurement of Small Airways on Low-Dose Thoracic CT Scans in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Conradi, Susan H.; Atkinson, Jeffrey J.; Zheng, Jie; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Senior, Robert M.; Gierada, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Partial volume averaging and tilt relative to the scan plane on transverse images limit the accuracy of airway wall thickness measurements on CT scan, confounding assessment of the relationship between airway remodeling and clinical status in COPD. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of partial volume averaging and tilt corrections on airway wall thickness measurement accuracy and on relationships between airway wall thickening and clinical status in COPD. Methods: Airway wall thickness measurements in 80 heavy smokers were obtained on transverse images from low-dose CT scan using the open-source program Airway Inspector. Measurements were corrected for partial volume averaging and tilt effects using an attenuation- and geometry-based algorithm and compared with functional status. Results: The algorithm reduced wall thickness measurements of smaller airways to a greater degree than larger airways, increasing the overall range. When restricted to analyses of airways with an inner diameter < 3.0 mm, for a theoretical airway of 2.0 mm inner diameter, the wall thickness decreased from 1.07 ± 0.07 to 0.29 ± 0.10 mm, and the square root of the wall area decreased from 3.34 ± 0.15 to 1.58 ± 0.29 mm, comparable to histologic measurement studies. Corrected measurements had higher correlation with FEV1, differed more between BMI, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity (BODE) index scores, and explained a greater proportion of FEV1 variability in multivariate models. Conclusions: Correcting for partial volume averaging improves accuracy of airway wall thickness estimation, allowing direct measurement of the small airways to better define their role in COPD. PMID:23172175

  6. Lecithin-coated gold nanoflowers (GNFs) for CT scan imaging applications and biochemical parameters; in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Farooq; Bano, Khizra; Siddique, Ahmad Hassan; Bajwa, Sadia Zafar; Nazir, Aalia; Munawar, Anam; Shaheen, Ayesha; Saeed, Madiha; Afzal, Muhammad; Iqbal, M Zubair; Wu, Aiguo; Khan, Waheed S

    2018-01-09

    We report a novel strategy for the fabrication of lecithin-coated gold nanoflowers (GNFs) via single-step design for CT imaging application. Field-emission electron microscope confirmed flowers like morphology of the as-synthesized nanostructures. Furthermore, these show absorption peak in near-infrared (NIR) region at λ max 690 nm Different concentrations of GNFs are tested as a contrast agent in CT scans at tube voltage 135 kV and tube current 350 mA. These results are compared with same amount of iodine at same CT scan parameters. The results of in vitro CT scan study show that GNFs have good contrast enhancement properties, whereas in vivo study of rabbits CT scan shows that GNFs enhance the CT image clearly at 135 kV as compared to that of iodine. Cytotoxicity was studied and blood profile show minor increase of white blood cells and haemoglobin, whereas decrease of red blood cells and platelets.

  7. [Exposure to CT scans in childhood and long-term cancer risk: A review of epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Baysson, Hélène; Journy, Neige; Roué, Tristan; Ducou-Lepointe, Hubert; Etard, Cécile; Bernier, Marie-Odile

    2016-02-01

    Amongst medical exams requiring ionizing radiation, computed tomography (CT) scans are used more frequently, including in children. These CT examinations are associated with absorbed doses that are much higher than those associated with conventional radiology. In comparison to adults, children have a greater sensitivity to radiation and a longer life span with more years at cancer risks. Five epidemiological studies on cancer risks after CT scan exposure during childhood were published between 2012 and 2015. The results of these studies are consistent and show an increase of cancer risks in children who have been exposed to several CT scans. However, methodological limits due to indication bias, retrospective assessment of radiation exposure from CT scans and lack of statistical power are to be taken into consideration. International projects such as EPI-CT (Epidemiological study to quantify risks for pediatric computerized tomography and to optimize dose), with a focus on dosimetric reconstruction and minimization of bias will provide more precise results. In the meantime, available results reinforce the necessity of justification and optimization of doses. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Visualized on CT Scans but Not Chest Radiographs: Pathogens, Severity, and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, Cameron P; Grijalva, Carlos G; Wunderink, Richard G; Williams, Derek J; Waterer, Grant W; Anderson, Evan J; Zhu, Yuwei; Hart, Eric M; Carroll, Frank; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Edwards, Kathryn M; Self, Wesley H

