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Sample records for abdominal gunshot wounds

  1. [Abdominal gunshot wound: description of 86 cases in Cameroon].

    PubMed

    Bahebeck, J; Masso-Misse, P; Essomba, A; Takongmo, S; Ngo-Nonga, B; Ngo-Nyeki, A R; Sosso, M; Malong, E

    2005-11-01

    Abdominal gunshot wound (AGSW) is a trauma emergency. The purpose of this report is to describe our experience with managing AGSW largely without modem investigational modalities. Data was collected retrospectively by reviewing the surgical reports and clinical charts of patients admitted to live hospitals dealing with AGSW over a 5-year period. Incomplete files and wounds not involving the abdomen were not included. A total of 86 files were analyzed. Patients ranged in age from 10 to 63 years ivith mean age of 32 years and a sex ratio of 5.5. Most patients (87%) underwent surgical exploration. Laboratory revealed no lesions in 22.5% of cases, minor lesions in 9.5% and major lesions justifying surgical repair in 68%. A total of 86 visceral lesions were found in the patients who underwent surgical exploration. The lesion involved the small intestine in 31.5% of case, colon in 24.5%, liver in 23.5%, spleen in 7%, stomach in 6%, and uterus in 2%. The kidney, pancreas, mesenteries, large momentum, and transverse mescaline each accounted for 1% of lesions. Conventional operative techniques were used with a mortality of 5.5% and morbidity of 4%. Based on our findings we conclude that when investigational tools (CT-scan, peritoneal lavage and laparoscopy) are unavailable prolonged watchful waiting increases the risk of mortality and morbidity in patients presenting AGSW associated with suspicious clinical signs. Prompt surgical treatment improves prognosis but is associated with a high rate of cases showing no lesions. PMID:16555515

  2. Missile pulmonary embolus secondary to abdominal gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Mctyre, Emory; McGill, Lee; Miller, Nessa

    2012-01-01

    Missile pulmonary emboli are rare sequelae of traumatic entry of projectile missiles-generally bullets or bullet fragments-in which access to the systemic venous circulation is established by the missile, making it possible for the missile to migrate to the pulmonary arteries. In the case introduced here, a 24-year-old male presented to the ER with a gunshot wound to the abdomen. In the early course of his care, it was determined that he had suffered a missile pulmonary embolus secondary to a large fragment of a bullet penetrating the IVC. Despite the large perfusion defect created by this missile embolus, the patient recovered uneventfully without embolectomy. PMID:27326301

  3. Gunshot wounds -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... remove pieces of broken or shattered bone To clean the wound Gunshots wounds that pass through the ... mind: Keep the dressing and area around it clean and dry. Take any antibiotics or pain relievers ...

  4. Gunshot wounds - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11(9):546-551. Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound Healing. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery . 19th ed. ... Of Gunshot Wounds To The Limbs: A Review. The Internet Journal ...

  5. Penetrating abdominal gunshot wounds caused by high-velocity missiles: a review of 51 military injuries managed at a level-3 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Gorgulu, Semih; Gencosmanoglu, Rasim; Akaoglu, Cuneyt

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present the outcomes of military penetrating abdominal gunshot injuries, to identify factors that predict morbidity, and to compare the present results with those from two civilian trauma centers. Fifty-one consecutive patients who had suffered high-velocity gunshot wounds to the abdomen were assessed retrospectively. Penetrating abdominal trauma index, the number of injured organs, and the presence of colonic injury were significantly associated with high morbidity by univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that only the number of organs injured and presence of colonic injury were independent predictors of morbidity. Our results showed that military rifle bullets do not cause greater tissue disruption than that found in wounds created by lower-velocity projectiles. The presence of colonic injury and the number of organs injured (more than three) seem to be important predictors of morbidity in penetrating abdominal gunshot wounds caused by high-velocity missiles. PMID:20085042

  6. Injuring mechanisms of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    White, K M

    1989-03-01

    The severity of injury in a gunshot wound is dependent on many factors, including the type of firearm; the velocity, mass, and construction of the bullet; and the structural properties of the tissues that are wounded. Knowledge of ballistics and an appreciation of the wounding potential of certain firearms and their ammunition can help clinicians anticipate the severity of a wound and raise the index of suspicion for occult but severe internal trauma. PMID:2679792

  7. Laparoscopic Bullet Removal in a Penetrating Abdominal Gunshot.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, Christos; Zikos, Nicolaos; Pappas-Gogos, George; Koulas, Spyridon; Tsimoyiannis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal trauma has been traditionally treated by exploratory laparotomy. Nowadays laparoscopy has become an accepted practice in hemodynamically stable patient without signs of peritonitis. We report a case of a lower anterior abdominal gunshot patient treated laparoscopically. A 32-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with complaint of gunshot penetrating injury at left lower anterior abdominal wall. The patient had no symptoms or obvious bleeding and was vitally stable. On examination we identified 1 cm diameter entry wound at the left lower abdominal wall. The imaging studies showed the bullet in the peritoneal cavity but no injured intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal viscera. We decided to remove the bullet laparoscopically. Twenty-four hours after the intervention the patient was discharged. The decision for managing gunshot patients should be based on clinical and diagnostic findings. Anterior abdominal injuries in a stable patient without other health problems can be managed laparoscopically. PMID:27525150

  8. Laparoscopic Bullet Removal in a Penetrating Abdominal Gunshot

    PubMed Central

    Koulas, Spyridon; Tsimoyiannis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal trauma has been traditionally treated by exploratory laparotomy. Nowadays laparoscopy has become an accepted practice in hemodynamically stable patient without signs of peritonitis. We report a case of a lower anterior abdominal gunshot patient treated laparoscopically. A 32-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with complaint of gunshot penetrating injury at left lower anterior abdominal wall. The patient had no symptoms or obvious bleeding and was vitally stable. On examination we identified 1 cm diameter entry wound at the left lower abdominal wall. The imaging studies showed the bullet in the peritoneal cavity but no injured intraperitoneal and retroperitoneal viscera. We decided to remove the bullet laparoscopically. Twenty-four hours after the intervention the patient was discharged. The decision for managing gunshot patients should be based on clinical and diagnostic findings. Anterior abdominal injuries in a stable patient without other health problems can be managed laparoscopically. PMID:27525150

  9. Characteristics of gunshot wounds in the skull.

    PubMed

    Quatrehomme, G; Işcan, M Y

    1999-05-01

    The analysis of trauma to the skeleton is an important aspect of forensic case work, but most pathology references devote limited attention to this topic. This paper describes various aspects of gunshot wounds, including entrance and exit patterns, angle and path, range of fire and velocity, and caliber of the bullet, based on observations of a series of known cases. Skeletal remains of 21 victims of gunshot wounds were studied. In most cases, there was documentation of the investigation, autopsy, and victim's identity. Each case was analyzed in terms of wound location, shape, size and exit/entry surface area ratio, beveling, and direction of shooting Skull entry wounds were most often round or oval. Unusual shapes were observed in bones like the mandible and mastoid process, but were also found to be triangular, nearly rectangular or irregular. Tunneling was observed in the mastoid process. The expected internal beveling was obvious in all but one skull. External beveling of an entry wound was only observed in one case (parietal bone). Exit wounds were roughly round, oval, square, and rectangular and were always more irregular than entry wounds. External beveling of exit wounds was observed in most vault bones, but there was none in the orbit, maxilla, greater wing of the sphenoid, temporal, or left occipital bone. Tangential gunshot wounds were seen in a mastoid process, zygomatic process, mandibular ramus and condyle, and occipital condyle. Most of the exit to entry surface area ratios (cm2) varied from 1.4 to 2.0. In four cases the ratio indicated that entrances were larger than exists. In conclusion, understanding of gunshot wound characteristics is an important matter to interpret distance, velocity, direction and sometimes caliber size. Assessment of this nature of gunshot wounds helps reconstruct events surrounding the death. PMID:10408112

  10. Concept of Gunshot Wound Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2013-01-01

    Gunshot wound (GSW) to the spine which was earlier common in the military population is now being increasingly noted in civilians due to easy availability of firearms of low velocity either licensed or illegal combined with an increased rate of violence in the society. Contributing to 13% to 17% of all spinal injuries, the management of complex injury to the spine produced by a GSW remains controversial. Surgery for spinal cord injuries resulting from low velocity GSWs is reserved for patients with progressive neurologic deterioration, persistent cerebrospinal fluid fistulae, and sometimes for incomplete spinal cord injuries. Surgery may also be indicated to relieve active neural compression from a bullet, bone, intervertebral disk, or a hematoma within the spinal canal. Spinal instability rarely results from a civilian GSW. Cauda equina injuries from low velocity GSWs have a better overall outcome after surgery. In general, the decision to perform surgery should be made on consideration of multiple patient factors that can vary over a period of time. Although there have been plenty of individual case reports regarding GSW to the spine, a thorough review of unique mechanical and biological factors that affect the final outcome has been lacking. We review the key concepts of pathogenesis and management of GSW to the spine and propose an algorithm to guide decision making in such cases. PMID:24353856

  11. Atypical gunshot wound: Bullet trajectory analyzed by computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Tae; Murray, Richard; Galvan, Dan; Nazim, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gunshot injuries are a result of a bullet or projectile fired from a weapon that penetrates the body. Homicide, suicide, and occasionally, accidental events are a significant cause of firearm-related injuries. In rare cases, the damage from the gunshot injury can be masked due to an atypical bullet trajectory. Presentation of case A 63-year-old male was found with a gunshot wound to the anterior left knee. Computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a bullet track extending from the anterior aspect of the left knee that traveled cephalad subcutaneously and entered into the peritoneal cavity, perforating the distal descending colon. The bullet was found to be at rest adjacent to the spleen and posterior chest wall, with no injury to the lungs, kidneys or the spleen. The patient required a sigmoid colectomy with descending colostomy and was subsequently discharged home without any complications. Discussion Intra-abdominal organ damage from a gunshot wound to the distal limb is a rare occurrence. Atypical gun shot wounds, such as this case, have the potential for multiple issues including: delayed diagnostic tests, inaccurate radiological readings, and inappropriate medical management. Conclusion If an abnormal trajectory is maintained, it is possible for a bullet to traverse half the length of the body without the patient realizing it. Accurate CT analysis and quick decisions in surgical and medical management are critical takeaways to provide quality care to patients with these injuries. PMID:26263447

  12. Gunshot wounds to the head: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, H H; Makela, M E; Lee, K F; Haid, R W; Gildenberg, P L

    1986-06-01

    Craniocerebral gunshot wounds are a significant cause of injury and death in the United States. However, despite reports of occasional unexpectedly favorable outcome in surgically treated patients, these injuries have been viewed pessimistically and indeed have generally been excluded from modern studies of head injuries, which have concentrated on closed head injuries. A review of 143 victims of craniocerebral gunshot wounds admitted to Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas, during a recent 30-month period confirmed that a few apparently neurologically devastated patients can be saved. A detailed analysis of these patients, including demographic details, general and neurological condition, anatomic injuries, laboratory findings, surgical care, neurological course, and neurological and functional outcome follows. The helpfulness of early resuscitation and appropriate criteria for surgery need to be studied using historic or randomized controls. PMID:3736794

  13. Gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract: A single-institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Cinman, Nadya M.; McAninch, Jack W.; Porten, Sima P.; Myers, Jeremy B.; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Bagga, Herman S.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to analyze characteristics and outcomes of gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract at our Level I trauma center. Our hypothesis is that gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract have characteristic bullet trajectories, injury patterns, and associated injuries. METHODS Our prospective trauma database was composed of reviewed gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract including the pelvic ureter, bladder, or urethra from 1989 through 2011. RESULTS We identified 50 patients (median age, 25 years; range, 3–53 years) with lower urinary tract injury. There was a mean of 2.3 bullets per patient (range, 1–8), with 26 patients injured from a single bullet. Urologic injury involving only the bladder occurred in 72% (36 of 50) of the patients. Ureteral injury was diagnosed in 20% (10 of 50) of the patients. Bullet trajectory was known in the majority of multiple bullet injuries and all cases involving a single bullet. All patients but one were managed operatively. During exploration, 90% (34 of 38) with transmural bladder injury had recognized bladder entry and exit wounds. Overall, 80% (40 of 50) had concurrent gastrointestinal injury. In patients with a single gunshot wound to the lower urinary tract, 58% (15 of 26) sustained concomitant intestinal injury, and 23% (6 of 26) sustained rectal injury. Of 20 posteroanterior gunshot wounds, 80% had buttock entry. All 10 single-bullet buttock-entry gunshot wounds injured the bladder. Isolated ureteral injury was associated with lower abdominal entry and anteroposterior trajectory. Urethral injury occurred in 4, with 75% upper-thigh entry. CONCLUSION Penetrating injuries to the lower urinary tract most commonly involve the bladder. During exploration for gunshot wounds to the bladder, two injury sites should be expected because failure to close may lead to complications. Gunshot wounds to the lower urinary tract often occur with concomitant bowel injury, with buttock entry. A multidisciplinary

  14. Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Porter W.; Falgiani, Tricia B.; Hoelle, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness. PMID:24851187

  15. Bevelling in exit gunshot wounds in bones.

    PubMed

    Quatrehomme, G; Işcan, M Y

    1997-09-19

    The analysis of trauma to the skeleton is an important aspect of forensic case work, but most major pathology references devote limited attention to this topic. The aim of this paper is to analyze bevelling in exit gunshot wounds from a series of 14 cases with 17 exit wounds. Assessment of bevelling was made by measuring the endocranial and ectrocranial size of the wound, locating the most pronounced bevelling, and determining if there is a correlation between the direction of bevelling and the direction of shooting. The results indicate outward bevelling of exit wounds in nearly two thirds of cases. No bevelling was observed in the orbits, sphenoid, and in some cases, the occipital and parietal bones. Internal bevelling of exit wounds was not found in this series. Bevelling may be partly understood using a glass model. The inconsistent correlation of the direction of bevelling in exit wounds with the direction of shooting leads to the conclusion that this characteristic cannot be relied upon to determine the direction of fire. PMID:9306668

  16. Socioeconomic aspects of stab and gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Wase, R E; Hamit, H F

    1979-09-01

    Records of 294 patients with gunshot, stab, or shotgun wounds admitted to Charlotte Memorial Hospital and Medical Center between July 1, 1976 and June 30, 1977 were reviewed. Data were gathered on 24 clinical, social, and economic aspects to discover any patterns in these areas. Eighty-three percent of the patients were male; 71%, black; 70%, unmarried; and 56%, between 16 and 30 years of age. Fifty-five percent came to the hospital between 10 pm and 3 am; 57% on Friday, Saturday, or Sunday; 31% came in June, July, or August. Sixty-four percent were gunshot wounds, 80% of which were by small caliber weapons. Ninety-four percent of all patients survived. The patients "consumed" 3,260 hosptial days, 526 intensive care unit days, 533 units of blood, and 261 operations, totaling 595 hours of operating room time. Hospital charges totaled $668,000, of which 1.1% was paid from private funds and nearly 65% from the taxpayers and other private paying patients. PMID:470276

  17. Facial Gunshot Wounds: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoav; Cole, Patrick; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial gunshot wounds, often comprising significant soft and bone tissue defects, pose a significant challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Whether resulting from assault, accident, or suicide attempt, a thorough assessment of the defects is essential for devising an appropriate tissue repair and replacement with a likely secondary revision. Immediately after injury, management is centered on advanced trauma life support with patient stabilization as the primary goal. Thorough examination along with appropriate imaging is critical for identifying any existing defects. Whereas past surgical management advocated delayed definitive treatment using serial debridement, today’s management favors use of more immediate reconstruction. Recent advances in microsurgical technique have shifted favor from local tissue advancement to distant free flap transfers, which improve cosmesis and function. This has resulted in a lower number of surgeries required to achieve reconstruction. Because of the diversity of injury and the complexity of facial gunshot injuries, a systematic algorithm is essential to help manage the different stages of healing and to ensure that the best outcome is achieved. PMID:22110801

  18. Pediatric intracranial gunshot wounds: the Memphis experience.

    PubMed

    DeCuypere, Michael; Muhlbauer, Michael S; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Penetrating brain injury in civilians is much less common than blunt brain injury but is more severe overall. Gunshot wounds (GSWs) cause high morbidity and mortality related to penetrating brain injury; however, there are few reports on the management and outcome of intracranial GSWs in children. The goals of this study were to identify clinical and radiological factors predictive for death in children and to externally validate a recently proposed pediatric prognostic scale. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective review of penetrating, isolated GSWs sustained in children whose ages ranged from birth to 18 years and who were treated at 2 major metropolitan Level 1 trauma centers from 1996 through 2013. Several standard clinical, laboratory, and radiological factors were analyzed for their ability to predict death in these patients. The authors then applied the St. Louis Scale for Pediatric Gunshot Wounds to the Head, a scoring algorithm that was designed to provide rapid prognostic information for emergency management decisions. The scale's sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictability were determined, with death as the primary outcome. RESULTS Seventy-one children (57 male, 14 female) had a mean age of 14 years (range 19 months to 18 years). Overall mortality among these children was 47.9%, with 81% of survivors attaining a favorable clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale score ≥ 4). A number of predictors of mortality were identified (all p < 0.05): 1) bilateral fixed pupils; 2) deep nuclear injury; 3) transventricular projectile trajectory; 4) bihemispheric injury; 5) injury to ≥ 3 lobes; 6) systolic blood pressure < 100 mm Hg; 7) anemia (hematocrit < 30%); 8) Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 5; and 9) a blood base deficit < -5 mEq/L. Patient age, when converted to a categorical variable (0-9 or 10-18 years), was not predictive. Based on data from the 71 patients in this study, the positive predictive value of the St

  19. Late treatment of a mandibular gunshot wound

    PubMed Central

    de Gouveia, Marcia Maria; Alves, Carlos Augusto Ferreira; Migliolo, Rodrigo Chenu

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular gunshot injuries are esthetically and functionally devastating, causing comminuted fractures and adjacent tissue destruction depending on the weapon gauge, projectile shape, impact kinetic energy, and density of the injured structures. If the mandibular fracture is not adequate or promptly treated, the broken fragments will fail to heal. In case of a treatment delay, progressive bone loss and fracture contracture will require a customized approach, which includes open reduction, removal of fibrous tissue between the bony stumps, and fixation of the fracture with a reconstruction plate and autogenous graft. The authors report the case of a 34-year-old man wounded on the mandible 15 years ago. With the aid of computed tomography and a prototype, a surgical plan was designed including open reduction and internal fixation of the segmental mandibular defect with a reconstruction plate and bone graft harvested from the iliac crest. The postoperative follow-up was uneventful and the 12-month follow up showed a positive aesthetic and functional result. PMID:26484326

  20. Trans-mediastinal gunshot wounds: are "stable" patients really stable?

    PubMed

    Nagy, Kimberly K; Roberts, Roxanne R; Smith, Robert F; Joseph, Kimberly T; An, Gary C; Bokhari, Faran; Barrett, John

    2002-10-01

    Gunshot wounds that traverse the mediastinum frequently cause serious injury to the cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, and digestive structures contained within. Most patients present with unstable vital signs signifying the need for emergency operation. An occasional patient will present with stable vital signs. Work-ups for such a patient may range from surgical exploration to radiographic and endoscopic testing to mere observation. We report our experience with diagnostic work-up of the stable patient with a transmediastinal gunshot wound. All stable patients who present to our urban level I trauma center following a transmediastinal gunshot wound undergo diagnostic work-up consisting of chest radiograph, cardiac ultrasound, angiography, esophagoscopy, barium swallow, and bronchoscopy. The work-up is dependent on the trajectory of the missile. Information on these patients is kept in a prospective database maintained by the trauma attending physicians. This database was analyzed and comparisons were made using Student's t-test and the Fisher exact c2 as appropriate. Over a 68-month period, 50 stable patients were admitted following a transmediastinal gunshot wound. All of these patients had a chest radiograph followed by one or more of the above tests. 8 patients (16%) were found to have a mediastinal injury (4 cardiac, 3 vascular, and 1 tracheo-esophageal) requiring urgent operation (group 1). The remaining 42 patients (84%) did not have a mediastinal injury (group 2). There was no difference between groups with respect to blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, pH, base deficit, or initial chest tube output. There was one death in each group, and three complications in group 2. Patients may appear stable following a transmediastinal gunshot wound, even when they have life-threatening injuries. There is no difference in vital signs, blood gas, or hemothorax to indicate which patients have serious injuries. We advocate continued aggressive work-up of these patients

  1. Constrictive Pericarditis Long after a Gunshot Wound.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Ho; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Chun, Kyung-Hyeon; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Seung Hyun; Hong, Geu-Ru; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-07-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon post-inflammatory disorder characterized by a variably thickened, fibrotic, and frequently calcified, pericardium. Etiology of the constriction can occur for many reasons. Although foreign bodies are not the common cause of constrictive pericarditis, the long-term presence of foreign bodies, like bullets, is presumed to cause chronic constrictive pericarditis even after a very long asymptomatic period. A 69-year-old patient with atrial flutter was admitted to the hospital. A cardiac computed tomography showed a bullet located adjacent to the right atrium. The transthoracic echocardiography showed a thickened pericardium and septal bouncing motion, which were compatible with constrictive pericarditis. The history of the patient revealed an injury by gunshot during the Korean War in 1950. Radiofrequency ablation of the atrial flutter was performed, and after ablation, the bullet was removed surgically. The patient was discharged home after surgery without complications. PMID:26240588

  2. Costs associated with gunshot wounds in Canada in 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the costs (in 1993 dollars) associated with gunshot wounds in Canada in 1991. DESIGN: Cost analysis using separate estimates of gunshot incidence rates and costs per incident for victims who died, those who survived and were admitted to hospital and those who survived and were treated and released from emergency departments. Estimates were based on costs for medical care, mental health care, public services (i.e., police investigation), productivity losses, funeral expenses, and individual and family pain, suffering and lost quality of life. SETTING: Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Costs per case, costs by type of incident (e.g., assault, suicide or unintentional shooting) and costs per capita. RESULTS: The total estimated cost associated with gunshot wounds was $6.6 billion. Of this, approximately $63 million was spent on medical and mental health care and $10 million on public services. Productivity losses exceeded $1.5 billion. The remaining cost represented the value attributed to pain, suffering and lost quality of life. Suicides and attempted suicides accounted for the bulk of the costs ($4.7 billion); homicides and assaults were the next most costly ($1.1 billion). The cost per survivor admitted to hospital was approximately $300,000; this amount included just over $29,000 for medical and mental health care. CONCLUSION: Costs associated with gunshot wounds were $235 per capita in Canada in 1991, as compared with $595 in the United States in 1992. The differences in these costs may be due to differences in gun availability in the two countries. This suggests that increased gun control may reduce Canada's costs, especially those related to suicide. PMID:7497388

  3. Differences in the element contents between gunshot entry wounds with full-jacketed bullet and lead bullet.

    PubMed

    Wunnapuk, Klintean; Durongkadech, Piya; Minami, Takeshi; Ruangyuttikarn, Werawan; Tohno, Setsuko; Vichairat, Karnda; Azuma, Cho; Sribanditmongkol, Pongruk; Tohno, Yoshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate characteristics of gunshot residues in gunshot entry wounds with full-jacketed and lead bullets, element contents in entry gunshot wounds and control skins were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). It was found that a high content of Fe and Zn was deposited in the gunshot entry wounds with full-jacketed bullet, whereas a high content of Pb was deposited in the gunshot entry wounds with lead (unjacked) bullet. It should be noted that the content of Pb was significantly higher in the gunshot entry wounds with lead bullet than in those with full-jacketed bullet. Regarding the relationships among elements, it was found that there were significant direct correlations between Pb and either Sb or Ba contents in both gunshot entry wounds with full-jacketed and lead bullets. As Pb increased in both gunshot entry wounds, Sb and Ba also increased in the wounds. PMID:17916957

  4. Principles of ballistics applicable to the treatment of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Swan, K G; Swan, R C

    1991-04-01

    Ballistics is the science of the motion of a projectile through the barrel of a firearm (internal ballistics), during its subsequent flight (external ballistics), and during its final complicated motion after it strikes a target (terminal ballistics). Wound ballistics is a special case of terminal ballistics. Although wound ballistics is at best sets of approximations, its principles enter usefully into an evaluation of a gunshot wound and its treatment. A special consideration in these cases is their medicolegal aspects. At a minimum, the medical team receiving the patient should exert care not to destroy the clothing and in particular to cut around and not through bullet holes, to turn over to law enforcement officials any metallic foreign body recovered from the patient, and to describe precisely, or even to photograph, any entrance or exit wounds. PMID:2003247

  5. Gunshot injuries of the abdominal aorta: a continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Degiannis, E; Levy, R D; Florizoone, M G; Badicel, T V; Badicel, M; Saadia, R

    1997-04-01

    This is a retrospective study of 57 patients with gunshot injuries of the abdominal aorta. The aortic repair was achieved by various means: lateral aortorraphy, patch aortoplasty and graft insertion. There was an 85 per cent mortality rate from bleeding or secondary coagulopathy directly related to the aortic injuries. The need for resuscitative thoracotomy, shock, lack of response to fluid resuscitation and intraperitoneal bleeding were directly related to mortality. We feel that shortening of prehospital transfer time will increase the absolute number of patients surviving this grave injury. PMID:9274736

  6. Contact gunshot wound of the head: diagnosis after surgical debridement of the wound.

    PubMed

    Prahlow, J A; Barnard, J J

    1999-09-01

    A case of homicidal contact gunshot wound of the head is described. The victim survived approximately 1 day and one-half following the shooting, during which time the bullet was recovered during surgery, the injuries were 'well-documented', and surgical debridement of the wound destroyed any visible evidence of gunshot residue on the scalp or underlying bone. Autopsy revealed a skull fragment with soot deposition within the depths of the injured brain, allowing an accurate determination of range-of-fire. The case reiterates the importance of performing autopsies on all homicides. PMID:15335485

  7. Comparison of gunshot wounds and field-tipped arrow wounds using morphological criteria and chemical spot tests.

    PubMed

    Randall, B; Newby, P

    1989-05-01

    Arrow wounds represent an unusual class of wounds rarely seen by most death investigators. Although the edged, broadhead-tipped arrow produces a wound usually characteristic of archery/crossbow weapons, the plain, field-tipped arrow wound can be confused with gunshot injuries in those cases in which powder residue or firearm projectiles or fragments or both are not recovered. We present a case of a deer carcass with a wound of uncertain firearm or archery origin which initiated a comparison of firearm wounds and archery wounds on fresh road-killed deer. We found the following features to be valuable in the differentiation of gunshot wounds and field-tipped archery wounds: First, the majority of the gunshot wounds (but none of the arrow wounds) had identifiable, macroscopic, wipe-off material and chemically identifiable wipe-off residue by spot test. Second, the archery wound defects had very inconspicuous abrasion rings as compared to the often prominent abrasion rings of gunshot wounds. Third, the actual central defect in the archery wounds was more likely to be oblong or slit-like compared to the gunshot wound defects, which were more likely to be round. PMID:2738561

  8. Gunshot wounds to the face--acute management.

    PubMed

    McLean, J Nicolas; Moore, Charles E; Yellin, Seth A

    2005-08-01

    The complex facial trauma victim poses a genuine therapeutic challenge as a whole, and may be particularly challenging to the medical team. The literature on acute management of gunshot wounds to the face is scarce. We performed an extensive review of the English-language literature in an effort to better delineate the diagnosis and acute management of these injuries. Most of these injuries do not present with initial threat to life and can safely be managed non-operatively. Definitive treatment is often deferred in patients with multiple, or more severe, injuries. Airway compromise is the most frequent and most life-threatening early problem reported in most series. CT scan remains the most useful method in the evaluation of these types of injuries and associated cervical spine lesions. Facial bleeding is best controlled by angiography and subsequent embolization. Anatomic repair of soft tissue and bony injuries is recommended to obtain an optimal functional and aesthetic outcome. Despite the creation of some algorithms, no clear correlation has been found between the site of entrance wound and the injuries and outcome of gunshot wounds to the face. PMID:16307399

  9. Penetrating intracranial gunshot wound transecting the right transverse sinus

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Narlin Bennet; Diaz, Cara; Crandall, Kenneth; Sansur, Charles

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old man sustained a gunshot wound to the posterior head. Imaging demonstrated a transection of the right transverse sinus, a retained bullet fragment and significant cerebellar oedema. The patient emergently underwent suboccipital decompression associated with brisk bleeding from the transverse sinus. Reported examples of surgical management of cerebral venous sinuses include: packing, grafting, patching and ligation. Our patient had a codominant transverse sinus and underwent successful unilateral ligation. His postoperative course was uneventful, however, he did require a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. He was subsequently discharged to rehab with a favourable outcome. PMID:22987903

  10. Effects of decomposition on gunshot wound characteristics: under moderate temperatures with insect activity.

    PubMed

    MacAulay, Lauren E; Barr, Darryl G; Strongman, Doug B

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies document characteristics of gunshot wounds shortly after they were inflicted. This study was conducted to determine if the early stages of decomposition obscure or alter the physical surface characteristics of gunshot wounds, thereby affecting the quantity and quality of information retrievable from such evidence. The study was conducted in August and September, 2005 in Nova Scotia, Canada in forested and exposed environments. Recently killed pigs were used as research models and were shot six times each at three different ranges (contact, 2.5 cm, and 1.5 m). Under these test conditions, the gunshot wounds maintained the characteristics unique to each gunshot range and changes that occurred during decomposition were not critical to the interpretation of the evidence. It was concluded that changes due to decomposition under the conditions tested would not affect the collection and interpretation of gunshot wound evidence until the skin was degraded in the late active or advanced decay stage of decomposition. PMID:19215324

  11. Abdominal stab wounds: self-inflicted wounds versus assault wounds.

    PubMed

    Venara, Aurélien; Jousset, Nathalie; Airagnes, Guillaume; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Rougé-Maillart, Clotilde

    2013-05-01

    Intentional penetrating wounds, self inflicted or inflicted by others, are increasingly common. As a result, it can be difficult for the forensic examiner to determine whether the cause is self-inflicted or not. This type of trauma has been studied from a psychological perspective and from a surgical perspective but the literature concerning the forensic perspective is poorer. The objective of this study was to compare the epidemiology of abdominal stab wounds so as to distinguish specific features of each type. This could help the forensic scientist to determine the manner of infliction of the wound. We proposed a retrospective monocentric study that included all patients with an abdominal wound who were managed by the visceral surgery department at Angers University Hospital. Demographic criteria, patient history, circumstances and location of the wound were noted and compared. A comparison was drawn between group 1 (self inflicted wound) and group 2 (assault). This study showed that the only significant differences are represented by the patient's prior history and the circumstances surrounding the wound, i.e. the scene and time of day. In our study, neither the site, nor the injuries sustained reveal significant clues as to the origin of the wound. According to our findings, in order to determine the cause, the forensic examiner should thus carefully study the circumstances and any associated injuries. PMID:23622473

  12. Homicide or suicide? Gunshot wound interpretation: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Cave, Rowena; DiMaio, Vincent J; Molina, D Kimberley

    2014-06-01

    Many studies have been published examining various features of fatal gunshot wounds such as type of firearm, range of fire, number of shots, and wound location as a way of determining between homicidal and suicidal deaths. Pathologists frequently have to give evidence in court, and may have their opinion about probable manner of death challenged or be questioned about how sure they can be. In the literature, the features are always discussed in isolation, but in practice, the pathologist has to consider such details in combination. Using pooled data from a systematic review to obtain large data sets, this study shows how Bayesian analysis can be applied to consideration of combined features and can thus provide a quantified degree of confidence to support the pathologist's opinion through the use of likelihood ratios. Case examples are provided to illustrate the impact of different features. PMID:24781397

  13. Biomechanics of femur fractures secondary to gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Smith, H W; Wheatley, K K

    1984-11-01

    Nonlethal gunshot wounds to the femur produce four classical types of fractures. The 'drill-hole,' incomplete, and 'butterfly' fractures have been described in both clinical and experimental settings. The remote spiral fracture, sometimes attributed to the fall on the femur after wounding, is unique to the weight-loaded femur. A mathematical model relying on the beam in bending and the mechanics of a cylindrical shell is offered. An experimental method utilizing an apparatus (the 'osteoclast') designed to apply torsion, bending, or combined forces to cadaveric long bones is discussed. Femur failure proximal or distal to the impact site of a projectile is a function of stress risers operating at relatively great distances. Predictable primary and secondary peak moment locations for fracture are illustrated. PMID:6502770

  14. Fatal gunshot wounds between 1995 and 2001 in a highly populated region in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rainio, Juha; Sajantila, Antti

    2005-03-01

    Gunshot injuries are a major problem worldwide from the human, medical, and economic perspectives. The number and characteristics of gunshot fatalities have been observed to vary significantly between countries. This study analyzes fatal gunshot wounds in the region of Uusimaa, Southern Finland, between 1995 and 2001. Gunshot wounds were typically found in suicides committed by men aged between 20 and 60 years. In most cases, a handgun was used. Mental disorders were present in the history of almost one quarter of the victims. Alcohol was identified in postmortem toxicology in half of the cases, but drugs of abuse were relatively uncommon. The autopsy rate in Finland is among the highest of the European Union countries, and a medicolegal investigation is performed in virtually all fatal gunshot incidents. This study is therefore representative of forensic investigations of gunshot fatalities in Finland overall. PMID:15725780

  15. Transmediastinal and Transcardiac Gunshot Wound with Hemodynamic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lal, Yusef Mohamed; de Tomás Palacios, Jorge; Amunategui Prats, Iñaki; Turégano Fuentes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac injuries caused by knives and firearms are slightly increasing in our environment. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with a transmediastinal gunshot wound (TGSW) and a through-and-through cardiac wound who was hemodynamically stable upon his admission. He had an entrance wound below the left clavicle, with no exit wound, and decreased breath sounds in the right hemithorax. Chest X-ray showed the bullet in the right hemithorax and large right hemothorax. The ultrasound revealed pericardial effusion, and a chest tube produced 1500 cc. of blood, but he remained hemodynamically stable. Considering these findings, a median sternotomy was carried out, the through-and-through cardiac wounds were suture-repaired, lung laceration was sutured, and a pacemaker was placed in the right ventricle. The patient had uneventful recovery and was discharged home on the twelfth postoperative day. The management and prognosis of these patients are determined by the hemodynamic situation upon arrival to the Emergency Department (ED), as well as a prompt surgical repair if needed. Patients with a TGSW have been divided into three groups according to the SBP: group I, with SBP >100 mmHg; group II, with SBP 60–100 mmHg; and group III, with SBP <60 mmHg. The diagnostic workup and management should be tailored accordingly, and several series have confirmed high chances of success with conservative management when these patients are hemodynamically stable. PMID:25197606

  16. Costs of gunshot and cut/stab wounds in the United States, with some Canadian comparisons.

    PubMed

    Miller, T R; Cohen, M A

    1997-05-01

    This article estimates the costs of U.S. gunshot and cut/stab wound by intent. It also compares U.S. to Canadian gunshot experience. Incidence data are from published sources, the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), and cause-coded emergency department discharge and hospital discharge data systems. Medical care payments and lost earnings per case come from National Crime Survey data, a literature review, and weighting of costs by diagnosis from Databook on Nonfatal Injury-Incidence. Costs, and Consequences by Miller et al. (The Urban Institute Press, Washington, DC. 1995) with the diagnosis distribution of penetrating injuries from the discharge data systems. Quality of life losses are estimated primarily from jury awards to penetrating injury victims. In 1992, gunshots killed 37,776 Americans; cut/stab wounds killed 4095. Another 134,000 gunshot survivors and 3,100,000 cut/stab wound survivors received medical treatment. Annually, gunshot wounds cost an estimated U.S. $126 billion. Cut/stab wounds cost another U.S. $51 billion. The gunshot and cut/stab totals include U.S. $40 billion and U.S. $13 billion respectively in medical, public services, and work-loss costs. Across medically treated cases, costs average U.S. $154,000 per gunshot survivor and U.S. $12,000 per cut/stab survivor. Gunshot wounds are more than three times as common in the U.S. than in Canada, which has strict handgun control. With the same quality of life loss per victim, gunshot costs per capita are an estimated U.S. $495 in the U.S. vs U.S. $180 in Canada. Per gun, however, the costs are higher in Canada, Gunshot wound rates rise linearly with gun ownership. PMID:9183471

  17. Effects of decomposition on gunshot wound characteristics: under cold temperatures with no insect activity.

    PubMed

    MacAulay, Lauren E; Barr, Darryl G; Strongman, Doug B

    2009-03-01

    Information on gunshot wound characteristics has been well documented; however, there is little documented information on the effects of decomposition or environmental conditions on gunshot wound characteristics. This study was conducted in order to determine if decomposition would obscure or alter the physical surface characteristics of gunshot wounds when exposed to a low temperature environment. The study was conducted from November 2005 to January 2006 in Nova Scotia, Canada in forested and exposed environments, with air temperatures between -10 degrees C and +10 degrees C. Pigs were used as human models and were shot six times each at three different ranges (contact, 2.5 cm, and 1.5 m). Gunshot wound characteristics persisted until the wounds were covered with ice and snow, after which changes were observed. The changes were recognized as being unique to the different ranges of gunshots and it was concluded that changes due to decomposition under the conditions tested would not affect the collection and interpretation of gunshot wound evidence. PMID:19215323

  18. 9 mm ammunition used in a 40 caliber glock pistol: an atypical gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Thogmartin, J R; Start, D A

    1998-05-01

    Atypical gunshot wounds due to ricochet and intermediate targets have been well described in the literature. We represent a case of suicide with an atypical entrance wound and bullet without rifling marks due to 9 mm ammunition being loaded and fired from a 40 caliber semiautomatic pistol. PMID:9608712

  19. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds severely damaged by fire.

    PubMed

    Fais, Paolo; Giraudo, Chiara; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Amagliani, Alessandro; Miotto, Diego; Feltrin, Giampietro; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, S Davide; Cecchetto, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Incineration or extensive burning of the body, causing changes in the content and distribution of fluids, fixation and shrinking processes of tissues, can alter the typical macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of firearm wounds, hampering or at least complicating the reconstruction of gunshot fatalities. The present study aims at evaluating the potential role of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for detecting and quantifying gunshot residue (GSR) particles in experimentally produced intermediate-range gunshot wounds severely damaged by fire. Eighteen experimental shootings were performed on 18 sections of human calves surgically amputated for medical reasons at three different firing distances (5, 15 and 30 cm). Six stab wounds produced with an ice pick were used as controls. Each calf section underwent a charring cycle, being placed in a wood-burning stove for 4 min at a temperature of 400 °C. At visual inspection, the charred entrance wounds could not be differentiated from the exit lesions and the stab wounds. On the contrary, micro-CT analysis showed the presence of GSR particles in all burnt entrance gunshot wounds, while GSR was absent in the exit and stab wounds. The GSR deposits of the firearm lesions inflicted at very close distance (5 cm) were mainly constituted of huge particles (diameter >150 μm) with an irregular shape and well-delineated edges; at greater distances (15 and 30 cm), agglomerates of tiny radiopaque particles scattered in the epidermis and dermis layers were evident. Statistical analysis demonstrated that also in charred firearm wounds the amount of GSR roughly correlates with the distance from which the gun was fired. The obtained results suggest that micro-CT analysis can be a valid screening tool for identifying entrance gunshot wounds and for differentiating firearm wounds from sharp-force injuries in bodies severely damaged by fire. PMID:23010908

  20. A Rare Case of an Intact Bone Plug Associated with a Gunshot Exit Wound.

    PubMed

    Bird, Cate E; Fleischman, Julie M

    2015-07-01

    This case study presents an unusual manifestation of gunshot trauma in skeletal tissue from a post-World War II human rights abuse sample uncovered in Vilnius, Lithuania. After briefly reviewing the typical wound appearance of projectile trauma in the cranium, we discuss the presence of an intact bone plug associated with a gunshot exit wound in an individual from the Tuskulenai Case. While this individual demonstrated typical gunshot entry and exit wounds to the cranium consistent with high-velocity trauma, the bone plug indicates that the projectile likely lost much of its kinetic energy while traveling through the cranium resulting in a low-velocity impact at the exit site. This study reviews a similar instance of a bone plug recovered from a bioarcheological sample in Peru and emphasizes the importance of thorough archeological excavations of mass graves. PMID:25832722

  1. Conservative management of an abdominal gunshot injury with a peritoneal breach: wisdom or absurdity?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salma; Pardhan, Amyn; Bawa, Tufail; Haroon, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical exploration has been the standard of care for abdominal gunshot injuries. The authors report a case of a 28-year-old man who sustained a transabdominal gunshot injury, which entered the anterior abdominal wall and exited adjacent to the T12 vertebra posteriorly with a tangential trajectory. On presentation, the patient was haemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Based on trajectory of the bullet, intra-abdominal injury was suspected. Therefore a CT scan abdomen with intravenous and rectal contrast was performed. The CT scan revealed no extravasation of the rectal contrast but showed free air specks behind the descending colon. Delayed renal images of the left ureter were also normal. Based on the clinical findings, the patient was managed non-operatively with nothing per oral, intravenous antibiotics and frequent abdominal assessments. He made an uneventful recovery without necessitating laparotomy. PMID:24272989

  2. Microscopic and spectroscopic features of gunpowder and its documentation in gunshot wounds in charred bodies.

    PubMed

    Dolinak, David; Wise, Steven H; Jones, Curtiss

    2008-12-01

    Determining the direction and range of fire of gunshot wounds in charred bodies can be difficult because soot resulting from thermal injury can grossly be identical to soot arising from a contact or close-range firearm discharge. Two charred bodies had gunshot wounds of the head and neck region that were distorted by thermal effect, precluding determination of the direction and range of fire by gross findings alone. By microscopy, deep wound tissue from each charred body had foreign material suggestive of gunpowder. Samples of the foreign material were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microscopy and determined to be cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose), a main component of gunpowder. In addition, 12 cases of suicide in well-preserved bodies with contact gunshot wounds were examined with FT-IR microscopy, confirming the presence of cellulose nitrate in 6 (50%) of the cases. Identification of cellulose nitrate in the tracks of gunshot wounds can assist in the determination of direction and range of fire when the surface features are charred. PMID:19259016

  3. Gunshot-like wound caused by sling shot injury – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Vinuthinee, Naidu; Azreen-Redzal, Anuar; Juanarita, Jaafar; Zunaina, Embong

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of sling shot injury that presented with a gunshot-like wound with preseptal cellulitis, in a toddler. An 11-month-old Malay child presented with a gunshot-like wound over the forehead following sling shot injury. On examination, he had a deep circular laceration wound over the forehead, measuring 2.0 cm in diameter, with minimal bleeding. There was no obvious foreign body seen inside the wound and no palpable foreign body surrounding the wound. The gunshot-like wound was associated with left preseptal cellulitis. A skull X-ray showed a white opaque foreign body in the left frontal bone. Computed tomography (CT) scan of orbit and brain revealed a left comminuted fracture of the left orbital roof, and left frontal brain contusion with prelesional edema. Wound exploration was performed and revealed a 0.5 cm unshattered marble embedded in the left frontal bone. The marble and bone fragments were removed. The left preseptal cellulitis responded well to intravenous antibiotic and topical antibiotic. PMID:25709507

  4. [Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for detection of bullet metal residue in gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Zelenka, K

    2003-04-01

    The article describes using of energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons. PMID:12874887

  5. The survival of metallic residues from gunshot wounds in cremated bone: a SEM-EDX study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Brandone, Alberto; Rizzi, Agostino; Mazzarelli, Debora; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-07-01

    The research and analysis of gunshot residues has a relevant role in the examination of gunshot wounds. Nevertheless, very little literature exists concerning gunshot wounds on charred material. In this study, 16 adult bovine ribs (eight still with soft tissues and eight totally skeletonized) underwent a shooting test with two types of projectiles (9 mm full metal-jacketed bullet and 9 mm unjacketed bullet). Each rib then underwent a charring process in an electric oven, reaching the stage of complete calcination at 800°C. The area of each entrance wound was analyzed before and after the carbonization process via a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX). In each sample, metallic residues composed of lead, barium, and antimony were found. These metallic residues were thus preserved also after exposure to the extremely high temperatures reached within the oven, especially with unjacketed bullets, although the particles seem to be more irregular in shape as a result of the heating process. In conclusion, this study proved that gunshot residues survive extremely high temperatures and can be detected via SEM/EDX even in cases of charred tissues. PMID:22249273

  6. Substitute ellipse of the permanent cavity in gelatin blocks and debridement of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Korać, Z; Kelenc, D; Baskot, A; Mikulić, D; Hancević, J

    2001-08-01

    A new method in terminal ballistics is presented that allows precise numerical analysis of characteristics of the permanent cavity by computed tomography (CT). Shots were made with a Russian AK-74 assault rifle (5.45 mm) into gelatin used as a tissue simulant. CT scans were made of the gelatin blocks, transferred into digital format, and analyzed using computer software. CT scans of the permanent cavity are characterized by markedly irregular shapes, and an attempt was made to simplify these forms and to link them with surgical debridement of gunshot wounds. An assumption was made that the zone of debridement has the form of an ellipse. Using the information from the CT images, a substitute ellipse was constructed as an approximation of the a vital tissue surrounding the wound channel with the aim of approaching a more exact definition of the zone of necessary debridement of gunshot wounds. PMID:11515318

  7. MicroCT detection of gunshot residue in fresh and decomposed firearm wounds.

    PubMed

    Cecchetto, Giovanni; Amagliani, Alessandro; Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Montisci, Massimo; Feltrin, Giampietro; Viel, Guido; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2012-05-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) evidence may be altered or obscured by after-death events such as putrefaction, autolysis, and/or damage by animals. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the amount and differential distribution of GSR utilizing microcomputed tomography (microCT) analysis of fresh and decomposed gunshot wounds. A total of 60 experimental shootings at three different firing distances (5, 15, and 30 cm) were performed on human calves surgically amputated for medical reasons. Thirty specimens (10 for each tested distance) were immediately formalin-fixed, while the other 30 specimens were enclosed in a cowshed for 15 days, before formalin fixation (air temperature ranging from 11°C to 38°C). MicroCT analysis with three-dimensional image reconstruction detected GSR particles in all the investigated entrance wounds. In fresh specimens, GSR was concentrated on the skin surface around the entrance hole and in the epidermis and dermis layers around the cavity, while in decomposed specimens, the high density particles were detected only in the dermis layer. No GSR was detected in exit wounds of both fresh and decomposed specimens regardless of the tested firing distance. Statistical analysis demonstrated that also in decomposed wounds the amount of GSR roughly correlated with the distance from which the gun was fired, exhibiting, however, a higher variability than in fresh samples. The obtained results suggest that microCT analysis can be a valid screening tool for differentiating decomposed entrance and exit gunshot wounds. PMID:22086714

  8. A Case Report of Spinal Cord Injury Patient From a High Velocity Gunshot Wound to the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong; Kim, Je Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on operational and rehabilitation management, as well as the outcome, of a patient who with sustained spinal cord injury from a high velocity gunshot wound to the lumbar spine. More specifically, a patient with a gunshot wound to the spine is more likely to sustain a complete injury and have a poor prognosis. As such, there should be concerns regarding associated and extended injuries related to bullet fragmentation as well as the possibility of long-term sequelae. PMID:23526072

  9. Estimation of the firing distance through micro-CT analysis of gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Cecchetto, Giovanni; Giraudo, Chiara; Amagliani, Alessandro; Viel, Guido; Fais, Paolo; Cavarzeran, Fabiano; Feltrin, Giampietro; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Montisci, Massimo

    2011-03-01

    Estimation of the firing range is often critical for reconstructing gunshot fatalities, where the main measurable evidence is the gunshot residue (GSR). In the present study intermediate-range gunshot wounds have been analysed by means of a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) coupled to an image analysis software in order to quantify the powder particles and to determine the firing distance. A total of 50 shootings were performed on skin sections obtained from human legs surgically amputated for medical reasons. For each tested distance (5, 15, 23, 30 and 40 cm), firing was carried out perpendicularly at the samples using a 7.65-mm pistol loaded with jacketed bullets. Uninjured skin sections were used as controls. By increasing the firing distance, micro-CT analysis demonstrated a clear decreasing trend in the mean GSR percentage, particularly for shots fired from more than 15 cm. For distances under 23 cm, the powder particles were concentrated on the epidermis and dermis around the hole, and inside the cavity; while, at greater distances, they were deposited only on the skin surface. Statistical analysis showed a nonlinear relationship between the amount of GSR deposits and the firing range, well explained by a Gaussian-like function. The proposed method allowed a good discrimination for all the tested distances, proving to be an objective, rapid and inexpensive tool for estimating the firing range in intermediate-range gunshot wounds. PMID:21120514

  10. Extensive Mine-Shrapnel and Gunshot Wound Closure Using Keystone Island Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Sliesarenko, Sergii V.; Sliesarenko, Kirill S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: During military operations, one aspect of a plastic surgeon’s work is to restore extensive and deep wound defects in a short period of time and provide a high degree of functional recovery to the damaged area. Because many injuries caused by military operations cannot be closed using a primary suture, the specialist has to select another surgical approach to close the wound defect. Surgeons must select methods that not only cover the extensive wound defect in 1 step but also allow skin coverage that is anatomically, functionally, and visually similar to the surrounding tissues to reduce the length of the hospital stay and ensure optimal functional recovery of the damaged organ. Methods: From 2014 to 2015, 25 patients underwent 36 reconstructions at our center after receiving mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds. All reconstructions occurred during the acute period and used keystone island perforator flaps. The authors’ wound management technique was characterized by an aggressive surgical and antibiotic therapy protocol. Results: In all cases, after surgical debridement, the mine-shrapnel and gunshot wound defects were completely closed in 1 stage during the acute period. The working time in the operating room to perform the transposition of the flap ranged from 45 to 90 minutes, with an average of 68 minutes. All displaced flaps were similar in structure and color to the surrounding tissues and did not change the contours of the body. The adequate restoration of skin allowed patients to begin early recovery of functional activity. Conclusions: Local keystone island perforator flaps can be considered one of the primary methods of plastic closure of extensive defects caused by mine-shrapnel and gunshot wounds at different anatomical locations, providing that the tissue surrounding the defect is intact and usable as a donor resource. PMID:27579247

  11. Gunshot wound to the pregnant uterus: case report.

    PubMed

    Osnaya-Moreno, Humberto; Zaragoza Salas, Tahitiana Abelina; Escoto Gomez, Jorge Armando; Mondragon Chimal, Marco Antonio; Torres Castaneda, Maria De Lourdes; Jimenez Flores, Mauro

    2013-09-01

    Crime and violence have become a public health problem. Pregnant women have not been the exception and gunshot injuries occupy an important place as a cause of trauma. An important fact is that pregnant women, who suffer trauma, are special patients because pregnancy causes physiological and anatomical changes. Management of these patients should be multidisciplinary, by the general surgeon, the obstetrician and the neonatologist. However, even trauma referral centers could neither have the staff nor the ideal training for these specific cases. In this context we present the following case. PMID:24217572

  12. Case-study of fatal gunshot wounds from non-lethal projectiles.

    PubMed

    Chowaniec, Czesław; Kobek, Mariusz; Jabłoński, Christian; Kabiesz-Neniczka, Stanisława; Karczewska, Weronika

    2008-07-01

    The authors present a case of the death of a 60-year-old man shot using rubber projectiles that were fired by a police officer from a Mossberg smooth-bore shotgun in an enclosed space from a distance of a few metres. The post-mortem examination revealed that death had been due to gunshot wounds in the chest which had caused heart and lung damage with subsequent massive internal haemorrhaging. PMID:18514453

  13. [Histochemical detection of primary shell residue mixture in the entry of gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Kovacević, Vesna; Krstić, Dragan; Jović, Milena; Stanković, Zoran; Milosavljević, Ivica; Marinković, Nadica

    2002-01-01

    Alizarin red S, a commonly used organic dye in the histologic identification of calcium deposits, also forms colored reaction products with other metal ions, such as barium and lead, which are present in primer residue. The possibility was presented of using this histochemical technique in determination of firing distance based on the results in experimentally made close-range gunshot wounds (up to 1 m) by using several types of firearms. PMID:12852144

  14. Superior mesenteric artery-duodenal fistula secondary to a gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Cory M; Frandah, Wesam; Krohmer, Steven; Flomenhoft, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Arterioenteric fistulas are a rare cause of massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. We present a patient who developed a fistula between a middle colic artery pseudoaneurysm, a proximal branch of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and the third part of the duodenum 2 weeks after a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the abdomen. The patient's presentation, evaluation, treatment, and prognosis are discussed. All prior published cases of SMA-duodenal fistulas are reviewed. PMID:26722161

  15. Simulating backspatter of blood from cranial gunshot wounds using pig models.

    PubMed

    Radford, G E; Taylor, M C; Kieser, J A; Waddell, J N; Walsh, K A J; Schofield, J C; Das, R; Chakravorty, E

    2016-07-01

    Few studies have examined the biomechanical basis for backspatter from cranial gunshot wounds. Backspatter is material which travels against the direction of fire following ejection from a gunshot entrance wound. Our paper focuses on the use of animals for reconstructing this phenomenon. Five live pigs and several slaughtered pigs were shot using either 9 × 19 mm, 115 grain, full metal jacketed ammunition or .22 long rifle, 40 grain, lead, round-nose ammunition. A high-speed camera was used to record the entrance wound formation and backspatter. A small amount of backspattered material was produced with all targets, and blood backspatter was seen in a few cases. However, we conclude that our model provides an understanding of the phenomenon of backspatter and the physical mechanisms associated with it. The various components of the mechanism of backspatter formation are complex and overlap. The principle mechanism observed in pig cranial gunshots was the high-speed impact response of the skin overlying the skull bone. This study has also produced evidence supporting the view that backspatter can result from the splashing of superficial blood if it is already present on the skin. Subcutaneous gas effects have been demonstrated for backspatter from contact shots. There has been no clear evidence of the role of the collapse of a temporary cavity within the brain. PMID:26156450

  16. [On the treatment of gunshot wounds of extremities in the conditions of local military actions].

