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  1. The lactase persistence -13910C>T polymorphism shows indication of association with abdominal obesity among Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, David; Nóbrega, Clévio; Manco, Licínio

    2013-04-01

    The -13910C>T single nucleotide polymorphism located upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) was found tightly associated with lactase persistence in European populations. Recently, it was also associated with body mass index (BMI) and obesity in European adults. The aim of this study was to test the association of -13910C>T polymorphism with obesity-related traits and risk of obesity in children. We genotyped 580 Portuguese children (6-12-year-olds) for the -13910C>T polymorphism using TaqMan probes by real-time PCR. Anthropometric measurements were assessed in all children. Obesity was defined according to the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF) cut-offs and abdominal obesity using the sex and age-specific ≥90th waist circumference percentile. We found indication for an association between the-13910*T allele and children abdominal obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.41; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.03-1.94; p = 0.030). Under the dominant model, the indicative association was observed between the LCT-13910 CT/TT genotypes and abdominal obesity, remaining significant after adjustment for age and gender (OR = 1.65; 95% CI: 1.04-2.60; p = 0.029). No association was detected with the risk of obesity (p = 0.350). Our results suggest that the -13910C>T polymorphism may predispose to abdominal obesity in Portuguese children. The association with BMI or risk of obesity, previously observed in adults, was not confirmed. ©2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  2. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  3. Helical CT of abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Bell, T

    1999-05-01

    CT has revolutionized the diagnostic work-up of trauma patients with suspected abdominal injuries. A wide range of intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal organ injuries can be quickly and accurately diagnosed with CT. Today, helical CT technology permits even faster examinations, with improved intravenous contrast opacification of parenchymal organs and vascular structures and reduced CT artifacts caused by patient motion, respiration, and arterial pulsation. Severely injured and potentially unstable patients, who might not have been able to tolerate the long CT examinations of the past, may be quickly evaluated today with helical CT. Accurate diagnosis requires high quality CT examinations that are performed with optimum CT protocols. This article reviews the currently recommended helical CT protocols for evaluating patients with suspected abdominal injuries, and the CT findings when injuries are present.

  4. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  5. [Gallstone ileus. Abdominal CT usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh, F; Brasseur, P; Bissen, L

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the case of a 93-year old woman referred to the emergency department and presenting with an intestinal obstruction. Abdominal CT reveals a biliary ileus caused by the migration and the impaction of a 3 cm gallstone in the small bowel. Surgical treatment by enterolithotomy was successful. In over 90% of cases, gallstone ileus is a complication of cholelithiasis and accounts for 25% of intestinal obstruction in patients over 65 years. To reduce morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential. Abdominal CT-scan is the gold standard technique.

  6. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  7. Plain abdominal radiographs and abdominal CT scans for nontraumatic abdominal pain--added value?

    PubMed

    Nagurney, J T; Brown, D F; Novelline, R A; Kim, J; Fischer, R H

    1999-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective descriptive study to determine the value of plain abdominal radiographs in emergency department (ED) patients also receiving abdominal computed tomography scans (CT) for the evaluation of nontraumatic abdominal, back and flank pain (NTAP). Cases were identified through radiology log books. Medical records and radiology reports were reviewed to determine whether the CT confirmed the findings of the plain abdominal radiographs, and whether the clinical course confirmed the results of either. Test characteristics for the plain abdominal radiograph and for the CT, using the clinical course including subsequent invasive procedures as the gold standard, were calculated. Of 177 patients who received CTs, 97 (55%) also received plain abdominal radiographs. Among the 74 patients who were admitted to the hospital and had complete data, the sensitivity and specificity for the plain abdominal radiographs were .43 and .75 respectively, compared to .91 and .94 for the CT scan (P(sens.) < .05, P(spec.) < .05). In 4 patients (5%), both studies failed to identify pathology shown in a subsequent procedure. In ED patients with NTAP, the plain abdominal radiograph may have some value as a screening tool; however, in patients in whom a CT is likely to be ordered anyway, a plain abdominal radiograph is unhelpful and often misleading.

  8. Abdominal vascular emergencies: US and CT assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Acute vascular emergencies can arise from direct traumatic injury to the vessel or be spontaneous (non-traumatic). The vascular injuries can also be divided into two categories: arteial injury and venous injury. Most of them are life-treatening emergencies, sice they may cause an important ipovolemic shock or severe ischemia in their end organ and require prompt diagnosis and treatment. In the different clinical scenarios, the correct diagnostic approach to vascular injuries isn’t firmly established and advantages of one imaging technique over the other are not obvious. Ultrasound (US) is an easy accessible, safe and non-invasive diagnostic modality but Computed Tomography (CT) with multiphasic imaging study is an accurate modality to evaluate the abdominal vascular injuries therefore can be considered the primary imaging modality in vascular emergencies. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of abdominal vascular emergencies, including traumatic and non traumatic vessel injuries, focusing of US and CT modalities. PMID:23902665

  9. Abdominal vascular emergencies: US and CT assessment.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Fonio, Paolo; Floridi, Chiara; Macchi, Monica; Maccaferri, Anna; Ianora, Antonio Amato Stabile; Cagini, Lucio; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo

    2013-07-15

    Acute vascular emergencies can arise from direct traumatic injury to the vessel or be spontaneous (non-traumatic).The vascular injuries can also be divided into two categories: arteial injury and venous injury.Most of them are life-treatening emergencies, sice they may cause an important ipovolemic shock or severe ischemia in their end organ and require prompt diagnosis and treatment.In the different clinical scenarios, the correct diagnostic approach to vascular injuries isn't firmly established and advantages of one imaging technique over the other are not obvious.Ultrasound (US) is an easy accessible, safe and non-invasive diagnostic modality but Computed Tomography (CT) with multiphasic imaging study is an accurate modality to evaluate the abdominal vascular injuries therefore can be considered the primary imaging modality in vascular emergencies.The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of abdominal vascular emergencies, including traumatic and non traumatic vessel injuries, focusing of US and CT modalities.

  10. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Hong, Hye-Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Ha, Hong Il; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. Results The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Conclusion Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity. PMID:23901318

  11. Abdominal CT findings in small bowel perforation.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Osadchy, A; Gayer, G

    2009-02-01

    Small bowel perforation is an emergent medical condition for which the diagnosis is usually not made clinically but by CT, a common imaging modality used for the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Direct CT features that suggest perforation include extraluminal air and oral contrast, which are often associated with secondary CT signs of bowel pathology. This pictorial review illustrates the CT findings of small bowel perforation caused by various clinical entities.

  12. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  13. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation.

  14. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  15. Construction of Abdominal Probabilistic Atlases and Their Value in Segmentation of Normal Organs in Abdominal CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Hero, Alfred; Bland, Peyton; Kessler, Marc; Seo, Jongbum; Meyer, Charles

    A good abdominal probabilistic atlas can provide important information to guide segmentation and registration applications in the abdomen. Here we build and test probabilistic atlases using 24 abdominal CT scans with available expert manual segmentations. Atlases are built by picking a target and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. We improve our previous abdominal atlas by 1) choosing a least biased target as determined by a statistical tool, i.e. multidimensional scaling operating on bending energy, 2) using a better set of control points to model the deformation, and 3) using higher information content CT scans with visible internal liver structures. One atlas is built in the least biased target space and two atlases are built in other target spaces for performance comparisons. The value of an atlas is assessed based on the resulting segmentations; whichever atlas yields the best segmentation performance is considered the better atlas. We consider two segmentation methods of abdominal volumes after registration with the probabilistic atlas: 1) simple segmentation by atlas thresholding and 2) application of a Bayesian maximum a posteriori method. Using jackknifing we measure the atlas-augmented segmentation performance with respect to manual expert segmentation and show that the atlas built in the least biased target space yields better segmentation performance than atlases built in other target spaces.

  16. CT evaluation of complications of abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.; Moss, A.A.; Lusby, R.; Kaiser, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the CT findings in 29 consecutive patients being studied to detect complications of aortofemoral bypass surgery. Presenting symptoms included fever in 22 (76%), gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (7%), a pulsating mass in 3 (10%), jaundice in 1 (3%), and back pain in 1 (3%). The complications observed most frequently were groin infection in 7 (24%), abdominal perigraft abscess in 11 (38%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (21%), aorto-enteric fistula in 3 (10%), and lymphocystic hematoma in 3 (10%). There were no false negatives, and overall accuracy and sensitivity of CT in detecting complications was 100%. The authors recommend that CT be performed prior to angiography or surgery whenever an abscess, pseudoaneurysm, or aorto-enteric fistula is suspected.

  17. Incidental discovery of radiopaque pills on abdominal CT in a patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Judge, Bryan S; Hoyle, John D

    2008-07-01

    We present a case in which a young female ingested several tablets of an over-the-counter cough and cold remedy over the course of a week. Pill fragments were identifiable and incidentally discovered when a CT scan of the abdomen was performed to evaluate the cause of her abdominal pain. Discovery of radiopaque pills on diagnostic imaging studies warrants further history and appropriate testing to rule out a life-threatening ingestion.

  18. Distribution of abdominal and pelvic Hodgkin disease: implications for CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Aisen, A.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.; Amendola, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis is frequently performed for the staging of abdominal and pelvic lymphoma. Certain limited CT protocols have been nearly as accurate as more complete examinations at defining the extent of lymphadenopathy and the response to therapy, with the advantages of decreased scanning time and patient radiation dose. The authors reviewed abdominal and pelvic CT scans and reports of 58 patients with Hodgkin disease to determine whether the entire abdomen and pelvis must always be scanned in such patients. Pelvic adenopathy without concurrent abdominal adenopathy was present in only one of 58 patients, and that patient presented clinically with inguinal adenopathy. These findings are supported by larger pathologic studies showing that Hodgkin disease always spreads contiguously. Patients with Hodgkin disease presenting above the diaphragm should undergo abdominal CT for staging; if the abdomen is normal, the pelvis need not be scanned. For Hodgkin patients with clinical or CT evidence of disease below the diaphragm, both abdomen and pelvis should be scanned.

  19. CT of benign cystic abdominal masses in children

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, P.J.; Whitley, N.O.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) correctly portrayed the gross anatomic features of six mesenteric, omental, and ovarian cysts and diagnosed two pancreatic pseudocysts in children. Large, well defined, low-density masses were found, often containing septa and filling most of the abdomen and pelvis. CT displayed the size and extent of the mass and showed extrinsic compression of displacement of surrounding structures. Different pathologic entities may have similar CT appearances, particularly with very large cystic masses.

  20. Abdominal CT scanning in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, S H; Civetta, J M

    1985-01-01

    Clinical parameters, intensive care unit (ICU) course, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans, and the clinical decisions of 53 critically ill patients were reviewed to determine the influence of the CT scan. No scans were positive before the eighth day. Sensitivity was 48% and specificity, 64%. Seventeen (23%) scans of the 72 provided beneficial results: eight localized abscesses that were drained; nine were negative and not operated on. Five (7%) scans provided detrimental information: scan negative with abscess discovered or scan positive but negative laparotomy. Fifty (70%) scans were either of no help or not used in management. The mortality rate was 50% when CT led to an intervention, and 47% in the entire group. Hospital charges were +33,408. Personnel time and cost were 497 hours and +3658; of the total +37,066, 77% (+28,541) could be considered wasted. From these data, it was concluded that CT scans should be used to confirm abscesses, not to search for a source of sepsis. PMID:4015222

  1. Low contrast detection in abdominal CT: comparing single-slice and multi-slice tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Alexandre; Racine, Damien; Viry, Anaïs.; Verdun, Francis R.; Schmidt, Sabine; Bochud, François O.

    2017-03-01

    Image quality assessment is crucial for the optimization of computed tomography (CT) protocols. Human and mathematical model observers are increasingly used for the detection of low contrast signal in abdominal CT, but are frequently limited to the use of a single image slice. Another limitation is that most of them only consider the detection of a signal embedded in a uniform background phantom. The purpose of this paper was to test if human observer performance is significantly different in CT images read in single or multiple slice modes and if these differences are the same for anatomical and uniform clinical images. We investigated detection performance and scrolling trends of human observers of a simulated liver lesion embedded in anatomical and uniform CT backgrounds. Results show that observers don't take significantly benefit of additional information provided in multi-slice reading mode. Regarding the background, performances are moderately higher for uniform than for anatomical images. Our results suggest that for low contrast detection in abdominal CT, the use of multi-slice model observers would probably only add a marginal benefit. On the other hand, the quality of a CT image is more accurately estimated with clinical anatomical backgrounds.

  2. Acute ureteric calculus obstruction: unenhanced spiral CT versus HASTE MR urography and abdominal radiograph.

    PubMed

    Regan, F; Kuszyk, B; Bohlman, M E; Jackman, S

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the performance of unenhanced spiral CT to the combination of HASTE MR urography (MRU) and plain abdominal radiography (KUB) in patients suspected of having acute calculus ureteric obstruction. 64 patients with suspected acute calculus ureteric obstruction were evaluated. The presence of perirenal fluid, presence and level of ureteric obstruction and calculi were assessed on both techniques. 44 of 64 (69%) patients had acute calculus ureteric obstruction based on clinical, radiographic or surgical findings. MRU showed perirenal fluid in acute ureteric obstruction (77%) with a greater sensitivity than CT showed stranding (45%). The combination of fluid and ureteric dilation on MRU showed a sensitivity of 93% (CT 80%), specificity of 95% (CT 85%), and accuracy of 94% (CT 81%). There were 61 findings of either fluid or ureteric dilatation on MRU in 44 acutely obstructed kidneys compared with 37 similar findings on CT (p<0.005). Although there was excellent reproducibility (Kappa=/>0.75) in the finding of perirenal fluid on MRU, there was only fair interobserver agreement (Kappa<0.4) regarding perirenal stranding on CT. MRU/KUB showed ureteric calculi in 21/29 (72%) of patients with calculi seen by CT. Overall, MRU/KUB revealed 2.4 abnormalities per acutely obstructed ureter compared with 1.8 abnormalities detected by CT. MRU/KUB using HASTE sequences can diagnose the presence of acute calculus ureteric obstruction with similar accuracy to spiral CT. The technique has less observer variability and is more accurate than CT in detecting evidence of obstruction such as perirenal fluid.

  3. [Modern CT diagnosis of acute thoracic and abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Rieger, M; Sparr, H; Esterhammer, R; Fink, C; Bale, R; Czermak, B; Jaschke, W

    2002-07-01

    To evaluate a modified algorithm in the diagnostic management of polytraumatized patients by using whole body multislice CT (MSCT) as primary diagnostic tool. Between June 1999 and October 2000 532 polytraumatized patients were referred to the emergency department. 336 polytraumatized patients were primarily evaluated using whole body MSCT according to the "Innsbruck Emergency Algorithm." MSCT is performed immediately after cardiovascular stabilization of the patient. During the initial stabilization period free intraabdominal fluid is excluded or demonstrated by abdominal ultrasound. Time-consuming conventional radiographs are omitted with exception of an optimal chest X-ray. In patients with suspected or obvious arterial injuries or fractures the multislice-CT-dataset is used to perform 2D and 3D reconstructions in order to optimize visualization of additional skeletal and vascular injuries. By means of whole body MSCT it was possible to detect all injuries. The diagnostic advantage of whole body MSCT as compared to conventional X-ray was analyzed in 111 consecutive polytraumatized patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of 34.77. The early use of MSCT shortened the time for diagnostic work-up substantially (approximately 50%). Whole body multislice-CT used as primary diagnostic tool in the management of polytraumatized patients allows for a fast, accurate and comprehensive diagnostic work-up.

  4. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  5. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Arrivé, L; Corréas, J M; Lesèche, G; Ghebontni, L; Tubiana, J M

    1995-12-01

    Inflammatory aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) is a variant of atherosclerotic aneurysm that is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum [1, 2]. These inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes are probably the result of a local autoallergic reaction to certain components of atherosclerotic plaques [2]. This distinct entity has important implications, as the periaortic fibrotic tissue adherent to ureters, the duodenum, and the inferior vena cava may complicate surgical repair [1, 2]. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of IAAA, with emphasis on the identification of IAAA and differentiation from conventional aortic aneurysms, evaluation of the involvement of adjacent structures by the periaortic fibrosis, and evaluation of the retroperitoneum after aneurysmal repair to analyze the resolution or the persistence of the periaortic fibrosis.

  6. Screening and comparison of polychromatic and monochromatic image reconstruction of abdominal arterial energy spectrum CT.

    PubMed

    Wang, X P; Wang, B; Hou, P; Li, R; Gao, J B

    2017-01-01

    We screened the suitable image reconstruction to observe the abdominal artery and compare the quality between the polychromatic and the monochromatic reconstruction images of the abdominal artery spectrum CT. Eighty patients underwent Gemstone CT energy spectrum imaging to obtain an abdominal artery polychromatic image (140 kVp) and a monochromatic image from 40 ~ 140 keV. The CT value of region of interest (ROI) was measured on the polychromatic image and the single energy image. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery were determined. The images in each group underwent image quality subjective scoring by three experienced radiologists using a blinded method. Finally, comprehensive comparisons and image quality subjective scorings were performed on the CT, SNR, and CNR values of the abdominal aorta. The obtained data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 19.0 software. When the keV value was reduced, the CT value of the abdominal artery gradually increased, and the image noise also changed. The comprehensive comparisons and subjective scorings were finalized for each single energy image based on the abdominal artery image quality objective indicators (CT value, SNR, and CNR). Results revealed that the abdominal artery image quality in the 50 ~ 60 keV monochromatic group was better compared to the polychromatic group. Furthermore, onochromatic imaging had different impacts on the abdominal aorta and hepatic artery image qualities. In different types of abdominal arterial reconstruction images obtained using abdominal energy spectrum CT conventional enhanced scanning, the image quality of the 50 ~ 60keV monochromatic reconstruction was higher when compared with the polychromatic reconstruction. Thus, it is recommended to apply the conventional reconstruction for abdominal artery energy spectrum CT scanning.

  7. The impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and radiation dose in thoracic and abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Kalmar, Peter I; Quehenberger, Franz; Steiner, Jürgen; Lutfi, Andre; Bohlsen, Dennis; Talakic, Emina; Hassler, Eva Maria; Schöllnast, Helmut

    2014-08-01

    To compare the image quality and radiation dose between iterative reconstruction (IR) and standard filtered back projection (FBP) in CT of the chest and abdomen. Thoracic CT was performed in 50 patients (38 male, 12 female; mean age, 51 ± 23 yrs; range, 7-85 yrs) and abdominal CT was performed in 50 patients (36 male, 14 female; mean age, 62 ± 13 yrs; range, 20-85 yrs), using IR as well as FBP for image reconstruction. Image noise was quantitatively assessed measuring standard deviation of Hounsfield Units (HU) in defined regions of interest in subcutaneous tissue. Scan length and Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were documented. Scan length, image noise, and CTDI of both reconstruction techniques were compared by using paired tests according to the nature of variables (McNemar test or Student t test). Overall subjective image quality and subjective image noise were compared. There was no significant difference between the protocols in terms of mean scan length (p>0.05). Image noise was statistically significantly higher with IR, although the difference was clinically insignificant (13.3 ± 3.0 HU and 13.6 ± 3.0 HU for thoracic CT and 11.5 ± 3.1 HU and 11.7 ± 3.0 HU for abdominal CT, p<0.05). There was no significant difference in overall subjective image quality and subjective image noise. The radiation dose was significantly lower with IR. Volume-weighted CTDI decreased by 64% (6.2 ± 2.5 mGy versus 17.1 ± 9.5 mGy, p<0.001) for thoracic CT and by 58% (7.8 ± 4.6 mGy versus 18.5 ± 8.6 mGy, p<0.001) for abdominal CT. Our study shows that in thoracic and abdominal CT with IR, there is no clinically significant impact on image quality, yet a significant radiation dose reduction compared to FBP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of five image registration tools for abdominal CT: pitfalls and opportunities with soft anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  9. Evaluation of Five Image Registration Tools for Abdominal CT: Pitfalls and Opportunities with Soft Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher P; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-20

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  11. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  12. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  13. Immersive Virtual Reality for Visualization of Abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A; Bodenheimer, Robert E

    2013-03-28

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two-dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  14. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  15. CT Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT scans: variability between two different manufacturers' MDCT scanners.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P; Corwin, Michael T; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers' MDCT scanners. A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers.

  16. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum: A Case Report of MRI, CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-02-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum.A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved.This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH.

  17. Deformable registration of abdominal kilovoltage treatment planning CT and tomotherapy daily megavoltage CT for treatment adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deshan; Chaudhari, Summer R; Goddu, S Murty; Pratt, David; Khullar, Divya; Deasy, Joseph O; El Naqa, Issam

    2009-02-01

    In adaptive radiation therapy the treatment planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) images need to be registered with daily CT images. Daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) images are generally noisier than the kVCT images. In addition, in the abdomen, low image contrast, differences in bladder filling, differences in bowel, and rectum filling degrade image usefulness and make deformable image registration very difficult. The authors have developed a procedure to overcome these difficulties for better deformable registration between the abdominal kVCT and MVCT images. The procedure includes multiple image preprocessing steps and a two deformable registration steps. The image preprocessing steps include MVCT noise reduction, bowel gas pockets detection and painting, contrast enhancement, and intensity manipulation for critical organs. The first registration step is carried out in the local region of the critical organs (bladder, prostate, and rectum). It requires structure contours of these critical organs on both kVCT and MVCT to obtain good registration accuracy on these critical organs. The second registration step uses the first step results and registers the entire image with less intensive computational requirement. The two-step approach improves the overall computation speed and works together with these image preprocessing steps to achieve better registration accuracy than a regular single step registration. The authors evaluated the procedure on multiple image datasets from prostate cancer patients and gynecological cancer patients. Compared to rigid alignment, the proposed method improves volume matching by over 60% for the critical organs and reduces the prostate landmark registration errors by 50%.

  18. Texture-learning-based system for three-dimensional segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cong-Qi; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Li-Jen; Wong, Yon-Choeng; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Jiang, Yan-Yau

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal CT images are commonly used for the diagnosis of kidney diseases. With the advances of CT technology, processing of CT images has become a challenging task mainly because of the large number of CT images being studied. This paper presents a texture-learning based system for the three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images. The system is designed to automatically delineate renal parenchyma and is based on the texturelearning and the region-homogeneity-based approaches. The first approach is achieved with the texture analysis using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features and an artificial neural network (ANN) to determine if a pixel in the CT image is likely to fall within the renal parenchyma. The second approach incorporates a two-dimensional (2D) region growing to segment renal parenchyma in single CT image slice and a 3D region growing to propagate the segmentation results to neighboring CT image slices. The criterion for the region growing is a test of region-homogeneity which is defined by examining the ANN outputs. In system evaluation, 10 abdominal CT image sets were used. Automatic segmentation results were compared with manually segmentation results using the Dice similarity coefficient. Among the 10 CT image sets, our system has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 that clearly shows a high correlation between the two segmentation results. Ultimately, our system could be incorporated in applications for the delineation of renal parenchyma or as a preprocessing in a CAD system of kidney diseases.

  19. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Zengjie; Sun, Binbin; Li, Dacheng; Wang, Zhenguang; Liu, Fangjun; Hua, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors.

  20. Abdominal aortitis on PET CT: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Foley, J.; Mullan, D.; Mohan, H.; Schmidt, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aortitis often occurs in patients with systemic vasculitis. Presentation of case We reported a 73 year old man with giant cell arteritis who was presented with abdominal pain and weight loss. Discussion Aortitis was diagnosed on PET-CT scan performed because initial investigations raised the possibility of pancreatic pathology. Conclusion This case highlights the utility of PET-CT in the diagnosis of abdominal aortitis and the need to consider aortitis as a differential in patients with abdominal pain with a history of vasculitis. PMID:25827296

  1. Improvement of CT-based treatment-planning models of abdominal targets using static exhale imaging.

    PubMed

    Balter, J M; Lam, K L; McGinn, C J; Lawrence, T S; Ten Haken, R K

    1998-07-01

    CT-based models of the patient that do not account for the motion of ventilation may not accurately predict the shape and position of critical abdominal structures. Respiratory gating technology for imaging and treatment is not yet widely available. The purpose of the current study is to explore an intermediate step to improve the veracity of the patient model and reduce the treated volume by acquiring the CT data with the patients holding their breath at normal exhale. The ventilatory time courses of diaphragm movement for 15 patients (with no special breathing instructions) were measured using digitized movies from the fluoroscope during simulation. A subsequent clinical protocol was developed for treatment based on exhale CT models. CT scans (typically 3.5-mm slice thickness) were acquired at normal exhale using a spiral scanner. The scan volume was divided into two to three segments, to allow the patient to breathe in between. Margins were placed about intrahepatic target volumes based on the ventilatory excursion inferior to the target, and on only the reproducibility of exhale position superior to the target. The average patient's diaphragm remained within 25% of the range of ventilatory excursion from the average exhale position for 42% of the typical breathing cycle, and within 25% of the range from the average inhale position for 15% of the cycle. The reproducibility of exhale position over multiple breathing cycles was 0.9 mm (2sigma), as opposed to 2.6 mm for inhale. Combining the variation of exhale position and the uncertainty in diaphragm position from CT slices led to typical margins of 10 mm superior to the target, and 19 mm inferior to the target, compared to margins of 19 mm in both directions under our prior protocol of margins based on free-breathing CT studies. For a typical intrahepatic target, these smaller volumes resulted in a 3.6% reduction in Veff for the liver. Analysis of portal films shows proper target coverage for patients treated

  2. Deformable registration of abdominal kilovoltage treatment planning CT and tomotherapy daily megavoltage CT for treatment adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Deshan; Chaudhari, Summer R.; Goddu, S. Murty; Pratt, David; Khullar, Divya; Deasy, Joseph O.; El Naqa, Issam

    2009-01-01

    In adaptive radiation therapy the treatment planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) images need to be registered with daily CT images. Daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) images are generally noisier than the kVCT images. In addition, in the abdomen, low image contrast, differences in bladder filling, differences in bowel, and rectum filling degrade image usefulness and make deformable image registration very difficult. The authors have developed a procedure to overcome these difficulties for better deformable registration between the abdominal kVCT and MVCT images. The procedure includes multiple image preprocessing steps and a two deformable registration steps. The image preprocessing steps include MVCT noise reduction, bowel gas pockets detection and painting, contrast enhancement, and intensity manipulation for critical organs. The first registration step is carried out in the local region of the critical organs (bladder, prostate, and rectum). It requires structure contours of these critical organs on both kVCT and MVCT to obtain good registration accuracy on these critical organs. The second registration step uses the first step results and registers the entire image with less intensive computational requirement. The two-step approach improves the overall computation speed and works together with these image preprocessing steps to achieve better registration accuracy than a regular single step registration. The authors evaluated the procedure on multiple image datasets from prostate cancer patients and gynecological cancer patients. Compared to rigid alignment, the proposed method improves volume matching by over 60% for the critical organs and reduces the prostate landmark registration errors by 50%. PMID:19291972

  3. Primary malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the abdominal cavity: CT findings and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Bivek; Xu, Yi-Kai; Wu, Yuan-Kui; Zhang, Wei-Wei

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study computed tomography (CT) features of abdominal malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) in various rare locations. METHODS: We retroprospectively identified cases of MFH involving the abdominal cavity. Particular attention was paid to details regarding imaging features and histological types. RESULTS: The study population consisted of seven men and one woman, with a mean age of 52.5 years. Seven patients had some physical symptoms, while one was incidentally detected. The sites of origin were liver (n = 3), greater omentum (n = 1), superior mesentery (n = 1), ileum (n = 1), right psoas muscle (n = 1) and right kidney (n = 1). With the exception of the ileum lesion, all were of huge size. The contour of the lesions was more or less clear. Foci of necrosis were present in six lesions (n = 6). On plain CT scan, all lesions were hypo to iso dense. The lesion in the greater omentum was cystic. One lesion (n = 1) showed significant enhancement and the cystic lesion showed mild peripheral enhancement. An abundance of blood vessels surrounding the mass was seen in two lesions (n = 2) and both were of the inflammatory variety. Pathological examination revealed storiform-pleomorphic variety (n = 4), inflammatory variety (n = 3) and myxoid variety (n = 1). Two of the patients with inflammatory MFH had a clinical presentation of fever and one was afebrile, however, blood investigations in all three showed leukocytosis. CONCLUSION: Primary MFHs of the abdominal viscera and gastrointestinal tract are generally huge soft tissue masses containing areas of low attenuation and mild to moderate contrast enhancement. PMID:22590669

  4. Unsupervised quantification of abdominal fat from CT images using Greedy Snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Chirag; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Patel, Aalpen; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Adipose tissue has been associated with adverse consequences of obesity. Total adipose tissue (TAT) is divided into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Intra-abdominal fat (VAT), located inside the abdominal cavity, is a major factor for the classic obesity related pathologies. Since direct measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat is not trivial, substitute metrics like waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) are used in clinical settings to quantify obesity. Abdominal fat can be assessed effectively using CT or MRI, but manual fat segmentation is rather subjective and time-consuming. Hence, an automatic and accurate quantification tool for abdominal fat is needed. The goal of this study is to extract TAT, VAT and SAT fat from abdominal CT in a fully automated unsupervised fashion using energy minimization techniques. We applied a four step framework consisting of 1) initial body contour estimation, 2) approximation of the body contour, 3) estimation of inner abdominal contour using Greedy Snakes algorithm, and 4) voting, to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat. We validated our algorithm on 952 clinical abdominal CT images (from 476 patients with a very wide BMI range) collected from various radiology departments of Geisinger Health System. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on such a large and diverse clinical dataset. Our algorithm obtained a 3.4% error for VAT segmentation compared to manual segmentation. These personalized and accurate measurements of fat can complement traditional population health driven obesity metrics such as BMI and WC.

  5. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  6. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses following abdominal surgery under real-time CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 +/- 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 +/- 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  7. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  8. Efficient Abdominal Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT with SIMPLE Context Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-20

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  9. Efficient multi-atlas abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  10. Efficient abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  11. How reliable is routine lumbar spine MRI for detection of renal cysts? Correlation with abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Woo; Lee, Young Han; Chung, Soo Yoon; Park, Jin-Oh; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-04-01

    Incidental renal cysts are a very common finding in routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there is no report of the renal cyst detection rate on routine lumbar spine MRI. To determine the renal cyst detection rate in routine lumbar spine MRI based on findings of abdominal computed tomography (CT), and to investigate if the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT could be also detected by routine lumbar spine MRI. A retrospective study was conducted of 70 patients who underwent both routine lumbar spine MRI and abdominal CT between December 2011 and January 2014. The detection rate of all renal cysts>5 mm as well as the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT were assessed in routine lumbar spine MRI. On routine lumbar spine MRI, the detection rate of renal cysts was 46.5% (73/157) for>5-mm renal cysts and 68.0% (34/50) for>10-mm renal cysts, correlating with abdominal CT. The detection rate of the largest renal cyst seen by abdominal CT was 60.0% (27/45). Non-detection of the largest renal cyst could be caused by upper positioning (n = 7), lateral positioning (n = 6), or relatively small cyst size (n = 5). Approximately half of renal cysts>5 mm and two-thirds of renal cysts>10 mm were detected on routine lumbar spine MRI. However, radiologists should be aware that kidney lesions may not be included in the scan coverage of routine lumbar spine MRI. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  12. [Development of CT manifestations and anatomic studies on thoracic-abdominal junctional zone].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yilan; Deng, Wen; Yang, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Thoracic-abdominal junctional zone is an area from the inferior chest to superior belly. The inferior chest contains inferior pulmonary lobes, pulmonary ligament, inferior mediastinum and lower thoracic cavity,while the superior belly contains upper abdominal cavity, spatium retroperitonaeale, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, liver, stomach, adrenal glands, kidneys and spleen. This article is to review the CT manifestations and anatomy of diseases such as infection, trauma, hemorrhage, hernia and tumor involving this area. It could provides anatomic and pathological information for instituting clinical treatments.

  13. [Evaluation of Intra-abdominal fat distribution using X-ray CT data for detection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Takatsu, Kazuaki; Negishi, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Kouichi; Satou, Masanori; Yanai, Kazuya; Sasaki, Isamu; Fukuda, Kazuya; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Kouno, Atsushi; Shimomura, Younosuke

    2005-06-20

    To develop a novel method of detecting rectal cancer, we assessed relationships between intra-abdominal fat distribution and rectal cancer in Japanese patients. Subjects comprised 38 patients with rectal cancer apparent on CT-colonography and 110 other cases. The intra-abdominal fat area was determined by calculating pixel distribution with attenuation values from -140 HU to -40 HU. The area of intra-abdominal fat was measured on axial images using an interslice gap of 10 mm. Profile curves of intra-abdominal fat were in the plane direction from diaphragm to anus. Of note is the fact that Ogura's peak, a secondary small peak around the rectal cancer, was apparent on the profile of intra-abdominal fat, with 73.7% of rectal cancers displaying Ogura's peak. In comparison, only 19.1% of other cases displayed Ogura's peak on this profile. The relationship between fat and rectal cancer is difficult to explain. However, making good use of these results showing intra-abdominal fat distribution, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detecting rectal cancer according to the presence of Ogura's peak has potential as a method of mass screening. As only 148 cases were investigated in the present study, the accumulation of additional data is needed. More detailed studies with larger patient populations are warranted.

  14. Controversies in emergency radiology. CT versus ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rhea, James T; Garza, Daniel H; Novelline, Robert A

    2004-07-01

    There has been controversy regarding ultrasonography (US) versus CT in blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Each modality has its strengths and weaknesses. US is fast and allows resuscitative efforts to proceed while the patient is being scanned. However, the sensitivity of US is inferior to that of CT, and there is user variability. CT is better at determining the extent, type, and grade of injury, resulting in a more tailored therapeutic plan and safe conservative management of many patients. However, CT involves ionizing radiation, cannot be performed portably, and requires only visual monitoring while scanning. Given each modality's strengths and weaknesses we conclude that CT is the preferred examination when the BAT patient is stable or moderately stable, enough to be taken to CT. If a BAT patient is unstable, US is beneficial in screening for certain injuries or large hemoperitoneum prior to an exploratory laparotomy.

  15. Integrated circuit detector technology in abdominal CT: added value in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Morsbach, Fabian; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Rätzer, Susan; Schmidt, Bernhard; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to assess the effect of an integrated circuit (IC) detector for abdominal CT on image quality. In the first study part, an abdominal phantom was scanned with various extension rings using a CT scanner equipped with a conventional discrete circuit (DC) detector and on the same scanner with an IC detector (120 kVp, 150 effective mAs, and 75 effective mAs). In the second study part, 20 patients were included who underwent abdominal CT both with the IC detector and previously at similar protocol parameters (120 kVp tube current-time product and 150 reference mAs using automated tube current modulation) with the DC detector. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection. Image quality in the phantom was higher for images acquired with the IC compared with the DC detector. There was a gradually increasing noise reduction with increasing phantom sizes, with the highest (37% in the largest phantom) at 75 effective mAs (p < 0.001). In patients, noise was overall significantly (p = 0.025) reduced by 6.4% using the IC detector. Similar to the phantom, there was a gradual increase in noise reduction to 7.9% in patients with a body mass index of 25 kg/m(2) or lower (p = 0.008). Significant correlation was found in patients between noise and abdominal diameter in DC detector images (r = 0.604, p = 0.005), whereas no such correlation was found for the IC detector (r = 0.427, p = 0.060). Use of an IC detector in abdominal CT improves image quality and reduces image noise, particularly in overweight and obese patients. This noise reduction has the potential for dose reduction in abdominal CT.

  16. Liver Segmentation Based on Snakes Model and Improved GrowCut Algorithm in Abdominal CT Image

    PubMed Central

    He, Baochun; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zong, Mao; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel method based on Snakes Model and GrowCut algorithm is proposed to segment liver region in abdominal CT images. First, according to the traditional GrowCut method, a pretreatment process using K-means algorithm is conducted to reduce the running time. Then, the segmentation result of our improved GrowCut approach is used as an initial contour for the future precise segmentation based on Snakes model. At last, several experiments are carried out to demonstrate the performance of our proposed approach and some comparisons are conducted between the traditional GrowCut algorithm. Experimental results show that the improved approach not only has a better robustness and precision but also is more efficient than the traditional GrowCut method. PMID:24066017

  17. Abdominal CT scanning in reproductive-age women with right lower quadrant abdominal pain: does its use reduce negative appendectomy rates and healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Morse, Bryan C; Roettger, Richard H; Kalbaugh, Corey A; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Hines, William B

    2007-06-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most frequent cause of the acute abdomen in the United States, its accurate diagnosis in reproductive-age women remains difficult. Problems in making the diagnosis are evidenced by negative appendectomy rates in this group of 20 per cent to 45 per cent. Abdominal CT scanning has been used in diagnosing acute appendicitis, but its reliability and usefulness remains controversial. There is concern that the use of CT scanning to make this diagnosis leads to increased and unwarranted healthcare charges and costs. The purpose of our study is to determine if abdominal CT scanning is an effective test in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women (age, 16-49 years) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and to determine if its use is cost-effective. From January 2003 to December 2006, 439 patients were identified from our academic surgical database and confirmed by chart review as undergoing an appendectomy with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data, including age, presence and results of preoperative abdominal CT scans, operative findings, and pathology reports were reviewed. Comparison of patients receiving a preoperative CT scan with those who did not was performed using chi-squared analysis. In the subgroup of reproductive-age women, there was a significant difference in negative appendectomy rates of 17 per cent in the group that received abdominal CT scans versus 42 per cent in the group that did not (P < 0.038). After accounting for the patient and insurance company costs, abdominal CT scan savings averaged $1412 per patient. Abdominal CT scanning is a reliable, useful, and cost-effective test for evaluating right lower quadrant abdominal pain and making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women.

  18. Comparative analysis of the radiation shield effect in an abdominal CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Joon-Seok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lim, Chang-Seon

    2014-03-01

    This study measured and compared the dose on the eyeballs and the thyroid with and without the use of a shield by applying the abdominal examination protocol used in an actual examination to a 64-channel computed tomography (CT) scan. A dummy phantom manufactured from acryl was used to measure the dose to the eyeballs and the thyroid of a patient during a thoraco-abdominal CT scan. The dose was measured using three dosimeters (optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and photoluminescence dosimeter (PLD)) attached to the surfaces of three parts (left and right eyeballs and thyroid) in a phantom with and without the use of a shield for the eyeballs and the thyroid. Two types of shields (1-mm barium shielding sheet and 1-mm tungsten shielding sheet) were used for the measurements. The goggles and the lead shield, which are normally used in clinical practice, were used to compare the shield ratios of the shields. According to the results of the measurements made by using the OSLD, the shield ratios of the barium and the tungsten sheets were in the range of 34-36%. The measurements made by using the TLD showed that the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 6.25% higher than that of the tungsten sheet. When the PLD was used for the measurement, the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 33.34%, which was equivalent to that of the tungsten sheet. These results confirmed that the cheap barium sheet had a better shielding effect than the expensive tungsten sheet.

  19. Colitis detection on abdominal CT scans by rich feature hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lay, Nathan; Wei, Zhuoshi; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Colitis is inflammation of the colon due to neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn disease), infection and immune compromise. Colitis is often associated with thickening of the colon wall. The wall of a colon afflicted with colitis is much thicker than normal. For example, the mean wall thickness in Crohn disease is 11-13 mm compared to the wall of the normal colon that should measure less than 3 mm. Colitis can be debilitating or life threatening, and early detection is essential to initiate proper treatment. In this work, we apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals to detect potential colitis on CT scans. Our method first generates around 3000 category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using selective search. Then, a fixed-length feature vector is extracted from each region proposal using a CNN. Finally, each region proposal is classified and assigned a confidence score with linear SVMs. We applied the detection method to 260 images from 26 CT scans of patients with colitis for evaluation. The detection system can achieve 0.85 sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  20. Foreign objects encountered in the abdominal cavity at CT.

    PubMed

    Gayer, Gabriela; Petrovitch, Ivan; Jeffrey, R Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Foreign objects are not infrequently seen at computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis and may pose a diagnostic challenge to the radiologist, who must recognize the object, characterize its nature and location, and determine its clinical significance. Most foreign objects are incidentally detected at CT, but they may mimic a wide range of pathologic conditions. Some foreign objects (eg, an object that has been swallowed either intentionally or unintentionally) are the cause of the patient's signs and symptoms and require prompt medical attention. Other objects, such as a sponge or surgical instrument that has been retained postoperatively, may have medicolegal consequences. Furthermore, certain objects, such as intentionally concealed drug packets, may go undetected unless a high degree of suspicion exists and appropriate window settings are used to review the study. The radiologist should be familiar with the wide range of foreign objects that may be encountered at abdominopelvic CT, be able to recognize them promptly, and understand their implications for patient treatment.

  1. SU-F-I-33: Estimating Radiation Dose in Abdominal Fat Quantitative CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Yang, K; Liu, B

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) in abdominal fat quantitative CT with another dose estimate D{sub size,L} that also takes into account scan length. Methods: This study complied with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. At our institution, abdominal fat CT is performed with scan length = 1 cm and CTDI{sub vol} = 4.66 mGy (referenced to body CTDI phantom). A previously developed CT simulation program was used to simulate single rotation axial scans of 6–55 cm diameter water cylinders, and dose integral of the longitudinal dose profile over the central 1 cm length was used to predict the dose at the center of one-cm scan range. SSDE and D{sub size,L} were assessed for 182 consecutive abdominal fat CT examinations with mean water-equivalent diameter (WED) of 27.8 cm ± 6.0 (range, 17.9 - 42.2 cm). Patient age ranged from 18 to 75 years, and weight ranged from 39 to 163 kg. Results: Mean SSDE was 6.37 mGy ± 1.33 (range, 3.67–8.95 mGy); mean D{sub size,L} was 2.99 mGy ± 0.85 (range, 1.48 - 4.88 mGy); and mean D{sub size,L}/SSDE ratio was 0.46 ± 0.04 (range, 0.40 - 0.55). Conclusion: The conversion factors for size-specific dose estimate in AAPM Report No. 204 were generated using 15 - 30 cm scan lengths. One needs to be cautious in applying SSDE to small length CT scans. For abdominal fat CT, SSDE was 80–150% higher than the dose of 1 cm scan length.

  2. A Novel Multiinstance Learning Approach for Liver Cancer Recognition on Abdominal CT Images Based on CPSO-SVM and IO

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Dehui

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy. PMID:24368931

  3. A novel multiinstance learning approach for liver cancer recognition on abdominal CT images based on CPSO-SVM and IO.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Zheng, Ruiping; Yi, Dehui; Zhao, Di

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy.

  4. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management.

    PubMed

    Millet, Ingrid; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Riou, Bruno; Taourel, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1x10(-6)) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6x10(-6)) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT improves significantly diagnosis accuracy compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT optimizes appropriate hospitalization by increasing the number of discharged patients. • Systematic unenhanced CT allows detection of about one-third of acute unsuspected abdominal conditions. • It should allow boosting emergency department management decision-making confidence in old patients.

  5. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  6. Clinical significance of pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Breen, Micheál; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-11-01

    The clinical significance of a pulmonary nodule that is detected incidentally on CT studies in children is unknown. In addition, there is limited information regarding the management of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules discovered on abdominal CT studies in children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of incidental pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT studies in children. This was a retrospective study performed following institutional review board approval. Abdominal CT reports in patients younger than 18 years of age from July 2004 to June 2011 were reviewed for the terms "nodule," "nodular" or "mass" in reference to the lung bases. The study population included those pediatric patients in whom pulmonary nodules were initially detected on abdominal CT studies. The largest pulmonary nodules detected on CT studies were evaluated for their features (size, shape, margin, attenuation, location, and presence of calcification and cavitation). Follow-up CT studies and clinical records were reviewed for demographic information, history of underlying malignancies and the clinical outcome of the incidental pulmonary nodules. Comparison of malignant versus benign pulmonary nodules was performed with respect to the size of the nodule, imaging features on CT, and patient history of malignancy using the Student's t-test and Fisher exact test. Youden J-index in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off size for suggesting a high risk of malignancy of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Pulmonary nodules meeting inclusion criteria were detected in 62 (1.2%) of 5,234 patients. The mean age of patients with nodules was 11.2 years (range: 5 months-18 years). Thirty-one patients (50%) had follow-up CT studies and two of these patients (6%) were subsequently found to have malignant pulmonary nodules. Both of these patients had a history of malignancy. Of the remaining 31 patients

  7. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  8. Abdominal CT findings of disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare in AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, D.A.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Bottles, K.; Wofsy, C.B.

    1985-08-01

    Disseminated infection from Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) has recently been recognized as a common and serious complication of the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors report the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 17 patients with AIDS and disseminated MAI referred for abdominal CT examination. Multiple large retroperitoneal and mesenteric lymph nodes were demonstrated in 14 patients (82%). The authors concluded that large, bulky, intraabdominal adenopathy in AIDS patients should suggest the diagnosis of MAI infection as well as other known causes of adenopathy, including lymphoma and metastatic Kaposi sarcoma. The authors recommend percutaneous aspiration of enlarged intraabdominal lymph nodes to establish the correct diagnosis.

  9. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  10. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-07

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution's standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  11. Handheld device review of abdominal CT for the evaluation of acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Carr, Thomas M; Ho, Christopher P; Stone, James R; Gay, Spencer B; Lambert, Drew L

    2012-08-01

    Advances in handheld computing now allow review of DICOM datasets from remote locations. As the diagnostic ability of this tool is unproven, we evaluated the ability to diagnose acute appendicitis on abdominal CT using a mobile DICOM viewer. This HIPAA compliant study was IRB-approved. Twenty-five abdominal CT studies from patients with RLQ pain were interpreted on a handheld device (iPhone) using a DICOM viewer (OsiriX mobile) by five radiologists. All patients had surgical confirmation of acute appendicitis or follow-up confirming no acute appendicitis. Studies were evaluated for the ability to find the appendix, maximum appendiceal diameter, presence of an appendicolith, periappendiceal stranding and fluid, abscess, and an assessment of the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Results were compared to PACS workstation. Fifteen cases of acute appendicitis were correctly identified on 98% of interpretations, with no false-positives. Eight appendicoliths were correctly identified on 88% of interpretations. Three abscesses were correctly identified by all readers. Handheld device measurement of appendiceal diameter had a mean 8.6% larger than PACS measurements (p = 0.035). Evaluation for acute appendicitis on abdominal CT studies using a portable device DICOM viewer can be performed with good concordance to reads performed on PACS workstations.