    2018-03-01

    The clinical significance of pneumonia visualized on CT scan in the setting of a normal chest radiograph is uncertain. In a multicenter prospective surveillance study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we compared the presenting clinical features, pathogens present, and outcomes of patients with pneumonia visualized on a CT scan but not on a concurrent chest radiograph (CT-only pneumonia) and those with pneumonia visualized on a chest radiograph. All patients underwent chest radiography; the decision to obtain CT imaging was determined by the treating clinicians. Chest radiographs and CT images were interpreted by study-dedicated thoracic radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The study population included 2,251 adults with CAP; 2,185 patients (97%) had pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, whereas 66 patients (3%) had pneumonia visualized on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiography. Overall, these patients with CT-only pneumonia had a clinical profile similar to those with pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, including comorbidities, vital signs, hospital length of stay, prevalence of viral (30% vs 26%) and bacterial (12% vs 14%) pathogens, ICU admission (23% vs 21%), use of mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%), septic shock (5% vs 4%), and inhospital mortality (0 vs 2%). Adults hospitalized with CAP who had radiological evidence of pneumonia on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiograph had pathogens, disease severity, and outcomes similar to patients who had signs of pneumonia on chest radiography. These findings support using the same management principles for patients with CT-only pneumonia and those with pneumonia seen on chest radiography. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.

  9. Automated CT Scan Scores of Bronchiectasis and Air Trapping in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Swiercz, Waldemar; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Anthony, Margaret M.; Szefler, Paul; Klein, Rebecca; Strain, John; Brody, Alan S.; Sagel, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Computer analysis of high-resolution CT (HRCT) scans may improve the assessment of structural lung injury in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The goal of this cross-sectional pilot study was to validate automated, observer-independent image analysis software to establish objective, simple criteria for bronchiectasis and air trapping. Methods: HRCT scans of the chest were performed in 35 children with CF and compared with scans from 12 disease control subjects. Automated image analysis software was developed to count visible airways on inspiratory images and to measure a low attenuation density (LAD) index on expiratory images. Among the children with CF, relationships among automated measures, Brody HRCT scanning scores, lung function, and sputum markers of inflammation were assessed. Results: The number of total, central, and peripheral airways on inspiratory images and LAD (%) on expiratory images were significantly higher in children with CF compared with control subjects. Among subjects with CF, peripheral airway counts correlated strongly with Brody bronchiectasis scores by two raters (r = 0.86, P < .0001; r = 0.91, P < .0001), correlated negatively with lung function, and were positively associated with sputum free neutrophil elastase activity. LAD (%) correlated with Brody air trapping scores (r = 0.83, P < .0001; r = 0.69, P < .0001) but did not correlate with lung function or sputum inflammatory markers. Conclusions: Quantitative airway counts and LAD (%) on HRCT scans appear to be useful surrogates for bronchiectasis and air trapping in children with CF. Our automated methodology provides objective quantitative measures of bronchiectasis and air trapping that may serve as end points in CF clinical trials. PMID:24114359

  10. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  11. WE-EF-207-07: Dual Energy CT with One Full Scan and a Second Sparse-View Scan Using Structure Preserving Iterative Reconstruction (SPIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T; Zhu, L

    Purpose: Conventional dual energy CT (DECT) reconstructs CT and basis material images from two full-size projection datasets with different energy spectra. To relax the data requirement, we propose an iterative DECT reconstruction algorithm using one full scan and a second sparse-view scan by utilizing redundant structural information of the same object acquired at two different energies. Methods: We first reconstruct a full-scan CT image using filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm. The material similarities of each pixel with other pixels are calculated by an exponential function about pixel value differences. We assume that the material similarities of pixels remains in the second CTmore » scan, although pixel values may vary. An iterative method is designed to reconstruct the second CT image from reduced projections. Under the data fidelity constraint, the algorithm minimizes the L2 norm of the difference between pixel value and its estimation, which is the average of other pixel values weighted by their similarities. The proposed algorithm, referred to as structure preserving iterative reconstruction (SPIR), is evaluated on physical phantoms. Results: On the Catphan600 phantom, SPIR-based DECT method with a second 10-view scan reduces the noise standard deviation of a full-scan FBP CT reconstruction by a factor of 4 with well-maintained spatial resolution, while iterative reconstruction using total-variation regularization (TVR) degrades the spatial resolution at the same noise level. The proposed method achieves less than 1% measurement difference on electron density map compared with the conventional two-full-scan DECT. On an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom, our method successfully reconstructs the complicated vertebra structures and decomposes bone and soft tissue. Conclusion: We develop an effective method to reduce the number of views and therefore data acquisition in DECT. We show that SPIR-based DECT using one full scan and a second 10-view scan