    PubMed

    Agakhanian, N V; Ter-Avetikian, Z A; Mkrtchian, M E; Amirian, E G

    2009-04-01

    Together with the improvement of new types of weapons with more destroying effect, the treatment methods of gunshot wounds including laser therapy, extrafocal osteosynthesis, new antibacterial means are also developing. The application of these methods makes it possible to create optimal conditions for the treatment of different types of injuries of extremities with positive results in 88% cases. These results were received due to early and thorough first surgical processing of wounds by wide usage of helium-neon laser radiation as well as with the help of traumatologists who are the skilled in the new treatment methods including the extrafocal compressional osteosynthesis. PMID:19430037

  17. [Left ventricular projectile migration after an accidental close-range gunshot wound].

    PubMed

    Driessen, A; Tjardes, T; Eikermann, C; Trojan, S; Fröhlich, M; Grimaldi, G; Kosse, N

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old female after sustaining a shotgun wound in the left upper extremity and chest. Initial emergency diagnostics revealed numerous shotgun pellets scattered throughout the left-side soft tissue, chest and upper lung lobe with one pellet having migrated into the left ventricle of the heart.Due to the devastating injury pattern, gunshot wounds are interdisciplinarily challenging and should include extended initial diagnostics, such as contrast agent CT. The potential toxicity of elevated lead blood levels have to be taken into further account. PMID:27286982

  18. Wound ballistics of gunshot injuries to the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Holt, G R; Kostohryz, G

    1983-05-01

    It is important for the trauma surgeon to understand the basic principles of terminal gunshot ballistics and the study of the projectile's effect on striking soft tissue. The amount of kinetic energy dissipated to the tissue is directly related to the mass and velocity of the projectile as follows: K = MV2/2. Doubling the velocity quadruples the energy, while doubling the mass only doubles the energy. A temporary tissue cavity is produced as the striking projectile compresses the surrounding tissue; the higher the energy release, the more extensive the inapparent compressive damage. The permanent cavity that remains is the result of extrusion of tissue from the pathway of the projectile. The higher the velocity, the higher the likelihood of extensive damage. If the missile expands or fragments within the tissues, more damage will occur. PMID:6847483

  19. Post mortem computed tomography: useful or unnecessary in gunshot wounds deaths? Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Aniello; Gitto, Lorenzo; De Matteis, Alessandra; Panebianco, Valeria; Bolino, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    Post-mortem computer tomography (PMCT) is currently an useful procedure that can elucidate patterns of injuries, providing strong medical evidence that is very useful during litigation and at trial. This technique is especially useful in gunshot wounds cases, allowing an easier location and retrieval of the bullet and/or its fragments inside the body. In such cases, the use of 3D rendering can be very useful in order to obtain essential information, such as: accurate depict of the wound track, discerning between entrance and exit wounds, show bone's fracture and its fragments course inside the body. The authors performed analysis on two cases of death by gunshot wounds, and a PMCT before the postmortem examination was made. The obtained CT scans were evaluated using the open-source software OsiriX on a Mac OS X computer, performing 3D rendering of the DICOM images. The crime scene reconstruction was performed using the software Poser Debut® on a Mac OS X computer. In both cases, PMCT showed multiple advantages: objectivity, reproducibility, ease visualization of the wound paths, easy localization of bullet and their fragments, allowing us to clarify the cause of death before the traditional autopsy. PMCT should became a standard in forensic practice as an aid to the tradition postmortem examination to obtain as much information as possible in order to clarify the cause and manner of death. PMID:25001050

  20. An autopsy case of a decomposed body with keyhole gunshot wound and secondary skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Kuroda, Ryohei; Nakajima, Makoto; Takizawa, Ayako; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The decomposed body of a 53 or 57-year-old male was found with a gun in a locked car parked in a coin-operated parking lot. During autopsy, the entrance wound in the frontal bone showed a characteristic keyhole defect with internal and external beveling. There was no exit wound. The fragmented bullet traveled downward within the calvarium and struck the right orbital plate. Two independent linear fractures were observed away from the entrance. These were believed to be secondary fractures resulting neither from internal ricochet of the bullet nor from direct blunt force to the head. Although decomposition complicated the evaluation of the gunshot wound characteristics, microscopic examination confirmed large quantities of soot along the wound tract, supporting our conclusion that the range of fire was contact. PMID:22633563

  1. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  2. Gunshot Wound in Lumbar Spine with Intradural Location of a Bullet

    PubMed Central

    Bordon, G.; Burguet Girona, S.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a migratory bullet in the spinal canal after a gunshot injury is a rare finding, specially without causing permanent neurologic damage. We present the case of a patient who suffered a gunshot wound with an entry point in the posterior arc of L2-L3 and a migratory bullet detected at the level of L5-S1 in the CT scan. The patient complained about intense headache, dizziness, and variable sensitive impairment in lower legs apparently depending on the patient's position in bed. We decided to remove the bullet in order to prevent the delayed neurological damage and lead toxicity. We discuss technical details of this surgery. PMID:24991440

  3. Gunshot wound in lumbar spine with intradural location of a bullet.

    PubMed

    Bordon, G; Burguet Girona, S

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a migratory bullet in the spinal canal after a gunshot injury is a rare finding, specially without causing permanent neurologic damage. We present the case of a patient who suffered a gunshot wound with an entry point in the posterior arc of L2-L3 and a migratory bullet detected at the level of L5-S1 in the CT scan. The patient complained about intense headache, dizziness, and variable sensitive impairment in lower legs apparently depending on the patient's position in bed. We decided to remove the bullet in order to prevent the delayed neurological damage and lead toxicity. We discuss technical details of this surgery. PMID:24991440

  4. [Thoracic and abdominal and limb wounds by gun shot].

    PubMed

    Naomi, Akira; Oyamatsu, Yoshinori; Narita, Kunio; Nakayama, Masato

    2015-02-01

    In Japan, we are permitted to own fire arms only for hunting and clay pigeon shooting, but gunshot wound victims have neen rarely seen due to the strict laws against owing guns, and the lack of related crimes. Therefore, surgeons should be familiar with ballistics, practical gunshot wound management, and the possibility of delayed lead poisoning ssociated with bullet residue. A 69-year-old man was brought to our hospital because he was accidentally shot by his companion's shotgun during hunting. On admission, although he had stable vital sign and multiple gunshot wounds on his right forearm and femur, chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) revealed a few of bullets and its flagments on his back, into spleen and pericardium. Following local debridment after removal of the bullets in his right forearm and femur at an emergency room, broken heart muscle and diaphragm were repaired and hematoma in the anterior mediastinum was removed at the operating room. The patient was discharged on the 25th post-operative day and his post-operative course was uneventful. In case of gunshot injuries, in addition to prompt diagnosis and evaluation of organ injuries, careful follow up for possible delayed lead poisoning is important. PMID:25743351

  5. Gunshot Wounds to the Brain—A Civilian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, William D.; Apuzzo, Michael L. J.; Heiden, James S.; Petersons, Viesturs T.; Weiss, Martin H.

    1980-01-01

    A study involving 79 patients who were considered for surgical treatment for craniocerebral gunshot injuries between 1972 and 1978 was carried out to develop criteria for radiographic assessment and surgical operation, as well as to improve operative techniques and preoperative planning. The study focused on differences between military and civilian injuries, as well as criteria for gross prediction of outcome. Of note in the overall perspective of the series were (1) the predominance of low-velocity missiles, (2) the high rate of self-inflicted injuries (34 percent), (3) the overall mortality of 23 percent with the rate for persons older than 60 being approximately 70 percent, (4) the correlation between preoperative patient assessment and mortality, (5) complications predominated by cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (10 percent), (6) the value of computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scanning in patient assessment and operative strategy and (7) the ultimate employability rate in survivors (78 percent). An historical review of the development of management principles based on operative experience in the military sector as well as other recent civilian literature also deserves consideration. PMID:7385830

  6. Gunshot wounds: a review of firearm type, range, and location as pertaining to manner of death.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; DiMaio, Vincent; Cave, Rowena

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have examined the characteristics of gunshot wounds by manner of death; however, no published study has directly compared these characteristics for the different types of firearms. This study was designed to address that deficiency. Existing data sets of nonaccidental deaths by handguns, shotguns, and rifles were reviewed. The victim data were analyzed by age and sex of the victims, wound location, range of fire, manner of death, and type of firearm. Handguns were the most common firearm used in both suicides and homicides, followed by rifles and then shotguns. For both homicides and suicides, there were significant differences between the firearm types for age of victims, range of fire, and wound locations. Possible reasons for those differences are discussed. It is concluded that information about the type of firearm is crucial to have when examining the nature of a firearm injury and determining the manner of death. PMID:24196728

  7. An Analysis of the Characteristics of Thoracic and Abdominal Injuries Due to Gunshot Homicides in Israel.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Hiss, Jehuda; Gips, Hadas; Hocherman, Gil; Levin, Nadav; Kosachevsky, Olga; Vinokurov, Asya; Zelkowicz, Avraham; Byard, Roger W

    2016-01-01

    De-identified wound data from 197 homicidal gunshot postmortems were obtained between 2000 and 2008. Forensic ballistics data were only available for cases between 2004 and 2008. Males represent 91% of gunshot victims and were struck in the thorax/abdomen with an average of 2.3 bullets. The type of firearms involved were semi-automatic pistols in the predominant caliber 9-mm Luger and assault rifles in caliber 5.56 × 45 mm and caliber 7.62 × 39 mm Soviet, using full metal jacket bullets. The majority of shootings occurred at ranges of 1 m or greater. The most common bullet path was front to back in 66% of cases. Entry wounds occurred more often on the left side of the thorax, abdomen, and back. The most common critical organs/tissues to sustain bullet trauma in descending order were as follows: heart, lungs, liver, aorta, spleen, kidneys, and vena cava. Ribs were struck by most bullets that entered the thorax. PMID:26264376

  8. Gunshot wounds to the spine: literature review and report on a migratory intrathecal bullet.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edward; Kondrashov, Dimitriy; Hannibal, Matthew; Hsu, Ken; Zucherman, Jim

    2008-03-01

    Treatment of the complex injury to the spine produced by a gunshot wound remains controversial. Treatment depends on the physician's ability to understand mechanism of injury, principles of medical management, diagnostic imaging, and surgical options. Antibiotics are an important component of treatment and should be continued for a minimum of 7 days in cases of wounds that both perforate the colon and injure the spine. Corticosteroids do not affect neurologic outcome and therefore should not be used. Decompression and removal of intracanal bullets at T12 and below may improve motor function. In select cases of cervical injuries, removal of intracanal bullet fragments may be justified, particularly with incomplete lesions. Regardless of injury level, new-onset or progressive neurologic deterioration is an indication for urgent decompression. Optimal surgical timing remains a controversial issue, and more study is needed to develop treatment guidelines. Intrathecal migratory missiles represent a very rare subset of the gunshot wounds to the spine, and their treatment should be individualized. In this article, we review the literature and then describe the case of a migratory intrathecal bullet in the lumbar spine of a patient who presented with cauda equina-type symptoms. PMID:18438477

  9. Covered Stent and Coils Embolization of a Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Gunshot Wound.

    PubMed

    Huet, Nicolas; Rodiere, Mathieu; Badet, Michel; Michoud, Marie; Brichon, Pierre-Yves; Ferretti, Gilbert; Thony, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    We report the first case of endovascular covered stent implantation for the treatment of a large pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm (PAPA) following a right thoracic gunshot wound. After resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, a CT angiography was performed to analyze the neck size of the PAPA and its position relative to the branches of the parent artery. Covered stent implantation with additional coil embolization was successfully performed. At the 4-year follow-up, the stents remained patent and there was neither pseudoaneurysm recurrence nor treatment-related complication. PMID:26662074

  10. Brain injury after gunshot wounding: morphometric analysis of cell destruction caused by temporary cavitation.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; Meissner, C; König, H G

    2000-02-01

    In addition to the primary destruction of brain tissue readily visible at autopsy (permanent track), gunshot wounding to the brain creates a pulsating temporary cavity due to radial expansion along the bullet's track. To determine the maximum extent of this temporary cavitation in brains of victims of gunshots from weapons with low muzzle velocity, we carried out morphometric studies on 20 cases of death from gunshot wounding to the head from bullets with a muzzle energy <500 J and a survival time of <90 min. The brains were fixed in formalin, examine macroscopically and microscopically, and subjected to morphometric analyses. Surrounding the permanent track, a narrow mantle-like zone of astrocyte destruction was found within an area of hemorrhagic extravasation. Axons near the permanent track had been broken into tiny fragments. The axonal damage lessened with increasing distance from the permanent track, although axons continued to be fragmented and to exhibit varicose changes and clumping until assuming their normal structure beyond 18 mm. Nerve cells were extremely shrunken close to the permanent track but gradually took on their normal shape with increasing distance. We also assessed the loss of glial fibrillary acid protein expression by astrocytes in the white matter, the extent of traumatic bleeding, and damage to axons and neurons as measured radially from the permanent track. Axonal and neuronal damage were found to extend about 18 mm radially from the permanent track, tapering gradually along the track from entry point to exit point. The destruction was probably produced by the temporary cavitation and accords with theoretical considerations and experimental observations. PMID:10709873

  11. Low velocity gunshot wounds result in significant contamination regardless of ballistic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Joseph; Putney, Emily; Egol, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Controversy exists among the orthopedic community regarding the treatment of gunshot injuries. No consistent treatment algorithm exists for treatment of low energy gunshot wound (GSW) trauma. The purpose of this study was to critically examine the wound contamination following low velocity GSW based upon bullet caliber and clothing fiber type found within the injury track. Four types of handguns were fired at ballistic gel from a 10-foot distance. Various clothing materials were applied (denim, cotton, polyester, and wool) circumferentially around the tissue agar in a loose manor. A total of 32 specimens were examined. Each caliber handgun was fired a minimum of 5 times into a gel. Regardless of bullet caliber there was gross contamination of the entire bullet track in 100% of specimens in all scenarios and for all fiber types. Furthermore, as would be expected, the degree of contamination appeared to increase as the size of the bullet increased. Low velocity GSWs result in significant contamination regardless of bullet caliber and jacket type. Based upon our results further investigation of low velocity GSW tracks is warranted. Further clinical investigation should focus on the degree to which debridement should be undertaken. PMID:24490188

  12. Gunshot wounds (resulting from execution) of exhumed victims of the communist regime in Poland.

    PubMed

    Szleszkowski, Łukasz; Thannhäuser, Agata; Szwagrzyk, Krzysztof; Kawecki, Jerzy; Jurek, Tomasz

    2014-07-01

    This study presents the results of the analysis of the remains of 23 executed male individuals aged between 21 and 63 years, recovered from Osobowicki Cemetery in Wroclaw (Poland), field 83B, in 2012. In 1948 and 1949, prisoners sentenced to death by firing squad--most of them associated with the post-war anti-communist underground independence movement in Poland--were buried there. The aim of the study was to analyse fatal wounds and the method of execution, and to compare the results to data from archival documents. The results were also compared with studies concerning executions during a later period, i.e. 1949-1954. The research on the method of execution during this period of history carried out during the exhumations in Osobowicki Cemetery was the first conducted on such a scale in Poland. Forensic analysis revealed a wide variety of gunshot wounds inflicted during executions, revealing both gunshots to the head, especially single shots to the back of the head, and cases corresponding to the use of a firing squad, probably equipped with machine guns. The results of the research indicate that capital punishment by shooting was carried out in ways both similar to those the specified in the regulations and completely different. PMID:24767546

  13. Intersecting fractures of the skull and gunshot wounds. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Viel, Guido; Gehl, Axel; Sperhake, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    When two fracture lines of a solid surface (ice, glass, eggshell, etc.) intersect, it is always possible to tell which one has been made first. Indeed pre-existing damage of the surface arrests all the fracture lines produced by subsequent impacts. This well-known principle (established by Puppe in 1903) has been largely used in glass fracture analysis, but can be applied also to the examination of skull fractures. It can help sequencing blunt force or gunshot injuries determining the direction of fire and differentiating entrance from exit wounds in the absence of specific distinguishing features (i.e., internal/external beveling of the skull or overlying skin indicators). In this context, we report the case of a 76-year-old man who shot himself in the mouth with a Walther PPK 7.65 handgun and highlight the utility of the application of both Puppe's Rule and Multislice Computed Tomography (MSCT) in the examination of gunshot wounds to the skull. PMID:19291431

  14. [Characteristics of gunshot wounds caused by the special forces shooting knife (NRS and NRS-2)].

    PubMed

    Isakov, V D; Dyskin, E A; Panchuk, Iu P; Zlodeev, N A

    2004-01-01

    Gunshot wounds of skin and long cortical bones inflicted by the special intelligence knife (NRS and NRS-2: special silent cartridges SP-3 and SP-4) from different distances were examined. Stereomicroscopy, emission spectral analysis, contact-diffusion method and regression- step-by-step analysis were made use of within the case study. A lack of mechanical, thermal or chemical impact from firing gas and of fire soot as well as presence of particles of rubber, copper and sealing varnish, i.e. the most informative shot products, were found to be the main distinctive features in the said wounds. The data obtained can be used in the differential diagnosis of a type and model of the used gun. PMID:15648916

  15. Micro-CT features of intermediate gunshot wounds covered by textiles.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Fais, Paolo; Pelletti, Guido; Viero, Alessia; Miotto, Diego; Boscolo-Berto, Rafael; Viel, Guido; Montisci, Massimo; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of gunshot residue (GSR) on the clothing and the underlying skin of the victim may play an important role in the reconstruction of the shooting incident. The aim of the present study was to test micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for the analysis of firearm wounds experimentally produced on human skin covered by textiles. Firing trials were performed on 60 sections of human calves enveloped by a single layer of fabric (cotton or jeans or leather or nylon) and 15 controls consisting of bare calves. Experimental firings were conducted in a ballistic laboratory at three different muzzle-to-target distances (5, 15, and 30 cm), using a .32 ACP pistol (Beretta Mod. 81) loaded with full-jacketed bullets coming from the same production lot (7.65 × 17 mm, Browning SR). The visual inspection revealed the classic pattern of GSR distribution on the fabrics and the skin of control samples, while only a dark ring around the entrance lesion was identified on the skin beneath the fabrics. Micro-CT analysis showed the presence of radiopaque material on all entrance wounds, with a statistically significant difference between cases and controls. No differences were found among specimens covered by fabrics, with regard to the firing distance and the type of clothing. No GSR-like deposits were detected in exit wounds. Our results suggest that micro-CT analysis may be a useful screening tool for differentiating entry from exit gunshot wounds when the covering textiles are contaminated, damaged, or missing. PMID:27325255

  16. Chromatic variation of soot soiling: a possible marker for gunshot wounds in burnt bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Soot soiling is a crucial forensic parameter around gunshot lesions. Carbonization, however, can severely alter human tissues and mimic such clues. This study aims at evaluating the survival of soot soiling even after carbonization in bone. A total of 36 bovine ribs (half fleshed and half defleshed) were shot with two types of bullet (both 9-mm; full metal-jacketed and unjacketed) with a near-contact range. With unjacketed bullets, the shot left in every case a clear, black, and roughly round soot stain around the entrance wound, whereas full metal-jacketed bullets left no signs of soot. Every specimen then underwent calcination in an oven at 800°C. The analysis of the charred samples clearly showed the survival of the soot soiling in both fleshed and bony samples, with a clear correspondence with the former position, but with a different color (yellow). Thus, soot soiling may survive, although with a different color, even after charring. PMID:24147992

  17. Inflammation: John Hunter's "A treatise on the blood, inflammation and gun-shot wounds".

    PubMed

    Turk, J L

    1994-12-01

    John Hunter's A Treatise on the Blood, Inflammation and Gunshot Wounds was published in 1794. Throughout the nineteenth century this was considered the most important study of inflammation and has been widely quoted since. After a section on the nature of blood and the circulatory system, in which he describes the vascular supply in detail, he passes on to an extensive survey of inflammation. This is based mainly on his wide clinical experience, including that as a military surgeon. He, however, supplements this with a number of experiments, some of which are classic. He bases his observations on the four cardinal signs of Celsus (redness, heat, swelling and pain). Inflammation is then divided into three main groups: adhesive, suppurative and ulcerative. He discusses the nature of pus and the formation and treatment of abscesses. He describes his experiments on the transplantation of tissues under the general heading of adhesive inflammation. This, he states, underlies the union of wounds and thus the union of tissues after transplantation. Although unaware of the role of infecting organisms as a cause of inflammation, he makes observations on inflammation in smallpox, venereal infections and tuberculosis. He relates these to his observations on inflammatory aspects of wound healing. Lister was particularly influenced by Hunter's observations in the development of antisepsis. As well as the local effect of inflammation, Hunter was concerned with the constitutional effects such as fever. PMID:7734328

  18. Concordance Rate for the Identification of Distant Entrance Gunshot Wounds of the Back by Experienced Forensic Pathologists Examining Only Images of Autopsies.

    PubMed

    Heninger, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The images of 66 gunshot entrance wounds with a defect on the back, a bullet in the body, hemorrhage along the wound track, and logical certainty that it was an entrance wound were collected from the files of a moderately busy medical examiner's office. Participants numbering 22 board-certified forensic pathologists viewed a single digital archival image of each of the 66 entrance wounds randomly mixed with 74 presumptive exit wounds to determine whether they were entrance or exit wounds. The concordance rate for correctly identifying the 66 logically known entrance wounds was 82.8% with a range from 58% to 97%. This pilot study was conducted to provide an evidence-based approach to the interpretation of the direction of gunshot wounds by reviewing pathologists with access only to archival photographs, and it is not a measure of the accuracy to distinguish entrance from exit wounds when given all of the circumstances. PMID:27404608

  19. Sir Victor Horsley's contributions to the study and treatment of gunshot wounds of the head.

    PubMed

    Cybulski, George R; Stone, James L; Patel, Ketan J

    2008-10-01

    Sir Victor Horsley'S many contributions to neurological surgery include experimental and clinical studies of gunshot wounds (GSW) of the head. Horsley's publications from 1894 to 1897 and 1914 to 1915 on GSWs were reviewed. Horsley described GSWs in animal and clay models, illustrating characteristics of the primary missile tract and secondary cavitation. A transcranial GSW model in 67 dogs related intracranial damage to the projectile's velocity and sectional area, producing a marked sudden increase in intracranial pressure that presumably "tunneled" to the medullary respiratory and cardiac centers. If the resultant sudden apnea was treated with artificial respiration and prompt surgical decompression, the animal often survived. In these animal experiments, Horsley clearly described increased intracranial pressure, hypertension, and bradycardia-later recognized as the Cushing response or triad. With the onset of World War I, Horsley again reviewed the ballistics of military weaponry, emphasizing projectile spin and velocity as the main wounding mechanisms. He was outspoken against the "wicked tradition" of neglecting cranial GSWs and personally treated cases with aggressive respiratory support and prompt decompression of devitalized tissue. Horsley's contributions to the experimental and clinical aspects of GSWs to the head are consistent with his other important contributions to neurosurgery and have largely stood the test of time. PMID:18981893

  20. Spinal cord injury from civilian gunshot wounds: the Rancho experience 1980-88.

    PubMed

    Kane, T; Capen, D A; Waters, R; Zigler, J E; Adkins, R

    1991-09-01

    We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of 316 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) secondary to gunshot wounds (GSW) admitted to Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center for rehabilitation between 1980 and 1988. There were 289 male and 27 female patients whose mean age was 25.9 years (range, 11-56 years). Of these, 238 were paraplegic (103 incomplete, 135 complete), and 78 were quadriplegic (45 incomplete, 33 complete). Forty were shot by handguns of known caliber and four by shotguns; in 272 cases, the type of weapon was unknown. A total of 230 cases sustained a single bullet wound, and 86 had multiple bullet wounds. The length of acute hospitalization, but not rehabilitation hospital stay, increased with the number of associated injuries. Rehabilitation and, hence, total length of stay was significantly less (mean, 100 and 130 days, respectively) for SCI/GSW victims than for SCI victims of motor vehicle accidents, falls, or diving accidents. The methods of calculating costs for admission were based upon Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center financial statistics. This hospital has charged for a daily occupancy fee. The fee is based upon an average of all charges for all patients. No additional fees are charged for special tests or procedures. In 1980, the average daily admission hospitalization charge was $785. In 1990, the last quoted hospital charge was $1,125. This is for the basic spinal cord injury rehabilitative stay. In general, at Rancho Los Amigos, patients are admitted for rehabilitation when all acute medical and surgical problems have been cleared and the patient is ready to participate in rehabilitation evaluation and therapy programs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1802161

  1. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  2. Single Operation to Repair Multifocal Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulae Following Gunshot Wound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    White-Dzuro, Gabrielle A.; Entezami, Pouya; Wanna, George; Russell, Paul; Chambless, Lola B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae can be a challenging neurosurgical disease, often requiring complicated surgical intervention. Case Presentation A 54-year-old man presented with a gunshot wound to the head with complex injury to the skull base and significant CSF leakage from multiple sites. A single surgery was performed using a combined Neurosurgery, Neurotology, and Rhinology team, which was successful in repairing the multiple skull base defects and preventing further CSF leak. Discussion Trauma to the skull base is a common inciting factor for the development of CSF fistulae. Endoscopic approaches are often preferred for repairing these defects, but craniotomy remains a viable option that may be required in more complex cases. A combined approach has not been described previously, but was successful for this severe multifocal defect. Conclusion A multidisciplinary approach allowed for a combined intervention that addressed both the anterior and middle fossae fistulae simultaneously. This limited the potential infectious complications of continued CSF leak and allowed for early rehabilitation. PMID:27330926

  3. Trauma Deserts: Distance From a Trauma Center, Transport Times, and Mortality From Gunshot Wounds in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Douglas; Unger, Erin; Straus, David; Brasel, Karen; Hsia, Renee; Esposito, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether urban patients who suffered gunshot wounds (GSWs) farther from a trauma center would have longer transport times and higher mortality. Methods. We used the Illinois State Trauma Registry (1999–2009). Scene address data for Chicago-area GSWs was geocoded to calculate distance to the nearest trauma center and compare prehospital transport times. We used multivariate regression to calculate the effect on mortality of being shot more than 5 miles from a trauma center. Results. Of 11 744 GSW patients during the study period, 4782 were shot more than 5 miles from a trauma center. Mean transport time and unadjusted mortality were higher for these patients (P < .001 for both). In a multivariate model, suffering a GSW more than 5 miles from a trauma center was associated with an increased risk of death (odds ratio = 1.23; 95% confidence interval = 1.02, 1.47; P = .03). Conclusions. Relative “trauma deserts” with decreased access to immediate care were found in certain areas of Chicago and adversely affected mortality from GSWs. These results may inform decisions about trauma systems planning and funding. PMID:23597339

  4. Autopsy radiography: digital radiographs (DR) vs multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in high-velocity gunshot-wound victims.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H Theodore; Levy, Angela D; Abbott, Robert M; Mallak, Craig T; Getz, John M; Champion, Howard R; Pearse, Lisa

    2007-03-01

    This study compared full-body digital radiography (DR) with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the postmortem evaluation of gunshot wound (GSW) victims. Thirteen consecutive male GSW victims (mean age, 27 years) had full-body DR and MDCT prior to routine autopsy. DR successfully identified all metallic fragments, but MDCT was superior in its ability to precisely determine location because it provided 3-dimensional anatomic localization. In all cases, MDCT more accurately assessed organ injuries and wound tracks. Both DR and MDCT are limited in classifying multiple wounds and major vessel injury, but MDCT is generally superior to DR. MDCT shows significant advantages over DR in the forensic evaluation of GSW victims. This is particularly advantageous for the pathologist retrieving metallic fragments and for describing fracture detail accurately. Use of MDCT instead of radiographs will require medical examiners to become familiar with reading cross-sectional images. PMID:17325457

  5. Management of low velocity gunshot wounds to the anterior urethra: the role of primary repair versus urinary diversion alone.

    PubMed

    Husmann, D A; Boone, T B; Wilson, W T

    1993-07-01

    The management of partial transection of the anterior urethra following penetrating penile injuries is controversial. Optional therapeutic techniques range from a primary sutured reapproximation to urinary diversion alone. We recently managed 17 low velocity gunshot wounds to the external genitalia in which the missile traversed the penile corpus cavernosum, and was associated with less than 40% transection of the corpus spongiosum and anterior urethra. Nine patients were managed with suprapubic diversion, skin débridement and corporeal closure along with placement of a urethral catheter. Eight patients were managed by suprapubic diversion, débridement, closure of the corporeal bodies and a primary sutured reapproximation of the anterior urethra. Urethral strictures developed in 7 patients (78%) managed by a suprapubic tube and urethral stenting during an average followup of 20 months (range 18 to 24). In contrast, 1 patient (12%) managed by a sutured urethral approximation had a urethral stricture during an average followup of 20 months (range 18 to 30, p < 0.01). Our data support a significantly better prognosis for partial transection of the anterior urethra secondary to low velocity gunshot wounds if managed by aggressive wound débridement, corporeal repair, placement of a suprapubic catheter and primary repair of the urethra. PMID:8510278

  6. Gunshot wound causing complete spinal cord injury without mechanical violation of spinal axis: Case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rahul; Jaiswal, Gaurav; Gupta, Tarun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating spine injury (PSI) forms the third most common cause of spine injury, only next to road traffic accidents and fall. Gunshot wound (GSW) forms the major bulk of PSI. Due to easy availability of firearms and antisocial behavior, GSW which were predominant in military population is now increasingly seen in civilized society. Here, we present a detail case review of unique case of civilian GSW indirectly causing complete spinal cord injury due to shock wave generated by the bullet, along with its systematic management. PMID:26692690

  7. Combat-Related Intradural Gunshot Wound to the Thoracic Spine: Significant Improvement and Neurologic Recovery Following Bullet Removal

    PubMed Central

    Louwes, Thijs M; Ward, William H; Lee, Kendall H

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of combat-related penetrating spinal injuries from gunshot wounds result in severe or complete neurological deficit. Treatment is based on neurological status, the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulas, and local effects of any retained fragment(s). We present a case of a 46-year-old male who sustained a spinal gunshot injury from a 7.62-mm AK-47 round that became lodged within the subarachnoid space at T9-T10. He immediately suffered complete motor and sensory loss. By 24-48 hours post-injury, he had recovered lower extremity motor function fully but continued to have severe sensory loss (posterior cord syndrome). On post-injury day 2, he was evacuated from the combat theater and underwent a T9 laminectomy, extraction of the bullet, and dural laceration repair. At surgery, the traumatic durotomy was widened and the bullet, which was laying on the dorsal surface of the spinal cord, was removed. The dura was closed in a water-tight fashion and fibrin glue was applied. Postoperatively, the patient made a significant but incomplete neurological recovery. His stocking-pattern numbness and sub-umbilical searing dysthesia improved. The spinal canal was clear of the foreign body and he had no persistent CSF leak. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed contusion of the spinal cord at the T9 level. Early removal of an intra-canicular bullet in the setting of an incomplete spinal cord injury can lead to significant neurological recovery following even high-velocity and/or high-caliber gunshot wounds. However, this case does not speak to, and prior experience does not demonstrate, significant neurological benefit in the setting of a complete injury. PMID:25705346

  8. The role of arthroscopy in the management of low-velocity gunshot wounds of the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Parisien, J S; Esformes, I

    1984-05-01

    Eight patients with low-velocity civilian gunshot wounds of the knee were examined and evaluated by arthroscopy. Three of these patients were also treated by surgical arthroscopy and underwent limited arthrotomy for bullet removal. In two patients small arthrotomy incisions were made following arthroscopic exploration for removal of bullets. Two patients underwent diagnostic arthroscopy. One underwent internal fixation for a chondral fracture of the femoral condyle. The majority of patients sustained intra-articular damage and retained foreign materials (denim flecks and metallic shards) and osteochondral fragments. There were no postoperative infections after a minimum follow-up period of one year. Arthroscopy is highly effective in the diagnosis and surgical management of low-velocity gunshot wounds of the knee both alone and in combination with limited arthrotomy depending on the severity of the condylar damage. The length of the hospital stay is reduced (length of stay exceeded 3-4 days only as a result of intravenous antibiotic coverage). Physical therapy requirements are minimal. Active mobility and a full range of motion are regained more rapidly with arthroscopy than with surgical exposure of multiple exploratory incisions or conventional standard arthrotomy. PMID:6705381

  9. Overutilization of bracing in the management of penetrating spinal cord injury from gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Eftekhary, Nima; Nwosu, Kenneth; McCoy, Eric; Fukunaga, Dudley; Rolfe, Kevin

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the spinal column are stable injuries and do not require spinal orthoses or bracing postinjury. Nonetheless, a high number of GSW-related spinal cord injury (SCI) patients are referred with a brace to national rehabilitation centers. Unnecessary bracing may encumber rehabilitation, create skin breakdown or pressure ulcers, and add excessive costs. The aim of this study was to confirm the stability of spinal column injuries from GSWs and quantify the overutilization rate of bracing based on long-term follow-up. METHODS This retrospective cohort study was performed at a nationally renowned rehabilitation center. In total, 487 GSW-related SCI patients were transferred for rehabilitation and identified over the last 14 years. Retrospective chart review and telephone interviews were conducted to identify patients who were braced at the initial treating institution and determine if late instability, deformity, or neurological deterioration resulted in secondary surgery or intervention. In addition, 396 unoperated patients were available for analysis after 91 patients were excluded for undergoing an initial destabilizing surgical dissection or laminectomy, thereby altering the natural history of the injury. All of these 396 patients who presented with a brace had bracing discontinued upon reaching the facility. RESULTS In total, 203 of 396 patients were transferred with a spinal brace, demonstrating an overutilization rate of 51%. No patients deteriorated neurologically or needed later surgery for spinal column deformity or instability attributable to the injury. All patients had stable injuries. The patterns of injury and severity of neurological injury did not vary between patients who were initially braced or unbraced. The average follow-up was 7.8 years (range 1-14 years) and the average age was 25 years (range 10-62 years). CONCLUSIONS The incidence of brace overutilization for penetrating GSW-related SCI was 51%. Long

  10. Management and outcome of abdominal shotgun wounds. Trauma score and the role of exploratory laparotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, B A; Oller, D W; Meyer, A A; Napolitano, L M; Rutledge, R; Baker, C C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The management and outcome of 138 abdominal shotgun wounds were examined over a 5-year period. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been proposed that exploratory laparotomy may be unnecessary and even overused in a subset of patients with abdominal shotgun wounds. METHODS: Data on shotgun wound patients from October 1987 through March 1992 from a statewide trauma registry were examined. Patients with abdominal shotgun wounds were identified and compared with patients with nonabdominal shotgun wounds. RESULTS: Of 516 shotgun wound patients, 138 (26.7%) had abdominal wounds and 88 (63.8%) had exploratory laparotomies. Abdominal shotgun wounds resulted in significantly longer number of intensive care unit days (4.3 vs. 2.5, p < 0.05), a greater number of blood units transfused (7.8 vs. 2.4, p < 0.05), and a higher mortality (15.9% vs. 4.8%, p < 0.05) when compared with nonabdominal shotgun wounds. When stratified for trauma score, the mortality for abdominal shotgun wounds always was significantly greater than for nonabdominal shotgun wounds. All abdominal shotgun wound patients with trauma scores less than ten died. The negative laparotomy rate for abdominal shotgun wound patients with normal trauma scores was 9.4%. No patient with a negative laparotomy died. CONCLUSION: Abdominal shotgun wounds are a particularly lethal subset of shotgun wounds. Although some abdominal shotgun wound patients can be managed without laparotomy, the morbidity and mortality for these injuries are substantial, even in patients with normal trauma score. Clinical judgment is an excellent predictor of the need for laparotomy. PMID:7717780

  11. Do Patients with Penetrating Abdominal Stab Wounds Require Laparotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Sanei, Behnam; Mahmoudieh, Mohsen; Talebzadeh, Hamid; Shahabi Shahmiri, Shahab; Aghaei, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background The optimal management of hemodynamically stable asymptomatic patients with anterior abdominal stab wounds (AASWs) remains controversial. The goal is to identify and treat injuries in a safe cost-effective manner. Common evaluation strategies are local wound exploration (LWE), diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL), serial clinical assessment (SCAs) and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Making a decision about the right time to operate on a patient with a penetrating abdominal stab wound, especially those who have visceral evisceration, is a continuing challenge. Objectives Until the year 2010, our strategy was emergency laparotomy in patients with penetrating anterior fascia and those with visceral evisceration. This survey was conducted towards evaluating the results of emergency laparotomy. So, better management can be done in patients with penetrating abdominal stab wounds. Patients and Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed on patients with abdominal penetrating trauma who referred to Al- Zahra hospital in Isfahan, Iran from October 2000 to October 2010. It should be noted that patients with abdominal blunt trauma, patients under 14 years old, those with lateral abdomen penetrating trauma and patients who had unstable hemodynamic status were excluded from the study. Medical records of patients were reviewed and demographic and clinical data were collected for all patients including: age, sex, mechanism of trauma and the results of LWE and laparotomy. Data were analyzed with PASW v.20 software. All data were expressed as mean ± SD. The distribution of nominal variables was compared using the Chi-squared test. Also, diagnostic index for LWE were calculated. A two-sided P value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results During the 10 year period of the study, 1100 consecutive patients with stab wounds were admitted to Al-Zahra hospital Isfahan, Iran. In total, about 150 cases had penetrating traumas in

  12. A rare remarkable recovery in a pediatric patient with the bi-hemispheric, transventricular trajectory craniocerebral gunshot wound

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Montoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The gunshot wound to the head (GSWH) is associated with a mortality rate of 20–90% in adults and 20–65% in the pediatric population. Due to the high rates of mortality and morbidity, the management of these patients has been a topic of high interest in the neurosurgical community. We present an 18-year-old male suffering a GSWH with the bullet following a transventricular trajectory and crossing the midsagittal plane, creating extensive intracranial injuries. Despite a calculated mortality rate of >97% from these devastating injuries, the patient survived the GSWH and made a remarkable recovery. The young adult brain still maintains a high potential for neurological plasticity. This may partially explain why the young adult population with a severe GSWH can have a better than expected recovery course. Bifrontal GSW injuries may have much better outcomes than more posterior injuries as has been demonstrated in this patient in this case. PMID:27165750

  13. A rare remarkable recovery in a pediatric patient with the bi-hemispheric, transventricular trajectory craniocerebral gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Montoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    The gunshot wound to the head (GSWH) is associated with a mortality rate of 20-90% in adults and 20-65% in the pediatric population. Due to the high rates of mortality and morbidity, the management of these patients has been a topic of high interest in the neurosurgical community. We present an 18-year-old male suffering a GSWH with the bullet following a transventricular trajectory and crossing the midsagittal plane, creating extensive intracranial injuries. Despite a calculated mortality rate of >97% from these devastating injuries, the patient survived the GSWH and made a remarkable recovery. The young adult brain still maintains a high potential for neurological plasticity. This may partially explain why the young adult population with a severe GSWH can have a better than expected recovery course. Bifrontal GSW injuries may have much better outcomes than more posterior injuries as has been demonstrated in this patient in this case. PMID:27165750

  14. Visualization of the air ejected from the temporary cavity in brain and tissue simulants during gunshot wounding.

    PubMed

    Lazarjan, M S; Geoghegan, P H; Taylor, M C; Jermy, M C

    2015-01-01

    One hypothesis for the physical mechanism responsible for backspatter during cranial gunshot wounding is that air is ejected by the collapse of the temporary cavity formed around the bullet path. Using bovine and ovine heads and simulant materials, evidence of this ejection was sought by measuring the velocity of the air that was drawn in and ejected from the cavity in front of the wound channel after bullet impact. A laminar flow of fog-laden air was arranged in front of the wound channel and two high speed cameras recording at 30,000 frames/second captured the air motion. All samples were shot with standard 9 mm × 19 mm FMJ ammunition. Different concentrations of ballistic gelatine were used to characterize the effect of elasticity of the material on the velocity of the air. Fresh bovine and ovine heads were shot with the same experimental set up to investigate if there was induction of air into, and ejection of air from the entrance wounds. The results show, for the first time, that the temporary cavity does eject air in gelatine. The velocity of in-drawn air for 3, 5 and 10% concentration of gelatine was 81, 76 and 65 m/s respectively and the velocity of ejected air for 5 and 10% concentration of gelatine were 43 and 72 m/s respectively. The results show that when the concentration of gelatine is increased, the velocity of the air drawn into the cavity decreases and the velocity of the ejected air increases. However, no ejection was observed in 3% gelatine, ovine or bovine heads. Although ejection of air was not observed, ejection of brain from the wound channel was seen. Using the velocity of the ejected brain, the minimum intracranial pressure required to eject the brain tissue was estimated to be 712 kPa and 468 kPa for the sheep and bovine heads respectively. PMID:25485950

  15. Is estimated bullet trajectory a reliable predictor of severe injury? Case report of a thoraco-abdominal gunshot with a protracted trajectory managed nonoperatively

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Operative management of all gunshot’s traumas carries a high rate of unwarranted interventions that are known to cause serious complications. Selective nonoperative management is thus being increasingly practiced which has reduced these avoidable interventions. Physical examination and computed tomography scans are most sensitive in assessing need of laparotomy. Assessment of internal injuries on the basis of an estimated bullet trajectory is often practiced but has seldom been studied. We report a case of conservative management of a thoraco abdominal gun shot patient where an estimated bullet trajectory was indicative of serious injuries. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of a thoraco abdominal gunshot that, despite of a protracted trajectory, had no sequelae and was thus managed nonoperatively. Case presentation A 30 year old male patient having height of 180 cm and weight of 70 kg (Body Mass Index 21.6) presented with complaint of a penetrating injury at left side of upper torso. The patient had no symptoms or obvious bleeding and was vitally stable. On examination a 1 cm × 1 cm entry wound at the left 3rd intercostal space in the mid clavicular line was identified. The chest and abdomen were otherwise unremarkable on examination. The chest radiograph displayed clear lung fields. The abdominal radiographs displayed a bullet in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen lateral to the spine. The bullets estimated trajectory from 3rd intercostal space and its lodgment in the abdomen lateral to the spine indicated severe visceral injury. The computed tomography scan showed that the bullet was lodged postero-medially to the left kidney. All thoracic, intra peritoneal and retroperitoneal visceral structures were identified to be normal. The patient remained clinically and vitally stable, hence was managed nonoperatively being discharged after 48 h of observation. Conclusion From this case we conclude that decision for managing gun

  16. Gunshot-induced plumbism in an adult male.

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Abbasi J.; Funnyé, Allen S.; Akanno, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Our objective is to present a case of symptomatic lead toxicity (plumbism) with abdominal colic and hemolytic anemia following a gunshot wound. It is a retrospective case report and the setting is in a teaching hospital in south central Los Angeles. The case report is that of a patient who presented with abdominal pain, generalized weakness, and hypertension following multiple gunshot wounds, 15 years previously. Other causes of abdominal pain and weakness--such as diabetes mellitus, alcohol abuse, pancreatitis, and substance abuse--were ruled out. Interventions included treatment with the newer oral chelating agent, Succimer (2, 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid), and subsequent surgery. The main outcome was the initial reduction in blood lead levels with improvement of symptoms. Because of a recurrent rise in the blood lead levels, the patient was again treated with Succimer and underwent surgery to remove two bullet fragments from the face. We conclude that lead toxicity should be ruled out in patients presenting with abdominal cramps and a history of a gunshot wound. Prompt therapy--including environmental intervention and chelation therapy--is mandatory, and surgical intervention may be necessary. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14620713

  17. Fractures Due to Gunshot Wounds: Do Retained Bullet Fragments Affect Union?

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, John T.; Connolly, Keith; Haidukewych, George; Koval, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background Many types of projectiles, including modern hollow point bullets, fragment into smaller pieces upon impact, particularly when striking bone. This study was performed to examine the effect on time to union with retained bullet material near a fracture site in cases of gunshot injury. Methods All gunshot injuries operatively treated with internal fixation at a Level 1 Trauma Center between March 2008 and August 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Retained bullet load near the fracture site was calculated based on percentage of material retained compared to the cortical diameter of the involved bone. Analyses were performed to assess the effect of the lead-cortical ratio and amount of comminution on time to fracture union. Results Thirty-two patients (34 fractures) met the inclusion criteria, with an equal number of comminuted (17) and non-comminuted fractures (17). Seventeen of 34 fractures (50%) united within 4 months, 16/34 (47%) developed a delayed union, and 1/34 (3%) developed a nonunion requiring revision surgery. Sixteen of 17 fractures (94%) that united by 4 months had a cumulative amount of bullet fragmentation retained near the fracture site of less than 20% of the cortical diameter. Nine out of 10 fractures (90%) with retained fragments near the fracture site was equal to or exceeding 20% of the cortical diameter had delayed or nonunion. Fracture comminution had no effect on time to union. Conclusions The quantity of retained bullet material near the fracture site was more predictive of the rate of fracture union than was comminution. Fractures with bullet fragmentation equal to or exceeding 20% of the cortical width demonstrated a significantly higher rate of delayed union/nonunion compared to those fractures with less retained bullet material, which may indicate a local cytotoxic effect from lead on bone healing. These findings may influence decisions on timing of secondary surgeries. Level of Evidence Level III PMID:26361445

  18. Outcomes Following Low-Energy Civilian Gunshot Wound Trauma to the Lower Extremities: Results of a Standard Protocol at an Urban Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Abghari, Michelle; Monroy, Alexa; Schubl, Sebastian; Davidovitch, Roy; Egol, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower extremity injuries secondary to low-energy gunshot wounds are frequently seen in the civilian populations of urban areas. Although these wounds have fewer complications than high-energy gunshot injuries, the functional and psychological damage is still significant making appropriate timely orthopaedic treatment and follow-up imperative. Purpose The purpose of this study is to present our outcomes in the treatment of low-energy gunshot wounds in a civilian population at an urban, level one trauma center in patients treated by a standard protocol. Methods One hundred and thirty three patients who sustained 148 gunshot wound injuries were treated at our level one trauma center between January 1st, 2009 and October 1st, 2011. Following IRB approval, we extracted information from medical records regarding hospital course, length of stay and type of operative or non-operative treatment. If available, injury and post-operative radiographs were also reviewed. Patients were contacted by telephone to obtain Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) surveys, pain on a scale of 0–10 and for the determination of any adverse events related to their shooting. Results There were 125 men (94.0%) and 8 women (6.0%) with an average age of 27.1 years (range 15.2–56.3). Seventy-six patients (57.1%) did not have any health insurance upon admission. The average length of stay in the hospital was 4.5 days (range 0.0–88.0). Fifty-one gun shots (34.5%) resulted in fractures of the lower extremities. Patients underwent a total of 95 lower extremity-related procedures during their hospitalization. Twenty-two patients (16.5%) experienced a complication related to their gunshot wounds. 38% of the cohort was available for long-term functional assessment At a mean 23.5 months (range 8–48) of follow up, patients reported mean Functional and Bothersome SMFA scores of 19.6 (SD 15.9) and 10.9 (SD 15.6) suggesting that these patients have poorer function scores than the

  19. An alarming presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease following a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head.

    PubMed

    Harnish, Carissa; Gross, Brian; Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Bupp, Katherine; Vellucci, Ashley; Anderson, Jeffrey; Riley, Deborah; Rogers, Frederick B

    2015-05-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), also known as prion diseases, are characterized by rapid and fatal neurological decline. They not only detrimentally affect the patient, but also present additional challenges to healthcare systems due to the infectivity of the tissues and the difficulty of inactivating the prion. The most common TSE is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), which can occur after familial, spontaneous or acquired transmission. TSEs received more attention after the development of variant CJD (vCJD), also known as Mad Cow Disease, in the UK during the mid-1990s. Unlike familial or spontaneous CJD, this variant was connected to consumption of cattle contaminated with the prion disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy.This development increased interest in the etiology of CJD and other TSEs and the risk it presents as an infectious disease. The following details the case of a 59-year-old male infected with CJD presented to our level II trauma center for treatment following a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. PMID:25530409

  20. [Criteria for the determination of the distance of a gunshot from limited-range firearms based on the morphological characteristics of the wound and the results of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Svetlolobov, D Iu; Luzanova, I S; Demidov, I V; Zorin, Iu V; Sonis, M A; Likhachev, A S

    2013-01-01

    We have developed the criteria allowing to determine the distance of a gunshot from limited-range firearms (an IZh-79-9TGM pistol with the elastic bullet cartridges) based on the morphological characteristics of the wound and the results of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The method has been developed for the quantitative determination of barium, lead, and antimony in the targets depending on the gunshot distance. PMID:24428050

  1. A civilian perspective on ballistic trauma and gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gun violence is on the rise in some European countries, however most of the literature on gunshot injuries pertains to military weaponry and is difficult to apply to civilians, due to dissimilarities in wound contamination and wounding potential of firearms and ammunition. Gunshot injuries in civilians have more focal injury patterns and should be considered distinct entities. Methods A search of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health MEDLINE database was performed using PubMed. Results Craniocerebral gunshot injuries are often lethal, especially after suicide attempts. The treatment of non space consuming haematomas and the indications for invasive pressure measurement are controversial. Civilian gunshot injuries to the torso mostly intend to kill; however for those patients who do not die at the scene and are hemodynamically stable, insertion of a chest tube is usually the only required procedure for the majority of penetrating chest injuries. In penetrating abdominal injuries there is a trend towards non-operative care, provided that the patient is hemodynamically stable. Spinal gunshots can also often be treated without operation. Gunshot injuries of the extremities are rarely life-threatening but can be associated with severe morbidity. With the exception of craniocerebral, bowel, articular, or severe soft tissue injury, the use of antibiotics is controversial and may depend on the surgeon's preference. Conclusion The treatment strategy for patients with gunshot injuries to the torso mostly depends on the hemodynamic status of the patient. Whereas hemodynamically unstable patients require immediate operative measures like thoracotomy or laparotomy, hemodynamically stable patients might be treated with minor surgical procedures (e.g. chest tube) or even conservatively. PMID:20565804

  2. The survival of metallic residues from gunshot wounds in cremated bone: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-05-01

    In literature, many studies have been performed in order to investigate the presence of GSR ("gunshot residue") and metallic residues in general with radiological techniques on several types of material, but the survival of metallic residues on charred samples has never been systematically performed. In this study, 31 adult bovine ribs underwent a shooting test. Every rib was shot with a single bullet, at a near-contact shooting distance, using two kinds of projectile: 17 samples were shot with a full metal-jacketed bullet and the remaining 14 with an unjacketed bullet. After the shooting test, every rib underwent a "charring cycle" in an electric oven up to 800°C. Every sample underwent radiological investigation with conventional radiography, before and after the burning process, to evaluate any changes in number and distribution of metallic residues. Radiographs showed survival of radiopaque residues in every sample, even after the charring process, especially when the bullet used was of the unjacketed type. PMID:22037901

  3. [Comparison of wound morphology following gunshots by machine guns and sub-machine guns].