  12. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  13. Association of intraluminal thrombus, hemodynamic forces, and abdominal aortic aneurysm expansion using longitudinal CT images

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Byron A.; Gharahi, Hamidreza; Lim, ChaeYoung; Jaberi, Farhad A.; Choi, Jongeun; Lee, Whal; Baek, Seungik

    2016-01-01

    While hemodynamic forces and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) are believed to play important roles on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), it has been suggested that hemodynamic forces and ILT also interact with each other, making it a complex problem. There is, however, a pressing need to understand relationships among three factors: hemodynamics, ILT accumulation, and AAA expansion for AAA prognosis. Hence this study used longitudinal CT scans from 14 patients and analyzed the relationship between them. Hemodynamic forces, represented by wall shear stress (WSS), were obtained from computational fluid dynamics; ILT accumulation was described by ILT thickness distribution changes between consecutives scans, and ILT accumulation and AAA expansion rates were estimated from changes in ILT and AAA volume. Results showed that, while low WSS was observed at regions where ILT accumulated, the rate at which ILT accumulated occurred at the same rate as the aneurysm expansion. Comparison between AAAs with and without thrombus showed that aneurysm with ILT recorded lower values of WSS and higher values of AAA expansion than those without thrombus. Findings suggest that low WSS may promote ILT accumulation and submit the idea that by increasing WSS levels ILT accumulation may be prevented. PMID:26429788

  14. Effects of anatomical characteristics as factors in abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture: CT aortography analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Min Uk; Lee, Do Yun; Kim, Kyung Ah; Park, Sanghui

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical characteristics of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) using computed tomography (CT) aortography in order to determine the risk factors for rupture.We retrospectively reviewed the CT aortography findings and medical records of patients with ruptured AAAs who underwent CT aortography between February 2002 and December 2014. Age, sex, blood pressure at the time of rupture, treatment methods used for the ruptured AAAs, and treatment outcomes were analyzed. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between the maximum aneurysm diameter, which is considered the standard predictor of aneurysm rupture, and anatomical characteristics such as proximal neck diameter, angle between the suprarenal aorta and the aneurysm neck (α angle), angle between the aneurysm neck and aneurysm sac (β angle), and angles between the abdominal aorta and both iliac arteries.Data were reviewed for a total of 36 patients. The mean maximum diameter of AAAs was 76.84 ± 21.08 mm. Multivariate analysis adjusted for age and sex indicated statistical correlations between the α and β angles and maximum aneurysm diameter and between the β angle and iliac artery involvement.Our results suggest that the tortuosity of the aorta tends to be associated with the diameter of AAAs and iliac artery involvement. Investigation of the anatomical characteristics of individual patients using CT aortography is expected to aid in predicting the risk of AAA rupture.

  15. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  16. Radiation dose reduction with application of non-linear adaptive filters for abdominal CT

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Sung, Mi Kim; Back, Anni; Blake, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of non-linear adaptive filters (NLAF) on abdominal computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different radiation dose levels. METHODS: Nineteen patients (mean age 61.6 ± 7.9 years, M:F = 8:11) gave informed consent for an Institutional Review Board approved prospective study involving acquisition of 4 additional image series (200, 150, 100, 50 mAs and 120 kVp) on a 64 slice multidetector row CT scanner over an identical 10 cm length in the abdomen. The CT images acquired at 150, 100 and 50 mAs were processed with the NLAF. Two radiologists reviewed unprocessed and processed images for image quality in a blinded randomized manner. CT dose index volume, dose length product, patient weight, transverse diameters, objective noise and CT numbers were recorded. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance and Wilcoxon signed rank test. RESULTS: Of the 31 lesions detected in abdominal CT images, 28 lesions were less than 1 cm in size. Subjective image noise was graded as unacceptable in unprocessed images at 50 and 100 mAs, and in NLAF processed images at 50 mAs only. In NLAF processed images, objective image noise was decreased by 21% (14.4 ± 4/18.2 ± 4.9) at 150 mAs, 28.3% (15.7 ± 5.6/21.9 ± 4) at 100 mAs and by 39.4% (18.8 ± 9/30.4 ± 9.2) at 50 mAs compared to unprocessed images acquired at respective radiation dose levels. At 100 mAs the visibility of smaller structures improved from suboptimal in unprocessed images to excellent in NLAF processed images, whereas diagnostic confidence was respectively improved from probably confident to fully confident. CONCLUSION: NLAF lowers image noise, improves the visibility of small structures and maintains lesion conspicuity at down to 100 mAs for abdominal CT. PMID:22328968

  17. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  18. Adapted morphing model for 3D volume reconstruction applied to abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, Aleksey; Eltonsy, Nevine; Tourassi, Georgia; Martin, Robert; Elmaghraby, Adel

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D volume reconstruction model for volume rendering and apply this model to abdominal CT data. The model development includes two steps: (1) interpolation of given data for a complete 3D model, and (2) visualization. First, CT slices are interpolated using a special morphing algorithm. The main idea of this algorithm is to take a region from one CT slice and locate its most probable correspondence in the adjacent CT slice. The algorithm determines the transformation function of the region in between two adjacent CT slices and interpolates the data accordingly. The most probable correspondence of a region is obtained using correlation analysis between the given region and regions of the adjacent CT slice. By applying this technique recursively, taking progressively smaller subregions within a region, a high quality and accuracy interpolation is obtained. The main advantages of this morphing algorithm are 1) its applicability not only to parallel planes like CT slices but also to general configurations of planes in 3D space, and 2) its fully automated nature as it does not require control points to be specified by a user compared to most morphing techniques. Subsequently, to visualize data, a specialized volume rendering card (TeraRecon VolumePro 1000) was used. To represent data in 3D space, special software was developed to convert interpolated CT slices to 3D objects compatible with the VolumePro card. Visual comparison between the proposed model and linear interpolation clearly demonstrates the superiority of the proposed model.

  19. Low-dose multiphase abdominal CT reconstruction with phase-induced swap prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Mona; Rashed, Essam A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Multiphase abdominal CT is an imaging protocol in which the patient is scanned at different phases before and after the injection of a contrast agent. Reconstructed images with different concentrations of contrast material provide useful information for effective detection of abnormalities. However, several scanning during a short period of time eventually increase the patient radiation dose to a remarkable value up to a risky level. Reducing the patient dose by modulating the x-ray tube current or acquiring the projection data through a small number of views are known to degrade the image quality and reduce the possibility to be useful for diagnosis purpose. In this work, we propose a novel multiphase abdominal CT imaging protocol with patient dose reduction and high image quality. The image reconstruction cost function consists of two terms, namely the data fidelity term and penalty term to enforce the anatomical similarity in successive contrast phase reconstruction. The prior information, named phase-induced swap prior (PISP) is computed using total variation minimization of image acquired from different contrast phases. The new method is evaluated through a simulation study using digital abdominal phantom and real data and results are promising.

  20. Improvement of image quality of low radiation dose abdominal CT by increasing contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruo; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of noise index and contrast material dose on radiation dose, contrast enhancement, image noise, and image quality in abdominal CT. Contrast-enhanced abdominal CT with tube current modulation was performed on 195 patients. The patients were prospectively randomized into three groups of equal size (protocol A, noise index of 12 HU and 521 mg I/kg; protocol B, 15 HU and 521 mg I/kg; protocol C, 15 HU and 600 mg I/kg). Scanning was initiated 5 and 45 seconds after aortic enhancement reached 100 HU. Attenuation was measured in the aorta, portal vein, and liver. Transverse CT images were qualitatively graded for diagnostic acceptability and image noise. Arterial phase volume-rendered and multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images and portal venous phase MPR CT angiograms were qualitatively graded for depiction of vessels. Contrast enhancement, objective image noise, radiation dose, and qualitative grades were analyzed and compared among the three groups. The contrast enhancement values of the aorta, portal vein, and liver were higher in protocol C than in protocols A and B (p < 0.05). Objective image noise was greater in protocols B and C than in protocol A (p < 0.05). The radiation dose in protocols B and C was 31-32% lower than in protocol A (p < 0.001). Depiction of vessels, diagnostic acceptability, and subjective image noise were comparable in protocols A and C. Use of higher contrast enhancement can compensate for the degradation of image quality resulting from use of a low radiation dose for CT.

  1. Statistical 4D graphs for multi-organ abdominal segmentation from multiphase CT.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A; Pamulapati, Vivek; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-05-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D convolution using population training information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen and kidneys was applied to multiphase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient-specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance, enhancement, shape and location on organ segmentation. All four abdominal organs were segmented robustly and accurately with volume overlaps over 93.6% and average surface distances below 1.1mm.

  2. Statistical 4D Graphs for Multi-Organ Abdominal Segmentation from Multiphase CT

    PubMed Central

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A.; Pamulapati, Vivek; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D convolution using population training information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen and kidneys was applied to multiphase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient-specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance, enhancement, shape and location on organ segmentation. All four abdominal organs were segmented robustly and accurately with volume overlaps over 93.6% and average surface distances below 1.1 mm. PMID:22377657

  3. 3D segmentation of abdominal aorta from CT-scan and MR images.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Anthony Adam; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Bouchot, Olivier; Lalande, Alain

    2012-06-01

    We designed a generic method for segmenting the aneurismal sac of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) both from multi-slice MR and CT-scan examinations. It is a semi-automatic method requiring little human intervention and based on graph cut theory to segment the lumen interface and the aortic wall of AAAs. Our segmentation method works independently on MRI and CT-scan volumes and has been tested on a 44 patient dataset and 10 synthetic images. Segmentation and maximum diameter estimation were compared to manual tracing from 4 experts. An inter-observer study was performed in order to measure the variability range of a human observer. Based on three metrics (the maximum aortic diameter, the volume overlap and the Hausdorff distance) the variability of the results obtained by our method is shown to be similar to that of a human operator, both for the lumen interface and the aortic wall. As will be shown, the average distance obtained with our method is less than one standard deviation away from each expert, both for healthy subjects and for patients with AAA. Our semi-automatic method provides reliable contours of the abdominal aorta from CT-scan or MRI, allowing rapid and reproducible evaluations of AAA.

  4. Preoperative planning for endovascular aortic repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: feasibility of nonenhanced MR angiography versus contrast-enhanced CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Goshima, Satoshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kojima, Toshihisa; Sakurai, Kota; Watanabe, Haruo; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro; Ishida, Narihiro; Takemura, Hirofumi; Bae, Kyongtae T

    2013-06-01

    To compare vascular measurements to determine stent types and configurations for abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) by comparing results of contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) angiography and nonenhanced magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. This prospective study was institutional review board approved, and all patients provided written informed consent. Fifty patients (45 men and five women; mean age, 76.0 years) admitted for elective abdominal EVAR underwent preoperative abdominal CT angiography (triplanar reformatted images; section thickness of 1-3 mm) and nonenhanced MR angiography (triplanar two-dimensional single-shot turbo field-echo images; section thickness of 6 mm). Two observers independently completed standard measurement and device selection forms for endovascular stent planning for CT and MR angiography. Pearson and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate intermodality and interobserver differences. No significant difference was found in aortic neck diameter (observer 1: CT, 18.5 mm; MR, 19.0 mm; P = .43) (observer 2: CT, 19.6 mm; MR, 19.3 mm; P = .59), aortic neck diameter 15 mm distal to the lowest renal artery (observer 1: CT, 19.2 mm; MR, 19.2 mm; P = .38) (observer 2: CT, 19.6 mm; MR, 19.6 mm; P = .91), aortic neck length (observer 1: CT, 43.6 mm; MR, 43.6 mm; P = .85) (observer 2: CT, 44.4 mm; MR, 44.0 mm; P = .93), or other key vascular measurements (P = .23-.99) for preoperative planning. These included aneurysm diameter, lowest renal artery to aortic bifurcation length, aortic bifurcation diameter, common iliac artery diameters, external iliac artery diameters, length between orifices of lower renal and internal iliac arteries, and iliac artery sealing length. CT and MR angiography measurements showed very strong correlation (r = 0.92-0.99). Intraclass correlation coefficients between observers ranged from 0.90 to 0.98. Stent types and configurations determined with CT measurements remained

  5. A hybrid 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis-based automatic abdominal blood vessel segmentation through contrast enhanced CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maklad, Ahmed S.; Matsuhiro, Mikio; Suzuki, Hidenobu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Shimada, Mitsuo; Iinuma, Gen

    2017-03-01

    In abdominal disease diagnosis and various abdominal surgeries planning, segmentation of abdominal blood vessel (ABVs) is a very imperative task. Automatic segmentation enables fast and accurate processing of ABVs. We proposed a fully automatic approach for segmenting ABVs through contrast enhanced CT images by a hybrid of 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis. The proposed method comprises three stages. First, candidates of bone, kidneys, ABVs and heart are segmented by an auto-adapted threshold. Second, bone is auto-segmented and classified into spine, ribs and pelvis. Third, ABVs are automatically segmented in two sub-steps: (1) kidneys and abdominal part of the heart are segmented, (2) ABVs are segmented by a hybrid approach that integrates a 3D region growing and 4D curvature analysis. Results are compared with two conventional methods. Results show that the proposed method is very promising in segmenting and classifying bone, segmenting whole ABVs and may have potential utility in clinical use.

  6. Basic study for automatic recognition of osteoporosis using abdominal x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Iida, Tadayuki; Takigawa, Atsushi; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong

    2004-05-01

    We have developed an algorithm that can be used to distinguish the central part of the vertebral body from an abdominal X-ray CT image and to automatically calculate three measures to diagnose the degree of osteoporosis in a patient. In addition, we examined whether it is possible to use these CT images as an aid in diagnosing osteoporosis. Three measures that were automatically extracted from the central part of a vertebral body in the CT images were compared with the bone mineral density (BMD) values that were obtained from the same vertebral body. We calculated the mean CT number, coefficient of variation, and the first moment of power spectrum in the recognized vertebral body. We judged whether a patient had osteoporosis using the diagnostic criteria for primary osteoporosis (Year 2000 revision, published by the Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research). We classified three measures for normal and abnormal groups using the principal component analysis, and the two groups were compared with the results obtained from the diagnostic criteria. As a result, it was found that the algorithm could be used to distinguish the central part of the vertebral body in the CT images and to calculate these measures automatically. When distinguishing whether a patient was osteoporotic or not with the three measures obtained from the CT images, the ratio (sensitivity) usable for diagnosing a patient as osteoporotic was 0.93 (14/15), and the ratio (specificity) usable for diagnosing a patient as normal was 0.64 (7/11). Based on these results, we believe that it is possible to utilize the measures obtained from these CT images to aid in diagnosing osteoporosis.

  7. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  8. Diagnosis and disposition are changed when board-certified emergency physicians use CT for non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barksdale, Aaron Nathan; Hackman, Jeff Lee; Gaddis, Monica; Gratton, Matt Christopher

    2015-11-01

    To determine the effect of abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scan results on diagnosis and disposition of patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain who were evaluated by board-certified emergency physicians (EPs). Prospective, observational study conducted at a safety-net facility with an emergency medicine residency and 65000 annual adult visits. Patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain who underwent an abdominal CT from 3/2011 through 8/2011 were included. Decision to obtain CT was made by the EP. The computer order entry system required the EP to report the most likely diagnosis, and the management and disposition plan. After CT results, the same EP electronically again entered the most likely diagnosis and the planned management and disposition. CTs were interpreted by an attending radiologist. Descriptive statistics and χ(2) tests were used. Six hundred twenty-nine patients were entered and 547 remained after exclusions; 298 (54%) subjects had a change in diagnosis. In 6 categories, there was a statistically significant change, with non-specific abdominal pain the most common(P < .001); followed by renal colic (P < .001), appendicitis (P < .001), diverticulitis (P < .001), small bowel obstruction (P < .029), and gynecologic process (P < .001). The most common disposition plan was "admit for observation," which was reported in 262 patients and remained in only 122 post CT (47%); 301 (54%) patients whose initial plan was admission were ultimately managed otherwise. Abdominal CT use by board certified EPs for nontraumatic abdominal pain changed diagnosis and disposition, with more sent home in lieu of admission. Diagnostic accuracy did not appear to be related to years of clinical experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pain Outcomes in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis for Intractable Abdominal Visceral Pain.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Mark R; Gabriel, Ryan T; Elbich, Jeffrey D; Wolfe, Luke G; Sydnor, Malcolm K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess outcomes in patients who have undergone celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) as treatment for refractory abdominal visceral pain at a tertiary care medical center. This study involved retrospective analysis of all patients who had undergone computed tomography (CT)-guided CPN over a 7-year period, as identified in the medical record. Cases were categorized into 1 of 3 groups-group 1: patients getting at least moderate improvement in pain but with improvements subsiding within 2 days; group 2: patients with some sustained pain relief but still requiring heavy doses of narcotics; group 3: patients with major or complete sustained reduction in pain where the narcotic dose was able to be reduced. One hundred thirty-eight cases were identified, 51 of which had no or insufficient follow-up, leaving 87 cases for analysis. Of the 87 cases, 31 (36%) were categorized as group 1, 21 (24%) as group 2, and 35 (40%) as group 3. There were no statistical differences in outcomes based on patient age, gender, time since diagnosis, or type of cancer. Documented postoperative complications were diarrhea (11 cases) and 1 case each of obtundation, hypotension, and presyncopal event. We conclude that patients undergoing CT-guided CPN for abdominal visceral pain achieve moderate or major short-term pain relief in a majority of cases. The procedure is safe with minimal complications.

  10. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks.

  11. Irreversible JPEG 2000 compression of abdominal CT for primary interpretation: assessment of visually lossless threshold.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Bo Hyoung; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Hyuk Jung; Hahn, Seokyung

    2007-06-01

    To estimate the visually lossless threshold for Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) images, 100 images were compressed to four different levels: a reversible (as negative control) and irreversible 5:1, 10:1, and 15:1. By alternately displaying the original and the compressed image on the same monitor, six radiologists independently determined if the compressed image was distinguishable from the original image. For each reader, we compared the proportion of the compressed images being rated distinguishable from the original images between the reversible compression and each of the three irreversible compressions using the exact test for paired proportions. For each reader, the proportion was not significantly different between the reversible (0-1%, 0/100 to 1/100) and irreversible 5:1 compression (0-3%). However, the proportion significantly increased with the irreversible 10:1 (95-99%) and 15:1 compressions (100%) versus reversible compression in all readers (P < 0.001); 100 and 95% of the 5:1 compressed images were rated indistinguishable from the original images by at least five of the six readers and all readers, respectively. Irreversibly 5:1 compressed abdominal CT images are visually lossless and, therefore, potentially acceptable for primary interpretation.

  12. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80 each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. • Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection provides appropriate scan protocols. • Abdominal CT is feasible using spectral imaging and 300 mgI/kg contrast agent. • 50-keV monochromatic images with 50 % ASIR provide optimal image quality.

  13. CT-guided fine-needle aspiration of abdominal and retroperitoneal small lesions with the coaxial technique using MPR images.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, Massimo; Saba, Luca; Azzali, Emanuele; Milanese, Gianluca; Mostardi, Maurizio; Borgia, Daniele; Capasso, Raffaella; Nizzoli, Rita

    2016-07-28

    To demonstrate the advantages of CT-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of abdominal and retroperitoneal small lesions with the coaxial technique using MPR images. The study included retrospectively 50 patients who underwent CT-guided FNA of abdominal and/or retroperitoneal small lesion (<30 mm). Patients with suspected lymphomas or sarcomas were excluded. Cytology reports were the reference standard. The cytology was diagnostic in 48/50 biopsies (96%): out of 41 neoplastic lesions (85%), 37 were malignant (90.2%) and 4 were benign (9.8%); 7 out of 48 were non-neoplastic (14.6%). No procedural complications were observed (0%). By using MPR images there is an effective improvement in coaxial CT-guided FNA of abdominal and retroperitoneal small lesions.

  14. Development of automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, Sanne D.; Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Belder, Ruben; Klaase, Joost M.; Bezooijen, Roland; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    This contribution describes a novel algorithm for the automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans of patients referred for colorectal resection. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes can accurately be measured with errors of 1.2 and 0.5%, respectively. Also the reproducibility of CT measurements is good; a disadvantage is the amount of radiation. In this study the diagnostic CT scans in the work - up of (colorectal) cancer were used. This implied no extra radiation. For the purpose of segmentation alone, a low dose protocol can be applied. Obesity is a well known risk factor for complications in and after surgery. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted indicator of obesity, but it is not specific for risk assessment of colorectal surgery. We report on an automated method to quantify visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes as a basic step in a clinical research project concerning preoperative risk assessment. The outcomes are to be correlated with the surgery results. The hypothesis is that the balance between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue together with the presence of calcifications in the major bloodvessels, is a predictive indicator for post - operatieve complications such as anastomotic leak. We start with four different computer simulated humanoid abdominal volumes with tissue values in the appropriate Hounsfield range at different dose levels. With satisfactory numerical results for this test, we have applied the algorithm on over a 100 patient scans and have compared results with manual segmentations by an expert for a smaller pilot group. The results are within a 5% difference. Compared to other studies reported in the literature, reliable values are obtained for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas.

  15. Sagittal abdominal diameter shows better correlation with cardiovascular risk factors than waist circumference and BMI

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity (abdominal adiposity) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and the most used methods to measure the adiposity are body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD). Objective To correlate BMI, WC, and SAD with biochemical parameters and blood pressure in adults. Methods A non-experimental exploratory/descriptive and cross sectional study was developed and it was assessed 133 subjects (59 men and 74 women) aging between 18 and 87 years. It was registered the patients’ weight (kg), height (m), BMI (kg/m2), WC (cm) and SAD (cm), and these parameters were correlated with glycemia, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and blood pressure. Results After adjustment for gender and age, it was observed a positive correlation between SAD and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.20), glycemia (r = 0.20), triglycerides (r = 0.32), LDL (r = 0.26), total cholesterol (TC) (r = 0.33), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.21) (p < 0.05). It was observed a positive correlation between WC and systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.14), triglycerides (r = 0.31), total cholesterol (r = 0.21), and a negative correlation with HDL-c (r = −0.24) (p < 0.05). BMI showed a positive correlation with systolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.22), total cholesterol (r = 0.20), and triglycerides (r = 0.23) (p < 0.05). Conclusion SAD correlated with almost all the cardiovascular risk factors analyzed and it might be considered the best predictor of abdominal fat and cardiovascular risk. PMID:23856008

  16. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  17. Target volume definition for upper abdominal irradiation using CT scans obtained during inhale and exhale phases.

    PubMed

    Aruga, T; Itami, J; Aruga, M; Nakajima, K; Shibata, K; Nojo, T; Yasuda, S; Uno, T; Hara, R; Isobe, K; Machida, N; Ito, H

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of a treatment-planning technique involving the use of CT images obtained during both the static exhalation phase and static inhalation phase (two-phase planning). Ten patients with pancreatic or liver tumors underwent CT scanning under static exhale and inhale conditions, after a period of mild ventilation. By setting image positions differently, we were able to treat the two-phase images as one dataset. Each gross tumor volume (GTV) was contoured separately and the mixed GTV was used for the two-phase treatment planning. Treatment plans were constructed to compare the two-phase plans with the plans constructed using static exhalation images. The shift of the center of the GTV and kidneys and the minimum dose of GTV were then calculated. The shift of the GTV ranged from 2.6 to 27. 3 mm and that of the kidneys from 2.2 to 24 mm. In some patients whose treatment was planned using exhalation planning, the minimum dose of GTV at inhalation was less than 90% of the isocenter dose. Two-phase planning is a simple technique that can visualize tumor and organ movement simultaneously using CT. It further defines adequate field margins around the tumor and prevents unexpected radiation exposure to critical organs. Routine use of this technique for upper abdominal irradiation is recommended.

  18. Intra-individual comparison between abdominal virtual mono-energetic spectral and conventional images using a novel spectral detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Wybranski, Christian; Byrtus, Jonathan; Houbois, Christian; Hauger, Myriam; Heneweer, Carola; Siedek, Florian; Hickethier, Tilman; Große Hokamp, Nils; Maintz, David; Haneder, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To quantitatively and qualitatively assess abdominal arterial and venous phase contrast-enhanced spectral detector computed tomography (SDCT) virtual mono-energetic (MonoE) datasets in comparison to conventional CT reconstructions provided by the same system. Materials and methods Conventional and MonoE images at 40–120 kilo-electron volt (keV) levels with a 10 keV increment as well as 160 and 200 keV were reconstructed in abdominal SDCT datasets of 55 patients. Attenuation, image noise, and contrast- / signal-to-noise ratios (CNR, SNR) of vessels and solid organs were compared between MonoE and conventional reconstructions. Two readers assessed contrast conditions, detail visualization, overall image quality and subjective image noise with both, fixed and adjustable window settings. Results Attenuation, CNR and SNR of vessels and solid organs showed a stepwise increase from high to low keV reconstructions in both contrast phases while image noise stayed stable at low keV MonoE reconstruction levels. Highest levels were found at 40 keV MonoE reconstruction (p<0.001), respectively. Solid abdominal organs showed a stepwise decrease from low to high energy levels in regard to attenuation, CNR and SNR with significantly higher values at 40 and 50 keV, compared to conventional images. The 70 keV MonoE was comparable to conventional poly-energetic reconstruction (p≥0.99). Subjective analysis displayed best image quality for the 70 keV MonoE reconstruction level in both phases at fixed standard window presets and at 40 keV if window settings could be adjusted. Conclusion SDCT derived low keV MonoE showed markedly increased CNR and SNR values due to constantly low image noise values over the whole energy spectrum from 40 to 200 keV. PMID:28837641

  19. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Showing Intense Tracer Uptake on PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Noto, Benjamin; Weckesser, Matthias; Buerke, Boris; Pixberg, Michaela; Avramovic, Nemanja

    2017-03-01

    A 70-year-old man with suspected prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT (short PSMA PET/CT) for staging of tumor extent. Apart from vivid tracer uptake in the prostate gland and osseous metastasis, PSMA PET/CT revealed a large soft tissue mass with calcifications in the left upper abdomen showing intense tracer uptake. Histologic examination revealed the mass to be a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  20. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  1. Calcification detection of abdominal aorta in CT images and 3D visualization in VR devices.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Berna, Jose A; Sanchez-Gomez, Juan M; Hermanns, Judith; Garcia-Mateos, Gines; Fernandez-Aleman, Jose L

    2016-08-01

    Automatic calcification detection in abdominal aorta consists of a set of computer vision techniques to quantify the amount of calcium that is found around this artery. Knowing that information, it is possible to perform statistical studies that relate vascular diseases with the presence of calcium in these structures. To facilitate the detection in CT images, a contrast is usually injected into the circulatory system of the patients to distinguish the aorta from other body tissues and organs. This contrast increases the absorption of X-rays by human blood, making it easier the measurement of calcifications. Based on this idea, a new system capable of detecting and tracking the aorta artery has been developed with an estimation of the calcium found surrounding the aorta. Besides, the system is complemented with a 3D visualization mode of the image set which is designed for the new generation of immersive VR devices.

  2. JPEG 2000 compression of abdominal CT: difference in tolerance between thin- and thick-section images.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyoun Sik; Kim, Kil Joong; Kim, Tae Jung; Hahn, Seokyung; Kim, Bohyoung; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Kyoung Ho

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare the tolerance of Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compression between thin- and thick-section abdominal CT images. One hundred 0.67-mm-thick and corresponding 5-mm-thick images were compressed to four different levels: reversible and irreversible 6:1, 10:1, and 15:1. Five radiologists determined if the compressed images were distinguishable from the originals. The percentage of distinguishable pairs and peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) were compared between the thin and thick sections. The visually lossless threshold was estimated by comparing the percentages of the distinguishable pairs between each irreversible compression and the reversible compression. Paired Student's t tests and exact tests for paired proportions were used. Thin sections had smaller PSNRs at each compression level (p < 0.001). According to the pooled responses, the percentages of distinguishable pairs for the thin and thick sections, respectively, were 0% (0/100) and 0% at reversible compression, 27% and 0% at 6:1 (p < 0.001), 100% and 80% at 10:1 (p < 0.001), and 100% and 100% at 15:1. Artifacts increased significantly (p < 0.001) at 6:1 or more for the thin sections and at 10:1 and 15:1 for the thick sections, indicating that the visually lossless thresholds were below 6:1 and between 6:1 and 10:1, respectively. Thin-section abdominal CT images are less tolerant of compression, and a lower compression level should be used for the visually lossless threshold.

  3. CFD modelling of abdominal aortic aneurysm on hemodynamic loads using a realistic geometry with CT.

    PubMed

    Soudah, Eduardo; Ng, E Y K; Loong, T H; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m(3) and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10(-3) Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index ( β ), saccular index ( γ ), deformation diameter ratio ( χ ), and tortuosity index ( ε )) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  4. Comparison of CT and dual-energy DEXA using a modified trunk compartment in the measurement of abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Lane, James T; Mack-Shipman, Lynn R; Anderson, Joseph C; Moore, Timothy E; Erickson, Judi M; Ford, Timothy C; Stoner, Julie A; Larsen, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    The quantification of abdominal fat is a marker of health risk. While dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is easily applied, it measures overall fat, although abdominal fat may be a better indicator of health risk from obesity. We have evaluated whether a subcomponent of DEXA measurements correlates better with computed tomography (CT) for body fat than those traditionally used. Forty-seven healthy adults (22 M/25 F), aged 54.5+/-15.8 yr (mean+/-SD), with BMI of 27.1+/-4.6 kg/m2 participated in a cross-sectional study. Body fat was measured using abdominal CT and DEXA for total fat, trunk fat, and a modified trunk measurement that excludes the chest, termed "lower trunk," and compared. The coefficient of variation for DEXA measurements for trunk, lower trunk, and total body were 1.98, 3.12, and 0.85%, respectively. Mean DEXA for percentage fat ranged from 31.7% to 34.1% for trunk, lower trunk, and total body, compared to 54.2% for abdominal CT (p<0.003 for each pairwise comparison). Lower trunk, whole trunk, and total body DEXA measurements were not different. Measurement of subcomponents of fat content by DEXA is not superior to whole body measurements and remains consistently lower than measurements by CT.

  5. Giant mesenteric cyst: a rare cause of abdominal distension diagnosed with CT and managed with ultrasound-guided drainage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Alexander; Ayre, Karyn; Wijeyekoon, Sanjaya

    2012-09-03

    This rare cystic lesion has an approximate incidence of 1 in 200,000. This patient complained of abdominal distension and was diagnosed with a giant mesenteric cyst measuring 26 cm in height using CT imaging. She underwent a successful ultrasound-guided drainage, which is not previously reported in the literature. This represents utilisation of an established procedure in a novel situation.

  6. Analysis of the abdominal musculo-aponeurotic anatomy in rectus diastasis: comparison of CT scanning and preoperative clinical assessment with direct measurement intraoperatively.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, P; Dahlstrand, U; Strömsten, U; Gunnarsson, U; Strigård, K; Stark, B

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the consistency of agreement of two methods for measuring abdominal rectus diastasis (ARD), preoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning and preoperative clinical assessment were compared with direct measurement intraoperatively. Fifty-five consecutive patients were retrieved from an ongoing prospective randomised trial comparing two operative techniques for the repair of ARD. All patients underwent a preoperative clinical assessment and CT scan, and the results were compared with intraoperative measurement of the ARD width. Agreement between methods was described with Bland-Altman plots (BA plots) and calculated using Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC). The median width of the diastasis was 4.0 cm in the upper midline and 3.0 cm in the lower midline for the intraoperative measurement. BA plots showed that measurements on CT and intraoperatively are not in agreement in the lower midline, whereas the agreement was stronger between the clinical and the intraoperative method. The CCC was higher for clinical vs. intraoperative measurement (0.479) than for CT vs. intraoperative measurement (-0.002) in the lower midline, although the agreement was over all low. CT scanning underestimated the width of the ARD when compared to 87 % of preoperative clinical assessments, and 83 % of intraoperative measurements. Preoperative clinical assessment overestimated ARD in 35 % when compared with intraoperative measurements. Clinical assessment prior to surgery provides more accurate information than CT scanning in the assessment of ARD width. CT scanning underestimates ARD width when compared with intraoperative measurement.

  7. Automatic vessel extraction and abdominal aortic stent planning in multislice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyan, Krishna; Smith, Dava; Varma, Jay; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-05-01

    The abdominal aorta is the most common site for an aneurysm, which may lead to hemorrhage and death, to develop. The aim of this study was to develop a semi-automated method to de-lineate the vessels and detect the center-line of these vessels to make measurements necessary for stent design from multi-detector computed tomograms. We developed a robust method of tracking the aortic vessel tree with branches from a user selected seed point along the vessel path using scale space approaches, central transformation measures, vessel direction findings, iterative corrections and a priori information in determining the vessel branches. Fifteen patients were scanned with contrast on Mx8000 CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems), with a 3.2 mm thickness, 1.5 mm slice spacing, and a stack of 512x512x320 volume data sets were reconstructed. The algorithm required an initial user input to locate the vessel seen in axial CT slice. Next, the automated image processing took approximately two minutes to compute the centerline and borders of the aortic vessel tree. The results between the manually and automatically generated vessel diameters were compared and statistics were computed. We observed our algorithm was consistent (less than 0.01 S.D) and similar (less than 0.1 S.D) to manual results.

  8. Disproportionate fat stranding: a helpful CT sign in patients with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose M; Sirlin, Claude B; Pinto, Pedro S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Stella, Damien L; Casola, Giovanna

    2004-01-01

    Fat stranding adjacent to thickened bowel wall seen at computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute abdominal pain suggests an acute process of the gastrointestinal tract, but the differential diagnosis is wide. The authors observed "disproportionate" fat stranding (ie, stranding more severe than expected for the degree of bowel wall thickening present) and explored how this finding suggests a narrower differential diagnosis, one that is centered in the mesentery: diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and appendicitis. The characteristic CT findings (in addition to fat stranding) of each of these entities often lead to a final diagnosis. Diverticulitis manifests with mild, smooth bowel wall thickening and no lymphadenopathy. Epiploic appendagitis manifests with central areas of high attenuation and a hyperattenuated rim, in addition to its characteristic location adjacent to the colon. In contrast, omental infarction is always centered in the omentum. The most specific finding of appendicitis is a dilated, fluid-filled appendix. Correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches for these conditions range from monitoring to surgery.

  9. Advanced abdominal imaging with dual energy CT is feasible without increasing radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, Monika; Simons, David; Kachelrieß, Marc; Pisana, Francesco; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2016-06-21

    Dual energy CT (DECT) has proven its potential in oncological imaging. Considering the repeated follow-up examinations, radiation dose should not exceed conventional single energy CT (SECT). Comparison studies on the same scanner with a large number of patients, considering patient geometries and image quality, and exploiting full potential of SECT dose reduction are rare. Purpose of this retrospective study was to compare dose of dual source DECT versus dose-optimized SECT abdominal imaging in clinical routine. One hundred patients (62y (±14)) had either contrast-enhanced SECT including automatic voltage control (44) or DECT (56). CT dose index (CTDIvol), size-specific dose-estimate (SSDE) and dose-length product (DLP) were reported. Image noise (SD) was recorded as mean of three ROIs placed in subcutaneous fat and normalized to dose by [Formula: see text] . For dose-normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD), mean attenuation of psoas muscle (CTmuscle) and subcutaneous fat (CTfat) were compared by CNRD = (CTmuscle - CTfat)/SDn. Statistical significance was tested with two-sided t-test (α = 0.05). There was no significant difference (p < 0.05) between DECT and SECT: Mean CTDIvol was 14.2 mGy (±3.9) (DECT) and 14.3 mGy (±4.5) (SECT). Mean DLP was 680 mGy*cm (±220) (DECT) and 665 mGy*cm (±231) (SECT). Mean SSDE was 15.7 mGy (±1.9) (DECT) and 16.1 mGy (±2.5) (SECT). Mean SDn was 42.2 (±13.9) HU [Formula: see text] (DECT) and 47.8 (±14.9) HU [Formula: see text] (SECT). Mean CNRD was 3.9 (±1.3) [Formula: see text]. (DECT) and 4.0 (±1.3) [Formula: see text] (SECT). Abdominal DECT is feasible without increasing radiation dose or deteriorating image quality, even compared to dose-optimized SECT including automatic voltage control. Thus DECT can contribute to sophisticated oncological imaging without dose penalty.

  10. Automatic multi-label annotation of abdominal CT images using CBIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique to annotate multiple organs shown in 2-D abdominal/pelvic CT images using CBIR. This annotation task is motivated by our research interests in visual question-answering (VQA). We aim to apply results from this effort in Open-iSM, a multimodal biomedical search engine developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Understanding visual content of biomedical images is a necessary step for VQA. Though sufficient annotational information about an image may be available in related textual metadata, not all may be useful as descriptive tags, particularly for anatomy on the image. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a multi-label image annotation method using CBIR. We evaluate our method on two 2-D CT image datasets we generated from 3-D volumetric data obtained from a multi-organ segmentation challenge hosted in MICCAI 2015. Shape and spatial layout information is used to encode visual characteristics of the anatomy. We adapt a weighted voting scheme to assign multiple labels to the query image by combining the labels of the images identified as similar by the method. Key parameters that may affect the annotation performance, such as the number of images used in the label voting and the threshold for excluding labels that have low weights, are studied. The method proposes a coarse-to-fine retrieval strategy which integrates the classification with the nearest-neighbor search. Results from our evaluation (using the MICCAI CT image datasets as well as figures from Open-i) are presented.

  11. Computerized organ localization in abdominal CT volume with context-driven generalized Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Fast localization of organs is a key step in computer-aided detection of lesions and in image guided radiation therapy. We developed a context-driven Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for robust localization of organ-of-interests (OOIs) in a CT volume. Conventional GHT locates the center of an organ by looking-up center locations of pre-learned organs with "matching" edges. It often suffers from mislocalization because "similar" edges in vicinity may attract the prelearned organs towards wrong places. The proposed method not only uses information from organ's own shape but also takes advantage of nearby "similar" edge structures. First, multiple GHT co-existing look-up tables (cLUT) were constructed from a set of training shapes of different organs. Each cLUT represented the spatial relationship between the center of the OOI and the shape of a co-existing organ. Second, the OOI center in a test image was determined using GHT with each cLUT separately. Third, the final localization of OOI was based on weighted combination of the centers obtained in the second stage. The training set consisted of 10 CT volumes with manually segmented OOIs including liver, spleen and kidneys. The method was tested on a set of 25 abdominal CT scans. Context-driven GHT correctly located all OOIs in the test image and gave localization errors of 19.5±9.0, 12.8±7.3, 9.4±4.6 and 8.6±4.1 mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively. Conventional GHT mis-located 8 out of 100 organs and its localization errors were 26.0±32.6, 14.1±10.6, 30.1±42.6 and 23.6±39.7mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively.

  12. Comparing the diagnostic performance of MRI versus CT in the evaluation of acute nontraumatic abdominal pain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baron, Keren Tuvia; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Robinson, Christopher; Sanelli, Pina C

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to document the utilization of MRI compared with CT in pregnant patients presenting with acute nontraumatic abdominal pain at our institution and to compare the diagnostic performance of the two modalities. A retrospective review identified all pregnant patients at our institution who had MRI or CT exams of the abdomen and/or pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal pain over a 3-year period from January 2008 through December 2010. The imaging diagnoses were compared with pathologic data or operative findings as the primary reference standard or with clinical follow-up and laboratory data as the secondary reference standard. Patients without surgically proven diagnoses were followed clinically until delivery, when possible. Ninety-four pregnant patients were included in this study: 61 MRI exams were performed in 57 patients, 44 CT exams were performed in 43 patients (including six patients who had both), and 72 patients (77 %) had ultrasound prior to cross-sectional imaging, with the appendix specifically assessed in 25 patients but visualized in only two of them. Of 61 MRI exams, 24 were considered positive for imaging diagnoses, 33 were negative, and 4 were equivocal. Of 44 CT exams, 24 were positive and 20 were negative. The test characteristics for MRI and CT in the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain were as follows: sensitivity 91 and 88 %, specificity 85 and 90 %, positive predictive value 81 and 91 %, negative predictive value 94 and 8 5 %, and diagnostic accuracy 88 and 88 %, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant (p value = 1). The majority of MRIs (34/61 = 56 %) were read by emergency radiologists. MRI and CT performed equally well in the evaluation of acute nontraumatic abdominal pain during pregnancy. Given its lack of ionizing radiation, MRI may be preferable. Given that the majority of MRIs were read by radiologists specializing in emergency imaging, this is a technique that emergency

  13. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  14. Automated incision line determination for virtual unfolded view generation of the stomach from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suito, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Iinuma, Gen; Misawa, Kazunari; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated incision line determination method for virtual unfolded view generation of the stomach from 3D abdominal CT images. The previous virtual unfolding methods of the stomach required a lot of manual operations such as determination of the incision line, which heavily tasks an operator. In general, an incision line along the greater curvature of the stomach is used for making pathological specimen. In our method, an incision line is automatically determined by projecting a centerline of the stomach onto the gastric surface from a projection line. The projection line is determined by using positions of the cardia and the pylorus, that can be easily specified by two mouse clicks. The process of our method is performed as follows. We extract the stomach region using a thresholding and a labeling processes. We apply a thinning process to the stomach region, and then we extract the longest line from the result of the thinning process. We obtain a centerline of the stomach region by smoothing the longest line by using a Bezier curve. The incision line is calculated by projecting the centerline onto the gastric surface from the projection line. We applied the proposed method to 19 cases of CT images. We automatically determined incision lines. Experimintal results showed our method was able to determine incision lines along the greater curvature for most of 19 cases.

  15. False-positive F-18 FDG uptake in PET/CT studies in pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Riad, Raef; Omar, Walid; Sidhom, Iman; Zamzam, Manal; Zaky, Iman; Hafez, Magdy; Abdel-Dayem, Hussein M

    2010-03-01

    In pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma, the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and abdominal lymph nodes are the main presenting feature of the disease. Chemotherapy is the main treatment modality and could be preceded by surgical excision of the abdominal masses. To achieve cure or long-term disease-free survival a balance has to be struck between aggressive chemotherapy and the probability of tumor necrosis secondary to treatment complicated by acute infections, perforation or intestinal bleeding. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG-PET/CT) has been recommended over conventional imaging modalities for the follow-up of these patients and for monitoring treatment response. As the incidences of postchemotherapy complications are high, the positive predictive value of PET/CT studies in these patients is very low and the false-positive rate is high from acute infections and tumor necrosis. Accordingly, histopathological confirmation of positive lesions on F-18 FDG-PET/CT studies is essential. This is especially important as post-therapy complications might present with nonspecific and nonurgent symptoms. At the same time initiating a second course of salvage chemotherapy is risky. Retrospectively reviewed F-18 FDG-PET/CT studies for 28 pediatric patients with abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after their treatment with chemotherapy or surgery. Four positive studies were found. All had pathological verification and were because of acute inflammation and tumor necrosis and there was no evidence of viable tumor cells. One patient had multiple recurrent lesions in the abdomen after the initial surgical excision and before starting chemotherapy. The incidence of acute complications in this series is 10.7%. This study confirms the high incidence of tumor necrosis and inflammation after chemotherapy for the abdominal Burkitt's lymphoma and consequently, the incidence of true

  16. Optimal table feed in run-off CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Werncke, T; von Falck, C; Wittmann, M; Elgeti, T; Wacker, F K; Meyer, B C

    2013-09-01

    To assess the influence of different table feeds (TFs) on vascular enhancement and image quality in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) undergoing computed tomography (CT) angiography of the lower extremities (run-off CTA). Seventy-nine patients (71 ± 8 years) with an AAA (>30 mm) who underwent run-off CTA between January 2004 and August 2011 were included in this retrospective institutional review board-approved study. Run-off CTA was conducted using 16- and 64-row CT. The range of TFs was 30-86 mm/s and was categorised in quartiles TF1 (32.6 ± 1.9 mm/s), TF2 (38.9 ± 0.9 mm/s), TF3 (43.9 ± 3.1 mm/s) and TF4 (57.4 ± 10.5 mm/s). Image quality was rated independently by two radiologists and vessel enhancement was assessed. Image quality was diagnostic at all aortic, pelvic and almost all thigh levels. Below the knee, the number of diagnostic levels was highest for TF1 and decreased to TF4. Arterial enhancement between the aorta and fibular trunk was not different in all TF groups, P > 0.05. At the calf and foot strongest arterial enhancement was noted for TF1 and TF2 and decreased to TF4, P < 0.01. Results indicate that the highest image quality of run-off CTA in patients with an AAA may be obtained using table feeds measuring 30-35 mm/s. • CTA has become a key investigation for peripheral vascular disease. • Run-off CTA is more complex in patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm. • Run-off CTA is feasible with a short bolus of intravenous contrast medium. • A constant 30-35 mm/s table feed provides the highest likelihood of diagnostic images.

  17. Subacute Cortical Infarct Showing Uptake on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward

    2017-02-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. We present a case of subacute cortical cerebral infarct showing focal uptake on PSMA PET/CT. It is an important potential cause of false-positive uptake in this imaging cohort. The patient is an 85-year-old man with a background of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis and previous cerebrovascular events. He was referred for PSMA PET/CT for staging of high-risk prostate cancer.