  12. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Predicting hollow viscus injury in blunt abdominal trauma with computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bhagvan, Savitha; Turai, Matthew; Holden, Andrew; Ng, Alexander; Civil, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is commonly used but has limitations, especially in excluding hollow viscus injury in the presence of solid organ injury. To determine whether CT reports alone could be used to direct operative treatment in abdominal trauma, this study was undertaken. The trauma database at Auckland City Hospital was accessed for patients who had abdominal CT and subsequent laparotomy during a five-year period. The CT scans were reevaluated by a consultant radiologist who was blinded to operative findings. The CT findings were correlated with the operative findings. Between January 2002 and December 2007, 1,250 patients were evaluated for blunt abdominal injury with CT. A subset of 78 patients underwent laparotomy, and this formed the study group. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scan in predicting hollow viscus injury was 55.33 and 92.06 % respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 61.53 and 89.23 % respectively. Presence of free fluid in CT scan was sensitive in diagnosing hollow viscus injury (90 %). Specific findings for hollow viscus injuries on CT scan were free intraperitoneal air (93 %), retroperitoneal air (100 %), oral contrast extravasation (100 %), bowel wall defect (98 %), patchy bowel enhancement (97 %), and mesenteric abnormality (94 %). CT alone cannot be used as a screening tool for hollow viscus injury. The decision to operate in hollow viscus injury has to be based on mechanism of injury and clinical findings together with radiological evidence.

  14. Multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media concentrations in combined F-18-FDG PET/CT: Effect on quantitative and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Rebière, Marilou; Verburg, Frederik A; Palmowski, Moritz; Krohn, Thomas; Pietsch, Hubertus; Kuhl, Christiane K; Mottaghy, Felix M; Behrendt, Florian F

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of multiphase CT scanning and different intravenous contrast media on contrast enhancement, attenuation correction and image quality in combined PET/CT. 140 patients were prospectively enrolled for F-18-FDG-PET/CT including a low-dose unenhanced, arterial and venous contrast enhanced CT. The first (second) 70 patients, received contrast medium with 370 (300) mg iodine/ml. The iodine delivery rate (1.3mg/s) and total iodine load (44.4g) were identical for both groups. Contrast enhancement and maximum and mean standardized FDG uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were determined for the un-enhanced, arterial and venous PET/CT at multiple anatomic sites and PET reconstructions were visually evaluated. Arterial contrast enhancement was significantly higher for the 300mg/ml contrast medium compared to 370mgI/ml at all anatomic sites. Venous enhancement was not different between the two contrast media. SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher for the contrast enhanced compared to the non-enhanced PET/CT at all anatomic sites (all P<0.001). Tracer uptake was significantly higher in the arterial than in the venous PET/CT in the arteries using both contrast media (all P<0.001). No differences in tracer uptake were found between the contrast media (all P>0.05). Visual assessment revealed no relevant differences between the different PET reconstructions. There is no relevant qualitative influence on the PET scan from the use of different intravenous contrast media in its various phases in combined multiphase PET/CT. For quantitative analysis of tracer uptake it is required to use an identical PET/CT protocol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rare Case of Intratracheal Metastasis Detected on 68Ga-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT Scan in a Case of Thyroglobulin Elevated Negative Iodine Scan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Oommen, Karuna Elza; Jayakumar, R

    2018-04-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent completion thyroidectomy with upper tracheal ring resection and right-sided neck dissection for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid infiltrating the trachea and was given I radioiodine treatment. Three years later, she presented with hemoptysis. On evaluation, she had increased serum thyroglobulin and negative iodine scan (TENIS). F-FDG PET/CT scan did not identify any site of disease. One year later, Ga-PSMA scan done revealed a moderate focal tracer-avid intratracheal soft tissue; biopsy revealed it to be metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. This case kindles the possibility of using Ga-PSMA PET/CT to reveal occult disease in cases of TENIS.

  16. Development of a database of organ doses for paediatric and young adult CT scans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K. P.; Berrington de González, A.; Pearce, M. S.; Salotti, J. A.; Parker, L.; McHugh, K.; Craft, A. W.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite great potential benefits, there are concerns about the possible harm from medical imaging including the risk of radiation-related cancer. There are particular concerns about computed tomography (CT) scans in children because both radiation dose and sensitivity to radiation for children are typically higher than for adults undergoing equivalent procedures. As direct empirical data on the cancer risks from CT scans are lacking, the authors are conducting a retrospective cohort study of over 240 000 children in the UK who underwent CT scans. The main objective of the study is to quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk in relation to the radiation dose from CT scans. In this paper, the methods used to estimate typical organ-specific doses delivered by CT scans to children are described. An organ dose database from Monte Carlo radiation transport-based computer simulations using a series of computational human phantoms from newborn to adults for both male and female was established. Organ doses vary with patient size and sex, examination types and CT technical settings. Therefore, information on patient age, sex and examination type from electronic radiology information systems and technical settings obtained from two national surveys in the UK were used to estimate radiation dose. Absorbed doses to the brain, thyroid, breast and red bone marrow were calculated for reference male and female individuals with the ages of newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 y for a total of 17 different scan types in the pre- and post-2001 time periods. In general, estimated organ doses were slightly higher for females than males which might be attributed to the smaller body size of the females. The younger children received higher doses in pre-2001 period when adult CT settings were typically used for children. Paediatric-specific adjustments were assumed to be used more frequently after 2001, since then radiation doses to children have often been smaller than those to adults. The