    PubMed

    Grellner, W; Madea, B

    1999-01-01

    Automatic weapons such as machine guns and submachine guns are found in the German-speaking region only in special army and police units and appear accordingly rarely in homicides, suicides and accidents. In the following, the findings in two cases of death with the use of machine and submachine guns are presented. The first case was a fatal accident during shooting on a training area (current machine gun of the German army, calibre 7.62 x 51 mm), the second case was a killing during a physical conflict (submachine gun MP 40 from World War II, calibre 9 x 19 mm). In the case with the machine gun autopsy disclosed typical entry holes corresponding to the calibre, but unusually large exit wounds with tissue bridges in the wound ground, measuring 4 x 2.5 cm in diameter. By contrast, the second case (submachine gun) showed "normal" entry and exit wounds. The differences are mainly caused by deviating ballistic data of the ammunition used. They are discussed against the background of literature on wound ballistics. PMID:10198694

  4. A deceptive case of gunshot entry wounds -- beware of frangible bullets.

    PubMed

    Martrille, Laurent; Artuso, Alain; Cattaneo, Cristina; Baccino, Eric

    2007-04-01

    In December 2003, two young men decided to go shooting in the countryside near Montpellier, France. One accidentally shot the other. Upon crime scene examination and autopsy of the victim experts observed, at the right thorax, two round wounds, distanced 5mm from each other, presenting typical characteristics of entry wounds of bullets shot from a distance. Because of the presence of two clear cut round wounds, the Procurator suspected voluntary homicide. However, thanks to the balistics expertise, the authors concluded that all fragments belonged to a unique projectile, 22 Short caliber (Remington cartouche) of the frangible type. The barrel of the rifle infact presented an imperfection where the screw was fixed on the frontsite. The screw had obviously been changed, and the new screw was longer and therefore extended into the barrel, causing a small obstacle to the bullet when exiting the barrel. Shooting tests were performed, allowing the authors to conclude that a single bullet had fragmented before entering the body into two fragments. This lead the Procurator to consider the lesions consistent with an accident. PMID:17079183

  5. Designing the ideal model for assessment of wound contamination after gunshot injuries: a comparative experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern high-velocity projectiles produce temporary cavities and can thus cause extensive tissue destruction along the bullet path. It is still unclear whether gelatin blocks, which are used as a well-accepted tissue simulant, allow the effects of projectiles to be adequately investigated and how these effects are influenced by caliber size. Method Barium titanate particles were distributed throughout a test chamber for an assessment of wound contamination. We fired .22-caliber Magnum bullets first into gelatin blocks and then into porcine hind limbs placed behind the chamber. Two other types of bullets (.222-caliber bullets and 6.5 × 57 mm cartridges) were then shot into porcine hind limbs. Permanent and temporary wound cavities as well as the spatial distribution of barium titanate particles in relation to the bullet path were evaluated radiologically. Results A comparison of the gelatin blocks and hind limbs showed significant differences (p < 0.05) in the mean results for all parameters. There were significant differences between the bullets of different calibers in the depth to which barium titanate particles penetrated the porcine hind limbs. Almost no particles, however, were found at a penetration depth of 10 cm or more. By contrast, gas cavities were detected along the entire bullet path. Conclusion Gelatin is only of limited value for evaluating the path of high-velocity projectiles and the contamination of wounds by exogenous particles. There is a direct relationship between the presence of gas cavities in the tissue along the bullet path and caliber size. These cavities, however, are only mildly contaminated by exogenous particles. PMID:22490236

  6. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  7. Isolated abdominal wound recurrence after lymph-node dissection for appendiceal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishimaru, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Hatanaka, Kazuhito; Uekusa, Toshimasa; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with acute abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant underwent an appendectomy via McBurney's incision. Postoperative histology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in the appendix that invaded the submucosa along with lymphatic involvement. Forty-three days later, an ileocecal resection with radical lymph node dissection was performed through a midline incision. Three of the 30 resected lymph nodes were found to have adenocarcinoma metastasis. Five years later, an isolated abdominal wall recurrence occurred within the wound scar of the midline incision. A complete excision of the tumor and the invaded portion of the ileum was performed. To date, the patient has been well, with no evidence of recurrence for 5 years since the resection. The mechanism of abdominal wound recurrence is considered the leakage of carcinoma cells from transected lymph vessels during lymph node dissection, followed by the implantation of these cells into the abdominal wound. PMID:19837396

  8. [CHARACTERISTICS OF ANTIBIOTICORESISTANCE OF MICROFLORA IN A COMBAT (THE GUN-SHOT ANO THE MINE-EXPLOSION) WOUNDS OF THE EXTREMITIES].

    PubMed

    Kondratyuk, V M

    2016-04-01

    Abstract Results of bacteriological investigations of a gun-shot and a mine-explosion woundings of the extremities were analyzed in Military-Medical Clinical Centres (MMCC) of Kyiv, Lviv and Vinnytsya. Spectrum of the allotted microorganisms and profile of their antibioticoresistance were disclosed. The patterns of resistance were determined in accordance to offering of international experts of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Dominating microflora in a Chief MMCC (Kyiv) and MMCC of a Western Region (Lviv) were various species of the Enterobacteriaceae and P. aeruginosa families, while in MMCC of a Central Region (Vinnytsya)--a gramm-negative non-fermentative bacilli of the Acinetobacter genus and Pseudomonas genus. The majority (79.5%) of isolates were characterized by polyresistance for antibiotics. Maximal quantity of strains with a widened spectrum of resistance was revealed in 2 - 3 weeks after a wounding--in 71.4 and 96.9% accordingly. PMID:27434956

  9. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  10. Helicopter In-flight Resuscitation with Freeze-dried Plasma of a Patient with a High-velocity Gunshot Wound to the Neck in Afghanistan - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gellerfors, Mikael; Linde, Joacim; Gryth, Dan

    2015-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage with coagulopathy is one of the leading causes of preventable death in the battlefield. The development of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) allows for early treatment with coagulation-optimizing resuscitation fluid in the prehospital setting. This report describes the first prehospital use of FDP in a patient with carotid artery injury due to a high-velocity gunshot wound (HVGSW) to the neck. It also describes in-flight constitution and administration of FDP in a Medevac Helicopter. Early administration of FDP may contribute to hemodynamic stabilization and reduction in trauma-induced coagulopathy and acidosis. However, large-scale studies are needed to define the prehospital use of FDP and other blood products. PMID:26323858

  11. Planned complex suicide by self-poisoning and a manipulated blank revolver: remarkable findings due to multiple gunshot wounds and self-made wooden projectiles.

    PubMed

    Padosch, Stephan A; Schmidt, Peter H; Madea, Burkhard

    2003-11-01

    A remarkable case of complex suicide with poisoning and multiple self-inflicted gunshot wounds to the head is reported. After ingestion of a liquid insecticide, the victim shot himself twice in the head, once in each temple. Self-manufactured wooden dowels were used as projectiles in combination with conventional blank cartridges. The dowels had been glued on top of the blank cartridges and expelled by propellant gases. Moreover, the blank revolver used had been extensively manipulated in a rarely observed manner. Several occlusive devices had been removed from the barrel and the cylinder chamber to enable the expulsion of the wooden projectiles. The investigation of the methods used and the circumstances found at the scene pointed towards a planned complex suicide. A remarkable case with unusual projectiles, i.e., wooden dowels, fired by an extensively manipulated blank gun is reported, emphasizing the importance of close collaboration between the police firearm laboratory and forensic pathology in practical casework. PMID:14640288

  12. [The "inner gunshot residue"--a gunshot entry marker in gunshot of ridged skin].

    PubMed

    Sigrist, T; Knüsel, H P; Markwalder, C; Rabl, W

    1992-01-01

    Gunshot residue below the surface of the skin is typical of a contact gunshot wound. However, in a case of our own, when a taxi-robber was shot by the cab driver through his right hand at a distance of several yards, this finding provoked quite a confusion. Only when experimental shots at thick glabrous skin were performed, it could be established that long range shots led to intraepidermal gunshot deposit too. The explanation of this phenomenon lies in the tenacity of thick skin. Unlike the thin hairy skin, which is punched out by the penetrating projectile, the thicker and more tenacious plantar/palmar epidermis gets displaced radially, the stratum germinativum tears and the projectile casts its gunshot residue in the pouch formed in such a manner. Therefore, intraepidermal gunshot residue is proof of an entrance gunshot wound but not always a sign of contact shot if the wound is located in the palmar or plantar region. It is typically produced by shots at thick skin. PMID:1610267

  13. [58 people with bullet wounds in Gothenburg during 18 months. This demonstrates the need for preparedness and competence within trauma care].

    PubMed

    Holmström, Björn; Alhbin, Sven; Pazooki, David; Granhed, Hans

    2015-01-01

    From 1 January 2013 to 30 June 2014, 58 patients sustained gunshot wounds in the city of Gothenburg. 57 were males and the median age was 26 years. The majority of injuries were musculoskeletal. Ten patients died, of these 4 patients suffered single gunshot wounds to the head, while 6 patients had wounds to mediastinal structures and large abdominal vessels. 90 % of patients presented out-of-hours. The total length of stay for the 47 patients admitted was 316 days. Direct health care costs were calculated to 6.2 MSEK. PMID:26173141

  14. Analysis of abdominal wounds made by surgical trocars using functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) technology.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Barry P; O'Donovan, Deidre; Liao, Donghua; Zhao, Jingbo; Schiretz, Rich; Heninrich, Russell; Gregersen, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The aim was to use a novel functional luminal imaging probe for evaluation of wound defects and tissue damage resulting from the use of trocars. Following general anesthesia of 4 adult pigs, 6 different trocars were randomly inserted at preselected locations in the porcine abdominal wall. The functional luminal imaging probe was used to profile the trocar holes during bag distension from 8 axial cross-sectional area measurements. The cross-sectional areas and pressure in the bag were recorded and exported to Matlab for analysis and data display. Geometric profiles were generated, and the minimum cross-sectional area and hole length (abdominal wall thickness) were used as endpoints. Successful distensions were made in all cases. The slope of the contours increased away from the narrowest point of the hole. The slope increased more rapidly toward the inner abdominal wall than toward the outer wall. The slope of the linear trend lines for the cross-sectional area-pressure relation represents the compliance at the narrowest point in the wall. The hole length (abdominal wall thickness) could be obtained at different cross-sectional area cutoff points. A cutoff point of 300 mm(2) gave good results when compared to the length of the hole measured after the tissue was excised. This technique represents a new and straightforward way to evaluate the effects of trocars on the abdominal wall. It may also prove useful in comparing techniques and technology from different manufacturers. PMID:18757380

  15. Characterization of the gunshot suicides.

    PubMed

    Balci, Y; Canogullari, G; Ulupinar, E

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study is to present the characteristics of gunshot suicides by highlighting the ones with multiple entrance wounds. The criminal investigation reports of suicides (n=318) during the period 1991-2000, in the central judicial district of Eskisehir were investigated. 20.4% of all suicide cases (n=65) used firearms. Firearm suicides were more common in males and their frequency decreased as age increased. The usage of long-barrelled weapons was 47.7%. Among the long-barrelled gunshots, twelve were shotguns and the remaining were military riffles. Forty-five weapons were legal. Thirty-four out of 45 gunshot suicide victims had licensed weapons because of their occupations. In the majority of cases, (72.3%) the shooting distance was contact or near contact. Most of the entrance wounds (75.0%) were located in the head and neck region and the direction of the bullet path was upward and front-to-back. Of all the gunshot suicides, 6.1% (n=4) had multiple entrance and exit wounds. All of the victims were soldiers. In suicide cases using long-barrelled weapons (3/4), military rifles were set on automatic mode. In our study, at least eight of the victims survived for a period. To be able to increase the survival rate of the victims or improve the outcomes, intensive pre- and post-operative care is critical. PMID:17321192

  16. Staged approach for abdominal wound closure following combined liver and intestinal transplantation from living donors in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Grevious, Mark A; Iqbal, Ronak; Raofi, Vandad; Beatty, Elizabeth; Oberholzer, José; Cohen, Mimis; Abcarian, Herand; Testa, Giuliano; Benedetti, Enrico

    2009-03-01

    Primary closure of the abdominal wall after combined liver and intestine transplantation from a living donor into a pediatric patient is usually not possible, because of the size of the donor organ, graft edema, and preexisting scars or stomas of the abdominal wall. Closure under tension may lead to abdominal compartment syndrome with vascular compromise and necrosis of the transplanted organ. We describe our experience of abdominal wound closure after liver and intestinal transplant in the pediatric patient using a staged approach. From February 2003 to June 2006, we managed five pediatric liver and intestinal living donor transplant recipients. Because of the large post-transplantation abdominal wall defect, a staged technique of abdominal wound closure was utilized. Initially, an absorbable Polygalactin mesh was sutured around the layer of the defect. As soon as adequate granulation tissue was formed over the mesh a STSG was applied. From the wound stand point all five patients were managed successfully with staged wound closure after transplantation. Granulation tissue filled and covered the mesh within 7.6 wk. A STSG was then used to cover the defect. All infants recovered well and none had a significant wound complication in the immediate post-operative period following STSG. At a mean follow-up of 24 months only one patient developed an entero-cutaneous fistula five months post-transplant. Staged abdominal wall coverage with the use of Polygalactin mesh followed by STSG is a simple and effective technique. A closed wound is achieved in a timely fashion with protection of the viscera. Residual ventral hernia will need to be managed in the future with one of several reconstructive techniques. PMID:18537902

  17. [Should routine exploratory laparotomy be performed in the presence of an abdominal wound? Discussion apropos of 176 cases].

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, B; Kohen, M; Borde, L; Sartre, J Y; Bourseau, J C; Le Neel, J C

    1992-10-01

    Management of abdominal wounds is presently the subject of discussion between the partisans of routine laparotomy and those preferring "armed" surveillance. Results of study of a series of 176 abdominal wounds subjected to surgical dogma showed: that the diagnosis of non penetrating wounds (17.6%) was not always evident, due either to their anatomical localization (frontier region wounds) or to insufficient local exploration in urgent cases (6.6% of false-negatives), that the existence of serious clinical signs (50 cases) was always associated with one or more visceral lesions, requiring urgent laparotomy with a morbidity of 20% and a mortality of 8% (4 cases), that in the case of asymptomatic penetrating wounds (96 cases), routine laparotomy did nevertheless allow the diagnosis of visceral lesions in 50 cases (including 23 major lesions) but was of no utility in 46 cases (31.5% of blind laparotomies for the total series). The elevated proportion of useless laparotomies (30% in the literature), the result of a dogmatic attitude, or the risk of a delayed intervention (5 to 8%) in the series practising the selective method, led to a modification in the authors' attitude. The existence of serious signs should obviously result in a laparotomy. In their absence, and when confronted with a penetrating or doubtful (frontier region) wound, an exploratory celioscopy is proposed to ensure complete abdominal exploration, to confirm the presence or absence of penetration, to treat minimal lesions and to perform a classical laparotomy in case of evident necessity. PMID:1294583

  18. Lead Toxicity Risks in Gunshot Victims

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Gabriel Costa Serrão; Mourão, Natália Teixeira; Pinheiro, Igor Natário; Xavier, Analúcia Rampazzo; Gameiro, Vinicius Schott

    2015-01-01

    Background Gunshot wounds require surgeons to decide whether to remove or leave bullet fragments in the body. Surgeons also decide how to follow up with patients who have lead fragments retained in their body. Current literature recommends to remove only intra-articular fragments without the need for a follow-up for patients with the metal retained. Therefore, this study investigates chronic lead toxicity for gunshot wounds. Methods The study was performed in the metropolitan area of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil, between 2013 and 2015. It was a case-control study that included 45 victims of gunshot lesions with metallic fragments retained for more than 6 months. The 45 controls were matched for gender, age, and race. We compared the lead blood levels and frequency of symptoms. Results The control group had average blood lead levels of 2.17 μg/dL (95% Confidence Interval [CI]; 1.71–2.63) and median 2.1 μg/dL. The case group had average values of 9.01 μg/dL (CI; 6.07–11.96) and median values of 6.5 μg/dL with p-values < = 0.001. The case group reported the following more frequently: irritancy, bad mood, headache, memory losses, daylight drowsiness, myalgia, weakness, abdominal pain, joint pain, trembling, tingling limbs. There was statistical significance for the differences of symptoms frequencies and for odds ratio between groups. Conclusions Although the mean lead levels found were lower than the current laboratory references, low levels have been associated with both rising morbidity and mortality. The WHO stated: “There is no known level of lead exposure that is considered safe”. In conclusion, this work showed that bullets retained in the body are not innocuous. There are impacts in the blood lead levels and symptoms related to it, even with few fragments, extra-articular located or existing with low blood lead levels. PMID:26509498

  19. [COMPLEX OF THE TREATMENT MEASURES IN A SYSTEM OF THE MEDICAL CARE DELIVERY TO WOUNDED PERSONS WITH THE GUN-SHOT AND MINE-EXPLOSIVE INJURIES OF THE FOOT].

    PubMed

    Korohl, S O

    2015-11-01

    Complex of the treatment measures, conducted in 302 wounded persons, suffering the gun-shot and mine-explosive injuries of the foot in 2014 - 2015 yrs, was analyzed. Primary surgical processing of the wound was conducted in all injured persons, secondary surgical processing--in 64.6%, the foot bones osteosynthesis--in 13.9%, primary immobilization, using improvised tire--in 77.8%, secondary immobilization, using the plaster splint--in 48.1%, llizarov's spokes--in 35.2%, Ilizarov's apparatus--in 18.5%, the rods apparatuses of external fixation--in 16.7%. For improvement of functioning of a modern system for the treatment-evacuation provision it is necessary, to reduce the quantity of levels of the medical help provision maximally. PMID:26939433

  20. Use of Vacuum-assisted closure in management of open abdominal wound with multiple enterocutaneous fistulae during chemotherapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fukata, Tadafumi; Yagi, Toshiya; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. In the present report, a successful case of VAC used for an open abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae after multiple intestinal perforations during chemotherapy is described. Presentation of case A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with severe abdominal pain. He underwent surgical resection for ascending colon cancer 4 years ago and was administered chemotherapy with bevacizumab for recurrence. Physical examination and computed tomography revealed perforation of the intestine, and an emergency operation was performed. Following this procedure, other intestinal perforations occurred, resulting in an open abdominal wound at postoperative day (POD) 10. To isolate enteric contents and promote granulation, VAC was applied to the abdominal wound with enterocutaneous fistulae. Oral intake started at POD 21 and the wound size became smaller. Further, an ostomy bag was directly attached to the most oral perforation site. The patient recovered from life-threatening events without severe infection and was transferred to another hospital close to his home at POD 180. Discussion Gastrointestinal perforation is known to be one of the fatal adverse events of bevacizumab. In this case four gastrointestinal perforations were observed. Isolation of enteric contents is important to heal the wound and VAC is an effective therapy for the management of open abdominal wounds even with enterocutaneous fistulae. Conclusion Innovative VAC use for the management of open abdominal wounds can improve the nutritional status and overall wound healing of the patient. PMID:26599504

  1. [Gunshot wounds of the head in soldiers wearing military helmets-- general aspects and experiments and observations on the biomechanics and wound morphology].

    PubMed

    Missliwetz, J; Wieser, I

    1989-01-01

    With respect to wound ballistics, the situation is different if the person wearing a military helmet suffers head injuries from a bullet. The mechanisms of injury were investigated in four experimental series and supplemented by a case history. The study showed surprising results: in the majority of cases, the helmet does not protect the wearer, but instead intensifies the damage caused by the bullet. The reasons for this phenomena are changes in the stability of the projectile and deformation of or damage to the bullet. All of these mechanisms result in the bullet striking the tissue with higher energy. In this investigation, Kevlar helmets were also tested, which are not penetrated by 9 X 19 mm parabellum bullets. Even so, however, severe injuries of the skull and brain can occur because the projectile causes intensified impressions on the skull under the helmet and, in addition, an acceleration of the head. PMID:2922957

  2. Non-fatal gunshot wounds in the context of intimate partner violence. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Katerina; Ribeiro, Cristina; Jardim, Patrícia; Santos, Agostinho; Magalhães, Teresa

    2011-07-01

    According to Portuguese law, if a case of intimate partner violence is noticed or suspected by a professional working in public services, reporting it to the police, medico-legal services or directly to the public prosecutor is mandatory. However, in most cases, reporting does not take place, despite its vital importance in triggering the multidisciplinary intervention that will ensure the correct and timely diagnosis and protection of the victim. In the present case, the victim, a 37 year-old woman, was sexually and physically abused by her husband in their home, and was physically abused again at the victim's mother's house. The victim mentioned that her husband struck her in the head with a hammer and shot a handgun while in her mother's house. However, she denied having a gunshot wound. The couple's daughter was also slapped in the face by her father. The police took the victim to the emergency room of a central hospital to receive medical attention, while the medical examiner on duty was called to the same emergency room to perform a medico-legal evaluation in the context of the intimate partner violence reported to the police. Medico-legal assessment revealed scalp injuries that had not been detected during the first inspection by the emergency room attending physicians who had performed a neurological examination, which revealed no neurological dysfunction. A cranial computed tomography with three-dimensional reconstitution and virtual dissection, requested by the medical examiner, revealed two projectiles trapped in between the inner and the outer table of the cranium, with linear fractures only in the inner table and no brain injuries. Gynecological examination with the collection of biological evidence, also performed by the medical examiner, made it possible to identify a male DNA profile matching her husband's. The victim was subjected to neurosurgery and a follow-up, and was released one month after the traumatic event. A forensic psychological

  3. Endovascular Repair of an Actively Hemorrhaging Stab Wound Injury to the Abdominal Aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Qasim; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Fourneau, Inge

    2008-09-15

    Traumatic injury of the abdominal aorta is rare and potentially lethal (Yeh et al., J Vasc Surg 42(5):1007-1009, 2005; Chicos et al., Chirurgia (Bucur) 102(2):237-240, 2007) as it can result in major retroperitoneal hemorrhage, requiring an urgent open surgery. In case of concomitant bowel injury or other conditions of hostile abdomen, endovascular repair can be an alternative treatment. This case report deals with a 50-year-old man presenting at the emergency ward with three stab wounds: two in the abdomen and one in the chest. During explorative laparotomy, liver laceration and bowel perforation were repaired. One day later, abdominal CT-scan revealed an additional retroperitoneal hematoma associated with an aortic pseudoaneurysm, located anteriorly 3 cm above the aortic bifurcation. Because of the risk of graft infection, an endovascular repair of the aortic injury using a Gore excluder stent-graft was performed. Radiological and clinical follow-up revealed a gradual shrinkage of the pseudo-aneurysm and no sign of graft infection at two years' follow-up.

  4. The spectrum of injuries resulting from posterior abdominal stab wounds: a South African experience

    PubMed Central

    Oosthuizen, GV; Clarke, DL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The spectrum of injury associated with anterior abdominal stab wounds (SWs) is well established. The literature on the spectrum of organ injury associated with SWs to the posterior abdomen, however, is limited. Methods We reviewed our experience of 105 consecutive patients who had established indications for laparotomy managed over a 4-year period in a high volume trauma service in South Africa. Results Of the 105 patients, 97 (92%) were male and the overall mean age was 24 years. Fifty-seven patients (54%) had immediate indications for laparotomy. The remaining 48 patients (46%) initially underwent active clinical observation and the indications for laparotomy became apparent during the observation period. Of the 105 laparotomies performed, 94 (90%) were positive and 11 (10%) were negative. Of the 94 positive laparotomies, 92 were therapeutic and 2 were non-therapeutic. A total of 176 organ injuries were identified: 50 (53%) of the 94 patients sustained a single organ injury while the remaining 44 (47%) sustained multiple organ injuries. The most commonly injured organs were the colon (n=63), spleen (n=21) and kidney (n=19). Conclusions The pattern of intra-abdominal injuries secondary to SWs to the posterior abdomen is different to that seen with the anterior abdomen. Colonic injury is most commonly encountered, followed by injuries to the spleen and kidney. Clinicians must remain vigilant because of the potential for occult injuries. PMID:26263933

  5. The use of gentamicin-PMMA chains in abdominal surgery: a pilot study of prophylaxis against wound infection.

    PubMed

    Aubrey, D A; Jenkins, N H; Morgan, W P; Thomas, M

    1986-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of gentamicin-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate beads in the prevention of wound sepsis after gastro-intestinal surgery. The beads were laid in the abdominal and perineal incisions (61 wounds) of 55 patients at the end of the operative procedures, and were withdrawn in stages from the fifth post-operative day. This method of administration results in a sustained high antibiotic concentration in the wound with low serum and urine concentrations, thus eliminating the dangers of gentamicin toxicity. Wound infection occurred in only 1 instance, a favourable result when compared to historical controls. It is suggested that further controlled studies of this method of topical prophylactic antibiotic administration are indicated. PMID:3714759

  6. [Gunshot injuries in the pediatric area].

    PubMed

    Baeza-Herrera, C; Baeza-Herrera, M A

    1998-01-01

    Gunshot and air weapon wounds in children have become a significant source of morbidity and mortality in our community in the last four years. Ninety five children, 15 years of age and younger, were admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Service for gunshot and air mechanism wounds during this period. Review of the circumstances of injury revealed that more than 50% were accidental 71% were male patients, and 65% were caused by gunshots and outside of the home. Thoracic region was affected in 42%; abdomen, 20%; skull, face and neck, 13.4%; lower extremities, 13.4%; upper extremities 9%; genitalia, 2.0%; and perineal region, 0.8%. Rapid resuscitation and triage of major injury allowed us a survival of 97%. Social service intervention and educational task can offer significant benefit to these children but, ultimately gun control laws with strict enforcement are needed to stop this type of violence toward children. PMID:9780489

  7. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  8. High velocity gunshot injuries to the extremities: management on and off the battlefield.

    PubMed

    Penn-Barwell, Jowan G; Brown, Kate V; Fries, C Anton

    2015-09-01

    The gunshot wounds sustained on the battlefield caused by military ammunition can be different in nature to those usually encountered in the civilian setting. The main difference is that military ammunition has typically higher velocity with therefore greater kinetic energy and consequently potential to destroy tissue. The surgical priorities in the management of gunshot wounds are hemorrhage control, preventing infection, and reconstruction. The extent to which a gunshot wound needs to be surgically explored can be difficult to determine and depends on the likely amount of tissue destruction and the delay between wounding and initial surgical treatment. Factors associated with greater energy transfer, e.g., bullet fragmentation and bony fractures, are predictors of increased wound severity and therefore a requirement for more surgical exploration and likely debridement. Gunshot wounds should never be closed primarily; the full range of reconstruction from secondary intention to free tissue transfer may be required. PMID:26108862

  9. Wound Edge Protectors in Open Abdominal Surgery to Reduce Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljevic, André L.; Müller, Tara C.; Kehl, Victoria; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Importance Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections. Evidence Review A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted. Findings We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51–0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%). The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44–0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%). Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15–0.55) than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54–0.92), but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28–0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23%) than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57–0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46%) and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24–0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%). Conclusions and Relevance Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of

  10. Gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Hinkle, J; Betz, S

    1995-05-01

    If current trends for this nation continue, by the year 2003 the number of people killed by firearms will exceed the number of people killed in motor vehicle accidents. Critical care practitioners must understand the mechanism of injury associated with firearm injuries to provide optimal care. This article reviews internal, exterior, and terminal ballistics, bullet design, wound classification, and initial assessment and treatment of firearm injuries. PMID:7743422

  11. Extremity gunshot injuries treated in an urban children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Victoroff, B N; Robertson, W W; Eichelberger, M R; Wright, C

    1994-02-01

    In the years 1985 to 1989 75 children and adolescents presented to an urban children's hospital for treatment of 76 incidents of extremity gunshot wounds. Although the population ranged widely, the "typical" patient was a preteen or teenager (n = 70) who was shot in the lower extremity (n = 53) with a low velocity handgun (n = 74). No vascular injuries and only two transient nerve injuries accompanied the wounds. Only 30% of the shots caused fractures. Many (43%) of the patients had other relevant psychosocial or medical problems. Previous treatment for other gunshot wounds or trauma had occurred in 27 patients. Although follow-up was not good, no consequent infections were identified. Outpatient local wound irrigation with minimal debridement sufficed as treatment for entry/exit wounds without contamination or fracture. Intravenous antibiotics are necessary in these wounds only for short-term prophylactic coverage of fractures. Larger soft tissue wounds, intraarticular foreign bodies, and fracture stabilization require operative treatment. PMID:8177799

  12. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Turnock, Adam R.; Fleischer, Brian P.; Carney, Martin J.; Vanderlan, Wesley B.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones. PMID:27302498

  13. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen.

    PubMed

    Turnock, Adam R; Fleischer, Brian P; Carney, Martin J; Vanderlan, Wesley B

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones. PMID:27302498

  14. The Effect of Honey Gel on Abdominal Wound Healing in Cesarean Section: A Triple Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nikpour, Maryam; Shirvani, Marjan Ahmad; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Zanjani, Roya; Mousavi, Ensieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess whether honey can accelerate the wound healing in women undergoing cesarean section. Methods This was a triple blinded randomized prospective clinical trial. Women with cesarean section were randomly designated as drug (37 cases) and placebo (38 cases) groups. The drug group received local honey gel 25% while the placebo group received similar free-honey gel on abdominal cesarean incision twice a day for 14 days. REEDA scale (Redness, Edema, Ecchymosis, Discharge and Approximation of wound edges) was used to assess wound healing. Results The mean REEDA was 2.27 ± 2.46 and 3.91 ± 2.74 (p=0.008) on the 7th day and 0.47 ± 0.84 and 1.59± 1.95 (p=0.002) on the 14th day for the drug and placebo groups, respectively. Redness, edema and hematoma in the drug group were significantly lower on the 7th and 14th days. Conclusion Honey was effective in healing the cesarean section incision. Using topical honey is suggested as a natural product with rare side effects in order to reduce the complications of cesarean wounds. PMID:25170405

  15. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction

    PubMed Central

    Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene® mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence. PMID:25519257

  16. Successful management of abdominal wound dehiscence using a vacuum assisted closure system combined with mesh-mediated medial traction.

    PubMed

    Lord, A C; Hompes, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A; Arnold, S

    2015-01-01

    Management of the open abdomen has advanced significantly in recent years with the increasing use of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) techniques leading to increased rates of fascial closure. We present the case of a patient who suffered two complete abdominal wall dehiscences after an elective laparotomy, meaning primary closure was no longer possible. She was treated successfully with a VAC system combined with continuous medial traction using a Prolene(®) mesh. This technique has not been described before in the management of patients following wound dehiscence. PMID:25519257

  17. Usefulness and limitations of postmortem computed tomography in forensic analysis of gunshot injuries: Three case reports.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihito; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Kozakai, Masataka; Saito, Haruo; Funayama, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Gunshot injury has always been an important field of investigation in postmortem forensic radiology. The localization and retrieval of the bullet and of potentially important fragments are vital to these cases. Using postmortem multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) prior to forensic autopsy, we sought to illustrate the importance of this modality in the noninvasive characterization of gunshot wounds. We obtained and analyzed MDCT images in three cases of gunshot wounds (accidental close-range shotgun shooting, suicidal contact gunshot to the head and accidental long-range buckshot shooting). We discuss the value of postmortem MDCT findings in gunshot wound cases by comparing with forensic autopsy findings in Japan, a developing country with miserably low autopsy rate. PMID:26832386

  18. Macroscopic, microscopic, and chemical assessment of gunshot lesions on decomposed pig skin.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Andreola, Salvatore; Porta, Davide; Giudici, Elena; Grandi, Marco Aurelio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2010-07-01

    Very little literature exists on gunshot wounds on decomposed material. In this study, seven pig heads underwent a shooting test. Entrance wounds from the first head underwent neutron activation analysis (NAA) and histological testing immediately after the firing test; the other six heads were exposed to two different environments (open air and soil) and analyzed by radiochemical and histological tests every 15 days. Gunshot wounds in air maintained their morphological characteristics, and those in soil showed severe alteration after 5 weeks. Microscopic testing verified positive results for lead in all gunshot wounds in open air, whereas in most of those in soil lead could not be detected. Radiochemical analysis performed by NAA yielded for all gunshot wounds but one antimony quantities in the range of 0.07-13.89 microg. In conclusion, it may be possible to detect residues of antimony even in degraded tissues. PMID:20384926

  19. “Time is brain” the Gifford factor - or: Why do some civilian gunshot wounds to the head do unexpectedly well? A case series with outcomes analysis and a management guide

    PubMed Central

    Lin, David J.; Lam, Fred C.; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Ajith; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Review of intracranial gunshot wounds (GSWs) undergoing emergent neurosurgical intervention despite a very low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission in order to identify predictors of good outcome, with correlates to recent literature. Methods: A retrospective review of select cases of GSWs presenting to our trauma center over the past 5 years with poor GCS requiring emergent neurosurgical intervention and a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Results: Out of a total of 17 patients who went to the operating room (OR) for GSW to the head during this period, 4 cases with a GCS < 5 on admission were identified. All cases required a hemicraniectomy to alleviate cerebral swelling. Two cases presented with a unilaterally blown pupil due to raised intracranial pressure. The remaining 2 cases had equal and reactive pupils. One patient with a GCS of 3 and a significant bilateral pattern of parenchymal bullet injury was initially assessed in moribund status but rallied and received a delayed hemicraniectomy on day 7. Three out of 4 patients are functionally independent at 1-year follow-up. The fourth patient who received a delayed decompression remains wheelchair dependent. Conclusion: Victims of GSWs can have good outcomes despite having a very poor admission GCS score and papillary abnormalities. Factors predicting good outcomes include the following: time from injury to surgical intervention of < 1 h; injury to noneloquent brain; and absence of injury to midbrain, brainstem, and major vessels. PMID:23061014

  20. [Shotgun gunshot injury--shotgun slugs].

    PubMed

    Hejna, P; Pleskot, J

    2008-07-01

    Injuries caused by a shotgun belong to the group of less frequent gunshot wounds. Shotguns are usually used to fire multiple pellets, but they are capable of firing single projectiles. Shotgun slug injuries are rare and severe, and fully compareable to those inflicted by high-velocity projectiles. Thanks to great slug's mass and size can create more tissue destruction than the high-velocity missiles. Characteristic ballistic properties of shotgun slugs, their wounding potential and significance in forensic pathology are presented. PMID:18783118

  1. USE OF ALLOPLASTIC MESHES IN ABDOMINAL WOUNDS OF RATS WITH INDUCED PERITONITIS

    PubMed Central

    BARBUTO, Rafael Calvão; DUVAL-ARAUJO, Ivana; BARRAL, Sumara Marques; ROCHA, Raphael Grossi; BECHARA, Cristiane de Souza; BARBOSA, Alfredo José Afonso

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of alloplastic meshes has been historically contra-indicated in patients with infection. Aim To evaluate the use of polypropylene meshes in the treatment of abdominal wall defects in rats with peritonitis. Methods Twenty Wistar female rats were divided into two groups: induction of peritonitis (test group) and without peritonitis (control group). An abdominal wall defect was created in all animals, and polypropylene mesh was applied. The evaluation of the tensile strength of the mesh was carried out using tensiometer and microscopic analysis of the healing area was done. Results More adhesion of the mesh to the rat abdominal wall was observed in test group. The histopathological analyses showed prevalence of moderate to accentuated granulation tissue in both groups, without significant differences. Conclusion The use of the mesh coverage on abdominal wall defects of rats with induced peritonitis did not show worse results than its use in healthy animals, nor was its integration to the resident tissue any worse. PMID:24676294

  2. An Interesting Case of Gunshot Injury to the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mário Sergio Medeiros; Giongo, Caroline Comis; Antonello, Guilherme de Marco; Couto, Ricardo Torres do; Filho, Ruy de Oliveira Veras; Junior, Otacílio Luiz Chagas

    2014-01-01

    The head and face are relatively common sites of gunshot injury, and the temporomandibular joint is often affected. These wounds usually produce major deformity and functional impairment, particularly when the temporomandibular joint is affected or when structures such as the facial nerve are damaged. Complications may include mandibular displacement at maximum mouth opening and in protrusion, limited mouth opening, limited lateral movement of the jaw, anterior open bite, and, more rarely, temporomandibular ankylosis. Projectiles that strike the mandible usually cause comminuted fractures; maxillary wounds, in turn, are most commonly perforating. The present report describes a case of gunshot injury in which the projectile lodged within the mandibular fossa but did not cause any fractures. Oral and maxillofacial trauma surgeons must be aware of the different types of gunshot injury, as they produce distinct patterns of tissue destruction due to projectile trajectory and release of kinetic energy into surrounding tissue. PMID:25709756

  3. New concepts in the management of patients with penetrating abdominal wounds.

    PubMed

    Ferrada, R; Birolini, D

    1999-12-01

    In the future, trauma research and care will have to become better, faster, and less expensive. Surgeons in the next millennium must be able to diagnose wounds, initiate correct procedures, and anticipate complications more accurately than before. Violent crime will not abate, nor will the proliferation of more powerful arms; these trends translate into graver traumatic wounds, giving the operating team less time to stabilize patients. Time management and team coordination are becoming key elements for patient survival, especially for patients with potentially fatal wounds, such as those to the heart. The authors have reduced the time from arrival to surgery to a few minutes. The keys to this feat are readiness, team coordination, and high morale. Financial resources will continue to be limited and allocated on a need-first basis. In the future, trauma centers will compete for dwindling funds. Technology is and always will be just a tool, whereas qualified trauma surgeons are irreplaceable, much more so than in any other surgical specialty. Observation, diagnosis, and surgery are, of course, greatly facilitated by ever-evolving technology, but since the time of Hippocrates, split-second decisions can ultimately be made only by the caregiver in the white smock. Trauma surgeons in the next millennium will have to exercise judgment based on knowledge, surgical skills, and contact with patients. To err is human, but in surgery, errors often cause death, and no machine will ever relieve surgeons of that burden. PMID:10625982

  4. [Gunshot injury caused by a training bullet].

    PubMed

    Rabl, W; Markwalder, C

    1992-01-01

    In the course of a scuffle a 50-year old man has been shot by a revolver. The culprit and witnesses state, there has been only one shot, whereas the victim declared having been shot twice. The medico-legal investigation revealed a gunshot wound that passed through the left thigh, a grazing shot of the right hand and a superficial lesion of the skin at the forehead with sprinkled gunshot residue in the epidermis. The investigation confirmed the statement of the victim: the first shot to the forehead was caused by a plastic training cartridge, the second to the right hand and thigh by a cartridge loaded with an ordinary bullet. PMID:1444710

  5. Treatment of subcutaneous abdominal wound healing impairment after surgery without fascial dehiscence by vacuum assisted closure™ (SAWHI-V.A.C.®-study) versus standard conventional wound therapy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A decision of the Federal Joint Committee Germany in 2008 stated that negative pressure wound therapy is not accepted as a standard therapy for full reimbursement by the health insurance companies in Germany. This decision is based on the final report of the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care in 2006, which demonstrated through systematic reviews and meta-analysis of previous study projects, that an insufficient state of evidence regarding the use of negative pressure wound therapy for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds exists. Further studies were therefore indicated. Methods/design The study is designed as a multinational, multicenter, prospective randomized controlled, adaptive design, clinical superiority trial, with blinded photographic analysis of the primary endpoint. Efficacy and effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy for wounds in both medical sectors (in- and outpatient care) will be evaluated. The trial compares the treatment outcome of the application of a technical medical device which is based on the principle of negative pressure wound therapy (intervention group) and standard conventional wound therapy (control group) in the treatment of subcutaneous abdominal wounds after surgery. The aim of the SAWHI-VAC® study is to compare the clinical, safety and economic results of both treatment arms. Discussion The study project is designed and conducted with the aim of providing solid evidence regarding the efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy. Study results will be provided until the end of 2014 to contribute to the final decision of the Federal Joint Committee Germany regarding the general admission of negative pressure wound therapy as a standard of performance within both medical sectors. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov NCT01528033 German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00000648 PMID:24252551

  6. Gunshot residue, ten years later.

    PubMed

    Wilber, C G; Lantz, R K; Sulik, P L

    1991-09-01

    Gunshot residues may be central to a competent reconstruction of a shooting incident. When a young boy was shot in the neck by a playmate using a .22-caliber single-action revolver, permanent paralysis from mid-thorax downward ensued. Ten years later the victim sued the importer, the vendor, the German manufacturer, and the shooter's family. Investigative reports indicated "horseplay" and questionable emergency medical team care. Depositions were contradictory. The entry wound, removed at surgery, was fixed and processed for slides. The histopathologist referred to "black pigment granules" in the wound track. The 10-year-old slides and block were retrieved. The coverslip was removed from a representative slide that was examined under the scanning, x-ray dispersive microscope. The black granules contained amounts of lead, barium, and antimony far beyond any normal range. The firing range had to have been no greater than 6-12 in (15.24-30.48 cm). The case was promptly settled out of court. PMID:1750390

  7. Nasolabial Flap in Maxillofacial Gunshot Trauma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The nasolabial flap (NLF) has many advantages in oromaxillary reconstruction, but the majority of cases are reconstructions after pathologic resections. Its usage in trauma surgery, especially in the management of gunshot wounds, is rarely mentioned. Case Presentation Three cases involving gunshot injuries to the face are presented: one for reconstruction of the nasal ala, another for bone graft coverage in mandibular reconstruction, and the third for the repair of premaxillary hard and soft tissue avulsive defects. Conclusions The NLF is a thin, pliable flap and is useful for intraoral and facial reconstruction of trauma patients with small to moderate soft tissue loss. PMID:27148497

  8. Porcine acellular lung matrix for wound healing and abdominal wall reconstruction: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Rhudy, Jessica R; Cabrera, Fernando J; Acharya, Ghanashyam S; Tasciotti, Ennio; Sakamoto, Jason; Nichols, Joan E

    2016-01-01

    Surgical wound healing applications require bioprosthetics that promote cellular infiltration and vessel formation, metrics associated with increased mechanical strength and resistance to infection. Porcine acellular lung matrix is a novel tissue scaffold known to promote cell adherence while minimizing inflammatory reactions. In this study, we evaluate the capacity of porcine acellular lung matrix to sustain cellularization and neovascularization in a rat model of subcutaneous implantation and chronic hernia repair. We hypothesize that, compared to human acellular dermal matrix, porcine acellular lung matrix would promote greater cell infiltration and vessel formation. Following pneumonectomy, porcine lungs were processed and characterized histologically and by scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate efficacy of the decellularization. Using a rat model of subcutaneou implantation, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 8) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 8) were incubated in vivo for 6 weeks. To evaluate performance under mechanically stressed conditions, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 7) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 7) were implanted in a rat model of chronic ventral incisional hernia repair for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining to quantify cell infiltration and vessel formation. Porcine acellular lung matrices were shown to be successfully decellularized. Following subcutaneous implantation, macroscopic vessel formation was evident. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated sufficient incorporation and showed no evidence of mechanical failure after ventral hernia repair. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated significantly greater cellular density and vessel formation when compared to human acellular dermal matrix. Vessel sizes were similar across all groups. Cell infiltration and vessel formation are well-characterized metrics of incorporation

  9. Porcine acellular lung matrix for wound healing and abdominal wall reconstruction: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Rhudy, Jessica R; Cabrera, Fernando J; Acharya, Ghanashyam S; Tasciotti, Ennio; Sakamoto, Jason; Nichols, Joan E

    2016-01-01

    Surgical wound healing applications require bioprosthetics that promote cellular infiltration and vessel formation, metrics associated with increased mechanical strength and resistance to infection. Porcine acellular lung matrix is a novel tissue scaffold known to promote cell adherence while minimizing inflammatory reactions. In this study, we evaluate the capacity of porcine acellular lung matrix to sustain cellularization and neovascularization in a rat model of subcutaneous implantation and chronic hernia repair. We hypothesize that, compared to human acellular dermal matrix, porcine acellular lung matrix would promote greater cell infiltration and vessel formation. Following pneumonectomy, porcine lungs were processed and characterized histologically and by scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate efficacy of the decellularization. Using a rat model of subcutaneou implantation, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 8) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 8) were incubated in vivo for 6 weeks. To evaluate performance under mechanically stressed conditions, porcine acellular lung matrices (n = 7) and human acellular dermal matrices (n = 7) were implanted in a rat model of chronic ventral incisional hernia repair for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining to quantify cell infiltration and vessel formation. Porcine acellular lung matrices were shown to be successfully decellularized. Following subcutaneous implantation, macroscopic vessel formation was evident. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated sufficient incorporation and showed no evidence of mechanical failure after ventral hernia repair. Porcine acellular lung matrices demonstrated significantly greater cellular density and vessel formation when compared to human acellular dermal matrix. Vessel sizes were similar across all groups. Cell infiltration and vessel formation are well-characterized metrics of incorporation

  10. Gunshot residue preservation in seawater.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Anne-Christine; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Athens, Josie; Obertova, Zuzana; Duncan, Warwick; Waddell, Neil; Kieser, Jules

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about the persistence of gunshot residue (GSR) in soft tissue and bones during decomposition in marine environments. For a better understanding, qualitative and quantitative data were obtained on GSR retention on soft tissue and bony gunshot wounds (GSWs). A quantity of 36 fleshed and 36 defleshed bovine ribs were shot at contact range with 0.22 calibre hollow point ammunition using a Stirling 0.22 calibre long rifle. Bone specimens in triplicate were placed in three environments: submerged, intertidal and in supralittoral zone. Sets of triplicates were recovered on day 3, 10, 24 and 38, and analysed with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX), and inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The SEM-EDX recorded GSR-indicative particles surrounding the bullet entrance on all bone types (fleshed and defleshed) in all environments throughout the study. GSR-unique particles were only detected on the supralittoral bones. The ICP-MS analysis showed faster GSR loss on submerged than intertidal and supralittoral defleshed specimens. Fleshed specimens showed a faster GSR loss on intertidal than submerged and supralittoral specimens. In conclusion, the GSR disappeared faster from submerged and intertidal than non-submerged specimens. The difference of detection of GSR between analysed specimens (defleshed versus fleshed) disappeared upon defleshing. This study highlights the potential of finding evidence of GSR in a submerged body and the potential of microscopic and analytical methods for examining suspected GSW in highly decomposed bodies in marine habitats. PMID:26115226

  11. Potent anti-inflammatory agent escin does not affect the healing of tibia fracture and abdominal wound in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Hongsheng; Wang, Tian; Jiang, Na; Yu, Pengfei; Liu, Feiyan; Chong, Yating; Fu, Fenghua

    2012-04-01

    Escin, a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous agent, has been widely used clinically in preventing inflammatory edema after trauma, such as fracture and surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether escin has an inhibitory effect on fracture healing, and whether escin has an inhibitory effect on wound healing after surgery. Male New Zealand white rabbits underwent tibial mid-diaphyseal osteotomy, and were administered escin once per day for 10 days. At weeks 2, 4 and 6, bone fracture healing and bone mineral density were measured. The histologic examination of callus, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphate in the serum were also assayed. In another experiment, the rats underwent midline laparotomy, and received escin once prior to or after the operation. Six days later, the abdominal incision wounds were excised for measuring hydroxyproline levels. The results showed that there were no significant differences in fracture healing between the model and rabbits administered escin, and escin did not affect the hydroxyproline levels in the abdominal incision wounds of the rats. These findings suggest that escin has no inhibitory effect on fracture and wound healing in animal models. PMID:22969961

  12. Potent anti-inflammatory agent escin does not affect the healing of tibia fracture and abdominal wound in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LEIMING; WANG, HONGSHENG; WANG, TIAN; JIANG, NA; YU, PENGFEI; LIU, FEIYAN; CHONG, YATING; FU, FENGHUA

    2012-01-01

    Escin, a potent anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous agent, has been widely used clinically in preventing inflammatory edema after trauma, such as fracture and surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether escin has an inhibitory effect on fracture healing, and whether escin has an inhibitory effect on wound healing after surgery. Male New Zealand white rabbits underwent tibial mid-diaphyseal osteotomy, and were administered escin once per day for 10 days. At weeks 2, 4 and 6, bone fracture healing and bone mineral density were measured. The histologic examination of callus, osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphate in the serum were also assayed. In another experiment, the rats underwent midline laparotomy, and received escin once prior to or after the operation. Six days later, the abdominal incision wounds were excised for measuring hydroxyproline levels. The results showed that there were no significant differences in fracture healing between the model and rabbits administered escin, and escin did not affect the hydroxyproline levels in the abdominal incision wounds of the rats. These findings suggest that escin has no inhibitory effect on fracture and wound healing in animal models. PMID:22969961

  13. [Comparative evaluation of drainage methods used for penetrating gunshot cerebral injuries].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V P

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a comparative evaluation of the methods of gunshot craniocerebral wounds draining, applied when the primary surgical treatment at the stages of medical evacuation of the limited contingent of Soviet troops in Afghanistan. An analysis of occurring infectious complications and outcomes of surgical treatment of the wounded is given. Based on clinical observations revealed most effective method of the active drainage gunshot traumatic brain injuries. The advantages of tidal drainage, appropriate for mechanical cleaning of wounds, allows controlling hemostasis, using antibacterial solutions are given. PMID:27416716

  14. [Forensic aspects of gunshot suicides in Germany].