  18. The feasibility of patient size-corrected, scanner-independent organ dose estimates for abdominal CT exams.

    PubMed

    Turner, Adam C; Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Chris H; Cody, Dianna D; Stevens, Donna M; McCollough, Cynthia H; McNitt-Gray, Michael F

    2011-02-01

    A recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of estimating the dose to individual organs from multidetector CT exams using patient-specific, scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients. However, the previous study only investigated organ dose to a single patient model from a full-body helical CT scan. The purpose of this work was to extend the validity of this dose estimation technique to patients of any size undergoing a common clinical exam. This was done by determining the influence of patient size on organ dose conversion coefficients generated for typical abdominal CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of abdominal exams were performed using models of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers to obtain dose to radiosensitive organs for eight patient models of varying size, age, and gender. The scanner-specific organ doses were normalized by corresponding CTDIvol values and averaged across scanners to obtain scanner-independent CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for each patient model. In order to obtain a metric for patient size, the outer perimeter of each patient was measured at the central slice of the abdominal scan region. Then, the relationship between CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients and patient perimeter was investigated for organs that were directly irradiated by the abdominal scan. These included organs that were either completely ("fully irradiated") or partly ("partially irradiated") contained within the abdominal exam region. Finally, dose to organs that were not at all contained within the scan region ("nonirradiated") were compared to the doses delivered to fully irradiated organs. CTDIvol-to-organ-dose conversion coefficients for fully irradiated abdominal organs had a strong exponential correlation with patient perimeter. Conversely, partially irradiated organs did not have a strong dependence on patient perimeter. In almost all cases, the doses delivered to nonirradiated

  19. Optimizing abdominal CT dose and image quality with respect to x-ray tube voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the x-ray tube voltage that results in optimum performance for abdominal CT imaging for a range of imaging tasks and patient sizes. Theoretical calculations were performed of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for disk shaped lesions of muscle, fat, bone and iodine embedded in a uniform water background. Lesion contrast was the mean Hounsfield Unit value at the effective photon energy, and image noise was determined from the total radiation intensity incident on the CT x-ray detector. Patient size ranging from young infants (10 kg) to oversized adults (120 kg), with CNR values obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Patients of varying sizes were modeled as an equivalent cylinder of water, and the mean section dose (D) was determined for each selected x-ray tube kV value at a constant mAs. For each patient size and lesion type, we identified an optimal kV as the x-ray tube voltage that yields a maximum value of the figure of merit (CNR2/D). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV reduced lesion contrast by 11% for muscle, 21% for fat, 35% for bone and 52% for iodine, and these reductions were approximately independent of patient size. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased a muscle lesion CNR relative to a uniform water background by a factor of 2.6, with similar trends observed for fat (2.3), bone (1.9) and iodine (1.4). The improvement in lesion CNR with increasing x-ray tube voltage was highest for the largest sized patients. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the patient dose by a factor of between 5.0 and 6.2 depending on the patient size. For small sized patients (10 and 30 kg) and muscle lesions, best performance is obtained at 80 kV; however, for adults (70 kg) and oversized adults (120 kg), the best performance would be obtained at 140 kV. Imaging fat lesions was best performed at 80 kV for all patients except for oversized adults

  20. Giant mesenteric cyst: a rare cause of abdominal distension diagnosed with CT and managed with ultrasound-guided drainage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alexander; Ayre, Karyn; Wijeyekoon, Sanjaya

    2012-01-01

    This rare cystic lesion has an approximate incidence of 1 in 200 000. This patient complained of abdominal distension and was diagnosed with a giant mesenteric cyst measuring 26 cm in height using CT imaging. She underwent a successful ultrasound-guided drainage, which is not previously reported in the literature. This represents utilisation of an established procedure in a novel situation. PMID:22948982

  1. Benefit of follow-up CT in emergency department patients with persistent non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Ashwin V; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari F; Novelline, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    To determine the benefit of a short-term follow-up abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT) examination among emergency department (ED) patients with persistent abdominal pain and an initially negative CT. During a 5-year period from January 2004 to December 2008, our institution's radiology department performed approximately 56,000 APCTs examinations in the ED. Sixty-eight percent of the APCT examinations used intravenous contrast. Nine hundred fifty-seven patients received two APCTs within 1 week for non-traumatic abdominal pain in the ED. Sixty-four patients with initially negative APCTs presented to the ED within 1 week with persistent abdominal pain and received follow-up APCT imaging. The mean follow-up period was 2.6 days. The mean interval period in which the second APCT yielded a positive result was 2.0 days. Seventy-five percent of follow-up examinations were performed with intravenous contrast. Twenty-three percent of patients had positive findings on the follow-up examination. Seventy-three percent of the follow-up positive findings were referable to bowel pathology. The cause of abdominal pain remained elusive at 1 week in 23% of patients. Short-term follow-up APCT examinations in patients with persistent, unexplained abdominal pain may be of benefit if the second APCT is performed with intravenous contrast in patients suspected of having bowel pathology.

  2. Longitudinal tube modulation for chest and abdominal CT examinations: impact on effective patient doses calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Depuydt, M.; Jacobs, J.; Nens, J.; Lemmens, K.; Oyen, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: In multi-slice CT, manufacturers have implemented automatic tube current modulation (TCM) algorithms. These adjust tube current in the x-y plane (angular modulation) and/or along the z-axis (z-axis modulation) according to the size and attenuation of the scanned body part. Current methods for estimating effective dose (ED) values in CT do not account for such new developments. This study investigated the need to take TCM into account when calculating ED values, using clinical data. Methods: The effect of TCM algorithms as implemented on a GE BrightSpeed 16, a Philips Brilliance 64 and a Siemens Sensation 64 CT scanners was investigated. Here, only z-axis modulation was addressed, considering thorax and abdomen CT examinations collected from 534 adult patients. Commercially available CT dosimetry software (CT expo v.1.7) was used to compute EDTCM (ED accounting for TCM) as the sum of ED of successive slices. A two-step approach was chosen: first we estimated the relative contribution of each slice assuming a constant tube current. Next a weighted average was taken based upon the slice specific tube current value. EDTCM was than compared to patient ED estimated using average mA of all slices. Results and Conclusions: The proposed method is relatively simple and uses as input: the parameters of each protocol, a fitted polynomial function of weighting factors for each slice along the scan length and mA values of the individual patient examination. Results show that z-axis modulation does not have a strong impact on ED for the Siemens and the GE scanner (difference ranges from -4.1 to 3.3 percent); for the Philips scanner the effect was more important, (difference ranges from -8.5 to 6.9 percent), but still all median values approached zero (except for one case, where the median reached -5.6%), suggesting that ED calculation using average mA is in general a good approximation for EDTCM. Higher difference values for the Philips scanner are due to a stronger

  3. Significance of measurements of herniary area and volume and abdominal cavity volume in the treatment of incisional hernia: application of CT 3D reconstruction in 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Yao, Sheng; Li, Ji-ye; Liu, Fei-de; Pei, Li-juan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the value of CT 3D reconstruction in the diagnosis and treatment of incisional hernia and the related factor of abdominal cavity volume. Abdominal wall defect and herniary volume were measured using 3D reconstruction based on plain CT scans in 17 patients with incisional hernias. The herniary diameter, area and volume could be measured in the 17 patients and the abdominal cavity volume was also measured in 10 patients using the 3D reconstruction technique. The correlation indices of the abdominal cavity volume with the patient's height, weight and body mass index (BMI) were all less than 0.01. Herniary area and volume and abdominal cavity volume can be accurately calculated through CT 3D reconstruction. The patch area should be more than 5 times as large as the defect area; combined with the perioperative overlap margin measurement method, this results in more scientific surgical management. The ratio of the herniary volume to the abdominal cavity volume may be conducive to preoperative assessment of the risk of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS); however, the ratio that may lead to postoperative ACS remains to be determined. There are correlations of abdominal cavity volume with patient height, weight and BMI, especially with weight. We therefore propose that the abdominal cavity volume should be evaluated with internationally accepted indices.

  4. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative.

  5. FDG-PET/CT in advanced ovarian cancer staging: value and pitfalls in detecting lesions in different abdominal and pelvic quadrants compared with laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    De Iaco, Pierandrea; Musto, Alessandra; Orazi, Luca; Zamagni, Claudio; Rosati, Marta; Allegri, Vincenzo; Cacciari, Nicoletta; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Rubello, Domenico; Venturoli, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano

    2011-11-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is a common cancer in the Western Countries, and an important cause of death in patients suffering with gynaecologic malignancies. The majority of patients present with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Treatment with debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy is the standard approach while chemotherapy is contemplated when surgery is not possible. A correct pre-operative staging is important to ensure a most appropriate management. Laparoscopy (LPS) is the standard diagnostic tool for the assessment of intraperitoneal infiltration but is invasive and requires general anaesthesia. FDG-PET/CT is increasingly used for staging different types of cancer, and the aim of this study is to assess the value of FDG-PET/CT in staging advanced OC and its sensitivity to detect lesions in different quadrants of the abdominal-pelvic area compared to laparoscopy. From September 2004 till April 2008, 40 patients with high suspicion of OC were referred to our hospital for diagnostic LPS to explore the possibility of optimal debulking surgery. Those who were not suitable for surgery were referred for chemotherapy. Before chemotherapy, the patients underwent an FDG-PET/CT scan. The findings in 9 quadrants of abdominal-pelvic area (total 360 quadrants) for PET/CT and LPS were recorded and compared. In 14/360 areas (3.8%), surgical evaluation was not possible because of presence of adhesions, thus the number of areas explored by laparoscopy was 346. Tumour was found in 308 quadrants (38 quadrants free of disease). PET/CT was positive in all 40 patients with true negative results in 26/346 quadrants (7.5%), and true positives results in 243/346 quadrants (70.2%). False positive and negative PET/CT results were found in 12/346 and 65/346 quadrants, respectively. False positive PET/CT findings were evenly present in all quadrants. False negative PET/CT findings were present in 31/109 (28.4%) upper abdominal quadrants (epigastrium and diaphragmatic areas

  6. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  7. Follicular Thyroid Adenoma Showing Avid Uptake on 68Ga PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Kanthan, Gowri L; Drummond, James; Schembri, Geoff Paul; Izard, Michael A; Hsiao, Edward

    2016-04-01

    68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT imaging is a relatively new imaging technique used to evaluate the extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Various other neoplasms may also express PSMA and show uptake on PSMA PET/CT scan. We report a case of a 62-year-old man who had a PSMA PET/CT scan for restaging of prostate carcinoma. A PSMA-avid thyroid lesion was identified, and subsequent tissue sampling confirmed the diagnosis of follicular thyroid adenoma. It is important to be aware of this possibility to avoid scan misinterpretation. Tissue biopsy of PSMA-avid thyroid lesions should be considered to exclude a primary thyroid neoplasm.

  8. Radiation dose reduction and image quality in pediatric abdominal CT with kVp and mAs modulation and an iterative reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwee; Kim, Myung-Joon; Kim, Ha Yan; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the radiation dose and image quality of pediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) using a protocol reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and a protocol with both kVp and mAs modulation and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). We retrospectively reviewed pediatric abdominal CT examinations performed with both kVp and mAs modulation. These raw data were reconstructed with SAFIRE at different strengths from 2 to 4 (SAFIRE groups 2-4). Another set of age/sex-matched pediatric abdominal CT examinations were also reviewed, which were performed during the same period with only mAs modulation and FBP (control group). The radiation dose and image quality were compared between groups. The image quality was objectively evaluated as the noise measured in the liver, aorta, and spleen at the level of the main portal vein and the image quality was subjectively reviewed by two radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale (0: unacceptable; 1: worse than the control group, but acceptable; 2: comparable with the control group; and 3: better than the control group). An independent t test was used in order to compare the radiation dose. An independent t test with Bonferroni correction and generalized estimating equations were used for the comparison of the objective and subjective image quality, respectively. Twenty-nine patients (M:F=19:10; mean age, 10.0 years) were enrolled in each group. The SAFIRE group, using the size-specific dose estimates calculation method showed a 64.2% radiation dose reduction (from 8.1 to 2.9 mGy, P<.05), compared with the results of the control group. The objective image noise of the SAFIRE groups 2 and 3 was comparable to that of the control group. The subjective image quality was the best in SAFIRE group 3 [odds ratio (OR) 3.015, P<.001 when comparing to SAFIRE group 0; OR 1.513, P<.001 when comparing to SAFIRE group 2]. Image acquisition with both kVp and m

  9. A dual radiologic contrast agent protocol for 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET/CT imaging of mice bearing abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Aide, Nicolas; Kinross, Kathryn; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Neels, Oliver; Potdevin, Titaina; Roselt, Peter; Dorow, Donna; Cullinane, Carleen; Hicks, Rodney J

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to improve abdominal tumor detection by use of a dual radiologic contrast protocol. eXia160® (Benitio international) was mixed with 2-deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D: -glucose or 3'-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine for intravenous (IV) injections. Omnipaque® 300 (GE healthcare) was used for intraperitoneal (IP) injections. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans were acquired on a Siemens Biograph® equipped with point spread function reconstruction. The optimal concentration and injection schedule of IP contrast agent was studied in 12 mice. The impact of IP contrast media on PET quantitative accuracy was investigated by phantom studies and by imaging six mice before and after IP injection of Omnipaque®. The impact of a dual contrast media protocol on tumor delineation and quantitation was evaluated in 15 tumor-bearing mice using ex vivo counting as the reference. The optimal sequence was a mixture of tracer plus IV contrast agent followed by 1 mL of IP contrast agent (20 mg iodine/mL) administered 10 min before PET/CT acquisition. Phantom studies showed that the use of a 20-mg iodine/mL concentration of Omnipaque® led to a 4.8% overestimation of radioactivity concentration, as compared to saline. This was confirmed by animal studies that demonstrated a 4.3% overestimation. Tumor detection was excellent and correlation between PET/CT quantitative data and ex vivo counting was good (r² = 0.91, slope = 0.7). A dual radiologic contrast protocol is useful in PET/CT scanning of mice bearing abdominal tumors. Contrast agents used in this manner lead to a small but acceptable overestimation of quantitative PET data.

  10. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Wacker, Frank Klaus

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volume data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.

  12. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  13. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Ken; Baba, Rika

    2006-12-15

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  14. Development of automated extraction method of biliary tract from abdominal CT volumes based on local intensity structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Hirose, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Nagino, Masato; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated biliary tract extraction method from abdominal CT volumes. The biliary tract is the path by which bile is transported from liver to the duodenum. No extraction method have been reported for the automated extraction of the biliary tract from common contrast CT volumes. Our method consists of three steps including: (1) extraction of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) candidate regions, (2) extraction of intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) candidate regions, and (3) combination of these candidate regions. The IHBD has linear structures and intensities of the IHBD are low in CT volumes. We use a dark linear structure enhancement (DLSE) filter based on a local intensity structure analysis method using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix for the IHBD candidate region extraction. The EHBD region is extracted using a thresholding process and a connected component analysis. In the combination process, we connect the IHBD candidate regions to each EHBD candidate region and select a bile duct region from the connected candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 22 cases of CT volumes. An average Dice coefficient of extraction result was 66.7%.

  15. Potential for radiation dose savings in abdominal and chest CT using automatic tube voltage selection in combination with automatic tube current modulation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Caroline; Meyer, Mathias; Fink, Christian; Schmidt, Bernhard; Sedlmair, Martin; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Henzler, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simultaneous use of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) and automatic tube voltage selection (ATVS) for abdominal and chest CT examinations regarding radiation dose reduction and image quality. We enrolled 617 patients who all underwent contrast-enhanced chest or abdominal CT and divided them into two groups. In group A, 317 patients who underwent CT with only ATCM and a fixed body mass index-adjusted tube voltage (120 kV or 100 kV) were enrolled. In group B, both ATCM and ATVS were used. Image attenuation and noise were measured in different anatomic regions. The mean contrast-to-noise ratio and the signal-to-noise ratio of abdomen and chest CT was higher in group B compared with group A (p < 0.0001). In total, the effective radiation doses for abdomen and chest CT examinations were significantly reduced in group B by 18% compared with group A (p < 0.0001). When only examining those who benefited from the ATVS tool, a dose reduction of 35% for chest CT and 42% for abdomen CT could be achieved (p < 0.0001 for each). The simultaneous use of ATVS and ATCM enables significant radiation dose reduction in abdominal and thoracic contrast-enhanced CT examinations compared with the use of ATCM alone.

  16. Automated segmentation of upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT data using hierarchical statistical modeling of organ interrelations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, S.; Otake, Y.; Okada, T.; Hori, M.; Tomiyama, N.; Sato, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have been studying the automatic segmentation of multi-organ region from abdominal CT images. In previous work, we proposed an approach using a hierarchical statistical modeling using a relationship between organs. In this paper, we have proposed automatic segmentation of the upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT using previously segmented multiple organs. We compared segmentation accuracy of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum between our proposed method using hierarchical statistical modeling and a conventional statistical atlas method. Additionally, preliminary experiment was performed which added the region representing gas to the candidate region at the segmentation step. The segmentation results were evaluated quantitatively by Dice coefficient, Jaccard index and the average symmetric surface distance of the segmented region and correct region data. Percentage of the average of Dice coefficient of esophagus, stomach and duodenum were 58.7, 68.3, and 38.6 with prediction-based method and 23.7, 51.1, and 24.4 with conventional atlas method.

  17. An Abdominal CT may be Safe in Selected Hypotensive Trauma Patients with Positive FAST Exam

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mackenzie R.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) and hypotension often indicates urgent surgery. An abdomen/pelvis CT (apCT) may allow less invasive management but the delay may be associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Patients in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study with hypotension and a positive FAST (HF+) who underwent a CT (apCT+) were compared to those who did not. Results Of the 92 HF+ identified, 32(35%) underwent apCT during initial evaluation and apCT was associated with decreased odds of an emergency operation, OR 0.11 95% CI (0.001–0.116) and increased odds of angiographic intervention, OR 14.3 95% CI (1.5–135). There was no significant difference in 30 day mortality or need for dialysis. Conclusion An apCt in HF+ patients is associated with reduced odds of emergency surgery, but not mortality. Select HF+ patients can safely undergo apCT to obtain clinically useful information. PMID:25805456

  18. The application of automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on image quality and radiation dose at abdominal computed tomography (CT): A phantom study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Zhao, Xinming; Song, Junfeng; Guo, Ning; Zhu, Ying; Liu, Jianxin; Qi, Weiwei; Wu, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Feng, Shichao; Hu, Mancang; Zhou, Chunwu; Wang, Xiaoying; Hong, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Multi-phase spiral Computed tomography (CT) of abdomen has been widely used as an effective imaging modality to diagnose variety of diseases. As a result, the accumulated radiation exposure on the abdomen is substantially higher than other human organ regions. According to ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle, how to control radiation dose without compromising imaging quality becomes a research topic of high interest. However, how to achieve dose optimization of the abdomen CT examinations in Chinese patients have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In this study, we develop an abdomen-equivalent tissue model made by well-known CTP579 auxiliary testing model and the real CT data acquired from 68 Chinese male subjects. Combining with catphan600, we simulated the visibility of low and high contrast objects at adult abdomen under variety of x-ray dose levels. Using the automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) technique, we reduced the total radiation dose and identified a proper noise index (NI) for Chinese patients to maintain low or high contrast detectability of abdominal CT image. Our numerical experiments showed that in the phantom study for Chinese patients, when a NI was set at 10, the radiation dose reduced by 34.3% with low contrast objects detectable, while setting NI at 14 the dose level decreased by 65.1% without change the detectability of high contrast targets. The subjective ratings from three radiologists also yielded high consistence with Kappa > 0.75. This study demonstrated the feasibility of performing the CT dose optimization studies through a unique phantom with the ATCM method.

  19. Automated pediatric abdominal effective diameter measurements versus age-predicted body size for normalization of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M; Vachon, Linda A; Duddalwar, Vinay A

    2013-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in adjusting CT radiation dose data for patient body size. A method for automated computation of the abdominal effective diameter of a patient from a CT image has previously only been tested in adult patients. In this work, we tested the method on a set of 128 pediatric patients aged 0.8 to 12.9 years (average 8.0 years, SD = 3.7 years) who had CT abdomen/pelvis exams performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 scanner. For this set of patients, age-predicted abdominal effective diameter extrapolated based on data from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements was a relatively poor predictor of measured effective diameter. The mean absolute percentage error between the CTDI normalization coefficient calculated from a manually measured effective diameter and the coefficient determined by age-predicted effective diameter was 12.3 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-52.8 %, SD 8.7 %) and 12.9 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-56.4 %, SD 9.2 %). In contrast, there is a close correspondence between the automated and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 0.6 cm (error range 0.2-1.3 cm). This correspondence translates into a high degree of correspondence between normalization coefficients determined by automated and manual measurements; the mean absolute percentage error was 2.1 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-8.1 %, SD = 1.4 %) and 2.3 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-9.3 %, SD = 1.6 %).

  20. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  1. Utility of the CT Scan in Diagnosing Midgut Volvulus in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Morshedi, Mehdi; Baradaran Jamili, Mohammad; Shafizadeh Barmi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic intestinal malrotation first presenting in the adults is rare. Midgut volvulus is the most common complication of malrotation in the adults. Because of more differential diagnosis, Computed Tomography (CT) scan can play an important role in the evaluation of patients with this abnormality. The whirl pattern around the superior mesenteric artery found on CT scan in patients with midgut volvulus is pathognomonic and diagnostic. We describe a case of intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus in an adult patient. The preoperative CT findings were pathognomonic. PMID:28182093

  2. Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are rare tumors arising from the epithelium of the endolymphatic sac and duct that can be either sporadic or associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. We report a case of a VHL patient with histologically proven residual ELST who underwent Ga DOTATATE PET/CT showing increased activity (SUVmax, 6.29) by the ELST. The presented case of a VHL-associated ELST with increased Ga DOTATATE uptake indicates cell-surface expression of somatostatin receptors by this tumor, suggesting the potential application of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides in the workup and management of these patients.

  3. CT of nontraumatic abdominal fluid collections after initial fluid resuscitation of patients with major burns.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Vernon M; Rhea, James T; Sacknoff, Richard; Novelline, Robert A

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the presence and CT distribution of nontraumatic fluid collections and edema in the abdomen and pelvis after initial fluid resuscitation of patients with major (>/==" BORDER="0"> 25% total body surface area) thermal burns. Awareness of the presence and expected CT distribution of nontraumatic fluid after initial fluid resuscitation in patients with major burns can assist the radiologist in differentiating such collections from those caused by mechanical trauma.

  4. Segmentation of Costal Cartilage in Abdominal CT Data using Watershed Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Andrew B.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2007-05-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is a promising non-invasive technique that heats a specific tumor region to fatal levels, while minimizing cell death in nearby healthy areas. For liver applications, the rib cage limits the transducer placement. A treatment plan based on CT images would segment the ribs and provide visualization of them and the tumor. A HIFU simulation of deposited heat would also require rib segmentation. Unfortunately, the ribs are difficult to segment on CT as they transition to cartilage, with CT units similar to that of the liver. The purpose of this work was to develop a rib segmentation algorithm based on CT images for HIFU treatment planning. After an initial threshold of the CT data, rib regions were characterized based on their size, and if a region were greater than a predetermined area parameter (i.e. it consisted of rib and liver), a marker based watershed transformation separated the two regions and continued to the next inferior slice. After false positives were removed by a predetermined volume parameter, the remaining objects were reassigned high CT values. Preliminary results from six human CT datasets indicated this segmentation method works well, successfully distinguishing the ribs from nearby organs. Of the fifty-five ribs counted in these datasets, only five contained small errors due to reconstruction shading irregularities, with four of these in one dataset. Once all cartilage was assigned high CT numbers, any commercially available 3D rendering software (e.g. OsiriX) can be used to visualize the ribs and tumor.

  5. Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A; Chowdhury, Ananda S; Summers, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D erosion using population historic information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen, and kidneys was applied to multi-phase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance and enhancement, and shape and location on organ segmentation.

  6. Point Organ Radiation Dose in Abdominal CT: Effect of Patient Off-Centering in an Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Ali Khawaja, Ranish Deedar; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Lira, Diego; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Primak, Andrew; Xu, George; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2017-01-10

    To determine the effect of patient off-centering on point organ radiation dose measurements in a human cadaver scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol. A human cadaver (88 years, body-mass-index 20 kg/m(2)) was scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol on 128-slice dual source MDCT (Definition Flash, Siemens). A total of 18 scans were performed using two scan protocols (a) 120 kV-200 mAs fixed-mA (CTDIvol 14 mGy) (b) 120 kV-125 ref mAs (7 mGy) with automatic exposure control (AEC, CareDose 4D) at three different positions (a) gantry isocenter, (b) upward off-centering and (c) downward off-centering. Scanning was repeated three times at each position. Six thimble (in liver, stomach, kidney, pancreas, colon and urinary bladder) and four MOSFET dosimeters (on cornea, thyroid, testicle and breast) were placed for calculation of measured point organ doses. Organ dose estimations were retrieved from dose-tracking software (eXposure, Radimetrics). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. There was a significant difference between the trends of point organ doses with AEC and fixed-mA at all three positions (p < 0.01). Variation in point doses between fixed-mA and AEC protocols were statistically significant across all organs at all Table positions (p < 0.001). There was up to 5-6% decrease in point doses with upward off-centering and in downward off-centering. There were statistical significant differences in point doses from dosimeters and dose-tracking software (mean difference for internal organs, 5-36% for fixed-mA & 7-48% for AEC protocols; p < 0.001; mean difference for surface organs, >92% for both protocols; p < 0.0001). For both protocols, the highest mean difference in point doses was found for stomach and lowest for colon. Measured absorbed point doses in abdominal CT vary with patient-centering in the gantry isocenter. Due to lack of consideration of patient positioning in the dose estimation on automatic software-over estimation of

  7. A Method for the Automatic Exposure Control in Pediatric Abdominal CT: Application to the Standard Deviation Value and Tube Current Methods by Using Patient's Age and Body Size.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ken; Akiyama, Shinji; Nambu, Atushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hasebe, Yuusuke

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to apply the pediatric abdominal CT protocol of Donnelly et al. in the United States to the pediatric abdominal CT-AEC. Examining CT images of 100 children, we found that the sectional area of the hepatic portal region (y) was strongly correlated with the body weight (x) as follows: y=7.14x + 84.39 (correlation coefficient=0.9574). We scanned an elliptical cone phantom that simulates the human body using a pediatric abdominal CT scanning method of Donnelly et al. in, and measured SD values. We further scanned the same phantom under the settings for adult CT-AEC scan and obtained the relationship between the sectional areas (y) and the SD values. Using these results, we obtained the following preset noise factors for CT-AEC at each body weight range: 6.90 at 4.5-8.9 kg, 8.40 at 9.0-17.9 kg, 8.68 at 18.0-26.9 kg, 9.89 at 27.0-35.9 kg, 12.22 at 36.0-45.0 kg, 13.52 at 45.1-70.0 kg, 15.29 at more than 70 kg. From the relation between age, weight and the distance of liver and tuber ischiadicum of 500 children, we obtained the CTDIvol values and DLP values under the scanning protocol of Donnelly et al. Almost all of DRL from these values turned out to be smaller than the DRL data of IAEA and various countries. Thus, by setting the maximum current values of CT-AEC to be the Donnelly et al.'s age-wise current values, and using our weight-wise noise factors, we think we can perform pediatric abdominal CT-AEC scans that are consistent with the same radiation safety and the image quality as those proposed by Donnelly et al.

  8. [Significance of abdominal wall CT-angiography in planning DIEA perforator flaps, TRAM flaps and SIEA flaps].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schirmer, S; Frerichs, O; Gehl, H B

    2011-04-01

    Muscle sparing TRAM flaps and DIEA perforator flaps are standard procedures for breast reconstruction. Recently CT-angiography has been established to evaluate perforator vessels pre-operatively. CT-angiography was introduced to our department in July 2009. In a retrospective analysis data of the last 20 patients (altogether 22 flaps) before CT-angiography introduction and the following 20 (also 22 flaps) patients after introduction of CT-angiography were analysed with regard to the ratio of TRAM to DIEP flaps, and the time required to raise the flaps. The same surgeon raised all flaps. As different surgeons performed dissection of the recipient site, anastomoses, and insertion of flaps, and patients received primary (with sentinel or complete lymphadenctomy) or secondary reconstructions, only the time required harvesting the flap was compared. Thus other influences on raising the flap were eliminated. DIEP flaps were harvested with one single perforator. If perfusion or was considered not to be safe via one single perforator a muscle sparing TRAM flap (ms2) was raised. Angiography was performed using a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner. CT-angiography did not lead to an increased rate of DIEP flaps in relation to ms2-TRAM flaps. Harvesting time of all flap types with CT-angiography on average was 121 min, without CT-angiography 135 min. This was not significantly different. However, separate analysis of DIEP flaps and ms2-TRAM flaps revealed a significant advantage of CT-angiography based harvesting of DIEP flaps of 26 min: with CT-angiography 101 min vs. 127 min without CT-angiography (p<0.028). There were no significant differences for ms2-TRAM flaps. All scans showed course and branching, diameter and size of the inferior epigastric artery. If evident the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) was marked. Dosage was 292 mGy-606 mGy×cm dependent on body weight. CTDI was 6.8-14.7 mGy. CT-angiography is a reproducible and observer independent procedure

  9. Usefulness of a metal artifact reduction algorithm for orthopedic implants in abdominal CT: phantom and clinical study results.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seonji; Kim, Se Hyung; Hwang, Eui Jin; Shin, Cheong-Il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for orthopedic prostheses in phantom and clinical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An agar phantom with two sets of spinal screws was scanned at various tube voltage (80-140 kVp) and tube current-time (34-1032 mAs) settings. The orthopedic MAR algorithm was combined with filtered back projection (FBP) or iterative reconstruction. The mean SDs in three ROIs were compared among four datasets (FBP, iterative reconstruction, FBP with orthopedic MAR, and iterative reconstruction with orthopedic MAR). For the clinical study, the mean SDs of three ROIs and 4-point scaled image quality in 52 patients with metallic orthopedic prostheses were compared between CT images acquired with and without orthopedic MAR. The presence and type of image quality improvement with orthopedic MAR and the presence of orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were also analyzed. RESULTS. In the phantom study, the mean SD with orthopedic MAR was significantly lower than that without orthopedic MAR regardless of dose settings and reconstruction algorithms (FBP versus iterative reconstruction). The mean SD near the metallic prosthesis in 52 patients was significantly lower on CT images with orthopedic MAR (28.04 HU) than those without it (49.21 HU). Image quality regarding metallic artifact was significantly improved with orthopedic MAR (rating of 2.60 versus 1.04). Notable reduction of metallic artifacts and better depiction of abdominal organs were observed in 45 patients. Diagnostic benefit was achieved in six patients, but orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were seen in 30 patients. CONCLUSION. Use of the orthopedic MAR algorithm significantly reduces metal artifacts in CT of both phantoms and patients and has potential for improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artifacts.

  10. The diagnostic role of abdominal CT imaging findings in adults intussusception: focused on the vascular compromise.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Bin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Beom Jin; Jin, Yong Hyun; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Kyoung Won

    2007-06-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. Unlike that in children, adult intussusception is a relatively rare condition. More than 90% of patients with adult intussusception have been reported to have an organic cause, with benign or malignant tumors for accounting for approximately 65% of the cases. In general, the diagnosis is easily made by means of computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The imaging appearance of a bowel-within-bowel configuration with or without contained fat and mesenteric vessels, is pathognomonic. As the intussusceptum enters into the intussuscipiens, the mesentery is carried forward and trapped between the overlapping layers of bowel. The twisting or severe constriction of the mesenteric vessels may result in vascular compromise with subsequent edematous thickening of the involved bowel. In these circumstances, ischemic necrosis may develop if timely intervention is not undertaken. Therefore, determination of the presence or absence of intestinal necrosis in intussusception is important in patient management. On CT, the presence of well-known diagnostic CT criteria for strangulated obstruction (especially severe engorgement or twisting of the mesenteric vessels) as well as evidence of loss of the layered pattern, accumulation of extraluminal fluid collection, and bowel perforation, may suggest the diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. CT and MR imaging are limited in determining the primary disease causing intussusception. However, CT and MR provide excellent pre-operative evaluation, including the possible extension and/or dissemination of a malignant tumor. CT and MR imaging may also be useful in suggesting the presence of vascular compromise.

  11. [Hard-copy (film) versus soft-copy (CRT) reading performance between compressed and uncompressed images: SOLs in abdominal CT images].

    PubMed

    Ando, Y; Tsukamoto, N; Kawaguchi, O; Kitamura, M; Kunieda, E; Kubo, A; Ogasawara, K; Kinosada, Y; Maeda, T; Kozuka, T

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the feasibility of soft-copy (CRT) reading and suitable compression. Forty abdominal CT images with a space-occupying lesion (SOL) in liver and 40 normal images were selected for receiver-operating-curve (ROC) analysis. Each image was compressed by JPEG extended mode into 1/10 its original capacity, and then an expanded image was printed on film. Ten radiologists evaluated the presence of liver SOLs (primary and secondary tumors) on soft-copy (CRT) and hard-copy (film) images. Each radiologist reviewed four types of images (original and compressed hard-copy and original and compressed soft-copy images). Values of the area under the curve in the various ROC analyses were 0.858 (FILM) and 0.842 (CRT) for original images and 0.879 (FILM) and 0.846 (CRT) for compressed images. The results of ROC analysis showed better reading performance with hard-copy than soft-copy images, but the difference was not statistically significant. Compressed images showed a higher value (0.879) than original images (0.858), a difference that was statistically significant (p < 0.029) by the paired t-test but not by the jackknife method. The results indicate that soft-copy reading is a clinically acceptable alternative to hard-copy reading. We have had no difficulty in reading abdominal CT images compressed to 1/10 of the original size by the JPEG method. This study was supported in part by a grant from the Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare.

  12. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter

    2016-01-01

    Background Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. Methods We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Results Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. Conclusion A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. PMID:27013638

  13. Predicting Future Hip Fractures on Routine Abdominal CT Using Opportunistic Osteoporosis Screening Measures: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Scott J; Anderson, Paul A; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2017-08-01

    Hip fracture is a major consequence of low bone mineral density, which is treatable but underdiagnosed. The purpose of this case-control study is to determine whether lumbar vertebral trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures, and femoral neck T scores readily derived from abdominopelvic CT scans obtained for various indications are associated with future hip fragility fracture. A cohort of 204 patients with hip fracture (130 women and 74 men; mean age, 74.3 years) who had undergone abdominopelvic CT before fracture occurred (mean interval, 24.8 months) was compared with an age- and sex-matched control cohort without hip fracture. L1 trabecular attenuation, vertebral compression fractures of grades 2 and 3, and femoral neck T scores derived from asynchronous quantitative CT were recorded. The presence of one or more clinical risk factor for fracture was also recorded. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association of each measurement with the occurrence of hip fracture. The mean L1 trabecular attenuation value, the presence of one or more vertebral compression fracture, and CT-derived femoral neck T scores were all significantly different in patients with hip fracture versus control subjects (p < 0.01). Logistic regression models showed a significant association of all measurements with hip fracture outcome after adjustments were made for age, sex, and the presence of one or more clinical risk factor. L1 trabecular attenuation and CT-derived femoral neck T scores showed moderate accuracy in differentiating case and control patients (AUC, 0.70 and 0.78, respectively). L1 trabecular attenuation, CT-derived femoral neck T scores, and the presence of at least one vertebral compression fracture on CT are all associated with future hip fragility fracture in adults undergoing routine abdominopelvic CT for a variety of conditions.

  14. Estimation of CT-derived abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots from anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Sophie V; Tillin, Therese; Wright, Andrew; Heasman, John; Willis, Joseph; Godsland, Ian F; Forouhi, Nita; Whincup, Peter; Hughes, Alun D; Chaturvedi, Nishi

    2013-01-01

    South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry. We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT. 669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70 ± 7 years) underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means. South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference), model fit was better in men (R(2) range 0.59-0.71) than women (range 0.35-0.59). Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference) improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R(2) 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively). For basic SAT equations, R(2) was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%. We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available.

  15. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aneurysm: a retrospective analysis of CT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hechelhammer, Lukas; Wildermuth, Simon; Lachat, Mario L; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Retrospective radiologic and clinical midterm follow-up is reported for 10 patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). At a mean follow-up of 33 months, regression of the thickness of the perianeurysmal fibrosis (PAF) and decrease of aneurysmal sac diameter was observed in nine patients. Four EVAR-associated complications were observed: periinterventional dissection of femoral artery (n = 1), blue toe syndrome (n = 1), and stent-graft disconnection (n = 2). EVAR is the less invasive method of aneurysm exclusion in patients with IAAA with a comparable evolution of the PAF as reported after open repair.

  16. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  17. Automatic segmentation of the liver using multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yujin; Hong, Helen; Chung, Jin Wook; Yoon, Young Ho

    2012-02-01

    We propose an effective technique for the extraction of liver boundary based on multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images. Our method is composed of four main steps. First, for extracting an optimal volume circumscribing a liver, lower and side boundaries are defined by positional information of pelvis and rib. An upper boundary is defined by separating the lungs and heart from CT images. Second, for extracting an initial liver volume, optimal liver volume is smoothed by anisotropic diffusion filtering and is segmented using adaptively selected threshold value. Third, for removing neighbor organs from initial liver volume, morphological opening and connected component labeling are applied to multiple planes. Finally, for refining the liver boundaries, deformable surface model is applied to a posterior liver surface and missing left robe in previous step. Then, probability summation map is generated by calculating regional information of the segmented liver in coronal plane, which is used for restoring the inaccurate liver boundaries. Experimental results show that our segmentation method can accurately extract liver boundaries without leakage to neighbor organs in spite of various liver shape and ambiguous boundary.

  18. Cross-sectional, school-based study of 14-19 year olds showed that raised blood pressure was associated with obesity and abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Ferreira, Marcus Vinícius; De Moraes, Augusto César Ferreira; Rendo-Urteaga, Tara; de Oliveira Forkert, Elsie Costa; Collese, Tatiana Sadalla; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Reis, Victor M M; Torres-Leal, Francisco Leonardo; Moreno, Luis A; Carvalho, Heráclito Barbosa

    2017-03-01

    Gaining weight has been directly associated with an increased probability of developing high blood pressure (HBP) and metabolic abnormalities. We examined the independent and combined effects of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity on blood pressure in adolescents. This cross-sectional school-based study evaluated 869 adolescents (53.4% girls) from 14 to 19 years of age, and the data were collected in 2013 in the city of Imperatriz, Maranhão, Brazil. The outcome was HBP. The independent variables were overweight and obesity classified by body mass index, abdominal obesity classified by the waist-to-height ratio and the combination of obesity and overweight and abdominal obesity. The potential confounding variables were age, the socio-economic status of the family, parental education, type of school and physical activity levels. The prevalence ratios of HBP were higher when male and female adolescents were overweight (1.61-3.11), generally obese (3.20-4.70), had abdominal obesity (2.18-3.02) and were both generally obese and had abdominal obesity (3.28-5.16) compared with normal weight adolescents. Obesity or abdominal obesity increased the risk of HBP in adolescents aged 14-19. However, adolescents who were both generally obese and had abdominal obesity showed an even higher risk of having HBP. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  1. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  2. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  3. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  4. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P < .001) for groups A, B, and C, respectively, no significant differences were observed in the corresponding SNRL with 9.2 ± 1.4, 9.1 ± 1.2, and 9.2 ± 3. Radiation (mGy × cm) and contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P < .001). None of the studies was graded as poor or inadequate by both readers, and the prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa ranged between 0.48 and 0.93 for all but one criteria. A constant image quality in CE-MDCT can be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. SU-F-I-47: Optimizing Protocols for Image Quality and Dose in Abdominal CT of Large Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L; Yester, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Newer CT scanners are able to use scout views to adjust mA throughout the scan in order to achieve a given noise level. However, given constraints of radiologist preferences for kVp and rotation time, it may not be possible to achieve an acceptable noise level for large patients. A study was initiated to determine for which patients kVp and/or rotation time should be changed in order to achieve acceptable image quality. Methods: Patient scans were reviewed on two new Emergency Department scanners (Philips iCT) to identify patients over a large range of sizes. These iCTs were set with a limit of 500 mA to safeguard against a failure that might cause a CT scan to be (incorrectly) obtained at too-high mA. Scout views of these scans were assessed for both AP and LAT patient width and AP and LAT standard deviation in an ROI over the liver. Effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver were both studied as possible metrics for identifying patients who would need kVp and/or rotation time changed. The mA used for the liver in the CT was compared to these metrics for those patients whose CT scans showed acceptable image quality. Results: Both effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver result in similar predictions for which patients will require the kVp and/or rotation time to be changed to achieve an optimal combination of image quality and dose. Conclusion: Two mechanisms for CT technologists to determine based on scout characteristics what kVp, mA limit, and rotation time to use when DoseRight with our physicians’ preferred kVp and rotation time will not yield adequate image quality are described.

  6. Classification of visual signs in abdominal CT image figures in biomedical literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    "Imaging signs" are a critical part of radiology's language. They not only are important for conveying diagnosis, but may also aid in indexing radiology literature and retrieving relevant cases and images. Here we report our work towards representing and categorizing imaging signs of abdominal abnormalities in figures in the radiology literature. Given a region-of-interest (ROI) from a figure, our goal was to assign a correct imaging sign label to that ROI from the following seven: accordion, comb, ring, sandwich, small bowel feces, target, or whirl. As training and test data, we created our own "gold standard" dataset of regions containing imaging signs. We computed 2997 feature attributes to represent imaging sign characteristics for each ROI in training and test sets. Following feature selection they were reduced to 70 attributes and were input to a Support Vector Machine classifier. We applied image-enhancement methods to compensate for variable quality of the images in radiology articles. In particular we developed a method for automatic detection and removal of pointers/markers (arrows, arrowheads, and asterisk symbols) on the images. These pointers/markers are valuable for approximately locating ROIs; however, they degrade the classification because they are often (partially) included in the training ROIs. On a test set of 283 ROIs, our method achieved an overall accuracy of 70% in labeling the seven signs, which we believe is a promising result for using imaging signs to search/retrieve radiology literature. This work is also potentially valuable for the creation of a visual ontology of biomedical imaging entities.

  7. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  8. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  9. SU-F-207-14: Low Contrast Detectability (LCD) at Different Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Abdominal CT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Using diagnostic reference levels (DRL) to optimize CT protocols has potential to reduce radiation dose and meet regulatory requirements. However, DRL’s tend to be misconstrued as dose limits, are typically designed for specific patient populations, and are assumed to have acceptable image quality (AIQ) associated with them. To determine the image quality that is associated with established DRL’s for adult abdominal CT studies, a LCD phantom study was employed. Methods: A CT phantom (CIRS) containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background (HUBB) matrix was scanned with a GE HD750 64 slice scanner. The phantom was scanned at the NEXT 2006 25th CTDIvol of 12 mGy, the NCRP 172 achievable dose (AD) CTDIvol of 17 mGy and 75th CTDIvol of 25 mGy and at the ACR recommended CTDIvol of 25 mGy. It was also scanned at a CTDIvol 20% greater than the AD at 20 mGy and the ACR maximum threshold of 30 mGy. Results: At the NEXT 2006 25th percentile CTDIvol of 12 mGy, a 6.3 mm low contrast lesion was detectable in the 20 HUBB; 6.3 mm in the 10 HUBB and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column. Increasing the CTDIvol to the NCRP 172 AD of 17 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was visualized in the 20 HUBB column. At 20 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was detectable in the 10 HUBB column. No further lesions were visible between 20 and 30 mGy. However, conspicuity of all lesions increased with each additional step up in CTDI. Conclusion: Optimizing radiation dose to achieve AIQ is a critical aspect of any dose optimization committee. Hence, judicious monitoring of radiation exposure to patients has to be balanced with diagnostic image quality.

  10. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-05-26

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. Low kV settings CT angiography (CTA) with low dose contrast medium volume protocol in the assessment of thoracic and abdominal aorta disease: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Talei Franzesi, C; Fior, D; Bonaffini, P A; Minutolo, O; Sironi, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic quality of low dose (100 kV) CT angiography (CTA), by using ultra-low contrast medium volume (30 ml), for thoracic and abdominal aorta evaluation. Methods: 67 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease underwent multidetector CT study using a 256 slice scanner, with low dose radiation protocol (automated tube current modulation, 100 kV) and low contrast medium volume (30 ml; 4 ml s−1). Density measurements were performed on ascending, arch, descending thoracic aorta, anonymous branch, abdominal aorta, and renal and common iliac arteries. Radiation dose exposure [dose–length product (DLP)] was calculated. A control group of 35 patients with thoracic or abdominal vascular disease were evaluated with standard CTA protocol (automated tube current modulation, 120 kV; contrast medium, 80 ml). Results: In all patients, we correctly visualized and evaluated main branches of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. No difference in density measurements was achieved between low tube voltage protocol (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 304 HU; abdominal, 343 HU; renal arteries, 331 HU) and control group (mean attenuation value of thoracic aorta, 320 HU; abdominal, 339; renal arteries, 303 HU). Radiation dose exposure in low tube voltage protocol was significantly different between thoracic and abdominal low tube voltage studies (490 and 324 DLP, respectively) and the control group (thoracic DLP, 1032; abdomen, DLP 1078). Conclusion: Low-tube-voltage protocol may provide a diagnostic performance comparable with that of the standard protocol, decreasing radiation dose exposure and contrast material volume amount. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage-setting protocol combined with ultra-low contrast agent volume (30 ml), by using new multidetector-row CT scanners, represents a feasible diagnostic tool to significantly reduce the radiation dose delivered to patients and to preserve renal function

  12. Effect of automatic tube voltage selection on image quality and radiation dose in abdominal CT angiography of various body sizes: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Schindera, S T; Winklehner, A; Alkadhi, H; Goetti, R; Fischer, M; Gnannt, R; Szucs-Farkas, Z

    2013-02-01

    To assess the effect of an automatic tube voltage selection technique on image quality and radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography (CT) angiography of various body sizes. An abdominal aortic phantom was filled with iodinated contrast medium and placed into three different cylindrical water containers, which simulated a small, intermediate-sized, and large patient. The phantom was scanned with a standard 120 kVp abdominal CT angiography protocol and with an optimized tube voltage protocol that was modulated by an automatic tube voltage technique. The attenuation of the aorta, background, and image noise was measured, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated. Three independent readers assessed the overall image quality. The automatic tube voltage technique selected 70 kVp as the optimal tube voltage for the small phantom, 80 kVp for the intermediate phantom, and 100 kVp for the large phantom. Compared to the standard 120 kVp protocol, the automatic tube voltage selection yielded significantly increased CNR values in the small phantom (15.8 versus 19.4, p < 0.001), intermediate phantom (8.4 versus 8.7, p < 0.05), and large phantom (4.3 versus 4.6, p < 0.01). The automatic tube voltage selection resulted in a 55%, 49%, and 39% reduction in the volume CT dose index (CTDI(vol)) in the small, intermediate, and large phantoms, respectively. The subjective overall image quality of the three phantom sizes at different tube voltages ranged between poor and good. Compared to a standard 120 kVp abdominal CT angiography protocol, the automatic tube voltage selection substantially reduced the radiation dose without compromising image quality in various simulated patient sizes. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-V technique for radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyeong; Kim, Dongwon; Cho, Junghyun; Kim, Sanghyun; Lee, Sangyun; Lee, Jihyun

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether reduced radiation dose abdominal CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction V (ASIR-V) compromise the depiction of clinically competent features when compared with the currently used routine radiation dose CT images reconstructed with ASIR. 27 consecutive patients (mean body mass index: 23.55 kg m(-2) underwent CT of the abdomen at two time points. At the first time point, abdominal CT was scanned at 21.45 noise index levels of automatic current modulation at 120 kV. Images were reconstructed with 40% ASIR, the routine protocol of Dong-A University Hospital. At the second time point, follow-up scans were performed at 30 noise index levels. Images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), 40% ASIR, 30% ASIR-V, 50% ASIR-V and 70% ASIR-V for the reduced radiation dose. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses of image quality were conducted. The CT dose index was also recorded. At the follow-up study, the mean dose reduction relative to the currently used common radiation dose was 35.37% (range: 19-49%). The overall subjective image quality and diagnostic acceptability of the 50% ASIR-V scores at the reduced radiation dose were nearly identical to those recorded when using the initial routine-dose CT with 40% ASIR. Subjective ratings of the qualitative analysis revealed that of all reduced radiation dose CT series reconstructed, 30% ASIR-V and 50% ASIR-V were associated with higher image quality with lower noise and artefacts as well as good sharpness when compared with 40% ASIR and FBP. However, the sharpness score at 70% ASIR-V was considered to be worse than that at 40% ASIR. Objective image noise for 50% ASIR-V was 34.24% and 46.34% which was lower than 40% ASIR and FBP. Abdominal CT images reconstructed with ASIR-V facilitate radiation dose reductions of to 35% when compared with the ASIR. This study represents the first clinical research experiment to use ASIR-V, the newest version of

  14. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  15. Elimination of CT-detected gas bubbles derived from decompression illness with abdominal symptoms after a short hyperbaric oxygen treatment in a monoplace chamber: a case report.