  17. Development of a database of organ doses for paediatric and young adult CT scans in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Kim, K P; Berrington de González, A; Pearce, M S; Salotti, J A; Parker, L; McHugh, K; Craft, A W; Lee, C

    2012-07-01

    Despite great potential benefits, there are concerns about the possible harm from medical imaging including the risk of radiation-related cancer. There are particular concerns about computed tomography (CT) scans in children because both radiation dose and sensitivity to radiation for children are typically higher than for adults undergoing equivalent procedures. As direct empirical data on the cancer risks from CT scans are lacking, the authors are conducting a retrospective cohort study of over 240,000 children in the UK who underwent CT scans. The main objective of the study is to quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk in relation to the radiation dose from CT scans. In this paper, the methods used to estimate typical organ-specific doses delivered by CT scans to children are described. An organ dose database from Monte Carlo radiation transport-based computer simulations using a series of computational human phantoms from newborn to adults for both male and female was established. Organ doses vary with patient size and sex, examination types and CT technical settings. Therefore, information on patient age, sex and examination type from electronic radiology information systems and technical settings obtained from two national surveys in the UK were used to estimate radiation dose. Absorbed doses to the brain, thyroid, breast and red bone marrow were calculated for reference male and female individuals with the ages of newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 y for a total of 17 different scan types in the pre- and post-2001 time periods. In general, estimated organ doses were slightly higher for females than males which might be attributed to the smaller body size of the females. The younger children received higher doses in pre-2001 period when adult CT settings were typically used for children. Paediatric-specific adjustments were assumed to be used more frequently after 2001, since then radiation doses to children have often been smaller than those to adults. The

  18. Congenital heart disease manifested as acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Macha, Mahender; Gupta, Dipin; Molina, Ezequiel; Palma, Jon; Rothman, Steven

    2007-06-12

    We present a case of a 53-year-old man with complaints of severe abdominal pain and nausea. Emergency department abdominal workup was non-diagnostic. Physical examination revealed signs of right- and left-heart failure. A past medical history of dysrhythmias and chronic abdominal complaints prompted hospital admission. Subsequent right heart catheterization revealed a significant left-to-right shunt. CT scan of the chest and angiography confirmed the diagnosis of an abnormal ascending vein between the innominate vein and the left superior pulmonary vein. After the anomalous vein was ligated, the patient's abdominal pain resolved.

  19. Significance of computed tomography finding of intra-abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury after blunt abdominal trauma: time for laparotomy on demand.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Ismail; Tawfek, Zainab; Abdelrahman, Yassir; Siddiuqqi, Tariq; Abdelrahman, Husham; El-Menyar, Ayman; Al-Hassani, Ammar; Tuma, Mazin; Peralta, Ruben; Zarour, Ahmad; Yakhlef, Sawsan; Hamzawi, Hazim; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-06-01

    Optimal management of patients with intra-abdominal free fluid found on computed tomography (CT) scan without solid organ injury remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of CT scan findings of free fluid in the management of blunt abdominal trauma patients who otherwise have no indications for laparotomy. During the 3-year study period, all patients presenting with blunt abdominal trauma who underwent abdominal CT examination were retrospectively reviewed. All hemodynamically stable patients who presented with abdominal free fluid without solid organ injury on CT scan were analyzed for radiological interpretation, clinical management, operative findings, and outcome. A total of 122 patients were included in the study, 91 % of whom were males. The mean age of the patients was 33 ± 12 years. A total of 34 patients underwent exploratory laparotomy, 31 of whom had therapeutic interventions. Small bowel injuries were found in 12 patients, large bowel injuries in ten, and mesenteric injuries in seven patients. One patient had combined small and large bowel injury, and one had traumatic gangrenous appendix. In the remaining three patients, laparotomy was non-therapeutic. A total of 36 patients had associated pelvic fractures and 33 had multiple lumbar transverse process fractures. Detection of intra-peritoneal fluid by CT scan is inaccurate for prediction of bowel injury or need for surgery. However, the correlation between CT scan findings and clinical course is important for optimal diagnosis of bowel and mesenteric injuries.