    PubMed

    Kunz, Sebastian Niko; Meyer, Harald J; Kraus, Sybille

    2013-12-01

    Suicidal gunshot wounds are a common appearance in forensic casework. The main task of the coroner lies in the detection of typical pathomorphological correlates, thus differentiating between homicide, suicide and accident. Apart from characteristic bloodstain patterns on the gun and shooting hand, the localisation of the entrance wound and the position of the weapon, additional details such as family background or medical history are important aspects of forensic investigation. An uncommon choice of weaponry and its unusual morphological manifestation often complicate the examination and reconstruction of such cases. Furthermore, due to social stigmatisation, the possibility of secondary changes by relatives at the crime scene should be considered. In addition to autopsy findings, a careful crime scene investigation and bloodstain pattern analysis, a ballistic reconstruction can be an essential tool to gain knowledge of the shooting distance and position of the gun. PMID:23857247

  15. Hyperacute abdominal compartment syndrome: an unrecognized complication of massive intraoperative resuscitation for extra-abdominal injuries.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Edgar B; Malhotra, Ajai K; Chhitwal, Reena; Aboutanos, Michel B; Duane, Therese M; Ivatury, Rao R

    2005-11-01

    Primary and secondary abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are well-recognized entities after trauma. The current study describes a "hyperacute" form of secondary ACS (HACS) that develops intraoperatively while repair of extra-abdominal injuries is being carried out simultaneous with massive resuscitation for shock caused by those injuries. The charts of patients requiring abdominal decompression (AD) for HACS at time of extra-abdominal surgery at our level I trauma center were reviewed. The following data was gathered: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism, resuscitation details, time to AD, time to abdominal closure, and outcome. All continuous data are presented as mean +/- standard error of mean. Hemodynamic and ventilatory data pre- and post-AD was compared using paired t test with significance set at P < 0.05. Five (0.13%) of 3,750 trauma admissions developed HACS during the 15-month study period ending February 2004. Mean age was 32 +/- 7 years, and mean ISS was 19 +/- 2. Four of five patients arrived in hemorrhagic shock (blunt subclavian artery injury, 1; chest gunshot, 1; gunshot to brachial artery, 1; stab transection of femoral vessels, 1) and were immediately operated upon. One of five patients (70% burn) developed HACS during burn wound excision on day 2. HACS developed after massive crystalloid (15 +/- 1.7 L) and blood (11 +/- 0.4 units) resuscitation during prolonged surgery (4.8 +/- 0.8 hours). Pre- versus post-AD comparisons revealed significant (P < 0.05) improvements in mean arterial pressure (55 +/- 6 vs 88 +/- 3 mm Hg), peak airway pressure (44 +/- 5 vs 31 +/- 2 mm Hg), tidal volume (432 +/- 96 vs 758 +/- 93 mL), arterial pH (7.16 +/- 0.0 vs 7.26 +/- 0.04), and PaCO2 (52 +/- 6 vs 45 +/- 6 mm Hg). There was no mortality among the group, and all patients underwent abdominal closure by fascial reapproximation in 2-5 days. Two (40%) of the five patients required extremity fasciotomy for compartment syndrome. HACS is a rare complication of

  16. Abdominoperineal resection without an abdominal incision for rectal cancer has the advantage of no abdominal wound complication and easier stoma care.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Chi

    2012-02-01

    Abdominoperineal resection has been used for years for the management of low rectal cancer. However, the abdominal incision is associated with many complications and causes interference of the stoma care. If the abdominal incision can be avoided, it would be beneficial to the patient. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility and safety of performing abdominoperineal resection and the oncology result without an abdominal incision. From September 2001 to May 2010, 40 patients with rectal malignancies received excision of the rectum, anus, and perineum through a perineal incision and a skin hole created for stomy. No harmonic scalpel or laser was used during surgery. No laparoscope or hand port was used in the procedure. There were 19 males and 21 females. Age ranged from 31 to 87 years old (average, 62.9 years). There were 39 adenocarcinomas and one malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor. There was no operative mortality. Six patients had postoperative complications; three patients had intestinal obstructions; and one patient each had bleeding, urinary tract infection, and colostomy separation from the skin. The lymph nodes in the specimens ranged from 9 to 33 cm (average, 16.8 cm). The survival is similar to the traditional abdominoperineal resection. This limited experience suggests that an abdominal incision is not necessary for radical resection of the rectum, anus, and perineum in patients with low-lying rectal cancer. It also offers the patient easier care of stoma without interference of the abdominal incision. PMID:22369824

  17. Abdominal injuries in communal crises: The Jos experience

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Emmanuel Olorundare; Ozoilo, Kenneth N.; Sule, Augustine Z.; Ugwu, Benjamin T.; Misauno, Michael A.; Ismaila, Bashiru O.; Peter, Solomon D.; Adejumo, Adeyinka A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abdominal injuries contribute significantly to battlefield trauma morbidity and mortality. This study sought to determine the incidence, demographics, clinical features, spectrum, severity, management, and outcome of abdominal trauma during a civilian conflict. Materials and Methods: A prospective analysis of patients treated for abdominal trauma during the Jos civil crises between December 2010 and May 2012 at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Results: A total of 109 victims of communal conflicts with abdominal injuries were managed during the study period with 89 (81.7%) males and 20 (18.3%) females representing about 12.2% of the total 897 combat related injuries. The peak age incidence was between 21 and 40 years (range: 3–71 years). The most frequently injured intra-abdominal organs were the small intestine 69 (63.3%), colon 48 (44%), and liver 41 (37.6%). Forty-four (40.4%) patients had extra-abdominal injuries involving the chest in 17 (15.6%), musculoskeletal 12 (11%), and the head in 9 (8.3%). The most prevalent weapon injuries were gunshot 76 (69.7%), explosives 12 (11%), stab injuries 11 (10.1%), and blunt abdominal trauma 10 (9.2%). The injury severity score varied from 8 to 52 (mean: 20.8) with a fatality rate of 11 (10.1%) and morbidity rate of 29 (26.6%). Presence of irreversible shock, 3 or more injured intra-abdominal organs, severe head injuries, and delayed presentation were the main factors associated with mortality. Conclusion: Abdominal trauma is major life-threatening injuries during conflicts. Substantial mortality occurred with loss of nearly one in every 10 hospitalized victims despite aggressive emergency room resuscitation. The resources expenditure, propensity for death and expediency of timing reinforce the need for early access to the wounded in a concerted trauma care systems. PMID:26957819

  18. [Computed tomography in gunshot trauma. I. Ballistics elements and the mechanisms of the lesions].

    PubMed

    Scialpi, M; Magli, T; Boccuzzi, F; Scapati, C

    1995-04-01

    The knowledge of wound ballistics and of wounding mechanisms is mandatory for the radiologist to interpret the CT findings of gunshot wounds. The severity of a bullet wound depends on the characteristics of the tissue it goes through, i.e., tissue elasticity, density, thickness of the wounded body part, the type of tissue, its specific gravity, internal cohesiveness and anatomical relationships, as well as on missile characteristics, i.e., mass, shape, fragmentation and deformation. Bullet velocity is certainly a major factor in wounding, but it is only one factor. Two major wounding mechanisms exist the crushing of the bullet-struck tissue (forming the permanent cavity) and radial stretching (forming a temporary cavity). Bullet "yaw" is defined as the angle between the long axis of the bullet and its flight path. The yaw is directly proportional to tissue crushing and stretching: the wider the yaw, the most severe tissue crushing and stretching and, therefore, the more severe tissue damage. The basic knowledge of these concepts is of the utmost importance to understand the CT findings of gunshot wounds and can help physicians study and treat gunshot wounds. PMID:7597231

  19. Intrauterine Fetal Death in Gunshot Injury to the Gravid Uterus: Forensic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Yogender Singh; Kumar, Senthil; Rao, Murali G

    2015-08-01

    Assault on pregnant women is not a rare event; however forensic analysis of gunshot injuries among the same group requires a greater deliberation. This is the report of a 38-week-old fetus which succumbed following gunshot injuries to the mother while the latter survived. The uniqueness of fetal injuries in the form of avulsed wound with complete detachment of anus is of great forensic interest. Such unusual wound pattern could have been the result of a blast wave effect created due to the high velocity projectile affecting the fluid filled uterine cavity. PMID:26435965

  20. Intrauterine Fetal Death in Gunshot Injury to the Gravid Uterus: Forensic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil; Rao, Murali G

    2015-01-01

    Assault on pregnant women is not a rare event; however forensic analysis of gunshot injuries among the same group requires a greater deliberation. This is the report of a 38-week-old fetus which succumbed following gunshot injuries to the mother while the latter survived. The uniqueness of fetal injuries in the form of avulsed wound with complete detachment of anus is of great forensic interest. Such unusual wound pattern could have been the result of a blast wave effect created due to the high velocity projectile affecting the fluid filled uterine cavity. PMID:26435965

  1. Close proximity gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    Thornton, J I

    1986-04-01

    Intuitively, a hand held in close proximity to a firearm at the instant of discharge will intercept a significant amount of gunshot residue, even though the hand did not actually come into contact with the weapon. There is, however, little information specifically described in the forensic science literature concerning the residue levels which might be encountered in such an instance. The present work confirms that antimony levels consistent with an individual having fired or handled a firearm may be intercepted by a hand held in close proximity. PMID:3711843

  2. Gunshot residues on dry bone after decomposition--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Taborelli, Anna; Gibelli, Daniele; Rizzi, Agostino; Andreola, Salvatore; Brandone, Alberto; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2012-09-01

    Very little literature exists concerning radiochemical and microscopic analyses of gunshot wounds in decomposed material, and even less concerning skeletonized samples; the most advanced technologies may provide useful indications for the diagnosis of suspect lesions, especially if gunshot wounds are no longer recognizable. However, we know very little of the survival of gunshot residues (GSR) in skeletonized samples. This study examined nine gunshot wounds produced on pig heads which then underwent skeletonization for 4 years, and four gunshot entries on human heads from judicial cases which were then macerated to the bone in water; the samples underwent scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analysis. Positive results for GSR were observed only in four of the nine animal samples and in all four human samples. Among the human samples, two lesions showed Pb and Sb, one lesion only Pb, and one Pb, Sb, and Ba. This pilot study showed the survival of GSR in skeletal material and therefore the crucial importance of SEM-EDX analyses on skeletonized material. Further studies are needed in order to ascertain the role of environmental modifications of GSR. PMID:22471895

  3. Treatment options for traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the paravisceral abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sonny; Rowe, Vincent L; Rao, Rajeev; Hood, Douglas B; Harrell, Donald; Weaver, Fred A

    2005-09-01

    Penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the abdominal aorta are frequently lethal. Alternative management options for treatment of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta are illustrated by three patient case histories. Patient A sustained two GSWs to the abdomen (midepigastrium, right subcostal region). He was hypotensive in the field. Emergent laparotomy was undertaken with suture ligature of a celiac injury and distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy for a pancreatic injury. Postoperative abdominal CT for an intraabdominal infection with leukocytosis revealed a 4 cm traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta that extended from the suprarenal aorta to the level of the renal arteries. Six weeks later, he underwent an open repair. Patient B sustained multiple GSWs to his right arm and right upper quadrant. He was hemodynamically stable. He underwent abdominal exploration for a grade 3 liver laceration. Postoperative abdominal CT revealed a supraceliac abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm. An aortogram demonstrated a 1.5 cm defect in the aortic wall above the celiac trunk communicating with the inferior vena cava (IVC). He underwent endovascular repair with covered aortic stent graft. Patient C sustained multiple thoracoabdominal GSWs. He was hemodynamically stable. Emergent laparotomy revealed multiple left colonic perforations, two duodenal lacerations, and an unsalvageable left kidney laceration. Postoperatively, he developed a duodenal-cutaneous fistula with multiple intraabdominal abscesses. Serial CT scans revealed an enlarging infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm. He underwent angiographic coil embolization and intraarterial injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysm sac. The average time from injury to surgical treatment was 46 days (range 29-67). Postoperatively, none of the patients developed paraplegia. Advances in endovascular techniques have provided options to deal with traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta. In a hemodynamically stable

  4. The atypical entrance wound: differential diagnosis and discussion of an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Rulon, Jennifer J; Wallace, Edward I

    2012-09-01

    The appearance of gunshot entrance wounds on the body depends upon many factors including, the type of firearm, the type of ammunition, the location of the wound on the body, and the circumstances of how a wound was sustained. Atypical gunshot entrance wounds are usually created when the bullet is destabilized prior to entering the body and consequently does not enter the body nose first but sideways or at an angle. The most common causes of an atypical entrance wound are bullet ricochet and interaction with an intermediate target. A case is presented in which the decedent sustained a gunshot wound with an atypical entrance. The cause of the atypical nature of the wound was determined to be increased yaw due to bullet instability caused by the condition of the firearm used, not a ricochet or intermediate target. The case emphasizes the importance of collaborative investigation between the different forensic agencies in gunshot cases. PMID:23066534

  5. [Atypical trajectory of gunshot injury].

    PubMed

    Aygün, Mert; Tulay, Cumhur Murat

    2014-11-01

    Gunshot injuries are common medical-legal issues. Atypical tract lines resulting from this type of injuries cause difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, a gunshot injury on the right anterior thigh extending to the right hemithorax was presented. A 67-year-old Syrian refugee patient was brought to the emergency service due to gunshot injury. Bullet entrance hole was determined on the right anterior thigh region; however, exit side could not be seen. Bullet was determined on the right thorax at tomography and the patient was taken to operation due to diaphragm rupture and lung parenchymal injury. Other body parts must be examined radiologically for the bullet which cannot be determined at gunshot injury side. PMID:25541926

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, James T; Marks, Malcolm W

    2007-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy has become an increasingly important part of wound management. Over the last decade, numerous uses for this method of wound management have been reported, ranging from acute and chronic wounds, to closure of open sternal and abdominal wounds, to assistance with skin grafts. The biophysics behind the success of this treatment largely have focused on increased wound blood flow, increased granulation tissue formation, decreased bacterial counts, and stimulation of wound healing pathways through shear stress mechanisms. The overall success of negative pressure wound therapy has led to a multitude of clinical applications, which are discussed in this article. PMID:17967622

  7. Circular saw-associated fatality mimicking gunshot injury.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Petr; Zátopková, Lenka; Safr, Miroslav; Straka, Lubomír

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old man was found dead in the yard of his house with penetrating injury of the trunk. Initial examination of the body revealed a single penetrating injury on his chest with a collar abrasion-the injury pattern that is similar to a gunshot entry wound or shored exit wound. According to witnesses, the man had cut wooden frames from old windows with a circular saw. X-rays of the torso revealed a contrast object resembling a projectile in the left scapular region. The internal examination disclosed an isolated trunk trauma involving the left lung. In the soft tissue, between the inner edge of the left scapula and thoracic spine, the fragment of a metal nail was found. The autopsy confirmed that the wound on the chest was a non-firearm-related injury. The death of deceased was attributed to massive internal hemorrhage. Further investigation revealed that the pseudo-gunshot wound injury of the trunk of the victim was caused by a fast-flying metal object thrown against the man's trunk from a circular saw while cutting the wooden beams of old windows. PMID:23181567

  8. Bilateral fractures of the coronoid processes: differential diagnosis of intra-oral gunshot trauma and scavenging using a sheep crania model.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Cathy M

    2003-11-01

    Approximately half of the skeleton of an adult male (minus the cranium) was found in a forested part of Greater Vancouver, Canada, in August 2000 by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Authorities ruled the death as suicide. The only compelling signs of perimortem trauma were symmetrically fractured coronoid processes of the mandible, which can be attributed to a gunshot in the mouth. However, the remains had also been scavenged by canids, raising a problem in differential diagnosis. Could canid scavenging produce bilateral fracturing of the mandible indistinguishable from gunshot wounds to the mouth? We found that canid scavengers could not mimic the type of damage to the mandible caused by intra-oral gunshot wounding using a sheep model (n = 20). Bilateral fracturing of the coronoid processes was found to be characteristic of intra-oral gunshot wounding, while canid scavengers typically ignore this region of the mandible. PMID:14640263

  9. Autopsy features relevant for discrimination between suicidal and homicidal gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Karger, B; Billeb, E; Koops, E; Brinkmann, B

    2002-10-01

    A total of 624 consecutive gunshot autopsies from the Institutes of Legal Medicine in Münster and Hamburg was investigated retrospectively. In a subsample of 284 suicides and 293 homicides (n=577), a large variety of features such as firearm, ammunition, number and site of entrance wounds, shooting distance and direction of the internal bullet path were recorded and binary logistic regression analysis performed in the case of bullet paths. Females constituted 26.3% of the homicide victims and 10.6% of the suicides. Short-barrelled firearms outnumbered long arms in homicides by 6:1 and in suicides by 2:1. More than 1 gunshot injury was found in 5.6% of the suicides (maximum 5 gunshots) and in 53.9% of the homicides (maximum 23 gunshots). The suicidal gunshots were fired from contact or near contact range in 89% while this was the case in only 7.5% of the homicides. The typical entrance wound sites in suicides were the temple (36%), mouth (20%), forehead (11%) and left chest (15%) but uncommon entrance wound sites such as the eye, ear, and back of the neck and head were also encountered. In suicidal gunshots to the right temple (n=107), only 6% of the bullet paths were directed downwards and only 4% were directed from back-to-front. In gunshots to the left chest (n=130), bullet paths running right-to-left or parallel occurred frequently in suicides (75%) and infrequently in homicide victims (19%). From 61 suicides who fired the gun inside their mouth, only 1 pointed the gun downwards. Consequently, some bullet path directions cannot be considered indicative of suicide: downwards and back-to-front in gunshots to the temple, left-to-right in gunshots to the left chest and downwards in mouth shots. The isolated autopsy findings can only be indicative of suicide or homicide but the combined analysis of several findings can be associated with a high probability. PMID:12376836

  10. A simple histochemical technique for the identification of gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, D L; Noguchi, T T; Klatt, E C

    1991-03-01

    Alizarin red S (ARS) is a commonly used organic dye useful in the histologic identification of calcium deposits. ARS also forms colored reaction products with other metal ions, including barium and lead, which are present in primer residue. In histochemical studies, ARS is shown to identify primer residues from several manufacturers as well as primer residue deposited in tissue, either experimentally or in close-range gunshot wounds. This can be easily accomplished with routine histologic techniques. ARS does not stain gunpowder residue, tattoo pigment, melanin, graphite, india ink, or anthracotic pigment. PMID:2066729

  11. Muskets, musket balls and the wounds they made.

    PubMed

    Magee, R

    1995-12-01

    Gunshot wounds are a common occurrence today in both military and civilian situations. This paper discusses the development of the weapons, their capabilities, the type of wounds produced and their management in earlier times. A brief comparison is made with the wounds produced by modern firearms. It may be concluded that the earlier wounds were simpler due to the lower velocity of the projectile and therefore a more conservative approach to treatment was acceptable. PMID:8611115

  12. [Using of scanning electron microscopy for detection of gunshot residue].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Vajtr, D; Starý, V; Vrána, J; Zelenka, K; Adámek, T

    2006-07-01

    Scanning electron microscope improves the possibility of investigation of surroundings near of gunshot wounds in forensic medicine, it is the next subsequent method for differentiating of area of entrance and exit wound, supplemental method for determination of firing distance, permit of detection (GSR) on the hand of shooter and ensured describing of samples and their stored. Detection of GSR provides many information about composition of bullet and primer. Authors are demonstrating the possibility of detection of GSR on experimental shooting to the krupon (pigs' skin) in different situation (such as in a room and in outside area) and using of different weapon (hand gun CZ No.75 and machine gun No.58). PMID:16948447

  13. The evaluation of a synthetic long bone structure as a substitute for human tissue in gunshot experiments.

    PubMed

    Kneubuehl, B P; Thali, M J

    2003-12-17

    Our goal was to compare experimental gunshot wounds in our non-biological bone model with similarly created wounds in swine bones, and evaluate the results. The design of the synthetic (polyurethane) bone was patterned after human bone structure, with a compact outer layer covering a porous inner layer. Ordnance gelatin, as substitute bone marrow, was injected into the bone's hollow core. To simulate the periostium, the bone was covered with a layer of latex. Then the bone was embedded in gelatin used to simulate surrounding soft tissue. For comparison, fresh swine bones were also embedded in gelatin, and fired upon under the same guidelines. All gunshots were high-speed filmed. In our experimental study, gunshot wounds to swine bones, and to our synthetic, non-biological bones were compared. The results (the comparison between the biological swine bones and the non-biological model bones) in regard to the following points are absolutely equal: the loss of velocity and energy after striking bone, bone fragmentation, bullet deformation, and the penetrating wound channel. Continuing studies with our synthetic bone model will bring about an even greater understanding of the mechanisms of "bullet-bone interaction". For this reason, we have extended our variety of bone models to include other skeletal structures such as skull, spine, pelvis and flat bones for further gunshot experiments. PMID:14642718

  14. [Retained capacity for action in brain gunshot injury. Case report and systematic examination].

    PubMed

    Karger, B; Banaschak, S; Brinkmann, B

    1997-01-01

    A case of physical activity following a suicidal gunshot to the head including perforation of the left frontal lobe from a .22 rimfire rifle is reported. Subsequently, the man was able to walk a distance of more than 100 m and to reload manually. The special wound ballistic features of the head leading to increased intracranial projectile effects are discussed and the morphological changes such as cortical contusion zones, intracerebral hemorrhages or indirect skull fractures are explained. The analysis of 38 cases of head shots followed by physical activity reveals that injury to certain CNS-areas or the use of centre fire rifles and large handguns usually excludes a potential for subsequent physical activity. But physical activity is possible if the trajectory is restricted to the frontal brain or one temporal lobe only and if a projectile of low wounding potential has been used for this gunshot. PMID:9313065

  15. Biochemical Response to Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment of a Transhemispheric Penetrating Cerebral Gunshot Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Nekludov, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy has been suggested a treatment option in order to reduce the development of secondary insults succeeding traumatic brain injury. This case report studied the course of a 23-year-old gentleman with a close range transhemispheric gunshot wound. The biochemical parameters, using a multi-modal monitoring in the neuro-intensive care unit, improved following HBO treatment. PMID:25852640

  16. Reconstruction and rehabilitation of short-range gunshot injury to lower part of face: A systematic approach of three cases.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Ashutosh; Adhyapok, Apurba-Kumar; Debnath, Subhas-Chandra; Malik, Kapil

    2016-08-01

    Gunshot injuries are always known to cause severe morbidity and mortality when head and neck are involved. They vary in morbidity, which can occur in civilian surroundings. The wound largely depends on the type of weapon, mass and velocity of the bullet, and the distance from where it has been shot. Close-range gunshot wounds in the head and neck region can result in devastating aesthetic and functional impairment. The complexity in facial skeletal anatomy cause multiple medical and surgical challenges to an operating surgeon, demanding elaborate soft and hard tissue reconstruction. Here we presented the successful management of three patients shot by short-range pistol with basic life support measures, wound management, reconstruction and rehabilitation. PMID:27578384

  17. Outpatient management of low-velocity gunshot-induced fractures.

    PubMed

    Dickson, K; Watson, T S; Haddad, C; Jenne, J; Harris, M

    2001-10-01

    This prospective study evaluated the efficacy of an outpatient management protocol for patients with a gunshot-induced fracture with a stable, nonoperative configuration. Forty-one patients (44 fractures) with a grade I or II open, nonoperative fracture secondary to a low-velocity missile comprised the study population. Patients were treated by a standard protocol, which included 1 g of cefazolin administered in the emergency room and a 7-day course of oral cephalexin. Follow-up visits were performed until complete wound and fracture healing were achieved. Thirty-two (78%) of 41 patients underwent full follow-up. Average follow-up was 5.2 months. One (2.8%) fracture (distal fibula) developed a superficial infection, which responded to an additional week of oral antibiotics, and no patient developed a deep infection. There was 1 delayed union and 2 patients with painful retained shrapnel. These results demonstrate that patients with stable, low-velocity, gunshot-induced fractures can be managed effectively and safely on an outpatient basis using this protocol. PMID:11688773

  18. High-velocity gunshot to the head presenting as initial minor head injury: things are not what they seem.

    PubMed

    Robles, Luis A

    2012-11-01

    Tangential gunshots to the head are a special type of injury in which the bullet or bullet fragments do not penetrate the inner table of the skull. Most of patients experiencing this kind of injuries usually have a benign clinical presentation. We describe the case of a 22-year-old soldier who had a tangential gunshot to the head caused by a high-velocity projectile. Initially, the patient was neurologically intact, progressing to profound coma in the next 2 hours. The characteristics of the wound and initial neurologic condition led to first contact physicians to treat this injury as a case of mild head trauma. This case shows us that gunshots to the head caused by high-velocity missiles must be treated aggressively like a severe head injury, even when the initial neurologic examination is normal. PMID:22386344

  19. Detectability and medico-legal value of the gunshot residues in the intracorporeal channel.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Arnaldo Stanislao; Andreola, Salvatore; Battistini, Alessio; Gentile, Guendalina; Muccino, Enrico; Vancheri, Giulia; Zoja, Riccardo

    2015-11-01

    The application of the histochemical stain of sodium rhodizonate to the entrance wound for the detection of the lead (Pb) residues coming from the gunshot may be affected by false positive cases due to the contamination of the environmental Pb. The aim of the Authors is to histochemically search the Pb of GSR in a region which should be more protected by the contamination: the intracorporeal channel. Two hundreds and eighteen serial histological specimens of the intracorporeal channels coming from 25 subjects (dead due to gunshots and being autopsied at the Section of Legal Medicine of the Milan University, in the years 2013-2014) were stained with the sodium rhodizonate and sodium rhodizonate in acid environment (HCl 5%), and then observed by the microscope. The sodium rhodizonate showed a positivity for the Pb residues in the intracorporeal channel, with the detection of the particles within the first 2 cm beyond the entrance wound in 6 cases over the total number of 25 (24%). Victims were characterized by common features: short-barreled weapon; contact shots or short-distance shots; involvement of regions that were not covered by clothing; preservation of the microscopic structure of organs interested by the intracorporeal channel. The searching of GSR in the intracorporeal channel, even in conditions securing a high sensitivity, could represent an important test for the discrimination between an environmental contamination of Pb and the presence of Pb residues by GSR: once confirmed the presence of GSR in the intracorporeal channel by the histochemical analysis, the diagnostic process should require the application of the SEM-EDX for the confirmation of the results. Although not yet studied, this combination could be applied to cadavers exposed to the environment, with advanced post-mortal phenomena permitting at least the suspects of the existence of gunshot wounds at the macroscopic autopsy evaluation. Indeed, in some cases, the putrefaction is so advanced

  20. High-speed documented experimental gunshot to a skull-brain model and radiologic virtual autopsy.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Vock, Peter; Allmen, Gabriel v; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2002-09-01

    The authors documented and evaluated experimental gunshots to a skull-brain model with high-speed photography and subsequent radiographic examination for comparison of the morphologic findings in the model. The artificial skull was a polyurethane ball constructed in layers, with a porous diploe sandwiched between a tabula externa and a tabula interna. The brain itself was simulated with gelatin 10% at 4 degrees C, a material well known in wound ballistics. Gunshots were fired at the model from a distance of 10 m and documented with high-speed photography (up to 50 million frames/sec). Subsequently, a complete examination of the artificial skull was performed, including spiral computed tomography (with two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstructions) and classic skull autopsy. The high-speed photographs clearly showed the dynamic development of the skull fracture system from an external perspective. The subsequent radiographic examination of the entire head volume created two-dimensional reformations in any plane and three-dimensional reconstructions of the gunshot injury of the polyurethane skull-brain model, especially the wound channel and the fracture system. Thanks to the model and high-speed photographs, the dynamic development of the morphology of a gunshot wound could be documented and studied. The data from computed tomography, using two-dimensional and three-dimensional postprocessing with a perspective view, were very similar to those from classic head autopsy, but derived in a hands-off and nondestructive manner. This examination method leads the way to radiographic digital autopsy or virtual autopsy. PMID:12198345

  1. Determination of gunshot residues with image analysis: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Tuğcu, Harun; Yorulmaz, Coşkun; Bayraktaroğlu, Görgün; Uner, Hüseyin Bülent; Karslioğlu, Yildirim; Koç, Sermet; Ulukan, Mustafa Ozer; Celasun, Bülent

    2005-09-01

    In firearm injuries, assessment of the firing range and determination of entrance and exit wounds are important. For this reason, evaluation of the amount and distribution of gunshot residues (GSRs) is necessary. Several methods and techniques for GSR analysis have been developed. Although these methods are relatively sensitive and specific, they may require expensive dedicated equipment. Therefore, a simple, easily applicable, more convenient method is needed. A total of 40 experimental shots were made to calf skin from distances of 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 cm. Eighty samples were taken from the right and left sides of the wounds, and Alizarin Red S dye staining was performed. The amounts of GSR particles were measured with image analysis. GSRs were detected in all shots. The mean size of the distribution area of barium and lead elements around the wound had a significant negative correlation with increasing shooting distance (r = -0.97, p < 0.001). As the distance increased, the amount of GSR decreased, and this decrease rate was nonlinear. Variance analysis suggested significant differences between data groups depending on range (p < 0.001). The image analysis method may solve some of the standardization problems for evaluation of GSRs. GSR detection with the image analysis method does not require experienced personnel and may be a suitable method for scientific studies and for routine purposes. PMID:16261988

  2. Detection of blunt, sharp force and gunshot lesions on burnt remains: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Poppa, Pasquale; Porta, Davide; Gibelli, Daniele; Mazzucchi, Alessandra; Brandone, Alberto; Grandi, Marco; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2011-09-01

    The study of skin and bone lesions may give information concerning type and manner of production, but in burnt material modification of tissues by the high temperatures may considerably change the morphological characteristics of the lesions. This study aims at pointing out the effects of burning head of pigs with several types of lesions (blunt trauma, sharp force, and gunshot lesions) on soft tissues and bones, both from a morphological and chemical point of view. Results show that the charring process does not completely destroy signs of lesions on bones, which can often be recovered by cleaning bone surface from charred soft-tissue residues. Furthermore, neutron activation analysis test proved that antimony may be detectable also on gunshot entry wounds at the final stages of charring process. PMID:21799393

  3. Gunshot residue inserted under hair scales as a result of a muzzle blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Bryan R.

    2009-05-01

    The victim was alleged to have been shot in the head with a .40 caliber pistol from several feet. The defendant claimed that the shot was on the order of inches. Examination in the scanning electron microscope of the hair from around the victim's wound showed no adherent gunshot residue (GSR). However, when the hair was pulled apart by the adhesive of a standard GSR sampler, GSR was found associated with the exposed inner surfaces of the cuticle and cortex fragments. The pistol was discharged close enough to the victim's head that some of the cuticular scales were lifted in the muzzle blast which allowed GSR to be inserted under those scales. Gunshot residue associated with the surface of the victim's hair had somehow been removed. The defendant's account of the shooting was verified by the presence of under-scale GSR.

  4. A retrospective analysis of gunshot injuries to the maxillo-facial region.

    PubMed

    Kassan, A H; Lalloo, R; Kariem, G

    2000-07-01

    This study analysed the prevalence, demography, soft- and hard-tissue injury patterns, management and complications of gunshot injuries to the maxillo-facial region in 301 patients treated at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town. The number of patients presenting with maxillo-facial injuries caused by gunshot increased over the 15-year study period. The majority were caused by civilian type low-velocity hand-guns and were purposefully and intentionally inflicted by others. Males in their third decade of life and of low socioeconomic status were most often the victims. The wounding effects of these low-velocity injuries were characteristic--small rounded entrance wounds, causing fragmentation of teeth and comminution of the underlying bone, usually without any exit wounds. A comminuted displaced type of fracture pattern was most frequently observed. Special investigations included plain film radiographs with more sophisticated investigations being requested where indicated. Definitive surgical management was initiated by early soft-tissue debridement. Both the mandibular and maxillary fractures had more open than closed reductions. Bone continuity defects as a result of the initial injury were usually reconstructed secondarily using free autogenous bone grafts. All the patients received anti-tetanus toxoid on admission and the majority received antibiotic treatment. The most common complications were sepsis, ocular and neurological complications and limitation of mouth opening. The postoperative sepsis rate was high (19%). The wounding effects of these low-velocity missile injuries are devastating and pose a treatment challenge to the maxillo-facial surgeon. PMID:12608195

  5. Three rounds as "tandem bullets": unusual findings in a case of a suicidal gunshot to the head.

    PubMed

    Tattoli, Lucia; Schmid, Simone; Tsokos, Michael

    2014-12-01

    We report an unusual case of suicide in which three 7.65 caliber projectiles were found in the single gunshot wound to the head of a 53-year-old man. Based on data collected at the death scene, CT scan, autopsy findings, and ballistics analysis, the events were reconstructed as follows: two 7.65 mm rounds had already been fired from the 9 mm Makarov pistol the subject was using but, being a smaller caliber, the cartridges had slipped forward and lodged within the barrel. When a third 7.65 mm cartridge was chambered and the gun fired for the third time, the nose of the last bullet hit the lodged bullets and all three rounds were propelled out of the muzzle in tandem as a single shot. Ballistic investigations confirmed that the kinetic energy of the three tandem bullets would have been sufficient to perforate the skull. In cases of gunshot wounds where the manner of death is unclear, a number of well-described circumstantial parameters, such as an atypical anatomical location of the gunshot, unusual firearm, or ammunition, as well as ambiguous autopsy findings, can raise doubts about the manner of death. In very rare cases, despite a single entrance wound, two or more bullets are recovered from the body, fired by the same weapon at the same time (the so-called "tandem bullet" phenomenon). Injuries by "tandem bullets" have crucial implications in gunshot deaths because of the mismatch between the number of entrance and exit wounds and the number of bullets found in or near the body. PMID:25091600

  6. A case of homicidal intraoral gunshot and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berens, Sandra; Ketterer, Thomas; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Thali, Michael J; Ross, Steffen; Bolliger, Stephan A

    2011-06-01

    Determination of the manner of death in case of intraoral firearm wounds can be a challenge, especially if the circumstances of the incident are unclear and crime scene investigation is inadequate. It is a well-known fact that the mouth is one of the selected sites for suicide with firearms. Homicidal shooting through the mouth is said to be rare, but does occur, and can be mistaken for a suicide. For discrimination between suicide and homicide in cases of intraoral firearm wounds, some useful points are the site of entry wound, the direction of the internal bullet path, the range of fire and the circumstances of death. We demonstrate these points in a case of a homicidal gunshot to the mouth assessed by both classical autopsy and post-mortem CT (PMCT). PMID:21076946

  7. Detecting Gunshots Using Wearable Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Gun violence continues to be a staggering and seemingly intractable issue in many communities. The prevalence of gun violence among the sub-population of individuals under court-ordered community supervision provides an opportunity for intervention using remote monitoring technology. Existing monitoring systems rely heavily on location-based monitoring methods, which have incomplete geographic coverage and do not provide information on illegal firearm use. This paper presents the first results demonstrating the feasibility of using wearable inertial sensors to recognize wrist movements and other signals corresponding to firearm usage. Data were collected from accelerometers worn on the wrists of subjects shooting a number of different firearms, conducting routine daily activities, and participating in activities and tasks that could be potentially confused with firearm discharges. A training sample was used to construct a combined detector and classifier for individual gunshots, which achieved a classification accuracy of 99.4 percent when tested against a hold-out sample of observations. These results suggest the feasibility of using inexpensive wearable sensors to detect firearm discharges. PMID:25184416

  8. Gunshot injuries as a topic of medicolegal research in the German-speaking countries from the beginning of the 20th century up to the present time.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S; Rothschild, M A

    2004-09-10

    The 100th anniversary of the foundation of the German Society of Legal Medicine is a good opportunity to review its contributions to forensic wound ballistics. The present article gives an overview of the scientific development in this field with special emphasis on work pioneering new developments and findings valid up to the present day, for example the presence of carboxyhemoglobin in the vicinity of the entrance wound as a sign of a contact or close-range shot [A. Paltauf, Wien. Klin. Wochenschr. 3 (1890) 984-991, 1015-1017]; the correct interpretation of the muzzle imprint [A. Werkgartner, Beitr. Gerichtl. Med. 6 (1924) 148-161] and the retrograde ballooning of the bullet entrance region in contact shots [F. Hausbrandt, Dtsch. Z. ges. Gerichtl. Med. 38 (1944) 45-76; H. Elbel, Med. Welt 20 (1958) 343-345]; wound patterns from captive-bolt livestock stunners [H. Czursiedel, Dtsch. Z. ges. Gerichtl. Med. 28 (1937) 132-133]; singeing of synthetic fiber textiles in close-range shots with nitro powder ammunition [S. Berg, Arch. Kriminol. 124 (1959) 5-8,17-22]; the wound ballistic processes on penetration of the bullet and the origin of the abrasion collar [K. Sellier, Beitr. Gerichtl. Med. 25 (1969) 265-270]. More recently medicolegal research in the German-speaking countries covered the following subjects: studies of the dynamic bullet-target interactions in experimental gunshots to simulants and composite body models; use of modern imaging techniques (CT, MRI) in the pre-autopsy diagnosis of lethal gunshot injuries; injuries from blank guns; mechanisms of incapacitation by gunshot injuries; development of improved methods for the evidence of gunshot residues on the firing hand; backspatter from close-range shots; medicolegal contributions in the discrimination of accidental, homicidal and suicidal gunshot injuries. PMID:15364391

  9. Occult gunshot injury of the temporal bone.

    PubMed Central

    Geary, U M; Ritchie, D A; Luke, L C

    1997-01-01

    Increasing firearms violence has produced much public disquiet in recent months and Liverpool has seen a particularly well publicized spate of shootings. This is a case report of an initially occult intracranial injury which illustrates the unpredictable nature of missile trauma and the importance of computerised tomography in all cases of gunshot injury to the head. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9193993

  10. Fatal gunshot injuries in Benin City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akhiwu, Wilson O; Igbe, Alex P

    2013-10-01

    An upsurge in gun violence in recent times in our environment necessitated this study, which aims to document the patterns of fatal gunshot injuries with the hope of finding a solution to this problem. The study was a retrospective analysis of cases of fatal gunshot injuries on which autopsies were carried out over the 5-year period from January 1998 to December 2002 at Police Medical Services, Benin City - a Nigerian ancient town located in the South-South zone of the country. Most cases of medico-legal death in Benin City and environs are referred to the Police Pathologist at the center for autopsy. A total of 210 cases representing 27.2% of all medico-legal deaths during the study period were reviewed. Males were far more affected than females (M:F = 10.7:1). The intent for the fatal gunshots was murder (88.5%), excusable homicide (4.8%), accident (4.3%) and suicide (0.5%). In 1.9% of the deaths, the circumstances were not clear. Armed robbers, thugs and assassins accounted for 88.1% of the fatal shots, while the Police accounted for 9.0%. The trunk was affected much more than the head, neck and limbs. There is a need to improve security in the country and reduce poverty. Illegal firearms should also be removed from circulation. An improvement in emergency health services will reduce deaths from gunshots. PMID:23842480

  11. Homicidal tandem bullet wound of the chest.

    PubMed

    Bentley, A J; Busuttil, A; Clifton, B; Sibbald, P

    1997-03-01

    An unusual case of a homicidal gunshot wound to the chest is reported in which two bullets were fired in unison as tandem bullets from a handgun. At autopsy, two intact bullets were retrieved from the body of the victim, yet there was only one entrance wound and a single bullet track across the chest wall and thoracic organs. An examination of the weapon and ammunition supported the likelihood of tandem bullets and suggested the probable mechanism for this event. Very few similar cases have been documented. PMID:9095302

  12. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve. PMID:26022525

  13. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  14. Gunshot energy transfer profile in ballistic gelatine, determined with computed tomography using the total crack length method.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Thali, Michael J; Bolliger, Michael J; Kneubuehl, Beat P

    2010-11-01

    By measuring the total crack lengths (TCL) along a gunshot wound channel simulated in ordnance gelatine, one can calculate the energy transferred by a projectile to the surrounding tissue along its course. Visual quantitative TCL analysis of cut slices in ordnance gelatine blocks is unreliable due to the poor visibility of cracks and the likely introduction of secondary cracks resulting from slicing. Furthermore, gelatine TCL patterns are difficult to preserve because of the deterioration of the internal structures of gelatine with age and the tendency of gelatine to decompose. By contrast, using computed tomography (CT) software for TCL analysis in gelatine, cracks on 1-cm thick slices can be easily detected, measured and preserved. In this, experiment CT TCL analyses were applied to gunshots fired into gelatine blocks by three different ammunition types (9-mm Luger full metal jacket, .44 Remington Magnum semi-jacketed hollow point and 7.62 × 51 RWS Cone-Point). The resulting TCL curves reflected the three projectiles' capacity to transfer energy to the surrounding tissue very accurately and showed clearly the typical energy transfer differences. We believe that CT is a useful tool in evaluating gunshot wound profiles using the TCL method and is indeed superior to conventional methods applying physical slicing of the gelatine. PMID:20725735

  15. Assets and pitfalls of chemical and microscopic analyses on gunshot residues in skeletonized bodies: a report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Gibelli, Daniele; Mazzarelli, Debora; Porta, Davide; Gaudio, Daniel; Salsarola, Dominic; Brandone, Alberto; Rizzi, Agostino; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    In case of gunshot wounds, forensic anthropologists and pathologists have many tools at hand, and the assistance that chemical and microscopic investigations can provide in such scenarios is often valuable and crucial. However, the results of such analyses in the search of gunshot residues (GSR) ought not to be acritically considered. We report five cases where chemical (sodium rhodizonate) and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX)) analyses were performed for the search of GSR. Four cases concerned the forensic field and analyses on buried, charred, or submerged remains, whereas one case concerned the historical remains of a soldier of the First World War. In every case, the search for GSR with these techniques showed their persistence even after long periods and preservation in peculiar environments. However, chemical analyses provided their contribution, but in two cases, anthropological analyses provided crucial and solving results. The five cases show the indisputable usefulness of chemical and microscopic analyses in the search of GSR in gunshot wounds and especially how such residues may survive in time and in adverse environmental conditions. However, experts should always be dubious about some pitfalls (such as contamination) one can frequently find in these scenarios. PMID:25394744

  16. The "skin-skull-brain model": a new instrument for the study of gunshot effects.

    PubMed

    Thali, M J; Kneubuehl, B P; Zollinger, U; Dirnhofer, R

    2002-02-18

    In order to create and study wound morphology, a "skin-skull-brain model" had to be designed which would make the laboratory reproduction of a real ballistic injury possible. To simulate the human skin, an artificial skin (a silicon cap) is used. This silicon scalp contains synthetic fibers (artificial leather) to simulate the collagen and fat of the scalp. The artificial skull is a layered polyurethane sphere (19 cm o.d.; and 5, 6, or 7 mm thick) constructed in a specially designed form with a Tabula externa, Tabula interna, and a porous Diploe sandwiched in between. The periostium of the artificial skull is made of latex. This elastic latex layer prevents the bone fragments from scattering after the model has been struck by gunfire. The brain itself is simulated with ordnance gelatin, 10% at 4 degrees C, a material well known in wound ballistics. Gunshots were fired at a distance of 10 m from the model. During the evaluation of the "skin-skull-brain model", it was possible to show that injuries inflicted to this model are fully comparable to the morphology of equivalent real gunshot injuries. Using the "skin-skull-brain model" has some significant advantages: the model is inexpensive, easy to construct, instantly available for use, and eliminates ethics conflicts. The main advantage of such a model is, in comparison with biological substances, the high reproducibility of inflicted traumas. PMID:11909661

  17. Prediction of blood back spatter from a gunshot in bloodstain pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiskey, P. M.; Yarin, A. L.; Kim, S.; Attinger, D.

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical model for predicting and interpreting blood-spatter patterns resulting from a gunshot wound is proposed. The physical process generating a backward spatter of blood is linked to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of blood accelerated toward the surrounding air, allowing the determination of the initial distribution of drop sizes and velocities. Then the motion of many drops in air is considered with governing equations accounting for gravity and air drag. Based on these equations, a numerical solution is obtained. It predicts the atomization process, the trajectories of the back-spatter drops of blood from the wound to the ground, the impact angle, and the impact Weber number on the ground, as well as the distribution and location of bloodstains and their shape and sizes. A parametric study is undertaken to predict patterns of backward blood spatter under realistic conditions corresponding to the experiments conducted in the present work. The results of the model are compared to the experimental data on back spatter generated by a gunshot impacting a blood-impregnated sponge.

  18. Detection of Gunshot Residues Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Blanes, Lucas; Cole, Nerida; Doble, Philip; Roux, Claude

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, forensic scientists have become increasingly interested in the detection and interpretation of organic gunshot residues (OGSR) due to the increasing use of lead- and heavy metal-free ammunition. This has also been prompted by the identification of gunshot residue- (GSR-) like particles in environmental and occupational samples. Various techniques have been investigated for their ability to detect OGSR. Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to a chromatographic system is a powerful tool due to its high selectivity and sensitivity. Further, modern MS instruments can detect and identify a number of explosives and additives which may require different ionization techniques. Finally, MS has been applied to the analysis of both OGSR and inorganic gunshot residue (IGSR), although the “gold standard” for analysis is scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray microscopy (SEM-EDX). This review presents an overview of the technical attributes of currently available MS and ionization techniques and their reported applications to GSR analysis. PMID:24977168

  19. Forensic value of gunpowder tattooing in identification of multiple entrance wounds from one bullet.

    PubMed

    Tokdemir, Mehmet; Kafadar, Huseyin; Turkoglu, Abdurrahim; Bork, Turgay

    2007-05-01

    Multiple entrance gunshot wounds can give useful information in forensic evaluation of deaths from homicide and suicide. Although the presence of multiple entrance gunshot wounds does not absolutely exclude the possibility of suicide, they are important to the forensic investigators and pathologists in cases of assault, attempted homicide and suicide as they provide important clues for determination of number of shots fired and direction of firing. We present a case of 16 years of young woman who was shot to death by her husband. External examination revealed an entrance wound with semi-lunar shot residue at the dorsal side of her left hand at 5th metacarpus, and exit wound on the hypothenar muscle. There was also a second wound entrance located on her left zygoma. Direction of the bullet was downward traveling from left-to-right. Initially it was thought that there were two close shots, but when her left hand was placed over the malar area her face, it was determined that the gunshot powder tattoos were completing the nature of a single shot from a close distance. Crime scene investigation revealed only one cartridge casing. The autopsy and radiography findings showed that the bullet was entered from dorsal site of the left hand exiting from the palm and re-entering from the zygomatic region, hit the base of the skull, and remained in the soft tissue of the right mandible after passing the soft palate. The bullet was caused an incomplete laceration of the right internal arteria carotid and she died of internal and external bleeding. Detailed investigation of gunshot residues can provide important information for clarification of close distance gunshot wounding. We present this case due to its interesting nature, and to highlight the importance of detailed investigation of the gun powder residues in cases with multiple entry wounds. PMID:17196870

  20. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  1. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  2. [Forensic medical estimation of gunshot fractures of the flat bones].

    PubMed

    Dubrovin, I A; Dubrovina, I A

    2012-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the investigations into the mechanisms of gunshot injuries are considered. The general and peculiar features of gunshot fractures and the pathological processes underlying them are discussed. The theory of bullet impact effect put forward by the Russian surgeons in the late XIXth century is verified. The explanation is proposed for the physical nature of direct and side impacts and the phenomenon of a temporary oscillating cavity from the standpoint of the theory of bullet impact effect. The new forensic medical criteria for the gunshot origin of an injury have been developed that allow the gunshot distance and the geometric characteristics of the bullet to be determined. A methodological basis for the determination of the long-range gunshot distance has been created. The results of the present study may be of interest for criminal lawyers and military specialists. PMID:22567957

  3. Forensic issues in suicidal single gunshot injuries to the chest: an autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Strajina, Veljko; Živković, Vladimir; Nikolić, Slobodan

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a case series of suicides carried out by self-inflicted gunshot wounds to the chest-a relatively uncommon means of suicide. The retrospective autopsy study performed included all cases of single suicidal gunshot injuries to the chest during a 20-year period and which were committed by the use of a handgun. The sample included 67 deceased persons that were an average of 44.4 ± 19.1 years old (range, 12-89 years; 58 men and 9 women). The most common region of the entrance wound was the left side of the chest (54/67), followed by the sternum (10/67), and the right side of the chest (3/67). For 9 subjects, the range of fire could not be determined, as well as whether the shot went through their clothing. In the remaining 58 subjects, only contact or near-contact wounds were found. Of the 58, only 3 subjects had their clothing removed between the chest wall and the muzzle. Three directions of the internal bullet paths were those most frequently found: downward right-to-left (27/67), downward left-to-right (20/67), and downward parallel (10/67) (χ = 101.045, P = 0.000). Also, most bullet paths were directed downward (57/67, χ = 32.970, P = 0.000). The most frequently injured organ was the heart (47/67), and the immediate causes of death were exsanguination (49/67), heart disruption (14/67), and tamponade (4/67). PMID:22354080

  4. Dynamic finite element simulation of the gunshot injury to the human forehead protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2016-04-01

    Although there are some traditional models of the gunshot wounds, there is still a need for more modeling analyses due to the difficulties related to the gunshot wounds to the forehead region of the human skull. In this study, the degree of damage as a consequence of penetrating head injuries due to gunshot wounds was determined using a preliminary finite element (FE) model of the human skull. In addition, the role of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge, which can be used as an alternative to reinforce the kinetic energy absorption capacity of bulletproof vest and helmet materials, to minimize the amount of skull injury due to penetrating processes was investigated through the FE model. Digital computed tomography along with magnetic resonance imaging data of the human head were employed to launch a three-dimensional (3D) FE model of the skull. Two geometrical shapes of projectiles (steel ball and bullet) were simulated for penetrating with an initial impact velocity of 734 m/s using nonlinear dynamic modeling code, namely LS-DYNA. The role of the damaged/distorted elements were removed during computation when the stress or strain reached their thresholds. The stress distributions in various parts of the forehead and sponge after injury were also computed. The results revealed the same amount of stress for both the steel ball and bullet after hitting the skull. The modeling results also indicated the time that steel ball takes to penetrate into the skull is lower than that of the bullet. In addition, more than 21% of the steel ball's kinetic energy was absorbed by the PVA sponge and, subsequently, injury sternness of the forehead was considerably minimized. The findings advise the application of the PVA sponge as a substitute strengthening material to be able to diminish the energy of impact as well as the load transmitted to the object. PMID:26886822

  5. Identification of gunshot residue: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Saverio Romolo, F; Margot, P

    2001-06-15

    A review of the scientific papers published on inorganic gunshot residue (GSR) analysis permits to study how the particle analysis has shown its capability in detection and identification of gunshot residue. The scanning electron microscope can be the most powerful tool for forensic scientists to determine the proximity to a discharging firearm and/or the contact with a surface exposed to GSR. Particle analysis can identify individual gunshot residue particles through both morphological and elemental characteristics. When particles are detected on the collected sample, the analytical results can be interpreted following rules of a formal general interpretative system, to determine whether they come from the explosion of a primer or from other possible sources. The particles on the sample are compared with an abstract idea of "unique" GSR particle produced by the sole source of the explosion of a primer. "Uniqueness" is not the only problem related to GSR detection and identification for a forensic scientist. With "not-unique" particles interpretation of results is extremely important. The evidential strength of "not-unique" particles can increase with a more fruitful interpretative framework based on Bayes rule. For the assessment of the value of a GSR in linking a suspect and a crime, it is important to compare two hypothesis: the first can be that of the evidence if the suspect has been shooting in a specific situation, the second that of the evidence if the suspect was not involved in this shooting. This case specific or case-by-case approach is closer to what the court is interested in. The authors consider that a "case-by-case" approach should be followed whenever possible. Research of models and data such as those developed in other trace evidence material (fibres, glass, etc.) using a Bayesian approach is suggested in the interpretation of GSR. PMID:11376984

  6. Acoustic gunshot location in complex environments: concepts and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showen, R. L.; Calhoun, R. B.; Chu, Wai C.; Dunham, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    A gunshot location system can be implemented in complex urban environments using a distributed array of acoustic sensors. A primary difficulty in computing the source location is that unknown path obstructions in the environment interfere with the reception of the sound at the sensor, by blocking the sound entirely, by refracting the path, or by creating echoes. Other complications are created by the similarity between gunshot sounds and other less interesting urban noises, frequency-dependent absorption of sound, and possible computational difficulty when multiple gunshots generate large data sets that stress real-time analysis routines. The ShotSpotter Gunshot Location System®1, deployed in over two dozen cities in the United States, detects and locates gunfire using a network of acoustic sensors placed on rooftops and utility poles, on moving vehicles, or on personnel. This sensor network, combined with a software system to collate and compute location results from the array of sensors, accurately locates gunshot sounds in complex urban environments. A classifier discards solutions incorporating non-gunshot audio pulses produced by the complex environment. Examples of difficult detection problems, including gunshots from a moving source, show that the detection and classification algorithms described are effective at recovering useful results from signals found in real-world urban scenarios.