    PubMed

    Oyaizu, Takuya; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Tsujimoto, Toshihide; Kojima, Yasushi; Okawa, Atsushi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a 54-year-old male compressed-air worker with gas bubbles detected by computed tomography (CT). He had complained of strong abdominal pain 30 minutes after decompression after working at a pressure equivalent to 17 meters of sea water for three hours. The initial CT images revealed gas bubbles in the intrahepatic portal vein, pulmonary artery and bilateral femoral vein. After the first hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBO₂ at 2.5 atmospheres absolute/ATA for 150 minutes), no bubbles were detected on repeat CT examination. The patient still exhibited abdominal distension, mild hypesthesia and slight muscle weakness in the upper extremities. Two sessions of U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 (TT6) were performed on Days 6 and 7 after onset. The patient recovered completely on Day 7. This report describes the important role of CT imaging in evaluating intravascular gas bubbles as well as eliminating the diagnosis of other conditions when divers or compressed-air workers experience uncommon symptoms of decompression illness. In addition, a short treatment table of HBO₂ using non-TT6 HBO₂ treatment may be useful to reduce gas bubbles and the severity of decompression illness in emergent cases. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  16. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  17. Artifacts in slab average-intensity-projection images reformatted from JPEG 2000 compressed thin-section abdominal CT data sets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohyoung; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Kil Joong; Mantiuk, Rafal; Kim, Hye-ri; Kim, Young Hoon

    2008-06-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the effects of compressing source thin-section abdominal CT images on final transverse average-intensity-projection (AIP) images. At reversible, 4:1, 6:1, 8:1, 10:1, and 15:1 Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) 2000 compressions, we compared the artifacts in 20 matching compressed thin sections (0.67 mm), compressed thick sections (5 mm), and AIP images (5 mm) reformatted from the compressed thin sections. The artifacts were quantitatively measured with peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and a perceptual quality metric (High Dynamic Range Visual Difference Predictor [HDR-VDP]). By comparing the compressed and original images, three radiologists independently graded the artifacts as 0 (none, indistinguishable), 1 (barely perceptible), 2 (subtle), or 3 (significant). Friedman tests and exact tests for paired proportions were used. At irreversible compressions, the artifacts tended to increase in the order of AIP, thick-section, and thin-section images in terms of PSNR (p < 0.0001), HDR-VDP (p < 0.0001), and the readers' grading (p < 0.01 at 6:1 or higher compressions). At 6:1 and 8:1, distinguishable pairs (grades 1-3) tended to increase in the order of AIP, thick-section, and thin-section images. Visually lossless threshold for the compression varied between images but decreased in the order of AIP, thick-section, and thin-section images (p < 0.0001). Compression artifacts in thin sections are significantly attenuated in AIP images. On the premise that thin sections are typically reviewed using an AIP technique, it is justifiable to compress them to a compression level currently accepted for thick sections.

  18. Correlation between abdominal perforator vessels identified with preoperative CT angiography and intraoperative fluorescent angiography in the microsurgical breast reconstruction patient.

    PubMed

    Pestana, Ivo A; Zenn, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    CT angiography (CTA) has become a reliable method of perforator vessel identification. Indocyanine green fluorescent angiography (ICGLA) produces a real-time image of large- and small-caliber blood vessels. The aim of this prospective study was to compare ICGLA with CTA to evaluate its reliability of vessel identification and correlation to perforator vessel size and number determined preoperatively by CTA. The effect of both imaging techniques on flap design or intraoperative plan was also evaluated. Over a 1-year period, patients presenting for free-tissue transfer breast reconstruction underwent preoperative CTA mapping of abdominal perforators followed by intraoperative ICGLA. Using visualization software, scaling factors were calculated so CTA and ICGLA data could be compared. Eighteen patients (24 breast reconstructions) were included. Larger CTA perforator size was associated with larger actual size (P = 0.04). The largest CTA perforator or largest actual perforator was used 78% of the time. Increasing body mass index was not associated with larger CTA perforator size (P = 0.67) or more intense ICGLA blushes (P = 0.13). No significant correlation was found between CTA perforator location and ICGLA skin blush location, size, or intensity. CTA or SPY guided intraoperative procedure adjustments in 72% of patients. ICGLA identified poor soft-tissue perfusion and guided flap resection in 46% of patients. ICGLA skin blush location, size, and intensity do not correlate with CTA-identified perforating vessel location or actual perforating vessel size. Despite this, the ICGLA information was useful for evaluation of soft-tissue perfusion and flap design.

  19. 18F-FDG PET/CT/MRI Fusion Images Showing Cranial and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Fernanda Borges; Itikawa, Emerson Nobuyuki; Alexandre, Leonardo Santos; Pitella, Felipe Arriva; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Wichert-Ana, Lauro

    2017-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old female patient with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL) who, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1 weighted and gadolinium-enhanced imaging, was found to have thickening and infiltration in 75% of peripheral nerves of the patient and enlargements of cranial nerves, possibly related to lymphomatous infiltration. Subsequent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) showed widespread active involvement of the cervical plexus, bilateral peripheral nerves, right femoral nerve, the parasellar region of the skull, and marked hypermetabolism in the left trigeminal ganglia. This case re-emphasizes that while CT and MRI provide anatomical details, 18F-FDG PET/CT images better delineate the metabolic activity of neurolymphomatosis (NL) in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:28242998

  20. Abdominal Mass Secondary to Human Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ghoroobi, Javad; Khoddami, Maliheh; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Naser; Mahdavi, Alireza; Hatefi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is an extensive helminthic infection that leads to visceral larva migrans in humans. A 2.5-year-old girl referred for abdominal mass. She had history of pharyngitis for two weeks. There were no other symptoms. Abdominal examination revealed an irregular solid mass in right lower quadrant (RLQ). Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an echohetrogenic large mass in RLQ, liver, and retroperitoneal area. Abdominal CT scan showed a huge mass. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal mass that involved right liver lobe, bladder, ileocecal valve, small and large intestines was found. At histopathology diagnosis of toxocariasis was made. PMID:28164001

  1. Abdominal Mass Secondary to Human Toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Ghoroobi, Javad; Mohajerzadeh, Leily; Khoddami, Maliheh; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Naser; Mahdavi, Alireza; Hatefi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is an extensive helminthic infection that leads to visceral larva migrans in humans. A 2.5-year-old girl referred for abdominal mass. She had history of pharyngitis for two weeks. There were no other symptoms. Abdominal examination revealed an irregular solid mass in right lower quadrant (RLQ). Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an echohetrogenic large mass in RLQ, liver, and retroperitoneal area. Abdominal CT scan showed a huge mass. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal mass that involved right liver lobe, bladder, ileocecal valve, small and large intestines was found. At histopathology diagnosis of toxocariasis was made.

  2. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed.

  3. Appropriate patient selection at abdominal dual-energy CT using 80 kV: relationship between patient size, image noise, and image quality.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luís S; Fletcher, Joel G; Harmsen, William S; Yu, Lifeng; Siddiki, Hassan; Melton, Zachary; Huprich, James E; Hough, David; Hartman, Robert; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2010-12-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) detector configuration, patient size, and image noise limitations that will result in acceptable image quality of 80-kV images obtained at abdominal dual-energy CT. The Institutional Review Board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study from archival material from patients consenting to the use of medical records for research purposes. A retrospective review of contrast material-enhanced abdominal dual-energy CT scans in 116 consecutive patients was performed. Three gastrointestinal radiologists noted detector configuration and graded image quality and artifacts at specified levels-midliver, midpancreas, midkidneys, and terminal ileum-by using two five-point scales. In addition, an organ-specific enhancement-to-noise ratio and background noise were measured in each patient. Patient size was measured by using the longest linear dimension at the level of interest, weight, lean body weight, body mass index, and body surface area. Detector configuration, patient sizes, and image noise levels that resulted in unacceptable image quality and artifact rankings (score of 4 or higher) were determined by using multivariate logistic regression. A 14 × 1.2-mm detector configuration resulted in fewer images with unacceptable quality than did the 64 × 0.6-mm configuration at all anatomic levels (P = .004, .01, and .02 for liver, pancreas, and kidneys, respectively). Image acceptability for the kidneys and ileum was significantly greater than that for the liver for all readers and detector configurations (P < .001). For the 14 × 1.2-mm detector configuration, patient longest linear dimensions yielding acceptable image quality across readers ranged from 34.9 to 35.8 cm at the four anatomic levels. An 80-kV abdominal CT can be performed with appropriate diagnostic quality in a substantial percentage of the population, but it is not recommended beyond the described patient size for each anatomic level. The 14 × 1.2-mm detector

  4. Spontaneous abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, K; Vanpaemel, G; Verheyen, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of spontaneous abscess of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci. A 52-year-old diabetic woman presented with abdominal tenderness and weight loss that had persisted for a few weeks. CT scan showed several abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity. The abscesses were drained laparoscopically and antibiotics were given postoperatively. Biopsies and cultures showed group G streptococci. The patient recovered without any complication and left our hospital on the 17th postoperative day.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... If you have a known allergy to contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the ... anything for a few hours beforehand, if contrast material will be used in your exam. You should ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  7. Idiopathic postpartum intussusception: a rare cause of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Koc, Mustafa; Balaban, Mehtap

    2010-01-01

    To present a case with acute abdominal pain due to idiopathic intestinal intussusception diagnosed by ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) during the early postpartum period. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain, nausea and emesis after a normal vaginal delivery. Laboratory tests done at admission were within normal limits except for leukocytosis. Physical examination revealed abdominal distention, guarding and rebound tenderness. Abdominal ultrasound and oral contrast-enhanced CT showed a complex mass in the hypogastrium, with a typical configuration of intussusception. Emergent laparotomy revealed ileoileal invagination approximately 70 cm to the ileocecal valve but no lead point. A partial ileal resection was performed. This case shows that when intussusception is suspected, an abdominal ultrasound should be performed even in patients with atypical symptoms. CT may be used to confirm the diagnosis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Efficacy of extended thrombo-prophylaxis in major abdominal surgery: what does the evidence show? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Federico Jorge; Elizondo, Maria Cristina; Doti, Carlos; Bruetman, Julio Enrique; Perez Moreno, Pablo Diego; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Ceresetto, Jose Manuel

    2008-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication following major abdominal surgery. The use of low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) to prevent thrombotic events in these patients is a common and well documented practice. However, there is some controversy surrounding the duration of the prophylaxis, as it has been suggested that the risk persists for several weeks after surgery. The objective of this meta-analysis is to systematically review the clinical studies that compared safety and efficacy of extended use of LMWH (for three to four weeks after surgery) versus conventional in-hospital prophylaxis. An electronic data base search was performed. Only randomized, controlled studies were eligible. Data on the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), VTE and bleeding were extracted. Only three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The indication for surgery was neoplastic disease in 70.6% (780/1104) of patients. The administration of extended LMWH prophylaxis significantly reduced the incidence of VTE, 5.93% (23/388) versus 13.6% (55/405), RR 0.44 (CI 95% 0.28 - 0.7); DVT 5.93% (23/388) versus 12.9% (52/402), RR 0.46 (CI 95% 0.29 - 0.74); proximal DVT 1% (4/388) versus 4.72% (19/402), RR 0.24 (CI 95% 0.09 - 0.67). We found no significant difference in major or minor bleeding between the two groups: 3.85% (21/545) in the extended thrombo-prophylaxis (ETP) group versus 3.48% (19/559) in the conventional prophylaxis group; RR 1.12 (CI 95% 0.61 - 2.06). There was no heterogeneity between the studies. We conclude that ETP with LMWH should be considered as a safe and useful strategy to prevent VTE in high-risk major abdominal surgery.

  9. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  10. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  11. Systematic radiation dose optimization of abdominal dual-energy CT on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner: assessment of the accuracy of iodine uptake measurement and image quality in an in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    PubMed

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Zaehringer, Caroline; D'Errico, Luigia; Schwartz, Fides; Kekelidze, Maka; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Benz, Matthias R

    2017-05-03

    To assess the accuracy of iodine quantification in a phantom study at different radiation dose levels with dual-energy dual-source CT and to evaluate image quality and radiation doses in patients undergoing a single-energy and two dual-energy abdominal CT protocols. In a phantom study, the accuracy of iodine quantification (4.5-23.5 mgI/mL) was evaluated using the manufacturer-recommended and three dose-optimized dual-energy protocols. In a patient study, 75 abdomino-pelvic CT examinations were acquired as follows: 25 CT scans with the manufacturer-recommended dual-energy protocol (protocol A); 25 CT scans with a dose-optimized dual-energy protocol (protocol B); and 25 CT scans with a single-energy CT protocol (protocol C). CTDIvol and objective noise were measured. Five readers scored each scan according to six subjective image quality parameters (noise, contrast, artifacts, visibility of small structures, sharpness, overall diagnostic confidence). In the phantom study, differences between the real and measured iodine concentrations ranged from -8.8% to 17.0% for the manufacturer-recommended protocol and from -1.6% to 20.5% for three dose-optimized protocols. In the patient study, the CTDIvol of protocol A, B, and C were 12.5 ± 1.9, 7.5 ± 1.2, and 6.5 ± 1.7 mGycm, respectively (p < 0.001), and the average image noise values were 6.6 ± 1.2, 7.8 ± 1.4, and 9.6 ± 2.2 HU, respectively (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the six subjective image quality parameters were observed between the dose-optimized dual-energy and the single-energy protocol. A dose reduction of 41% is feasible for the manufacturer-recommended, abdominal dual-energy CT protocol, as it maintained the accuracy of iodine measurements and subjective image quality compared to a single-energy protocol.

  12. Reporting standards for the imaging-based diagnosis of renal masses on CT and MRI: a national survey of academic abdominal radiologists and urologists.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew S; Hu, Eric M; Smith, Andrew D; Chandarana, Hersh; Hafez, Khaled; Palapattu, Ganesh S; Stuart Wolf, J; Silverman, Stuart G

    2017-04-01

    To define important elements of a structured radiology report of a CT or MRI performed to evaluate an indeterminate renal mass. IRB approval was waived for this multi-site prospective quality improvement study. A 35-question survey investigating elements of a CT or MRI report describing a renal mass was created through an iterative process by the Society of Abdominal Radiology Disease-Focused Panel on renal cell carcinoma. Surveys were distributed to consenting abdominal radiologists and urologists at nine academic institutions. Consensus within and between specialties was defined as ≥70% agreement. Respondent rates were compared with Chi Square test. The response rate was 68% (117/171; 55% [39/71] urologists, 78% [78/100] radiologists). Inter-specialty consensus was that the following were essential: mass size with comparison to prior imaging, mass type (cystic vs. solid), presence of fat, presence of enhancement, and radiologic stage. Urologists were more likely to prefer the Nephrometry score (75% [27/36] vs. 22% [17/76], p < 0.0001), quantitative reporting of enhancement on CT (85% [32/38] vs. 46% [36/77], p < 0.0001), and mass position with respect to the renal polar lines (67% [24/36] vs. 36% [27/76], p = 0.002). There was inter-specialty consensus that the Bosniak classification for cystic masses was preferred. Most urologists (60% [21/35]) preferred management recommendations be omitted for solid masses or Bosniak III-IV cystic masses. Important elements to include in a CT or MRI report of an indeterminate renal mass are critical diagnostic features, the Bosniak classification if relevant, and the most likely specific diagnosis when feasible; including management recommendations is controversial.

  13. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  14. A three-dimensional definition of nodal spaces on the basis of CT images showing enlarged nodes for pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Portaluri, Maurizio . E-mail: portaluri@hotmail.com; Bambace, Santa; Perez, Celeste; Angone, Grazia

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that margins of each pelvic chain may be derived by verifying the bony and soft tissue structures around abnormal nodes on computed tomography (CT) slices. Methods and Materials: Twenty consecutive patients (16 males, 4 females; mean age, 66 years; range, 43-80 years) with radiologic diagnosis of nodal involvement by histologically proved cervix carcinoma (two), rectum carcinoma (three), prostate carcinoma (four), lymphoma (five), penis carcinoma (one), corpus uteri carcinoma (one), bladder carcinoma (two), cutis tumor (one), and soft-tissue sarcoma (one) were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred CT scans showing 85 enlarged pelvic nodes were reviewed by two radiation oncologists (M.P., S.B.), and two radiologists (C.P., G.A.). Results: The more proximal structures to each enlarged node or group of nodes were thus recorded in a clockwise direction. Conclusion: According to their frequency and visibility, craniocaudal, anterior, lateral, posterior and medial margins of common iliac, external and internal iliac nodal chains, obturator and pudendal nodes, and deep and superficial inguinal nodes were derived from CT observations.

  15. Quality of routine diagnostic abdominal images generated from a novel detector-based spectral CT scanner: a technical report on a phantom and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Van Hedent, Steven; Rassouli, Negin; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Jordan, David; Dhanantwari, Amar; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2017-05-10

    To evaluate the image quality of routine diagnostic images generated from a novel detector-based spectral detector CT (SDCT) and compare it with CT images obtained from a conventional scanner with an energy-integrating detector (Brilliance iCT), Routine diagnostic (conventional/polyenergetic) images are non-material-specific images that resemble single-energy images obtained at the same radiation, METHODS: ACR guideline-based phantom evaluations were performed on both SDCT and iCT for CT adult body protocol. Retrospective analysis was performed on 50 abdominal CT scans from each scanner. Identical ROIs were placed at multiple locations in the abdomen and attenuation, noise, SNR, and CNR were measured. Subjective image quality analysis on a 5-point Likert scale was performed by 2 readers for enhancement, noise, and image quality. On phantom studies, SDCT images met the ACR requirements for CT number and deviation, CNR and effective radiation dose. In patients, the qualitative scores were significantly higher for the SDCT than the iCT, including enhancement (4.79 ± 0.38 vs. 4.60 ± 0.51, p = 0.005), noise (4.63 ± 0.42 vs. 4.29 ± 0.50, p = 0.000), and quality (4.85 ± 0.32, vs. 4.57 ± 0.50, p = 0.000). The SNR was higher in SDCT than iCT for liver (7.4 ± 4.2 vs. 7.2 ± 5.3, p = 0.662), spleen (8.6 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 3.5, p = 0.152), kidney (11.1 ± 6.3 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0, p = 0.033), pancreas (6.90 ± 3.45 vs 6.11 ± 2.64, p = 0.303), aorta (14.2 ± 6.2 vs. 11.0 ± 4.9, p = 0.007), but was slightly lower in lumbar-vertebra (7.7 ± 4.2 vs. 7.8 ± 4.5, p = 0.937). The CNR of the SDCT was also higher than iCT for all abdominal organs. Image quality of routine diagnostic images from the SDCT is comparable to images of a conventional CT scanner with energy-integrating detectors, making it suitable for diagnostic purposes.

  16. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  17. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  18. Epididymal Cystadenomas in von Hippel-Lindau Disease Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a familial cancer syndrome characterized by the development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors, including epididymal cystadenomas. We report a case of a VHL patient with bilateral epididymal cystadenomas who was evaluated with Ga DOTATATE PET/CT, showing intensely increased activity (SUVmax, 21.6) associated with the epididymal cystadenomas, indicating cell-surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors. The presented case supports the usefulness of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides for detection and follow-up of VHL manifestations, as well as surveillance of asymptomatic gene carriers.

  19. Effect of Low Tube Voltage on Image Quality, Radiation Dose, and Low-Contrast Detectability at Abdominal Multidetector CT: Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Wang, Ling; Li, Rui; Lin, Jie; Zheng, Xiangwu; Cao, Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of low tube voltage (80 kV) on image quality, radiation dose, and low-contrast detectability (LCD) at abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods. A phantom containing low-contrast objects was scanned with a CT scanner at 80 and 120 kV, with tube current-time product settings at 150–650 mAs. The differences between image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scores of LCD obtained with 80 kV at 150–650 mAs and those obtained with 120 kV at 300 mAs were compared respectively. Results. The image noise substantially increased with low tube voltage. However, with identical dose, use of 80 kV resulted in higher CNR compared with CNR at 120 kV. There were no statistically significant difference in CNR and scores of LCD between 120 kV at 300 mAs and 80 kV at 550–650 mAs (P > 0.05). The relative dose delivered at 80 kV ranged from 58% at 550 mAs to 68% at 650 mAs. Conclusion. With a reduction of the tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV at abdominal CT, the radiation dose can be reduced by 32% to 42% without degradation of CNR and LCD. PMID:22619490

  20. [Why should an abdominal CT scan be performed for suspected appendicitis in the adult patient? Lessons from ten clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Pautrat, K; Soyer, P; Pocard, M

    2009-10-01

    Ten years after its introduction, the contribution and indications for computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of appendicitis remain the subject of controversy among surgeons. Many argue that CT is frequently superfluous and costly, results in excessive radiation exposure, and delays surgical treatment. On our service, we perform 150 to 180 adult appendectomies annually. We feel that CT helps us to avoid unnecessary appendectomy, to clear up diagnostic uncertainty, and, most importantly, to guide the choice of surgical approach. We illustrate our experience through ten clinical cases in which the use of preoperative imaging has resulted in improved care.

  1. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Lamoureux, R; Smajdor, L; Cormack, B; Mohammed, T; Rill, L; Arreola, M; Sinclair, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5, 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality

  2. Thoraco-Abdominal Duplication Cyst- Role Tc-99m Pertechnetate SPECT-CT Scintigraphy in Localising Ectopic Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Datta, Deepanksha; Rangan, Kasturi; Suraj, Ajay Singh; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Thoraco-abdominal duplication cyst, a congenital malformation of the posterior primitive foregut rarely presents with anaemia. Ectopic gastric mucosa is seen in around 20%-30% of the enteric duplication cysts. We report the scintigraphic findings of one such case which helped in final diagnosis and management of the patient. PMID:28242991

  3. Fluorescence-based measurement of cystine uptake through xCT shows requirement for ROS detoxification in activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Siska, Peter J; Kim, Bumki; Ji, Xiangming; Hoeksema, Megan D; Massion, Pierre P; Beckermann, Kathryn E; Wu, Jianli; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Hong, Jiyong; Rathmell, Jeffrey C

    2016-11-01

    T and B lymphocytes undergo metabolic re-programming upon activation that is essential to allow bioenergetics, cell survival, and intermediates for cell proliferation and function. To support changes in the activity of signaling pathways and to provide sufficient and necessary intracellular metabolites, uptake of extracellular nutrients increases sharply with metabolic re-programming. One result of increased metabolic activity can be reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be toxic when accumulated in excess. Uptake of cystine allows accumulation of cysteine that is necessary for glutathione synthesis and ROS detoxification. Cystine uptake is required for T cell activation and function but measurements based on radioactive labeling do not allow analysis on single cell level. Here we show the critical role for cystine uptake in T cells using a method for measurement of cystine uptake using a novel CystineFITC probe. T cell receptor stimulation lead to upregulation of the cystine transporter xCT (SLC7a11) and increased cystine uptake in CD4+ and CD8+ human T cells. Similarly, lipopolysaccharide stimulation increased cystine uptake in human B cells. The CystineFITC probe was not toxic and could be metabolized to prevent cystine starvation induced cell death. Furthermore, blockade of xCT or competition with natural cystine decreased uptake of CystineFITC. CystineFITC is thus a versatile tool that allows measurement of cystine uptake on single cell level and shows the critical role for cystine uptake for T cell ROS regulation and activation.

  4. Evaluation of the clinical benefit of an electromagnetic navigation system for CT-guided interventional radiology procedures in the thoraco-abdominal region compared with conventional CT guidance (CTNAV II): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rouchy, R C; Moreau-Gaudry, A; Chipon, E; Aubry, S; Pazart, L; Lapuyade, B; Durand, M; Hajjam, M; Pottier, S; Renard, B; Logier, R; Orry, X; Cherifi, A; Quehen, E; Kervio, G; Favelle, O; Patat, F; De Kerviler, E; Hughes, C; Medici, M; Ghelfi, J; Mounier, A; Bricault, I

    2017-07-06

    Interventional radiology includes a range of minimally invasive image-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that have become routine clinical practice. Each procedure involves a percutaneous needle insertion, often guided using computed tomography (CT) because of its availability and usability. However, procedures remain complicated, in particular when an obstacle must be avoided, meaning that an oblique trajectory is required. Navigation systems track the operator's instruments, meaning the position and progression of the instruments are visualised in real time on the patient's images. A novel electromagnetic navigation system for CT-guided interventional procedures (IMACTIS-CT®) has been developed, and a previous clinical trial demonstrated improved needle placement accuracy in navigation-assisted procedures. In the present trial, we are evaluating the clinical benefit of the navigation system during the needle insertion step of CT-guided procedures in the thoraco-abdominal region. This study is designed as an open, multicentre, prospective, randomised, controlled interventional clinical trial and is structured as a standard two-arm, parallel-design, individually randomised trial. A maximum of 500 patients will be enrolled. In the experimental arm (navigation system), the procedures are carried out using navigation assistance, and in the active comparator arm (CT), the procedures are carried out with conventional CT guidance. The randomisation is stratified by centre and by the expected difficulty of the procedure. The primary outcome of the trial is a combined criterion to assess the safety (number of serious adverse events), efficacy (number of targets reached) and performance (number of control scans acquired) of navigation-assisted, CT-guided procedures as evaluated by a blinded radiologist and confirmed by an expert committee in case of discordance. The secondary outcomes are (1) the duration of the procedure, (2) the satisfaction of the operator and

  5. Case report highlighting how wound path identification on CT can help identify organ damage in abdominal blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tatjana V; Folio, Les R; Backus, Christopher E; Bunger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Penetrating trauma is frequently encountered in forward deployed military combat hospitals. Abdominal blast injuries represent nearly 11% of combat injuries, and multiplanar computed tomography imaging is optimal for injury assessment and surgical planning. We describe a multiplanar approach to assessment of blast and ballistic injuries, which allows for more expeditious detection of missile tracts and damage caused along the path. Precise delineation of the trajectory path and localization of retained fragments enables time-saving and detailed evaluation of associated tissue and vascular injury. For consistent and reproducible documentation of fragment locations in the body, we propose a localization scheme based on Cartesian coordinates to report 3-dimensional locations of fragments and demonstrating the application in three cases of abdominal blast injury.

  6. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  7. Assessment of 70-keV virtual monoenergetic spectral images in abdominal CT imaging: A comparison study to conventional polychromatic 120-kVp images.

    PubMed

    Rassouli, Negin; Chalian, Hamid; Rajiah, Prabhakar; Dhanantwari, Amar; Landeras, Luis

    2017-04-18

    To evaluate the image quality of 70-keV virtual monoenergetic (monoE) abdominal CT images compared to 120-kVp polychromatic images generated from a spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner. This prospective study included generation of a 120-kVp polychromatic dataset and a 70-keV virtual monoE dataset after a single contrast-enhanced CT acquisition on a SDCT scanner (Philips Healthcare) during portal venous phase. The attenuation values (HU), noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured in the liver, spleen, pancreas, kidney, aorta, portal vein, and muscle. The subjective image quality including noise, soft tissue contrast, sharpness, and overall image quality were graded on a 5-point Likert scale by two radiologists independently (1-worst image quality, 5-best image quality). Statistical analysis was performed using paired sample t test and Fleiss's Kappa. Fifty-five patients (54.3 ± 16.8 y/o; 28 M, 27 F) were recruited. The noise of target organs was significantly lower in virtual monoE images in comparison to polychromatic images (p < 0.001). The SNR and CNR were significantly higher in virtual monoE images (p < 0.001 for both). Subjective image quality of 70-keV virtual monoE images was significantly better (p < 0.001) for all evaluated parameters. Median scores for all subjective parameters were 3.0 versus 4.0 for polychromatic vs virtual monoE images, respectively. The inter-reader agreement for overall image quality was good (Kappa were 0.767 and 0.762 for polychromatic and virtual monoE images, respectively). In abdominal imaging, 70-keV virtual monoE CT images demonstrated significantly better noise, SNR, CNR, and subjective score compared to conventional 120-kVp polychromatic images.

  8. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  9. Whole-body CT screening: scan delay and contrast injection duration for optimal enhancement of abdominal organs and deep vessels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Haruo; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kondo, Hiroshi; Tomimatsu, Hideto; Sakurai, Kota; Goshima, Satoshi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Noda, Yoshifumi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    To assess the optimal scan delays and contrast injection durations for contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography (CT). One hundred forty-two patients were randomized into three groups: protocol A-scan delay of 65 s after starting contrast injection over 30 s; protocol B-105 and 70 s; and protocol C-145 and 110 s, respectively. Contrast enhancement and diagnostic acceptability were assessed. Qualitative assessment was subtle among the three protocols. Homogenous enhancement of deep veins was more assuredly achieved with protocol C. With protocol C, qualitatively acceptable enhancement can be obtained in whole-body CT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Indirect CT venography of the abdominal cavity and lower limbs in patients with the suspicion of pulmonary embolism--indications, technique, diagnostic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Czekajska-Chehab, Elzbieta; Drop, Andrzej; Terlecka, Barbara; Trzeciak, Jadwiga; Trojanowska, Agnieszka; Odój, Magdalena

    2004-01-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography has become the main method to diagnose and evaluate the intensity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). The most common cause of PE is thrombosis of veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The paper presents various aspects of the use of combined pulmonary artery arteriography and indirect venography performed using multi-slice tomography in relation to other methods imaging the venous system used so far. The authors presented the techniques of CT examination of venous vessels of the lower limbs, abdominal cavity and pelvis in patients with the suspicion of PE, typical images of lesions, results of studies concerning these issues conducted to date and their own experience based on clinical practice.

  11. COMPARISON OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASIR™) AND MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (VEO™) FOR PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: AN OBSERVER PERFORMANCE STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY.

    PubMed

    Hultenmo, Maria; Caisander, Håkan; Mack, Karsten; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The diagnostic image quality of 75 paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations reconstructed with two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms-adaptive statistical IR (ASiR™) and model-based IR (Veo™)-was compared. Axial and coronal images were reconstructed with 70 % ASiR with the Soft™ convolution kernel and with the Veo algorithm. The thickness of the reconstructed images was 2.5 or 5 mm depending on the scanning protocol used. Four radiologists graded the delineation of six abdominal structures and the diagnostic usefulness of the image quality. The Veo reconstruction significantly improved the visibility of most of the structures compared with ASiR in all subgroups of images. For coronal images, the Veo reconstruction resulted in significantly improved ratings of the diagnostic use of the image quality compared with the ASiR reconstruction. This was not seen for the axial images. The greatest improvement using Veo reconstruction was observed for the 2.5 mm coronal slices. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Syndrome The Digestive System & How it Works Abdominal Adhesions What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that ... or stool through the intestines. What causes abdominal adhesions? Abdominal surgery is the most frequent cause of ...

  13. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Abdominal and Pelvic CT Image Quality Using Iopromide With Different Concentrations of Iodine (300 and 370 mg I/mL).

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixia; Li, Zhenlin; Shuai, Tao; Qian, Lingling; Deng, Liping; Liao, Kai; Zhang, Kai; Jia, Bangsheng; Song, Bin

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the quality of MDCT images obtained using iopromide with two different concentrations of iodine (300 and 370 mg I/mL) in daily clinical settings. Patients from 38 hospitals in China undergoing abdominal or pelvic CT with iopromide were prospectively recruited. MDCT was performed using iopromide with an iodine concentration of 300 or 370 mg I/mL. CT quality image was graded as excellent, good, adequate, and poor. Objective indicators were the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Outcomes were compared according to organ studied, tumor type (benign vs malignant), saline usage, and type of MDCT (16-MDCT vs 64-MDCT). A total of 4506 patients (63.7% men) with a mean (± SD) age of 56.3 ± 14.1 years and mean body mass index (weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) of 23.2 ± 3.3 were included. Iopromide with 300 mg I/mL was used for 3042 patients (67.5%), and 370 mg I/mL was used for 1464 patients (32.2%). A total of 1847 scans (41.0%) had excellent image quality, 2454 (54.5%) had good quality, 176 (3.9%) had adequate quality, and 29 (0.6%) had poor quality. No differences were noted between CT scans that did or did not use saline, 16-MDCT versus 64-MDCT scans, and 300 versus 370 mg I/mL iopromide. Variations in the CNR and SNR were noted between the two iodine concentrations with respect to other parameters examined. Iopromide with both concentrations of iodine provided acceptable image quality, though according to CNR and SNR, one or the other may provide better quality in different situations.

  14. [Gene-environment interaction for the HIF1-A 1772C>T polymorphisms and cigarette smoking increase susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Staniszewski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes in the vascular vessels, such as the presence of atherosclerotic plaques or aneurysmal dilatations, are associated with the local conditions of ischemial/hypoxia. Polymorphisms in the HIF1A gene, encoding an oxygen-regulated HIF-1 subunit (HIF-1a), determine inter-individual variability in vascular response to hypoxia. Stimulation of selected pathways, related to this response (i.e. angiogenesis) is impaired by cigarette smoke exposure. In this work, we examined the associations between 1772C>T polymorphism (rs11549465) located in the coding region of HIF1A gene (Pro582-Ser), smoking and the occurrence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Moreover, the relations of these factors with the presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with AAA were studied. The case-control study was designed, in which a group of 1060 Caucasian subjects: 535 AAA patients and 525 controls, was analyzed. Data regarding smoking status were collected using questionnaire. Past and current smokers were analyzed together. In the group of 220 AAA subjects the coexistence of PAD was characterized. HIF-1A genotypes were assessed by PCR-RFLP method. Genetic-environmental interactions were examined by a two-by-four tables. In these analyzes, logistic regression models were used to adjusting for the relevant covariates. The frequency of HIF1A 1772T allele in AAA group (0,067) was similar to that observed in the control group (0,070). In the analyses of genetic-environmental interactions was observed that the co-occurrence of HIF1A 1772CT and TT genotypes and exposure to tobacco smoke has a strong multiplicative effect on the susceptibility to the AAA development. The age and gender adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were: 7,6 for smoking alone (p<0,0001); 0,65 for 1772CT and TT genotypes alone (p=0,3) and 14,4for smoking plus 1772CT and TT genotypes (p<0,0001). The proportion of smokers carrying 1772T allele was higher among patients with advanced form of PAD (femoro

  15. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  16. Detection and visualization of endoleaks in CT data for monitoring of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Egger, J.; Wimmer, A.; Großkopf, S.; Freisleben, B.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an efficient algorithm for the segmentation of the inner and outer boundary of thoratic and abdominal aortic aneurysms (TAA & AAA) in computed tomography angiography (CTA) acquisitions. The aneurysm segmentation includes two steps: first, the inner boundary is segmented based on a grey level model with two thresholds; then, an adapted active contour model approach is applied to the more complicated outer boundary segmentation, with its initialization based on the available inner boundary segmentation. An opacity image, which aims at enhancing important features while reducing spurious structures, is calculated from the CTA images and employed to guide the deformation of the model. In addition, the active contour model is extended by a constraint force that prevents intersections of the inner and outer boundary and keeps the outer boundary at a distance, given by the thrombus thickness, to the inner boundary. Based upon the segmentation results, we can measure the aneurysm size at each centerline point on the centerline orthogonal multiplanar reformatting (MPR) plane. Furthermore, a 3D TAA or AAA model is reconstructed from the set of segmented contours, and the presence of endoleaks is detected and highlighted. The implemented method has been evaluated on nine clinical CTA data sets with variations in anatomy and location of the pathology and has shown promising results.

  17. Benign hormone-secreting adenoma within a larger adrenocortical mass showing intensely increased activity on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-10-01

    Adrenal adenomas usually show (18)F-FDG activity less than that of the liver parenchyma. However, lipid-poor and hormone-secreting adenomas have been reported to show mild (18)F-FDG avidity. We report on a 51-year-old female with clinical symptoms of hypercortisolemia and a large right adrenal mass detected on CT. Post-contrast CT images showed an enhancing focus in the lower pole of the mass, with corresponding markedly increased activity on (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Right adrenalectomy was performed and histology revealed a benign adenoma, indicating that functioning benign adenomas can show intensely increased metabolic activity on (18)F-FDG mimicking malignancy.

  18. An hybrid CPU-GPU framework for quantitative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysm volume by CT angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An; Therasse, Eric; Soulez, Gilles

    2010-03-01

    We developed a hybrid CPU-GPU framework enabling semi-automated segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) on Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) examinations. AAA maximal diameter (D-max) and volume measurements and their progression between 2 examinations can be generated by this software improving patient followup. In order to improve the workflow efficiency some segmentation tasks were implemented and executed on the graphics processing unit (GPU). A GPU based algorithm is used to automatically segment the lumen of the aneurysm within short computing time. In a second step, the user interacted with the software to validate the boundaries of the intra-luminal thrombus (ILT) on GPU-based curved image reformation. Automatic computation of D-max and volume were performed on the 3D AAA model. Clinical validation was conducted on 34 patients having 2 consecutive MDCT examinations within a minimum interval of 6 months. The AAA segmentation was performed twice by a experienced radiologist (reference standard) and once by 3 unsupervised technologists on all 68 MDCT. The ICC for intra-observer reproducibility was 0.992 (>=0.987) for D-max and 0.998 (>=0.994) for volume measurement. The ICC for inter-observer reproducibility was 0.985 (0.977-0.90) for D-max and 0.998 (0.996- 0.999) for volume measurement. Semi-automated AAA segmentation for volume follow-up was more than twice as sensitive than D-max follow-up, while providing an equivalent reproducibility.

  19. Shape-intensity prior level set combining probabilistic atlas and probability map constrains for automatic liver segmentation from abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinke; Cheng, Yuanzhi; Guo, Changyong; Wang, Yadong; Tamura, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Propose a fully automatic 3D segmentation framework to segment liver on challenging cases that contain the low contrast of adjacent organs and the presence of pathologies from abdominal CT images. First, all of the atlases are weighted in the selected training datasets by calculating the similarities between the atlases and the test image to dynamically generate a subject-specific probabilistic atlas for the test image. The most likely liver region of the test image is further determined based on the generated atlas. A rough segmentation is obtained by a maximum a posteriori classification of probability map, and the final liver segmentation is produced by a shape-intensity prior level set in the most likely liver region. Our method is evaluated and demonstrated on 25 test CT datasets from our partner site, and its results are compared with two state-of-the-art liver segmentation methods. Moreover, our performance results on 10 MICCAI test datasets are submitted to the organizers for comparison with the other automatic algorithms. Using the 25 test CT datasets, average symmetric surface distance is [Formula: see text] mm (range 0.62-2.12 mm), root mean square symmetric surface distance error is [Formula: see text] mm (range 0.97-3.01 mm), and maximum symmetric surface distance error is [Formula: see text] mm (range 12.73-26.67 mm) by our method. Our method on 10 MICCAI test data sets ranks 10th in all the 47 automatic algorithms on the site as of July 2015. Quantitative results, as well as qualitative comparisons of segmentations, indicate that our method is a promising tool to improve the efficiency of both techniques. The applicability of the proposed method to some challenging clinical problems and the segmentation of the liver are demonstrated with good results on both quantitative and qualitative experimentations. This study suggests that the proposed framework can be good enough to replace the time-consuming and tedious slice-by-slice manual

  20. [Mesenteric cyst is a rare origin for abdominal pain in children].

    PubMed

    Dawar, Mirwais; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk

    2015-02-16

    A ten-year-old boy with known episodes of moderate abdominal pain during 18 months suddenly developed severe abdominal pain, and a CT scan showed a 25 × 15 cm cystic process. The patient was operated and a mesenteric cyst was removed along with 15 cm of small bowel. Post-operative course was uneventful. Mesenteric cysts are rare, but should be considered as an origin for abdominal pain in children, particularly after exclusion of more common diagnoses.

  1. Intra-Abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Abdominal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oguejiofor, Njideka; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Njoku, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infectious disease, caused by gram positive anaerobic bacteria, that may appear as an abdominal mass and/or abscess (Wagenlehner et al. 2003). This paper presents an unusual case of a hemodynamically stable 80-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with 4 weeks of worsening abdominal pain and swelling. He also complains of a 20-bound weight loss in 2 months. A large tender palpable mass in the right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Laboratory studies showed a normal white blood cell count, slightly decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, and mildly elevated total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. A CT with contrast was done and showed a liver mass. Radiology and general surgery suspected malignancy and recommended CT guided biopsy. The sample revealed abundant neutrophils and gram positive rods. Cytology was negative for malignancy and cultures eventually grew actinomyces. High dose IV penicillin therapy was given for 4 weeks and with appropriate response transitioned to oral antibiotic for 9 months with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:28299215

  2. Studies on the application of a low-voltage peak to the postsurgical follow-up CT scan in abdominal cancer patients in order to reduce the exposure of patients to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H. J.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the radiation dose, computed tomography (CT) number, contrast and image quality of patients requiring periodic follow-up abdominal CT examinations at various tube voltages. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients who underwent a clinical analysis and the other group was a phantom one. Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Twenty patients who underwent a periodic follow-up examination by CT were selected randomly. The tube current was fixed to 150 mA, and the tube voltage was adjusted according to the appropriate value of each examination. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values were measured. The CT number of each organ was measured by setting up a 1 cm diameter return on investment (ROI) in the abdominal organs at the same height of the first lumbar vertebra using images of the arterial phase. Two radiologists in consensus graded the quality of the abdominal images into three groups. An abdomen-shaped acrylic phantom was used in the phantom study. An ion chamber was inserted into the holes located at the center and periphery of the phantom, where the radiation dose was automatically displayed on the reader. Tube voltages of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were applied to the phantom (diluted contrast medium with water at 1:10 ratio) and the phantom was scanned. The CT number was measured from a 1 cm diameter ROI at the center of the image. The CTDI value decreased by 36% at 100 kVp (7.50 mGy) compared with that at 120 kVp (11.70 mGy). According to the radiologists' evaluation, there were 17 equivalent, 3 acceptable and 0 unacceptable levels in the group of 20 subjects. The radiation dose in the phantom study decreased with increasing tube voltages from 80 to 140 kVp. The peripheral and central doses decreased by 38% and 41%, respectively. The CT numbers at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were 1365.9±4.4, 1046.1±3.7, 862.8±3.2 and 737.5±3.0 HU, respectively. In conclusion, in a follow

  3. Small bowel volvulus diagnosed by the CT "whirl sign".

    PubMed

    de Korte, Niels; Grutters, Cornelis T; Snellen, Jacob P

    2008-08-01

    A 24-year-old man presented to the emergency department with acute onset, colicky, abdominal pain. A CT scan showed the "whirl sign" diagnostic of small bowel volvulus. Diagnosis of a small bowel volvulus can be challenging, and CT scan is the imaging modality of choice.

  4. FDG PET/CT findings of common bile duct tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jing; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) tuberculosis is rare. A 39-year-old woman was referred because of a 5-month history of abdominal pain. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed dilatation of the distal CBD with irregularly thickened wall. Enhanced CT revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake of the CBD lesion and several retroperitoneal lymph nodes with slight FDG uptake. CBD cholangiocarcinoma with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was suspected. CBD tuberculosis was confirmed by endoluminal biopsy. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal biliary FDG accumulation, particularly in tuberculosis endemic areas.

  5. Prospective Comparison of Reduced-Iodine-Dose Virtual Monochromatic Imaging Dataset From Dual-Energy CT Angiography With Standard-Iodine-Dose Single-Energy CT Angiography for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mukta D; Oliveira, George R; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Pinho, Daniella F; Arellano, Ronald S; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of reduced-iodine-dose single-source dual-energy CT angiography (CTA) with that of standard-iodine-dose single-energy CTA in examinations of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and to assess the effect of the concentration of iodinated contrast medium on intravascular enhancement and image quality of reduced-iodine-dose CTA. In a prospective randomized clinical trial, 66 consecutively registered patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm who had previously undergone single-energy CTA (30-37 g I) underwent follow-up CTA at a reduced dose (21-27 g I) of iodinated contrast medium of either 270 mg I/mL (n = 33) or 320 mg I/mL (n = 33). Two readers independently evaluated virtual monochromatic imaging datasets (40-140 keV) and single-energy CTA images for image quality and noise and their preference for optimal energy virtual monochromatic imaging dataset. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. All 66 dual-energy CTA examinations were rated diagnostic with mean image quality and image noise scores of 4.8 and 4.5 for reader 1 and 3.8 and 3.4 for reader 2 compared with single-energy CTA results of 4.5 and 4.2 for reader 1 and 4.5 and 4.1 for reader 2. Low-energy virtual monochromatic images (40-60 keV) from reduced-iodine-dose (28%) dual-energy CTA had significantly higher intravascular aortic attenuation (26-185%) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) (20-25%) than standard-iodine-dose single-energy CTA images (p < 0.0001). No significant difference was found between patients who received 270 and those who received 320 mg I/mL with respect to intravascular aortic attenuation (p = 0.6331) or CNR (p = 0.9775). Low-energy virtual monochromatic imaging datasets from reduced-iodine (24 g I) single-source dual-energy CTA of the abdomen provide up to 185% higher attenuation and 25% higher CNR than standard-iodine-dose (33.3 g I) single-energy CTA while offering a wide range of energy settings

  6. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormal result may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscess Cancer or tumors that involves the adrenal ... Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 5. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute arterial ...

  7. [Value of serial CT scanning and intracranial pressure monitoring for detecting new intracranial mass effect in severe head injury patients showing lesions type I-II in the initial CT scan].