  20. Inter- and intra-observer reliability of measurement of pedicle screw breach assessed by postoperative CT scans.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, William F; Ranade, Ashish; Samdani, Amer F; Gaughan, John P; D'Andrea, Linda P; Betz, Randal R

    2014-01-01

    Pedicle screws are used increasingly in spine surgery. Concerns of complications associated with screw breach necessitates accurate pedicle screw placement. Postoperative CT imaging helps to detect screw malposition and assess its severity. However, accuracy is dependent on the reading of the CT scans. Inter- and intra-observer variability could affect the reliability of CT scans to assess multiple screw types and sites. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of multi-observer analysis of CT scans for determining pedicle screw breach for various screw types and sites in patients with spinal deformity or degenerative pathologies. Axial CT scan images of 23 patients (286 screws) were read by four experienced spine surgeons. Pedicle screw placement was considered 'In' when the screw was fully contained and/or the pedicle wall breach was ≤2 mm. 'Out' was defined as a breach in the medial or lateral pedicle wall >2 mm. Intra-class coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess the inter- and intra-observer reliability. Marked inter- and intra-observer variability was noticed. The overall inter-observer ICC was 0.45 (95% confidence limits 0.25 to 0.65). The intra-observer ICC was 0.49 (95% confidence limits 0.29 to 0.69). Underlying spinal pathology, screw type, and patient age did not seem to impact the reliability of our CT assessments. Our results indicate the evaluation of pedicle screw breach on CT by a single surgeon is highly variable, and care should be taken when using individual CT evaluations of millimeters of breach as a basis for screw removal. This was a Level III study.

  1. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P < .001) for groups A, B, and C, respectively, no significant differences were observed in the corresponding SNRL with 9.2 ± 1.4, 9.1 ± 1.2, and 9.2 ± 3. Radiation (mGy × cm) and contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P < .001). None of the studies was graded as poor or inadequate by both readers, and the prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa ranged between 0.48 and 0.93 for all but one criteria. A constant image quality in CE-MDCT can be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  3. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu; Torigian, Drew A.

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How doesmore » one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly

  4. Image processing based detection of lung cancer on CT scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdillah, Bariqi; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we implement and analyze the image processing method for detection of lung cancer. Image processing techniques are widely used in several medical problems for picture enhancement in the detection phase to support the early medical treatment. In this research we proposed a detection method of lung cancer based on image segmentation. Image segmentation is one of intermediate level in image processing. Marker control watershed and region growing approach are used to segment of CT scan image. Detection phases are followed by image enhancement using Gabor filter, image segmentation, and features extraction. From the experimental results, we found the effectiveness of our approach. The results show that the best approach for main features detection is watershed with masking method which has high accuracy and robust.

  5. Possibilities of CT Scanning as Analysis Method in Laser Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karme, Aleksis; Kallonen, Aki; Matilainen, Ville-Pekka; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing is an established and constantly developing technique. Structural assessment should be a key component to ensure directed evolution towards higher level of manufacturing. The macroscopic properties of metallic structures are determined by their internal microscopic features, which are difficult to assess using conventional surface measuring methodologies. X-ray microtomography (CT) is a promising technique for three-dimensional non-destructive probing of internal composition and build of various materials. Aim of this study is to define the possibilities of using CT scanning as quality control method in LAM fabricated parts. Since the parts fabricated with LAM are very often used in high quality and accuracy demanding applications in various industries such as medical and aerospace, it is important to be able to define the accuracy of the build parts. The tubular stainless steel test specimens were 3D modelled, manufactured with a modified research AM equipment and imaged after manufacturing with a high-power, high-resolution CT scanner. 3D properties, such as surface texture and the amount and distribution of internal pores, were also evaluated in this study. Surface roughness was higher on the interior wall of the tube, and deviation from the model was systematically directed towards the central axis. Pore distribution showed clear organization and divided into two populations; one following the polygon model seams along both rims, and the other being associated with the concentric and equidistant movement path of the laser. Assessment of samples can enhance the fabrication by guiding the improvement of both modelling and manufacturing process.