  7. Positive Outcome After a Small-Caliber Gunshot Fracture of the Upper Cervical Spine without Neurovascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Thula; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Gunshot wounds to the cervical spine most frequently concur with serious injuries to the spinal cord and cervical vessels and often have a fatal outcome. Case Report We describe the case of a 35-year-old male with a complex fracture of the C2 vertebra body and a mandibular fracture after a penetration gunshot to the cervical spine. Computed tomography (CT) at admission revealed the exact extent of the fractures and the small caliber bullet lodged next to the C2 vertebra. In this rare and extremely lucky case no collateral vascular or neurological damage was detected. Eighteen months after surgical bullet removal and posterior C1–C3 fusion complete bone healing of the C2 vertebra was achieved and there were no secondary neurovascular deficits. Conclusions Immediate surgical C1–C3 fixation resulted in an excellent outcome without secondary neurovascular deficits in this rare case of traumatic complex C2 vertebral fracture caused by a gunshot injury. PMID:27081417

  8. Compartment Syndrome Following Arthroscopic Removal of a Bullet in the Knee Joint after a Low-Velocity Gunshot Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yalçin, Sercan; Oltulu, İsmail; Erdil, Mehmet Emin; Örmeci, Tuğrul

    2016-01-01

    Gunshot injuries are getting more frequently reported while the civilian (nongovernmental) armament increases in the world. A 42-year-old male patient presented to emergency room of Istanbul Medipol University Hospital due to a low-velocity gunshot injury. We detected one entry point on the posterior aspect of the thigh, just superior to the popliteal groove. No exit wound was detected on his physical examination. There was swelling around the knee and range of motion was limited due to pain and swelling. Neurological and vascular examinations were intact. Following the initial assessment, the vascular examination was confirmed by doppler ultrasonography of the related extremity. There were no signs of compartment syndrome in the preoperative physical examination. A bullet was detected in the knee joint on the initial X-rays. Immediately after releasing the tourniquet, swelling of the anterolateral compartment of the leg and pulse deficiency was detected on foot in the dorsalis pedis artery. Although the arthroscopic removal of intra-articular bullets following gunshot injuries seems to have low morbidity rates, it should always be considered that the articular capsule may have been ruptured and the fluids used during the operation may leak into surrounding tissues and result in compartment syndrome. PMID:26929809

  9. [Forensic medical characteristics of Glock 19 pistol-shot wounds].

    PubMed

    Musin, E Kh; Lepik, D; Viali, M

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study was made of gun-shot wounds inflicted by shots from a modern stub-barrelled pistol 9mm Glock 19. The study has ascertain characteristics differentiating injuries inflicted by shots from this pistol: specific recoil injury, specific topography, intensity and distribution of begrime, gunpowder and metal particles and relevant lesions. It was found that depth of penetration under the skin depends both on shooting distance and the position of the particle from the inlet. PMID:16509203

  10. Distinction between entrance and exit wounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takakura, Ayaka; Jamal, Mostofa; Ito, Asuka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shoji; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated gunshot wounds in two autopsy cases using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Lead and copper were detected in the entrance wound of one case and lead, antimony, and copper were detected in that of the other case. In the exit wounds of both cases, lead, antimony, and copper were below detection limits. These findings indicate that the detection of metallic elements, such as lead, antimony, and copper, which are found in bullets, may be useful for differentiating entrance from exit wounds using EDX. PMID:27591531

  11. The survival of gunshot residues in cremated bone: an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) has been sought and demonstrated on many types of material and with many techniques. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) could be a useful method on difficult substrates, but a systematic study on burnt material has never been performed. Hence, this study aims at evaluating the usefulness and reliability of this method on burnt samples. Sixteen adult bovine ribs (eight with soft tissues, eight totally skeletonized) were shot using two kinds of projectile (both 9 mm full metal-jacketed or unjacketed). Then, every sample was led to complete calcination in an electric oven. The area of the gunshot entrance wound was swabbed and analyzed by ICP-OES; the results were also correlated with a previously published parallel study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an SEM-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. ICP-OES proved to be very sensitive and reliable even on degraded material and can be an appropriate nondestructive method for detecting residues on difficult and delicate substrates such as burnt bone. PMID:23692414

  12. Elemental quantification of large gunshot residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, A.; Silva, L. M.; de Souza, C. T.; Stori, E. M.; Boufleur, L. A.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we embarked on the evaluation of the Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba elemental ratios found in relatively large particles (of the order of 50-150 μm across) ejected in the forward direction when a gun is fired. These particles are commonly referred to as gunshot residues (GSR). The aim of this work is to compare the elemental ratios of the GSR with those found in the primer of pristine cartridges in order to check for possible correlations. To that end, the elemental concentration of gunshot residues and the respective ammunition were investigated through PIXE (Particle-Induced X-ray Emission) and micro-PIXE techniques. The ammunition consisted of a .38 SPL caliber (ogival lead type) charged in a Taurus revolver. Pristine cartridges were taken apart for the PIXE measurements. The shooting sessions were carried out in a restricted area at the Forensic Institute at Porto Alegre. Residues ejected at forward directions were collected on a microporous tape. The PIXE experiments were carried out employing 2.0 MeV proton beams with a beam spot size of 1 mm2. For the micro-PIXE experiments, the samples were irradiated with 2.2 MeV proton beams of 2 × 2 μm2. The results found for the ratios of Sb/Pb, Ba/Pb and Sb/Ba do not correlate with those stemming from the analysis of the primer.

  13. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  14. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses.

    PubMed

    Sen, P; Panigrahi, N; Rao, M S; Varier, K M; Sen, S; Mehta, G K

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations. PMID:7097204

  15. [THE PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATION AND TREATMENT FOR SORTING OF WOUNDED PERSONS WITH A COMBAT SURGICAL TRAUMA OF EXTREMITIES ON THE IV LEVEL OF THE MEDICAL CARE PROVISION].

    PubMed

    Korohl, S O; Zherdev, I I; Domanskiy, A M

    2015-12-01

    Experience of medical sorting of 434 injured persons with a gun-shot woundings of extremities in 2014-2015 yrs is adduced. The principles of organization and treatment for medical sorting of wounded persons were elaborated. Prognostic intrahospital, diagnostic and evacuation--transport sorting was introduced in wounded persons in the IV level hospital, concerning severity of traumatic shock and prognosis of their survival. PMID:27025033

  16. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Ye, CY; Zhu, MY; Yuan, JD; Ten, HL

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage. PMID:25429487

  17. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, C Y; Zhu, M Y; Yuan, J D; Ten, H L

    2014-08-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage. PMID:25429487

  18. [Wound management].

    PubMed

    Gresser, J; Bitz, K; Hegglin, J

    1992-07-01

    The following article is a check-list for wound care giving some practical hints. Special interest has been given to the themes of local anesthesia and prevention of infections. The indications and limits of the ambulant wound care are also discussed. Finally, a short explanation is given for the treatment of wounds situated at delicate regions of the body. PMID:1440441

  19. [Surgical peculiarities of gunshot injuries to arteries of the extremities caused by modern small arms and light weapons].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Reva, V A; Denisov, A V; Ozeretskovskiĭ, L B; Pronchenko, A A

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the given study was development of surgical tactics in case of femoral artery injury, caused by medium-calibre bullet, on the basis acute experiment on large biological objects. Experimental animals were shot into mid third of the femora by a rifle cartridge in 7,62-mm calibre (AK-47 made in 1943). The analysis of microstructure, made in 5 cross-sections performed every 1-centimetre way from the wound canal, showed that there were no any damages of arterial wall. Authors came to conclusion that the surgical debridement of the gunshot wound, made by a rifle cartridge in 7,62-mm calibre of AK-47, should consist of exsection of devitalized section of artery. PMID:25532307

  20. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  1. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you have: Artificial heart valves Brain aneurysm clips Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) ... which the test may be performed: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Carcinoma of the renal pelvis ...

  2. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  4. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part I: Analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a deceased person's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Each of these techniques has been extensively studied, especially on living individuals. The current studies (Part I and Part II) were designed to compare the use and utility of the different GSR testing techniques in a medical examiner setting. In Part I, the hands of deceased persons who died from undisputed suicidal handgun wounds were tested for GSR by SEM-EDX over a 4-year period. A total of 116 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and results of GSR testing, including spatial deposition upon the hands. It was found that in only 50% of cases with a known self-inflicted gunshot wound was SEM-EDX positive for at least 1 specific particle for GSR. In 18% of the cases there was a discernible pattern (spatial distribution) of the particles on the hand such that the manner in which the weapon was held could be determined. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon immediately prior to death were positive for GSR by SEM-EDX, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether a deceased individual has discharged a firearm. Furthermore, in only 18% of cases was a discernible pattern present indicating how the firearm was held. The low sensitivity, along with the low percentage of cases with a discernible pattern, limits the usefulness of GSR test results by SEM-EDX in differentiating self-inflicted from non-self-inflicted wounds. PMID:17721163

  5. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as

  6. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  7. Wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Lionelli, Gerald T; Lawrence, W Thomas

    2003-06-01

    There are currently hundreds of dressings on the market to aid in wound management. Before selecting a dressing for a particular wound, a practitioner must assess carefully the needs of the wound to understand which dressing would provide maximal benefit. Frequently, there is not one clear best choice, and it is crucial that the pros and cons of each dressing modality be understood. This article has provided a framework to assist in dressing assessment. PMID:12822729

  8. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death. PMID:17721164

  9. Management of Craniocerebral Gunshot Injuries: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Adie Villafañe, Roberto; Rojas, Alejandro; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Craniocerebral gunshot injuries (CGI) are increasingly encountered by neurosurgeons in civilian and urban settings. Unfortunately this is a prevalent condition in developing countries, with major armed conflicts which is not very likely to achieve a high rate of prevention. Management goals should focus on early aggressive, vigorous resuscitation and correction of coagulopathy; those with stable vital signs undergo brain computed tomography scan. Neuroimaging is vital for surgical purposes, especially for determine type surgery, size and location of the approach, route of extraction of the foreign body; however not always surgical management is indicated, there is also the not uncommon decision to choose non-surgical management. The treatment consist of immediate life salvage, through control of persistent bleeding and cerebral decompression; prevention of infection, through extensive debridement of all contaminated, macerated or ischemic tissues; preservation of nervous tissue, through preventing meningocerebral scars; and restoration of anatomic structures through the hermetic seal of dura and scalp. There have been few recent studies involving penetrating craniocerebral injuries, and most studies have been restricted to small numbers of patients; classic studies in military and civil environment have identified that this is a highly lethal or devastating violent condition, able to leave marked consequences for the affected individual, the family and the health system itself. Various measures have been aimed to lower the incidence of CGI, especially in civilians. It is necessarily urgent to promote research in a neurocritical topic such as CGI, looking impact positively the quality of life for those who survive. PMID:27169063

  10. Management of Craniocerebral Gunshot Injuries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Adie Villafañe, Roberto; Rojas, Alejandro; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Craniocerebral gunshot injuries (CGI) are increasingly encountered by neurosurgeons in civilian and urban settings. Unfortunately this is a prevalent condition in developing countries, with major armed conflicts which is not very likely to achieve a high rate of prevention. Management goals should focus on early aggressive, vigorous resuscitation and correction of coagulopathy; those with stable vital signs undergo brain computed tomography scan. Neuroimaging is vital for surgical purposes, especially for determine type surgery, size and location of the approach, route of extraction of the foreign body; however not always surgical management is indicated, there is also the not uncommon decision to choose non-surgical management. The treatment consist of immediate life salvage, through control of persistent bleeding and cerebral decompression; prevention of infection, through extensive debridement of all contaminated, macerated or ischemic tissues; preservation of nervous tissue, through preventing meningocerebral scars; and restoration of anatomic structures through the hermetic seal of dura and scalp. There have been few recent studies involving penetrating craniocerebral injuries, and most studies have been restricted to small numbers of patients; classic studies in military and civil environment have identified that this is a highly lethal or devastating violent condition, able to leave marked consequences for the affected individual, the family and the health system itself. Various measures have been aimed to lower the incidence of CGI, especially in civilians. It is necessarily urgent to promote research in a neurocritical topic such as CGI, looking impact positively the quality of life for those who survive. PMID:27169063

  11. Automated gunshot residue particle search and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tillman, W L

    1987-01-01

    The main disadvantage to gunshot residue (GSR) particle analysis utilizing scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) instrumentation has been the excessive operator time required for search and identification. This study uses an automated particle search and characterization program for unattended GSR search and identification. This system allows for automatic matrix search, particle sizing, chemical typing, and spectral aquisition with subsequent storage of data to disk for later operator review and verification. This work describes various aspects of the program, determines appropriate parameters adequate for both unique and characteristic GSR particle identification, and evaluates the reliability of data obtained. Samples are collected via the tape lift method from test-firings of .38, .32, .25, and .22 caliber handguns at time after firing intervals of 0 to 6 h. Unique GSR particles are consistently and correctly identified by this method on tape lift samples taken up to 4 h after firing. False positive results of unique GSR particles are not encountered on control handblank samples. This technique appears to provide the forensic science community with an operator-free method of reliable GSR particle search and an improved analyst-time-per-case ratio. PMID:3819690

  12. Gunshot residue particle velocity and deceleration.

    PubMed

    De Forest, Peter R; Martir, Kirby; Pizzola, Peter A

    2004-11-01

    The velocity of over 800 gunshot residue particles from eight different sources was determined using high speed stroboscopic photography (spark gap light source). These particles were found to have an average velocity of 500 to 600 ft per second. Many particles acquired considerably higher velocities. Thus, the particles have sufficient energy to embed themselves within certain nearby targets like skin or fabric. The relatively high velocity that the particles acquire explain the formation of stippling on skin in close proximity to a muzzle discharge. These findings also indicate little influence of air currents on particle behavior near the muzzle. The deceleration of less than 100 particles during a 100-microsecond interval was also calculated. The particles experienced rapid rates of deceleration which would explain why few particles are found in test firings beyond 3 ft from the muzzle of a discharged firearm. Because of their relatively high velocity, normal wind velocity would not be expected to significantly influence their motion near the muzzle. PMID:15568695

  13. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  14. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  15. Gunshot Injuries in Children Served by Emergency Services

    PubMed Central

    Kuppermann, Nathan; Holmes, James F.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Wetzel, Brian; Hsia, Renee Y.; Wang, N. Ewen; Bulger, Eileen M.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Mann, N. Clay; Barton, Erik D.; Wintemute, Garen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence, injury severity, resource use, mortality, and costs for children with gunshot injuries, compared with other injury mechanisms. METHODS: This was a population-based, retrospective cohort study (January 1, 2006–December 31, 2008) including all injured children age ≤19 years with a 9-1-1 response from 47 emergency medical services agencies transporting to 93 hospitals in 5 regions of the western United States. Outcomes included population-adjusted incidence, injury severity score ≥16, major surgery, blood transfusion, mortality, and average per-patient acute care costs. RESULTS: A total of 49 983 injured children had a 9-1-1 emergency medical services response, including 505 (1.0%) with gunshot injuries (83.2% age 15–19 years, 84.5% male). The population-adjusted annual incidence of gunshot injuries was 7.5 cases/100 000 children, which varied 16-fold between regions. Compared with children who had other mechanisms of injury, those injured by gunshot had the highest proportion of serious injuries (23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17.6–28.4), major surgery (32%, 95% CI 26.1–38.5), in-hospital mortality (8.0%, 95% CI 4.7–11.4), and costs ($28 510 per patient, 95% CI 22 193–34 827). CONCLUSIONS: Despite being less common than other injury mechanisms, gunshot injuries cause a disproportionate burden of adverse outcomes in children, particularly among older adolescent males. Public health, injury prevention, and health policy solutions are needed to reduce gunshot injuries in children. PMID:24127481

  16. A molecular method to correlate bloodstains with wound site for crime scene reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Donald J; Andersen, Cheryl; Scriven, Katherine A; Klein, Amberly N; Choi, Mo Re; Carroll, Cindy; de Leon, Ray D

    2014-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis to determine the wound-of-origin of bloodstains is problematic with nonspecific patterns. In this proof-of-concept study, the authors examined a molecular approach to correlate bloodstains with injuries using the rat as a model. Specifically, investigations were conducted on the rat brain marker, rno-miR-124-3p, with the QIAGEN miScript System and real-time PCR analysis. Rno-miR-124-3p was detected in brain homogenates diluted 100,000 times; in 3-week-old, room temperature stored, simulated brain-blood stains; and in bloodstains from head gunshot wounds collected with swabs and subsequently frozen for 9-18 months; however, rno-miR-124-3p was not detected in whole blood. Proof-of-principle was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish bloodstains from a gunshot wound to the head versus bloodstains from a gunshot wound to the chest, by the testing of otherwise identical bloodstains from the two patterns for the presence of the marker. The results suggest a viable approach to a longstanding problem in casework. PMID:24606037

  17. Penetrating gunshots to the head and lack of immediate incapacitation. II. Review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Karger, B

    1995-01-01

    Because of the enhanced intracranial tissue disruption (see companion paper) and the functional significance of the central nervous system, penetrating gunshot wounds of the head commonly result in immediate incapacitation. However, in the last century numerous publications reported sustained capability to act following penetrating gunshot wounds of the head. These are reviewed. A large number of case reports had to be excluded from re-examination because of doubtful capability to act or lack of morphological documentation. There remained 53 case reports from 42 sources for systematic analysis. Favourable conditions for sustained capability to act are present in cases where the additional wounding resulting from the special wound ballistic qualities of the head (see companion paper) are minimized. Thus, more than 70% of the guns used fired slow and lightweight bullets: 6.35 mm Browning, .22 rimfire or extremely ineffective projectiles (ancient, inappropriate or selfmade). A centre-fire rifle or a shotgun from close range were never employed in cases involving intracerebral tracts. A coincidence of several lucky circumstances made sustained capability to act possible in two cases of military centrefire rifle bullets passing longitudinally between the frontal lobes without direct contact with brain tissue. Only two large handguns resulting in intracerebral wounding were used: one firing a .38 special bullet, which solely wounded the base of the right temporal lobe and one firing a .45 lead bullet, which seriously injured the left frontal lobe but whose trajectory was limited to the anterior fossa of the skull. Of the trajectories, 28% were outside the neurocranium. At least 70% of the craniocerebral tracts passed above the anterior fossa of the skull, wounding the frontal parts of the brain. Apart from a neurophysiological approach, this preference can be explained by the fact that the base of the anterior cranial fossa and the sella turcica area serve as a bony

  18. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient With Cloacal Exstrophy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caleb E; Kennedy, Alfred P; Smith, D Preston

    2016-07-01

    We present a rare complication of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a child undergoing complex urologic reconstruction. A 10-year-old female born with the abdominal wall defect cloacal exstrophy who had previously undergone multiple abdominal procedures then developed findings consistent with ACS following a complex Mitrofanoff procedure. Although intravesical pressures were not documented because of the nature of her reconstruction, her ACS-type findings were (1) abdominal pain, (2) melena, (3) pulmonary hypoinflation, (4) renal insufficiency, (5) tachycardia, and (6) segmental ischemic small bowel. Management consisted of abdominal decompression, segmental bowel resections, and wound vacuum-assisted-closure management. Patient was eventually discharged home. PMID:26921644

  19. [Homicide-suicide by a single gunshot to the head].

    PubMed

    Wirth, Ingo; Correns, Andreas; Hartwig, Sven; Schmeling, Andreas; Schmidt, Sven

    2008-01-01

    Apart from typical suicides, there are sometimes unusual deaths from gunshots to the head. The presented case is a double death from the autopsy material of the Institute of Legal Medicine in Berlin. The report deals with a murder-suicide of a man, who killed himself and his 2-year-old daughter by a single gunshot. After having administered a tranquilizer to the child, he held her head to his own and fired a contact shot to his right temple so that the bullet passed through both heads. PMID:18389860

  20. Experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of brain simulants used for cranial gunshot simulation.

    PubMed

    Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Geoghegan, Patrick Henry; Jermy, Mark Christopher; Taylor, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical properties of the human brain at high strain rate were investigated to analyse the mechanisms that cause backspatter when a cranial gunshot wound occurs. Different concentrations of gelatine and a new material (M1) developed in this work were tested and compared to bovine brain samples. Kinetic energy absorption and expansion rate of the samples caused by the impact of a bullet from .22 air rifle (AR) (average velocity (uav) of 290m/s) and .22 long rifle (LR) (average velocity (uav) of 330m/s) were analysed using a high speed camera (24,000fps). The AR projectile had, in the region of interest, an average kinetic energy (Ek) of 42±1.3J. On average, the bovine brain absorbed 50±5% of Ek, and the simulants 46-58±5%. The Ek of the .22 LR was 141±3.7J. The bovine brain absorbed 27% of the .22LR Ek and the simulants 15-29%. The expansion of the sample, after penetration, was measured. The bovine brain experienced significant plastic deformation whereas the gelatine solution exhibited a principally elastic response. The permanent damage patterns in the M1 material were much closer to those in brain tissue, than were the damage patterns in the gelatine. The results provide a first step to developing a realistic experimental simulant for the human brain which can produce the same blood backspatter patterns as a human brain during a cranial gunshot. These results can also be used to improve the 3D models of human heads used in car crash and blast trauma injury research. PMID:24747670

  1. The determination of firing distance applying a microscopic quantitative method and confocal laser scanning microscopy for detection of gunshot residue particles.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-07-01

    In this study, we applied a microscopic quantitative method based on the use of sodium rhodizonate to verify the presence of residues and their distribution on the cutis of gunshot wounds. A total of 250 skin samples were selected from cases in which the manner of death (accidental, suicide, and homicide) and the shooting distance could be reliably determined. The samples were examined under a light microscope, in transmitted bright field illumination and phase contrast mode, and with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In all skin specimens the area of each histological section was directly measured by an image analysis system. Both the number and the size of powder particles were measured. The distribution of gunshot residues (GSR) in the epidermal and subepidermal layers was also analyzed. The evaluation of the microscopic entrance wounds demonstrated different findings related to the range of fire. The data derived from the evaluation of both macroscopic and microscopic features demonstrated that the amount and the spatial distribution of GSR deposits in the skin surrounding entrance wounds strictly correlate with shooting distance. PMID:16862444

  2. A new model for the characterization of infection risk in gunshot injuries:Technology, principal consideration and clinical implementation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The extent of wound contamination in gunshot injuries is still a topic of controversial debate. The purpose of the present study is to develop a model that illustrates the contamination of wounds with exogenous particles along the bullet path. Material and methods To simulate bacteria, radio-opaque barium titanate (3-6 μm in diameter) was atomized in a dust chamber. Full metal jacket or soft point bullets caliber .222 (n = 12, v0 = 1096 m/s) were fired through the chamber into a gelatin block directly behind it. After that, the gelatin block underwent multi-slice CT in order to analyze the permanent and temporary wound cavity. Results The permanent cavity caused by both types of projectiles showed deposits of barium titanate distributed over the entire bullet path. Full metal jacket bullets left only few traces of barium titanate in the temporary cavity. In contrast, the soft point bullets disintegrated completely, and barium titanate covered the entire wound cavity. Discussion Deep penetration of potential exogenous bacteria can be simulated easily and reproducibly with barium titanate particles shot into a gelatin block. Additionally, this procedure permits conclusions to be drawn about the distribution of possible contaminants and thus can yield essential findings in terms of necessary therapeutic procedures. PMID:22032229

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  4. [Wound healing and wound irrigation in cesarean section of cattle].

    PubMed

    de Kruif, A; van den Brand, L P; van Kuyk, M M; Raymakers, R J; Sietsma, C; Westerbeek, A J

    1987-09-01

    Calves were delivered by Caesarean section in 128 cases during the early months of 1984. All animals were allocated alternately to a trial group and a group of controls. When the peritoneum and transverse muscle had been sutured, the wounds of the animals in the trial group were irrigated and washed with 300 ml. of Betadine (10 per cent of PVP-iodine in water). This was followed by closure of the wound. The animals of the group of controls were not treated. The procedure was performed in ninety-four primiparae (73 per cent) and thirty-four multiparae (27 per cent). The indication for Caesarean section consisted in fetal oversize in 119 cases (93 per cent). Eight calves (6 per cent) were stillborn or died immediately post partum. The proportion of animals in which the placentae were retained, was 9 per cent. Two animals died from peritonitis and intra-abdominal haemorrhage respectively. Irrigation of the wound did not have any effect on the number of wound infections (Table 3). Wound infection occurred in nineteen animals (15 per cent). The operations were performed by six veterinary surgeons (Table 4). The trial group and group of controls treated by each veterinarian did not differ essentially as regards wound healing. PMID:3672464

  5. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  6. Scientific working group on gunshot residue (SWGGSR): a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpe, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    The Scientific Working Group on Gunshot Residue (SWGGSR) was founded in 2007. Twenty-four experienced and well-recognized scientists throughout the world are working toward internationally accepted guidelines in the analysis of gunshot residue. With this goal in mind the group has set up specific committees to cogitate and develop recommendations in key areas of gunshot residue analysis. The SWGGSR meets annually and is in constant contact throughout the year via email. In 2007 SWGGSR assumed responsibility for updating ASTM E-1588 the Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/ Energy Dispersive Xray Spectrometry. In 2010 a revised E-1588 was published. The SWGGSR is currently working on a more comprehensive guide that will be published through NIJ (National Institute of Justice) and available for free to everyone in the world. In addition, we have attended meetings hosted by the federal government's SoFs (Subcommittee on Forensic Science) IWG (Interagency Working Groups) to insure our input on the future of forensic science in the Untied States.

  7. Survey of gunshot residue analysis in forensic science laboratories.

    PubMed

    DeGaetano, D; Siegel, J A

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of this survey was to determine the methods of analysis being used on gunshot residue (GSR) samples in forensic science laboratories across the United States. In addition, the two general techniques of GSR analysis are compared and contrasted. Problems encountered by analysts using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) are discussed. PMID:2230684

  8. Persistent oronasal fistula after primary management of facial gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Majid, Omer W

    2008-01-01

    We present our experience of treating 42 young men with facial gunshot injuries, 9 of whom had associated palatal injuries. We attempted definitive treatment at the primary operation, but five patients with palatal injuries presented with oronasal fistula postoperatively and required secondary intervention. Three patients underwent surgical closure using palatal transposition flap, in all of whom it was successful. PMID:17196310

  9. [Management of combined thoracoabdominal wounds].

    PubMed

    Solov'ev, G M; Bagdasarov, V V

    1998-01-01

    Last years in the country gace rise to the problem of treatment of fire-arm's wounds in civil population. The results of treatment of victims with firearm thoracoabdominal wounds have evidenced unprepareness of surgeons for rendering specialized aid in conditions of "military-urban" surgery. The study performed by the authors has shown that there are substantial and principal differences between many postulates of war-field surgery and "military-urban" surgery. It consists in early hospitalization of victims with combined thoraco-abdominal injuries, prevalence of bullet wounds over fire-mine explosive injuries which have an effect on the extent of surgical intervention, results of treatment and development of complications. The proposed treatment modalities in victims with combined penetrated thoracoabdominal injuries in great measure may contribute to optimization of surgical aid in conditions of "military-urban" surgery. PMID:9791984

  10. New technique for treating abdominal surgical site infection using CT woundgraphy and NPWT: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Eisaku; Yoshida, Masashi; Nakashima, Keigo; Suzuki, Norihiko; Imakita, Tomonori; Tsutsui, Nobuhiro; Ohdaira, Hironori; Kitajima, Masaki; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for abdominal surgical site infection (SSI) is becoming increasingly common, although enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) has been reported as a complication. To avoid ECF, we used computed tomography (CT) woundgraphy to evaluate the relationship between the wound and the intestine, and then safely treated the abdominal SSI with NPWT. Case presentation Following a laparoscopic intersphincteric resection for low rectal neuroendocrine tumor and covering ileostomy, a 59-year-old woman underwent stoma closure. Six days after surgery, we diagnosed SSI. We suspected ECF, because the wound was deep and the pus resembled enteric fluid. However, CT woundgraphy showed that the wound was separated from the abdominal cavity and the intestine by the abdominal rectus muscle. Accordingly, we performed NPWT. SSI was cured and the wound was well granulated. Twenty-three days after surgery, the patient was discharged. Eventually, the wound was completely epithelialized. Discussion Although successful NPWT has been reported for open abdominal wounds, ECF is a common complication. ECF can be prevented by separating the wound from the intestine by the omentum or muscle fascia, protecting the intestinal serosa during surgery, and applying low vacuum pressure. The relationships among the wound, the fascia, and the intestine must be evaluated before abdominal SSI treatment. One good method is CT woundgraphy, which evaluates wound extent and depth, closure of muscle fascia, and the relationship between the wound and the intestine. Conclusion We report a case of CT woundgraphy before NPWT for abdominal SSI. CT woundgraphy is a good candidate for evaluating wound condition. PMID:27002290

  11. A Retrospective Study of Blade Wound Characteristics in Suicide and Homicide.

    PubMed

    Krywanczyk, Alison; Shapiro, Steven

    2015-12-01

    The distinction between self-inflicted blade wounds and blade wounds inflicted by another can be difficult in situations where there is little available history or context. We reviewed homicides and suicides in the past 10 years at the Vermont Office of the Chief Medical Examiner to define the characteristics of homicidal and suicidal blade wounds. All homicides and suicides involving blade wounds, not just those in which blade wounds were the cause of death, were included. Information regarding victim demographics, location and type of injuries, toxicology, and evidence of suicidality was gathered. Blade wounds were the cause of death in 85.7% of homicides but only in 36% of suicides. Hanging and gunshot wounds were the cause of death in 28% and 24% of suicides, respectively. Multiple stab wounds were found in 10% of homicides and in 0% of suicides, whereas multiple incised wounds were found in 60% of suicides and only 10% of homicides. However, several unusual instances of suicide were found, including suicides with clothing damage or bone or cartilage injury from blade wounds. No characteristics of blade wounds were definitive for homicide or suicide. History and circumstances of the scene are thus crucial in determining the manner of death. PMID:26230455

  12. Morphoscopic analysis of experimentally produced bony wounds from low-velocity ballistic impact.

    PubMed

    Kieser, Jules A; Tahere, Joy; Agnew, Caitlin; Kieser, David C; Duncan, Warwick; Swain, Michael V; Reeves, Matthew T

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how bone behaves when subjected to ballistic impact is of critical importance for forensic questions, such as the reconstruction of shooting events. Yet the literature addressing microscopic anatomical features of gunshot wounds to different types of bone is sparse. Moreover, a biomechanical framework for describing how the complex architecture of bone affects its failure during such impact is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the morphological features associated with experimental gunshot wounds in slaughtered pig ribs. We shot the 4th rib of 12 adult pigs with .22 mm subsonic bullets at close range (5 cm) and examined resultant wounds under the light microscope, scanning electron microscope SEM and micro tomograph μCT. In all cases there was a narrow shot channel followed by spall region, with evidence of plastic deformation with burnishing of the surface bone in the former, and brittle fracture around and through individual Haversian systems in the latter. In all but one case, the entrance wounds were characterized by superficially fractured cortical bone in the form of a well-defined collar, while the exit wounds showed delamination of the periosteum. Inorganic residue was evident in all cases, with electron energy dispersive spectroscopy EDS confirming the presence of carbon, phosphate, lead and calcium. This material appeared to be especially concentrated within the fractured bony collar at the entrance. We conclude that gunshot wounds in flat bones may be morphologically divided into a thin burnished zone at the entry site, and a fracture zone at the exit. PMID:21533860

  13. Treatment of close-range, low-velocity gunshot fractures of tibia and femur diaphysis with consecutive compression-distraction technique: a report of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Ateşalp, A Sabri; Kömürcü, Mahmut; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Bek, Dogan; Oğuz, Erbil; Yanmiş, Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    Lower extremity injuries secondary to close-range, low-velocity gunshot wounds are frequently seen in both civilian and military populations. A close-range, low-velocity injury produces high energy and often results in comminuted and complicated fractures with significant morbidity. In this study, four femoral, four tibial, and three combined tibia and fibular comminuted diaphyseal fractures secondary to close-range, low-velocity gunshot wounds in 11 military personnel were treated with debridement followed by compression-distraction lengthening using a circular external fixator frame. Fracture union was obtained in all without significant major complications. Fracture consolidation occurred at a mean of 3.5 months. At follow-up of 46.8 months, there were no delayed unions, nonunions, or malunions. Minor complications included four pin-tract infections and knee flexion limitation in two femur fractures. Osteomyelitis and deep soft tissue infection were not observed. This technique provided an alternative to casting, open reduction internal fixation, or intermedullary fixation with an acceptable complication rate. PMID:15281409

  14. Comparison of Gunshot Entrance Morphologies Caused by .40-Caliber Smith & Wesson, .380-Caliber, and 9-mm Luger Bullets: A Finite Element Analysis Study

    PubMed Central

    Matoso, Rodrigo Ivo; Freire, Alexandre Rodrigues; Santos, Leonardo Soriano de Mello; Daruge Junior, Eduardo; Rossi, Ana Claudia; Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua

    2014-01-01

    Firearms can cause fatal wounds, which can be identified by traces on or around the body. However, there are cases where neither the bullet nor gun is found at the crime scene. Ballistic research involving finite element models can reproduce computational biomechanical conditions, without compromising bioethics, as they involve no direct tests on animals or humans. This study aims to compare the morphologies of gunshot entrance holes caused by.40-caliber Smith & Wesson (S&W), .380-caliber, and 9×19-mm Luger bullets. A fully metal-jacketed.40 S&W projectile, a fully metal-jacketed.380 projectile, and a fully metal-jacketed 9×19-mm Luger projectile were computationally fired at the glabellar region of the finite element model from a distance of 10 cm, at perpendicular incidence. The results show different morphologies in the entrance holes produced by the three bullets, using the same skull at the same shot distance. The results and traits of the entrance holes are discussed. Finite element models allow feasible computational ballistic research, which may be useful to forensic experts when comparing and analyzing data related to gunshot wounds in the forehead. PMID:25343337

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  16. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  17. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  18. Backspatter on the firearm and hand in experimental close-range gunshots to the head.

    PubMed

    Karger, Bernd; Nüsse, Roland; Bajanowski, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    The deposition of backspatter on the firearm or person shooting can greatly assist the reconstruction of shooting incidents. Backspatter was investigated in experimental transverse gunshots (9-mm Luger) to the heads of calves (n = 9) from shooting distances of 0 to 10 cm. The firearms were examined with a magnifying glass; the surgical gloves and the right sleeve worn by the person shooting were examined with a stereomicroscope. On the firearms, backspatter of blood was found in five of the nine cases, and one or both gloves showed bloodspatter deposits in six and the right sleeves in four cases. Most droplets were 1 to 3 mm and circular or elongated. In addition, a fine spray of tiny blood deposits was present on the firearm and textiles in four cases. The distribution of the droplets on the firearms varied: the areas included regions shielded by prominent parts, and the droplets were predominantly located on the extensor side of the fingers and the radial aspect of the hands and sleeves. Backspatter of tiny bone fragments was recovered from the firearm and sleeve in only one case, but tissue (bone, fat, muscle, skin) was present on the ground in front of the entrance wound in seven cases. A careful investigation, including appropriate lightning and magnification, is necessary for reliable statements concerning the absence of backspatter or the extent of backspatter present. PMID:12198343

  19. Historical overview of wound ballistics research.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Ballistics involves the study of the scientific properties of projectiles, their behavior and their terminal effects on biological tissues and other materials. Wound ballistics deals with the analysis of injuries caused by projectiles and the behavior of projectiles within human or other biological tissues. The nineteenth century witnessed the development of both of these areas with Kocher's hydrodynamic theory and the understanding of the significance of bullet deformation in causing tissue injury. The degree of traumatic disruption of tissues and organs was also related to direct energy transfer from projectiles. While subsequent research has concentrated on elucidating further mechanisms of injury, the exact cause of remote tissue damage from high energy projectiles is still the subject of ongoing research. Much of the contemporary literature regarding wound ballistics concentrates on the forensic aspects and their application for legal purposes, in particular the investigation of shooting scenes. There have been many advances in this area, particularly in relation to the identification of various types of gunshot wounds and how their appearance can be used to establish if a shooting was accidental, deliberate (homicidal) or self inflicted (suicidal). PMID:19466590

  20. Preliminary evaluation of the persistence of organic gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Arndt, James; Bell, Suzanne; Crookshanks, Lindsey; Lovejoy, Marco; Oleska, Casey; Tulley, Tanya; Wolfe, Drew

    2012-10-10

    The organic components of gunshot residue (OGSR, also called firearms discharge residue (FDR) or cartridge discharge residue (CDR)) have been studied and discussed in the literature. These residues, consisting of particulates such as burned and unburned powder as well as molecular compounds, are rarely used in casework except for purposes such as shooting reconstructions. Molecular compounds that survive the firing event or that are created as a result of the firing event could, with focused research and development, open a new avenue for forensic gunshot residue analysis. In this study, the persistence of organic gunshot residue was evaluated using diphenylamine (DPA) as a target analyte and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as the detection system. Samples were collected from hands using a solvent swabbing technique and the swab was analyzed using direct thermal desorption for sample introduction into the IMS. OGSR was found to persist for at least 4 h. Although DPA is a widely used industrial compound, analysis of numerous blank and background samples (n∼100) did not show any significant response for DPA using this detector. Variations were noted among individuals and as such, the data set does not support estimation of a half-life as has been done for traditional primer residues. No secondary transfers were observed, suggesting the possibility of skin adhesion via interactions between the lipophilic organic compounds and skin lipids. IMS proved valuable as a means of generating patterns for forensic pattern matching and shows promise as a screening tool applied to firearms discharge. PMID:22682933

  1. Suicide reconstruction by glue-lift of gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Basu, S; Ferriss, S; Horn, R

    1984-07-01

    Based upon the recently developed glue-lift collection of gunshot residue particles for examination in the scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-rays, this laboratory has undertaken a research program to determine if reconstruction of gunshot deaths is feasible. Because undisturbed conditions of suicide victims may help in securing unambiguous results and high success rates, the program has been carried out to reconstruct suicides only. Data obtained from 13 firearms suicides and their laboratory reconstruction which involved primarily shotguns and handguns, indicate that reconstruction can be immensely useful to interpretation of the gunshot residue distributions on a suspect's or victim's hands. This reports outlines the basic experiments performed to relate the residue emission from the gun to the deposits found on the firing hand(s) and a description of the reconstruction technique that uses a target to simulate a human body. The technique can determine the specifics of a victim's hand position at the time of firing and which hand was used to pull the trigger. Because the technique is sensitive to the nature of the grasp of the firing hand and of the supporting hand, in the case of a shotgun, it has been possible in all cases to date, to determine which one of the potential eight hand positions existed at the time of shooting. PMID:6747586

  2. SECURES: system for reporting gunshots in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Edward A.; Sharkey, Brian

    1995-05-01

    SECURESTM (System for the Effective Control of Urban Environment Security) is being developed to support local law enforcement in the critical problem of gun-related violence on America's streets. Once deployed, SECURES will instantaneously detect, recognize, and pinpoint the location of gunfire, and transmit this finding to the police dispatcher or directly to scout cars in the vicinity. Local law enforcement and trauma care resourses will be able to respond quickly, thereby dramatically increasing the probability of arrest of the gunman and survival of the victim. SECURES will employ an air-acoustic detection grid composed of small, low-cost, battery powered sensor modules, called Pole Units. These modules will be located on utility poles and buildings primarily at city block intersections, and consists of an acoustic sensor, signal processing electronics, and a transmitter. Development efforts have concentrated on i) developing and testing algorithms capable of identifying gunshots with an extremely low false alarm rate, ii) developing ultra- low power electronics capable of reliable operation for long periods in outdoor environments, and iii) determining the RF communications design. Pole Unit prototype electronics and gunshot identification algorithms have been developed and successfully tested on an extensive database of recorded gunshots and background noises.

  3. Visualization of gunshot residue patterns on dark clothing.

    PubMed

    Atwater, Christina S; Durina, Marie E; Durina, John P; Blackledge, Robert D

    2006-09-01

    Determination of the muzzle-to-target distance is often a critical factor in criminal and civil investigations involving firearms. However, seeing and recording gunshot residue patterns can be difficult if the victim's clothing is dark and/or bloodstained. Trostle reported the use of infrared film for the detection of burn patterns. However, only after the film is developed are the results visible and multiple exposures at different settings may be needed. The Video Spectral Comparator 2000 (Foster & Freeman Ltd., Evesham, Worcestershire, U.K.) is an imaging instrument routinely used by forensic document examiners. Without use of specialized film could the VSC 2000 (at appropriate instrument settings) quickly, easily, and reliably provide instantaneous viewing, saving, and printing of gunshot residue patterns on dark and/or blood soaked clothing? At muzzle-to-target distances of 6, 12, and 18 in., test fires were made into five different types of dark clothing using eight different handguns of different calibers. Gunshot residues were detected for all eight calibers, and powder burn patterns were seen on dark clothing for all three target distances and calibers except 0.22 long rifle and 0.25 ACP. Bloodstains did not preclude the viewing of these patterns. PMID:17018087

  4. Treatment Protocol for High Velocity/High Energy Gunshot Injuries to the Face

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  5. Treatment protocol for high velocity/high energy gunshot injuries to the face.

    PubMed

    Peled, Micha; Leiser, Yoav; Emodi, Omri; Krausz, Amir

    2012-03-01

    Major causes of facial combat injuries include blasts, high-velocity/high-energy missiles, and low-velocity missiles. High-velocity bullets fired from assault rifles encompass special ballistic properties, creating a transient cavitation space with a small entrance wound and a much larger exit wound. There is no dispute regarding the fact that primary emergency treatment of ballistic injuries to the face commences in accordance with the current advanced trauma life support (ATLS) recommendations; the main areas in which disputes do exist concern the question of the timing, sequence, and modes of surgical treatment. The aim of the present study is to present the treatment outcome of high-velocity/high-energy gunshot injuries to the face, using a protocol based on the experience of a single level I trauma center. A group of 23 injured combat soldiers who sustained bullet and shrapnel injuries to the maxillofacial region during a 3-week regional military conflict were evaluated in this study. Nine patients met the inclusion criteria (high-velocity/high-energy injuries) and were included in the study. According to our protocol, upon arrival patients underwent endotracheal intubation and were hemodynamically stabilized in the shock-trauma unit and underwent total-body computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the head and neck and computed tomography angiography. All patients underwent maxillofacial surgery upon the day of arrival according to the protocol we present. In view of our treatment outcomes, results, and low complication rates, we conclude that strict adherence to a well-founded and structured treatment protocol based on clinical experience is mandatory in providing efficient, appropriate, and successful treatment to a relatively large group of patients who sustain various degrees of maxillofacial injuries during a short period of time. PMID:23449809

  6. [Modern wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Planinsek Rucigaj, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    Chronic wounds are, due to the slow healing, a major clinical problem. In addition to classic materials, a great number of supportive wound dressings for chronic wound treatment, developed on the basis of new knowledge about the pathophysiological events in non-healing wounds, are available on the market. Today we know that modern wound dressings provide the best local environment for optimal healing (moisture, warmth, appropriate pH). Wound dressings control the amount of exudate from the wound and bacterial load, thus protecting local skin from the wound exudate and the wound from secondary infections from the environment. Using supportive wound dressings makes sense only when the wound has been properly assessed, the etiologic factors have been clarified and the obstacles making the wound chronic identified. The choice of dressing is correlated with the characteristics of the wound, the knowledge and experience of the medical staff, and the patient's needs. We believe that the main advantage of modern wound dressing versus conventional dressing is more effective wound cleaning, simple dressing application, painless bandaging owing to reduced adhesion to the wound, and increased absorption of the wound exudate. Faster wound granulation shortens the length of patient hospitalization, and eventually facilitates the work of medical staff. The overall cost of treatment is a minor issue due to faster wound healing despite the fact that modern supportive wound dressings are more expensive than conventional bandaging. The article describes different types of modern supportive wound dressings, as well as their characteristics and indications for use. PMID:24371980

  7. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain. PMID:26585951

  8. Metal dust deposition in a shotgun wound associated with barrel modification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew S; Bowes, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Contact-range gunshot wounds commonly demonstrate deposition of black soot in and around the wound. Deposition of other visible pigments originating from the firearm has not been specifically described. In the current case, an adult male was found dead adjacent to a shotgun fixed in a vice grip with a modified, shortened barrel. A handheld, powered, metal grinding wheel was nearby. Autopsy revealed an intraoral gunshot wound, including soot deposition in and around the mouth and within the wound track. In addition, there was a peculiar, gray, lustrous film on the lips, gingiva, and anterior teeth. The material was concentrated around the most severe areas of injury in the anterior mouth and easily rubbed off with a cotton swab. It was not visualized in the rest of the mouth and not present in the larynx, or the esophagus. Overall, our opinion is that this unique, gray, lustrous film represents deposition of fine metallic dust that accumulated in the barrel of the shotgun during its modification with the grinding wheel. This type of unique pigment deposition should be recognized by forensic pathologists as possibly being related to the discharge of a firearm with a recently modified barrel or other cause for fine metallic dust accumulation within the barrel. Depending on the circumstances of the case, collection of samples of such metal dust deposits could be indicated for subsequent analysis. PMID:26782960

  9. Gunshot deaths in Geneva, Switzerland: 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    La Harpe, Romano; Mohamed, Nadja Ben; Burkhardt, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    We have conducted a retrospective study of all gunshot deaths that occurred in Geneva, Switzerland, over a 10-year period (2001-2010). The 133 cases reviewed were classified according to the manner of death, that is, suicide (106 cases), homicide (25 cases), and accident (2 cases). Various data from police authorities and the medicolegal examinations of the bodies were studied, including the age and sex of the victims, location of the event, type of firearm used, concomitant use or nonuse of alcohol and/or other drugs, seasonality, and entry site. These various elements were compared with data found in the literature. PMID:23629396

  10. Potential uses of lead isotope ratios in gunshot cases.

    PubMed

    Keisch, B; Callahan, R C

    1978-05-01

    The determination of lead isotope ratios in 14 bullets, and in material taken from 9 hand swabs and 5 primers shows that there are potentially valuable forensic uses for such a method. While a more complete study is required, this method could possibly be used to prove (or disprove) relatiohships between bullets and manufacturers, weapons, or persons firing the weapons. Sample size requirements (1 microgram or less) are such that damaged or fragmented bullets, or minute particles therefrom, may be used for the required analyses. An experiment showed that gunshot residue from a test-fired weapon was detectable even after washing the hands. PMID:649545

  11. A simple method for collection of gunshot residues from clothing.

    PubMed

    Andrasko, J; Pettersson, S

    1991-01-01

    Simple equipment for the sampling of gunshot residue particles from clothing, inside of bags, pockets, etc, is described. Collection was achieved by vacuuming through a double filtration system constructed from a Nucleopore aerosol holder connected to an ordinary vacuum cleaner. The collected particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Good results were observed in functional tests of this equipment and the method has been introduced into casework in our laboratory. Various experiments on possible contamination of clothing by GSR particles were performed. The usefulness of clothing as evidence material in searching for GSR particles is discussed. PMID:1744623

  12. Hair combing to collect organic gunshot residues (OGSR).

    PubMed

    MacCrehan, William A; Layman, Malinda J; Secl, Janelle D

    2003-08-12

    A protocol is presented for the collection and analysis of gunshot residues (GSR) from hair. A fine-toothed comb is used for collection of the residues. A small zip-closure bag serves as a container for both sample storage and extraction of the characteristic organic powder additives. The success of this residue recovery approach was tested on simulated shooters and victims using mannequin-supported human wig hair as well as on human shooters. Residues were collected from four weapons: a revolver and semi-automatic pistol, rifle and shotgun. One characteristic additive, nitroglycerin, was detected by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in the majority of the collection experiments. PMID:12927420

  13. Combat Anesthesia: A Case Report of a Gunshot Wound and New Trauma Protocols.

    PubMed

    Strube, Peter D; Perkins, Andrew D

    2015-08-01

    Revolutionary innovations and technical advances in the disciplines of medicine, surgery, and anesthesia are inextricably connected to military conflict. The demonstrated lifesaving value of these novel approaches in high-acuity trauma has provided the impetus for translation of these elements into injury care in the civilian environment. One element of this battlefield medical revolution is the implementation and refinement of forward surgical care. All US military services have unique configurations of this surgical team to match their expeditionary capacity. The US Army Forward Surgical Team (FST) is a small, mobile surgical unit fielded since the 1990s, but not ubiquitously used until the current contingency operations in southwest Asia. The FST has been used in a variety of ways during the current conflict with or without augmentation by a forward support medical company, Area Support Medical Company, and Brigade Medical Company also known as C-Med. Far forward stand-alone FST have often been emplaced to provide a surgical capability for patients in austere operational environments and to optimize casualty survival in situations of high-risk operations and/or with potential for protracted evacuation. PMID:26390742

  14. [Problems posed during surgical repair of a gunshot wound in the mandible].

    PubMed

    Roulaud, J P; Tournaire, J; Roux, R

    1975-09-01

    The authors present a case of a balistic lesion of the labio-mental region after attempted suicide. They expose the different procedures used for its repair and attempt to analyze the problems which arose from the therapeutic standpoint. They lay stress on the necessity to immobilize these mandibular fragments in good occlusion, as rapidly as possibly. PMID:1108168

  15. [Peculiarities of forensic medical expertise of gunshot wounds inflicted through a bulletproof vest].

    PubMed

    Ozertskovskiĭ, L B; Tiurin, M V; Denisov, A V

    2013-01-01

    A series of experimental studies was conducted with the object of elucidating the mechanisms of the bullet after-penetration effect produced by a handgun shot into the armoured vest with special reference to the changes developing in the space behind the barrier. The application of the pulsed radiographic technique revealed a transient cavity the presence of which accounts for the injuries to soft tissues, bones, and internal organs in the projection of the bullet impact without damage to the armour plates. PMID:23888503

  16. PreFix™ external fixator used to treat a floating shoulder injury caused by gunshot wound.

    PubMed

    Vogels, J; Pommier, N; Cursolle, J-C; Belin, C; Tournier, C; Durandeau, A

    2014-10-01

    Open fractures of the shoulder are extremely rare, and their treatment is a major challenge for surgeons. Only cases encountered in military settings have been reported thus far. Such fractures are often the result of ballistic trauma, which causes extensive damage to both bony and soft tissues. Since these injuries are associated with a high risk of infection and the presence of comminuted fractures, external fixation is necessary for repair. Use of external fixators and revascularization techniques has reduced the number of cases requiring shoulder amputation or disarticulation. Injury to the proximal extremity of the humerus, acromion, and clavicle further complicates the treatment. No published studies have described the assembly of external fixators for fractures in the scapular region with significant bone loss. In addition, no cases have been described in civilian settings. However, with an increase in urban violence and the traffic of illegal arms, civilian surgeons are now encountering an increasing number of patients with these injuries. In this report, we not only present a rare case of floating shoulder injury in a civilian setting but also provide an overview of the existing treatment strategies for this type of trauma, with special focus on the use of external fixators in elective shoulder arthrodesis and on military cases. PMID:25267396

  17. [Treatment methods of atypical gunshot wounds to the head--case reports].

    PubMed

    Mielniczek, Paweł; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Koziarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Due to a high mortality rate, headshot injuries pose serious diagnostic and clinical problems. In this work, we wanted to describe four atypical headshot injuries. The first patient with a headshot injury using a nail gun mishap; the second one after a headshot injury, as a result of attempted murder (the bullet came to a parasagittal halt in the left parietal area); the third victim, after a suicide attempt (the bullet was removed from clivus area, below the pituitary gland); in the case of the fourth patient, after shooting himself with a self-constructed weapon in the chin, the metal body was surgically removed - a bearing pellet from the corpus callosum. Males dominate among victims of headshot injuries. Alcohol is one of the elements that facilitate suicidal behaviour. Anti-spasm, antibacterial, anti-tetanus prophylaxes are incredibly important. In some cases, the metallic body does not have to be removed from the brain. Pulmonary embolism can be a cause of death after 7 days from injury. PMID:27234864

  18. [Young man with gunshot wound (GSW)--what killed Ernst vom Rath?].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Eithan, Arieh; Feinsod, Moshe; Georg M, Weisz

    2013-11-01

    On the morning of November 7, 1938 vom Rath, a diplomat at the German embassy in Paris, was shot by Herschel Grynzspan, a Jewish teenager. Of the 5 shots fired, 2 hit vom Rath, one in the right shoulder and one in the abdomen. He was rushed to Alma Women's Hospital near the embassy, where emergency surgery was undertaken. Two days later his condition deteriorated rapidly and succumbed 55 hours after the shooting. It is believed that the assassination triggered the "Kristallnacht"--the organized Nazi pogrom against Jews across Germany. Based on the Alma hospital registry, autopsy findings and articles from recent years, the course of his condition and possible cause of his death are discussed. The possibility of malpractice, and even medical fraud, which led to his death are also mentioned. PMID:24416826

  19. A medical history of Governor John B. Connally and his gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Li, George Z; Duke, James H; Pappas, Theodore N

    2015-11-01

    : On November 22, 1963, the Governor of Texas, John Connally, was injured during the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Multiple authors have documented President Kennedy's injuries, the attempted resuscitation, and the controversies surrounding these events. However, the injuries sustained by Governor Connally have been overlooked by historians predominantly because of the extraordinary importance of the presidential assassination and its impact on the national consciousness. This review discusses the governor's political life, the mechanism of injury, his medical care, and the role the injuries had on his subsequent public life. PMID:26496116

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  1. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal pain Acute cholecystitis Acute kidney failure Addison disease Adenomyosis Annular pancreas Aplastic anemia Appendicitis Ascariasis Atheroembolic renal disease Biliary atresia Blind loop syndrome Cholangitis Chronic ...