    PubMed

    Lobato, R D; Alen, J F; Perez-Nuñez, A; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Pascual, B; Lagares, A; Miranda, P; Arrese, I; Kaen, A

    2005-06-01

    To determine the incidence of pathological and intracranial pressure (ICP) changes during the acute posttraumatic period in severe head injury patients presenting with lesions Types I-II (TCDB classification) in the admission CT scan with the aim of defining the most appropriate strategy of sequential CT scanning and ICP monitoring for detecting new intra-cranial mass effect and improving the final outcome. 56 patients (ages 15-80 years) consecutively admitted during a 2 years period were included. All had the initial CT scan < 24 hours after injury (mean interval = 150 min), several CT controls within the first days of the course and ICP monitoring after admission. Different epidemiological, clinical and radiological variables were recorded and deterioration defined as the development of sustained ICP over 20 mmHg requiring aggressive medical and/or surgical treatment was considered the dependent variable. Uni and multivariate analyses were made for determining the correlation between different parameters and the occurrence of deterioration and the final outcome as assessed with the GOS. The mean GCS score was 5 and 37% of the patients showed pupillary changes; 52.3% had peritraumatic hypotension-hypoxemia, 16.1% anemia and 12.3% coagulation changes. 50% of the patients showed petechial hemorrhages in the white matter or the brainstem, 66% SAH, 40% HIV, 39.3% brain contusion and 21.4% small extraaxial hematomas. 57.1% of the patients showed CT changes through the acute post-traumatic period consisting of new contusion (26.8% of the cases), growing of previous contusion (68.2%) or previous extraaxial hematoma (10.7%), and generalized brain swelling (10.7%). 64.9% of the patients made a favourable and 35.7% an unfavourable outcome. Overall, 27 (48.9%) patients developed deterioration, 21 (37.5%) with concurrent CT changes and 6 (10.7%) without new pathology as seen by the CT control. The remaining 29 (51.7%) patients in this series did not develop deterioration in

  8. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  9. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  10. [Atypical appearance of pneumatosis intestinalis at multidetector CT].

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Valentina; Stabile Ianora, Antonio Amato; Rubini, Giuseppe; Losco, Matteo; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Fonio, Paolo; Moschetta, Marco

    2012-11-01

    Pneumatosis intestinalis may be caused by bowel ischemia and may display different patterns of appearance. We report a case of pneumatosis intestinalis with an atypical target pattern, detected by multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a 66-year-old male presenting with acute abdominal syndrome. Abdominal CT scan showed a double gas collection within the wall of a jejunal segment, with a characteristic target air distribution. The patient was surgically treated and successfully discharged from our hospital with the diagnosis of acute bowel ischemia. The target air sign can be an initial CT finding of the typical pneumatosis intestinalis and it can be useful in the early diagnosis of bowel ischemia.

  11. Giant Cell Tumor with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Shows Heterogeneous Metabolic Pattern on (18)F-FDG PET/CT: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Seong Young; Cho, Sang-Geon; Kim, Jahae; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Sung Sun; Yoon, Yeon Hong; Park, Jin Gyoon

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a generally benign bone tumor accounting for approximately 5 % of all primary bone neoplasms. Cystic components in GCTs that indicate secondary aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are reported in 14 % of GCTs. Although both of them have been described separately in previous reports that may show considerable fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake despite their benign nature, the findings of GCT with secondary ABC on (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have not been well-known. We report a case of GCT with secondary ABC in a 26-year-old woman. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed a heterogeneous hypermetabolic lesion in the left proximal femur with the maximum standardized uptake value of 4.7. The solid components of the tumor showed higher FDG uptake than the cystic components. These observations suggest that the ABC components in GCTs show heterogeneous metabolic patterns on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

  12. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  13. CT enterography.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Giulia A; Raptopoulos, Vassilios

    2010-04-01

    Conventional radiologic and endoscopic evaluations of the small bowel are often limited by the length, caliber, and motility of the small bowel loops. The development of new multidetector-row CT scanners, with faster scan times and isotropic spatial resolution, allows high-resolution multiphasic and multiplanar assessment of the bowel, bowel wall, and lumen. CT Enterography (CTE) is a variant of routine abdominal scanning, geared toward more sustained bowel filling with oral contrast material, and the use of multiplanar images, that can enhance gastrointestinal (GI) tract imaging. This article examines the techniques and clinical applications of CTE in comparison with CT enteroclysis, focusing on Crohn disease, obscure GI bleeding, GI tumors, acute abdominal pain, and bowel obstruction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance of adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D integrated with automatic tube current modulation in radiation dose and image noise reduction compared with filtered-back projection for 80-kVp abdominal CT: Anthropomorphic phantom and patient study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ming; Lin, Yang-Yu; Hsu, Ming-Yi; Hung, Chien-Fu; Liao, Ying-Lan; Tsai, Hui-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Evaluate the performance of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D (AIDR 3D) and compare with filtered-back projection (FBP) regarding radiation dosage and image quality for an 80-kVp abdominal CT. An abdominal phantom underwent four CT acquisitions and reconstruction algorithms (FBP; AIDR 3D mild, standard and strong). Sixty-three patients underwent unenhanced liver CT with FBP and standard level AIDR 3D. Further post-acquisition reconstruction with strong level AIDR 3D was made. Patients were divided into two groups (< and ≧29cm) based on the abdominal effective diameter (Deff) at T12 level. Quantitative (attenuation, noise, and signal-to-noise ratio) and qualitative (image quality, noise, sharpness, and artifact) analysis by two readers were assessed and the interobserver agreement was calculated. Strong level AIDR 3D reduced radiation dose by 72% in the phantom and 47.1% in the patient study compared with FBP. There was no difference in mean attenuations. Image noise was the lowest and signal-to-noise ratio the highest using strong level AIDR 3D in both patient groups. For Deff<29cm, image sharpness of FBP was significantly different from those of AIDR 3D (P<0.05). For Deff ≧29cm, image quality of AIDR 3D was significantly more favorable than FBP (P<0.05). Interobserver agreement was substantial. Integrated AIDR 3D allows for an automatic reduction in radiation dose and maintenance of image quality compared with FBP. Using AIDR 3D reconstruction, patients with larger abdomen circumference could be imaged at 80kVp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CT angiography in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease: a transformation in cardiovascular CT practice

    PubMed Central

    Al Moudi, Mansour; Cao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) angiography represents the most important technical development in CT imaging and it has challenged invasive angiography in the diagnostic evaluation of cardiovascular abnormalities. Over the last decades, technological evolution in CT imaging has enabled CT angiography to become a first-line imaging modality in the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This review provides an overview of the diagnostic applications of CT angiography (CTA) in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on selected clinical challenges in some common cardiovascular abnormalities, which include abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism (PE) and coronary artery disease. An evidence-based review is conducted to demonstrate how CT angiography has changed our approach in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. Radiation dose reduction strategies are also discussed to show how CT angiography can be performed in a low-dose protocol in the current clinical practice. PMID:25392823

  16. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma.

  17. FDG PET/CT detection of intussusception caused by lymphoma in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Jin; Beylergil, Volkan; Price, Anita P; Abramson, Sara J; Carrasquillo, Jorge A

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 9-year-old boy presented to an outside hospital with a history of abdominal pain and vomiting. An abdominal x-ray was unremarkable. A CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed to evaluate possible obstruction after weight loss and vomiting over a 3-week period demonstrated a large retroperitoneal mass. Laparoscopic biopsy showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. FDG PET/CT was performed for staging. An ileocolic intussusception was identified on the PET/CT. The intussusception was successfully managed with medical treatment. We present FDG PET/CT findings in intussusception with non-Hodgkin lymphoma as the lead point in a pediatric patient.

  18. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078–1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323–5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003–1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489–0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC. PMID:26904670

  20. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078-1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323-5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003-1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489-0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC.

  1. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  2. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  4. [The computed tomographic diagnosis of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Grützner, G; Jungblut, R M; Kniemeyer, H W; Mödder, U

    1994-07-01

    Amongst 1599 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, there were 89 patients (5.6%) who showed typical features of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA). 37 of the 89 patients had been examined preoperatively by CT. In 73% of the cases (27/37) a correct diagnosis had been made. Localisation, width and extent of the IAAA was correctly diagnosed in all patients. Involvement of the renal arteries by the inflammatory process, the extent of thrombus and of mural calcification were accurately shown. The inflammatory tissues were typically ventral and lateral to the aorta. Frequently, there were adhesions to neighbouring structures. Aortic rupture, aortic dissection and retroperitoneal lymphoma may produce similar CT appearances; nevertheless, CT remains at present the method of choice for the diagnosis of IAAA because of its high sensitivity.

  5. Impact of model-based iterative reconstruction on low-contrast lesion detection and image quality in abdominal CT: a 12-reader-based comparative phantom study with filtered back projection at different tube voltages.

    PubMed

    Euler, André; Stieltjes, Bram; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Eichenberger, Reto; Reisinger, Clemens; Hirschmann, Anna; Zaehringer, Caroline; Kircher, Achim; Streif, Matthias; Bucher, Sabine; Buergler, David; D'Errico, Luigia; Kopp, Sebastién; Wilhelm, Markus; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2017-04-03

    To evaluate the impact of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) on image quality and low-contrast lesion detection compared with filtered back projection (FBP) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) of simulated medium and large patients at different tube voltages. A phantom with 45 hypoattenuating lesions was placed in two water containers and scanned at 70, 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The 120-kVp protocol served as reference, and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) was kept constant for all protocols. The datasets were reconstructed with MBIR and FBP. Image noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were assessed. Low-contrast lesion detectability was evaluated by 12 radiologists. MBIR decreased the image noise by 24% and 27%, and increased the CNR by 30% and 29% for the medium and large phantoms, respectively. Lower tube voltages increased the CNR by 58%, 46%, and 16% at 70, 80, and 100 kVp, respectively, compared with 120 kVp in the medium phantom and by 9%, 18% and 12% in the large phantom. No significant difference in lesion detection rate was observed (medium: 79-82%; large: 57-65%; P > 0.37). Although MBIR improved quantitative image quality compared with FBP, it did not result in increased low-contrast lesion detection in abdominal CT at different tube voltages in simulated medium and large patients. • MBIR improved quantitative image quality but not lesion detection compared with FBP. • Increased CNR by low tube voltages did not improve lesion detection. • Changes in image noise and CNR do not directly influence diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Abdominal fat distribution on computed tomography predicts ureteric calculus fragmentation by shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Juan, Hsu-Cheng; Lin, Hung-Yu; Chou, Yii-Her; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Shih, Paul Ming-Chen; Chuang, Shu-Mien; Shen, Jung-Tsung; Juan, Yung-Shun

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effects of abdominal fat on shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). We used pre-SWL unenhanced computed tomography (CT) to evaluate the impact of abdominal fat distribution and calculus characteristics on the outcome of SWL. One hundred and eighty-five patients with a solitary ureteric calculus treated with SWL were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient underwent unenhanced CT within 1 month before SWL treatment. Treatment outcomes were evaluated 1 month later. Unenhanced CT parameters, including calculus surface area, Hounsfield unit (HU) density, abdominal fat area and skin to calculus distance (SSD) were analysed. One hundred and twenty-eight of the 185 patients were found to be calculus-free following treatment. HU density, total fat area, visceral fat area and SSD were identified as significant variables on multivariate logistic regression analysis. The receiver-operating characteristic analyses showed that total fat area, para/perirenal fat area and visceral fat area were sensitive predictors of SWL outcomes. This study revealed that higher quantities of abdominal fat, especially visceral fat, are associated with a lower calculus-free rate following SWL treatment. Unenhanced CT is a convenient technique for diagnosing the presence of a calculus, assessing the intra-abdominal fat distribution and thereby helping to predict the outcome of SWL. • Unenhanced CT is now widely used to assess ureteric calculi. • The same CT protocol can provide measurements of abdominal fat distribution. • Ureteric calculi are usually treated by shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). • Greater intra-abdominal fat stores are generally associated with poorer SWL results.

  7. CT demonstration of peripelvic and periureteral non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McMillin, K.I.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-05-01

    Abdominal CT is often performed for the staging of lymphoma. Retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy is the most common abnormality identified, but various extranodal sites of lymphomatous involvement have been reported, especially in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Renal involvement is not rare, but peripelvic or periureteral involvement in the absence of renal parenchymal involvement or contiguous abdominal adenopathy is extremely unusual. Two recent patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who did show these findings are presented.

  8. Comparison of thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Courtney; Fransson, Boel A; Ragle, Claude A; Mattoon, John; Gay, John M

    2013-06-01

    To compare thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift (AWL) conditions. In vitro cadaveric study. Mature medium-to-large breed fresh canine cadavers (n = 6). Each cadaver was imaged with computed tomography (CT) under baseline, abdominal CO2 insufflation, and AWL conditions. Measurements of thoracic and abdominal cavities were performed for each condition using image-analyzing software. Resulting volumes for each cadaver were converted to percent change from baseline to normalize the data. The t-tests were used to compare percent changes of both thoracic and abdominal volumes. Thoracic volume significantly decreased from baseline during CO2 insufflation (P < .01). No significant difference in thoracic volume occurred with AWL when compared with baseline. Abdominal volume increased by 80% with CO2 insufflation (95% CI: 56.4-107.0%) but only 25% with AWL (95% CI: 12.3-37.8%). Abdominal CO2 insufflation results in decreased thoracic volume when compared with baseline. AWL preserved thoracic volume similar to baseline. Abdominal volumes achieved with abdominal CO2 insufflation are significantly greater than those attained with AWL. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  10. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  11. A rare case of abdominal infection: Emphysematous pyelonephritis without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Oyar, Orhan; Tan, Gözde Canan; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Turan, Celaleddı̇n

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare form of necrotizing pyelonephritis. It is a life-threatening condition that usually affects patients with diabetes, and a small percentage may be due to urinary tract obstruction. Here, we present the case of an EP caused by urinary tract obstruction without diabetes. A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, chills, and abdominal pain. There was no significant past history. Physical examination depicted bilateral lower abdominal and right flank knocking tenderness. Laboratory exams revealed leukocytosis, neutrophilia, a high C-reactive protein level, and pyuria. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) showed diffuse gas in the right renal collecting system and dilatation of the right renal pelvis compared to the right side, in addition to multiple millimetric stones located in the right kidney and right ureter. After emergent placement of a percutaneous nephrostomy, she was admitted. Control abdominal CT without contrast revealed the absence of gas, hydronephrosis of the right renal pelvis, and the presence of nephrolithiasis. The patient was discharged 10 days of post-procedure with instructions for follow-up. Emergency physicians need to remain alert about this life-threatening disease and the typical CT findings of this disease to make a timely diagnosis and navigate management. PMID:28250980

  12. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  13. Is abdominal CT useful for the management of patients with severe acute colitis complicating inflammatory bowel disease? A study in 54 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Mege, D; Monsinjon, M; Zappa, M; Stefanescu, C; Treton, X; Maggiori, L; Bouhnik, Y; Panis, Y

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the contribution of CT for the management of patients with severe acute exacerbation of colitis (SAC) complicating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); in particular, its contribution to surgical decision making. All patients who were admitted to our institution for SAC complicating IBD were divided into two groups: group A (those who received surgical treatment); and group B (those who received medical treatment). Admission CT results were compared between groups. From 2006 to 2015, 54 patients [26 male; median age 39 (17-71) years] presenting with SAC were placed in either group A (n = 41; 76%) or group B (n = 13; 24%). Surgical patients in group A more frequently had altered general status (50 vs 17%; P = 0.01). Physical examination, Lichtiger score, endoscopic findings and laboratory results were similar between the groups. There was no significant difference in CT data between the groups with respect to extent of the colitis (pan-colitis in 54 and 69%, respectively, P = 0.35), median colonic thickness [10 (4-16) vs 8 (6-11) mm, P = 0.15], target enhancement (88 vs 77%, P = 0.38) and occurrence of toxic megacolon (2 vs 0%). Admission CT is not helpful in surgical decision making in SAC. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Effect of Fixed-Volume and Weight-Based Dosing Regimens on the Cost and Volume of Administered Iodinated Contrast Material at Abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew S; Parikh, Kushal R; Mayo-Smith, William W; Israel, Gary M; Brown, Richard K J; Ellis, James H

    2017-03-01

    To determine the magnitude of subject-level and population-level cost savings that could be realized by moving from fixed-volume low-osmolality iodinated contrast material administration to an effective weight-based dosing regimen for contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT. HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-exempt retrospective cohort study of 6,737 subjects undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT from 2014 to 2015. Subject height, weight, lean body weight (LBW), and body surface area (BSA) were determined. Twenty-six volume- and weight-based dosing strategies with literature support were compared with a fixed-volume strategy used at the study institution: 125 mL 300 mgI/mL for routine CT, 125 mL 370 mgI/mL for multiphasic CT (single-energy, 120 kVp). The predicted population- and subject-level effects on cost and contrast material utilization were calculated for each strategy and sensitivity analyses were performed. Most subjects underwent routine CT (91% [6,127/6,737]). Converting to lesser-volume higher-concentration contrast material had the greatest effect on cost; a fixed-volume 100 mL 370 mgI/mL strategy resulted in $132,577 in population-level savings with preserved iodine dose at routine CT (37,500 versus 37,000 mgI). All weight-based iodine-content dosing strategies (mgI/kg) with the same maximum contrast material volume (125 mL) were predicted to contribute mean savings compared with the existing fixed-volume algorithm ($4,053-$116,076/strategy in the overall study population, $1-$17/strategy per patient). Similar trends were observed in all sensitivity analyses. Large cost and material savings can be realized at abdominopelvic CT by adopting a weight-based dosing strategy and lowering the maximum volume of administered contrast material. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging for chronic abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging is often not indicated in chronic abdominal pain. In particular, undifferentiated abdominal pain is rarely an indication for a CT scan. CT scanning is overused even when imaging is required. Other modalities may be preferable. A normal CT scan does not rule out cancer. Alarm symptoms, including anaemia, blood in the stool, waking at night with gastrointestinal symptoms, and weight loss, should be investigated. The most appropriate modality depends on the symptoms. Clinical information on request forms for CT scans should be specific and include the suspected condition as this helps the radiologist to determine an appropriate imaging protocol.

  16. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  17. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  18. Assessment of image quality and low-contrast detectability in abdominal CT of obese patients: comparison of a novel integrated circuit with a conventional discrete circuit detector at different tube voltages.

    PubMed

    Euler, A; Heye, T; Kekelidze, M; Bongartz, G; Szucs-Farkas, Z; Sommer, C; Schmidt, B; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2015-03-01

    To compare image quality and low-contrast detectability of an integrated circuit (IC) detector in abdominal CT of obese patients with conventional detector technology at low tube voltages. A liver phantom with 45 lesions was placed in a water container to mimic an obese patient and examined on two different CT systems at 80, 100 and 120 kVp. The systems were equipped with either the IC or conventional detector. Image noise was measured, and the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) was calculated. Low-contrast detectability was assessed independently by three radiologists. Radiation dose was estimated by the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The image noise was significantly lower, and the CNR was significantly higher with the IC detector at 80, 100 and 120 kVp, respectively (P = 0.023). The IC detector resulted in an increased lesion detection rate at 80 kVp (38.1 % vs. 17.2 %) and 100 kVp (57.0 % vs. 41.0 %). There was no difference in the detection rate between the IC detector at 100 kVp and the conventional detector at 120 kVp (57.0 % vs. 62.2 %). The CTDIvol at 80, 100 and 120 kVp measured 4.5-5.2, 7.3-7.9 and 9.8-10.2 mGy, respectively. The IC detector at 100 kVp resulted in similar low-contrast detectability compared to the conventional detector with a 120-kVp protocol at a radiation dose reduction of 37 %.

  19. Radiologic diagnosis of an intra-abdominal abscess. Do multiple tests help

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrin, P.B.; Gully, P.H.; Greenlee, H.B.; Freeark, R.J.; Moncada, R.; Churchill, R.; Reynes, C.; Henkin, R.

    1986-01-01

    A review was made of the charts of 94 patients who underwent ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and gallium citrate Ga 67 (Gall) scan to rule out intra-abdominal abscesses. Of all the clinical and laboratory data, only the presence of pain and tenderness differentiated patients with and without abscesses. A review of radiologic data showed that CT was superior to US, and that US was superior to Gall scan with regard to sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values. When multiple radiologic tests were performed, results agreed in 72% of cases; therefore, the additional tests were essentially redundant. When radiologic test results disagreed, accuracy rates were CT, 0.86; US, 0.00; and Gall scan, 0.44. These findings suggest that, except to rule out pelvic abscesses in the presence of pelvic inflammatory disease, CT is usually the only special radiologic test that should be performed to localize a suspected intra-abdominal abscess.

  20. 64-Slice CT angiography of the abdominal aorta and abdominal arteries: comparison of the diagnostic efficacy of iobitridol 350 mgI/ml versus iomeprol 400 mgI/ml in a prospective, randomised, double-blind multi-centre trial.

    PubMed

    Loewe, Christian; Becker, Christoph R; Berletti, Riccardo; Cametti, Carlo Alberto; Caudron, Jerome; Coudyzer, Walter; De Mey, Johan; Favat, Massimo; Heautot, Jean-François; Heye, Sam; Hittinger, Markus; Larralde, Antoine; Lestrat, Jean-Pierre; Marangoni, Roberto; Nieboer, Koenraad; Reimer, Peter; Schwarz, Martin; Schernthaner, Melanie; Lammer, Johannes

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of iodine concentration on diagnostic efficacy in multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of the abdominal aorta and abdominal arteries. IRB approval and informed consent were obtained. In this double-blind trial, patients were randomised to undergo MDCT angiography of the abdominal arteries during administration of iobitridol (350 mgI/ml) or iomeprol (400 mgI/ml). Each centre applied its own technique for delivery of contrast medium, regardless of iodine concentration. Diagnostic efficacy, image quality, visualisation of the arterial wall and arterial enhancement were evaluated. A total of 153 patients received iobitridol and 154 received iomeprol. The ability to reach a diagnosis was "satisfactory" to "totally satisfactory" in 152 (99.3%) and 153 (99.4%) patients respectively. Image quality was rated as being "good" to "excellent" in 94.7 and 94.8% segments respectively. Similar results were observed for image quality of arterial walls (84.3 vs. 83.2%). The mean relative changes in arterial enhancement between baseline and arterial phase images showed no statistically significant differences. This study demonstrated the non-inferiority of the 350 versus 400 mgI/ml iodine concentration, in terms of diagnostic efficacy, in abdominal MDCT angiography. It also confirmed the high robustness and reliability of this technique across multi-national practices.

  1. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  2. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  3. [Clinical and imaging features of abdominal rhabdomyosarcoma of non-organ origin in children].

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Du, J; Wu, W; Wang, Q

    2016-11-23

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging features of abdominal rhabdomyosarcoma of non-organ origin in children. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging features of 12 pediatric patients with abdominal rhabdomyosarcoma confirmed by surgery and pathology at our hospital. Results: There were 9 boys and 3 girls, with an average age of (5.47±3.92) years old (range, 1 to 15). According to Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study (IRS) staging system, they were of stage Ⅲ to stage Ⅳ, and most were of embryonal type. Tumors of 7 cases were located in the pelvic cavity, 2 cases in the abdominal cavity, 1 in the retroperitoneal space, 1 in both the abdominal and pelvic cavities and 1 across the retroperitoneal space, and abdominal and pelvic cavities. Gray-scale ultrasound showed moderate inhomogeneous echo structure and color Doppler flow imaging showed rich blood flow signals. CT plain scan showed masses of iso- or low-density, and the contrast-enhanced scan showed lesions with inhomogeneous enhancement. The enhancement in delay scan was more obvious and the peripheral enhancement was more significant than central enhancement. Conclusions: Childhood abdominal rhabdomyosarcoma of non-organ origin may arise from the peritoneum, be commonly seen in boys younger than 10 years old, more likely located in the pelvic cavity, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common histological variant seen in childhood. Ultrasound and CT imaging can provide useful information for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this tumor.

  4. Clinical significance of mesenteric panniculitis-like abnormalities on abdominal computerized tomography in patients with malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Roginsky, Grigory; Gore, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the association of malignancy with mesenteric panniculitis-like changes on computed tomography (CT). METHODS All abdominal CT scans performed at NorthShore University HealthSystem showing mesenteric panniculitis from January 2005 to August 2010 were identified in the Radnet (RadNet Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) database. Patients with a new or known diagnosis of a malignancy were included for this analysis. Longitudinal clinical histories were obtained from electronic medical records. RESULTS In total, 147794 abdominal CT scans were performed during the study period. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients had mesenteric panniculitis (MP)-like abnormalities on their abdominal CT. Of these patients, 81 patients (22.6%) had a known history of cancer at the time of their CT scan. Nineteen (5.3%) had a new diagnosis of cancer in concurrence with their CT, but the majority of these (14/19, 74%) were undergoing CT as part of a malignancy evaluation. Lymphomas were the most common cancers associated with MP-like findings on CT (36 cases, 36%), with follicular lymphoma being the most frequent subtype (17/36). A variety of solid tumors, most commonly prostate (7) and renal cell cancers (6) also were seen. CT follow up was obtained in 56 patients. Findings in the mesentery were unchanged in 45 (80%), worsened in 6 (11%), and improved in 5 patients (9%). Positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed in 44 patients only showed a positive uptake in the mesenteric mass in 2 patients (5%). CONCLUSION A new diagnosis of cancer is uncommon in patients with CT findings suggestive of MP. MP-like mesenteric abnormalities on CT generally remain stable in patients with associated malignancies. PET scanning is not recommended in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis-like findings on CT. PMID:28082812

  5. [The different genotypes of MTHFR 1298A>C and PON1 -108C>T polymorphisms confer the increased risk of the abdominal aortic aneurysm in the smoking and nonsmoking persons].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Andrzej L

    2005-01-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) both the etiology and the pathogenesis are of the multifactorial character. The genetic component in the determination of this disease is proven by its familial occurrence. Smoking represents the best recognized risk factor of the AAA development. Increased concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) in plasma are the common finding in these patients. It is assumed that the Hcy thiolactone, the most reactive metabolite of Hcy, may participate in the aortic wall destruction in AAA. The polymorphic variants of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T and 1298A>C) influence tissue concentrations of the Hcy. Paraoxonase (PON1), the enzyme associated in plasma with the HDL fraction, as lactonase detoxicates the Hcy thiolactone. The promotor polymorphism of PON1 - 108C>T gene may determine the lower activity of this enzyme. In the case-control study of 106 patients with AAA and 97 healthy persons, the effects of selected genetic and nongenetic risk factors on development of AAA were assessed, considering the possibilities of interaction between them. It was found, that the arterial hypertension, cigarette smoking and the lower HDL fraction are independent risk factors of AAA. The arterial hypertension was a risk factor both in the smoking and the nonsmoking males, whereas the lower HDL fraction has been the risk factor only for the smoking men. By the multivariate analysis in the nonsmoking males the MTHFR 1298 AC and CC genotypes increased the risk of AAA development 4,8-fold in relation to the MTHFR 1298 AA nonsmoking males. In reference to the genotypes of the expected high impact on the metabolism of Hcy and of Hcy thiolactone, the genotypes of MTHFR 677TT and PON1 -108CT and TT were more frequent in smoking ones, but the difference was not significant. This observation fits with the assumption that the influence of smoking on the occurrence of AAA prevails over that of genetic variability. When the patients age was considered

  6. Did low tube voltage CT combined with low contrast media burden protocols accomplish the goal of "double low" for patients? An overview of applications in vessels and abdominal parenchymal organs over the past 5 years.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Zou, Xianlun; Zhu, Di; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2016-09-01

    Imaging communities have already reached a consensus that the radiation dose of computed tomography (CT) should be reduced as much as reasonably achievable to lower population risks. Increasing attention is being paid to iodinated contrast media (CM) induced nephrotoxicity (CIN); a decrease in the intake of iodinated CM is required by increasingly more radiologists. Theoretically, the radiation dose varies with the tube current time and square of the tube voltage, with higher iodine contrast at low photon energies (Huda et al. [2000] Radiology, 21 7, 430-435).The use of low tube voltage is a promising strategy to reduce both the radiation dose and CM burden. The term 'double low' has been coined to describe scanning protocols that reduce radiation dose and iodine intake synchronously. These protocols are becoming increasingly popular in the clinical setting. The aim of this review was to describe all original studies using the 'double low' strategy in the last 5 years. We searched an online electronic database (PubMed) from January 2011 to December 2015 for original studies published on the relationship of low tube voltage with low radiation dose and low iodine contrast media burden in patients undergoing CT scans. Studies that failed to reduce radiation dose or iodine CM burden were excluded in this study. Thirty-seven studies aimed at reducing radiation dose using low tube voltage combined with iodine CM reduced protocols were included in this study. Most studies evaluated conditions associated with arteries. Four were cerebral and neck computed tomography angiography (CTA) studies, 15 were pulmonary CTA (pCTA) and coronary CTA (cCTA) studies, one concerned myocardial perfusion, five studies focused on the thoracic and abdominal aorta, and one investigated renal arteries. Three studies consisted of CT venography (CTV) of the pelvis and lower extremities. Six publications examined the liver, and two focused on the kidney. Overall, this review demonstrates that

  7. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  8. Abdominal wall abscess: more than meets the eye

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jamish; Gandhi, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old, mildly demented rest home resident presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of a right sided abdominal wall mass. He had a mechanical fall 2 days previously and landed on his right side and had attributed the mass to this. He had no symptoms apart from feeling bloated and not being able to pass wind for a day. He had passed a normal bowel motion the day before presentation. On abdominal examination there was an 11 × 4 cm mass in the right lower quadrant. It was firm in consistency, non-fluctuant and non-tender to touch. There was mild erythema over the area but no skin breaks. Chest radiograph was unremarkable. The abdominal film showed dilated small bowel and no large bowel could be seen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a thick walled gallbladder with multiple calculi and air present. There was also an extensive air and fluid collection in the layers of the abdominal wall and subcutaneous fat which arose from a perforation of the gallbladder. The patient was not a surgical candidate due to multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with antibiotics and underwent a CT guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Despite the radiological intervention and antibiotics the patient progressively deteriorated and died peacefully 5 days after admission. PMID:22315645

  9. Abdominal wall abscess: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Gandhi, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old, mildly demented rest home resident presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of a right sided abdominal wall mass. He had a mechanical fall 2 days previously and landed on his right side and had attributed the mass to this. He had no symptoms apart from feeling bloated and not being able to pass wind for a day. He had passed a normal bowel motion the day before presentation. On abdominal examination there was an 11 × 4 cm mass in the right lower quadrant. It was firm in consistency, non-fluctuant and non-tender to touch. There was mild erythema over the area but no skin breaks. Chest radiograph was unremarkable. The abdominal film showed dilated small bowel and no large bowel could be seen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a thick walled gallbladder with multiple calculi and air present. There was also an extensive air and fluid collection in the layers of the abdominal wall and subcutaneous fat which arose from a perforation of the gallbladder. The patient was not a surgical candidate due to multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with antibiotics and underwent a CT guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Despite the radiological intervention and antibiotics the patient progressively deteriorated and died peacefully 5 days after admission.

  10. NIH-funded study shows 20 percent reduction in lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT compared to chest X-ray: | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray. The primary research results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. |

  11. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  12. The relationship of abdominal fat mass assessed by helical or conventional computed tomography to serum leptin concentration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junji; Sasaki, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Mitsuyo

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we focused on the relationship of intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) or subcutaneous fat (SF) mass to serum leptin levels, and also on the relationship of leptin to serum lipid and lipoprotein concentration. Subjects with obesity (26 men, 26 women) were recruited for this study. We obtained helical CT scans with a tube current of 150 mA, voltage of 120 kV and 2:1 pitch (table speed in relation to slice thickness), starting at the upper edge of the liver and continuing to the pelvis. The intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) volume was measured by drawing a line within the muscle wall surrounding the abdominal cavity. The abdominal SF volume was calculated by subtracting the VF volume from the total abdominal fat volume. By comparison, the abdominal VF and SF areas were determined at the umbilical level by the established slice-by-slice CT scanning technique. We found: 1) abdominal SF mass, either as volume or area, was a more important determinant of serum leptin than was VF mass; 2) among TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C, only TG had a positive correlation to serum leptin levels in men, whereas in women no lipid parameters had any relationship with leptin; and 3) VF mass had a positive correlation to serum TC and TG in men, whereas SF did not. The present study provides considerable evidence on the relationship between abdominal fat mass and serum leptin, and shows that the relationships between serum leptin and serum lipids and lipoproteins are not straightforward. We also suggest that fat area measured by conventional CT is a better indicator than its corresponding volume assessed by helical CT, based on the present results showing its closer association to serum lipids.

  13. An uncommon cause of abdominal pain: Mesenteric cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Ünlüer, Seran; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Kamer, Kemal Erdı̇nç; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Tan, Gözde Canan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst. A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure. Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients. PMID:28250978

  14. An uncommon cause of abdominal pain: Mesenteric cyst.

    PubMed

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Ünlüer, Seran; Şahı N, Yusuf; Kamer, Kemal Erdı Nç; Karagöz, Arı F; Tan, Gözde Canan

    2016-03-01

    Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst. A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure. Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients.

  15. Reducing Iodine Contrast Volume in CT Angiography of the Abdominal Aorta Using Integrated Tube Potential Selection and Weight-Based Method Without Compromising Image Quality.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Rogerio; Vrtiska, Terri J; Foley, Thomas A; Macedo, Thanila A; Cardona, Juan C Montoya; Williamson, Eric E; McCollough, Cynthia H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether image quality was maintained when a weight-based protocol incorporating tube potential selection was used to select lower iodine contrast volumes for aortic CT angiography (CTA). Patients with potentially decreased renal function underwent CTA performed with the iodinated contrast volume determined using a table incorporating different tube potentials and patient weights. The image quality of CTA examinations performed with a reduced iodine volume (hereafter known as "low-iodine CTA examinations"), internal control CTA examinations (i.e., prior examinations), and size-matched control CTA examinations was evaluated in separate reading sessions conducted by three vascular radiologists who were blinded as to the contrast volume and tube potential used. Side-by-side unblinded comparison of the examinations was also performed. Aortic attenuation and the contrast-to-noise ratio were measured. Comparisons were performed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Fifty low-iodine CTA examinations, 36 internal control CTA examinations, and 50 size-matched control CTA examinations were performed. Contrast volumes were 63% lower when the protocol based on tube potential and patient weight was used (mean contrast volume, 49 mL for low-iodine CTA vs 133 mL for internal control CTA and 138 mL for size-matched control CTA). The mean volume CT dose index was 15.1 mGy for low-iodine CTA versus 18.8 mGy for internal control CTA (p < 0.001), and 15.3 mGy for low-iodine CTA versus 17.1 mGy for size-matched control CTA (p = 0.11). Of the image quality and diagnostic confidence evaluations for low-iodine CTA examinations, over 97% had acceptable image quality and diagnostic confidence for blinded (50/50) and unblinded (35/36) comparisons. Aortic attenuation was similar between groups (p = 0.13-0.71). A weight-based protocol that incorporates tube potential selection allows the use of substantially lower volumes of iodinated contrast material

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transportation (CT) number 2 shows the new muffler system on the vehicle. The CT also recently underwent modifications to the cab. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP). The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transportation (CT) number 2 shows the new muffler system on the vehicle. The CT also recently underwent modifications to the cab. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP). The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

  17. Right upper quadrant abdominal pain as the initial presentation of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Gago, Ricardo; Shum, Lee Ming; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-02-22

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotising vasculitis that involves medium and small vessels. PAN generally presents with constitutional, cutaneous, neurological, renal and gastrointestinal manifestations. However, PAN initially involving a single organ/system is uncommon. Here, we present a 42-year-old man who was hospitalised because of severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain that started 2 months before. Physical examination was remarkable for right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness. Abdominopelvic CT showed lymphadenopathy but no hepatic, gallbladder, pancreatic, intestinal or renal abnormalities. Abdominal angiography showed multiple small aneurysms located in the jejunal and hepatic arteries characteristic of PAN. He had a prompt and remarkable response to high-dose corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide. Our case, together with other reports, suggests that PAN should be considered in patients presenting with right upper abdominal pain. Timely diagnosis and treatment reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of the disease.

  18. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Hoddick, W K; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R; Justich, E; Filly, R A; Higgins, C B

    1985-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate abdominal aortic aneurysms in 27 patients. The findings were compared retrospectively with CT, ultrasound (US), and angiography in 17 cases and prospectively with US in 10 cases. MRI identified the renal arteries in all cases, demonstrated involvement at or above the origin of the renal arteries in eight patients, and showed extension of the aneurysm into the iliac arteries in 12 cases. The outer dimension of the aneurysm, the diameter of the residual lumen, and the length of the aneurysm were measured easily from the MR images. The measurements of transverse dimension of the abdominal aortic aneurysm were similar for MRI, CT, and US. MRI more accurately defined extension above the renal arteries and below the aortic bifurcation. It is concluded that MRI provides the necessary information for the surveillance and preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  19. CT and US findings of pancreatoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Young; Kim, In-One; Kim, Woo Sun

    1996-05-01

    Our goal was to evaluate US and CT findings of pancreatoblastoma. Three US and four CT scans before surgery and one follow-up CT after surgery were reviewed in four patients (two female, two male) with pathologically proven pancreatoblastoma. The mean age of the patients was 4 years (range 2-5 years). The masses were analyzed for origin, US and CT architecture, presence of calcification, enhancement pattern, and metastatic spread. In two patients, the tumors arose from the pancreatic head and in one patient from the pancreatic tail. The mean largest diameter of the masses was 10 cm, ranging from 5 to 14 cm. Sonography obtained from three cases showed mixed echogenic solid mass. On the CT scan, all tumors were huge, lobulated masses with heterogeneous attenuation. One tumor contained numerous foci of calcification. On the enhanced CT scan, three tumors showed multiloculated appearance by enhancing internal septations. There was no evidence of metastasis to distant organ or abdominal lymph node in any case. We suggest that the most common US finding of pancreatoblastoma is a mixed echogenic, solid mass inseparable from the pancreas, and the most common CT finding is a relatively well defined, lobulated, huge mass with multiloculated appearance by enhancing septae in or near the lesser sac. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  1. Abdominal actinomycosis masquerading as an omental tumor in a 12-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Hashizume, Naoki; Yoshida, Motomu; Iida, Hisataka; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2013-02-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 12-year-old girl in whom an omental primary tumor was suspected before surgery. The patient began to experience intermittent lower left abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were inconclusive at this time, but 6 months later, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed a 7-cm, tumor-like lesion in the left abdominal cavity; malignancy could not be ruled out. The tumor, which originated in the omentum and adhered strongly to the left abdominal wall, was resected along with approximately 90 % of the omentum, the peritoneum in contact with the mass, and the posterior layer of the rectus abdominal sheath, under suspicion of a malignant tumor. However, omental actinomycosis was the final pathological diagnosis. The patient's antibiotic treatment was changed to a penicillin-series oral antibiotic to prevent recurrence of the actinomycosis. The patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days after the first surgery, but she developed three episodes of ileus; the first two required surgery. The patient has had no further recurrences of actinomycosis or postoperative ileus 20 months after discharge.

  2. CT findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Hee; Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee

    2014-12-01

    To determine the computed tomographic (CT) findings of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This retrospective, single-institution case-control study was approved by our institutional review board, and the informed consent was waived owing to the retrospective nature of the study. CT images of 32 women with clinically proven acute PID and 32 control subjects with other conditions of similar presentation were retrospectively reviewed. Analysis of CT findings included hepatic capsular enhancement, pelvic fat haziness, complicated ascites, uterine serosal enhancement, tubal thickening, endometritis, and oophoritis. Comparison of CT findings was performed with the Chi square test or the Fisher exact test and logistic regression analysis was used to determine significant CT findings in predicting PID. The CT findings that showed a statistically significant difference were hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase (p = 0.003), pelvic fat haziness (p = 0.045), and tubal thickening (p = 0.001). Subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase and tubal thickening were significant predictors of PID (hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase, p = 0.015, odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; tubal thickening, p = 0.005, OR = 10.5). Diagnostic morphological CT findings in women with clinically proven PID and acute abdominal pain include hepatic capsular enhancement on late arterial phase and tubal thickening.

  3. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  4. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  5. [Abdominal pregnancy. Surgical emergency].

    PubMed

    Márquez Becerra, M A; Toro Calzada, R J; Puello Camara, J J

    1991-02-01

    Concept, classification, frequency and predominant factors of abdominal pregnancy, were reviewed. The case of a patient 32 years old, from Hospital General Tacuba, ISSSTE; with a history of secondary sterility of seven years duration, win an abdominal pregnancy with symptomatology mainly digestive; she was under hypovolemic shock, acute abdomen, but with an ultrasonographic study showing intrauterine pregnancy and a tumor in right iliac fossa, which confounded the preoperative diagnosis. Exploratory laparotomy, was done. An alive product was found 14 to 16 years old, and living the placenta in situ. Evolutions was favorable. In the final comment the clinical picture, the diagnostic media, the management possibilities for the placenta and hemorrhage, are mentioned.

  6. [Perforation of hollow organs in the abdominal contusion: diagnostic features and prognostic factors of death].

    PubMed

    Nicolau, A E; Merlan, V; Dinescu, G; Crăciun, M; Kitkani, A; Beuran, M

    2012-01-01

    Blunt hollow viscus perforations (HVP) due to abdominal contusions (AC), although rare, are difficult to diagnose early and are associated with a high mortality. Our paper analyses retrospectively data from patients operated for HVP between January 2005 and January 2009, the efficiency of different diagnostic tools, mortality and prognostic factors for death. There were 62 patients operated for HVP, 14 of which had isolated abdominal contusion and 48 were poly trauma patients. There were 9 women and 53 men, the mean age was 41.5 years (SD: +17,9), the mean ISS was 32.94 (SD: +15,94), 23 patients had associated solid viscus injuries (SVI). Clinical examination was irelevant for 16 of the 62 patients, abdominal Xray was false negative for 30 out of 35 patients and abdominal ultrasound was false negative for 16 out of 60 patients. Abdominal CT was initially false negative for 7 out of 38 patients: for 4 of them the abdominal CT was repeated and was positive for HVP, for 3 patients a diagnostic laparoscopy was performed. Direct signs for HVP on abdominal CT were present for 3 out of 38 patients. Diagnostic laparoscopy was performed for 7 patients with suspicion for HVP, and was positive for 6 of them and false negative for a patient with a duodenal perforation. Single organ perforations were present in 55 cases, multi organ perforations were present in 7 cases. There were 15 deaths (15.2%), most of them caused by haemodynamic instability (3 out of 6 patients) and associated lesions: SOL for 9 out of 23 cases, pelvic fracture (PF) for 6 out of 14 patients, craniocerebral trauma (CCT) for 12 out of 33 patients.Multivariate analysis showed that the prognostic factors for death were ISS value (p = 0,023) and associated CCT (odds ratio = 4,95; p = 0,017). The following factors were not confirmed as prognostic factors for death: age, haemodynamic instability, associated SVI, thoracic trauma (TT), pelvic fractures (PF), limbs fractures (LF) and admission-operation interval

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  8. Bilateral ureteropelvic disruption following blunt abdominal trauma: case report.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Fumiaki; Miyazaki, Yoshibumi; Kobayashi, Tastuho; Kikuchi, Hiroko; Mastuda, Kiyoshi

    2011-07-07

    Ureteral injury occurs in less than 1% of blunt abdominal trauma cases, partly because the ureters are relatively well protected in the retroperitoneum. Bilateral ureteral injury is extremely rare, with only 10 previously reported cases. Diagnosis may be delayed if ureteric injury is not suspected, and delay of 36 hours or longer has been observed in more than 50% of patients with ureteric injury following abdominal trauma, leading to increased morbidity. A 29-year-old man was involved in a highway motor vehicle collision and was ejected from the front passenger seat even though wearing a seatbelt. He was in a preshock state at the scene of the accident. An intravenous line and left thoracic drain were inserted, and he was transported to our hospital by helicopter. Whole-body, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan showed left diaphragmatic disruption, splenic injury, and a grade I injury to the left kidney with a retroperitoneal haematoma. He underwent emergency laparotomy. The left diaphragmatic and splenic injuries were repaired. Although a retroperitoneal haematoma was observed, his renal injury was treated conservatively because the haematoma was not expanding. In the intensive care unit, the patient's haemodynamic state was stable, but there was no urinary output for 9 hours after surgery. Anuresis prompted a review of the abdominal x-ray which had been performed after the contrast-enhanced CT. Leakage of contrast material from the ureteropelvic junctions was detected, and review of the repeat CT scan revealed contrast retention in the perirenal retroperitoneum bilaterally. He underwent cystoscopy and bilateral retrograde pyelography, which showed bilateral complete ureteral disruption, preventing placement of ureteral stents. Diagnostic laparotomy revealed complete disruption of the ureteropelvic junctions bilaterally. Double-J ureteral stents were placed bilaterally and ureteropelvic anastomoses were performed. The patient's postoperative progress

  9. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  10. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) Findings of a Diagnostic Dilemma: Atypically Located Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Evrimler, Sehnaz; Okumuser, Irfan; Unal, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acute appendicitis is an emergent surgically treated disease generally represented by right lower abdominal pain. The most common location of the appendix is descending intraperitoneal. However, it can also show atypical locations such as inguinal canal, femoral canal, subhepatic, retrocecal, intraperitoneal abdominal midline and left side in situs inversus or intestinal malrotation patients. Atypical location can lead to atypical clinical presentations. Ultrasonography is the first choice modality for imaging. However, it can be insufficient for demonstration of the appendix. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) is needed for further examination. We aim to review the CT findings of atypically located acute appendicitis with cases and remind the clinicians and radiologists the importance of the prompt diagnosis. Case Report We presented five atypically-located appendix cases, including four with acute appendicitis that presented to our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Two of the acute appendicitis cases had normal, the other two had elevated white blood cell count, but all of them had elevated CRP. Ultrasonography imaging was performed as a first-line imaging modality. Because of the inconclusive results of both clinical-laboratory findings and ultrasonography, CT imaging was performed. Abdominal CT demonstrated all of the atypically localised appendices successfully, which were left-sided in a malrotated patient, retrocecal, subhepatic, retrocecal ascending, intraperitoneal abdominal midline localised. Conclusıons Atypically located acute appendicitis can show atypical presentation and result in misdiagnosis. If ultrasonograpgy is inconclusive, we suggest abdominal CT in such confusing, complicated cases, because misdiagnosis or delay in the right diagnosis can result in complications and increased morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:28058072

  12. The role of abdominal computed tomography scanning in patients with non-traumatic abdominal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brown, David F M; Fischer, Randy H; Novelline, Robert A; Kim, Jennifer; Nagurney, J Tobias

    2002-12-01

    To describe the non-traumatic clinical settings in which abdominal computed tomography (CT) is used and to determine its diagnostic utility. A retrospective descriptive study of consecutive non-traumatic adult patients who underwent abdominal CT in a university hospital emergency department (ED). Radiology reports and patient charts were reviewed. The indication for each CT was determined by two reviewers. Indications were described as specific (e.g. "rule-out" appendicitis) or non-specific (e.g. abdominal pain). CT results were classified as positive, negative (normal or no new information) or indeterminate (technical limitations). For those with specific indications, positive results were further subdivided into supportive (of the clinical suspicion) or non-supportive (abnormal but suggesting an alternative diagnosis). The clinical course and results of subsequent diagnostic procedures were used to confirm CT results for admitted patients. Incidental CT findings were recorded. 177 patients were entered; mean age was 58 years; 48% were men. The most frequent indications ("rule-outs") were aortic disorders (23%), abscess (16%), and diverticulitis (14%). In patients with specific indications (n=160), 44% of the CT results supported the indication, 13% suggested an alternative diagnosis (non-supportive), 41% were negative, and 3% were indeterminate. In admitted patients (n=129), CT findings were contradicted in 6%. Adult ED patients undergo abdominal CT for a variety of non-traumatic indications. Findings in less than half support the pre-test clinical suspicion and an alternative previously unsuspected diagnosis is suggested in 13%. Follow-up is inconsistent with CT results in a small but significant number of cases.