  6. Characterizing functional lung heterogeneity in COPD using reference equations for CT scan-measured lobar volumes.

    PubMed

    Come, Carolyn E; Diaz, Alejandro A; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Muralidhar, Nivedita; Hersh, Craig P; Zach, Jordan A; Schroeder, Joyce; Lynch, David A; Celli, Bartolome; Washko, George R

    2013-06-01

    CT scanning is increasingly used to characterize COPD. Although it is possible to obtain CT scan-measured lung lobe volumes, normal ranges remain unknown. Using COPDGene data, we developed reference equations for lobar volumes at maximal inflation (total lung capacity [TLC]) and relaxed exhalation (approximating functional residual capacity [FRC]). Linear regression was used to develop race-specific (non-Hispanic white [NHW], African American) reference equations for lobar volumes. Covariates included height and sex. Models were developed in a derivation cohort of 469 subjects with normal pulmonary function and validated in 546 similar subjects. These cohorts were combined to produce final prediction equations, which were applied to 2,191 subjects with old GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stage II to IV COPD. In the derivation cohort, women had smaller lobar volumes than men. Height positively correlated with lobar volumes. Adjusting for height, NHWs had larger total lung and lobar volumes at TLC than African Americans; at FRC, NHWs only had larger lower lobes. Age and weight had no effect on lobar volumes at TLC but had small effects at FRC. In subjects with COPD at TLC, upper lobes exceeded 100% of predicted values in GOLD II disease; lower lobes were only inflated to this degree in subjects with GOLD IV disease. At FRC, gas trapping was severe irrespective of disease severity and appeared uniform across the lobes. Reference equations for lobar volumes may be useful in assessing regional lung dysfunction and how it changes in response to pharmacologic therapies and surgical or endoscopic lung volume reduction.

  7. Efficient organ localization using multi-label convolutional neural networks in thorax-abdomen CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efrain Humpire-Mamani, Gabriel; Arindra Adiyoso Setio, Arnaud; van Ginneken, Bram; Jacobs, Colin

    2018-04-01

    Automatic localization of organs and other structures in medical images is an important preprocessing step that can improve and speed up other algorithms such as organ segmentation, lesion detection, and registration. This work presents an efficient method for simultaneous localization of multiple structures in 3D thorax-abdomen CT scans. Our approach predicts the location of multiple structures using a single multi-label convolutional neural network for each orthogonal view. Each network takes extra slices around the current slice as input to provide extra context. A sigmoid layer is used to perform multi-label classification. The output of the three networks is subsequently combined to compute a 3D bounding box for each structure. We used our approach to locate 11 structures of interest. The neural network was trained and evaluated on a large set of 1884 thorax-abdomen CT scans from patients undergoing oncological workup. Reference bounding boxes were annotated by human observers. The performance of our method was evaluated by computing the wall distance to the reference bounding boxes. The bounding boxes annotated by the first human observer were used as the reference standard for the test set. Using the best configuration, we obtained an average wall distance of 3.20~+/-~7.33 mm in the test set. The second human observer achieved 1.23~+/-~3.39 mm. For all structures, the results were better than those reported in previously published studies. In conclusion, we proposed an efficient method for the accurate localization of multiple organs. Our method uses multiple slices as input to provide more context around the slice under analysis, and we have shown that this improves performance. This method can easily be adapted to handle more organs.

  8. A reassessment of cervical surface anatomy via CT scan in an adult population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Xue, Hua-Dan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Man; Mirjalili, S Ali; Zhang, Zhu-Hua; Ma, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Surface landmarks in the neck are important for orientations of cervical glands, arteries, veins, nerves, and vertebrae. Recent research suggests some orientations are not correct. What are the cervical landmark orientations in the Chinese population? In this study, two essential cervical anatomy planes, the thyroid cartilage and C7 planes, were assessed in living adult Chinese subjects using computed tomography (CT), and the hyoid, carotid bifurcation, cricoid cartilage, thyroid arteries, and vertebral artery were simultaneously positioned. After excluding patients with distorting pathology, a total of 108 cervical CT scans were examined. The thyroid cartilage plane commonly passed through the C5 (in males) or C4 (in females) vertebral level. The carotid artery bifurcated most commonly at C3 (left) or C4 (right), more than 10 mm above the thyroid cartilage plane bilaterally in most cases. Orientation of the carotid bifurcation according to the body or greater horn of the hyoid was more accurate. The superior thyroid artery was found a finger-breadth below the thyroid cartilage plane, and the inferior thyroid artery in the C7 plane. The inferior border of the cricoid cartilage was most often at C7 (in males) or C6 (in females). The vertebral artery entered the C6 transverse foramen in more than 80% of scans. This reassessment of cervical surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo provides both qualitative and quantitative information for surgeons in clinical practice. Clin. Anat. 30:330-335, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Methodologies for Development of Patient Specific Bone Models from Human Body CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, Vikas Narayan; Mulay, Arati Vinayak; Ahuja, Bharatkumar Bhagatraj