  2. Urban gunshot and sniper location: technologies and demonstration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Glynn; Shaw, Scott; Crowe, Michael; Cranford, Clay; Torvik, Kevin; Scharf, Peter; Stellingworth, Bob

    2002-08-01

    The Law Enforcement and Military technology development communities have a growing common interest in the technologies associated with gunshot detection and localization. These common interests include urban warfare, community-oriented policing and sniper location. Technologies of interest include those associated with muzzle blast and bullet shockwave detection and the inter-netting of these acoustic sensors with electro-optic sensors. To date, no one sensor technology has proven totally effective for a complete solution. PSI has a muzzle blast detection and localization product which is wireless, highly mobile and reconfigurable, with a user-friendly laptop processor and display unit, which is currently being demonstrated in two different implementations: 1) A one-year, and on-going urban gunshot detection system installed in Austin, Texas, that began July 2001; and 2) A counter sniper system demonstration conducted at both the Aberdeen Proving Grounds and at an Israeli Defense Force firing range in the second half of the year in 2001. The former topic is under the auspices of a National Institute of Justice Cooperative Agreement with PSI and the Austin Police Department, and the latter topic was managed by the Army Research Laboratory and co-funded by DARPA/ATO and PSI. This paper will discuss successful aspects of the demonstrations to date, operational conclusions, and the development directions indicated for the future.

  3. Fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors for gunshot localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Currano, Luke; Gee, Danny; Yang, Benjamin; Yu, Miao

    2009-05-01

    The supersensitive ears of the parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea have inspired researchers to develop bio-inspired directional microphone for sound localization. Although the fly ear is optimized for localizing the narrow-band calling song of crickets at 5 kHz, experiments and simulation have shown that it can amplify directional cues for a wide frequency range. In this article, a theoretical investigation is presented to study the use of fly-ear inspired directional microphones for gunshot localization. Using an equivalent 2-DOF model of the fly ear, the time responses of the fly ear structure to a typical shock wave are obtained and the associated time delay is estimated by using cross-correlation. Both near-field and far-field scenarios are considered. The simulation shows that the fly ear can greatly amplify the time delay by ~20 times, which indicates that with an interaural distance of only 1.2 mm the fly ear is able to generate a time delay comparable to that obtained by a conventional microphone pair with a separation as large as 24 mm. Since the parameters of the fly ear structure can also be tuned for muzzle blast and other impulse stimulus, fly-ear inspired acoustic sensors offers great potential for developing portable gunshot localization systems.

  4. [Gunshot or blast injuries of the hand. Principles of treatment].

    PubMed

    Kollig, E; Franke, A

    2012-07-01

    Gunshot injuries to the hand are rare in Central Europe. As a result of their special trauma morphology they are a serious threat to the functional integrity of the hand and often lead to a loss of function which can be associated with a permanent unfitness to work or disability. Blast injuries to the hand are more common in this part of the world and are usually caused by the inappropriate use of fireworks. This trauma entity is associated with a number of special kinetic features and effects which have therapeutic consequences and should therefore be discussed separately. As a result of the low incidence of these specific types of injuries in times of peace, experience-based expertise is unlikely to be available. The management of gunshot injuries to the hand is a particular challenge to hand surgeons who must have specialist knowledge and skills in order to achieve an optimum outcome. This applies even more so to the treatment of blast injuries to the hand which are associated with far more complex injury patterns. As a rule blast injuries are associated with a high risk of complications and require a rapid assessment and rigorous management of all damaged structures similar to approaches used for infections of the hand. Illustrated by several cases which have been treated at our institution the basic aspects of the development and morphology of these injuries are discussed as well as different treatment options, algorithms and possible treatment outcomes. PMID:22772439

  5. Variations in recorded acoustic gunshot waveforms generated by small firearms.

    PubMed

    Beck, Steven D; Nakasone, Hirotaka; Marr, Kenneth W

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of recorded acoustic gunshot signals to determine firearm waveform characteristics requires an understanding of the impulsive signal events, how the waveforms vary among different sources, and how the waveforms are affected by the environment and the recording system. This paper presents empirical results from waveforms produced by different small firearms and an analysis of their variations under different and controlled conditions. Acoustic signals were generated using multiple firearm makes and models firing different ammunition types. Simultaneous recordings from the microphones located at different distances from the source and at different azimuth angles (from the line-of-fire) were used to study source characteristics and sound propagation effects. The results indicate that recorded gunshot waveforms generally consist of multiple acoustic events, and these are observable depending on the received distance and azimuth angle. The source blast size, microphone distance, and microphone azimuth angle are the primary factors affecting the recorded muzzle blast characteristics. Ground or object reflections and ballistic shockwaves and their reflections can interfere with the muzzle blast waveform and its measurements. This experiment confirmed and quantified the wide range of correlation results between waveforms recorded from different source, microphone distance, and microphone angle configurations. PMID:21476632

  6. Prehospital Management of Gunshot Patients at Major Trauma Care Centers: Exploring the Gaps in Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Norouzpour, Amir; Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Kazemzadeh, Gholam-Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Prehospital management of gunshot-wounded (GW) patients influences injury-induced morbidity and mortality. Objectives To evaluate prehospital management to GW patients emphasizing the protocol of patient transfer to appropriate centers. Patients and Methods This prospective study, included all GW patients referred to four major, level-I hospitals in Mashhad, Iran. We evaluated demographic data, triage, transport vehicles of patients, hospitalization time and the outcome. Results There were 66 GW patients. The most affected body parts were extremities (60.6%, n = 40); 59% of cases (n = 39) were transferred to the hospitals with vehicles other than an ambulance. Furthermore, 77.3% of patients came to the hospitals directly from the site of event, and 22.7% of patients were referred from other medical centers. EMS action intervals from dispatchers to scene departure was not significantly different from established standards; however, arrival to hospital took longer than optimal standards. Additionally, time spent at emergency wards to stabilize vital signs was significantly less in patients who were transported by EMS ambulances (P = 0.01), but not with private ambulances (P = 0.47). However, ambulance pre-hospital care was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. Injury Severity was the only determinant of hospital stay duration (β = 0.36, P = 0.01) in multivariate analysis. Conclusions GW was more frequent in extremities and the most patients were directly transferred from the accident site. EMS (but not private) ambulance transport improved patients' emergency care and standard time intervals were achieved by EMS; however more than a half of the cases were transferred by vehicles other than an ambulance. Nevertheless, ambulance transportation (either by EMS or by private ambulance) was not associated with a shorter hospital stay. This showed that upgrade of ambulance equipment and training of private ambulance personnel may be needed. PMID:24350154

  7. [Chronic wounds: differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Kolić, Maja

    2013-10-01

    Wound is a disruption of anatomic and physiologic continuity of the skin. According to the healing process, wounds are classified as acute and chronic wounds. A wound is considered chronic if standard medical procedures do not lead to the expected healing, or if the wound does not heal within six weeks. Chronic wounds are classified as typical and atypical. Typical wounds include ischemic, neurotrophic and hypostatic wounds. Diabetic foot and decubitus ulcers stand out as a specific entity among typical wounds. About 80 percent of chronic wounds localized on lower leg are the result of chronic venous insufficiency, in 5-10 percent the cause is of arterial etiology, whereas the remainder are mostly neuropathic ulcers. About 95 percent of chronic wounds manifest as one of the above-mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds are atypical chronic wounds, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, psychiatric disorders, drug related reactions, etc. Numerous systemic diseases can present with atypical wounds. The primary cause of the wound can be either systemic disease itself (Crohn's disease) or aberrant immune response due to systemic disease (pyoderma gangrenosum, paraneoplastic syndrome). Although atypical wounds are a rare cause of chronic wounds, it should always be taken in consideration during diagnostic procedure. PMID:24371971

  8. Abdominal Compartment Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maluso, Patrick; Olson, Jody; Sarani, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare but potentially morbid diagnoses. Clinical index of suspicion for these disorders should be raised following massive resuscitation, abdominal wall reconstruction/injury, and in those with space-occupying disorders in the abdomen. Gold standard for diagnosis involves measurement of bladder pressure, with a pressure greater than 12 mm Hg being consistent with IAH and greater than 25 mm Hg being consistent with ACS. Decompressive laparotomy is definitive therapy but paracentesis can be equally therapeutic in properly selected patients. Left untreated, ACS can lead to multisystem organ failure and death. PMID:27016163

  9. Application of x-ray fluorescence analysis to investigation of the composition of gunshot residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazimirov, V. I.; Zorin, A. D.; Zanozina, V. F.

    2006-05-01

    We have used x-ray fluorescence analysis to study the elemental composition of gunshot residues from smooth-bore and rifled-bore guns. We have established that it is possible to differentiate between types of projectiles (jacketed/lead), types of primers (corrosive/noncorrosive), and types of propellant powders (black/smokeless) by analysis of the elemental composition of the gunshot residues. We have shown that the mercury content in gunshot residues on the surface of the object carrying the residues steadily decreases as storage time increases. Despite this fact, mercury can be preserved as a component of gunshot residues on the object (cotton cloth) under room conditions for more than 45 days.

  10. Monitoring combat wound healing by IR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howle, Chris R.; Spear, Abigail M.; Gazi, Ehsan; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In recent conflicts, battlefield injuries consist largely of extensive soft injuries from blasts and high energy projectiles, including gunshot wounds. Repair of these large, traumatic wounds requires aggressive surgical treatment, including multiple surgical debridements to remove devitalised tissue and to reduce bacterial load. Identifying those patients with wound complications, such as infection and impaired healing, could greatly assist health care teams in providing the most appropriate and personalised care for combat casualties. Candidate technologies to enable this benefit include the fusion of imaging and optical spectroscopy to enable rapid identification of key markers. Hence, a novel system based on IR negative contrast imaging (NCI) is presented that employs an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a periodically-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal. The crystal operates in the shortwave and midwave IR spectral regions (ca. 1.5 - 1.9 μm and 2.4 - 3.8 μm, respectively). Wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the crystal within the pump beam. System size and complexity are minimised by the use of single element detectors and the intracavity OPO design. Images are composed by raster scanning the monochromatic beam over the scene of interest; the reflection and/or absorption of the incident radiation by target materials and their surrounding environment provide a method for spatial location. Initial results using the NCI system to characterise wound biopsies are presented here.

  11. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  12. A comparison between digital radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance in the detection of gunshot residues in burnt tissues and bone.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Borgonovo, Simone; Brandone, Alberto; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The radiological search for GSR is crucial in burnt material although it has been rarely tested. In this study, thirty-one bovine ribs were shot at near-contact range and burnt to calcination in an oven simulating a real combustion. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed before and after carbonization and compared with former analyses with DR (digital radiography); thus comparing the assistance, the radiological methods can provide in the search for GSR in fresh and burnt bone. DR demonstrated the greatest ability in the detection of metallic residues, CT showed lower abilities, while MR showed a high sensitivity only in soft tissues. Thus, DR can be considered as the most sensitive method in the detection of GSR in charred bones, whereas CT and MR demonstrated much less reliability. Nonetheless, the MR ameliorates the analysis of gunshot wounds in other types of remains with large quantities of soft tissues. PMID:24147424

  13. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat'hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  14. Image-guided ureteral reconstruction using rendezvous technique for complex ureteric transection after gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Mohammad; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Said, Mohammad T.; Bulbul, Muhammad; Haddad, Maurice; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-01-01

    Management of complex ureteric transection poses a significant clinical challenge, particularly after gunshot injuries due to marked distortion of anatomy and associated tissue loss. We report two cases of total ureteric transection due to gunshot injury successfully repaired using fluoroscopy-guided rendezvous procedure and double J stent placement. This minimally invasive approach may offer a safe and effective technique to repair complete ureteral transection and obviate the need for complex surgical procedures. PMID:26955601

  15. Field kit and method for testing for the presence of gunshot residue

    DOEpatents

    Rodacy, Philip J.; Walker, Pamela K.

    2003-09-02

    A field test kit for gunshot residue comprises a container having at least compartments separated by a barrier. A surface is tested by wiping it with a swab and placing the swab in a first compartment. The barrier is then breached, permitting reagent in the second compartment to flow onto the swab. The first compartment is transparent, and a color change will be observed if the reagent reacts with gunshot residue.

  16. [Provision of medical care to the wounded with craniocerebral injuries at stages of medical evacuation in mountains and desert areas].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V P

    2015-01-01

    The author shows that surgery with craniocerebral injuries should be fully performed at the stage of specialized medical care. Wounded have to be evacuated not earlier than 5-7 days after surgery with the mandatory use of a special air transport ("Scalpel" or "Spasatel"), accompanied by Anaesthetist. In the absence of the possibility of surgery in 5-7 days at this stage the wounded have to be evacuated by air to the center hospitals. On the stage there are only patients requiring specialized care because of health reasons. Wounded with gunshot wounds of the soft tissues of the head, and those with mild forms of brain damage during the explosive and combat injury (concussion, mild brain contusion) can be evacuated by air transport accompanied by a doctor or paramedic at any period of time after the injury (trauma). PMID:25916035

  17. [Wounded patients transportation during peace enforcement operation in Georgia (August 2008)].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, P K; Pak, R V; Golovinova, V Iu

    2014-09-01

    The article highlights the analysis of wounded movement during peace enforcement operation in Georgia (August 2008). 72% of incoming patients were walking wounded; 97,5% male patients, 2,5% female patients; per cent of combat surgery pathology - 90,2% including combat surgical trauma 83,2%, general surgical diseases - 7%, combat therapeutic pathology - 9,8%; leading gunshot traumas in walking wounded are lower extremities injuries - 33,6%, upper extremities injuries - 27,9% (in total 61,5%), head injuries - 25,4%. Within combat therapeutic pathology walking wounded suffered from the following classes of diseases/sicknesses - I class - 35,7%, XII class - 14,3%, V class - 10,7%. 236 military hospitals (In Vladikavkaz) had admitted 71,2% of walking wounded (of incoming traffic), 1458 military hospitals (in Mozdok) had admitted 91,7% of walking wounded from front traffic, flank traffic was 100%. 49, 7% of patients finished the treatment in military hospitals of zone level, 47,9% of patients - in hospitals of district level, 2,4% of patients - in central hospitals. The,average duration of the treatment of walking wounded in hospitals of zone level consisted 16,9±0,7 days, no lethal outcomes were registered. PMID:25546962

  18. Statistical challenges in the quantification of gunshot residue evidence.

    PubMed

    Gauriot, Romain; Gunaratnam, Lawrence; Moroni, Rossana; Reinikainen, Tapani; Corander, Jukka

    2013-09-01

    The discharging of a gun results in the formation of extremely small particles known as gunshot residues (GSR). These may be deposited on the skin and clothing of the shooter, on other persons present, and on nearby items or surfaces. Several factors and their complex interactions affect the number of detectable GSR particles, which can deeply influence the conclusions drawn from likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for prosecution hypotheses of interest. We present Bayesian network models for casework examples and demonstrate that probabilistic quantification of GSR evidence can be very sensitive to the assumptions concerning the model structure, prior probabilities, and the likelihood components. This finding has considerable implications for the use of statistical quantification of GSR evidence in the legal process. PMID:23822522

  19. A photoluminescence technique for detection of gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Jones, P F; Nesbitt, R S

    1975-04-01

    Rapid, convenient detection of gunshot residue on the hands of a suspect, following a shooting, can be accomplished by the photoluminescence determination of the presence of lead (Pb) and antimony (Sb), which originate in the cartiridge primer. Following the firing of a gun, the backs of both hands are washed in a stream of distilled water. Each hand washing is filtered, and the residue collected on a membrane filter is dissolved in hydrochloric acid. Lead(II)and Sb(III) form chloride ion complexes with the acid, which luminesce strongly upon selective ultraviolet excitation at low temperature. Upon excitation, the Pb and Sb complexes emit light with maxima at wavelengths characteristic for the two metallic elements. By the use of this procedure, it is possible to detect as little as 1.0 ng of Pb and 10 ng of Sb. The total time for sample collection and analysis is less than 30 min. PMID:1123593

  20. [Fatal gunshot injuries in Hamburg 1966-1991].

    PubMed

    Koops, E; Flüs, K; Lockemann, U; Püschel, K

    1994-01-01

    Deaths by fire-arms investigated at the Institute for Legal Medicine of the University of Hamburg were analyzed retrospectively since 1966. Among 70,000 deaths (33,000 autopsies) there were 838 fatalities caused by gunshots (about 30 cases per year). One third were classified as homicides, the others as suicides, only 3% as accidents. Almost the entire number of suicides was committed by men (relation male:female 20:1), whereas the proportion of women was higher among the homicides (ratio male:female 3:1). Details referring to the age of the victims, profession-coherence, alcohol-influence, capacity to act and survival-time are analyzed. The kinds of arms, and bullets (with special reference to self-made firearms), criminalistical aspects (i.e. differentiation between homicide and suicide, gun in the hand), morphological findings (i.e. nuchal and oral shots or bullet-related embolism) are introduced. PMID:8147700

  1. Developing a quality assurance program for gunshot primer residue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Thomas R.

    2014-09-01

    The Texas DPS Crime Laboratory Service analyzes an average of 45 gunshot residue (GSR) kits a month using three different SEM/EDS systems and involving four different analysts. To maintain the volume of cases, we have developed a robust, cost-efficient method to ensure that all three systems are performing automated GSR analysis within laboratory specifications, and yielding consistent results across all three systems. This analysis commonly includes analysis of GSR kits collected from suspects' hands, but can also include kits from screening of suspects' clothing for GSR. Analysts have developed procedures for cleaning and monitoring areas where clothing and GSR stubs are processed and analyzed in order to ensure that casework stubs were not contaminated in the laboratory.

  2. Probative value of gunshot residue on victims of shootings and comparison of gunshot residue results with modern technology versus older testing of samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert S.; Mershon, William J.

    2011-06-01

    Some government agencies take the position that the results of gunshot residue from the hands of victims of shootings are not probative and meaningless. It is my opinion from experience in many cases that this is not the case and the results can mean life or death in some cases. Actual individual cases are described. The results of samples examined years ago with a small number of gunshot residue particles and reexamined recently shows the number and quality of particles that can be located and identified with modern equipment.

  3. [Penetrating injuries of the abdomen. Results of two classical and selective attitudes in the management of 249 wounds].

    PubMed

    el Idrissi, H D; Kafih, M; Ajbal, M; Ridaï, M; Sarf, I; Salmi, A; Almou, M; Zerouali, N O

    1994-01-01

    The systematic surgical exploration of each abdominal penetrating wound allows an exact out-come of lesions and an adequate treatment without delay. But these advantages are made upon a possibly 30% negative laparotomy. The selective attitude in the management of these abdominal's wounds has permitted to decrease this rate to 5% with a risk of secondary operation for non primary detected lesions in 5%. Our attitude toward 249 penetrative abdominal's wounds was classic and selectable respectively from 86 to 89 and 90 to 93. The results has confirmed the literature's date and especially has shown no significant difference between the two attitude concerning the morbidity and the mortality. PMID:7844198

  4. Use of luminescent gunshot residues markers in forensic context.

    PubMed

    Weber, I T; Melo, A J G; Lucena, M A M; Consoli, E F; Rodrigues, M O; de Sá, G F; Maldaner, A O; Talhavini, M; Alves, S

    2014-11-01

    Chemical evaluation of gunshot residues (GSR) produced by non-toxic lead-free ammunition (NTA) has been a challenge to forensic analyses. Our group developed some luminescent markers specific to the detection of GSR. Here, we evaluated the performance of selected markers in experiments that mimic forensic context and/or routines in which luminescent characteristics would be very useful. We evaluated the influence of markers' addition on the bullet's speed, the rate of shot failure (i.e., when the cartridge case is not fully ejected and/or a new ammunition is not automatically replaced in the gun chamber) as a function of marker percentage, the possibility of collecting luminescent gunshot residue (LGSR) in unconventional locations (e.g. the shooters' nostrils), the LGSR lifetime after hand washing, the transfer of LGSR to objects handled by the shooter, and the dispersion of LGSR at the crime scene and on simulated victims. It was observed that high amounts of marker (10 wt%) cause high rates of failure on pistols, as well as a substantial decrease in bullet speed. However, the use of 2 wt% of marker minimizes these effects and allows LGSR detection, collection and analysis. Moreover, in all conditions tested, markers showed high performance and provided important information for forensic analyses. For instance, the LGSR particles were found on the floor, ranging from 0 to 9.4 m away from the shooter, on the door panel and seats after a car shooting experiment, and were found easily on a pig leg used to simulate a victim. When a selective tagging was done, it was possible to obtain positive or negative correlation between the victim and shooter. Additionally LGSR possesses a fairly long lifetime (9 h) and good resistance to hand washing (up to 16 washes). PMID:25305530

  5. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors, including cancer Infections or injury Kidney stones Appendicitis ... also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal artery stenosis ...

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  7. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall.

    PubMed

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity. PMID:27293982

  8. Prosthetics and Techniques in Repair of Animal's Abdominal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Karrouf, Gamal; Zaghloul, Adel; Abou-Alsaud, Mohamed; Barbour, Elie; Abouelnasr, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    The management of abdominal wall repair continues to present a challenging problem, especially in the repair of major defects. Many abdominal wall defects can be repaired by primary closure; however, if the defect is large and there is a tension on the closure of the wound, the use of prosthetic materials becomes indispensable. Many studies have been performed with various materials and implant techniques, without the comparison of their degrees of success, based on sound meta-analysis and/or inclusive epidemiologic studies. This review covered the effectiveness of recent advances in prosthetic materials and implant procedures used in repair of abdominal wall, based on biomechanical properties and economic aspects of reconstructed large abdominal wall defects and hernias in animals. The presented results in this review helped to reach treatment algorithms that could maximize outcomes and minimize morbidity. PMID:27293982

  9. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  10. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... around your wound: Use a normal saline solution (salt water) or mild soapy water. Soak the gauze or ... wash out, your wound: Fill a syringe with salt water or soapy water, whichever your doctor recommends. Hold ...

  11. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... bleed. For example, burns, some puncture wounds, and pressure sores don't bleed. Once the scab forms, your ...

  12. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (Vacuum Assisted Closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  13. Wound care centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this treatment, ...

  14. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  15. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  16. [Frangible bullets: wounding capability and clinical aspects of their use].

    PubMed

    Komenda, J; Hejna, P; Rydlo, M; Novak, M; Krajsa, J; Racek, F

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with basic characteristics of the frangible bullets and it documents a very specific behaviour of chosen types of these bullets in testing blocks as a substitute materials of alive tissues. The frangible bullets have several important advantages compared to the classical sorts of firearms bullets. The highest benefit could be seen especially in the limited penetrating capability and very low ricochet hazard connected with the use of these bullets. The absence of poisonous elements in the material of frangible bullets (for instance lead) is highly appreciated from the ecology reasons nowadays as well. The cartridges assembled with frangible bullets are used most of all for the practise reasons by law enforcement units, but can be used very effectively also in combat situations. Results of own shooting experiments confirm that the wound potential of bullet can be changed in a very large extent with the change of the manufacturing technology and the bullets geometry. Newly developed frangible bullets and the already manufactured bullets available on the market are characterized by very specific terminal ballistic features. Some frangible bullets behave in a comparable way to full metal jacketed bullets while penetrating soft tissues. Another frangible bullets of different designs fragment to the pieces in soft tissues and cause very serious wounds with persistent effects. The usage of frangible bullets and a potential risk of misuse of this specific sort of ammunition require also new approaches in the medicine for the treatment of the gunshot wounds. PMID:22724652

  17. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is an infection and what kind of antibiotic medicine would work best Debride the wound by removing dead or infected tissue in the wound Rinse the wound with salt water (saline solution) Drain the pocket of pus (abscess), if present ...

  18. [Toilet of chronic wound].

    PubMed

    Strok, Nevenka; Huljev, Dubravko

    2013-10-01

    Chronic wound toilet, with appropriate care of the surrounding skin, is one of the basic steps that must be performed in the treatment of patients with chronic wound. On wound cleaning and bandaging, it is of utmost importance to choose an appropriate technique of cleansing, select an appropriate solution for leaching and choose an appropriate wound dressing. In this way, the wound is protected from dirt from the environment and microorganisms, while protecting the surrounding tissue from the wound exudate, providing optimal conditions for better and faster wound healing and contributing to improved patient quality of life. The frequency of dressing change is individual and must be tailored to each patient in correlation with the psychosocial status of the patient, the type of the wound, the amount and type of wound exudate, as well as what is to be put on the wound. One of the most important elements in wound toilet is appropriate care for the surrounding skin. Basic guidelines for skin care must meet three basic criteria: adequate washing and cleansing of the skin, maintain the physiological balance of the skin and protect the skin from external damage. PMID:24371977

  19. A Retained Bullet in Pericardial Sac: Penetrating Gunshot Injury of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Adnan; Caliskan, Emine; Tatlisu, Mustafa Adem; Hayiroglu, Mert Ilker; Tekessin, Ahmet Ilker; Cakilli, Yasin; Avsar, Sahin; Oz, Ahmet; Uzman, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Penetrating cardiac trauma is rarely seen but when present there is a short time lag to keep the patients alive. Cardiac gunshot injuries are exceptional and it occurs mostly during interpersonal disagreements casualties or a mistakenly fired gun nowadays. Here we present a case of cardiac gunshot injury from the war of Kobani, Syria. The patient was mistakenly diagnosed to have a sole bullet in the left shoulder while he had a penetrating cardiac trauma with a bullet in the heart and pericardial effusion possibly giving rise to pericardial tamponade. Luckily the cardiac gunshot injury was noticed one day later and the patient was referred to a tertiary hospital. Intrapericardial bullet was conservatively followed up. The patient was discharged one week later after resection of the bullet in the shoulder. PMID:26977324

  20. Measurement of effective atomic number of gunshot residues using scattering of gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, Demet; Turşucu, Ahmet; Uzunoğlu, Zeynep; Korucu, Demet

    2014-09-01

    Better understanding of gunshot residues and the major elemental composition would be valuable to forensic scientists for their analysis work and interpretation of results. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues (cartridge case, bullet core, bullet jacket and gunpowder) were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The scattering of 59.54 keV gamma rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe detector. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number in the 4≤Z≤82. The intensity ratio of coherent to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best-fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of gunshot residues are determined.

  1. Distribution of gunshot residues--the influence of weapon type.

    PubMed

    Ditrich, Hans

    2012-07-10

    Gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is a frequently used forensic method for investigating shooting events. In this process, GSR-particles are detected on pertinent objects, often the hands of a suspect, with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in a scanning electron microscope. The question asked in court is usually the following: "… has or has not a given shot been fired by the suspect (at a certain place and time)?" Unfortunately, this question frequently cannot be answered by the analyst. Only the presence or absence of "characteristic" GSR-particles on the investigated sample can be stated with confidence. All other assumptions are inherently biased by many factors that are usually only known by the culprit or are generally unknown. In order to draw more profound conclusions from GSR analytical results, the dynamics of GSR particles have to be considered, i.e., how these particles reach a suspect. Consequently, the formation of the plume after firing was investigated for eleven different firearms with high speed-video analysis. The results show that a vast scope exists between revolvers - distributing many particles near the shooter - and e.g. shotguns that are quite sealed. These differences between the various weapon types should be considered for interpretation of the results of GSR-analysis. PMID:22370040

  2. Analysis of gunshot residue test results in 112 suicides.

    PubMed

    Reed, G E; McGuire, P J; Boehm, A

    1990-01-01

    The results of gunshot residue (GSR) tests in 112 suicide cases investigated by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command over a ten-year period are described. Only suicide cases in which there was certainty that the victim fired a weapon were examined in an effort to reduce ambiguous results. Previous case work research by Rudzitis indicated that positive GSR test results were encountered in suicides 62% of the time using various combinations of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Threshold values of 0.2-micrograms antimony and 0.3-micrograms barium (0.2-micrograms antimony and 0.5-micrograms barium after 1985) used by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory resulted in positive GSR results in suicide cases 38% of the time. The effects of time, location of body, handling of the body, weapon type, caliber, and condition of the hands on GSR results are examined. Case studies involving suicides by unit armorers are discussed. PMID:2313262

  3. Firework displays as sources of particles similar to gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Grima, Matthew; Butler, Mark; Hanson, Robert; Mohameden, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    In light of past research being targeted to find specific particles which may be similar to gunshot residue (GSR), this project was formulated to detect any possible particulate by random particle fallout onto substrates at firework displays and to assess the impact this may have on GSR evidence. Firework residue was collected at a display site, from amongst spectators as well as from the author's hair 90min after the display. SEM-EDX analysis has detected such particulate in all three scenarios, with the firework particle population at large providing a solid ground for discrimination from GSR. Wind dispersal was found to decrease the particle population and subsequently, the latter's discriminatory power. Some particles, if treated individually were found to be indistinguishable from GSR. Findings also include residues which may mimic strontium based GSR as well as GSR which may be mixed with that from previous firings. The continuous changes made to primer and propellant compositions by manufacturers also call for greater consideration when classifying particles as originating from pyrotechnic devices. Furthermore, authorities such as police forces should be made more aware about the incidence of such particle transfer in firework related periods. PMID:22325911

  4. [Peak sound pressure levels of gunshots from starter's pistols].

    PubMed

    Rothschild, M A; Dieker, L; Prante, H; Maschke, C

    1998-12-01

    Starter's pistols are often bought for self-defense, but can also be used for criminal activities (e.g. assaults, etc.). When a starter's pistol is loaded with blank cartridges and is fired, a powerful shooting noise results. The level of the noise produced is high enough to cause acoustic trauma. For legal examinations and giving an expert opinion further information is needed about the power of such noise. We examined how high peak sound pressure levels were of the gunshots of blank cartridges and whether there existed any directional characteristics from the noise emissions. In all, 15 different models of starter's pistols of 8 different calibres were examined. In addition to blank cartridges, 8 mm tear gas cartridges were also examined. Four transducers were situated in the horizontal plane around the muzzle: 0 degree (shooting direction), 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees (towards the firer). The distances between the transducers and the muzzle were 25 cm, 50 cm, 100 cm, and 200 cm. At a distance of 1 m and in the 0 degree shooting direction the peak sound pressure levels of nearly all weapons tested exceeded 160 dB. At a shooting distance of 25 cm the peak sound pressure levels reached 181 dB. In addition, we observed a directional characteristic concerning the emission of noise: pistols produced higher peak sound pressure levels to the front than backwards towards the firer. PMID:10023593

  5. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  6. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  7. Abdominal exploration - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical exploration of the abdomen, also called an exploratory laparotomy, may be recommended when there is abdominal ... blunt trauma"). Diseases that may be discovered by exploratory laparotomy include: inflammation of the appendix (acute appendicitis) ...

  8. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  9. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  10. [A sign of the rotational impact of the gunshot projectile on the flat bone].

    PubMed

    Leonov, S V

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the mechanisms of formation of the gunshot fracture of the flat bones with special reference to the translational and rotational motion of the projectile. A total of 120 real and experimental injuries of this type were available for the investigation with the use of simulation by the finite-elemental analysis. A set of morphological features has been identified that make it possible to determine the direction of rotation of the gunshot projectile. PMID:25764858

  11. Exploration of mXRF analysis of gunshot residue from cartridge cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Martin; Stamouli, Amalia; Knijnenberg, Alwin

    2015-10-01

    During the reconstruction of a shooting incident, several analytical techniques are at the disposal of forensic scientists. The Netherlands Forensic Institute is exploring the opportunities in which mXRF can be used to obtain information in these reconstructions. In this paper the possibilities of using the 2D-mXRF instrument as a screening tool are explored. Primarily the focus is on using mXRF to obtain information regarding the elemental composition of gunshot residue from cartridge cases. Secondly, the possibilities of using the 2D-mXRF instrument to, quickly and easily, set up databases for gunshot residue analysis are investigated.

  12. Simultaneous determination of inorganic and organic gunshot residues by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ernesto Bernal; Vázquez, Alma L Revilla

    2004-12-24

    A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to analyze simultaneously 11 organic and 10 inorganic components of gunshot residues as a cheaper and possibly more specific method comparing to traditional techniques. Pre-capillary complexation and simultaneously a micellar phase were combined to determine not only the metal but also the organic residues from a firearm. In order to test the possibility to apply the developed method to real cases, residues from shot samples from different firearms were analyzed and their results were compared with those obtained with electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy, an established technique for gunshot residue analysis. Good agreement between both techniques for lead was found. PMID:15641366

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  14. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  15. Analytical and quantitative concentration of gunshot residues (Pb, Sb, Ba) to estimate entrance hole and shooting-distance using confocal laser microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Di Peri, Giovanni Paolo; Nieddu, Antonio; Bello, Stefania; Monaci, Fabrizio; Neri, Margherita; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rabozzi, Roberto; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2013-09-10

    The identification of gunshot residues (GSRs) on human body in firearm related fatalities may be essential for the evaluation of gunshot wounds and for the analysis of the shooting distance. The present study introduces the elemental analysis of the GSRs by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer analysis (ICP-AES) performed on skin samples. ICP-AES was used to increase the accuracy of the analysis in gunshots fired from long and medium distance. In this experimental study, a series of 50 test shots have been performed in an open space with lateral wind protection. As target we used pig skin cut into 20 cm × 20 cm squares. The firing distances were 0.2, 5, 50, 100 and 150 cm. To exclude environmental contamination, each skin sample was carefully washed with deionized water and dried at room temperature in a closed box before the shooting test. We choose 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers handguns, loaded with different ammunitions. At ICP-AES analysis a clearly decreasing trend in the quantity and the concentration of the different elements of GSR by increasing the firing distance for both the guns used in the test was evident for every portion of skin samples analyzed. The analytical results obtained by ICP-AES confirmed very high concentrations of Pb, Sb, and Ba in the close-range shots and low concentrations of these particles in the intermediate and distant shots. In particular, the concentration of Sb, Ba, and Pb was significantly different from loose values when the firing distance was 100-150 cm for both the 9×21 and the 7.65 mm calibers. PMID:23890629

  16. Conservative Treatment of a Gossypiboma Causing Uterine Wound Dehiscence

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Taner A.; Ozyurek, Sefik E.; Gundogdu, Elif C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case with gossypiboma following cesarean section which led to uterine wound dehiscence. A 30-year-old woman had been submitted to an emergency cesarean section 4 months previously at another hospital. Clinical and ultrasound findings revealed a large intra-abdominal mass and diffuse peritonitis. At laparotomy, a gossypiboma causing an abscess and uterine wound dehiscence with necrosis of the margins was detected. We performed repetitive wound debridements under broad-spectrum antibiotic cover and eventually resutured the incision. Although hysterectomy has so far been the choice of treatment in the literature once a uterine wound dehiscence had occurred, it was possible in this case to preserve the uterus. PMID:24106624

  17. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing. PMID:25744144

  18. Perioperative complications in abdominal sacrocolpopexy and vaginal sacrospinous ligament fixation procedures.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Fuat; Ozdemir, Ismail; Somunkiran, Asli; Topuz, Samet; Iyibozkurt, Cem; Duras Doyran, Gonul; Kemik Gul, Ozlem; Gul, Baris

    2007-03-01

    This study assessed perioperative complications in abdominal sacrocolpopexy and vaginal sacrospinous ligament fixation procedures. Perioperative complications were defined as any complication occurring during surgery or the first 6 weeks postoperatively. Forty-five patients underwent abdominal procedures (20 sacrohysteropexy and 25 sacrocolpopexy) and 60 patients underwent vaginal sacrospinous fixation. Of the 105 patients, 13 had vaginal vault prolapse. In the abdominal group, one bladder injury, four hemorrhages, and three wound dehiscences occurred. In the vaginal group, one rectal injury and one postoperative vaginal vault infection occurred. Major and minor complications were more frequent in the abdominal group than in the vaginal group. Blood loss was not significantly different. The operating time and hospital stay in the abdominal group were significantly longer than in the vaginal group. In conclusion, abdominal sacrocolpopexy had a higher rate of perioperative complications and longer hospital stay and operating time. PMID:16688396

  19. Prehospital advanced trauma life support for critical penetrating wounds to the thorax and abdomen.

    PubMed

    Pons, P T; Honigman, B; Moore, E E; Rosen, P; Antuna, B; Dernocoeur, J

    1985-09-01

    The role of advanced trauma life support (ATLS) in the prehospital care of the critically injured is highly controversial. This study analyzes the efficacy of ATLS in the management of critical penetrating wounds of the thorax and abdomen. In the 2 1/2-year period ending July 1984, 203 consecutive patients underwent emergency laparotomy or thoracotomy for gunshot and stab wounds. All patients were treated in the field by advanced paramedics (EMT-P). For gunshot wounds the mean time (+/- S.E.M.) responding to the scene was 4.5 (+/- 0.29) minutes, on the scene 10.1 (+/- 0.41) minutes, and returning to the hospital 6.4 (+/- 0.32) minutes. For stab wounds the mean time responding to the scene was 4.8 (+/- 0.21) minutes, on the scene 9.5 (+/- 0.37) minutes, and returning to the hospital 5.7 (+ 0.30) minutes. The number of intravenous lines started averaged 1.8 per patient. Eighty-one patients had PASG applied and 28 patients underwent endotracheal intubation (21 orally, seven nasally). Thirty-three patients had no obtainable blood pressure, of whom six survived (18%). One hundred sixty (94%) of the remaining 170 patients who had any initial blood pressure survived. One hundred nine (55%) patients had an increase in BP greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 35.6 mm Hg), 64 (32%) had no significant change, and 25 (13%) had a fall greater than or equal to 10 mm Hg (average, 24.2 mm Hg) from the field to the emergency department. Twenty (80%) of the 25 patients with a fall in blood pressure survived.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4032506

  20. ADULT ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIA IN IBADAN

    PubMed Central

    Ayandipo, O.O; Afuwape, O.O; Irabor, D.O; Abdurrazzaaq, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal wall hernias are very common diseases encountered in surgical practice. Groin hernia is the commonest type of abdominal wall hernias. There are several methods of hernia repair but tension-free repair (usually with mesh) offers the least recurrent rate. Aim: To describe the clinical profile of anterior abdominal wall hernias and our experience in the surgical management of identified hernias Method: The project was a retrospective study of all patients with abdominal wall hernia presenting into surgical divisions of University College Hospital Ibadan during a 6 year period (January 2008 to December 2013). Relevant information was retrieved from their case notes and analysed. Results: The case records of 1215 (84.7%) patients out of 1435 were retrieved. Elective surgery was done in 981(80.7%) patients while 234 (19.3%) patients had emergency surgery. There were 922 (84.8%) groin hernias and post-operative incisional hernia accounted for 9.1% (111) of the patients. About half (49.1%) of those with incisional hernia were post obstetric and gynaecologic procedure followed by post laparotomy incisional hernias 16 (14%) and others (23.5%). The ratio of inguinal hernia to other types in this study is 3:1. Hollow viscus resection and emergency surgery were predictors of wound infection statistically significant in predicting wound infection (P < 0.001). Peri-operative morbidity/mortality at 28 days post operation was documented in 113 patients (12.1%). One year recurrence rate of groin hernia was 2.1%. Conclusion: The pattern of presentation and management of anterior wall hernias are still the same compared with the earlier study in this hospital. New modality of treatment should be adopted as the standard choice of care. Abdominal wall hernias are very common clinical presentation. Modified Bassini repair was the preferred method of repair due to its simplicity. Mesh repair is becoming more common in recent time but high cost and initial non

  1. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  2. Evaluation of the Wound Healing Potential of Achillea biebersteinii Afan. (Asteraceae) by In Vivo Excision and Incision Models

    PubMed Central

    Akkol, Esra Küpeli; Koca, Ufuk; Pesin, Ipek; Yilmazer, Demet

    2011-01-01

    Achillea species are widely used for diarrhea, abdominal pain, stomachache and healing of wounds in folk medicine. To evaluate the wound healing activity of the plant, extracts were prepared with different solvents; hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively from the roots of Achillea biebersteinii. Linear incision by using tensiometer and circular excision wound models were employed on mice and rats. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with the standard skin ointment Madecassol. The n-hexane extract treated groups of animals showed 84.2% contraction, which was close to contraction value of the reference drug Madecassol (100%). On the other hand the same extract on incision wound model demonstrated a significant increase (40.1%) in wound tensile strength as compared to other groups. The results of histoptological examination supported the outcome of linear incision and circular excision wound models as well. The experimental data demonstrated that A. biebersteinii displayed remarkable wound healing activity. PMID:19546149

  3. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  4. Craniocerebral Gunshot Injuries; A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; M. Rubiano, Andres; Agrawal, Amit; Rojas, Alejandro; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Satyarthee, Guru Dutta; Calderon-Miranda, Willem Guillermo; Hernandez, Nidia Escobar; Zabaleta-Churio, Nasly

    2016-01-01

    Craniocerebral gunshot injuries (CGI) are increasingly encountered by neurosurgeons in civilian and urban settings. Unfortunately, more   prevalent condition in developing countries, with major armed conflicts which is still persisting, since the main trigger is violence at the national or state level. Management goals of CGI should focus on aggressive resuscitation and correction of coagulopathy; those with stable vital signs should undergo CT scan head at the earliest possible opportunity. Neuroimaging is vital for   planning of surgical management, especially to determine the type of surgery, routes of the approach to the surgical target area and  extraction of the impacted foreign bodies, however, surgical management is not always indicated. Although subset of such cases may be managed even with non-surgical management. The treatment comprises of immediate life salvaging resuscitative measures including control of the  persistent bleeding, care of associated injury, management of raised intracranial pressure, prevention of cerebrospinal fistula formation by primary watertight dural repair and  prevention of infection, through extensive debridement of contaminated, macerated or ischemic tissues; preservation of nervous tissue and restoration of anatomic structures through the hermetic sealing of dural and scalp defect. Recently, only few studies of craniocerebral penetrating injuries are published that too involving smaller patients sample sizes; although classic studies in the military and civil situation noticed associated relatively very high mortality and morbidity and psychological as well as economic impact on the   affected individual, the family and the health system in providing ongoing care to the sufferers and society at large.  Currently various measures are advocated with aim to reduce the incidence of CGI especially in civilian populations. It is highly necessary and immensely urgent to promote research in a neurocritical care of CGI to

  5. Using Gunshot Detection Systems to Fight Explosive Fishing Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showen, R. L.; Dunson, J. C.; Woodman, G.; Christopher, S.; Wilson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Blast fishing (using explosives to catch fish) causes extensive damage to coral reefs, especially in the Coral Triangle in Southeast Asia. Subsistence fishermen and larger consortiums, often with criminal links, throw an explosive into a school of fish, killing all sea life within range. This unsustainable practice is becoming more prevalent, and threatens the protein supply of as many as a billion people. Ending blast fishing will require combined technical and societal methods aimed at both deterring the practice, and catching those responsible. Our work aims to significantly improve enforcement. We are re-purposing SST's ShotSpotter gunshot detection system, (trusted and valued by police around the world), substituting hydrophones for the present microphones. Using multilateration and trained human reviewers, the system can give prompt blast alerts, location data, and acoustic waveforms to law enforcement officials. We hope to establish a prototype system in Malaysia in 2015, and have already secured governmental approvals for installation and tests with local law enforcement. The Scubazoo media firm in Malaysia is working with resorts, dive operations, and celebrity sponsors, and is planning to produce videos to illustrate the severity of the problem to both governments and the public. Because there is little hard data concerning the prevalence of blast fishing in either marine protected areas or open waters, the system can also indicate to the world the actual blast rates and patterns of use. The Teng Hoi environmental NGO in Hong Kong showed in 2004 that acoustic waves from typical bombs propagate on the order of 20 km, so an underwater locator system with a small number of sensors can feasibly cover a sizable coral region. Our present plans are to mount sensors on piers, buoys, and boats, but if possible we would also like to integrate with other existing acoustic arrays to strengthen the fight against blast fishing.

  6. Outcome of abdominal wall hernia repair with Permacol™ biologic mesh.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Amy W; Abbas, Maher A; Tejirian, Talar

    2013-10-01

    The use of biologic mesh in abdominal wall operations has gained popularity despite a paucity of outcome data. We aimed to review the experience of a large healthcare organization with Permacol™. A retrospective study was conducted of patients who underwent abdominal hernia repair with Permacol™ in 14 Southern California hospitals. One hundred ninety-five patients were analyzed over a 4-year period. Operations included ventral/incisional hernia repairs, ostomy closures, parastomal hernia repairs, and inguinal hernia repairs. In 50 per cent of the patients, Permacol™ was used to reinforce a primary fascial repair and in 50 per cent as a fascial bridge. The overall complication rate was 39.5 per cent. The complication rate was higher in patients with infected versus clean wounds, body mass index (BMI) 40 kg/m(2) or greater versus BMI less than 40 kg/m(2), in patients with prior mesh repair, and when mesh was used as a fascial bridge. With a mean follow-up of 2.1 years, morbid obesity was associated with a higher recurrence. To date this is the largest study on the use of Permacol™ in abdominal wall hernia repair. In our patient population undergoing heterogeneous operations with a majority of wounds as Class II or higher, use of Permacol™ did not eliminate wound morbidity or prevent recurrence, especially in morbidly obese patients. PMID:24160785

  7. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. PMID:25500273

  8. Normoxic wound fluid contains high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Howdieshell, T R; Riegner, C; Gupta, V; Callaway, D; Grembowicz, K; Sathyanarayana; McNeil, P L

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the temporal integration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which has been shown to be present in wound fluid, with the putatively related processes of wound fluid oxygen content, wound angiogenesis, and granulation tissue formation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During cutaneous wound repair, new tissue formation starts with reepithelialization and is followed by granulation tissue formation, including neutrophil and macrophage accumulation, fibroblast ingrowth, matrix deposition, and angiogenesis. Because angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability are characteristic features of wound healing, VEGF may play an important role in tissue repair. METHODS: A ventral hernia, surgically created in the abdominal wall of female swine, was repaired using silicone sheeting and skin closure. Over time, a fluid-filled wound compartment formed, bounded by subcutaneous tissue and omentum. Ultrasonography was performed serially to examine the anatomy and dimensions of the subcutaneous tissue and wound compartment. Serial wound fluid samples, obtained by percutaneous aspiration, were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, pH, and growth factor concentrations. RESULTS: Three independent assays demonstrate that VEGF protein is present at substantially elevated levels in a wound fluid associated with the formation of abdominal granulation tissue. However, the wound fluid is not hypoxic at any time. Serial sampling reveals that transforming growth factor beta-1 protein appears in the wound fluid before VEGF. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that VEGF is a prominent regulator of wound angiogenesis and vessel permeability. A factor other than hypoxia, perhaps the earlier appearance of another growth factor, transforming growth factor beta-1, may positively regulate VEGF appearance in the wound fluid. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. Figure 7. PMID:9833810

  9. Analysis of gunshot residues as trace in nasal mucus by GFAAS.

    PubMed

    Aliste, Marina; Chávez, Luis Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    When a gun is fired, the majority of gunshot residues are deposited on the shooter's hands. But these residues disappear through contact with surfaces or washing. Therefore, the maximum time frame to find GSR on a suspect's hands is 8h. The mucus, inside of a nostril, forms a surface layer where they are trapped foreign particles. In this way, mucus inside of a gunshot suspect's nostrils could act like an adhesive medium to stick on it gaseous particles from a gunshot. In this study, the presence of GSR in nasal mucus and its residence time is examined. A new procedure for the sampling of possible gunshot residue accumulated in the nasal mucus is designed. Samples are taken with cotton swabs moistened with a solution of EDTA and, after an acid digestion, are analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, samples of hands are taken for comparison purposes. GSR recovery has been successful. The concentration of GSR in nasal mucus is found to be lower than on the hands, but with a longer residence time. Thus, it is possible to expand the sampling time of a suspect also, as nasal mucus cannot be contaminated by handling weapons. PMID:26874050

  10. Acoustic sensor planning for gunshot location in national parks: a pareto front approach.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario. PMID:22303135

  11. Acoustic Sensor Planning for Gunshot Location in National Parks: A Pareto Front Approach

    PubMed Central

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J.; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario. PMID:22303135

  12. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  13. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  14. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  16. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts and puncture wounds can be treated at home. Take the following steps. FOR MINOR CUTS Wash your hands with soap or antibacterial ... and scissors safely. Make sure you and your child are up to date on vaccinations . A tetanus vaccine is generally recommended every 10 ... Snake bite Minor cut - first aid Sewing a wound closed - series ...

  17. Saliva and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Veerman, Enno C I

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. Furthermore, saliva contains a variety of proteins that play a role in the various stages of the intraoral wound healing. Tissue factor, present in salivary exosomes, accelerates the clotting of blood dramatically. The subsequent proliferation of epithelial cells is promoted by growth factors in saliva, especially epidermal growth factor. The importance of secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor is demonstrated by the observation that in the absence of this salivary protein, oral wound healing is considerably delayed. Members of the salivary histatin family promote wound closure in vitro by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration. Cell proliferation is not enhanced by histatin. Cyclization of histatin increased its biological activity approximately 1,000-fold compared to linear histatin. These studies suggest that histatins could potentially be used for the development of new wound healing medications. PMID:23878824

  18. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  19. Integrated Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) in Gunshot Residue (GSR) characterisation.