  13. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cagini, Lucio; Gravante, Sabrina; Malaspina, Corrado Maria; Cesarano, Elviro; Giganti, Melchiorre; Rebonato, Alberto; Fonio, Paolo; Scialpi, Michele

    2013-07-15

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children.

  14. Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the assessment of polytrauma patient, an accurate diagnostic study protocol with high sensitivity and specificity is necessary. Computed Tomography (CT) is the standard reference in the emergency for evaluating the patients with abdominal trauma. Ultrasonography (US) has a high sensitivity in detecting free fluid in the peritoneum, but it does not show as much sensitivity for traumatic parenchymal lesions. The use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) improves the accuracy of the method in the diagnosis and assessment of the extent of parenchymal lesions. Although the CEUS is not feasible as a method of first level in the diagnosis and management of the polytrauma patient, it can be used in the follow-up of traumatic injuries of abdominal parenchymal organs (liver, spleen and kidneys), especially in young people or children. PMID:23902930

  15. Primary diagnosis of abdominal arteriovenous fistula by MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H

    1984-12-01

    Two cases of abdominal arteriovenous (AV) fistula were imaged by magnetic resonance (MR). Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormally increased flow with resultant dilatation of the veins draining the site of the fistula. Findings were correlated with CT, digital subtraction angiography, and arteriography. This report suggests the usefulness of MR imaging as the initial imaging technique of choice in clinically suspected cases of AV fistula. The diagnosis can be made within 30 to 45 min of imaging time and does not require administration of contrast material.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transporter (CT) number 2 shows the cab, at left, that recently underwent modifications. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) on a test run to the pad. The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transporter (CT) number 2 shows the cab, at left, that recently underwent modifications. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) on a test run to the pad. The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transporter (CT) number 2 shows the cab (left, above the tracks) that recently underwent modifications. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) on a test run to the pad. The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A closeup of crawler-transporter (CT) number 2 shows the cab (left, above the tracks) that recently underwent modifications. The CT is transporting a Mobile Launch Platform (MLP) on a test run to the pad. The CT moves Space Shuttle vehicles, situated on the MLP, between the VAB and launch pad. Moving on four double-tracked crawlers, the CT uses a laser guidance system and a leveling system for the journey that keeps the top of a Space Shuttle vertical within plus- or minus-10 minutes of arc. The system enables the CT-MLP-Shuttle to negotiate the ramp leading to the launch pads and keep the load level. Unloaded, the CT weighs 6 million pounds. Seen on top of the MLP are two tail service masts that support the fluid, gas and electrical requirements of the orbiter’s liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen aft umbilicals.

  18. [Contrast media extravasation in upper abdominal injuries: detection with spiral computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Catalano, O; Lobianco, R; Esposito, M; Sandomenico, F; Siani, A

    1999-03-01

    The possibility of detecting contrast agent extravasation (i.e., active hemorrhage) with dynamic conventional Computed Tomography (CT) in patients with abdominal trauma has already been reported in small series. We report our experience in the demonstration of contrast material extravasation using helical CT; we also investigate the diagnostic and clinical value of this finding. January 1997 to July 1998, we examined 41 consecutive patients with upper abdominal trauma. Twelve patients (29%) had contrast material extravasation. The examinations were performed with a helical unit and volumetric acquisitions (thickness 8-10 mm, pitch 1, reconstruction interval 5-8 mm). The intravenous contrast medium (350 mgI/mL, 130-140 mL) was administered with rapid infusion (2-2.5 mL/s, 40-50 s acquisition delay from bolus starting) and using a power injector. We reviewed the CT studies and clinical records of these 12 patients. Contrast agent extravasation was considered present when this finding, not recognizable on plain scans, showed equal attenuation to or higher attenuation than the vessels within the same level. Moreover we assessed leak site, CT appearance, the direct visualization of the involved vessel, the evidence of other abdominal or extra-abdominal injuries, the CT signs of hypovolemic shock, clinical and surgical data. For comparison, we finally evaluated 50 examinations performed with a conventional CT scanner in subjects with abdominal trauma. Active hemorrhage involved the abdominal wall in 1 case (intercostal artery), the solid organs in 4 (splenic in 2, hepatic in 1, of the middle hepatic vein in 1), the peritoneal cavity in 3 (splenic, midcolic, and gastroduodenal artery in 1 each), the retroperitoneum in 4 (renal pedicle in 2, renal parenchyma in 1, lumbar artery in 1). In all cases the site of contrast extravasation corresponded at surgery to the site of active bleeding. The pattern was localized in 10 cases and diffuse in 2. The involved vessel could be

  19. Jejunojejunal intussusception secondary to submucosal lipoma resulting in a 5-year history of intermittent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Seow-En, Isaac; Foo, Fung Joon; Tang, Choong Leong

    2014-10-29

    Jejunal lipomata are an unusual cause of adult intussusception. We report a case of a 44-year-old Chinese woman who presented with a 3-day history of abdominal pain and nausea; she had a 5-year history of similar episodic symptoms after meals. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed a fat-density lead point in the jejunum resulting in intussusception. Single port laparoscopic surgery was performed with reduction of the intussusception, bowel resection and primary anastamosis. Histology confirmed a benign submucosal lipoma. We discuss the recent published literature on this rare entity and show CT images and intraoperative pictures. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Metastatic Neuroblastoma in Adult Patient, Presenting as a Super Scan on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Malik, Dharmender; Jois, Abhiram; Singh, Harmandeep; Bora, Girdhar S; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of 23-year-old man who presented with complaints of progressive abdominal distension for the past 3 months along with the loss of appetite and weight and had a large solid cystic mass in the left half of the abdominal cavity revealed on ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Subsequent biopsy and histopathology revealed it to be neuroblastoma. Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scan performed to rule out distant metastasis showed intense radiotracer uptake distributed throughout the skeleton, mimicking a super scan.

  1. Computed tomography of abdominal carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Picus, D.; Glazer, H.S.; Levitt, R.G.; Husband, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained in 20 patients with primary and/or metastatic abdominal carcinoid tumors. The primary tumors were seen rarely on CT. Mesenteric involvement was seen in eight of the 20 patients, usually as a soft-tissue mass surrounded by fat and radiating soft-tissue strands. Enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes were seen in seven patients, but rarely were they the only manifestation of intraabdominal disease. The most common finding was liver metastases (13 of 20 patients). CT is helpful in evaluating the extent of tumor before surgical exploration an in following the progression of disease once the diagnosis has been established.

  2. Abdominal elephantiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Dominique; Cloutier, Richard; Lapointe, Roch; Desgagné, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Elephantiasis is a well-known condition in dermatology usually affecting the legs and external genitalia. It is characterized by chronic inflammation and obstruction of the lymphatic channels and by hypertrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The etiology is either idiopathic or caused by a variety of conditions such as chronic filarial disease, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and chronic recurrent cellulites. Elephantiasis of the abdominal wall is very rare. A complete review of the English and French literature showed only two cases reported in 1966 and 1973, respectively. We report a third case of abdominal elephantiasis and we briefly review this entity. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who had progressively developed an enormous pediculated abdominal mass hanging down her knees. The skin was thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured. She had a history of multiple abdominal cellulites. She underwent an abdominal lipectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal elephantiasis. Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare disease that represents end-stage failure of lymph drainage. Lipectomy should be considered in the management of this condition.

  3. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  4. Projection space denoising with bilateral filtering and CT noise modeling for dose reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manduca, Armando; Yu Lifeng; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Khaylova, Natalia; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia M.; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel locally adaptive projection space denoising algorithm for low-dose CT data. Methods: The denoising algorithm is based on bilateral filtering, which smooths values using a weighted average in a local neighborhood, with weights determined according to both spatial proximity and intensity similarity between the center pixel and the neighboring pixels. This filtering is locally adaptive and can preserve important edge information in the sinogram, thus maintaining high spatial resolution. A CT noise model that takes into account the bowtie filter and patient-specific automatic exposure control effects is also incorporated into the denoising process. The authors evaluated the noise-resolution properties of bilateral filtering incorporating such a CT noise model in phantom studies and preliminary patient studies with contrast-enhanced abdominal CT exams. Results: On a thin wire phantom, the noise-resolution properties were significantly improved with the denoising algorithm compared to commercial reconstruction kernels. The noise-resolution properties on low-dose (40 mA s) data after denoising approximated those of conventional reconstructions at twice the dose level. A separate contrast plate phantom showed improved depiction of low-contrast plates with the denoising algorithm over conventional reconstructions when noise levels were matched. Similar improvement in noise-resolution properties was found on CT colonography data and on five abdominal low-energy (80 kV) CT exams. In each abdominal case, a board-certified subspecialized radiologist rated the denoised 80 kV images markedly superior in image quality compared to the commercially available reconstructions, and denoising improved the image quality to the point where the 80 kV images alone were considered to be of diagnostic quality. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that bilateral filtering incorporating a CT noise model can achieve a significantly better noise-resolution trade

  5. Projection space denoising with bilateral filtering and CT noise modeling for dose reduction in CT.

    PubMed

    Manduca, Armando; Yu, Lifeng; Trzasko, Joshua D; Khaylova, Natalia; Kofler, James M; McCollough, Cynthia M; Fletcher, Joel G

    2009-11-01

    To investigate a novel locally adaptive projection space denoising algorithm for low-dose CT data. The denoising algorithm is based on bilateral filtering, which smooths values using a weighted average in a local neighborhood, with weights determined according to both spatial proximity and intensity similarity between the center pixel and the neighboring pixels. This filtering is locally adaptive and can preserve important edge information in the sinogram, thus maintaining high spatial resolution. A CT noise model that takes into account the bowtie filter and patient-specific automatic exposure control effects is also incorporated into the denoising process. The authors evaluated the noise-resolution properties of bilateral filtering incorporating such a CT noise model in phantom studies and preliminary patient studies with contrast-enhanced abdominal CT exams. On a thin wire phantom, the noise-resolution properties were significantly improved with the denoising algorithm compared to commercial reconstruction kernels. The noise-resolution properties on low-dose (40 mA s) data after denoising approximated those of conventional reconstructions at twice the dose level. A separate contrast plate phantom showed improved depiction of low-contrast plates with the denoising algorithm over conventional reconstructions when noise levels were matched. Similar improvement in noise-resolution properties was found on CT colonography data and on five abdominal low-energy (80 kV) CT exams. In each abdominal case, a board-certified subspecialized radiologist rated the denoised 80 kV images markedly superior in image quality compared to the commercially available reconstructions, and denoising improved the image quality to the point where the 80 kV images alone were considered to be of diagnostic quality. The results demonstrate that bilateral filtering incorporating a CT noise model can achieve a significantly better noise-resolution trade-off than a series of commercial

  6. Atypical abdominal pain: post-traumatic transverse colon stricture.

    PubMed

    Rotar, Raluca; Uwechue, Raphael; Sasapu, Kishore Kumar

    2013-08-23

    A driver presented to the emergency department 1 day after an accident driving his excavator with abdominal pain and vomiting. He was admitted to the surgical ward 2 days later, after reattending. A CT scan revealed wall thickening and oedema in the transverse colon. This was supported by a subsequent CT virtual colonoscopy which raised the suspicion of neoplasia. A follow-up colonoscopy was not carried further than the transverse colon due to an indurated, tight stricture. Biopsies from that area showed ulceration and inflammatory changes non-specific for ischaemia, drug-induced changes or inflammatory bowel disease. As a consequence of the subocclusive symptoms and the possibility of a neoplastic diagnosis, a laparoscopic-assisted transverse colectomy was performed. The histology of the resected segment revealed post-traumatic inflammation and fibrosis with no evidence of neoplasia.

  7. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Konosuke; Fujikawa, Takuro; Saito, Yasuo; Ando, Takaaki; Obi, Takeshi; Miura, Naoki; Kubota, Chikara

    2015-09-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery.

  8. Melaena as the presenting symptom of gastric mucosal injury due to blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Saeb‐Parsy, K; Omer, A; Hall, N R

    2006-01-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is a common cause of admission to the typical trauma centre. Hollow viscus injury from blunt trauma, however, is unusual and rarely involves the stomach. A 15 year old boy sustained a bicycle handle bar injury to the abdomen and presented to the casualty department four days later with melaena. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed normal findings but endoscopy revealed two “kissing” areas of mucosal ulceration on the anterior and posterior wall of the gastric antrum. The patient received a blood transfusion for anaemia but was otherwise treated conservatively and made a full recovery. The authors believe this to be the first reported case of melaena as the primary presenting symptom of gastric ulceration secondary to blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnosis of hollow viscus injuries due to blunt abdominal trauma requires a high index of suspicion and thorough investigation, particularly if the presentation is delayed. PMID:16627828

  9. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  10. Improved ventilation-perfusion matching with increasing abdominal pressure during CO(2) -pneumoperitoneum in pigs.

    PubMed

    Strang, C M; Freden, F; Maripuu, E; Ebmeyer, U; Hachenberg, T; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2011-08-01

    CO(2) -pneumoperitoneum (PP) is performed at varying abdominal pressures. We studied in an animal preparation the effect of increasing abdominal pressures on gas exchange during PP. Eighteen anaesthetized pigs were studied. Three abdominal pressures (8, 12 and 16 mmHg) were randomly selected in each animal. In six pigs, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used for the analysis of V/Q distributions; in another six pigs, multiple inert gas elimination technique (MIGET) was used for assessing V/Q matching. In further six pigs, computed tomography (CT) was performed for the analysis of regional aeration. MIGET, CT and central haemodynamics and pulmonary gas exchange were recorded during anaesthesia and after 60 min on each of the three abdominal pressures. SPECT was performed three times, corresponding to each PP level. Atelectasis, as assessed by CT, increased during PP and in proportion to abdominal pressure [from 9 ± 2% (mean ± standard deviation) at 8 mmHg to 15 ± 2% at 16 mmHg, P<0.05]. SPECT during increasing abdominal CO(2) pressures showed a shift of blood flow towards better ventilated areas. V/Q analysis by MIGET showed no change in shunt during 8 mmHg PP (9 ± 1.9% compared with baseline 9 ± 1.2%) but a decrease during 12 mmHg PP (7 ± 0.9%, P<0.05) and 16 mmHg PP (5 ± 1%, P<0.01). PaO(2) increased from 39 ± 10 to 52 ± 9 kPa (baseline to 16 mmHg PP, P<0.01). Arterial carbon dioxide (PCO(2) ) increased during PP and increased further with increasing abdominal pressures. With increasing abdominal pressure during PP perfusion was redistributed more than ventilation away from dorsal, collapsed lung regions. This resulted in a better V/Q match. A possible mechanism is enhanced hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction mediated by increasing PCO(2) . © 2011 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2011 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  11. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  12. Latissimus dorsi free flap reconstruction of major abdominal defect in treatment of giant Marjolin’s ulcer: a short report focused on preoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Anders; Jensen, Jesper Poul Naested; Soerensen, Jens Ahm

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old man with a giant carcinoma in the abdominal wall. Based on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan there were FDG-avid lymph nodes in the ipsilateral axillary and groin, suspicious for metastases. At contrast-enhanced CT the parietal peritoneum seemed free of tumor invasion, which was essential to radical surgery planning. The tumor was completely removed with clear margins of resection and no metastasis in the resected lymph nodes. The PET/CT scan was repeated after 4 months, showing no signs of recurrence. PMID:24778800

  13. Primary epiploic appendagitis: CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D; Rajesh, Arumugam; Akisik, Fatih M

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT signs of primary epiploic appendagitis. A retrospective search of the CT database over 12 months for this diagnosis revealed 11 cases. The clinical findings were recorded. Softcopy CT images were reviewed by two experienced abdominal radiologists (KS, DM) for location of lesion, size, shape, presence of central hyperdense focus, degree of bowel wall thickening, mass effect, and ancillary signs. Abdominal pain was the primary symptom in all patients. Preliminary diagnoses were appendicitis (n=2), diverticulitis (n=5), pancreatitis (n=1), ovarian lesion (n=1), or unknown (n=2). Abdominal examination and white blood cell count were uninformative. CT examination revealed a solitary (n=11), ovoid (n=9) fatty lesion with some soft tissue stranding adjacent to the left colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=3), or right colon (n=2). Central hyperdensity (n=5), mild bowel wall thickening (n=2), and parietal peritoneal thickening (n=4) were also seen. In 4 patients the lesions were not visible on follow-up CT examination performed 23-184 days later. Primary epiploic appendagitis can clinically mimic other, more serious inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of its findings on CT would help the radiologist make the diagnosis and allow a more conservative approach to patient care.

  14. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  15. Delay in diagnosis and lessons learnt from a case of abdominal wall abscess caused by fishbone perforation.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, A; Shanmugam, V; Badrinath, K; Dube, M; Panto, P

    2015-04-01

    Complications following foreign body (FB) ingestion are an uncommon clinical problem. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of left iliac fossa pain and 1 episode of dark red blood mixed with stools. Inflammatory markers were elevated, and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed an ill defined abdominal wall inflammatory collection in close contact with the small bowel loops. He was treated with antibiotics, and follow-up CT, colonoscopy and small bowel enema were mostly unremarkable. The patient presented again ten months later with left iliac fossa cellulitis and fever. Multiplanar CT (the patient's fourth scan) demonstrated a 10cm abdominal wall collection with a linear hyperdense structure in the collection. The radiologists suspected a FB and on close scrutiny of the previous scans, they noted it to have been present on all of them. A targeted incision led to the removal of a 3cm fishbone from the collection. This case highlights the need to consider the possibility of a FB being the underlying cause in any unexplained intra-abdominal or abdominal wall inflammatory process so that the diagnosis is made in a timely manner.

  16. Traumatic hypovolemic shock revisited: the spectrum of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography findings and clinical implications for its management.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Hiroki; Kanki, Akihiko; Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Akira; Noda, Yasufumi; Yasokawa, Kazuya; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Hypovolemic shock is often seen in patients with severe blunt trauma who have suffered from blood circulation inadequate to maintain oxygen delivery to multiple organs. The early recognition and prompt management of hypovolemic shock in patients with multiple injuries are mandatory to improving prognosis and patient conditions. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) as a primary diagnostic tool is well established. The abdominal organs show several common and classic appearances on contrast-enhanced CT in patients with trauma. The hypovolemic shock complex is reported in the previous literature as decreased enhancement of the viscera, increased mucosal enhancement and luminal dilation of the small bowel, mural thickening and fluid-filled loops of the small bowel, the halo sign and flattening of the inferior vena cava, reduced aortic diameter, and peripancreatic edema. However, there have been controversial CT reports with contradictory appearances. Physicians understanding these findings could prompt alternative approaches to the early assessment and management of hypovolemic shock. The aim of this article is to illustrate common and well-known abdominal CT features in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock, to discuss controversial CT signs in the pancreas and adrenal gland, and to describe CT findings' clinical implications when managing hypovolemic shock.

  17. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  18. CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Shakespear, Jonathan S; Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and illustrate the CT findings of acute cholecystitis and its complications. CT findings suggesting acute cholecystitis should be interpreted with caution and should probably serve as justification for further investigation with abdominal ultrasound. CT has a relatively high negative predictive value, and acute cholecystitis is unlikely in the setting of a negative CT. Complications of acute cholecystitis have a characteristic CT appearance and include necrosis, perforation, abscess formation, intraluminal hemorrhage, and wall emphysema.

  19. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  1. Abdominal radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation - abdomen - discharge; Cancer - abdominal radiation; Lymphoma - abdominal radiation ... When you have radiation treatment for cancer, your body goes through changes. About 2 weeks after radiation treatment starts, you might notice changes ...

  2. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  3. Pathologic aerophagia: a rare cause of chronic abdominal distension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Cestari, Ana Beatriz C.S.S.; da Silva, Orli Carvalho; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Firme, Livia Honorato

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adolescent with pathologic aerophagia, a rare condition caused by excessive and inappropriate swallowing of air and to review its treatment and differential diagnoses. Case description: An 11-year-old mentally impaired blind girl presenting serious behavior problems and severe developmental delay with abdominal distension from the last 8 months. Her past history included a Nissen fundoplication. Abdominal CT and abdominal radiographs showed diffuse gas distension of the small bowel and colon. Hirschsprung's disease was excluded. The distention was minimal at the moment the child awoke and maximal at evening, and persisted after control of constipation. Audible repetitive and frequent movements of air swallowing were observed. The diagnosis of pathologic aerophagia associated to obsessive-compulsive disorder and developmental delay was made, but pharmacological treatment was unsuccessful. The patient was submitted to an endoscopic gastrostomy, permanently opened and elevated relative to the stomach. The distention was resolved, while maintaining oral nutrition. Comments: Pathologic aerophagia is a rare self-limiting condition in normal children exposed to high levels of stress and may be a persisting problem in children with psychiatric or neurologic disease. In this last group, the disease may cause serious complications. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments are ill-defined. Severe cases may demand surgical strategies, mainly decompressive gastrostomy. PMID:26100594

  4. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  5. Accessory Spleen: Prevalence and Multidetector CT Appearance.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Sameeah Abdulrahman

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and computed tomography (CT) appearances of accessory spleens in hospital-based patients, and to measure and make comparisons between accessory spleen size and density. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a diagnostic center in Erbil, Iraq during January-December, 2012. Biphasic abdominal CT images of 334 consecutive patients with different age groups were evaluated for the presence of an accessory spleen, and if identified, it was further analysed for shape, diameter, density, number, and location. Patients with inadequate CT techniques, splenectomy, hematological disorders, and widespread lesions in the abdomen were excluded from this study. Of the 334 patients (198 female, 136 male), with a mean age of 47.2 years (SD 15.7), 82 accessory spleens were detected in 63 patients (18.8%). Their mean diameter was 14.7 mm (range 3-79 mm), 68% were round in shape and 75.6% were medial to the main spleen. Sixty percent of the cases showed a single accessory spleen and 40% had more than one (up to 4 detected). A significant difference in the mean diameter of accessory spleens between similar and different densities than the main spleen was observed (P = 0.018), 71 accessory spleens (mean diameter = 15.97 mm) displayed similar densities to the main spleen, while 11 (mean diameter = 7.09 mm) were hypodense or hyperdense to the main spleen. The prevalence of an accessory spleen is high, and should be considered by radiologists during abdominal CT scan reporting.

  6. CT densities in delayed iodine hepatic scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Perkerson, R.B. Jr.; Erwin, B.C.; Baumgartner, B.R.; Phillips, V.M.; Torres, W.E.; Clements, J.L. Jr.; Gedgaudas-McClees, K.; Bernardino, M.E.

    1985-05-01

    Sixty patients underwent CT scanning of the liver prior to, immediately after, and four hours after intravenous administration of 60% meglumine diatrizoate. Twenty patients received a 50 ml bolus of contrast material, 20 received 100 ml, and 20 received 200 ml. In each group, delayed CT scanning safely raised the inherent density of the liver significantly. Thus, delayed scanning with doses presently used in abdominal and neurological CT examinations may be helpful in detecting hepatic lesions.

  7. Rupture and bleeding secondary to renal infarction in a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Toshifumi; Mukai, Shogo; Obata, Shogo; Morimoto, Hironobu; Uchida, Hiroaki; Yamane, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old man had been followed up for severe left ventricular dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction with a left ventricular thrombus. He had been treated with anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy and was admitted to our hospital because of abdominal pain and shock. He had no prior episode of trauma. The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed no changes compared with the previous ECG. Enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma around an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and the right kidney. We suspected rupture of AAA or the right kidney, and we performed AAA replacement with a Y-shaped graft and nephrectomy of the right kidney. Pathological examination revealed hemorrhagic infarction of the lower part of the right kidney, with hemorrhage and rupture at the center of the infarct. In our case, enhanced CT showed extravasation from the lower part of the right kidney. In addition, postoperative echocardiography showed that the left ventricular thrombus had disappeared. We report a case of rupture and bleeding secondary to renal infarction in a patient with an AAA.

  8. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of intra-abdominal fluid collection characterization in the era of multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian C; Barnhart, Huiman; Bashir, Mustafa; Nieman, Christopher; Breault, Steven; Jaffe, Tracy A

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that with improved technology, the presence of abscess in a postoperative fluid collection may be prospectively made. This is an Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of computed tomography (CT)-guided intra-abdominal fluid collection drainages. The diagnostic CT scans of 95 consecutive patients performed on 16- and 64-multidetector CT (MDCT) were reviewed by four readers with varying abdominal imaging expertise. Readers were asked to determine fluid content, to document whether infection was present, and to rate reader confidence for infection. A fifth radiologist reviewed the collections for imaging characteristics. The gold standard for presence of infection was microbiological Gram stain and culture. The logistic regression model showed that both fluid collections containing gas or high attenuation fluid (average CT density 20 or greater Hounsfield units) are significant predictors of infection (P = 0.001). The average sensitivity over the four readers for determining presence of infection was 83.4 per cent and specificity was 39.3 per cent. Even in the era of MDCT, the ability to predict whether or not a fluid collection is infected or not, based on imaging findings alone, is limited. Presence of gas is a strong indicator of infection, but no imaging finding is characteristic of a sterile fluid collection.

  10. Survey of volume CT dose index in Japan in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, A; Kobayashi, K; Kinomura, Y; Kobayashi, M; Asada, Y; Minami, K; Suzuki, S; Chida, K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study are to propose a new set of Japanese diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for 2014 and to study the impact of tube voltage and the type of reconstruction algorithm on patient doses. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) for adult and paediatric patients is assessed and compared with the results of a 2011 national survey and data from other countries. Methods: Scanning procedures for the head (non-helical and helical), chest and upper abdomen were examined for adults and 5-year-old children. A questionnaire concerning the following items was sent to 3000 facilities: tube voltage, use of reconstruction algorithms and displayed CTDIvol. Results: The mean CTDIvol values for paediatric examinations using voltages ranging from 80 to 100 kV were significantly lower than those for paediatric examinations using 120 kV. For adult examinations, the use of iterative reconstruction algorithms significantly reduced the mean CTDIvol values compared with the use of filtered back projection. Paediatric chest and abdominal scans showed slightly higher mean CTDIvol values in 2014 than in 2011. The proposed DRLs for adult head and abdominal scans were higher than those reported in other countries. Conclusion: The results imply that further optimization of CT examination protocols is required for adult head and abdominal scans as well as paediatric chest and abdominal scans. Advances in knowledge: Low-tube-voltage CT may be useful for reducing radiation doses in paediatric patients. The mean CTDIvol values for paediatric scans showed little difference that could be attributed to the choice of reconstruction algorithm. PMID:26043158

  11. 18F-DG PET/CT in detection of recurrence and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long-Bang; Tong, Jin-Long; Song, Hai-Zhu; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Yu-Cai

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of 18F-DG PET/CT in detecting recurrence and/or metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS: Combined visual analysis with semiquantitative analysis, the 18F-DG PET/CT whole-body imaging results and the corresponding clinical data of 68 postoperative CRC patients including 48 male and 20 female with average age of 58.1 were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Recurrence and/or metastasis were confirmed in 56 patients in the clinical follow-up after the PET/CT imaging. The sensitivity of PET/CT diagnosis of CRC recurrence and/or metastasis was 94.6%, and the specificity was 83.3%. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 96.4% and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 76.9%. PET/CT imaging detected one or more occult malignant lesions in 8 cases where abdominal/pelvic CT and/or ultrasonography showed negative findings, and also detected more lesions than CT or ultrasonography did in 30.4% (17/56) cases. Recurrence and/or metastasis was detected in 91.7% (22/24) cases with elevated serum CEA levels by 18F-DG PET/CT imaging. CONCLUSION: 18F-DG PET/CT could detect the recurrence and/or metastasis of CRC with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:17854148

  12. Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: CT findings of three cases.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyeon Je; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae-Chan; Kim, Young Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Clinical manifestations and computed tomography (CT) findings of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome (FHCS) are relatively well stabilized as right upper quadrant abdominal pain and hepatic capsular enhancement because of perihepatitis associated with pelvic inflammatory disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis. We encountered three patients with serial FHCS associated with pelvic inflammatory disease, who visited the emergency room with right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Abdominal CT revealed hepatic capsular or pericapsular enhancement along the anterior surface of the liver on the arterial phase. Recently, multi-detector CT has evolved as the first-line imaging modality of acute abdomen at the emergency room; we reemphasized the importance of the CT findings of this syndrome for differential diagnosis of right upper quadrant abdominal pain in sexually active young women. Physicians at the emergency room acknowledge the syndrome and should perform dynamic abdominopelvic CT including the arterial phase.

  13. IgG4-Related Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Pattern in 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Bélissant, Ophélie; Guernou, Mohamed; Rouvier, Philippe; Compain, Caroline; Bonardel, Gérald

    2015-10-01

    A 17-year-old adolescent girl was admitted with chronic arthralgia, Raynaud phenomenon, pericarditis, and evidences of chronic diffuse inflammation. F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed to search systemic vasculitis and showed diffuse moderate uptake in the kidneys. We suggested the existence of a nephritis, but the ultrasonography result was normal, and no treatment was introduced. Another F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed 7 months later to explore abdominal pain. It showed again diffuse intense uptake in both kidneys. A proteinuria was highlighted, and renal biopsy allowed to diagnose IgG4-related disease.

  14. Time requirements in performing body CT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schoppe, W.D.; Hessel, S.J.; Adams, D.F.

    1981-08-01

    In computed tomography (CT), whole body examinations take 1.5 times as long as head studies. In 73 patients (11 thoracic studies, 25 abdominal examinations, 31 CT scans of abdomen and pelvis, and 6 examinations of pelvis alone), the average time for a CT study was 136 min. The active part of the procedure lasted 60 min. Seventy-six minutes were idle time. The physician's involvement in body CT was estimated to be 53 min for an average study, when scans were taken before and after administration of contrast material. There are time differences in body CT of various anatomic regions (thorax, 40 min; abdomen, 66 min; pelvic, 52 min). The complexity of body CT, the equipment of a CT department, and the approach to diagnosis are responsible for time requirements and physician's involvement in whole body CT.

  15. High-density renal cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease demonstrated by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.; Grantham, J.J.

    1985-02-01

    Unenhanced abdominal CT scans of 35 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) showed multiple high-density (58-84 HU) renal cysts in 42.9% of patients, occasional high-density cysts in 25.7%, and no high-density cysts in 31.4%. These high-density cysts were usually subcapsular and were more frequent in patients with markedly enlarged kidneys and flank pain at the time of CT. Follow-up CT often showed a reduction in cyst densities, although some cysts developed mural calcification and calcification of their contents. Renal carcinomas occur rarely in ADPKD and may occasionally be hyperdense. However, high-density cysts may usually be distinguished from carcinomas on CT by their smooth contours, sharp interfaces with renal parenchyma, homogeneity, and lack of contrast enhancement.

  16. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease.

  17. An evaluation of the use of oral contrast media in abdominopelvic CT.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Erica Lauren; Grima, Karen Borg; Cortis, Kelvin; Soler, Sandro Galea; Zarb, Francis

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of different oral contrast media (OCM) for abdominopelvic CT examinations performed for follow-up general oncological indications. The objectives were to establish anatomical image quality criteria for abdominopelvic CT; use these criteria to evaluate and compare image quality using positive OCM, neutral OCM and no OCM; and evaluate possible benefits for the medical imaging department. Forty-six adult patients attending a follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications and who had a previous abdominopelvic CT with positive OCM (n = 46) were recruited and prospectively placed into either the water (n = 25) or no OCM (n = 21) group. Three radiologists performed absolute visual grading analysis (VGA) to assess image quality by grading the fulfilment of 24 anatomical image quality criteria. Visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the data showed comparable image quality with regards to reproduction of abdominal structures, bowel discrimination, presence of artefacts, and visualization of the amount of intra-abdominal fat for the three OCM protocols. All three OCM protocols provided similar image quality for follow-up abdominopelvic CT for general oncological indications. • Positive oral contrast media are routinely used for abdominopelvic multidetector computed tomography • Experimental study comparing image quality using three different oral contrast materials • Three different oral contrast materials result in comparable CT image quality • Benefits for patients and medical imaging department.

  18. Evaluation of Clinical Alvarado Scoring System and CT Criteria in the Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Gunes Tatar, Idil; Yilmaz, Kerim Bora; Sahin, Alpaslan; Aydin, Hasan; Akinci, Melih; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim was to evaluate the clinical Alvarado scoring system and computed tomography (CT) criteria for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Material and Methods. 117 patients with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal CT were enrolled in this retrospective study. Patient demographics, clinical Alvarado scoring, CT images, and pathologic results of the patients were evaluated. Results. 39 of the 53 patients who were operated on had pathologically proven acute appendicitis. CT criteria of appendiceal diameter, presence of periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, appendicolith, and white blood cell (WBC) count were significantly correlated with the inflammation of the appendix. The best cut-off value for appendiceal diameter was 6.5 mm. The correlation between appendiceal diameter and WBC count was 80% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). The correlation between appendiceal diameter and Alvarado score was 78.7% (P = 0.01 < 0.05). Conclusion. Presence of CT criteria of appendiceal diameter above 6.5 mm, periappendiceal inflammation, fluid, and appendicolith should prompt the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Since patients with acute appendicitis may not always show the typical signs and symptoms, CT is a helpful imaging modality for patients with relatively low Alvarado score and leukocytosis and when physical examination is confusing.

  19. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  20. Serial CT Findings of Paragonimus Infested Dogs and the Micro-CT Findings of the Worm Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hyun; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Hyun Ju; Hong, Sung-Tae; Shen, Cheng Hua; Chung, Doo Hyun; Son, Kyu Ri; Chang, Jung Min; Eo, Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the serial CT findings of Paragonimus westermani infected dogs and the microscopic structures of the worm cysts using Micro-CT. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the committee on animal research at our institution. Fifteen dogs infected with P. westermani underwent serial contrast-enhanced CT scans at pre-infection, after 10 days of infection, and monthly thereafter until six months for determining the radiologic-pathologic correlation. Three dogs (one dog each time) were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. After fixation of the lungs, both multi-detector CT and Micro-CT were performed for examining the worm cysts. Results The initial findings were pleural effusion and/or subpleural ground-glass opacities or linear opacities at day 10. At day 30, subpleural and peribronchial nodules appeared with hydropneumothorax and abdominal or chest wall air bubbles. Cavitary change and bronchial dilatation began to be seen on CT scan at day 30 and this was mostly seen together with mediastinal lymphadenopathy at day 60. Thereafter, subpleural ground-glass opacities and nodules with or without cavitary changes were persistently observed until day 180. After cavitary change of the nodules, the migratory features of the subpleural or peribronchial nodules were seen on all the serial CT scans. Micro-CT showed that the cyst wall contained dilated interconnected tubular structures, which had communications with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. Conclusion The CT findings of paragonimiasis depend on the migratory stage of the worms. The worm cyst can have numerous interconnected tubular channels within its own wall and these channels have connections with the cavity and the adjacent distal bronchus. PMID:17923779

  1. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  2. [Case of abdominal wall malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor which is difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease].

    PubMed

    Tatenuma, Tomoyuki; Sakata, Ryoko; Sugiura, Shinpei; Tajiri, Takehiro; Gondo, Toshikazu; Kitami, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are highly malignant soft tissue sarcomas. It is very rare for MPNST to arise in the abdominal wall. We report a case of abdominal wall MPNST that was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease. A 72-year-old woman found a mass of the umbilicus in October 2011. She visited a digestive surgery department in November because it gradually enlarged. Diagnostic imaging suggested a urachal tumor. She was then referred to our clinic. Contrast enhanced CT showed that the 5-cm cystic tumor extended from the umbilicus to abdominal wall. The tumor showed low uptake value in PET-CT. We diagnosed her with a urachal cyst, but could not deny urachal carcinoma. Therefore, we performed surgical resection in January 2012. The pathological diagnosis was MPNST. She has not experienced recurrence for 9 months. MPNST mostly occur in the retroperitoneum close to the spine, extremities, head, and neck. It is very rare for them to occur in the abdominal wall. This is the sixth case including overseas reports. In addition, this is the first case in which it was difficult to distinguish from a urachal disease.

  3. Sudden onset abdominal pain and distension: an imaging sparkler.

    PubMed

    Klair, Jagpal Singh; Girotra, M; Medarametla, S; Shah, H R

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged patient presenting with acute onset abdominal pain and distension who had signs of bowel obstruction on physical exam. He was afebrile, hemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Abdominal radiograph and CT scan were pathognomic for sigmoid volvulus. Through this case report we want to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, management options for sigmoid volvulus and importance of features suggestive of ischemic bowel that necessitates different management options.

  4. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    implementation of the pathway. The enhanced recovery after surgery pathway included preoperative high-dose steroid, daily assessment of revised discharge criteria and an aggressive approach to restore bowel function (chewing gum and enema on postoperative day two). Patients who followed the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway reported low scores of pain, nausea and fatigue, and were discharged significantly faster than patients in the control group. A non-significant increase in postoperative readmissions and reoperations was observed after the introduction of the enhanced recovery after surgery pathway. Study III and IV were prospective studies of patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for giant incisional hernia, who were compared to a control group of patients with an intact abdominal wall undergoing colorectal resection for benign or low-grade malignant disease. Patients were examined within a week preoperatively and again one year postoperatively. In study III, the respiratory function and respiratory quality of life were assessed, and the results showed that patients with a giant incisional hernia had a decreased expiratory lung function (peak expiratory flow and maximal expiratory pressure) compared to the predicted values and also compared to patients in the control group. Both parameters increased significantly after abdominal wall reconstruction, while no other significant changes were found in objective or subjective measures at one-year follow-up in both groups of patients. Lastly, study IV examined the abdominal wall- and extremity function, as well as overall and disease specific quality of life. We found that patients with a giant hernia had a significantly decreased relative function of the abdominal wall compared to patients with an intact abdominal wall, and that this deficit was offset at one-year follow-up. Patients in the control group showed a postoperative decrease in abdominal wall function, while no changes were found in extremity function

  5. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  6. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  7. Patient with perforation caused by emphysematous cholecystitis who showed flare on the skin of the right dorsal lumbar region and intraperitoneal free gas.

    PubMed

    Kanehiro, Tetsuya; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Toru; Hino, Yuji; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Sueda, Taijiro

    2008-01-01

    We report an 84-year-old man with perforation caused by emphysematous cholecystitis who showed flare on the skin of the right dorsal lumbar region and intraperitoneal free gas. The patient was admitted for abdominal pain, abdominal swelling, and consciousness disorder 18 days after the onset. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed emphysema in the gallbladder and a small amount of intraperitoneal free gas. Intraoperative findings suggested gangrenous cholecystitis. The gallbladder wall was perforated, and an abscess involving the right subphrenic region, the periphery of the liver and gallbladder, and the right paracolonic groove, was detected. The flare on the body surface may have reflected abscess formation in the right abdominal cavity. Emphysematous cholecystitis induces necrosis and perforation in many patients, and immediate strategies such as emergency surgery are important.

  8. Biomechanics of abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Maltese, M R

    2001-01-01

    Although considerable efforts have been advanced to investigate the biomechanical aspects of abdominal injuries, reviews have been very limited. The purpose of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the topic. Traumatic abdominal injuries occur due to penetrating or blunt loading. However, the present review is focused on blunt trauma. Because of the complexity of the abdomen, biomechanically relevant anatomical characteristics of the various abdominal organs are presented. The proposed mechanism of injury for these organs and methods for abdominal injury quantification are described. This is followed by a detailed analysis of the biomechanical literature with particular emphasis on experiments aimed to duplicate real world injuries and attempt to quantify trauma in terms of parameters such as force, deflection, viscous criteria, pressure criteria, and correlation of these variables with the severity of abdominal injury. Experimental studies include tests using primates, pigs, rats, beagles, and human cadavers. The effects of velocity, compression, padding, and impactor characteristics on tolerance; effects of pressurization and postmortem characteristics on abdominal injury; deduction of abdominal response corridors; and force-deflection responses (of the different abdominal regions and organs) are discussed. Output of initial research is presented on the development of a device to record the biomechanical parameters in an anthropomorphic test dummy during impact. Based on these studies and the current need for abdominal protection, recommendations are given for further research.

  9. Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Sarah L; Knudson, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presentation in the outpatient setting and can represent conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. If the patient history, physical examination, and laboratory testing do not identify an underlying cause of pain and if serious pathology remains a clinical concern, diagnostic imaging is indicated. The American College of Radiology has developed clinical guidelines, the Appropriateness Criteria, based on the location of abdominal pain to help physicians choose the most appropriate imaging study. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging test of choice for patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended for evaluating right or left lower quadrant pain. Conventional radiography has limited diagnostic value in the assessment of most patients with abdominal pain. The widespread use of CT raises concerns about patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Strategies to reduce exposure are currently being studied, such as using ultrasonography as an initial study for suspected appendicitis before obtaining CT and using low-dose CT rather than standard-dose CT. Magnetic resonance imaging is another emerging technique for the evaluation of abdominal pain that avoids ionizing radiation.

  10. Spinal extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kerr, John M; Ukpeh, Henry; Steinbok, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Spinal arachnoid cysts are an infrequently reported cause of abdominal pain in children. In this report, we describe the unusual case of an extradural arachnoid cyst presenting as recurrent abdominal pain in a pediatric patient without any signs of cord or nerve root compression. A 14-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain as the only symptom of a spinal extradural arachnoid cyst is reported. The patient was incidentally diagnosed with an intraspinal mass on abdominal computed tomography (CT) during the course of investigating her abdominal pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a T11-L2 extradural arachnoid cyst. After resection of the T11-L2 arachnoid cyst, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing abdominal pain as the sole presenting feature of a spinal arachnoid cyst in the pediatric population. This case illustrates that abdominal pain may be the first and only presentation of spinal arachnoid cysts in children. Spinal pathology should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained abdominal pain, even when there are no other symptoms of spinal disease.

  11. Quantitative CT imaging for adipose tissue analysis in mouse model of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchadier, A.; Vidal, C.; Tafani, J.-P.; Ordureau, S.; Lédée, R.; Léger, C.

    2011-03-01

    In obese humans CT imaging is a validated method for follow up studies of adipose tissue distribution and quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. Equivalent methods in murine models of obesity are still lacking. Current small animal micro-CT involves long-term X-ray exposure precluding longitudinal studies. We have overcome this limitation by using a human medical CT which allows very fast 3D imaging (2 sec) and minimal radiation exposure. This work presents novel methods fitted to in vivo investigations of mice model of obesity, allowing (i) automated detection of adipose tissue in abdominal regions of interest, (ii) quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. For each mouse, 1000 slices (100μm thickness, 160 μm resolution) were acquired in 2 sec using a Toshiba medical CT (135 kV, 400mAs). A Gaussian mixture model of the Hounsfield curve of 2D slices was computed with the Expectation Maximization algorithm. Identification of each Gaussian part allowed the automatic classification of adipose tissue voxels. The abdominal region of interest (umbilical) was automatically detected as the slice showing the highest ratio of the Gaussian proportion between adipose and lean tissues. Segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous fat compartments was achieved with 2D 1/2 level set methods. Our results show that the application of human clinical CT to mice is a promising approach for the study of obesity, allowing valuable comparison between species using the same imaging materials and software analysis.

  12. A real-time predictive simulation of abdominal viscera positions during quiet free breathing.

    PubMed

    Hostettler, A; Nicolau, S A; Rémond, Y; Marescaux, J; Soler, L

    2010-12-01

    Prediction of abdominal viscera and tumour positions during free breathing is a major challenge from which several medical applications could benefit. For instance, in radiotherapy it would reduce the healthy tissue irradiation. In this paper, we present a new approach to predict real-time abdominal viscera positions during free breathing. Our method needs an abdo-thoracic 3D preoperative CT or MR image, a second one limited to the diaphragmatic area, and a tracking of the patient's skin position. First, a physical analysis of the breathing motion shows it is possible to predict accurately abdominal viscera positions from the skin position and a modelling of the diaphragm motion. Secondly, a quantitative analysis of the skin and organ motion allows us to define the demands our real-time simulation has to fulfill. Then, we present in detail all the necessary steps of our original method to compute a deformation field from data extracted in both 3D preoperative image and skin surface tracking. Finally, experiments carried out with two human data show that our simulation model predicts abdominal viscera positions, such as liver, kidneys or spleen, at 50 Hz with an accuracy within 2-3 mm.

  13. [A case of recurrent intra-abdominal pediatric desmoid tumor undergoing surgical intervention for 6 times].

    PubMed

    Kametaka, Hisashi; Makino, Hironobu; Koyama, Takashi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Akio

    2011-11-01

    A 15-year-old male patient with palpable abdominal tumor presented to our hospital. CT scan revealed a giant tumor, 15 cm in diameter, with infiltration to the pancreas body. In addition, the tumor invaded to the greater curvature of the stomach and the transverse colon. We performed distal gastrectomy, distal pancreatectomy, splenectomy and transverse colectomy. The final diagnosis of histopathology was desmoid tumor. The tumor recurred locally 9 months after the surgery. Recurrent legion was unresectable because of the invasion to the orifice of SMV and weekly combination chemotherapy of VLB and MTX was started. Although a partial response was achieved for a local recurrent legion after 20 courses, CT scan showed other new recurrent multiple lesions in the abdominal cavity. Due to the severe abdominal discomfort and intestinal obstruction, a reduction surgery was performed 5 times in total. Endocrine therapy and administration of NSAID were not effective. Tumor progression was uncontrollable, and the patient died 5 years and 8 months after the initial surgery.