    2016-06-01

    This work deals with development of algorithm for physical replication of patient specific human bone and construction of corresponding implants/inserts RP models by using Reverse Engineering approach from non-invasive medical images for surgical purpose. In medical field, the volumetric data i.e. voxel and triangular facet based models are primarily used for bio-modelling and visualization, which requires huge memory space. On the other side, recent advances in Computer Aided Design (CAD) technology provides additional facilities/functions for design, prototyping and manufacturing of any object having freeform surfaces based on boundary representation techniques. This work presents a process to physical replication of 3D rapid prototyping (RP) physical models of human bone from various CAD modeling techniques developed by using 3D point cloud data which is obtained from non-invasive CT/MRI scans in DICOM 3.0 format. This point cloud data is used for construction of 3D CAD model by fitting B-spline curves through these points and then fitting surface between these curve networks by using swept blend techniques. This process also can be achieved by generating the triangular mesh directly from 3D point cloud data without developing any surface model using any commercial CAD software. The generated STL file from 3D point cloud data is used as a basic input for RP process. The Delaunay tetrahedralization approach is used to process the 3D point cloud data to obtain STL file. CT scan data of Metacarpus (human bone) is used as the case study for the generation of the 3D RP model. A 3D physical model of the human bone is generated on rapid prototyping machine and its virtual reality model is presented for visualization. The generated CAD model by different techniques is compared for the accuracy and reliability. The results of this research work are assessed for clinical reliability in replication of human bone in medical field.

  10. Effect of Emphysema on CT Scan Measures of Airway Dimensions in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Han, MeiLan K.; Come, Carolyn E.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Ross, James C.; Kim, Victor; Dransfield, Mark T.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Schroeder, Joyce D.; Lynch, David A.; Tschirren, Juerg; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In CT scans of smokers with COPD, the subsegmental airway wall area percent (WA%) is greater and more strongly correlated with FEV1 % predicted than WA% obtained in the segmental airways. Because emphysema is linked to loss of airway tethering and may limit airway expansion, increases in WA% may be related to emphysema and not solely to remodeling. We aimed to first determine whether the stronger association of subsegmental vs segmental WA% with FEV1 % predicted is mitigated by emphysema and, second, to assess the relationships among emphysema, WA%, and total bronchial area (TBA). Methods: We analyzed CT scan segmental and subsegmental WA% (WA% = 100 × wall area/TBA) of six bronchial paths and corresponding lobar emphysema, lung function, and clinical data in 983 smokers with COPD. Results: Compared with segmental WA%, the subsegmental WA% had a greater effect on FEV1% predicted (−0.8% to −1.7% vs −1.9% to −2.6% per 1-unit increase in WA%, respectively; P < .05 for most bronchial paths). After adjusting for emphysema, the association between subsegmental WA% and FEV1 % predicted was weakened in two bronchial paths. Increases in WA% between bronchial segments correlated directly with emphysema in all bronchial paths (P < .05). In multivariate regression models, emphysema was directly related to subsegmental WA% in most bronchial paths and inversely related to subsegmental TBA in all bronchial paths. Conclusion: The greater effect of subsegmental WA% on airflow obstruction is mitigated by emphysema. Part of the emphysema effect might be due to loss of airway tethering, leading to a reduction in TBA and an increase in WA%. Trial registry: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00608764; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:23460155

  11. Deep learning for biomarker regression: application to osteoporosis and emphysema on chest CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Germán.; Washko, George R.; San José Estépar, Raúl

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Biomarker computation using deep-learning often relies on a two-step process, where the deep learning algorithm segments the region of interest and then the biomarker is measured. We propose an alternative paradigm, where the biomarker is estimated directly using a regression network. We showcase this image-tobiomarker paradigm using two biomarkers: the estimation of bone mineral density (BMD) and the estimation of lung percentage of emphysema from CT scans. Materials and methods: We use a large database of 9,925 CT scans to train, validate and test the network for which reference standard BMD and percentage emphysema have been already computed. First, the 3D dataset is reduced to a set of canonical 2D slices where the organ of interest is visible (either spine for BMD or lungs for emphysema). This data reduction is performed using an automatic object detector. Second, The regression neural network is composed of three convolutional layers, followed by a fully connected and an output layer. The network is optimized using a momentum optimizer with an exponential decay rate, using the root mean squared error as cost function. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficients obtained against the reference standards are r = 0.940 (p < 0.00001) and r = 0.976 (p < 0.00001) for BMD and percentage emphysema respectively. Conclusions: The deep-learning regression architecture can learn biomarkers from images directly, without indicating the structures of interest. This approach simplifies the development of biomarker extraction algorithms. The proposed data reduction based on object detectors conveys enough information to compute the biomarkers of interest.