    PubMed

    Romolo, F S; Christopher, M E; Donghi, M; Ripani, L; Jeynes, C; Webb, R P; Ward, N I; Kirkby, K J; Bailey, M J

    2013-09-10

    Gunshot Residue (GSR) is residual material from the discharge of a firearm, which frequently provides crucial information in criminal investigations. Changes in ammunition manufacturing are gradually phasing out the heavy metals on which current forensic GSR analysis is based, and the latest Heavy Metal Free (HMF) primers urgently demand new forensic solutions. Proton scanning microbeam Ion Beam Analysis (IBA), in conjunction with the Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer (SEM-EDS), can be introduced into forensic analysis to solve both new and old problems, with a procedure entirely commensurate with current forensic practice. Six cartridges producing GSR particles known to be interesting in casework by both experience and the literature were selected for this study. A standard procedure to relocate the same particles previously analysed by SEM-EDS, based on both secondary electron (SE) and X-ray imaging was developed and tested. Elemental Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) mapping of the emitted X-rays allowed relocation in a scan of 10 μm × 10 μm of even a 1 μm GSR particle. The comparison between spectra from the same particle obtained by SEM-EDS and IBA-PIXE showed that the latter is much more sensitive at mid-high energies. Results that are very interesting in a forensic context were obtained with particles from a cartridge containing mercury fulminate in the primer. Particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) maps of a particles from HMF cartridges allowed identification of Boron and Sodium in particles from hands using the (10)B(p,α1γ)(7)Be, (11)B(p,p1γ)(11)B and (23)Na(p,p1γ)(23)Na reactions, which is extraordinary in a forensic context. The capability for quantitative analysis of elements within individual particles by IBA was also demonstrated, giving the opportunity to begin a new chapter in the research on GSR particles. The integrated procedure that was developed, which makes use of all the IBA

  20. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  1. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  2. Decreasing prevalence and seasonal variation of gunshot trauma in raptors admitted to the wildlife center of Virginia: 1993-2002.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jean; Lickey, Adrienne; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify the epidemiologic factors associated with gunshot injuries in raptors presented to the Wildlife Center of Virginia from 1993 to 2002. Of the 3,156 raptors admitted, 118 raptors (3.7%), representing 15 species, were admitted with gunshot trauma as the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The majority of cases consisted of four species: red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis; 47%), red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus; 14%), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura; 10%), and bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus; 8%). For species with greater than 40 admissions during the study period, the proportion of gunshot trauma of all causes of morbidity and mortality ranged from <1% to 11%. Greater numbers of raptors with gunshot trauma were admitted during the fall and winter months (75%) compared with the spring and summer (25%). A significant decrease in the absolute number of gunshot cases per year was observed over the time period studied. The population-level effect of gunshot trauma is unknown for these species; however, it appears to be minor compared with other causes of morbidity and mortality. PMID:17312769

  3. Integrins in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, Leeni; Heino, Jyrki; Häkkinen, Lari; Larjava, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Regulation of cell adhesions during tissue repair is fundamentally important for cell migration, proliferation, and protein production. All cells interact with extracellular matrix proteins with cell surface integrin receptors that convey signals from the environment into the nucleus, regulating gene expression and cell behavior. Integrins also interact with a variety of other proteins, such as growth factors, their receptors, and proteolytic enzymes. Re-epithelialization and granulation tissue formation are crucially dependent on the temporospatial function of multiple integrins. This review explains how integrins function in wound repair. Recent Advances: Certain integrins can activate latent transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) that modulates wound inflammation and granulation tissue formation. Dysregulation of TGF-β1 function is associated with scarring and fibrotic disorders. Therefore, these integrins represent targets for therapeutic intervention in fibrosis. Critical Issues: Integrins have multifaceted functions and extensive crosstalk with other cell surface receptors and molecules. Moreover, in aberrant healing, integrins may assume different functions, further increasing the complexity of their functionality. Discovering and understanding the role that integrins play in wound healing provides an opportunity to identify the mechanisms for medical conditions, such as excessive scarring, chronic wounds, and even cancer. Future Directions: Integrin functions in acute and chronic wounds should be further addressed in models better mimicking human wounds. Application of any products in acute or chronic wounds will potentially alter integrin functions that need to be carefully considered in the design. PMID:25493210

  4. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  5. [Phlebology and wound healing].

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürg; Läuchli, Severin; French, Lars E

    2010-04-01

    Venous diseases are highly prevalent and chronic wounds cause high morbidity and costs. Prevalence of severe forms of chronic venous insufficiency is on the decline. This is due to improved diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism, and to improved surgery of varicose veins and their sequelae. The spectrum of chronic wounds has shifted from venous ulcers towards more complex pathologies. At the same time, new treatment options are available. Modern phlebology effectively treats varicose veins, prevents sequelae of varicosis and deep venous thrombosis, and offers help to the great majority of patients with chronic wounds. PMID:20336620

  6. The role of negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam in the treatment of war wounds.

    PubMed

    Powell, Elisha T

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of war wounds poses many unique challenges to all healthcare providers (surgeons, flight medics, nurses, etc.), whether they are located at the far forward trauma hospitals located in or near areas of conflict, at regional hospitals such as Landstuhl Medical Center in Germany, or the larger military hospitals in the United States. These complex wounds often involve massive loss of soft tissue and bone, are contaminated, and are unlike most injuries seen at civilian hospitals. Treatment guidelines, or doctrine, are the result of lessons learned in conflicts over the past few centuries dating back to early 19th century Europe through the Vietnam and recent Persian Gulf war. Advances in surgical and medical treatment have resulted from the complex challenges presented to the war trauma surgeon. More than 1 million patients have been treated for chronic pressure ulcers, abdominal wounds, diabetic ulcers, and acute civilian trauma wounds with negative pressure wound therapy with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by V.A.C.(R) Therapy (KCI, San Antonio, TX) for over the past decade. However, the use of NPWT/ROCF for the care of war wounds at battlefield trauma hospitals and/or in the aeromedical evacuation transport system aboard aircraft is a new application of this wound treatment not yet accepted as doctrine. Investigational studies are ongoing to study the safety and efficacy of the treatment of battlefield wounds with NPWT/ROCF both for those national citizens treated at the trauma hospitals in Iraq and Afghanistan and for those wounded American and coalition patients who are transported through the aeromedical transport system to medical centers in the United States. PMID:19034160

  7. A Study of Sepsis in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.; Macdonald, G. R.; Rodin, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Published records of the frequency of wound sepsis are often unreliable sources of information on the general frequency of this complication because of unstandardized methods of reporting and because of the various views of different investigators as to what constitutes sepsis. A method of infection reporting, its study and analysis are outlined. A survey of postoperative infections by this method for the years 1959, 1960 and 1961 revealed infection rates of 2.02%, 1.20% and 1.14%, respectively. For the same period the percentages of wound infections caused by Staph. aureus were 83.06%, 69.8% and 51.8%, respectively. The most prevalent phage types were 55/53/54 and 52/80/81/82, although types 80/81/82 and 80 were also involved. Infections with Gram-negative organisms were encountered more often in 1961 than in 1959. The majority of these were of mixed type, and followed abdominal surgery. There is need for more comprehensive study and analysis of postoperative wound sepsis and its complications. It was apparent from this study that, statistically, a relatively low rate of postoperative infections may mask a high rate following a specific surgical procedure. PMID:13954844

  8. Treatment Experience of Severe Abdominal Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y-G; Wu, J-S; Jiang, B; Wang, J-H; Liu, C-P; Peng, C; Tian, B-Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aims to investigate the causes and treatment experience of severe abdominal infection after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical data were retrospectively analysed in perioperative severe abdominal infection of 186 orthotopic liver transplantation cases from March 2004 to November 2011. Among the 186 patients, 16 cases had severe abdominal infection: five cases had bile duct anastomotic leakage-inducing massive hydrops and infection under liver interstice, 10 cases had extensive bleeding of surgical wound leading to massive haematocele and infection around the liver, and one case had postoperative lower oesophageal fistula leakage causing massive hydrops and infection under the left diaphragm. After definite diagnosis, 12 cases underwent surgery within three days, with no death. Among the four cases that underwent surgery three days after diagnosis, one case died of multiple-organ failure five days after abdominal cavity exploration, which was performed 21 days after liver transplantation. Severe abdominal infections after liver transplantation were the most common causes of death in perioperative liver transplantation. Comprehensive treatment with efficacious antibiotics, multiple-organ support, controlled surgical removal of the lesion, and adequate drainage establishment was the key to the entire treatment. PMID:26426173

  9. War wounds management--early reconstruction of soft tissue defects.

    PubMed

    Stanec, Z; Skrbić, S; Dzepina, I; Hulina, D; Ivrlac, R

    1994-01-01

    The authors emphasize that the knowledge of terminal ballistics is important for understanding the pathophysiology of war wounds. They present their own experiences in the treatment of war wounds in 504 casualties treated at the Institute of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Clinical Hospital Center in Zagreb. The locations of soft-tissue defects were: head and neck, 103; trunk, 90; and extremities, 903. War wounds were divided into four main categories with regard to the type of the injury and the extension of soft-tissue defect, thus showing the differences in primary excision and reconstruction of the wounds. About 30% of head and neck injuries were treated by primary or delayed primary reconstruction. All thoraco-abdominal wounds were type I or II, and most of them (53.3%) were reconstructed with split-thickness skin grafts. The greatest number of sophisticated reconstructions were performed on extremity injuries (63 wounds were reconstructed by local flaps, while free flaps were used in 40 cases). The authors emphasize the importance of proper primary treatment, which is the condition for early reconstruction. This results in significantly shorter hospitalization, so that 62% of the patients were cured in 20 days and then discharged to early rehabilitation. PMID:7532048

  10. Cranial fractures and direction of fire in low velocity gunshots.

    PubMed

    Betz, P; Stiefel, D; Eisenmenger, W

    1996-01-01

    A total of 59 penetrating contact shot wounds to the head caused by handguns was investigated and a comparison was made between the magnitude and the number of fracture lines at the entrance and exist site of the vault and at the base of the skull. It was noted that in approximately 50% of the cases the extent of fractures at the entrance site exceeded those at the exit wound while in the remaining individuals no relevant differences or even greater exit fractures were found. Furthermore, no close correlation between the fracture patterns of the vault and at the base of the skull occurred indicating that differences in the magnitude and the number of entrance or exit fracture lines cannot provide reliable information on direction of fire. Additionally, no further conclusions on the gun used can be drawn from differences in the entrance and exit fracture patterns. It can only be assumed that the absence of fractures in the cranial fossae points to the use of small calibre handguns (< or = 7.65 mm) while a fragmentation of the skull can as a rule be expected after shots from guns with larger calibres (> 7.65 mm). PMID:8912048

  11. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  12. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    PubMed

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings. PMID:26322408

  13. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2009:chap 39. Simon BC, Hern HG. Wound management principles. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  14. Anal avulsion caused by abdominal crush injury.

    PubMed

    Terrosu, G; Rossetto, A; Kocjancic, E; Rossitti, P; Bresadola, V

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a pelvic and lower abdomen crushing trauma in 37-year-old male patient. The patient had an open lumbar wound, laceration of the psoas muscle, pelvic fracture, a ruptured urogenital diaphragm, and extensive urogenital lacerations. An emergency laparotomy was performed with debridment, urethral reconstruction, and osteosynthesis of the pubic bone. The mobilization of the patient revealed a deep gap, about 8 × 8 cm, in the perineum, with the anus and rectum displaced from their original site. Anal reimplantation was performed, suturing the median raphe, inserting two pelvic drainage tubes, and fashioning a loop transverse colostomy. Closed rectal traumas account for only 4-11% of all rectal traumas. Crushing of the pelvis causes a sudden reduction in its anteroposterior diameter and a corresponding increase in its latero-lateral diameter, together with an abrupt rise in intra-abdominal pressure. The anus is pushed out of the perineal plane due to the divarication of the levator muscles. As suggested in the literature, the standard treatment is wound debridement with immediate or deferred repair, fashioning a diversion colostomy, and repair of the rectum, wherever possible. PMID:21556880

  15. [Laparoscopic repair of abdominal wall hernias].

    PubMed

    Bezsilla, János

    2010-10-01

    Repair of abdominal wall defects is a challenge for all general surgeons and a variety of methods have been described in the past. Traditionally, primary suture repair was shown to have a high recurrence rate in long-term follow-up studies. Herniorrhaphies that apply a large prosthetic mesh are appear to have a lower failure rate, but extensive dissection of soft tissue contributes to an increased incidence of wound infections and wound-related complications. The method of laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was developed in the early 1990s. This technique is based on the same physical and surgical principles as the open underlay procedure. The laparoscopic intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) technique and mesh materials were developed further in subsequent years, and there have been numerous reports on successful use of the IPOM technique even for extremely large hernia openings in obese and elderly patients. Reduced surgical trauma and lower infection and recurrence rates are key advantages of the minimally invasive repair. Therefore, this operation has increased in popularity promising shorter hospital stay, improved outcome, and fewer complications than traditional open procedures. PMID:20965866

  16. [Wounds and dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Bulić, Suzana Ozanić; Kotrulja, Lena; Sjerobabski-Masnec, Ines

    2012-10-01

    Wounds are a hallmark of various skin diseases. Most patients with wounds suffer from chronic venous insufficiency or other vascular diseases. Autoimmune, infective, metabolic, malignant, some psychiatric and diseases caused by environmental factors like radiation, present with skin and mucosal erosions and ulcerations. Lichen planus, lichen sclerosus, toxic epidermal necrolysis, Kaposi sarcoma, genodermatoses like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease belong to different dermatological entities, they have different etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation, but at some stage ulcerations and erosions dominate through the disease course as a result of complications of untreated disease or as part of a complex clinical presentation. Wounds demand a different multidisciplinary therapeutic approach, sometimes even in intensive care unit, where special care is available. Most patients are followed-up to avoid fatal complications like sepsis, as well as a potential malignant transformation of cells in the environment of chronic inflammation. Wounds are found in female genital lichen planus and lichen sclerosus. Oral lichen planus has a potential for malignant transformation and is considered a precancerous disease. Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a life threatening disease similar to burns. Wounds cover most of the body surface as well as mucosa. The high mortality rate is due to complications like sepsis, loss of thermoregulation, electrolyte and fluid disbalance and shock. Chronic wounds are also a hallmark of skin tumors and other skin malignancies like Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoma. The primary treatment goal in genodermatoses like epidermolysis bullosa is wound care, and to a less extent in other inherited skin diseases like Hailey-Hailey and Darier's disease wound healing is important for sustaining a good quality of life in affected individuals. PMID:23193818

  17. Wound dressings - a review.

    PubMed

    Dhivya, Selvaraj; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Santhini, Elango

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process which requires suitable environment to promote healing process. With the advancement in technology, more than 3000 products have been developed to treat different types of wounds by targeting various aspects of healing process. The present review traces the history of dressings from its earliest inception to the current status and also discusses the advantage and limitations of the dressing materials. PMID:26615539

  18. Unexpected multiple intra-abdominal injuries after projectile fragmentation: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Unlü, Aytekin; Petrone, Patrizio; Karşıdağ, Tamer; Asensio, Juan A

    2012-11-01

    Explosives create and energize particles that act as projectiles prone to further fragmentation or create other secondary missiles in the body. These fragments may result in secondary injuries. This has been repeatedly described in the orthopedic and neurosurgical literature. We report the same process for abdominal injuries after fascial penetration in the military setting. This is an observational case series study. Local wound exploration as a standard approach was performed in conscious patients who sustained abdominal wall injuries. Patients with negative physical examination were excluded from the study. An intraperitoneal injury was assumed in those with a full-thickness fascial defect, and laparotomy was performed. Twenty patients met the study eligibility criteria. Of those 20 patients, 12 had negative wound exploration and were excluded from the study, while abdominal organ injuries were found in eight (40%) patients. During laparotomy, projectile-induced injuries in a sprayed distribution were found in three (38%) of these patients. These injuries were far from the predictable trajectory and in the absence of bone fragmentation. The overall mean number of peritoneal defects was 1.7, and a mean 6.8 intra-abdominal injuries for each peritoneal defect were found when through-and-through injuries were excluded.Despite a single peritoneal defect, there may be multiple intraperitoneal injuries due to further fragmentation of the projectile. Under mass casualties, wound exploration with a full-thickness fascial defect could serve as an indicator of possible intra-abdominal injuries, and consequently indicate exploratory laparotomy. PMID:23588915

  19. Using medical silicone to ensure an airtight negative pressure wound therapy dressing seal in challenging wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nora; Hendricks, Joerg; Hoffmann, Karen; Hemprich, Alexander; Halama, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been used for a broad range of indications and wound types. However, it can be difficult to maintain an airtight dressing seal when the wound is located in an anatomically challenging area or environment. To address this problem, medical silicone, used to create intraoral vacuum dressings, was used in five patients (one woman, four men, age range 57 to 66 years) to seal leaking NPWT dressings (four polyurethane dressings and one polyurethane silver foam dressing). The wounds were located in the head and neck, abdominal, lower extremity, and anogenital areas. Initial wound sizes ranged from 2.5 cm² to 700 cm², and periwound areas were characterized by irregular surfaces (scars, skin folds, or curved surfaces), humid milieu, or mobile structures. In all five patients, negative pressure was set at -125 mm Hg constant suction, and the silicone was able to seal the leaking dressings. Wound size reductions from 2.5 cm² to 13.5 cm² were observed during 9 to 64 days (range) of NPWT treatment. In these patients, medical silicone was found to be a suitable material to facilitate airtight sealing of the dressings used with NPWT. PMID:25105477

  20. Increased collagen synthesis rate during wound healing in muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaobo; Salisbury, Jonathan; Preedy, Victor R; Emery, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing in muscle involves the deposition of collagen, but it is not known whether this is achieved by changes in the synthesis or the degradation of collagen. We have used a reliable flooding dose method to measure collagen synthesis rate in vivo in rat abdominal muscle following a surgical incision. Collagen synthesis rate was increased by 480% and 860% on days 2 and 7 respectively after surgery in the wounded muscle compared with an undamaged area of the same muscle. Collagen content was increased by approximately 100% at both day 2 and day 7. These results demonstrate that collagen deposition during wound healing in muscle is achieved entirely by an increase in the rate of collagen synthesis. PMID:23526975

  1. Prevent Bite Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  2. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  3. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies. Recent Advances: Phytochemicals are non-nutritive substances present in plants, and some of them have the potential to provide better tissue remodeling when applied on wounds and to also act as proangiogenic agents during wound healing. Critical Issues: In this review, we briefly discuss the current understanding, important molecular targets, and mechanism of action(s) of some of the phytochemicals such as curcumin, picroliv, and arnebin-1. We also broadly review the multiple pathways that these phytochemicals regulate to enhance wound repair and skin regeneration. Future Directions: Recent experimental data on the effects of phytochemicals on wound healing and skin regeneration establish the potential clinical utility of plant-based compounds. Additional research in order to better understand the exact mechanism and potential targets of phytochemicals in skin regeneration is needed. Human studies a2nd clinical trials are pivotal to fully understand the benefits of phytochemicals in wound healing and skin regeneration. PMID:27134766

  4. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Joseph Andrew; Underdown, Mary Jane; Clark, William Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Nutrition is one of the most basic of medical issues and is often ignored as a problem in the management of our chronic wound patients. Unfortunately, malnutrition is widespread in our geriatric patients even in nursing homes in developed countries. Attention to basic nutrition and providing appropriate supplements may assist in the healing of our chronic wounds. Recent Advances: Recent research has revealed the epidemiology of malnutrition in developed countries, the similarities to malnutrition in developing countries, and some of the physiologic and sociologic causes for this problem. More information is now available on the biochemical effects of nutrient deficiency and supplementation with macronutrients and micronutrients. In some cases, administration of isolated nutrients beyond recommended amounts for healthy individuals may have a pharmacologic effect to help wounds heal. Critical Issues: Much of the knowledge of the nutritional support of chronic wounds is based on information that has been obtained from trauma management. Due to the demographic differences of the patients and differences in the physiology of acute and chronic wounds, it is not logical to assume that all aspects of nutritional support are identical in these patient groups. Before providing specific nutritional supplements, appropriate assessments of patient general nutritional status and the reasons for malnutrition must be obtained or specific nutrient supplementation will not be utilized. Future Directions: Future research must concentrate on the biochemical and physiologic differences of the acute and chronic wounds and the interaction with specific supplements, such as antioxidants, vitamin A, and vitamin D. PMID:25371850

  5. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  6. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  7. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  8. [Experience with thoracoscopy for rifle gunshot penetrating trauma of the chest; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Kambayashi, T; Moriuchi, T; Noguchi, T; Kamakari, K; Terada, T

    2005-10-01

    A 57-year-old man came to our hospital by ambulance for a chest injury by a rifle gunshot. He had a penetrating injury of the chest wall, hemopneumothorax and pulmonary laceration. He was managed with chest drainage, oxygen inhalation. His respiratory and cardiac status was stable. However, for the purpose to prevent the development of empyema or pneumonia, and to check the existence of damage of intrathoracic structures by the gunshot injury, thoracoscopy was performed next day. He discharged without postoperative complications 17 days after the injury. Open thoracotomy is reported to be required in only about 10-15% of patients with chest injuries. However, operative indication of the chest injuries may spread in the future with the spread of thoracoscopy and its low invasiveness. PMID:16235855

  9. The incidence of transient particulate gunshot primer residue in Oregon and Washington bow hunters.

    PubMed

    Mann, M J; Espinoza, E O

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of GSR/PA (gunshot primer residue particulate analysis) results in an alleged firearm violation of bow hunting regulations is complicated by the theoretical presence of contaminant GSR from prior legitimate shooting incidents. A total of 120 samples representing field collections from thirty Oregon and Washington bow hunters were analyzed for the presence of particulate gunshot residue in order to assess the level of contamination that may be present in this population. Of the bow hunters sampled, 50% stated that they shoot guns; 80% of the shooting group stated at the time of the GSR field collection that they were wearing the same outer clothing or driving the same vehicle, or both, when they last handled and fired a weapon. Analysis of the 120 samples resulted in the detection of one tricomponent particle of GSR. PMID:8426156

  10. Vulnerability of children to gunshot trauma in violence-prone environment: the case of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Sudeshni; Van As, A B

    2011-01-01

    South Africa has a high level of violence, as more people are killed by gunfire each year than in motor vehicle accidents, and the numbers are increasing. Regrettably, children are affected most by this epidemic. During 1997, a total of 142 children aged less than 14 years died from gunshot injuries while many more were injured. Here we present the case of an 11-year-old male street child who sustained a gunshot to the face, and illustrate the magnitude of the problem. The escalating epidemic of firearm-related injuries and deaths among children and adolescents in Cape Town, like in many other parts of the world, calls for concern. Further research is needed to understand firearm-related injuries among children and adolescents in South Africa, and to develop policies and programmes for effective prevention of situations such as this. PMID:21478600

  11. An eye for a lost eye: A case of self-inflicting gunshot injury

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Indu Bhusan; Kar, Rosalin; Mishra, Niranjan; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Maxillofacial defects due to gunshot injuries can have detrimental functional and psychological effects on the patient. These occur predominantly in young males, although all are at risk. Military, civil, accidental or self-inflicted injuries employing guns of varying caliber and ballistic properties may produce a defect or deformity which encompasses the entire spectrum of reconstructive surgery. Patients with facial defects have major difficulties to re-establish their mastication, speech, soft-tissue projections and therefore social integration. Successful prosthetic rehabilitation is crucial for better quality of life in case of large facial deformities. We present a case of 24-year-old male with gunshot injury to the left side face leading damage to the eye, which was rehabilitated with oculo-facial prosthesis. PMID:25298724

  12. An unusual case of "dyadic-death" with a single gunshot.

    PubMed

    Viero, Alessia; Giraudo, Chiara; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Muscovich, Cristina; Favretto, Donata; Puglisi, Massimo; Fais, Paolo; Viel, Guido

    2014-11-01

    The terms "dyadic death" or "murder-suicide" refer to an incident where an individual commits homicide and then takes his or her own life. These events are generally committed by men within the family network, using firearms or sharp force instruments, and make up a relatively small proportion of homicides overall. Herein, we present the application of post-mortem multislice computed tomography (CT) and micro-CT analysis to an unusual case of dyadic death, where a 38-year-old man fired a single gunshot to his own right temple, killing himself and his 50-year-old wife, lying on the bed beside him. The integration of radiological, autoptic and histological data allowed us to reconstruct the trajectory of the gunshot, the most probable dynamics of the event, and to classify the incident as a "suicide-homicide", because the female victim died a few minutes later than her husband and murderer. PMID:25194714

  13. Firearms in US homes as a risk factor for unintentional gunshot fatality.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Douglas J

    2003-09-01

    This study used national data and a matched case-control design to estimate the relative risk of death by an unintentional gunshot associated with having firearms in the home. A sample of adults who died in the United States in 1993 from unintentional gunshot injuries was drawn from the National Mortality Followback Survey (NMFS) (n=84). Twenty controls were sought for each case from the 1994 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and matched to the cases by sex, age group, race, and region of residence (n=1451). Subjects were classified as having or not having guns in the home based interview responses. The relative risk of death by an unintentional gunshot injury, comparing subjects living in homes with and without guns, was 3.7 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.9-7.2). Adjustment for covariates resulted in little change in the effect estimates. There was evidence of a dose-response effect: compared to subjects living in homes with no guns, the relative risk was 3.4 (95% CI=1.5-7.6) among subjects with one gun and 3.9 (95% CI=2.0-7.8) among subjects with multiple guns in the home. Having handguns in the home was associated with the largest effect estimates. Tests of homogeneity showed that the effect estimates did not vary significantly across categories of the matching variables. Firearms in the home appear to be a risk factor for unintentional gunshot fatality among adults. The magnitude of the observed effect estimates should be compared with those from additional studies. PMID:12850071

  14. Historical Vignette of Infamous Gunshot Injury to Spine: "An Ailment not to be Treated"?

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy Kumar; Konar, Subhas; Bir, Shyamal Chandra; Bollam, Papireddy; Nanda, Anil

    2015-11-01

    The increasing prevalence and gloomy socioeconomic consequence of spine injury remain a concern in modern medicine. In this article, we highlight the infamous gunshot spinal injuries of a few eminent personalities across multiple centuries and their sociopolitical impact in context with the evolution of modern medicine. The role of available medicine in these victims was not more than a mere watcher, thus substantiating an infamous quote from ancient literature that describes spine injury as "an ailment not to be treated." PMID:25836272

  15. Gunshot injuries to the parotid gland: Patterns of injury and primary management.

    PubMed

    Majid, Omer W

    2007-10-01

    We have treated 16 patients with gunshot injuries to the cheek, 10 of whom had damage to the parotid. There were nine men and one woman, mean age 40 (range 15-65). All injuries were high velocity, and eight had other injuries. We followed them up for a month; three patients required further operation, three had facial palsy, and one lost his hearing on that side. PMID:16678314

  16. Gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge for preventing sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Targońska, Sylwia; Stążka, Janusz; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of sternal wound infection (SWI) after cardiac surgery ranges from 0.5% to 8% and is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not sufficient to fully prevent the contamination of the surgical access site. One of the most effective methods for the prevention of wound infection seems to be the use of gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge, which is successfully used in abdominal and orthopedic surgery. Surgically implantable topical antibiotics can reduce wound infection in cardiac patients as well, but the efficacy of SWI prevention in cardiac surgery still raises many questions. PMID:26336388

  17. [The prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient after gunshot wound and initial maxillofacial surgical reconstruction. A case report].

    PubMed

    Teubner, Eckart; Rohner, Dennis; Hammer, Beat; Marinello, Carlo P

    2007-01-01

    An improvement of prognosis after tumour therapy as well as a rather high number of multiple traumas in the craniofacial area imply a high treatment need for craniofacial tissue defects. For a successful rehabilitation of these individuals, reconstructive oral and maxillofacial surgery and prosthodontics must collaborate closely and synergistically. Besides medical and psychological findings, functional and esthetical aspects need to be taken into account. In this case report the prosthetic reconstruction of a patient with a tooth-supported telescopic defect prosthesis in the maxilla and with a multiple-unit implant-supported fixed prosthesis plus two full ceramic crowns in the mandible is shown. The prosthetic solution was indicated after maxillofacial reconstruction due to the consequence of a suicide attempt. PMID:17691422

  18. [The clinical biomechanical interpretation of gunshot wounds. The general problems (IV). The propedeutic ABCs of the terminal ballistics].

    PubMed

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Manganelli, F; Carolo, F; Malagutti, D; Prati, G; Massari, S; Tosi, D; Giarolli, M; Tenci, A

    1990-01-01

    If we want to enunciate the damaging potential of a bullet fired from a gun we have to express ourselves right from the outset in terms of destructive work, that is to say not only destruction of the structures the bullet passes through, but also, above all, destruction of the homeostatic condition. In modern terms, this is particularly true of the abdomen, which, in perspective, above and beyond any direct involvement, is a candidate for an interesting role. As regards the translation of this destructive force in mathematical language, formulae are proposed in kilogram-meters, feet per second and Joules. A basic factor in external ballistics, quite apart from the actual forces involved, is the trajectory in space, the hyperbola, though we should also reflect on the problem of resistance, which has such a considerable effect on the behaviour of the "ideal" bullet in the atmosphere (the smallest calibre for a given mass, with the attempt to rid itself of its forced subordination to the calibre of the barrel). This leads us on to the subsequent concept of the "ballistic coefficient" and, in itself definitively established the basic assumptions of terminal ballistics. PMID:2076585

  19. Quantifying gunshot residues in cases of suicide: Implications for evaluation of suicides and criminal shootings.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Nick; Cook, Michael; Wallace, James; Kirkbride, K Paul; Kobus, Hilton

    2016-09-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) is a valuable form of forensic trace evidence in the investigation of firearms-related suicide and crime. In order to ensure that such evidence is given appropriate evidential weighting when it comes to case investigations, the dynamics of the deposition and distribution of GSR must be understood. As the activity of the subject after firing is a major factor in the retention of GSR, cases of suicide involving a firearm provide an opportunity to assess GSR distribution where post-shooting activity is not an issue, assuming the subject had not been moved. Seventy-one cases of suicide by gunshot in South Australia between 1998 and 2014 were examined to collect data on firearm type, calibre, and gunshot residue test results. Overall, 47% of cases were found to produce GSR results that were not of high probative value, even though it was known that the shooter had fired a firearm. Of particular interest were cases involving 0.22 rimfire ammunition, for which characteristic particles are not expected due to lack of antimony present in the primer. Despite this, 64% of these cases resulted in the detection of antimony-containing, three-component particles. PMID:27348466

  20. The role of maxillofacial radiologists in gunshot injuries: a hypothesized missile trajectory in two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sansare, K; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-01-01

    Gunshot injuries are an emerging form of trauma that oral radiologists increasingly have to deal with. There are two main types of gunshot injuries: high-velocity and low-velocity bullet injuries. The outcome of high-velocity gunshot injury is usually fatal; however, a non-fatal low-velocity injury to the maxillofacial region is more likely to be encountered by the oral and maxillofacial radiologist. It is therefore important to up-to-date knowledge of ballistic science and its implications in the field of maxillofacial radiology. The ability of oral and maxillofacial radiologists to predict the missile trajectory will aid the assessment and localization of the damage caused by the bullet and its splinters. Predicting the missile trajectory may also be of help to law enforcement agencies and forensic scientists in determining the type of firearm used and direction of fire. This article, which examines two cases, attempts to highlight to the oral radiologist this emerging form of trauma and its implications. PMID:21159916

  1. Chemical and physical characterisation of welding fume particles for distinguishing from gunshot residue.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2015-09-01

    Spherical particles produced by firearms loaded with a traditional ammunition reveal characteristic elemental contents and so their identification may provide a significant evidence in criminal investigations. With the advent of modern technologies in manufacturing ammunition, which replace toxic compounds of lead, antimony and barium in the primer mixture by elements and compounds such as powdered aluminium, titanium, amorphous boron or calcium silicide, differentiation between gunshot residue and morphologically similar particles originating from other anthropogenic or natural sources becomes more difficult. This work provides a chemical and morphological characterisation of welding fume particles originating from both the core and the covering of electrodes used in popular manners of welding steel and aluminium alloy constructions. With the use of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry it has been established that single spherules containing aluminium, titanium or a set of such elements as aluminium, silicon, potassium and calcium may occur in result of welding processes, however, they are accompanied by great numbers of iron and iron oxide spherules. Thus, with this analytical method a population of welding particles can be distinguished from a population of gunshot residue originating from a modern type of ammunition, but a special care has to be taken when assessing the evidential value of single or few spherules consisting from light elements being detected in result of the search for gunshot residue for forensic purposes. PMID:26188699

  2. Long-term administration of magnesium after acoustic trauma caused by gunshot noise in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Abaamrane, L; Raffin, F; Gal, M; Avan, P; Sendowski, I

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that a 7-day post-trauma magnesium treatment significantly reduced auditory threshold shifts measured 7 days after gunshot noise exposure. However this improvement was only temporary, suggesting that it could be potentially beneficial to prolong this treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long-term (1 month) magnesium treatment after an impulse noise trauma, in comparison with either a 7-day magnesium treatment, an administration of methylprednisolone (conventional treatment), or a placebo (NaCl). Guinea pigs were exposed to impulse noise (three blank gunshots, 170 dB SPL peak). They received one of the four treatments, 1 h after the noise exposure. Auditory function was explored by recording the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and measuring the distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) over a 3-month recovery period after the gunshot exposure. The functional hearing study was supplemented by a histological analysis. The results showed that a 1-month treatment with magnesium was the most effective treatment in terms of hair cell preservation. The DPOAE confirmed this effectiveness. Methylprednisolone accelerated recovery but its final efficacy remained moderate. It is probable that magnesium acts on the later metabolic processes that occur after noise exposure. Multiple mechanisms could be involved: calcium antagonism, anti-ischaemic effect or NMDA channel blockage. Regardless of the specific mechanism, a 1-month treatment with magnesium clearly attenuates NIHL, and presents the advantage of being safe for use in humans. PMID:19084059

  3. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  4. Wound healing for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Zitelli, J

    1987-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex sequence of events, beginning with tissue injury, mediated by inflammation, and ending long after reepithelialization is complete. Research and controlled clinical experience have provided a better understanding so that clinicians can influence the events of healing to decrease pain, control bleeding, infection, and cosmetic result as well as speed the time for complete healing. The following is a summary of guidelines for the management of wound healing: (1) wound creation; wounds should be created with minimal necrosis of tissue in order to prevent delays in healing. Electrosurgical, cryosurgical, and laser surgical wounds heal more slowly than wounds created by scalpel excision or curettage. Electro-coagulation should be used sparingly in sutured wounds. Large lesions are best treated in a single stage rather than in divided treatments since the rate of wound healing is not proportional to the area but instead to the logarithm of the area. Thus, the total healing time is much shorter if done in a single treatment session. (2) use of drugs; corticosteroids given before or within three days of wounding in dose of prednisone 40 mg or greater will inhibit wound healing. Vitamin A topically or systemically may reverse this inhibition. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are more important for their effects on platelet function and bleeding than on wound healing. (3) wound dressings; the use of occlusive dressings to promote moist wound healing is the most significant advance in wound management. Occlusive dressings shorten the time for healing, decrease pain, reduce wound contamination, and improve the cosmetic result. (4) control of wound contraction and scar formation; at the time of wound formation, guiding sutures may be helpful in wound healing by secondary intention in order to control the direction of wound contraction and prevent distortion. Intralesional steroids may be useful for hypertrophic scars and keloids

  5. Patient perception of wound photography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheila C; Anderson, John Ae; Jones, Duncan Vb; Evans, Robyn

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to provide an assessment of photographic documentation of the wound from the patients' perspective and to evaluate whether this could improve patients' understanding of and involvement in their wound care. Our results revealed that most patients visiting the wound care clinic have difficult-to-see wounds (86%). Only 20% of patients monitor their wounds and instead rely on clinic or nurse visits to track the healing progress. There was a significant association between patients' ability to see their wound and their subsequent memory of the wound's appearance. This was especially true for patients who had recently begun visiting the wound care clinic. This relationship was not present in patients who had visited the clinic for 3  or more years. Patients reported that the inability to see their wounds resulted in feeling a loss of autonomy. The majority of patients reported that photographing their wounds would help them to track the wound progress (81%) and would afford them more involvement in their own care (58%). This study provides a current representation of wound photography from the patients' perspective and reveals that it can motivate patients to become more involved in the management of their wounds - particularly for patients with difficult-to-see wounds. PMID:24872018

  6. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  7. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures.

  8. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  9. Evaluation of negative pressure vacuum-assisted system in acute and chronic wounds closure: our experience.

    PubMed

    Chiummariello, S; Guarro, G; Pica, A; Alfano, C

    2012-10-01

    Negative-pressure therapy or vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) has been used in clinical applications since the 1940's and has increased in popularity over the past decade. This dressing technique consists of an open cell foam dressing put into the wound cavity, a vacuum pump produces a negative pressure and an adhesive drape. A controlled sub atmospheric pressure from 75 to 150 mmHg is applied. The vacuum-assisted closure has been applied by many clinicians to chronic wounds in humans; however it cannot be used as a replacement for surgical debridement. The initial treatment for every contaminated wound should be the necrosectomy. The VAC therapy has a complementary function and the range of its indications includes pressure sores, stasis ulcers, chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, post traumatic and post operative wounds, infected wounds such as necrotizing fasciitis or sternal wounds, soft-tissue injuries, bone exposed injuries, abdominal open wounds and for securing a skin graft. We describe our experience with the VAC dressing used to manage acute and chronic wounds in a series of 135 patients, with excellent results together with satisfaction of the patients. PMID:23095568

  10. The ``gunshot'' sound produced by male North Atlantic right whales and its potential function in reproductive advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Susan E.; Hamilton, Philip; Kraus, Scott D.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2001-05-01

    North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) commonly use sound to mediate social interactions between individuals. Surface active groups (SAGs) are the most commonly observed social interaction on the summer feeding grounds. These groups are typically composed of an adult female with two or more males engaged in social behavior at the surface. Several distinct types of sounds have been recorded from these groups. One sound commonly recorded from these groups is a brief broadband sound, referred to as a gunshot sound because it sounds like a rifle being fired. This sound has been recorded in the Bay of Fundy, Canada from both lone whales (N=9) and social SAGs (N=49). Those lone whales producing gunshot sounds whose sex could be determined (N=9) were all mature males. In surface active groups, the rate of production of gunshot sounds was weakly correlated with the total number of males present in the group. Given the behavioral contexts of gunshot sound production by male whales, gunshots probably function in a reproductive context as an agonistic signal directed toward other males, an advertisement signal to attract females, or a combination of the two functions.

  11. [Biomechanical and clinical interpretation of firearm wounds. General problems. VI. Propedeutic ABC of terminal ballistics].

    PubMed

    Marini, F; Radin, S; Mangiante, G; Carolo, F; Massari, S; Giarolli, M; Prati, G; Della Giacoma, G; Facci, E; Tenci, A

    1993-01-01

    Any lengthy and properly structured propedeutic ABC of terminal ballistics must necessarily embrace a comparison between the two main protagonists of gunshot wounds. It is almost a specular, yet distorted image of the ritual act consumed by the larger mammals, not proud of their mutual aggression, but the conformation between mechanics and biology, or between kilogram-metres and life. The two types of physical entity brought together through the unique agency of a new language--both biological and mechanical, but necessarily halting and inadequate--stand out like two parallel lines opposite one another, displaying their respective profiles and most intimate structures. One can take this as far as the biological paradox of the clash between the dimension of power and the chance quality of life. PMID:7923504

  12. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing. PMID:18081782

  13. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  14. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders. PMID:26972819

  15. DIEP breast reconstruction following multiple abdominal liposuction procedures

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Simon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Akali, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Previous abdominal wall surgery is viewed as a contraindication to abdominal free tissue transfer. We present two patients who underwent multiple abdominal liposuction procedures, followed by successful free deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. We review the literature pertaining to reliability of abdominal free flaps in those with previous abdominal surgery. Methods: Review of case notes and radiological investigations of two patients, and a PubMed search using the terms “DIEP”, “deep inferior epigastric”, “TRAM”, “transverse rectus abdominis”, “perforator” and “laparotomy”, “abdominal wall”, “liposuction”, “liposculpture”, “fat graft”, “pfannenstiel”, with subsequent appraisal of relevant papers by the first and second authors. Results: Patient 1 had 3 episodes of liposuction from the abdomen for fat grafting to a reconstructed breast. Subsequent revision reconstruction of the same breast with DIEP flap was preceded by CT angiography, which demonstrated normal perforator anatomy. The reconstruction healed well with no ischaemic complications. Patient 2 had 5 liposuction procedures from the abdomen to graft fat to a wide local excision defect. Recurrence of cancer led to mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with free DIEP flap. Preoperative MR angiography demonstrated a large perforator right of the umbilicus, with which the intraoperative findings were consistent. The patient had an uneventful recovery and good healing with no fat necrosis or wound dehiscence. Conclusions: We demonstrate that DIEP flaps can safely be raised without perfusion-related complications following multiple liposuction procedures to the abdomen. The safe interval between procedures is difficult to quantify, but we demonstrate successful free flap after 16 months. PMID:25671046

  16. [Dressing and wound care pain].

    PubMed

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2006-12-01

    Wound care is an important step for promoting wound healing. Nevertheless it is also a major source of pain for patients with wounds. The results of a survey showed that not only burn patients but also non-burn ones suffered from wound care pain which occurred in inpatients and outpatients. One of the significant factors causing wound care pain was that the dressing adhered to the wound bed. Although some agencies claimed that particular dressings with low adhesion can result in painless removal, the actual effects needed to be verified. Results of clinical trials revealed that for relieving wound care pain of certain kinds of wound, it was recommended to use particular dressings, such as banana leaf dressing, boiled potato peel bandage, Acticoat, Mepital or Mefix. PMID:17160873

  17. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications. Recent Advances: The published literature on the use of medical devices for wound healing continues to support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, negative pressure wound therapy, and most recently electrical stimulation. Critical Issue: To inform wound healing practitioners of the evidence for or against the use of medical devices for wound healing. This information will aid the practitioner in deciding which technology should be accepted or rejected for clinical use. Future Directions: To produce high quality, randomized controlled trials or acquire outcome-based registry databases to further test and improve the knowledge base as it relates to the use of medical devices in wound care. PMID:27076996

  18. Does the declining lethality of gunshot injuries mask a rising epidemic of gun violence in the United States?

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Sun, Eric C; Prasad, Vinay

    2014-07-01

    Recent mass shootings in the U.S. have reignited the important public health debate concerning measures to decrease the epidemic of gun violence. Editorialists and gun lobbyists have criticized the recent focus on gun violence, arguing that gun-related homicide rates have been stable in the last decade. While true, data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also demonstrate that although gun-related homicide rates were stable between 2002 and 2011, rates of violent gunshot injuries increased. These seemingly paradoxical trends may reflect the declining lethality of gunshot injuries brought about by surgical advances in the care of the patient with penetrating trauma. Focusing on gun-related homicide rates as a summary statistic of gun violence, rather than total violent gunshot injuries, can therefore misrepresent the rising epidemic of gun violence in the U.S. PMID:24452421

  19. Nutritional aspects of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ayello, E A; Thomas, D R; Litchford, M A

    1999-01-01

    Proper nutrition is essential to prevent the development of pressure ulcers and to support adequate and timely wound healing. Additionally, research and clinical observation suggest nutrients play a major role in wound healing. How the nutrients Vitamin A, Vitamin C, zinc, calories, protein, and fluids are used in wound healing and recommendations regarding use of supplements are discussed in this article. PMID:10855131

  20. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Wound Drainage Culture Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de heridas What It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as ...

  1. The History of Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jayesh B.

    2012-01-01

    The history of wound healing is, in a sense, the history of humankind. This brief history of wound healing has been compiled for the benefit of readers. It is amazing to see that some of the basic principles of wound healing have been known since 2000 bc. PMID:24525756

  2. [Useful wound management at home].

    PubMed

    Mizuhara, Akihiro; Taguchi, Akemi; Sato, Mikako; Shindo, Kazuko

    2014-12-01

    In wound care, close observation of the quantity and nature of exudate from a wound, and selection of appropriate dressing and/or medication are crucial. Care should be taken to prevent wounds with excessive exudate from becoming too moist. Furthermore, wound care at home must be easy, which is achievable through the use of readily available materials and medications. 1 ) A wound with little to moderate exudate should be treated using wrap therapy with perforated polyethylene sheets. This therapy can be used to treat pressure ulcers, wounds, wounds with slough, and burns. 2 ) An 18-gauge needle can be used to perforate wounds with little exudate, such as mild pressure ulcers or wounds with slough, and polyurethane film can then be applied. 3 ) Polyurethane film should be applied to blisters, pressure ulcers, or similar skin injuries with little exudate. 4 ) A hydrocolloid dressing should be used on wounds with light exudate. 5 ) An ointment containing steroids should be applied to critically colonized wounds. 6 ) Melolin dressings, Moiskin Pads, or a disposable diaper should be used to manage wounds with heavy exudate. PMID:25595088

  3. The Wounded Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretti, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This article offers a glimpse into the life of Frank Peretti, who as a child suffered abuse because of his physical disfigurement. He was bullied and physically assaulted by peers and sometimes adults. Now well known for his novels, Peretti suggests that people who cause others to suffer also suffer from a wounded spirit. (Author)

  4. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feet Footwear & Products Products by Company Products by Type Foot Health Awareness Diabetes Awareness What is a Podiatrist? Today's Podiatrist Print Share RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? ...

  5. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, Eric E.; Lundquist, Susan H.

    1999-01-01

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite.

  6. Spiral wound extraction cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Wisted, E.E.; Lundquist, S.H.

    1999-04-27

    A cartridge device for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises a hollow core, a sheet composite comprising a particulate-loaded porous membrane and optionally at least one reinforcing spacer sheet, the particulate being capable of binding the analyte, the sheet composite being formed into a spiral configuration about the core, wherein the sheet composite is wound around itself and wherein the windings of sheet composite are of sufficient tightness so that adjacent layers are essentially free of spaces therebetween, two end caps which are disposed over the core and the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite, and means for securing the end caps to the core, the end caps also being secured to the lateral ends of the spirally wound sheet composite. A method for removing an analyte from a fluid comprises the steps of providing a spirally wound element of the invention and passing the fluid containing the analyte through the element essentially normal to a surface of the sheet composite so as to bind the analyte to the particulate of the particulate-loaded porous membrane, the method optionally including the step of eluting the bound analyte from the sheet composite. 4 figs.

  7. Healing Invisible Wounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  8. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  9. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominalPa in inCh ildre n What is functional abdominal pain, and why does it happen? Most otherwise-healthy ... stomachaches for two months or more have functional abdominal pain. The term “functional” refers to the fact that ...

  10. On the prevalence of gunshot residue in selected populations - an empirical study performed with SEM-EDX analysis.

    PubMed

    Brożek-Mucha, Zuzanna

    2014-04-01

    The study was designed to obtain a comprehensive view on the prevalence of gunshot residue and the factors influencing their dispersion. 273 specimens collected from people of various professions, representing both users and non-users of firearms, as well as from the interior of a forensic laboratory were examined for the presence of gunshot residue. In specimens taken from hands of 100 people declaring no contact with firearms only one spherical particle containing lead, antimony and barium was found. Numbers of particles found in specimens collected from hands of 50 shooters varied from zero to numbers greater than 100 and were strongly correlated with the time interval between last shooting and collecting specimens. Within the first 4h after shooting particles are being lost from the shooter's hands, and so transferred from shooters to their environment. Thus, the relatives of five hunters were examined during both the close and open hunting seasons to trace the potential secondary transfer in practice. Using the criterion of low risk of contamination with gunshot residue, i.e. 5h after last handling a gun, only few specimens were encountered among these collected from hands of firearm users that contained characteristic particles and these occurred in small numbers. Frequent shooters, e.g. shooting instructors or firearm examiners, formed a class for themselves of high risk of contamination with gunshot residue. As a result of continuous monitoring of the laboratory (55 specimens examined so far), where the examinations of gunshot residue are being carried out, it has been proved that the laboratory is free from contamination and so confirmed the usefulness of protocols worked out. The obtained information provided empirical bases to the minimisation of the risk of contamination of the evidence as well as for the evaluation of the analytical findings in the expertise on gunshot incidents. PMID:24595061

  11. Choosing a Wound Dressing Based on Common Wound Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Phillips, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a major healthcare burden.The practitioner should have an appropriate understanding of both the etiology of the wound as well as the optimal type of dressings to use. Fundamental wound characteristics may be used to guide the practitioner's choice of dressings. The identification of optimal dressings to use for a particular wound type is an important element in facilitating wound healing. Recent Advances: Researchers have sought to design wound dressings that aim to optimize each stage in the healing process. In addition, dressings have been designed to target and kill infection-causing bacteria, with the incorporation of antimicrobial agents. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are frequently dynamic in presentation, and the numerous wound dressings available make dressing selection challenging for the practitioner. Choosing the correct dressing decreases time to healing, provides cost-effective care, and improves patient quality of life. Future Directions: Research into the mechanisms of wound healing has enhanced our ability to heal chronic wounds at a faster rate through the use of moisture-retentive dressings. Newer dressings are incorporating the use of nanotechnology by incorporating miniature electrical sensors into the dressing. These dressings are engineered to detect changes in a wound environment and alert the patient or practitioner by altering the color of the dressing or sending a message to a smartphone. Additional investigations are underway that incorporate biologic material such as stem cells into dressings. PMID:26858913

  12. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established. PMID:25616589

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection involves activation of its iron acquisition system in response to fascial contact

    PubMed Central

    Kim, M.; Christley, S.; Khodarev, N. N.; Fleming, I.; Huang, Y.; Chang, E.; Zaborina, O.; Alverdy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Wound infections are traditionally thought to occur when microbial burden exceeds the innate clearance capacity of host immune system. Here we introduce the idea that the wound environment itself plays a significant contributory role to wound infection. Methods We developed a clinically relevant murine model of soft tissue infection to explore the role of activation of microbial virulence in response to tissue factors as a mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria cause wound infections. Mice underwent abdominal skin incision and light muscle injury with a crushing forceps versus skin incision alone followed by topical inoculation of P. aeruginosa. Mice were sacrificed on postoperative day 6 and abdominal tissues analyzed for clinical signs of wound infection. To determine if specific wound tissues components induce bacterial virulence, P. aeruginosa was exposed to skin, fascia, and muscle. Results Gross wound infection due to P. aeruginosa was observed to be significantly increased in injured tissues vs non-injured (80% vs 10%) tissues (n=20/group, p<0.0001). Exposure of P. aeruginosa to individual tissue components demonstrated that fascia significantly induced bacterial virulence as judged by the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active phenazine compound known to kill immune cells. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of P. aeruginosa exposed to fascia demonstrated activation of multiple genes responsible for the synthesis of the iron scavenging molecule pyochelin. Conclusion We conclude that wound elements, in particular fascia, may play a significant role in enhancing the virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis of clinical wound infection. PMID:25807409

  14. INFLUENCE OF SURGICAL TECHNIQUE IN THE PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS SURGICAL WOUND IMPLANT: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Roberto Maranhão; CAIADO, Rafael Coelho; REIS, Paulo Roberto de Melo; LACERDA, Elisângela de Paula Silveira; SUGITA, Denis Masashi; MRUÉ, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of malignancies increased alarmingly. Surgery constitutes one of the most efficient therapeutic modalities for the treatment of solid tumors. The neoplastic implant in surgical wound is a complication whose percentage of occurrence reported in the literature is variable, but sets with high morbidity and therapeutic difficulties. Protecting the wound is one of the recommended principles of oncologic surgery. Aim To evaluate the influence of wound protection in the development of tumor implantation. Methods Sarcoma 180 tumor cells were used, with intraperitoneal inoculation in Swiss mice. After the establishment of neoplastic ascites, animals were randomized into two groups of 10, each group consisting of five males and five females. In both groups, laparotomy and manipulation of intra-abdominal organs was performed. In a group laparotomy was performed using the protection of the abdominal wound and the other group without it. On the 9th postoperative day macroscopic evaluation of the operative scar was performed, which was later removed for microscopic evaluation. Results There was microscopic infiltration of tumor cells in the wound of all animals. However, the group that held the protection, infiltration was less intense when compared to the group without it. The infiltration was also more severe in females than in males of the same group. Conclusion Tumor infiltration into the wound was more intense in the group in which the protection of the surgical site was not performed, and in females when compared to males of the same group. PMID:25861061

  15. Pressure ulcers. Local wound care.

    PubMed

    Goode, P S; Thomas, D R

    1997-08-01

    Local care of pressure ulcers includes wound cleansing, débridement, and dressings. Wound cleansing should remove loose debris and exudate but should not damage viable tissue. Saline irrigation is the standard. Débridement is often necessary for Stage III and IV pressure ulcers and can be performed autolytically, mechanically, enzymatically, or sharply. Prompt débridement is essential for infected wounds. Dressings should keep the wound bed continuously moist, should not be toxic to granulation tissue, and should keep the surrounding intact skin dry. Randomized, controlled clinical trials are necessary to define optimal local wound care further. PMID:9227943

  16. Comparison of novel synthetic materials with traditional methods to repair exposed abdominal wall fascial defects.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi-Wahle, S; Cnota, M; Choe, E; Jacob, J T; Flint, L M; Ferrara, J J

    1998-01-01

    Repair of large abdominal wall defects is a challenge, particularly when full-thickness tissue loss prohibits coverage of the fascial repair. Two novel synthetic materials (TMS-1 and TMS-2) have been shown to be better accepted than expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex), and polypropylene (Marlex) in the closure of clean and contaminated fascial wounds that are immediately covered by skin/soft tissue. Therefore, 1-cm2 abdominal wall defects were created in each of the four quadrants of rat groups. Gore-Tex, Marlex, and TMS-1 or TMS-2 were used to repair three defects, the fourth being primarily closed. To ensure that each repair remained exposed, skin edges were sutured to underlying muscle. Additional animal groups underwent the same protocol; however, peritonitis was induced at surgery using a fecal inoculum technique. Animals were sacrificed 2 weeks later, at which time a blinded observer assessed the surface area and severity of adhesions. In clean wounds, the surface area of formed adhesions was less (p < .004) after primary closure than each synthetic material; among the synthetics, TMS-2 caused significantly (p < .01) less extensive adhesions than Marlex. In addition, the severity of adhesions to TMS-2 was comparable to that of defects closed primarily, and less severe (p < .02) than those formed to Gore-Tex and Marlex. In animals with peritonitis, primary closure caused less extensive (p < .03) adhesions than Marlex and Gore-Tex and significantly (p < .002) less severe adhesions than Marlex, Gore-Tex, and TMS-2. However, the severity of adhesions formed to TMS-1 repairs proved comparable to primarily closed wounds. These experiments reaffirm the tenet that, whenever possible, abdominal wounds should undergo primary fascial closure. When soft tissue coverage over the repair cannot be achieved, TMS-2 is well tolerated in clean wounds. However, the superiority of TMS-1 over the other synthetic materials in contaminated wounds suggests it may also

  17. Office management of minor wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Gouin, S.; Patel, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review office interventions for minor wounds not requiring sutures, such as abrasions, bites, and lacerations. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Most information on minor wound management comes from descriptive studies. Few comparative studies examine the effectiveness of topical antisepsis for minor wounds. Several clinical trials have demonstrated that tissue adhesives produce short- and long-term cosmetic results equivalent to those achieved with suture materials. MAIN MESSAGE: Sterile saline is the least toxic solution for wound irrigation. Chlorhexidine (2%) and povidone iodine (10%) have been the most investigated antiseptic solutions. Systemic antibiotics are unnecessary for wounds unlikely to be infected. All bite wounds require special attention. Primary closure of bite wounds is indicated in certain circumstances: less than 12-hour-old nonpuncture wounds, uninfected wounds, and low-risk lesions (such as on the face). In spite of their many advantages, skin tapes should be used for low-tension wounds only. The popularity of tissue adhesives has greatly increased. Since the advent of newer products (with increased bonding strength and flexibility), adhesives are used to manage most lacerations except those in areas of high tension (e.g., joints) and on mucosal surfaces. CONCLUSION: Minor wounds not requiring sutures can be managed easily in the office. PMID:11340758

  18. Common questions about wound care.

    PubMed

    Worster, Brooke; Zawora, Michelle Q; Hsieh, Christine

    2015-01-15

    Lacerations, abrasions, burns, and puncture wounds are common in the outpatient setting. Because wounds can quickly become infected, the most important aspect of treating a minor wound is irrigation and cleaning. There is no evidence that antiseptic irrigation is superior to sterile saline or tap water. Occlusion of the wound is key to preventing contamination. Suturing, if required, can be completed up to 24 hours after the trauma occurs, depending on the wound site. Tissue adhesives are equally effective for low-tension wounds with linear edges that can be evenly approximated. Although patients are often instructed to keep their wounds covered and dry after suturing, they can get wet within the first 24 to 48 hours without increasing the risk of infection. There is no evidence that prophylactic antibiotics improve outcomes for most simple wounds. Tetanus toxoid should be administered as soon as possible to patients who have not received a booster in the past 10 years. Superficial mild wound infections can be treated with topical agents, whereas deeper mild and moderate infections should be treated with oral antibiotics. Most severe infections, and moderate infections in high-risk patients, require initial parenteral antibiotics. Severe burns and wounds that cover large areas of the body or involve the face, joints, bone, tendons, or nerves should generally be referred to wound care specialists. PMID:25591209

  19. Nutritional support for wound healing.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Miller, Alan L

    2003-11-01

    Healing of wounds, whether from accidental injury or surgical intervention, involves the activity of an intricate network of blood cells, tissue types, cytokines, and growth factors. This results in increased cellular activity, which causes an intensified metabolic demand for nutrients. Nutritional deficiencies can impede wound healing, and several nutritional factors required for wound repair may improve healing time and wound outcome. Vitamin A is required for epithelial and bone formation, cellular differentiation, and immune function. Vitamin C is necessary for collagen formation, proper immune function, and as a tissue antioxidant. Vitamin E is the major lipid-soluble antioxidant in the skin; however, the effect of vitamin E on surgical wounds is inconclusive. Bromelain reduces edema, bruising, pain, and healing time following trauma and surgical procedures. Glucosamine appears to be the rate-limiting substrate for hyaluronic acid production in the wound. Adequate dietary protein is absolutely essential for proper wound healing, and tissue levels of the amino acids arginine and glutamine may influence wound repair and immune function. The botanical medicines Centella asiatica and Aloe vera have been used for decades, both topically and internally, to enhance wound repair, and scientific studies are now beginning to validate efficacy and explore mechanisms of action for these botanicals. To promote wound healing in the shortest time possible, with minimal pain, discomfort, and scarring to the patient, it is important to explore nutritional and botanical influences on wound outcome. PMID:14653765

  20. Filament wound structure and method

    DOEpatents

    Dritt, William S.; Gerth, Howard L.; Knight, Jr., Charles E.; Pardue, Robert M.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention relates to a filament wound spherical structure comprising a plurality of filament band sets disposed about the surface of a mandrel with each band of each set formed of a continuous filament circumferentially wound about the mandrel a selected number of circuits and with each circuit of filament being wound parallel to and contiguous with an immediate previously wound circuit. Each filament band in each band set is wound at the same helix angle from the axis of revolution of the mandrel and all of the bands of each set are uniformly distributed about the mandrel circumference. The pole-to-equator wall thickness taper associated with each band set, as several contiguous band sets are wound about the mandrel starting at the poles, is accumulative as the band sets are nested to provide a complete filament wound sphere of essentially uniform thickness.