  14. Chronic pelvic pain reveals sacral osteomyelitis three years after abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Akhaddar, Ali; Mahi, Mohammed; Elouennass, Mostapha; Niamane, Redouane; Elmoustarchid, Brahim; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2009-12-01

    Deep pelvic abscess is a well-known infective complication in gynecologic practice. However, sacral osteomyelitis has been reported rarely. We describe sacral infection presenting three years after abdominal hysterectomy and point out the difficulty in management. Case report and review of the pertinent literature. A 46-year-old woman who had undergone abdominal hysterectomy three years before presented with an 8-month history of abdominopelvic pain recently intensifying in the sitting position without fever. Gynecologic, urinary, and rectal examination did not yield positive findings. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan was normal except for sacral osteolysis. A neoplasm was suspected, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed an S2-S4 cystic collection with presacral extension. Neurologic examination did not show any focal deficits. A posterior CT-guided biopsy-aspiration yielded purulent fluid. Pathologic examination revealed inflammatory granulations without any malignant tumor. Abscess cultures grew three microorganisms. The patient's symptoms resolved completely after 3 months of antibiotic therapy. Sacral osteomyelitis has not been reported previously after abdominal hysterectomy. Early diagnosis was made difficult by the absence of neurologic findings. Such postoperative infection should be considered after pelvic surgery. Minimally invasive needle aspiration may confirm the diagnosis and reduce the necessary extent of surgical intervention.

  15. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  16. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  17. CT angiography in the abdomen: a pictorial review and update.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter S; Platt, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    The development of multidetector CT technology and helical scanning techniques has revolutionized the use of CT for primary diagnostic evaluation of the abdominal vasculature, particularly the arterial system. CT angiography has numerous benefits relative to conventional catheter angiography, and has largely replaced catheter-based techniques in many clinical algorithms. This pictorial review and update will cover important technical principles related to modern CT angiography (including contrast delivery and dose considerations), discuss relevant anatomy and variants, and illustrate numerous arterial conditions related to the abdominal aorta and branch vessels.

  18. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  19. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  20. [Diagnostic problems in a case of dissecting aneurysm of the abdominal aorta with subsequent myelomalacia].

    PubMed

    Zareba, J

    1991-01-01

    A man aged 51 developed signs of damage to the inferior part of the thoracic cord and lumbosacral cord due to a dissecting aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. The aneurysm was demonstrated by USG and CT investigations of the abdomen.

  1. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  2. Abdominal Injuries in the "Found Down": Is Imaging Indicated?

    PubMed

    Ko, Ara; Zaw, Andrea A; Barmparas, Galinos; Hoang, David M; Murry, Jason S; Li, Tong; Ashrafian, Sogol; McNeil, Nathan J; Margulies, Daniel R; Ley, Eric J

    2015-07-01

    We sought to investigate the incidence of abdominal injuries in "found down" trauma patients to better understand the value of emergency department (ED) imaging. Found down patients are at high risk for injuries to the head or neck and low risk to the abdomen or pelvis, so imaging with CT of the abdomen/pelvis (AP) or Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) is of questionable value. The trauma registry was queried over a 10-year period ending December 2013 for found down patients. Demographics, CT AP, FAST scans, and injuries were abstracted from the trauma registry and then through a confirmatory chart review. The primary outcome was significant abdominal or pelvis injury, defined as abdomen/pelvis Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) ≥ 3 or an abdominal injury that required operative intervention. The secondary outcome was mortality due to abdominal injury. Of the 342 patients who met inclusion criteria, mean Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 11.0, and 189 (60%) of those tested for alcohol were intoxicated. Abdominal imaging included: CT AP only, 88 (57%); FAST only, 37 (24%); and CT AP and FAST, 29 (19%). Neither CT AP nor FAST scan led to a change in treatment and no patient had abdomen/pelvis AIS ≥ 3. Overall mortality was 33 (10%).The 24 trauma deaths were attributed to serious head trauma (n = 16) or traumatic arrest in the ED (n = 8); the 9 medical deaths were due to cerebral vascular accident (n = 5) or sepsis (n = 4). Although patients found down have a high mortality, abdominal injuries identified by imaging are highly unlikely. Efforts should focus on rapidly identifying and treating other causes of mortality, especially trauma to the head and neck, or medical diagnoses such as cerebral vascular accident or sepsis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mystery of a cryptogenic stroke solved by an abdominal angiogram.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Kaushik; Venkatasubramanian, Shankar; Umaiorubahan, Meenakshisundaram; Cannigaiper, Velmurugendran

    2015-12-16

    Despite advances in the field of imaging and diagnostics, the incidence of cryptogenic stroke is still around 30-40% in modern stroke databases. Our patient presented with recurrent midbrain infarcts over 3 years and was initially labelled as a patient with cryptogenic stroke. His blood investigations were normal, work up for autoimmune disorders was negative, CT brain angiogram was normal and a two-dimensional echo showed a small patent foramen ovale with a left to right shunt. He later presented with a right perinephric haematoma and an abdominal angiogram revealed multiple microaneurysms of the renal arteries, coeliac trunk and the mesenteric arterial system. The feeding renal artery was embolised. A diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa was made. The patient was subjected to digital subtraction angiography of neck and intracranial vessels, which revealed multiple microaneurysms in internal and external carotid artery territory. He was discharged with steroids and azathioprine. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Omental infarct: CT imaging features.

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Gervais, D A; Lee, P; Westra, S; Hahn, P F; Novelline, R A; Mueller, P R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) features of acute omental infarction and to study the evolutionary changes on follow-up CT imaging. Fifteen cases of omental infarction were evaluated for their initial CT imaging features. The imaging features evaluated included size of the fatty lesion, location, peripheral rim, and relation to colon. CT findings were correlated with etiology, clinical presentation, and leukocytosis. Follow-up CT images were available in eight patients and the imaging features were studied. Eight omental infarcts were of unknown etiology and seven were secondary to abdominal surgery. In 53% of patients (eight of 15), the location of the omental infarct was in the right lower, mid, or upper quadrants. These eight right-side infarcts occurred in six patients with primary omental infarcts. In 13 of 14 patients who underwent CT within 15 days of onset of omental infarct, the margin of the lesion was ill defined. Primary omental (n = 8) infarcts were seen in younger patients (p = 0.02) and were larger on CT (p = 0.02) compared with secondary omental infarcts. CT findings evolved from an ill-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion to a well-defined, heterogeneous fat-density lesion with a peripheral hyperdense rim in all six secondary omental infarctions for which acute stage and follow-up CT images were available for interpretation. There is a significant difference in the age distribution and CT findings in terms of size of the omental infarction between primary and secondary etiologies. On follow-up CT, secondary omental infarcts progressively shrank and developed a well-defined, hyperdense rim around a fatty core.

  5. Mesenteric Vasculature-guided Small Bowel Segmentation on 3D CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Louie, Adeline; Nguyen, Tan B.; Wank, Stephen; Nowinski, Wieslaw L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to its importance and possible applications in visualization, tumor detection and pre-operative planning, automatic small bowel segmentation is essential for computer-aided diagnosis of small bowel pathology. However, segmenting the small bowel directly on CT scans is very difficult because of the low image contrast on CT scans and high tortuosity of the small bowel and its close proximity to other abdominal organs. Motivated by the intensity characteristics of abdominal CT images, the anatomic relationship between the mesenteric vasculature and the small bowel, and potential usefulness of the mesenteric vasculature for establishing the path of the small bowel, we propose a novel mesenteric vasculature map-guided method for small bowel segmentation on high-resolution CT angiography scans. The major mesenteric arteries are first segmented using a vessel tracing method based on multi-linear subspace vessel model and Bayesian inference. Second, multi-view, multi-scale vesselness enhancement filters are used to segment small vessels, and vessels directly or indirectly connecting to the superior mesenteric artery are classified as mesenteric vessels. Third, a mesenteric vasculature map is built by linking vessel bifurcation points, and the small bowel is segmented by employing the mesenteric vessel map and fuzzy connectness. The method was evaluated on 11 abdominal CT scans of patients suspected of having carcinoid tumors with manually labeled reference standard. The result, 82.5% volume overlap accuracy compared with the reference standard, shows it is feasible to segment the small bowel on CT scans using the mesenteric vasculature as a roadmap. PMID:23807437

  6. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® pulsatile abdominal mass, suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Benoit; Dill, Karin E; Flamm, Scott D; Francois, Christopher J; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Mansour, M Ashraf; Mohler, Emile R; Oliva, Isabel B; Schenker, Matthew P; Weiss, Clifford; Rybicki, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical palpation of a pulsating abdominal mass alerts the clinician to the presence of a possible abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Generally an arterial aneurysm is defined as a localized arterial dilatation ≥50% greater than the normal diameter. Imaging studies are important in diagnosing the cause of a pulsatile abdominal mass and, if an AAA is found, in determining its size and involvement of abdominal branches. Ultrasound (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice when a pulsatile abdominal mass is present. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) may be substituted in patients for whom US is not suitable. When aneurysms have reached the size threshold for intervention or are clinically symptomatic, contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CTA) is the best diagnostic and preintervention planning study, accurately delineating the location, size, and extent of aneurysm and the involvement of branch vessels. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may be substituted if CT cannot be performed. Catheter arteriography has some utility in patients with significant contraindications to both CTA and MRA. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  7. Atypical moyamoya syndrome with brain calcification and stenosis of abdominal aorta and renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Uchikawa, Hideki; Fujii, Katsunori; Fujita, Mayuko; Okunushi, Tomoko; Shimojo, Naoki

    2017-09-01

    Moyamoya syndrome is a progressive cerebrovascular disease that is characterized by stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and its main branches, in combination with an accompanying disease. We herein describe an 8-year-old boy exhibiting transient loss of consciousness, who had recurrent seizures in infancy with progressive brain calcification. On admission, he was alert but magnetic resonance angiography showed bilateral stenosis of the whole internal carotid artery and proliferation of vascular collaterals, and brain CT revealed calcification on bilateral putamen. Given that this fulfilled diagnostic criteria, we finally diagnosed him as having moyamoya syndrome, though the etiology was unclear. Interestingly, a whole vessel survey revealed vascular stenosis of abdominal aorta and renal arteries, in which the former has not been reported in moyamoya syndrome. We considered that brain calcification was gradually formed by decreased cerebral vascular flow from infancy, and stenosis of abdominal aorta was possibly extended from renal arteries. This is, moyamoya syndrome with brain calcification and stenosis of abdominal aorta, suggesting that morphological screening of whole vessels containing cerebral and abdominal arteries should be considered in cases of slowly progressive brain calcification. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Extraanatomical ascending-abdominal aorta bypass with stump closure for aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Kei; Ohki, Shin-ichi; Konishi, Hiroaki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2008-08-01

    A 42-year-old man, who 25 years previously underwent grafting of the descending aorta because of traumatic rupture after a traffic accident, was admitted to our hospital complaining of fever and hemoptysis. Computed tomography (CT) scans showed a low density area around the prosthetic graft. We diagnosed a graft infection. We undertook extraanatomical ascending-abdominal aorta bypass with stump closure of the descending aorta, with omentopexy around the stump. Postoperative course was uneventful and he has been free from infection for one year. Extraanatomical bypass was an effective strategy for treatment of a graft infection.

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal MRI for Suspected Appendicitis: How We Do It

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Sonja; Repplinger, Michael D.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe our approach to contrast-enhanced abdominal MRI in patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain and suspected appendicitis. We aim to share our experience on the advantages, pearls, and pitfalls of MRI in this clinical setting, in comparison with CT and ultrasound. CONCLUSION We present some typical cases of appendicitis and alternative diagnoses in patients presenting with acute nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:27065072

  10. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  11. Management of stab wounds to the anterior abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Rezende-Neto, João Baptista; Vieira, Hélio Machado; Rodrigues, Bruno de Lima; Rizoli, Sandro; Nascimento, Barto; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The meeting of the Publication "Evidence Based Telemedicine - Trauma and Emergency Surgery" (TBE-CiTE), through literature review, selected three recent articles on the treatment of victims stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The first study looked at the role of computed tomography (CT) in the treatment of patients with stab wounds to the abdominal wall. The second examined the use of laparoscopy over serial physical examinations to evaluate patients in need of laparotomy. The third did a review of surgical exploration of the abdominal wound, use of diagnostic peritoneal lavage and CT for the early identification of significant lesions and the best time for intervention. There was consensus to laparotomy in the presence of hemodynamic instability or signs of peritonitis, or evisceration. The wound should be explored under local anesthesia and if there is no injury to the aponeurosis the patient can be discharged. In the presence of penetration into the abdominal cavity, serial abdominal examinations are safe without CT. Laparoscopy is well indicated when there is doubt about any intracavitary lesion, in centers experienced in this method.

  12. Doses metrics and patient age in CT.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer V

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how effective dose and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) change with patient age (size) for routine head and abdominal/pelvic CT examinations. Heads and abdomens of patients were modelled as a mass-equivalent cylinder of water corresponding to the patient 'effective diameter'. Head CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(S) of 40 mGy, and abdominal CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(L) of 10 mGy. Values of SSDE were obtained using conversion factors in AAPM Task Group Report 204. Age-specific scan lengths for head and abdominal CT scans obtained from the authors' clinical practice were used to estimate the dose-length product for each CT examination. Effective doses were calculated from previously published age- and sex-specific E/DLP conversion factors, based on ICRP 103 organ-weighting factors. For head CT examinations, the scan length increased from 15 cm in a newborn to 20 cm in adults, and for an abdominal/pelvic CT, the scan length increased from 20 cm in a newborn to 45 cm in adults. For head CT scans, SSDE ranged from 37.2 mGy in adults to 48.8 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 31 %. The corresponding head CT effective doses range from 1.4 mSv in adults to 5.2 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 270 %. For abdomen CT scans, SSDE ranged from 13.7 mGy in adults to 23.0 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 68 %. The corresponding abdominal CT effective doses ranged from 6.3 mSv in adults to 15.4 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 140 %. SSDE increases much less than effective dose in paediatric patients compared with adults because it does not account for scan length or scattered radiation. Size- and age-specific effective doses better quantify the total radiation received by patients in CT by explicitly accounting for all organ doses, as well as their relative radio sensitivity.

  13. Evaluating an Ultrasound Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma RTO-MP-HFM-109 P6 - 7 Table 1: Patients undergoing laparotomy U S US results C T CT result...11] Henneman PL, Marx JA, Moore EE. 1990. Diagnostic

  14. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  15. Abdominal wall endometriomas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Tsai, Eing Mei; Long, Cheng Yu; Chen, Yung Hung; Kay, Nari

    2009-03-01

    Abdominal wall endometriosis is rare, with an incidence of 0.03-0.47% following cesarean delivery. The study reviewed abdominal wall endometriomas during an 8-year period in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital. Of 166 patients with endometriosis treated surgically in the hospital during an 8-year period, 20 (12%) had abdominal wall endometriomas. The mean interval between the prior operation and the appearance of the first symptoms was 39.3 months. Preoperative diagnosis was correct in 14 patients (70%). Abdominal wall endometrioma is more common than generally assumed in patients visiting the hospital. In patients with a palpable subcutaneous mass near surgical scars associated with cyclic or constant pain, a thorough history and physical examination are sufficient to establish the presence of endometriomas. A surgical-wide excision with clear margins is the single treatment of choice.

  16. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  17. [The abdominal catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian A

    2011-08-01

    Patients with an abdominal catastrophe are in urgent need of early, interdisciplinary medical help. The treatment plan should be based on medical priorities and clear leadership. First priority should be given to achieve optimal oxygenation of blood and stabilization of circulation during all treatment-phases. The sicker the patient, the less invasive the (surgical) treatment should to be, which means "damage control only". This short article describes 7 important, pragmatic rules that will help to increase the survival of a patient with an abdominal catastrophe. Preexisting morbidity and risk factors must be included in the overall risk-evaluation for every therapeutic intervention. The challenge in patients with an abdominal catastrophe is to carefully balance the therapeutic stress and the existing resistance of the individual patient. The best way to avoid abdominal disaster, however, is its prevention.

  18. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  19. Multiple Ectopic Hepatocellular Carcinomas Arising in the Abdominal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery. PMID:23139654

  20. Multiple ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas arising in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery.

  1. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  2. Linear abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Danto, L A; Wolfman, E F

    1976-03-01

    Three cases of blunt abdominal trauma are presented to exemplify the mechanism of trauma and the problems of diagnosis associated with any linear blow to the abdomen. The mechanisms of visceral injury are reviewed, and special attention is directed to the abdominal wall injury that can be present in these patients. This injury has special implications in directing the operative approach and repair. An unusual aortic occlusion is described which is peculiar to this type of injury.

  3. Prevalence of abnormal CT findings in patients with proven ovarian torsion and a proposed triage schema.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christopher; Meyers, Arthur B; Capotasto, Juliana; Bokhari, Jamal

    2009-03-01

    Many women with ovarian torsion present with nonspecific abdominal/pelvic pain and initially receive computed tomography (CT). We hypothesize that the CT scans preformed on these women will all show abnormalities of the involved ovary. Our purpose is to review cases of surgically proven ovarian torsion at our institution over the last 20 years, assessing CT findings in women with ovarian torsion. A retrospective review of all patients at our institution with surgically proven ovarian torsion from 1985-2005 was conducted. Two physicians reviewed available CT reports, and a radiologist reviewed all available images. CT was obtained in 33% of the 167 patients. Dictated reports were available for 28 studies; all described an enlarged ovary, ovarian cyst, or adnexal mass of the involved ovary. Radiologist review of the available CT images confirmed these findings. This series supports the claim that a CT scan with well-visualized normal appearing ovaries rules out ovarian torsion, while abnormal pelvic findings or failure to visualize the ovaries in women with pelvic pain necessitates further evaluation of torsion.

  4. Helical mode lung 4D-CT reconstruction using Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    He, Tiancheng; Xue, Zhong; Nitsch, Paige L; Teh, Bin S; Wong, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    4D computed tomography (CT) has been widely used for treatment planning of thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. Current 4D-CT lung image reconstruction methods rely on respiratory gating to rearrange the large number of axial images into different phases, which may be subject to external surrogate errors due to poor reproducibility of breathing cycles. New image-matching-based reconstruction works better for the cine mode of 4D-CT acquisition than the helical mode because the table position of each axial image is different in helical mode and image matching might suffer from bigger errors. In helical mode, not only the phases but also the un-uniform table positions of images need to be considered. We propose a Bayesian method for automated 4D-CT lung image reconstruction in helical mode 4D scans. Each axial image is assigned to a respiratory phase based on the Bayesian framework that ensures spatial and temporal smoothness of surfaces of anatomical structures. Iterative optimization is used to reconstruct a series of 3D-CT images for subjects undergoing 4D scans. In experiments, we compared visually and quantitatively the results of the proposed Bayesian 4D-CT reconstruction algorithm with the respiratory surrogate and the image matching-based method. The results showed that the proposed algorithm yielded better 4D-CT for helical scans.

  5. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  6. CT and ultrasound of gastric and duodenal duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Guibaud, L.; Genin, G.; Fouque, P.

    1996-05-01

    We present the radiological findings of gastric and duodenal duplications in four adults, in whom abdominal ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), and CT were primarily used for diagnosis. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all cases. Preoperative diagnosis of duplications was possible with ultrasound in three patients, in whom CT showed a nonspecific cystic structure. Ultrasound demonstrated a pathognomonic multilayered wall appearance suggestive of a digestive origin, including an echogenic inner mucosal layer and a hypoechoic muscular layer, better appreciated using EUS in one patient. In one case, digestive origin was confirmed by direct visualization of a peristaltic activity within the cystic wall after water ingestion. In the last patient, a non-specific heterogeneous mainly solid mass of the esophagogastric junction was found to be an adenocarcinoma arising from a duplication on the histological analysis of the surgical specimen. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Biller, J A; Grand, R J; Harris, B H

    1987-09-01

    Little information is available about the development of abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease. We report the clinical presentation of five adolescents with Crohn's disease who developed this complication. The mean time from diagnosis until development of an abdominal abscess was 1.7 years. The admitting diagnosis was an acute abdomen in two patients and recurrent Crohn's disease in the other three. No features of the clinical presentation or laboratory data distinguished this group from other adolescents with Crohn's disease. The use of ultrasound and CT scanning was helpful in making this diagnosis preoperatively. Those patients with active Crohn's disease who do not respond promptly to medical therapy should be evaluated for the development of this complication.

  8. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Hemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ying; Chen, Xiao-nong; Shi, Hao; Xie, Jingyuan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is a rare disorder. Failure of an early diagnosis may cause progressive intestinal ischemia, leading to abdominal pain, sepsis, and death. Patients with end-stage renal disease are among the highest risk populations for developing this lethal complication. The key to a correct diagnosis at an early stage is a high index of suspicion in predisposed patients. In our case, we present a 62-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for 8 years; she complained of abdominal pain after hemodialysis in the last 3 months; NOMI was suspected after a CT angiography. She partially recovered after multiple clinical interventions such as decreased ultrafiltration, an increased dose of low molecular-weight heparin and the use of vasoactive drugs. In conclusion, NOMI can be reversible if it is diagnosed as early as possible and after the necessary diagnostic measurements are initiated. PMID:26266246

  9. Visceral abdominal fat accumulation predicts the progression of noncalcified coronary plaque.

    PubMed

    Imai, Atsuko; Komatsu, Sei; Ohara, Tomoki; Kamata, Teruaki; Yoshida, Jyunichi; Miyaji, Kazuaki; Takewa, Mitsuhiko; Kodama, Kazuhisa

    2012-06-01

    Excess visceral abdominal tissue (VAT) is more strongly associated with risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) than body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference. However, whether adding VAT measurements to CAD risk factors provides better risk assessment for CAD progression has not been fully evaluated. This prospective cohort study comprised 553 CAD patients with coronary plaque with ≤50% coronary stenosis as assessed by computed tomography (CT) angiography. Quantification of VAT area was performed together with CT angiography using abdominal CT scanning. After a mean 38±8 months follow-up, 320 patients underwent repeated CT scans for worsening angina symptoms without findings of positive ischemia. Increased segments of noncalcified plaque were seen in 152 (48%) and an increased calcium score was seen in 261 (82%) patients. The risk for progression of noncalcified plaque increased steadily with higher VAT quartiles, independent of CAD risk factors. Patients in the higher quartiles were at increased risk of progression of noncalcified plaque (quartiles IV OR 4.7; 95% CI 2.3-9.4, p-value<0.001). In contrast, increases above the median calcium score showed no independent correlation to VAT. Compared to VAT, progression of noncalcified plaque showed no phased increase with higher waist circumference and weaker increase with higher BMI quartiles. VAT accumulation was positively associated with progression of coronary noncalcified plaque, but not of calcified plaque. This suggests that risk assessment of progression of noncalcified plaque can be improved by combining VAT measurements and CAD risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed. PMID:24038286

  11. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-09-13

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed.

  12. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  13. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the…

  14. Advances in abdominal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, J T

    1998-01-01

    Major technical advances in MR imaging have led to its wider use in the evaluation of abdominal disease. The principle new pulse sequence is the RARE sequence for T2-weighted imaging. Multishot and breath-hold single-shot RARE techniques are now widely used, and both have performed as well as conventional spin-echo imaging with far shorter acquisition times. The most notable improvements have been in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Two liver-specific contrast agents received FDA approval during 1997: SPIO particles or ferumoxide and mangafodipir trisodium, a hepatocyte-specific agent. Both of these agents provide considerable benefit in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Manganese enhancement has also proved useful in MR imaging of the pancreas, although fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging with dynamic gadolinium enhancement has also yielded results comparable with those of contrast-enhanced CT. MR hydrography, a generic term for static fluid imaging, is another derivative of RARE fast T2-weighted imaging. MRCP, the best known example of MR hydrography, has been rapidly and widely employed as a primary method for imaging the biliary and pancreatic ducts and has become competitive with ERCP. MR vascular imaging, especially portal venography, has been used for noninvasive imaging of portal venous disease in Budd Chiari disease, before placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, and for pancreatic cancer staging. Finally, the development of conventional phased-array body coils and endorectal coils has enabled high-quality MR imaging of perirectal disease (including Crohn disease, fistula in ano, and postpartum sphincter dysfunction). Future abdominal applications of MR imaging will involve second-generation MR interventional techniques, including use of open systems, functional or diffusion-weighted imaging exploiting the molecular activity of tissues, and virtual MR endoscopy. Although CT continues to evolve

  15. Changing Abdominal Imaging Utilization Patterns: Perspectives From Medicare Beneficiaries Over Two Decades.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Courtney C; Hemingway, Jennifer; Johnson, Aileen C; Hughes, Danny R; Mittal, Pardeep K; Duszak, Richard

    2016-08-01

    To assess changing utilization patterns of abdominal imaging in the Medicare fee-for-service population over the past two decades. Medicare Physician Supplier Procedure Summary master files from 1994 through 2012 were used to study changes in the frequency and utilization rates (per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries per year) of abdominal CT, MRI, ultrasound, and radiography. In Medicare beneficiaries, the most frequently performed abdominal imaging modality changed from radiography in 1994 (207.4 per 1,000 beneficiaries) to CT in 2012 (169.0 per 1,000). Utilization rates of abdominal MR (1037.5%), CT (197.0%), and ultrasound (38.0%) all increased from 1994-2012 (but declined briefly from 2007 to 2009). A dramatic 20-year utilization rate decline occurred for gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations (-91.9% barium enema, -80.0% upper gastrointestinal series) and urologic radiographic examinations (-95.3%). Radiologists were the dominant providers of all modalities, accounting for >90% of CT and MR studies, and >75% of most ultrasound examination types. Medicare utilization of abdominal imaging has markedly changed over the past two decades, with overall dramatic increases in CT and MRI and dramatic decreases in gastrointestinal fluoroscopic and urologic radiographic imaging. Despite these changes, radiologists remain the dominant providers in all abdominal imaging modalities. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anatomical and CT approach of the adipose tissue: application in morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Renard, Yohann; Diaz Cives, Anna; Veyrie, Nicolas; Bouillot, Jean Luc; Bertin, Eric; Labrousse, Marc; Kianmanesh, Reza; Avisse, Claude

    2015-11-01

    The importance and proportion of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) represent the best criterion to define obesity. Because VAT value is difficult to obtain in clinical practice, the indication for bariatric surgery is still based at present on Body Mass index (BMI), even though BMI is a poor predictor of obesity-related morbid complications. This correlation study aimed at determining a simple and accurate computed tomography (CT) anatomic marker, which can be easily used clinically, well correlated with the volume of VAT and consequently with morbid complications. We studied 108 CT scans of patients presenting with morbid obesity. Several simplified measures (external and internal abdominal diameters and circumferences) were conducted on CT scan view, going through the fourth lumbar vertebra (L4), in addition to various vertebral measurements (area of the vertebra, sagittal and transversal diameters), VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Then, we reported the simplified measures values on the vertebral areas, and we calculated the Bertin index. Finally, we conducted a correlation study between all variables to obtain accurate VAT measurements. The internal abdominal circumference and the Bertin index showed the best correlations with VAT in morbidly obese patients (r = 0.84 and 0.85, respectively). BMI and anthropometric measures were not correlated with VAT. CT scan study allows to simply approximate VAT value in morbidly obese patients. An abdominal CT scan could be part of the tests used in the evaluation of obese patients to base therapeutic strategies on VAT values and not on BMI as it is the case today.

  17. Body fat of rats of different age-groups and nutritional states: assessment by micro-CT and skinfold thickness.

    PubMed

    Tekus, Eva; Miko, Alexandra; Furedi, Nora; Rostas, Ildiko; Tenk, Judit; Kiss, Tamas; Szitter, István; Balasko, Marta; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Wilhelm, Marta; Petervari, Erika

    2017-07-20

    Obesity presents a growing public health problem. Therefore, the analysis of body composition is important in clinical practice as well as in animal research models of obesity, hence precise methods for the assessment of body fat would be essential. We aimed to evaluate in vivo abdominal micro-computed tomography scan restricted to the L1-L3 region (micro-CT(L1-L3)), a skinfold thickness-based method (STM) and post mortem body composition analysis (PMA) with regard to whole-body micro-CT scan in rats. Male Wistar rats of different age-groups (from 3 to 24 months) and nutritional states (normally fed, high-fat diet-induced obese, calorie-restricted) were used. The fat percentage was determined with micro-CT(L1-L3) and whole-body scan in anesthesized rats. Their skinfold thickness was measured in five locations with Lange caliper. Wet weights of epididymal and retroperitoneal fat pads were determined via PMA. With regard to fat mass, the strongest correlation was observed between abdominal and whole-body micro-CT. The other methods showed weaker associations with whole-body micro-CT and with each other. Micro-CT(L1-L3) and PMA showed similar age-associated increase in fat mass between 3-18 months. Micro-CT(L1-L3), STM and PMA were efficient to detect differences in fat mass values in groups of different nutritional states. Micro-CT(L1-L3) appears to be a useful method for body fat assessment in rats with reduced scanning time. In rats STM may also be a useful, low-priced, non-invasive and simple in vivo technique to assess obesity. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  18. Show Code.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    "Let's get one thing straight: there is no such thing as a show code," my attending asserted, pausing for effect. "You either try to resuscitate, or you don't. None of this halfway junk." He spoke so loudly that the two off-service consultants huddled at computers at the end of the unit looked up… We did four rounds of compressions and pushed epinephrine twice. It was not a long code. We did good, strong compressions and coded this man in earnest until the end. Toward the final round, though, as I stepped up to do compressions, my attending looked at me in a deep way. It was a look in between willing me as some object under his command and revealing to me everything that lay within his brash, confident surface but could not be spoken. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF RESPIRATION-INDUCED DISPLACEMENT OF CANINE ABDOMINAL ORGANS IN DORSAL AND VENTRAL RECUMBENCY USING MULTISLICE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cintia R.; Henzler, Margaret A.; Johnson, Rebecca A.; Drees, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory-induced organ displacement during image acquisition can produce motion artifacts and variation in spatial localization of an organ in diagnostic computed tomography (CT) exams. The purpose of this prospective study was to quantify respiratory-induced abdominal organ displacement in dorsal and ventral recumbency using five normal dogs. All dogs underwent CT exams using 64-multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). A “3-dimensional (3D) apneic CT exam” of the abdomen was acquired followed by a “4-dimensional (4D) ventilated CT exam”. The liver, pancreas, both kidneys, both medial iliac lymph nodes and urinary bladder where delineated on the 3D–apneic exam and the organ outlines were compared to the maximum alteration in organ position in the 4D–ventilated exam. Displacement was measured in dorsal-to-ventral (DV), right-to-left (RL) and cranial-to-caudal (CC) directions. Respiratory-induced displacement of canine abdominal organs was not predictable and showed large variability in the three directions evaluated. For most canine abdominal organs, dorsal recumbency provided overall the least amount of displacement among all directions evaluated except for liver and urinary bladder. For liver, a large variability was found for all directions and a statistically significant difference was found only in RL direction with ventral recumbency exhibiting less displacement (P = 0.0099). For the urinary bladder ventral recumbency also provided less displacement but this was statistically significant only in the RL direction (P < 0.0001). Findings from this study indicated that dorsal recumbency may be preferred for whole abdomen studies, but ventral recumbency may be preferred for liver and urinary bladder studies when respiration cannot be controlled. PMID:25130054

  20. Prevalence of CT features of axial spondyloarthritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    De Kock, Isabelle; Hindryckx, Pieter; De Vos, Martine; Delrue, Louke; Verstraete, Koenraad; Jans, Lennart

    2017-05-01

    Background The sacroiliac joint and spine are seen on abdominal computed tomography (CT) and may show structural lesions as part of spondyloarthritis. Purpose To determine the prevalence of CT features of spondyloarthritis in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Material and Methods A retrospective study of structural lesions of spondyloarthritis on abdominal CT was performed. The sacroiliac joints and spine of 120 patients were studied: study group I consisted of 40 patients with known CD and inflammatory back pain, group II involved 40 patients with CD without inflammatory back pain, and group III consisted of 40 patients without known joint or inflammatory bowel disease. Recorded CT features included sclerosis, erosions or ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, enthesopathy, spinal syndesmophytes, and costovertebral joint lesions. Results CT showed structural lesions of the sacroiliac joints in 19/40 (48%) patients with CD and inflammatory back pain (sclerosis [n = 14; 35%], erosions [n = 14; 35%], ankylosis [n = 3; 8%]), in 8/40 (8%) patients with CD without inflammatory back pain (sclerosis [n = 3; 8%], erosions [n = 4; 10%], ankylosis [n = 3; 8%]), and in 3/40 (8%) patients without known joint or bowel disease (sclerosis [n = 2; 5%], ankylosis [n = 1; 3%]). Syndesmophytes were exclusively seen in group I (n = 6; 15%). Conclusion CT of the abdomen in patients with CD and inflammatory back pain shows structural lesions of the sacroiliac joint, entheses, or spine in almost half of the patients. Awareness and knowledge of these findings may guide the referring clinician to further clinical evaluation, imaging, and biomarker evaluation of the disease.

  1. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  2. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction.

  3. Primary lower extremity lymphedema: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Silverman, P.M.; Ling, D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-10-01

    The CT findings of two cases of primary lymphedema of the lower extremities are presented. CT showed a coarse, nonenhancing, reticular pattern in an enlarged subcutaneous compartment. CT excluded the diagnosis of secondary lymphedema from an obstructing mass by demonstrating a normal retroperitoneum and pelvis. The CT findings are correlated with pedal lymphangiograms.

  4. Current CT/MRI examination of the upper intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taourel, P; Pradel, J; Bruel, J M

    1994-12-01

    When properly performed, CT of the abdomen can provide valuable information about mural diseases of the alimentary tract. It can demonstrate the digestive origin of an abdominal mass, categorize a given lesion on the basis of its specific CT appearance and any associated CT findings, assess the extramural spread of gastrointestinal lesion, guide various interventional procedures (biopsy, drainage) and follow a patient's response to therapy.

  5. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  6. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study*

    PubMed Central

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emílio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fábio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. PMID:27777476

  7. Systematic Evaluation of Radiation Dose Reduction in CT Studies of Body Packers: Accuracy Down to Submillisievert Levels.

    PubMed

    Laberke, Patrick J; Blum, Simon; Waelti, Stephan; Fornaro, Jürgen; Hausmann, Roland; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate the accuracy of abdominal CT performed at different radiation dose levels for the detection of body packs in human cadavers, in comparison with the accuracy of abdominal radiography. In this study, differing numbers of body packs (range, 0-20) were placed in the alimentary tract of human cadavers and then underwent imaging with abdominal radiography and with CT performed at different radiation dose levels (ranging from the standard abdominal CT dose to the technical minimum dose). Depiction of body packs on abdominal radiographs and on each CT scan was assessed by two independent blinded radiologists, and the accuracy of detection of body packs was calculated. The radiation dose associated with abdominal radiography was measured, and the effective radiation dose associated with CT was estimated. The mean (± SD) effective radiation dose for abdominal radiography was 1.4 ± 0.3 mSv, whereas the mean effective dose of CT ranged from 0.1 to 9.6 mSv. Interobserver agreement for body pack detection was moderate (κ = 0.51) for abdominal radiography and good (κ = 0.72-0.85) for CT. In a per-body pack analysis, abdominal radiography depicted 42% of the body packs with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 100%. When performed at radiation dose levels of 0.6 mSv or greater, CT correctly detected all body packs. In per-person analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of CT for the correct detection of at least one body pack per cadaver was 100% for all radiation dose levels. CT performed at a dose of 0.6 mSv can be used for the detection of body packs. With a sensitivity and specificity of 100%, CT is superior to abdominal radiography in terms of reliability, associated radiation dose, and accuracy of detection.

  8. Is intra-abdominal drainage necessary after pancreaticoduodenectomy?

    PubMed

    Heslin, M J; Harrison, L E; Brooks, A D; Hochwald, S N; Coit, D G; Brennan, M F

    1998-01-01

    Closed suction drains after pancreaticoduodenectomy are theoretically used to drain potential collections and anastomotic leaks. It is unknown whether such drains are effective, harmful, or affect the outcome after this operation. Eighty-nine consecutive patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for presumed periampullary malignancy and were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-eight had no intra-abdominal drains and 51 had drains placed at the conclusion of the operation. We analyzed patient, nutritional, laboratory, and operating room factors with end points being complications and length of hospital stay. Intra-abdominal complications were defined as intra-abdominal abscess and pancreatic or biliary fistula. Postoperative interventions were defined as CT-guided drainage and reoperation. Analysis was by Student's t test and chi-square test. Two of eight surgeons contributed 92% of the patients without drains. The groups were equivalent with respect to demographic, nutritional, and operative factors. Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter in the group without drains (P = 0.0001). There was no statistical difference in the rate of fistula, abscess, CT drainage, or length of hospital stay. Intra-abdominal drainage did not significantly alter the risk of fistula, abscess, or reoperation or the necessity for CT-guided intervention after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Routine use of drains after pancreaticoduodenectomy may not be necessary and should be subjected to a randomized trial.

  9. Quantitative anatomical labeling of the anterior abdominal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wade M.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Ventral hernias (VHs) are abnormal openings in the anterior abdominal wall that are common side effects of surgical intervention. Repair of VHs is the most commonly performed procedure by general surgeons worldwide, but VH repair outcomes are not particularly encouraging (with recurrence rates up to 43%). A variety of open and laparoscopic techniques are available for hernia repair, and the specific technique used is ultimately driven by surgeon preference and experience. Despite routine acquisition of computed tomography (CT) for VH patients, little quantitative information is available on which to guide selection of a particular approach and/or optimize patient-specific treatment. From anecdotal interviews, the success of VH repair procedures correlates with hernia size, location, and involvement of secondary structures. Herein, we propose an image labeling protocol to segment the anterior abdominal area to provide a geometric basis with which to derive biomarkers and evaluate treatment efficacy. Based on routine clinical CT data, we are able to identify inner and outer surfaces of the abdominal walls and the herniated volume. This is the first formal presentation of a protocol to quantify these structures on abdominal CT. The intra- and inter rater reproducibilities of this protocol are evaluated on 4 patients with suspected VH (3 patients were ultimately diagnosed with VH while 1 was not). Mean surfaces distances of less than 2mm were achieved for all structures.

  10. Plaster body wrap: effects on abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Santos Moreira, Juliana; Melo, Ana Sofia Carneiro Pinto de; Noites, Andreia; Couto, Miriam Faria; Melo, Cristina Argel de; Adubeiro, Nuno Carvalho Freire de Almeida

    2013-12-01

    Abdominal fat is associated with metabolic disorders, leading to cardiovascular risk factors and numerous diseases. This study aimed to analyze the effect of plaster body wrap in combination with aerobic exercise on abdominal fat. Nineteen female volunteers were randomly divided into intervention group (IG; n = 10) performing aerobic exercise with plaster body wrap, and control group (CG; n = 9) performing only exercise. Subcutaneous and visceral fat were measured using ultrasound; subcutaneous fat was also estimated on analysis of skinfolds and abdominal perimeters. At the end of the 10-sessions protocol, the IG demonstrated a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.05) in subcutaneous fat at the left anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) level and in iliac crest perimeter measurements. A large intervention effect size strength (0.80) was found in subcutaneous fat below the navel and a moderate effect size strength on the vertical abdominal skinfold (0.62) and the perimeter of the most prominent abdominal point (0.57). Comparing the initial and final data of each group, the IG showed a significant decrease in numerous variables including visceral and subcutaneous fat above and below the navel measured by ultrasound (p ≤ 0.05). Plaster body wrap in combination with aerobic exercise seems to be effective for abdominal fat reduction.

  11. A case of abdominal aortic injury caused by a traffic accident.

    PubMed

    Kutsukata, Noriyoshi; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Hara, Yoshiaki; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Takei, Kenkichi; Saito, Nobuyuki

    2008-12-01

    A 30-year-old man was injured when the large motorcycle he was riding crashed into a power pole. Upon arrival at our institution, the patient complained of abdominal pain; blood pressure at admission was 160/70 mmHg, and the heart rate was 112 bpm. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a small collection of fluid in Morrison's pouch. A chest X-ray film showed a right rib fracture. Multidetector computed tomography (MD-CT) revealed pleural effusion, a hepatic lesion, and a dissection of the abdominal aorta distal to the renal artery. Because of the complicated intraluminal injuries, the insertion of a stent graft was difficult. On the 34th day after injury, elective surgery was performed. Because dissection of the lumen was observed, the vessel was replaced with an artificial graft. Medial degeneration of the aorta wall was not observed upon pathological examination, and no degenerative disorders have occurred. The postoperative progress was favorable, and the patient was discharged from hospital.

  12. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  13. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  14. Laparoscopy in Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, Selman; Dorr, Katrin

    2010-02-01

    The decision in favor of surgery or nonoperative conservative treatment in blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma requires a precise diagnosis that is not always possible with imaging techniques, whereby there is great danger that an injury to the diaphragm or intestines may be overlooked. To avoid such oversights, indications for exploratory laparotomy have traditionally been generous, to the extent that up to 41% of exploratory laparotomies turn out to be nontherapeutic and could be, or could have been, avoided with laparoscopy. A diagnostic laparoscopy with therapeutic option should only be attempted in stable patients. Three trocars are usually used and the abdomen is explored systematically, beginning with the right upper quadrant and continuing clockwise. Hollow viscus injuries and injuries to the diaphragm and mesentery can be detected and sutured laparoscopically. Injuries to parenchymal organs are not a primary focus of laparoscopy, but with a laparoscopic approach, they usually no longer bleed in stable patients and can be sealed with tissue adhesive and collagen tamponade to prevent re-bleeding. The routine use of laparoscopy can achieve a sensitivity of 90-100% in abdominal trauma. This can reduce the number of unnecessary laparotomies and the related morbidity. Laparoscopy can be performed safely and effectively in stable patients with abdominal trauma. The most important advantages are reduction of the nontherapeutic laparotomy rate, morbidity, shortening of hospitalization, and cost-effectiveness. In the future, new developments in and the miniaturization of equipment can be expected to increase the use of minimally invasive techniques in abdominal trauma cases.

  15. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, it is called a KUB (kidneys, ureters, bladder) x-ray.

  16. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  17. A reappraisal of adult abdominal surface anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S Ali; McFadden, Sara L; Buckenham, Tim; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Descriptions of clinically important surface landmarks often vary between and within contemporary anatomical texts. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface anatomy of major abdominal vessels, kidneys, spleen, gastroesophageal junction, and duodenojejunal flexure in living adults using computed tomography (CT). After excluding patients with distorting space-occupying lesions, scoliosis, abnormal lordosis, and obvious visceromegaly, 108 abdominal CT scans of supine adults (mean age 60 years, range 18-97 years; 64 female) at end tidal inspiration were available for analysis by dual consensus reporting. Intra-observer agreement was assessed by repeat blind assessment of a random sample of scans. The vertebral level of the aortic bifurcation and almost all of its major branches, and the origin of the inferior vena cava were consistent with current descriptions. Important differences from contemporary descriptions of surface anatomy were as follows: the renal arteries were most commonly at the L1 vertebral level (left 55%, right 43%); the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2 (left 68%, right 40%); the 11th rib was a posterior relation of the left kidney in only 28% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs (48%) with its long axis in line with the 11th rib (55%). Although the majority of vascular surface landmarks are consistent with standard descriptions, the surface anatomy of the kidneys, renal arteries, and spleen needs to be revised in accordance with observations using modern imaging techniques in vivo.

  18. Previous iodinated contrast anaphylaxis in blunt abdominal trauma: management options.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Shahriar Raj

    2012-06-01

    A 34-year-old man presented with significant intra-abdominal and orthopaedic injuries following a high-speed motorbike crash. The man had a history of an anaphylactic reaction to iodine. As a result, the gold standard CT of the abdomen with contrast was unable to be performed to ascertain the exact nature of the intra-abdominal injuries. After stabilisation, an MRI of the abdomen was performed which localised the injuries. The previous contrast anaphylaxis delayed full assessment of the patient and subsequent management. This case discusses the current literature and the management guidelines in a patient with previous anaphylaxis to contrast.

  19. Current advances in the surgical approach to abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Glen A; Casós, Steven R

    2006-12-01

    The management of abdominal injury has changed dramatically during the past two decades. This review examines the historic perspectives and recent developments of diagnosis and treatment of liver injuries, splenic injuries, and pancreatic injuries. The incorporation of non-operative management for liver injuries has had a very positive effect on mortality. Likewise, splenic conservative therapy is routinely used. The early treatment of pancreatic injury has changed very little; however, the ability to recognize these difficult injuries has improved with higher quality CT scanning. The authors present their preferred treatment for these three common types of abdominal solid organ injury and present an illustrative case example.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of abdominal masses in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Fredric A

    2005-08-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) plays a unique role in the diagnosis and management of pediatric abdominal masses. The "as low as reasonably achievable" (ALARA) radiation dose of CT is zero when substituted by MR. Whole body MR may also compete with PET imaging to stage abdominal tumors. Specific advantages of MR include determination of resectability of hepatic tumors using MRI and MRA; staging of neuroblastoma in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, and spinal canal; response of bilateral Wilms tumor and nephroblastomatosis; detection of pelvic tumors with sagittal sectioning, and peritoneal tumors with contrast enhancement.

  1. Incision for abdominal laparoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal laparoscopy is a useful aid in diagnosing disease or trauma in the abdominal cavity with less scarring than ... as liver and pancreatic resections may begin with laparoscopy to exclude the presence of additional tumors (metastatic ...