  12. Image quality of multiplanar reconstruction of pulmonary CT scans using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Honda, O; Yanagawa, M; Inoue, A; Kikuyama, A; Yoshida, S; Sumikawa, H; Tobino, K; Koyama, M; Tomiyama, N

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated the image quality of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Methods Inflated and fixed lungs were scanned with a garnet detector CT in high-resolution mode (HR mode) or non-high-resolution (HR) mode, and MPR images were then reconstructed. Observers compared 15 MPR images of ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) with those of ASIR (0%), and assessed image quality using a visual five-point scale (1, definitely inferior; 5, definitely superior), with particular emphasis on normal pulmonary structures, artefacts, noise and overall image quality. Results The mean overall image quality scores in HR mode were 3.67 with ASIR (40%) and 4.97 with ASIR (80%). Those in non-HR mode were 3.27 with ASIR (40%) and 3.90 with ASIR (80%). The mean artefact scores in HR mode were 3.13 with ASIR (40%) and 3.63 with ASIR (80%), but those in non-HR mode were 2.87 with ASIR (40%) and 2.53 with ASIR (80%). The mean scores of the other parameters were greater than 3, whereas those in HR mode were higher than those in non-HR mode. There were significant differences between ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) in overall image quality (p<0.01). Contrast medium in the injection syringe was scanned to analyse image quality; ASIR did not suppress the severe artefacts of contrast medium. Conclusion In general, MPR image quality with ASIR (80%) was superior to that with ASIR (40%). However, there was an increased incidence of artefacts by ASIR when CT images were obtained in non-HR mode. PMID:21081572

  13. Image quality of multiplanar reconstruction of pulmonary CT scans using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Honda, O; Yanagawa, M; Inoue, A; Kikuyama, A; Yoshida, S; Sumikawa, H; Tobino, K; Koyama, M; Tomiyama, N

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the image quality of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Inflated and fixed lungs were scanned with a garnet detector CT in high-resolution mode (HR mode) or non-high-resolution (HR) mode, and MPR images were then reconstructed. Observers compared 15 MPR images of ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) with those of ASIR (0%), and assessed image quality using a visual five-point scale (1, definitely inferior; 5, definitely superior), with particular emphasis on normal pulmonary structures, artefacts, noise and overall image quality. The mean overall image quality scores in HR mode were 3.67 with ASIR (40%) and 4.97 with ASIR (80%). Those in non-HR mode were 3.27 with ASIR (40%) and 3.90 with ASIR (80%). The mean artefact scores in HR mode were 3.13 with ASIR (40%) and 3.63 with ASIR (80%), but those in non-HR mode were 2.87 with ASIR (40%) and 2.53 with ASIR (80%). The mean scores of the other parameters were greater than 3, whereas those in HR mode were higher than those in non-HR mode. There were significant differences between ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) in overall image quality (p<0.01). Contrast medium in the injection syringe was scanned to analyse image quality; ASIR did not suppress the severe artefacts of contrast medium. In general, MPR image quality with ASIR (80%) was superior to that with ASIR (40%). However, there was an increased incidence of artefacts by ASIR when CT images were obtained in non-HR mode.

  14. Automatic three-dimensional rib centerline extraction from CT scans for enhanced visualization and anatomical context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Sowmya; Alvino, Christopher; Grady, Leo; Kiraly, Atilla

    2011-03-01

    We present a complete automatic system to extract 3D centerlines of ribs from thoracic CT scans. Our rib centerline system determines the positional information for the rib cage consisting of extracted rib centerlines, spinal canal centerline, pairing and labeling of ribs. We show an application of this output to produce an enhanced visualization of the rib cage by the method of Kiraly et al., in which the ribs are digitally unfolded along their centerlines. The centerline extraction consists of three stages: (a) pre-trace processing for rib localization, (b) rib centerline tracing, and (c) post-trace processing to merge the rib traces. Then we classify ribs from non-ribs and determine anatomical rib labeling. Our novel centerline tracing technique uses the Random Walker algorithm to segment the structural boundary of the rib in successive 2D cross sections orthogonal to the longitudinal direction of the ribs. Then the rib centerline is progressively traced along the rib using a 3D Kalman filter. The rib centerline extraction framework was evaluated on 149 CT datasets with varying slice spacing, dose, and under a variety of reconstruction kernels. The results of the evaluation are presented. The extraction takes approximately 20 seconds on a modern radiology workstation and performs robustly even in the presence of partial volume effects or rib pathologies such as bone metastases or fractures, making the system suitable for assisting clinicians in expediting routine rib reading for oncology and trauma applications.

  15. A fully automated non-external marker 4D-CT sorting algorithm using a serial cine scanning protocol.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Greg; Gaede, Stewart; Yu, Edward; Van Dyk, Jake; Battista, Jerry; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2009-04-07

    Curren