  2. Suture granuloma of the abdominal wall with intra-abdominal extension 12 years after open appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Goran; Korolija, Dragan; Skegro, Mate; Jakic-Razumovic, Jasminka

    2009-01-01

    Most complications after appendectomy occur within ten days; however, we report the unusual case of a suture granuloma 12 years after open appendectomy. The afebrile 75-year-old woman presented with a slightly painful palpable mass in the right lower abdomen. There was no nausea or vomiting and bowel movements were normal. She lost 10 kg during the 3 mo before presentation. The patient had undergone an appendectomy 12 years previously. Physical examination revealed a tender mass, 10 cm in diameter, under the appendectomy scar. The preoperative laboratory findings, tumor markers and plain abdominal radiographs were normal. Multi-slice computed tomography scanning showed an inhomogenous abdominal mass with minimal vascularization in the right lower abdomen 8.6 cm × 8 cm × 9 cm in size which communicated with the abdominal wall. The abdominal wall was thickened, weak and bulging. The abdominal wall mass did not communicate with the cecum or the ascending colon. Complete excision of the abdominal wall mass was performed via median laparotomy. Histopathological examination revealed a granuloma with a central abscess. This case report demonstrates that a preoperative diagnosis of abdominal wall mass after open appendectomy warrants the use of a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities and consequently different treatment options. PMID:19705509

  3. Abdominal Pain Caused by a Potentially Fatal Attraction.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Danielle Claire; Scace, Candace; Shah, Bhairav; Weiner, Evan; Prasad, Rajeev

    2016-11-19

    Abdominal pain is a challenging presentation in children. Examination findings and etiology vary greatly, spanning a vast spectrum from flatulence to frank peritonitis with septic shock. Here, we discuss a 10-year-old boy with 24 hours of progressively worsening lower abdominal pain, nausea, and subjective fevers. History and physical examination findings were consistent with appendicitis. However, physicians were surprised when the single-view abdominal radiograph showed an unanticipated, somewhat perplexing discovery.

  4. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  5. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  6. Patterns of abdominal relapse and role of sonography in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Daw, Najat C; Kauffman, William M; Bodner, Sara M; Pratt, Charles B; Hoffer, Fredric A

    2002-03-01

    This study characterizes the patterns of abdominal recurrence of Wilms tumor and describes the role of sonography in its detection. Twelve patients who had initial tumor recurrence in the abdomen were evaluated. Five patients had recurrence in the kidney; all had nephrogenic rests detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging but not by sonography. The remaining 7 patients had recurrence in the peritoneum (4), the nephrectomy site (2), or the regional lymph nodes (1); tumor spillage had occurred in five of these patients. Four recurrences were detected during therapy, and eight within 3 years after completion of therapy. Seven of the 12 recurrences were first detected by sonography. All 11 sonograms obtained at the time of relapse showed tumor recurrence. Nine patients died a median of 10 months after relapse. The results suggest that regular sonographic surveillance for 3 years after therapy is likely to reveal most abdominal recurrences. Supplementation with CT or MR imaging is indicated for detection of nephrogenic rests.

  7. Renal infarction due to spontaneous dissection of the renal artery: an unusual cause of non-visceral type abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Kang, James H-E; Kang, Jin-Yong; Morgan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with very severe right upper quadrant pain of sudden onset. This was exacerbated by movement but unaffected by food or defaecation. It was continuous—day and night —but resolved over a 1-week period. The physical examination was normal at presentation, by which time the pain had resolved. His white cell count, alanine transaminase and C reactive protein were elevated but normalised after 10 days. An abdominal CT showed low density lesions in the right kidney consistent with segmental infarcts. CT angiogram showed a dissection of the right renal artery. The patient remained asymptomatic and normotensive when reviewed 1 month later. PMID:24049091

  8. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  9. Relationships Among Factors Relevant to Abdominal Fat and Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young; Park, Mina

    2017-05-11

    Metabolic syndrome is related with abdominal fat and with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). In this study, we evaluated the association between a variety of factors relevant to abdominal fat (FRAs) and hearing thresholds. We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 2,602 subjects aged over 40 years with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss who underwent abdominal fat computed tomography (CT) scans. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to demonstrate the association between each FRA and hearing thresholds at low and high frequencies. Four of 5 FRAs were associated with hearing thresholds at high frequencies in males. All FRAs examined showed a relationship with hearing thresholds at low frequencies in females. Diabetes mellitus (DM) among clinical factors and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) among the 5 FRAs were the most reflective of hearing thresholds in both males and females. We found that FRAs were associated with hearing loss with frequency specific characteristics according to sex and reinforced that DM and VAT is particularly an important role for hearing.

  10. [A case of appendceal cancer with abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masao; Tomochika, Shinobu; Matoba, Katsuhiro

    2014-11-01

    A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital owing to difficulty walking and an abdominal tumor in the right lower abdomen. An irregular mass with calcification was detected in her cecum, and abdominal, intraabdominal, and retroperitoneal abscess was detected by computed tomography(CT). An irregular mass was diagnosed as Group 5 adenocarcinoma by biopsy. After the inflammation improved by abscess drainage, we conducted ileocecal resection and fenestrated the abscess. Pathological analysis showed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma: dimensions 20 × 20 mm, pSS, stroma: med, INF a, ly1, v0, pPM0 (70 mm), pDM0 (70 mm), pRM0 (8mm), LN(-): #201: (0/9), fStageII. Thepatie nts can now walk, and she remains in good health and has been recurrence-free 8 months after surgery. To our knowledge, colon cancer with an abdominal abscess is comparatively rare, and we discuss this in light of the literature.

  11. An unusual cause of paediatric abdominal pain: Mesenteric masses accompanied with volvulus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Jun; Kong, Xiang Ru; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Li, Chang Chun

    2016-07-01

    Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is rare and may result in serious consequences. This study aimed to better characterize volvulus caused by mesenteric masses in children. A retrospective study was conducted in 24 patients who underwent surgical treatment between January 1994 and January 2014 in one single institution. There were 10 boys and 14 girls. The most frequent findings were abdominal pain (100%), emesis (91.7%) and nausea (83.3%). Physical examination showed positive ileus signs in majority cases, and palpable mass was found in half of the patients. Ultrasound and CT scans revealed mesenteric masses in 21 and 24 patients, and 'whirlpool sign' was observed in 19 and 22 patients, respectively. Emergency laparotomy was performed in all patients. Histological examination revealed that 18 cystic masses were lymphangioma, 5 solid cases were lipoma and the remaining one was lipoblastoma. The postoperative course was uneventful in 22 patients, and postoperative obstruction and incision infection occurred in 2 patients. There was no evidence of recurrence at follow-up. Volvulus caused by mesenteric masses is a rare but potentially life-threatening cause of abdominal pain, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of paediatric acute abdominal pain.

  12. Vertically transmitted hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuin-Chew; Bird, Lynne M

    2004-01-01

    The prune belly syndrome (OMIM 100100) is an association of bladder dilation with hypoplasia of the abdominal wall muscles. This malformation sequence is due to early urethral obstruction. We report a family with abdominal wall muscular hypoplasia as an isolated defect, not associated with the urethral obstruction sequence. The proband is a q3-year-old male who presented with abdominal wall laxity and severe constipation. His mother, maternal grandmother and younger brother had varying degrees of abdominal wall muscular deficiency and constipation. His mother's condition was aggravated by her 2 pregnancies. This family shows vertical transmission (compatible with autosomal dominant or mitochondrial inheritance) of the abdominal phenotype of prune belly sequence without any evidence of urinary tract or renal pathology. The expression in the sons may remain incomplete because abdominal distention due to pregnancy will not occur.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene variants and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, L; Warrington, N; Allcock, R; van Bockxmeer, F; Palmer, L J; Iacopetta, B; Golledge, J; Norman, P E

    2009-08-01

    To investigate associations between two polymorphisms of the matrix metalloproteinase-2 gene (MMP2) and the incidence and progression of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Cases and controls were recruited from a trial of screening for AAAs. The association between two variants of MMP2 (-1360C>T, and +649C>T) in men with AAA (n=678) and in controls (n=659) was examined using multivariate analyses. The association with AAA expansion (n=638) was also assessed. In multivariate analyses with adjustments for multiple testing, no association between either SNP and AAA presence or expansion was detected. MMP2 -1360C>T and +649C>T variants are not risk factors for AAA.

  14. Multi-atlas segmentation for abdominal organs with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid / gray matter / white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  15. Multi-Atlas Segmentation for Abdominal Organs with Gaussian Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan P; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-17

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter/white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  16. Actinomycosis presenting as an abdominal mass in a child.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Rahsan; Mammadov, Emil; Aydin, Emrah; Adaletli, Ibrahim; Esen, Tugçe; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Celayir, Sinan

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis in childhood period is very rare and a relation to trauma is not well established. Herein we report a case that appeared subsequent to abdominal trauma. A 17 years old boy presented with left lower quadrant abdominal mass and signs of acute abdomen. The symptoms of abdominal discomfort began after a fall from height 3 months before admission. There were signs of acute abdomen at physical examination. Ultrasound of abdomen demonstrated a mass; CT scan findings pointed to a suspicious "internal hernia". An emergency laparotomy was performed. During surgery, a mass located over sigmoid colon and infiltrating the lateral abdominal wall was found. It was removed en bloc with the adjacent omentum. Except for the thickened sigmoid colon, no other pathologies were present at laparotomy. The pathology specimen revealed the actinomyces infection. The patient was treated with oral penicillin after discharge and the follow-up was uneventful. We advocate, keeping the actinomyces infection in mind in cases presenting with abdominal mass of unknown origin in childhood period.

  17. A rare case of febrile abdominal pain revealing Horton's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaudet, Arnaud; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Ghazali, Aiham Daniel

    2017-07-08

    Horton's disease is a systemic inflammatory vasculitis, usually found in persons over 50years old. It affects medium and large-sized arteries stemming from the external carotid, especially the superficial temporal arteries. It can affect extracranial large vessels but only rarely the aorta. Diagnosis of aortitis is difficult and its incidence is probably underestimated. A 68-year-old Caucasian woman consulted in an emergency department for febrile abdominal pain with inflammatory syndrome. Abdomen was soft with right-side flank sensitivity. A contrast-enhanced CT scan showed aortitis from the descending aorta to the iliac arteries without complication. Because of age, clinical presentation and aortitis, Horton disease was suspected. The temporal artery biopsy showed a histological aspect of degenerative endarteritis with intimal thickening and luminal stenosis. High-dose corticosteroid therapy was introduced which improved clinical conditions and resulted in the amendment of the pain. In the present case, this patient had Horton's disease, based on 3 criteria of The American College of Rheumatology (age, temporal artery abnormalities and inflammatory syndrome) associated with aortitis. However, aortitis is a rare complication of Horton disease and is a major cause of mortality inasmuch as it can be complicated by aneurysm and dissection. It is unusual to diagnose Horton's disease from aortitis symptoms without complications. The aorta represents the most severe localization of Horton's disease. It should not be ignored in etiological hypotheses regarding febrile abdominal pain in the elderly. Corticosteroids should be started rapidly at high doses and temporal artery biopsy should be planned. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Is FDG-PET/CT useful for managing malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hideki; Terazawa, Kaori; Morita, Naomi; Otomi, Yoichi; Yamashita, Kyo; Nishitani, Hiromu

    2009-02-01

    Imaging techniques such as CT, MRI and PET/CT have essential pre- and post-treatment roles in detecting tumors and evaluating the extension of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). We sough to evaluate the advantages and limitations on FDG-PET/CT findings. We performed 13 FDG-PET/CT studies in 9 patients with MPM (8 males, 1 female, aged 51 to 84 years, 9 at the initial diagnosis, 4 follow up studies). We reviewed FDG-PET/CT findings of primary tumors, recurrent tumors, lymph nodes, metastasis. All primary and recurrent tumors were FDG positive. The uptake patterns at initial diagnosis were; diffuse+multi-nodular uptake pattern in 5, diffuse irregular thickened uptake pattern in 2, some focal thickened pattern in one, and a slight diffuse uptake pattern in one. Two of the 3 patients diagnosed as N0 by PET and operated on had negative lymph nodes confirmed pathologically. The other patient diagnosed as N0 by PET, who had one month of time lag between PET/CT examination and surgery, was confirmed as N2 by extrapleural pneumonectomy. In 3 patients, hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes were difficult to distinguish from irregular pleural thickening. One patient had a FDG positive lymph node in the ipsilateral supraclavicular region confirmed as metastasis (N3). One patient had a FDG positive lymph node in the para-aortic region. Lung metastasis was seen in one patient (M1). In another patient, two focal nodular uptakes in the colon were detected and confirmed as colon polyps (pathologically Group 3-4). At restaging, 3 of 4 patients showed diffuse+multi-nodular uptake and one patient showed multi-nodular uptake. The utility of FDG-PET/CT is limited for evaluation of primary tumor extension and nodal status. FDG-PET/CT is useful for detecting distant metastasis and for evaluating activity in supraclavicular or abdominal lymph nodes. It is also useful for identifying unsuspected diseases.

  19. Antibody response of autogenous splenic tissue implanted in the abdominal cavity of mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sérgio I; Rezende, Alice B; Teixeira, Francisco M; Ferreira, Ana Paula; Alves, Márcio M J; Jamel, Nelson; Assis, Raimunda V C; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2005-12-01

    There is still controversy about the immunologic function of autotransplanted splenic tissue. In this study, splenic autotransplantation was performed in the abdominal cavity of mice, and the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay was used to investigate the frequency of antibody-forming cells in response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) immunization. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups according to the location of the autogenous graft: intraomental (IO), free peritoneal splenosis (FPS), retroperitoneal (RP), and nongrafted control (CT). Thirty days after surgery the mice were immunized intraperitoneally with SRBCs, and 4 days later splenic immunoglobulin M anti-SRBC-secreting cells were determined by counting the number of PFCs. All the immunized mice showed increased numbers of PFCs that were about 2 logs higher than those in the the nonimmunized controls (P < 0.005). The frequencies of anti-SRBC-producing cells in the tissues grafted in various sites of the abdominal cavity (IO, FPS, RP), in the normal spleen from nonoperated controls (CT), or in the sham-operated control group (SCT) were not notably different (5582 +/- 2475 PFC/10(7) cells for IO; 4849 +/- 1856 for FPS; 6604 +/- 2903 for RP; 5940 +/- 5029 for CT; and 6172 +/- 2203 for SCT). Similar histology with small architectural variations was observed in all implants; less white pulp was involved, and there was more congestion in the red pulp, with extensive sinusoids and reticular fiber proliferation. This study shows that the T cell-dependent antibody response in implanted splenic tissues is as efficient as in the intact spleen, with no difference between the graft sites studied. This immune response does not depend on the slight architectural variations observed in the splenic implants.

  20. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1982-08-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinicall useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure.

  1. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5%) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinically useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure. PMID:6830353

  2. Evaluation of plain abdominal radiographs in the diagnosis of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, R L; Heineken, P; Hedgcock, M W; Federle, M; Goldberg, H I

    1983-04-01

    In an effort to develop referral criteria for the ordering of abdominal radiographs for patients presenting with abdominal symptoms, we prospectively studied the relation between clinical data and radiographic abnormalities. Of 1780 examinations, 179 (10.0%) showed some radiographic abnormality. If abdominal radiographs would have been limited to those patients who had moderate or severe abdominal tenderness, or to patients with a high clinical suspicion of bowel obstruction, renal or ureteral calculi, trauma, ischemia, or gallbladder disease, regardless of the degree of tenderness, 956 (53.7%) examinations would not have been done. All radiographic abnormalities reflecting a serious pathologic process would have been identified. Only 33 (3.5%) abnormalities of limited significance, almost all localized or generalized ileus, would have been undetected. The adoption of these referral criteria would result in minimal loss of clinically useful information, large financial savings, and a reduction in radiation exposure.

  3. The role of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of loculated air collections: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavik N; Morgan, Madeline; Tyler, Douglas; Paulson, Erik; Jaffe, Tracy A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe our experience with the role of CT-guided percutaneous drainage of loculated intra-abdominal collections consisting entirely of gas. An IRB-approved retrospective study analyzing patients with air-only intra-abdominal collections over an 8-year period was undertaken. Seven patients referred for percutaneous drainage were included. Size of collections, subsequent development of fluid, and microbiological yield were determined. Clinical outcome was also analyzed. Out of 2835 patients referred for percutaneous drainage between 2004 and 2012, seven patients (5M, 2F; average age 63, range 54-85) met criteria for inclusion with CT showing air-only collections. Percutaneous drain placement (five 8 Fr, one 10 Fr, and one 12 Fr) using Seldinger technique was performed. Four patients (57%) had recently undergone surgery (2 Whipple, 1 colectomy, 1 hepatic resection) while two (29%) had a remote surgery (1 abdominoperineal resection, 1 sigmoidectomy). Despite the lack of detectable fluid on the original CT, 6 patients (86%) had air and fluid aspirated at drainage, 5 (83%) of the aspirates developed positive microbacterial cultures. Four patients (57%) presented with fever at the time of the initial scan, all of whom had positive cultures from aspirated fluid. Four patients (57%) had leukocytosis, all of whom had positive cultures from aspirated fluid. Although relatively rare in occurrence, patients with air-only intra-abdominal collections with signs of infection should be considered for percutaneous management similar to that of conventional infected fluid collections. Although fluid is not visible on CT, these collections can produce fluid that contains organisms.

  4. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  5. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  6. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  7. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  8. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  9. Unusual case of splenic sarcoidosis without morphological lesions detected by PET-CT in a patient with breast cancer: functional imaging between pitfalls and therapeutic guide.

    PubMed

    Paone, Gaetano; Di Lascio, Simona; Azzola, Andrea; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Pagani, Olivia

    2017-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman under treatment with letrozole for metastatic breast cancer underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT for restaging. A new widespread intense splenic FDG uptake without nodular lesions and multiple FDG-avid mediastinal and abdominal nodes were observed. Based on these findings, a nodal and transbronchial lung biopsy was performed. Histological results were compatible with sarcoidosis. The patient began steroid treatment and 6 weeks after a PET-CT showed normalisation of both splenic and nodal uptake. In our case, (18)F-FDG PET-CT has been useful in detecting a rare case of splenic sarcoidosis without typical nodular lesions on CT images, impacting the patient's treatment and prognosis.

  10. Abdominal computed tomography for postoperative abscess: is it useful during the first week?

    PubMed

    Antevil, Jared L; Egan, John C; Woodbury, Robert O; Rivera, Louis; Oreilly, Eamon B; Brown, Carlos V R

    2006-06-01

    While classic teaching dictates computed tomography (CT) for postoperative abdominal or pelvic abscess in the first week is of low yield, little evidence supports intentional delays in imaging for suspected abscess. This retrospective review examined all CT scans obtained for clinical suspicion of abscess between 3 and 30 days after abdominal or pelvic operation over a 3-year period. Scans were grouped into those obtained between 3 and 7 days after surgery (EARLY) and those obtained after day 7 (LATE). Diagnostic yield was compared between EARLY and LATE groups. Of 262 CT examinations (EARLY, n = 106; LATE, n = 156), 71 studies (27%) demonstrated abscess. There was no significant difference in the diagnostic yield of CT for abscess between EARLY and LATE groups (23% [24 of 106] versus 30% [47 of 156], P = 0.18). Of patients with an abscess, 63% (45 of 71) underwent percutaneous or operative drainage (EARLY 75% [18 of 24], LATE 57% [27 of 47], P = 0.15). Abdominal CT for postoperative abscess can be expected to be diagnostic in a substantial proportion of cases in the first week, the majority of which lead to percutaneous or operative drainage. Postoperative CT for intra-abdominal abscess should be obtained as clinically indicated, regardless of interval from surgery.

  11. Simultaneous CT angiography and whole-body CT is an effective imaging approach before multiorgan retrieval.

    PubMed

    Berthier, E; Ridereau-Zins, C; Dubé, L; Tchouante, P; Nedelcu, C; Lasocki, S; Aubé, C

    2017-03-01

    To assess the role of whole-body computed tomography (CT) for determining morphological suitability before multiorgan retrieval (MOR) in brain dead patients. Fifty-one clinically brain dead patients (21 women, 30 men; mean age 61 year±15) were included in this prospective, single center study. All patients had CT angiography of the brain and whole-body CT examination. CT images were evaluated for the presence of morphological abnormalities of lungs, liver and other abdominal organs and presence of vascular anatomical variants. The results of CT examinations were compared to intraoperative findings observed during organ harvesting and/or the results of histopathological analysis of biopsy specimens. The impact of whole-body CT examination on the harvesting process was evaluated. Ninety-five percent of vascular anatomical variants that were found intraoperatively were depicted on CT. CT density measurements predicted surgical finding of steatosis in 80% of patients. Whole-body CT changed the MOR strategy in 21/51 patients (41%) including 3 MOR cancellations and 8 grafts refusals, whereas organ harvesting was continued in 10 patients after histopathological analysis was performed. Selection of potential graft donors using whole-body CT is reliable and improves graft selection during MOR. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Use of abdominal computed tomography in blunt trauma: Do we scan too much?

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Bigelow, Eric; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Pagliarello, Guiseppe

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine what proportion of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans ordered after blunt trauma are positive and the applicability and accuracy of existing clinical prediction rules for obtaining a CT scan of the abdomen in this setting. Setting A leading trauma hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods All patients with blunt trauma admitted to hospital over a 1-year period having an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 who underwent CT of the abdomen during the initial assessment. Recorded data included age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ISS, type of injuries, number of abdominal CT scans ordered, and scan results. Two clinical prediction rules were found in the literature that identify patients likely to have intra-abdominal injuries. These rules were applied retrospectively to the cohort. The predicted proportion of positive CT scans was compared with the observed proportion, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were estimated. Results Of the 297 patients entered in the study, 109 underwent abdominal CT. The median age was 32 years, 71% were male and the median ISS was 24. In only 36.7% (40 of 109) of scans were findings suggestive of intra-abdominal injuries. Application of one of the clinical prediction rules gave a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 25.5% but excluded 23% of patients because of a GCS score less than 11. The second prediction rule tested could be applied to all patients and was highly sensitive (92.5%) and specific (100.0%). Conclusions The assessment of the abdomen in blunt trauma remains a challenge. Accuracy in predicting positive scans in equivocal cases is poor. Retrospective application of an existing clinical prediction rule was found to be highly accurate in identifying patients with positive CT findings. Prospective use of such a rule could reduce the number of CT scans ordered without missing significant injuries. PMID

  13. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Acquired Abdominal Intercostal Hernia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tripodi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Acquired abdominal intercostal hernia (AAIH) is a rare disease phenomenon where intra-abdominal contents reach the intercostal space directly from the peritoneal cavity through an acquired defect in the abdominal wall musculature and fascia. We discuss a case of a 51-year-old obese female who arrived to the emergency room with a painful swelling between her left 10th rib and 11th rib. She gave a history of a stab wound to the area 15 years earlier. A CT scan revealed a fat containing intercostal hernia with no diaphragmatic defect. An open operative approach with a hernia patch was used to repair this hernia. These hernias are difficult to diagnose, so a high clinical suspicion and thorough history and physical exam are important. This review discusses pathogenesis, clinical presentation, complications, and appropriate treatment strategies of AAIH. PMID:25197605

  15. Just another abdominal pain? Psoas abscess-like metastasis in large cell lung cancer with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Vera; Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Dias, João Lopes; Bento, Luís

    2015-06-10

    The authors report the case of a 69-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and previous pulmonary tuberculosis, who presented to the emergency department with abdominal and low back pain, anorexia and weight loss, rapidly evolving into shock. An initial CT scan revealed pulmonary condensation with associated cavitation and an iliopsoas mass suggestive of a psoas abscess. He was admitted in an intensive care unit unit; after a careful examination and laboratory assessment, the aetiology was yet undisclosed. MRI showed multiple retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies, bulky nodular adrenal lesions and bilateral iliac lytic lesions. Hypocortisolism was detected and treated with steroids. A CT-guided biopsy to the psoas mass and lytic lesions identified infiltration of non-small lung carcinoma. The patient died within days. Psoas metastases and adrenal insufficiency as initial manifestations of malignancy are rare and can be misdiagnosed, particularly in the absence of a known primary tumour.

  16. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  17. Motion-compensated PET image reconstruction with respiratory-matched attenuation correction using two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woo Hyun; Ahn, Il Jun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Byung Il; Ra, Jong Beom

    2013-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is widely used for diagnosis and follow up assessment of radiotherapy. However, thoracic and abdominal PET suffers from false staging and incorrect quantification of the radioactive uptake of lesion(s) due to respiratory motion. Furthermore, respiratory motion-induced mismatch between a computed tomography (CT) attenuation map and PET data often leads to significant artifacts in the reconstructed PET image. To solve these problems, we propose a unified framework for respiratory-matched attenuation correction and motion compensation of respiratory-gated PET. For the attenuation correction, the proposed algorithm manipulates a 4D CT image virtually generated from two low-dose inhale and exhale CT images, rather than a real 4D CT image which significantly increases the radiation burden on a patient. It also utilizes CT-driven motion fields for motion compensation. To realize the proposed algorithm, we propose an improved region-based approach for non-rigid registration between body CT images, and we suggest a selection scheme of 3D CT images that are respiratory-matched to each respiratory-gated sinogram. In this work, the proposed algorithm was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by using patient datasets including lung and/or liver lesion(s). Experimental results show that the method can provide much clearer organ boundaries and more accurate lesion information than existing algorithms by utilizing two low-dose CT images.

  18. Single- and dual-energy CT of the abdomen: comparison of radiation dose and image quality of 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Julian L; Hardie, Andrew D; Schoepf, U Joseph; Felmly, Lloyd M; Perry, Jonathan D; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Mangold, Stefanie; Caruso, Damiano; Canstein, Christian; Vogl, Thomas J; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2017-02-01

    To compare single-energy (SECT) and dual-energy (DECT) abdominal CT examinations in matched patient cohorts regarding differences in radiation dose and image quality performed with second- and third-generation dual-source CT (DSCT). We retrospectively analysed 200 patients (100 male, 100 female; mean age 61.2 ± 13.5 years, mean body mass index 27.5 ± 3.8 kg/m(2)) equally divided into four groups matched by gender and body mass index, who had undergone portal venous phase abdominal CT with second-generation (group A, 120-kV-SECT; group B, 80/140-kV-DECT) and third-generation DSCT (group C, 100-kV-SECT; group D, 90/150-kV-DECT). The radiation dose was normalised for 40-cm scan length. Dose-independent figure-of-merit (FOM) contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated for various organs and vessels. Subjective overall image quality and reader confidence were assessed. The effective normalised radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in groups C (6.2 ± 2.0 mSv) and D (5.3 ± 1.9 mSv, P = 0.103) compared to groups A (8.8 ± 2.3 mSv) and B (9.7 ± 2.4 mSv, P = 0.102). Dose-independent FOM-CNR peaked for liver, kidney, and portal vein measurements (all P ≤ 0.0285) in group D. Subjective image quality and reader confidence were consistently rated as excellent in all groups (all ≥1.53 out of 5). With both DSCT generations, abdominal DECT can be routinely performed without radiation dose penalty compared to SECT, while third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency. • Dual-source CT (DSCT) allows for single- and dual-energy image acquisition. • Dual-energy acquisition does not increase the radiation dose in abdominal DSCT. • Third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency compared to second-generation DSCT. • Dose-independent figure-of-merit image contrast was highest with third-generation dual-energy DSCT. • Third-generation DSCT shows improved dose efficiency for SECT and DECT.

  19. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as bilateral hydroureteronephrosis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Grilli Cicilioni, Carlo; Sbrollini, Giulia; Angelini, Andrea; Maselli, Guevar; Carbonari, Luciano

    2014-12-30

    We report a case of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (IAAA) producing bilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis. A 74-year-old patient presented to urologist office for bilateral hydronephrosis detected by kidney and bladder ultrasound (US). Patient reported lower urinary tract symptoms and inconstant and slight low back pain irradiated to inguinal region dating 3 weeks. Renal function, urine analysis and abdominal examination were normal. However the repeated ultrasound in the urologist office revealed abdominal aortic aneurism extended to iliac vessels. The patient was sent directly to vascular surgery unit where contrast computerized tomography (CT) and successful surgical repair were done. Final diagnosis was IAAA. The post-operative course was uneventful. Renal function was regular and the hydronephrosis reduced spontaneously under monitoring by CT and US. We review diagnosis and management of hydronephrosis that is sometimes linked to IAAA rather than standard AAA. Abdominal ultrasound is mandatory in any bilateral hydronephrosis and it could save lives.

  20. Automated noninvasive classification of renal cancer on multiphase CT

    SciTech Connect

    Linguraru, Marius George; Wang, Shijun; Shah, Furhawn; Gautam, Rabindra; Peterson, James; Linehan, W. Marston; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To explore the added value of the shape of renal lesions for classifying renal neoplasms. To investigate the potential of computer-aided analysis of contrast-enhanced computed-tomography (CT) to quantify and classify renal lesions. Methods: A computer-aided clinical tool based on adaptive level sets was employed to analyze 125 renal lesions from contrast-enhanced abdominal CT studies of 43 patients. There were 47 cysts and 78 neoplasms: 22 Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), 16 Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD), 19 hereditary papillary renal carcinomas (HPRC), and 21 hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancers (HLRCC). The technique quantified the three-dimensional size and enhancement of lesions. Intrapatient and interphase registration facilitated the study of lesion serial enhancement. The histograms of curvature-related features were used to classify the lesion types. The areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for receiver operating characteristic curves. Results: Tumors were robustly segmented with 0.80 overlap (0.98 correlation) between manual and semi-automated quantifications. The method further identified morphological discrepancies between the types of lesions. The classification based on lesion appearance, enhancement and morphology between cysts and cancers showed AUC = 0.98; for BHD + VHL (solid cancers) vs. HPRC + HLRCC AUC = 0.99; for VHL vs. BHD AUC = 0.82; and for HPRC vs. HLRCC AUC = 0.84. All semi-automated classifications were statistically significant (p < 0.05) and superior to the analyses based solely on serial enhancement. Conclusions: The computer-aided clinical tool allowed the accurate quantification of cystic, solid, and mixed renal tumors. Cancer types were classified into four categories using their shape and enhancement. Comprehensive imaging biomarkers of renal neoplasms on abdominal CT may facilitate their noninvasive classification, guide clinical management, and monitor responses to drugs or interventions.

  1. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  2. Diffuse Infiltrative Splenic Lymphoma: Diagnostic Efficacy of Arterial-Phase CT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Cho, June-Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Kim, Song Soo; You, Sun Kyoung; Park, Jae Woo; Shin, Hye Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen (ONHES) on arterial phase (AP) computed tomography (CT) images in diffuse infiltrative splenic lymphoma (DISL). One hundred and thirty-six patients with lymphoma who had undergone two-phase (arterial and portal venous) abdominal CT were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of ONHES on AP CT in diagnosing DISL. Two observers evaluated ONHES on AP CT using the 5-point confidence level and assessed the presence or absence of subjective splenomegaly on axial CT images. Another two observers measured the splenic index as proposed by objective CT criteria. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement and diagnostic performance of CT findings. Eleven of the 136 patients with lymphoma had DISL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of ONHES (0.948 for observer 1 and 0.922 for observer 2) was superior to that of the splenic index (0.872 for observer 3 and 0.877 for observer 4), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ONHES in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly showed higher diagnostic performance, as compared with subjective splenomegaly alone (accuracy: 100% and 85.3% for observer 1, 98.5% and 87.5% for observer 2; positive predictive value: 100% and 35.5% for observer 1, 90.9% and 39.3% for observer 2, respectively). Obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly can improve the diagnostic performance for DISL. Our results suggest that ONHES on AP CT images could be useful as an adjunctive diagnostic indicator of DISL in patients with lymphoma.

  3. Diffuse Infiltrative Splenic Lymphoma: Diagnostic Efficacy of Arterial-Phase CT

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Shin, Kyung Sook; Kim, Song Soo; You, Sun Kyoung; Park, Jae Woo; Shin, Hye Soo; Yoon, Yeo Chang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen (ONHES) on arterial phase (AP) computed tomography (CT) images in diffuse infiltrative splenic lymphoma (DISL). Materials and Methods One hundred and thirty-six patients with lymphoma who had undergone two-phase (arterial and portal venous) abdominal CT were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the diagnostic performance of ONHES on AP CT in diagnosing DISL. Two observers evaluated ONHES on AP CT using the 5-point confidence level and assessed the presence or absence of subjective splenomegaly on axial CT images. Another two observers measured the splenic index as proposed by objective CT criteria. Statistical analysis included interobserver agreement and diagnostic performance of CT findings. Results Eleven of the 136 patients with lymphoma had DISL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of ONHES (0.948 for observer 1 and 0.922 for observer 2) was superior to that of the splenic index (0.872 for observer 3 and 0.877 for observer 4), but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of ONHES in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly showed higher diagnostic performance, as compared with subjective splenomegaly alone (accuracy: 100% and 85.3% for observer 1, 98.5% and 87.5% for observer 2; positive predictive value: 100% and 35.5% for observer 1, 90.9% and 39.3% for observer 2, respectively). Conclusion Obliteration of normal heterogeneous enhancement of the spleen in conjunction with subjective splenomegaly can improve the diagnostic performance for DISL. Our results suggest that ONHES on AP CT images could be useful as an adjunctive diagnostic indicator of DISL in patients with lymphoma. PMID:27587962

  4. Intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal wall muscular function: spinal unloading mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Ian A.F.; Gardner-Morse, Mack G.; Henry, Sharon M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The roles of antagonistic activation of abdominal muscles and of intra-abdominal pressurization remain enigmatic, but are thought to be associated with both spinal unloading and spinal stabilization in activities such as lifting. Biomechanical analyses are needed to understand the function of intra-abdominal pressurization because of the anatomical and physiological complexity, but prior analyses have been over-simplified. METHODS To test whether increased intra-abdominal pressure was associated with reduced spinal compression forces for efforts that generated moments about each of the principal axis directions, a previously published biomechanical model of the spine and its musculature was modified by the addition of anatomically realistic three-layers of curved abdominal musculature connected by fascia to the spine. Published values of muscle cross-sectional areas and the active and passive stiffness properties were assigned. The muscle activations were calculated assuming minimized muscle stress and stretch for the model loaded with flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation moments of up to 60 Nm, along with intra-abdominal pressurization of 5 or 10 kPa (37.5 or 75 mmHg) and partial bodyweight (340 N). FINDINGS The analysis predicted a reduction in spinal compressive force with increase in intra-abdominal pressurization from 5 to 10 kPa. This reduction at 60 Nm external effort was 21% for extension effort, 18% for flexion effort, 29% for lateral bending and 31% for axial rotation. INTERPRETATION This analysis predicts that intra-abdominal pressure produces spinal unloading, and shows likely muscle activation patterns that achieve this. PMID:20655636

  5. Localization of the Patency Capsule by Abdominal Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Omori, Teppei; Nakamura, Shinichi; Shiratori, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    A patency capsule (PC) is used to assess intestinal patency in patients with known or suspected stricture, but PC localization by plain abdominal X-ray (AXR) is difficult in those patients in whom the PC is not detected in the feces. Tomosynthesis is a promising, cost-effective, and low-radiation digital tomographic technique. This prospective study evaluated its use for PC localization in the intestinal tract. The study subjects were 49 patients in whom the PC was not detected in the feces and was identified intra-abdominally on AXR films. PC localization in the small or large intestines by AXR alone or by tomosynthesis with AXR was compared with abdominal computed tomography (CT), which is the gold standard. The PC was judged in the large and small intestines in 22 and 27 patients by AXR alone versus 34 and 15 patients, respectively, by tomosynthesis combined with AXR. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for PC detection by AXR alone were 52.9, 53.3, 56.2, 50.0, and 53.1%, respectively. The same parameters were 100, 100, 100, 100, and 100%, respectively, for tomosynthesis with AXR, which were identical to those of CT. Tomosynthesis with AXR is superior to AXR alone, though similar to CT, with respect to localization of the PC.

  6. Patient Specific Wall Stress Analysis and Mechanical Characterization of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using 4D Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    van Disseldorp, E M J; Petterson, N J; Rutten, M C M; van de Vosse, F N; van Sambeek, M R H M; Lopata, R G P

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform wall stress analysis (WSA) using 4D ultrasound (US) in 40 patients with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The geometries and wall stress results were compared with computed tomography (CT) in seven patients. Additionally, the WSA models were calibrated using 4D motion estimation, resulting in patient specific material parameters that were compared among patients. 4D-US images were acquired for 40 patients (AAA diameter 27-52 mm). Patient specific AAA geometries and wall motion were extracted from the 4D-US. WSA was performed and corresponding patient specific material properties were derived. For seven patients, CT data were available and analyzed for geometry and wall stress comparison. The 4D-US based 99th percentile wall stress ranged from 198 to 390 kPa. Regression analysis showed no significant relation between wall stress and diameter of the AAA. The similarity indices between US and CT were very good and ranged between 0.90 and 0.96, and the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile wall stresses of the US and CT data were in agreement. The characterized patient specific shear modulus had a median of 1.1 MPa (interquartile range, 0.7-1.4 MPa). Based on the maximum AAA diameter, the AAAs were divided in a small, medium, and large diameter groups. The largest AAAs revealed an increased wall stiffness compared with the smallest AAAs. 4D ultrasound is applicable for wall stress analysis of AAAs, and offers the opportunity to perform wall stress analysis over time, also for AAAs who do not qualify for a CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, the patient specific material properties can be determined, which could possibly improve risk assessment. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  8. Gallbladder torsion resulting in gangrenous cholecystitis within a parastomal hernia: Findings on unenhanced CT

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Jessica K.; Dym, R. Joshua; Sas, Norman; Rozenblit, Alla M.

    2013-01-01

    Gallbladder torsion is a rare cause of acute gangrenous cholecystitis; its occurrence within an abdominal hernia has not been previously reported. We present such a case occurring within a parastomal hernia and imaged with unenhanced CT. PMID:24421934

  9. CT following US for possible appendicitis: anatomic coverage.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Martin E; Alharbi, Fawaz; Chawla, Tanya P; Moshonov, Hadas

    2016-02-01

    To determine superior-inferior anatomic borders for CT following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US for possible appendicitis. Ninety-nine patients with possible appendicitis and inconclusive/nondiagnostic US followed by CT were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists reviewed CT images and determined superior-inferior anatomic borders required to diagnose or exclude appendicitis and diagnose alternative causes. This "targeted" coverage was used to estimate potential reduction in anatomic coverage compared to standard abdominal/pelvic CT. The study group included 83 women and 16 men; mean age 32 (median, 29; range 18-73) years. Final diagnoses were: nonspecific abdominal pain 50/99 (51%), appendicitis 26/99 (26%), gynaecological 12/99 (12%), gastrointestinal 9/99 (10%), and musculoskeletal 2/99 (2%). Median dose-length product for standard CT was 890.0 (range, 306.3 - 2493.9) mGy.cm. To confidently diagnose/exclude appendicitis or identify alternative diagnoses, maximum superior-inferior anatomic CT coverage was the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis, for both reviewers. Targeted CT would reduce anatomic coverage by 30-55% (mean 39%, median 40%) compared to standard CT. When CT is performed for appendicitis following inconclusive/nondiagnostic US, targeted CT from the superior border of L2-superior border of pubic symphysis can be used resulting in significant reduction in exposure to ionizing radiation compared to standard CT. • When CT is used following inconclusive/ nondiagnostic ultrasound, anatomic coverage can be reduced. • CT from L2 to pubic symphysis can be used to diagnose/exclude appendicitis. • Reduced anatomic coverage for CT results in reduced exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. Low-dose interpolated average CT for attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Zhang, Geoffrey; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Chen, Chih-Hao; Yang, Bang-Hung; Wu, Nien-Yun; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2010-07-01

    Because of the advantages in the use of high photon flux and thus the short scan times of CT imaging, the traditional 68Ge scans for positron emission tomography (PET) image attenuation correction have been replaced by CT scans in the modern PET/CT technology. The combination of fast CT scan and slow PET scan often causes image misalignment between the PET and CT images due to respiration motion. Use of the average CT derived from cine CT images is reported to reduce such misalignment. However, the radiation dose to patients is higher with cine CT scans. This study introduces a method that uses breath-hold CT images and their interpolations to generate the average CT for PET image attenuation correction. Breath-hold CT sets are taken at end-inspiration and end-expiration. Deformable image registration is applied to generate a voxel-to-voxel motion matrix between the two CT sets. The motion is equally divided into 5 steps from inspiration to expiration and 5 steps from expiration to inspiration, generating a total of 8 phases of interpolated CT sets. An average CT image is generated from all the 10 phase CT images, including original inhale/exhale CT and 8 interpolated CT sets. Quantitative comparison shows that the reduction of image misalignment artifacts using the average CT from the interpolation technique for PET attenuation correction is at a similar level as that using cine average CT, while the dose to the patient from the CT scans is reduced significantly. The interpolated average CT method hence provides a low dose alternative to cine CT scans for PET attenuation correction.

  11. Abdominal Superficial Subcutaneous Fat

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Rachel; Shelef, Ilan; Rudich, Assaf; Gepner, Yftach; Shemesh, Elad; Chassidim, Yoash; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Henkin, Yaakov; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Ben Avraham, Sivan; Witkow, Shula; Liberty, Idit F.; Tangi-Rosental, Osnat; Sarusi, Benjamin; Stampfer, Meir J.; Shai, Iris

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Unlike visceral adipose tissue (VAT), the association between subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and obesity-related morbidity is controversial. In patients with type 2 diabetes, we assessed whether this variability can be explained by a putative favorable, distinct association between abdominal superficial SAT (SSAT) (absolute amount or its proportion) and cardiometabolic parameters. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 73 patients with diabetes (mean age 58 years, 83% were men) and cross-sectionally analyzed fat distribution at S1-L5, L5-L4, and L3-L2 levels. Patients completed food frequency questionnaires, and subgroups had 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and 24-h ambulatory electrocardiography. RESULTS Women had higher %SSAT (37 vs. 23% in men; P < 0.001) despite a similar mean waist circumference. Fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.046) and HbA1c (P = 0.006) were both lower with increased tertile of absolute SSAT. In regression models adjusted for age, waist circumference, and classes of medical treatments used in this patient population, increased %SSAT was significantly associated with decreased HbA1c (β = −0.317; P = 0.013), decreased daytime ambulatory blood pressure (β = −0.426; P = 0.008), and increased HDL cholesterol (β = 0.257; P = 0.042). In contrast, increased percent of deep SAT (DSAT) was associated with increased HbA1c (β = 0.266; P = 0.040) and poorer heart rate variability parameters (P = 0.030). Although total fat and energy intake were not correlated with fat tissue distribution, increased intake of trans fat tended to be associated with total SAT (r = 0.228; P = 0.05) and DSAT (r = 0.20; P = 0.093), but not with SSAT. CONCLUSIONS Abdominal SAT is composed of two subdepots that associate differently with cardiometabolic parameters. Higher absolute and relative distribution of fat in abdominal SSAT may signify beneficial cardiometabolic effects in patients with type 2

  12. An efficient and robust MRI-guided radiotherapy planning approach for targeting abdominal organs and tumours in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Luke; Tullis, Iain D. C.; Newman, Robert G.; Corroyer-Dulmont, Aurelien; Falzone, Nadia; Azad, Abul; Vallis, Katherine A.; Sansom, Owen J.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Hill, Mark A.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Smart, Sean C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preclinical CT-guided radiotherapy platforms are increasingly used but the CT images are characterized by poor soft tissue contrast. The aim of this study was to develop a robust and accurate method of MRI-guided radiotherapy (MR-IGRT) delivery to abdominal targets in the mouse. Methods A multimodality cradle was developed for providing subject immobilisation and its performance was evaluated. Whilst CT was still used for dose calculations, target identification was based on MRI. Each step of the radiotherapy planning procedure was validated initially in vitro using BANG gel dosimeters. Subsequently, MR-IGRT of normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was performed. Additionally, the SK-N-SH neuroblastoma xenograft model and the transgenic KPC model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma were used to demonstrate the applicability of our methods for the accurate delivery of radiation to CT-invisible abdominal tumours. Results The BANG gel phantoms demonstrated a targeting efficiency error of 0.56 ± 0.18 mm. The in vivo stability tests of body motion during MR-IGRT and the associated cradle transfer showed that the residual body movements are within this MR-IGRT targeting error. Accurate MR-IGRT of the normal adrenal glands with a size-matched collimated beam was confirmed by γH2AX staining. Regression in tumour volume was observed almost immediately post MR-IGRT in the neuroblastoma model, further demonstrating accuracy of x-ray delivery. Finally, MR-IGRT in the KPC model facilitated precise contouring and comparison of different treatment plans and radiotherapy dose distributions not only to the intra-abdominal tumour but also to the organs at risk. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate preclinical MR-IGRT in intra-abdominal organs. The proposed MR-IGRT method presents a state-of-the-art solution to enabling robust, accurate and efficient targeting of extracranial organs in the mouse and can operate with a

  13. Automatic anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lidong; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Odhner, Dewey; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Body-wide anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem because various diseases result in various abnormalities of objects such as shape and intensity patterns. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [1] whose applicability was demonstrated on near normal diagnostic CT images in different body regions on 35 organs. The aim of this paper is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to diagnostic CT images of patients with various pathologies as a first step toward automated body-wide disease quantification. The AAR approach consists of three main steps - model building, object recognition, and object delineation. In this paper, within the broader AAR framework, we describe a new strategy for object recognition to handle abnormal images. In the model building stage an optimal threshold interval is learned from near-normal training images for each object. This threshold is optimally tuned to the pathological manifestation of the object in the test image. Recognition is performed following a hierarchical representation of the objects. Experimental results for the abdominal body region based on 50 near-normal images used for model building and 20 abnormal images used for object recognition show that object localization accuracy within 2 voxels for liver and spleen and 3 voxels for kidney can be achieved with the new strategy.

  14. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  15. Recurrent pneumothorax following abdominal paracentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    A 62 year old man presented with abdominal ascites, without pleural effusion, due to peritoneal mesothelioma. He had chronic obstructive airways disease and a past history of right upper lobectomy for tuberculosis. On two occasions abdominal paracentesis was followed within 72 hours by pneumothorax. This previously unreported complication of abdominal paracentesis may be due to increased diaphragmatic excursion following the procedure and should be considered in patients with preexisting lung disease. PMID:2385561

  16. Abdominal cystic lymphangioma mimicking appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Wake, Sarah; Abhyankar, Aruna; Hutton, Kim

    2013-06-01

    A cystic lymphangioma arising within the abdomen is a rare entity in children. It may present with an abdominal mass and symptoms of abdominal pain, vomiting, and anorexia. These nonspecific clinical symptoms are often attributed to more common acute pediatric conditions. In this report, we describe two pediatric cases of intra-abdominal cystic lymphangioma that were initially diagnosed and treated as appendicitis. True diagnosis was only achieved on surgical excision and pathological investigation of cystic material.

  17. Abdominal pregnancy- a case report.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ii; Ude, Ac; Aderibigbe, Aso; Amu, Oc; Udeh, Pe; Obianyo, Nen; Ani, Coc

    2011-01-01

    A case of abdominal pregnancy in a 39 year old female gravida 4, para 0(+3) is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a viable abdominal pregnancy at 15 weeks gestational age. She was initially managed conservatively. Surgical intervention became necessary at 20 weeks gestational age following Ultrasound detection of foetal demise. The maternal outcome was favourable. This case is presented to highlight the dilemma associated with diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy with a