  1. [Negative pressure wound therapy - review].

    PubMed

    Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjorg; Steingrimsson, Steinn; Valsdottir, Elsa; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a new therapeutic option in wound healing and was first described in its present form in 1997. A vacuum source is used to create sub-atmospheric pressure in the local wound environment to promote healing. This is achieved by connecting a vacuum pump to a tube that is threaded into a wound gauze or foam filler dressing covered with a drape. This concept in wound treatment has been shown to be useful in treating different wound infections, including diabetic wounds as well as complex infections of the abdomen and thorax. NPWT has been used in Iceland for over a decade and its use is steadily increasing. This review describes the indications and outcome of NPWT and is aimed at a broad group of doctors and nurses where recent Icelandic studies on the subject are covered. PMID:24713539

  2. Characterisation of gunshot residue particles using self-consistent ion beam analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M. J.; Jeynes, C.

    2009-06-01

    Individual particles of gunshot residue were studied with particle-induced X-ray emission and backscattering spectrometry using a 2.5 MeV H + beam focussed to ˜4 μm and self-consistent fitting of the data. The geometry of these spherical particles was considered in order to accurately fit the corresponding particle spectrum and therefore to quantify the trace element composition of these particles. The demonstrable self-consistency of this method allows the compositions of most residue particles to be determined unambiguously and with a higher sensitivity to trace elements than conventional methods.

  3. Gunshot residue particles formed by using ammunitions that have mercury fulminate based primers.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, A; Levin, N; Dvorachek, M

    1992-11-01

    Ammunition having mercury fulminate-based primers are commonly manufactured by Eastern Bloc countries and used extensively in the Middle East. Gunshot residue (GSR) particles formed by firing these types of ammunition were examined. It was observed that much lower percentage of mercury-containing GSR particles were found in samples taken from a shooter as compared to the percentage of such particles in samples from cartridge cases. This fact must therefore be taken into account when interpreting case results. A plausible explanation for the results described is proposed. PMID:1453170

  4. A recovery method for airborne gunshot residue retained in human nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Zona, C A

    1995-07-01

    Each living person is equipped with their own personal particle filter, a nose. The human nose is capable of filtering and trapping airborne gunshot residue (AGSR) from discharged firearms. An extraction/concentration technique has been developed to recover the AGSR retained in human nasal mucus. The technique has successfully recovered abundant AGSR from 48 hours postfiring sample collection times. The AGSR particles were characterized by a JEOL 6400 scanning electron microscope coupled with a Noran Voyager energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. PMID:7595306

  5. [Forensic medical assessment of the mechanisms of development of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents].

    PubMed

    Musin, É Kh; Roman'ko, N A; Makarov, I Iu; Kutsenko, K I

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the data obtained in experimental studies and practical expert assessments of body injuries inflicted by rubber balls for traumatic weapons. The causes accounting for the polymorphism of such injuries and the mechanisms of their development were elucidated by means of damage simulation taking into consideration the physical and dynamic properties of elastic ball-type destructive agents and the morphological structure of different anatomical regions of the human body. The results of the study may be of interest for differential diagnostics of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents. PMID:22876645

  6. [Using Acupressure to Improve Abdominal Bloating in a Hemicolectomy Patient: A Nursing Experience].

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Ling; Hsu, Chun-Hung; Tseng, Hui-Chen

    2015-10-01

    This article describes a nursing experience applying the protocol of bilateral Zusanli (ST-36) acupressure to reduce abdominal bloating in a colon cancer patient who had undergone a right hemicolectomy. The period of care was between November 13 and November 23, 2014. Data were collected through direct care, interviews, observation, and physical assessment. The main health problems of the patient included anxiety, surgical wound pain, and abdominal bloating. We provided pre- and postoperative routine nursing care, wound pain management, and the protocol of Zusanli (ST-36) acupressure for reducing abdominal bloating. Results of care recorded the first passage of flatus and intestinal motility during the second postoperative day, with no complaints of bloating from the fourth postoperative day. The subject exhibited a relaxed mood and slept soundly following each acupressure session. Furthermore, the subject reported experiencing no abdominal bloating during the week following discharge, during which he continued to follow the acupressure protocol. This article provides support via an instance of nursing care for the effectiveness of the Zusanli (ST-36) acupressure in improving abdominal bloating and thus reducing the complications of hemicolectomy surgery. PMID:26507632

  7. Wound Microbiology and Associated Approaches to Wound Management

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, P. G.; Duerden, B. I.; Armstrong, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of dermal wounds are colonized with aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms that originate predominantly from mucosal surfaces such as those of the oral cavity and gut. The role and significance of microorganisms in wound healing has been debated for many years. While some experts consider the microbial density to be critical in predicting wound healing and infection, others consider the types of microorganisms to be of greater importance. However, these and other factors such as microbial synergy, the host immune response, and the quality of tissue must be considered collectively in assessing the probability of infection. Debate also exists regarding the value of wound sampling, the types of wounds that should be sampled, and the sampling technique required to generate the most meaningful data. In the laboratory, consideration must be given to the relevance of culturing polymicrobial specimens, the value in identifying one or more microorganisms, and the microorganisms that should be assayed for antibiotic susceptibility. Although appropriate systemic antibiotics are essential for the treatment of deteriorating, clinically infected wounds, debate exists regarding the relevance and use of antibiotics (systemic or topical) and antiseptics (topical) in the treatment of nonhealing wounds that have no clinical signs of infection. In providing a detailed analysis of wound microbiology, together with current opinion and controversies regarding wound assessment and treatment, this review has attempted to capture and address microbiological aspects that are critical to the successful management of microorganisms in wounds. PMID:11292638

  8. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Bro¿żek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horváth, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  9. Prostaglandins of the E-series inhibit connective tissue proliferation in the liver wound of the rat.

    PubMed

    Arend, A; Aunapuu, M; Masso, R; Selstam, G

    2005-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to relate wound healing of an internal organ to prostaglandins of the E and F series. A small liver wound was induced by a galvanic cauter via the abdominal route under general anesthesia and prostaglandin E1, E2 and F2alpha were injected twice daily at a dose of 250 microg/kg. Proliferation of the connective tissue in the liver wound was estimated morphometrically 6 days after liver wound infliction. Levels of prostaglandins E2 and F2alpha were measured in the liver wound as well as in normal liver tissue from adjacent lobes using radioimmunoassay. The results show that exogenous prostaglandins of the E-series suppress connective tissue proliferation. Three minutes after the last prostaglandin E2 injection, high prostaglandin concentrations were measured both in the liver wound and in the liver tissue of the adjacent lobe. Prostaglandin F2alpha injections had no effect on wound healing. We believe that the rat thermic liver wound model can be used for different studies on wound healing mechanisms and that prostaglandins of the E-series are involved in wound healing in the specific time period studied. PMID:15835401

  10. Comparison of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) &conventional wound dressings in the open fracture wounds

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamidreza; Khorami, Mohsen; Ebrahimi-Nejad, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Successful closure is a primary step of treatment in open fracture wounds. Delayed healing or complications can lead to increased treatment duration, costs and disability rates. The aim of this study was to compare Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and conventional wound dressings in patients with open fracture wounds. Methods: In a prospective randomized clinical trial study, 90 patients with open fractures that were referred for treatment were enrolled between February 2013 to March 2015. Patients were divided into two groups. Group I underwent NPWT and group II underwent conventional wound dressing. Then patients were followed up for one month. Within the one month, the number of dressing change varied based on the extent of the wound. Duration of wound healing, presence of infection and the number of hospitalization days in these patients were recorded and compared at the end of the study between the two groups. Questionnaires and check lists were used to collect data. Analysis was done with SPSS 20, paired sample T-test, and chi-square tests. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was a significant difference between the rate of wound healing in the group one or NPWT group and group II (conventional wound dressings) P<0.05. There was no significant difference between two groups in incidence of infection (P=0.6). Conclusion: Using NPWT expedites the healing process of extremity wounds. It is more economical and can be considered as a substitute for the treatment of extremity wounds. PMID:27022347

  11. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  12. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  13. The wound hormone jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Abraham J.K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic wound responses through distinct cell autonomous and nonautonomous pathways. In both pathways, bioactive JAs are recognized by an F-box protein-based receptor system that couples hormone binding to ubiquitin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressor proteins. These results provide a new framework for understanding how plants recognize and respond to tissue injury. PMID:19695649

  14. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  15. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  16. The Burn Wound Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Chan, Rodney K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: While the survival rate of the severely burned patient has improved significantly, relatively little progress has been made in treatment or prevention of burn-induced long-term sequelae, such as contraction and fibrosis. Recent Advances: Our knowledge of the molecular pathways involved in burn wounds has increased dramatically, and technological advances now allow large-scale genomic studies, providing a global view of wound healing processes. Critical Issues: Translating findings from a large number of in vitro and preclinical animal studies into clinical practice represents a gap in our understanding, and the failures of a number of clinical trials suggest that targeting single pathways or cytokines may not be the best approach. Significant opportunities for improvement exist. Future Directions: Study of the underlying molecular influences of burn wound healing progression will undoubtedly continue as an active research focus. Increasing our knowledge of these processes will identify additional therapeutic targets, supporting informed clinical studies that translate into clinical relevance and practice. PMID:26989577

  17. Telemedicine in wound care.

    PubMed

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2008-12-01

    Telemedical wound care is one of the applications of teledermatology. We present our experience using telemedicine in the successful assessment and treatment of three patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Three patients were seen at the PEMEX General Hospital in Veracruz, Mexico. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with hypertension, morbid obesity, chronic venous insufficiency, recurrent erysipelas, leg ulcers and lymphoedema. There was one ulcer on his left lower leg (20 x 10 cm) and one on his right leg (9 x 7 cm). The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with class III obesity and ulcers in her right leg, secondary to surgical debridement of bullous erysipelas. The third patient was a 51-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis with one ulcer on each leg and chronic lymphostasis. Photographs with a digital camera were taken and sent weekly via email to a wound care specialist in Mexico City. The photographs allowed the expert to diagnose and evaluate the chronic wounds periodically. In the present cases, telemedicine allowed us to have a rapid evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. The images were of enough quality to be useful and small enough to be sent via regular email to the remote physician who immediately gave his feedback. The expert was confident to give therapeutic recommendations in this way, and we considered this method to be very cost-effective, saving the patient and the health care system, especially in transportation. PMID:18808429

  18. Some wounds are hard to heal: an interesting presentation of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ryan, N; Walkden, G; Akbar, S

    2012-05-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was admitted for an elective mini laparotomy and cystectomy of the right ovary for the treatment of chronic supra-pubic abdominal pain. The procedure went without complication and she was discharged the next day. She was re-admitted a month later as an acute case with wound dehiscence. HIV serology, thyroid function, immunoglobulin, protein electrophoresis and electrolyte levels were all normal. There were no obvious signs of infection and the bacterial swabs failed to culture an organism. Despite conservative measures with regular dressing, oral antibiotics and input from the tissue viability team the wound failed to epithelialise. The wound was debrided and re-sutured a total of three times and the patient received 24 days of intravenous antibiotics. After input from various teams a diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was made, allowing for appropriate management and wound healing. PMID:22584739

  19. Peripheral Surgical Wounding and Age-Dependent Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Culley, Deborah J.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. However, its neuropathogenesis remains largely to be determined. Neuroinflammation and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) have been reported to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in humans and cognitive impairment in animals. Our recent studies have established a pre-clinical model in mice, and have found that the peripheral surgical wounding without the influence of general anesthesia induces an age-dependent Aβ accumulation and cognitive impairment in mice. We therefore set out to assess the effects of peripheral surgical wounding, in the absence of general anesthesia, on neuroinflammation in mice with different ages. Abdominal surgery under local anesthesia was established in 9 and 18 month-old mice. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Iba1 positive cells (the marker of microglia activation), CD33, and cognitive function in mice were determined. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and Iba1 positive cells in the hippocampus of both 9 and 18 month-old mice, and age potentiated these effects. The peripheral surgical wounding increased the levels of CD33 in the hippocampus of 18, but not 9, month-old mice. Finally, anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen ameliorated the peripheral surgical wounding-induced cognitive impairment in 18 month-old mice. These data suggested that the peripheral surgical wounding could induce an age-dependent neuroinflammation and elevation of CD33 levels in the hippocampus of mice, which could lead to cognitive impairment in aged mice. Pending further studies, anti-inflammatory therapies may reduce the risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients. PMID:24796537

  20. X-ray mapping technique: a preliminary study in discriminating gunshot residue particles from aggregates of environmental occupational origin.

    PubMed

    Cardinetti, Bruno; Ciampini, Claudio; D'Onofrio, Carlo; Orlando, Giovanni; Gravina, Luciano; Ferrari, Francesco; Di Tullio, Donatello; Torresi, Luca

    2004-06-30

    The possibility of detection of lead-antimony-barium aggregates from non-firearm sources is confirmed according to the tests performed on brake pads, and firework and automobile workers. Moreover, information on particles taken from cartridge cases shows the relative feeble importance of the morphology in distinguishing gunshot residues (GSRs). Furthermore, also the presence in the spectrum of other elements (e.g., iron) is not so conclusive. In this panorama, the possibility of discriminating gunshot residue particles from other non-firearm lead-antimony-barium aggregates is investigated: the proposed method is based on X-ray mapping technique--currently applied used in Reparto Carabinieri Investigazioni Scientifiche in Rome, the forensic service of Italian Carabinieri--according to which the spatial distribution of the emission energy of each element of the sample is pictured. Gunshot residues present the same lead-antimony-barium distribution (or at least the same antimony-barium distribution with lead nodules), as some other environmental occupational aggregates do not (different plaques of lead, antimony, and barium). So, X-ray mapping technique can offer a new fundamental evaluation parameter in analysis of gunshot residues with scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive (SEM/EDS) spectrometry, and new standards could be considered. PMID:15177626

  1. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  2. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  3. The evaluation of a new technology for gunshot residue (GSR) analysis in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondrogiannis, Ellen; Andersen, Danielle; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2013-05-01

    There continues to be a need for improved technology to be used in theater to quickly and accurately identify the person who shot any weapon during a terrorist attack as well as to link a suspect to the actual weapon fired during a crime. Beyond this, in areas of conflict it would be desirable to have the capability to establish the source country for weaponry and ammunition. Gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is a reasonably well-studied technology area. Recent scientific publications have reported that the residues have a rich composition of both organic and inorganic compounds. For the purposes of identifying the manufacturer or country of origin for the ammunition, the inorganic components of GSR appear to be especially promising since their presence in the propellant and primer formulations are either specific to a given chemical formula, or they represent impurities in the manufacturing process that can be unique to a manufacturer or the source country for the chemicals used for propellants and primers. The Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technology has already demonstrated considerable capability for elemental fingerprinting, especially for inorganic/metallic components. A number of reports have demonstrated LIBS capability in forensics for matching materials such as inks, fabrics, paper, glass, and paint. This work describes the encouraging results of an initial study to assess a new commercial field-portable (battery operated) LIBS system for GSR analysis with gunshot residues having been collected from inside cartridge casings from 3 different ammunition manufacturers.

  4. Skin permeation of organic gunshot residue: implications for sampling and analysis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jordan Wade; Bell, Suzanne

    2014-06-17

    Traditional gunshot residue (GSR) analysis is based on detection of particulates formed from metals found in the primer. Recent concerns regarding the interpretation of GSR evidence has led to interest in alternatives such as the organic constituents (organic gunshot residue, OGSR) found in propellants. Previous work has shown OGSR to be detectable on hands for several hours after a firing event, and given the lipophilic nature of these compounds, it was expected that losses due to secondary transfer (an issue with GSR particulates) would be negligible. However, other loss mechanisms have been identified, specifically skin permeation and evaporation. This paper describes experimental and modeling studies used to elucidate characteristics of skin permeation of 5 compounds present in OGSR. Pharmaceutical methods were adapted to characterize skin permeation using a skin surrogate and Franz diffusion cells. The amount of compounds deposited on skin after an authentic firing event (1 and 2 shots) was experimentally determined and applied for the permeation experiments. A fully validated selected ion monitoring GC/MS method was developed for quantitative analysis, and easily accessible online tools were employed for modeling. Results showed that OGSR residues should be detectable on skin for many hours after a firing event of as few as one or two shots, with detection capability being a function of the efficacy of sampling and sample preparation and the instrumental method employed. The permeation rates of the OGSR compounds were sufficiently different to suggest the potential to develop methods to approximate time-since-deposition. PMID:24837230

  5. A Comparison Between Non-Descent Vaginal Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dibyajyoti, Gharphalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hysterectomy is one of the most common gyneacological surgeries performed worldwide. The vaginal technique has been introduced and performed centuries back, but has been less successful due to lack of experience and enthusiasm among Gynaecologists, due to a misconception that the abdominal route is safer and easier. Aim To evaluate the most efficient route of hysterectomy in women with mobile nonprolapsed uteri of 12 weeks or lesser by comparing the intra and postoperative complications of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomies. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed wherein, 300 consecutive patients requiring hysterectomy for benign diseases were analysed over a period of 2 years (December 2012–November 2014). Group A (n = 150) underwent vaginal hysterectomy (non descent vaginal hysterectomy, NDVH) which was compared with group B (n = 150) who had abdominal hysterectomy. The primary outcome measures were operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative analgesia, hospital stay, postoperative mobility, blood transfusion, wound infection, febrile morbidity and postoperative systemic infections. Secondary outcome measures were conversion of vaginal to abdominal route and re-laparotomy. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Regarding operation duration, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain, postoperative blood transfusion, mobilization in post operative ward, postoperative wound infection, febrile morbidity, duration of hospital stay, p-value was significant in vaginal hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy. Regarding postoperative systemic infections, p-value was not significant. None of the cases in the vaginal group were converted to abdominal route and none of the cases in the whole study group underwent re-laparotomy. Conclusion The present study concludes that patients requiring hysterectomy

  6. [Stab wounds in emergency department].

    PubMed

    Bège, T; Berdah, S V; Brunet, C

    2013-12-01

    Stab wounds represent the most common cause of penetrating wounds, occurring mainly in case of aggression or suicide attempt. Clinical severity depends on the superficial or penetrating aspect of the wound, its location and damaged organs. Medical management must be known because the vital risk is involved in penetrating wounds. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be operated without delay after performing a chest X-ray and ultrasound Focus assisted sonography for trauma (FAST) to guide the surgery. In the stable patients, the general clinical examination, exploration of the wound and medical imaging detect injuries requiring surgical management. Stab penetrating wounds require close and rapid collaboration between medical teams, tailored to the institution's resources. PMID:24176734

  7. Chemokines and diabetic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Oscar; Torres, Francis M; Shireman, Paula K

    2007-01-01

    Chemokines are critical for white blood cell recruitment to injured tissues and play an important role in normal wound healing processes. In contrast, impaired wound healing in diabetic patients is accompanied by decreased early inflammatory cell infiltration but persistence of neutrophils and macrophages in the chronic, nonhealing wounds. These changes in inflammatory cell recruitment occur in conjunction with alterations in chemokine and growth factor expression. In addition to leukocyte trafficking, many different cell types, including endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes, produce and respond to chemokines, and these interactions are altered in diabetic wounds. Thus, the chemokine system may have both direct and inflammatory-mediated effects on many different aspects of diabetic wound healing. The potential roles of chemokines and inflammatory or immune cells in nonhealing diabetic wounds, including impairments in growth factor expression, angiogenesis, extracellular matrix formation, and reepithelialization, are examined. PMID:18053419

  8. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  9. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

  10. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  11. Wound Healing and the Dressing*

    PubMed Central

    Scales, John T.

    1963-01-01

    The evolution of surgical dressings is traced from 1600 b.c. to a.d. 1944. The availability of an increasing variety of man-made fibres and films from 1944 onwards has stimulated work on wound dressings, and some of the more important contributions, both clinical and experimental, are discussed. The functions of a wound dressing and the properties which the ideal wound dressing should possess are given. The necessity for both histological and clinical evaluation of wound dressings in animals and in man is stressed. Wound dressings are the most commonly used therapeutic agents, but there is no means whereby their performance can be assessed. An attempt should be made either nationally or internationally to establish a standard method of assessing the performance of wound dressings. For this it is necessary to have an internationally agreed standard dressing which could be used as a reference or control dressing in all animal and human work. The only animal with skin morphologically similar to that of man is the domestic pig. Three types of wounds could be used: (1) partial-thickness wounds; (2) full-thickness excisions; and (3) third-degree burns. The development of standard techniques for the assessment of the efficiency of wound dressings would be of considerable benefit to the research worker, the medical profession, the patient, and the surgical dressings industry. PMID:13976490

  12. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    PubMed

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them. PMID:26061489

  13. Abdominal trauma at the Southern Surgical Association, 1888-1987.

    PubMed Central

    Nance, F C

    1988-01-01

    Since 1888 98 papers have been presented to the Southern Surgical Association (SSA) dealing directly or indirectly with abdominal trauma. The papers reflect the progress over the century in the management of this injury. Almost two-thirds of the papers have originated from the major city hospitals of the south. An interest in abdominal trauma has been manifest among the officers of SSA. Twenty-two presidents have presented papers or taken part in discussions. Four 25-year eras were identified. In the earliest, exploration of abdominal wounds was firmly established as a principle. The second period was characterized by consolidation of principles and strengthening of supportive care. The third era encompassing World War II marked a nadir in productivity. In the last 25 years a reawakened interest has resulted in a marked increase in the number and quality of presentations, which have increasingly focused on specific organ injuries. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:3291795

  14. Abdominal compartment syndrome: an underrated complication in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Bertocchi, M; Centanaro, M; Varotti, G; Santori, G; Mondello, R; Tagliamacco, A; Cupo, P; Barabani, C; Palombo, D

    2014-09-01

    The transplantation of a large kidney in small children can lead to many complications, including an underrated complication known as abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), which is defined as intra-abdominal pressure (IAP)≥20 mm Hg with dysfunction of at least one thoracoabdominal organ. Presenting signs of ACS include firm tense abdomen, increased peak inspiratory pressures, oliguria, and hypotension. Between June 1, 1985, and September 30, 2013, our center performed 420 kidney transplants (deceased/living related donors: 381/39) in 314 pediatric recipients (female/male: 147/167). ACS occurred in 9 pediatric patients (weight<15 kg) who received a large kidney from adult donors. In 1 case, the patient underwent abdominal decompression with re-exploration and closure with mesh in the immediate postoperative period. In a second case, the patient developed a significant respiratory compromise with hemodynamic instability necessitating catecholamines, sedation, and assisted ventilation. For small children transplanted with a large kidney, an early diagnosis of ACS represents a critical step. From 2005 we have measured IAP during transplantation via urinary bladder pressure, and immediately after wound closure we use intraoperative and postoperative duplex sonography to value flow dynamics changes. We recommend that bladder pressure should be routinely checked in small pediatric kidney recipients who are transplanted with a large graft. PMID:25242763

  15. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  16. Handgun wounds: a review of range and location as pertaining to manner of death.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; DiMaio, Vincent J M; Cave, Rowena

    2013-12-01

    Citizens of the United States own more firearms than those in any other country, and the majority of the firearms owned are handguns. Given such prevalence, surprisingly few studies have been published describing the characteristics of deaths due to handguns. To address this gap, nonaccidental handgun deaths examined at the Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. A total of 1450 cases were identified, including 797 suicides and 653 homicides. Age, range of fire, location of wound, and manner of death were analyzed. The average age of suicide victims (46.7 years) was found to be greater than that of homicides (34.3 years). Suicidal wounds tended to be contact wounds to the head; abdominal, extremity, back, and multiple wound locations were more common in homicides as were distant and intermediate wounds. Handgun wounds to the forehead, side of head, submental, and intraoral locations were significantly more common in suicide, whereas those to the face, apex of the head, and back of the head were more common in homicides. Where possible, likelihood ratios were calculated to determine relative likelihood of suicide or homicide for specific wound locations and ranges. While each death should be analyzed based on its unique circumstances and not solely its statistical probability, these data may help inform the pathologist's conclusions. PMID:24189632

  17. Antinociceptive and wound healing activities of Croton adamantinus Müll. Arg. essential oil.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Morais Nogueira, Lenise; Cassundé, Nathalia Maria Rodrigues; Jorge, Roberta Jeane Bezerra; dos Santos, Simone Maria; Magalhães, Lucimere Paulino Machado; Silva, Monalisa Ribeiro; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro; Araújo, Renata Mendonça; de Sena, Kêsia Xisto da Fonseca Ribeiro; de Albuquerque, Julianna Ferreira Cavalcanti; Martins, René Duarte

    2013-10-01

    Leaves of Croton adamantinus have been used to treat inflammation and skin wounds in the semi-arid area of the Northeast of Brazil. In order to evaluate if the essential oil (EO) was responsible for the claimed activities; antinociceptive, wound healing and antimicrobial tests were carried out. Twenty constituents were identified in C. adamantinus EO by GC-MS, ¹H-NMR and ¹³C-NMR, the major compounds being methyl-eugenol (14.81%) and 1,8-cineol (13.74%). Antinociceptive activity was evaluated by the formalin test and the abdominal contortion assay in mice. The EO (50 and 100 mg/kg) decreased the licking time of both phases of the formalin test when compared to the vehicle, but not to morphine (7.5 mg/kg). In the abdominal contortion assay, the EO (50 and 100 mg/kg) reduced the number of contortions compared to the vehicle and to indometacin (10 mg/kg). The wound healing activity was verified also using two experimental models: excisional wound and dead space. Topical treatment with the EO (1%) increased the wound contraction from the third day of treatment (compared with nitrofurazone 0.2%), while systemic treatment (50 mg/kg/day) increased granulation tissue formation and reduced the water content. C. adamantinus EO also showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus in disk diffusion method. These results corroborate the ethnobotanical use of this specie by Brazilian population. PMID:23339025

  18. Development of a functional wound dressing composed of hyaluronic acid spongy sheet containing bioactive components: evaluation of wound healing potential in animal tests.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nahoko; Ishida, Daiki; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuroyanagi, Misato; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a novel wound dressing composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) spongy sheet containing bioactive components. The wound dressing prepared by the freeze-drying method has a two-layered structure: an upper layer composed of cross-linked high-molecular-weight HA (HMW-HA) and a lower layer composed of low-molecular-weight HA (LMW-HA) containing arginine (Arg), magnesium ascorbyl phosphate (vitamin C derivative: VC), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) (referred to as EGF-dressing). A wound dressing containing only Arg and VC was prepared in a similar manner (referred to as EGF-free-dressing). The potential of each wound dressing was evaluated in animal tests using Sprague Dawley (SD) rats and diabetic mice. In the first experiment, each wound dressing was applied to a full-thickness skin defect in the abdominal region of SD rats. Wound conditions after 1 week and 2 weeks of treatment were evaluated based on macroscopic and histological appearance. A commercially available non-woven alginate wound dressing (Alg-dressing) was used in a control group. Both EGF-free-dressing and EGF-dressing decreased wound size and promoted granulation tissue formation associated with angiogenesis more effectively when compared with Alg-dressing. In particular, EGF-dressing promoted re-epithelialization. In the second experiment, each wound dressing was applied to a full-thickness skin defect in the dorsal region of diabetic mice. Wound conditions after 1 week and 2 weeks of treatment were evaluated based on macroscopic and histological appearance. A commercially available Alg-dressing was used in a control group. Both EGF-free-dressing and EGF-dressing decreased wound size and promoted granulation tissue formation associated with angiogenesis more effectively when compared with Alg-dressing. These findings indicate that EGF-free-dressing and EGF-dressing have the potential for more effective wound healing when compared with Alg-dressing. In particular, EGF-dressing has

  19. Recording and Calculating Gunshot Sound—Change of the Volume in Reference to the Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaos, Tsiatis E.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in an open practice ground (shooting range) regarding the recording of the sound of gunshots. Shots were fired using various types of firearms (seven pistols, five revolvers, two submachine guns, one rifle, and one shotgun) in different calibers, from several various distances with reference to the recording sources. Both, a conventional sound level meter (device) and a measurement microphone were used, having been placed in a fixed point behind the shooting line. The sound of each shot was recorded (from the device). At the same time the signal received by the microphone was transferred to a connected computer through an appropriate audio interface with a pre-amplifier. Each sound wave was stored and depicted as a wave function. After the physic-mathematical analysis of these depictions, the volume was calculated in the accepted engineering units(Decibels or dB) of Sound Pressure Level (SPL). The distances from the recording sources were 9.60 meters, 14.40 m, 19.20 m, and 38.40 m. The experiment was carried out by using the following calibers: .22 LR, 6.35 mm(.25 AUTO), 7.62 mm Tokarev(7,62×25), 7.65 mm(.32 AUTO), 9 mm Parabellum(9×19), 9 mm Short(9×17), 9 mm Makarov(9×18), .45 AUTO, .32 S&W, .38 S&W, .38 SPECIAL, .357 Magnum, 7,62 mm Kalashnikov(7,62×39) and 12 GA. Tables are given for the environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, altitude & barometric pressure), the length of the barrel of each gun, technical characteristics of the used ammunition, as well as for the volume taken from the SLM. The data for the sound intensity were collected after 168 gunshots (158 single shot & 10 bursts). According to the results, a decreasing of the volume, equivalent to the increasing of the distance, was remarked, as it was expected. Values seem to follow the Inverse square Law. For every doubling of the distance from the sound source, the sound intensity diminishes by 5.9904±0.2325 decibels (on average). In addition, we have the

  20. The 'triple contrast' method in experimental wound ballistics and backspatter analysis.

    PubMed

    Schyma, Christian; Lux, Constantin; Madea, Burkhard; Courts, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    In practical forensic casework, backspatter recovered from shooters' hands can be an indicator of self-inflicted gunshot wounds to the head. In such cases, backspatter retrieved from inside the barrel indicates that the weapon found at the death scene was involved in causing the injury to the head. However, systematic research on the aspects conditioning presence, amount and specific patterns of backspatter is lacking so far. Herein, a new concept of backspatter investigation is presented, comprising staining technique, weapon and target medium: the 'triple contrast method' was developed, tested and is introduced for experimental backspatter analysis. First, mixtures of various proportions of acrylic paint for optical detection, barium sulphate for radiocontrast imaging in computed tomography and fresh human blood for PCR-based DNA profiling were generated (triple mixture) and tested for DNA quantification and short tandem repeat (STR) typing success. All tested mixtures yielded sufficient DNA that produced full STR profiles suitable for forensic identification. Then, for backspatter analysis, sealed foil bags containing the triple mixture were attached to plastic bottles filled with 10% ballistic gelatine and covered by a 2-3-mm layer of silicone. To simulate backspatter, close contact shots were fired at these models. Endoscopy of the barrel inside revealed coloured backspatter containing typable DNA and radiographic imaging showed a contrasted bullet path in the gelatine. Cross sections of the gelatine core exhibited cracks and fissures stained by the acrylic paint facilitating wound ballistic analysis. PMID:25616629

  1. Difficult wounds: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B; Gubler, K Dean; Drake, David B

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this collective review is to describe revolutionary advances in the treatment of Gardner's syndrome (GS), pseudofolliculitis barbae, nasal septal perforation, factitious wounds, and hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Gardner's syndrome or familial polyposis has various manifestations that appear to be controlled by a single genetic locus. Apart from the large bowel adenomas, which are always present, a common extracolonic symptom of Gardner's syndrome is the occurrence of epidermal cysts. These cysts can be seen before the intestinal polyps are evident. Because epidermal cysts in patients with Gardner's syndrome are always benign, we excise these cysts using incisions that are commonly used for rhytidectomy. Pseudofolliculitis barbae, a pseudofolliculitis caused by ingrown hairs, effects 85% of blacks who shave their beards. When this disease is allowed to progress to keloid formation, we use a surgical approach that includes excision of the keloidal scar, meticulous debridement of all residual ingrown hairs in the underlying wound, and coverage of the defect with a split-thickness skin graft. More recently, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of pseudofolliculitis barbae and has enabled a cure for the first time for those plagued with this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable. Nasal septal perforation is a well recognized complication of septal surgery. Other iatrogenic causes of perforation include cryosurgery, electrocoagulation for epitaxis, nasotracheal intubation, or nose packing. In recent years drugs such as cocaine account for an increasing number of perforations. It has only been with the use of an external approach for the repair of the nasal septal defect that surgical closure has become easier and more reliable. The external approach allows for greater surgical closure and enables the surgeon to use both hands with the aid of binocular vision to mobilize and suture local mucosal advancement flaps and the

  2. Multimodal imaging of ischemic wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Liu, Peng; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, no method is available for noninvasive, simultaneous, and quantitative imaging of these tissue parameters. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities into a single setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Advanced algorithms were developed for accurate reconstruction of wound oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between different imaging modalities. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated by an ongoing clinical trials approved by OSU IRB. In the clinical trial, a wound of 3mm in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was serially monitored by the multimodal imaging setup. Our experiments demonstrated the clinical usability of multimodal wound imaging.

  3. [Spinal cord injuries caused by extraspinal gunshot. A historical, experimental and therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Jourdan, P; Breteau, J P; Volff, P

    1994-01-01

    A careful study of all clinical observations reported by various authors during one century teaches us that spinal cord wounds caused by a missile path away from the spine have always had vague and mysterious mechanisms. We have simulate shots near the cervical spine included in gelatin and we have shot at pigs weighing 100 kilograms, previously anaesthetized and bio-instrumented according to J. Breteau methodology. So, we have been able to reproduce medullary wounds by shooting in the nape of the neck, away from the cervical spine. The knowledge of all mechanisms of balistic wounds, the analysis of the results obtained and a histological examination of wounded medulla leads us to the conclusion that this type of medullary wound distance from the spinal cord, is not specific and that, in fact, the missile causes an ordinary medullary contusion. While waiting for forthcoming medicinal progress, a management of treatment is suggested. PMID:7723926

  4. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  5. Wound care in venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mosti, G

    2013-03-01

    Wound dressings: ulcer dressings should create and maintain a moist environment on the ulcer surface. It has been shown that in an ulcer with a hard crust and desiccated bed, the healing process is significantly slowed and sometimes completely blocked so favouring infection, inflammation and pain. In contrast a moist environment promotes autolytic debridement, angiogenesis and the more rapid formation of granulation tissue, favours keratinocytes migration and accelerates healing of wounds. Apart from these common characteristics, wound dressings are completely different in other aspects and must be used according to the ulcer stage. In necrotic ulcers, autolytic debridement by means of hydrogel and hydrocolloids or with enzymatic paste is preferred. In case of largely exuding wounds alginate or hydrofibre are indicated. When bleeding occurs alginate is indicated due to its haemostatic power. Where ulcers are covered by granulation tissue, polyurethane foams are preferred. When infection coexists antiseptics are necessary: dressing containing silver or iodine with large antibacterial spectrum have proved to be very effective. In the epithelization stage polyurethane films or membranes, thin hydrocolloids or collagen based dressings are very useful to favour advancement of the healing wound edge. Despite these considerations, a Cochrane review failed to find advantages for any dressing type compared with low-adherent dressings applied beneath compression. Surgical debridement and grafting of wounds, negative wound pressure treatment: surgical and hydrosurgical debridement are indicated in large, necrotic and infected wounds as these treatments are able to get rid of necrotic, infected tissue very quickly in a single surgical session, thereby significantly accelerating wound bed preparation and healing time. Negative wound pressure treatment creating a negative pressure on ulcer bed is able to favour granulation tissue and shorten healing time. In case of hard

  6. Robust direction-of-arrival by matched-lags, applied to gunshots.

    PubMed

    Lyon Freire, Izabela

    2014-06-01

    This work investigates the direction-of-arrival problem. A time-delay-estimate (TDE) obtained from a peak of a correlation function is subject to two types of error: type I, approximation errors, and type II, errors due to spurious signals. The iterative least-squares algorithm tentatively selects spatially coherent subsets of TDEs containing no type II errors and minor contributions of type I errors ("matched-lags"). Simulations use a seven-microphone array and a gunshot signal. The evaluation methodology is rigorous, comparing empirical distribution functions of estimation error of algorithms through two-sample, one-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, and quantifying differences with Cohen's D. The direction-of-arrival estimate is improved, specifically at low signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:24907829

  7. [Suicidal gunshot to the nape from a small-bore rifle].

    PubMed

    Lüderwald, Sybille; Mützel, Elisabeth; Graw, Matthias; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang; Peschel, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was found dead on the bed lying on his side in a pool of blood with a bullet entrance hole in the nape. Behind his body, a semi-automatic rifle Remington Nylon, cal. .22 LR, was detected. As the gunshot entrance site was rather unusual for suicide, a forensic autopsy was performed, which showed a contact shot to the nape with the bullet path running upward to the left frontal area. The man had been treated with citalopram for delusional depression, so that a suicidal act seemed plausible, and the autopsy and criminalistic findings were also compatible with this assumption. A remarkable fact of the present case is that a long firearm had been used. Reports on suicidal shots to the nape are comparatively rare in the medicolegal literature and usually refer to pistols or revolvers. PMID:18389862

  8. The Relationship Between the Surface Morphology and Chemical Composition of Gunshot Residue Particles.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ilker; Lisesivdin, Sefer Bora; Kasap, Mehmet; Er, Elif; Uzek, Ugur

    2015-07-01

    In this study, chemical composition and morphology of gunshot residue (GSR) of 9 × 19 mm Parabellum-type MKE (Turkey)-brand ammunition were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. GSR samples were collected by "swab" technique from the shooter's right hand immediately after shooting. According to general principles of thermodynamics, it is likely that the structures will have a more regular (homogeneous) spherical form to minimize their surface area due to very high temperatures and pressures that occur during explosion. Studied samples were collected under the same conditions with the same original ammunition, from the same firearm and a single shooter. This is because many other variables may affect size, structure, and composition in addition to the concentrations of elements of the structure. Results indicated that the chemical compositions are effective in the formation of GSR morphological structures. PMID:25864563

  9. A new method for collection and identification of gunshot residues from the hands of shooters.

    PubMed

    Reis, Edson L T; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Neto, Osvaldo N; Rodrigues, Claudio; Kakazu, Maurício H; Viebig, Sônia

    2003-11-01

    This work presents a novel collection method for gunshot residues (GSR) using a sampling procedure based on ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution as a complexing agent on moistened swabs. Detection was via a sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HRICP-MS). The proposed collection and analytical method allowed detection of antimony (Sb), barium (Ba) and lead (Pb) after .38 shot tests. at detection limits of less than 1 microg L(-1) in four different areas of the hands of volunteers. This paper includes a discussion concerning hand areas near the thumb and forefinger as being more suitable for GSR collection as well as a comparison between differences observed using 2% diluted EDTA. 2% nitric acid solution, and simple deionized water as collecting solutions, proving the superior efficiency of EDTA in GSR recoveries. PMID:14640269

  10. A new quantitative method for gunshot residue analysis by ion beam analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Matthew E; Warmenhoeven, John-William; Romolo, Francesco S; Donghi, Matteo; Webb, Roger P; Jeynes, Christopher; Ward, Neil I; Kirkby, Karen J; Bailey, Melanie J

    2013-08-21

    Imaging and analyzing gunshot residue (GSR) particles using the scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) is a standard technique that can provide important forensic evidence, but the discrimination power of this technique is limited due to low sensitivity to trace elements and difficulties in obtaining quantitative results from small particles. A new, faster method using a scanning proton microbeam and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE), together with Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) is presented for the non-destructive, quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of single GSR particles. In this study, the GSR particles were all Pb, Ba, Sb. The precision of the method is assessed. The grouping behaviour of different makes of ammunition is determined using multivariate analysis. The protocol correctly groups the cartridges studied here, with a confidence >99%, irrespective of the firearm or population of particles selected. PMID:23775063

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy of gunshot residue: an application to forensic science.

    PubMed

    Bird, Damian K; Agg, Kent M; Barnett, Neil W; Smith, Trevor A

    2007-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has rapidly emerged as the technique of choice for many researchers aiming to gain specific insights into the dynamics of intricate biological systems. Although the unique advantages the technique provides over other methods have proven to be particularly useful in the biosciences, to date they have been largely unexploited by other research disciplines. In this paper, we demonstrate the capacity of time-resolved fluorescence microscopy as a practical analytical tool in the forensic sciences via the imaging of gunshot residues that are expelled when a firearm is discharged. This information may prove to be useful for determination of the true sequence of events that took place in a firearm related crime. PMID:17381705

  12. Detection of gunshot residue on dark-colored clothing prior to chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Kyla L; Childers, James M; Justice, Dale; Karim, Greg

    2014-05-01

    Detection of gunshot residue (GSR) is an arduous task for investigators. It is often accomplished with chemical tests, which can reveal elements and ions indicating the presence of GSR, but are likely to cause physical alteration to the pattern. In this study, the Spex Forensics Mini-CrimeScope MCS 400, along with 16 accompanying wavelength filters, was applied to various GSR patterns and target types. Three dark shirt materials, four ammunition calibers, and eight ammunition manufacturers, along with the primer residue of the different manufacturer ammunitions were tested. Results indicate the alternate light source wavelength of 445 nm to be the optimal setting. In addition, target material plays a large role in the preservation of GSR patterns as particles burn. Furthermore, it can be extrapolated that residue, observed from a full round and firing distance of six inches, is mostly composed of unburnt gunpowder residue, not primer residue. PMID:24634985

  13. High photoluminescent metal-organic frameworks as optical markers for the identification of gunshot residues.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ingrid Távora; de Melo, Adenaule James Geber; Lucena, Marcella Auxiliadora de Melo; Rodrigues, Marcelo Oliveira; Alves, Severino

    2011-06-15

    Gunshot residue (GSR) are solid particles produced when a firearm is discharged, and its detection is important evidence in forensic investigations. Currently, scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) is the standard technique adopted for the analysis and identification of GSR; however, this methodology is inefficient for lead-free ammunition. Herein, we report the inclusion of high photoluminescent metal-organic frameworks in ammunition to allow for the visual detection of GSR. The tests indicated that marked GSR is easily visible in proportions above 5.0 wt %. A total of 1 g of marker suffices to tag 100 0.38 mm bullets or 62 0.40 mm bullets. PMID:21585195

  14. Abdominal bloating: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, A Young; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  15. Abdominal pain with a twist

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Malrotation in children is due to either an incomplete or non-rotation of the foetal mid-gut during perinatal development. Presentation is usually in the first few weeks of life, often with life-threatening volvulus and ischaemia. However, it can be a rare cause of abdominal pain in older children and young adults. We present such a case, as a reminder to emergency physicians that malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or chronic abdominal pain not only in children but also in adolescents. PMID:21635723

  16. Ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M; Moosa, I; Hussein, F M; Qurttom, M A; Behbehani, A I

    1999-05-01

    Sonographic findings were retrospectively analysed in 39 patients with proven abdominal tuberculosis (TB). The patients were treated over 15 years at a major teaching hospital, Mubarak Al-Kabber Hospital, in Kuwait. The findings included clear or complex ascites with fine strands, loculations and debris. The other findings were lymphadenopathy, bowel wall thickening, omental mass, focal lesions in the liver and spleen and psoas abscess. The sonographic findings in abdominal TB are not specific but may give valuable information to prevent unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:10901897

  17. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  18. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  19. Investigation of gunshot residue patterns using milli-XRF-techniques: first experiences in casework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Rüdiger; Barth, Martin; Neimke, Dieter; Niewöhner, Ludwig

    2010-06-01

    The investigation of gunshot residue (GSR) patterns for shooting range estimation is usually based on visualizing the lead, copper, or nitrocellulose distributions on targets like fabric or adhesive tape by chemographic color tests. The method usually provides good results but has its drawbacks when it comes to the examination of ammunition containing lead-free primers or bloody clothing. A milli-X-ray fluorescence (m-XRF) spectrometer with a large motorized stage can help to circumvent these problems allowing the acquisition of XRF mappings of relatively large areas (up to 20 x 20 cm) in millimeter resolution within reasonable time (2-10 hours) for almost all elements. First experiences in GSR casework at the Forensic Science Institute of the Bundeskriminalamt (BKA) have shown, that m-XRF is a useful supplementation for conventional methods in shooting ranges estimation, which helps if there are problems in transferring a GSR pattern to secondary targets (e.g. bloody or stained garments) or if there is no suitable color test available for the element of interest. The resulting elemental distributions are a good estimate for the shooting range and can be evaluated by calculating radial distributions or integrated count rates of irregular shaped regions like pieces of human skin which are too small to be investigated with a conventional WD-XRF spectrometer. Beside a mapping mode the milli-XRF offers also point and line scan modes which can also be utilized in gunshot crime investigations as a quick survey tool to identify bullet holes based on the elements present in the wipe ring.

  20. Clinical characteristics of acoustic trauma caused by gunshot noise in mass rifle drills without ear protection.

    PubMed

    Moon, In Seok; Park, Sang-Yong; Park, Hyun Jin; Yang, Hoon-Shik; Hong, Sung-Jong; Lee, Won-Sang

    2011-10-01

    One of the major occupational hazards of working in military service is being subjected to intense impulse noise. We analyzed the clinical presentation of acoustic traumas, induced by mass rifle gunshot noise during military training, in unprotected patients. We evaluated 189 soldiers who had otologic symptoms after rifle shooting exercises without using any hearing protection. All soldiers had been training on the K2 rifle. We took medical histories; conducted physical examinations and hearing evaluations (pure-tone audiometry, speech audiometry, and impedence audiometry); and distributed the Newmann's Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) survey. In addition, we evaluated a normal control group of 64 subjects of similar age who had never fired a rifle. In the patient group, the most common and irritating reported symptom was tinnitus (94.2%), and the average THI score in the patient group was 39.51 ± 14.87, which was significantly higher than the control group score (0.56 ± 3.94) (p < 0.001). Average outcomes of post-exposure air conduction thresholds were 21.33 ± 13.25 dB HL in the affected ears. These levels also were significantly higher than those of the control group (9.16 ± 4.07dB HL) (p < 0.001). Hearing loss was most prominent at high frequencies. An asymmetry of hearing loss related to head position during shooting was not observed. Acoustic trauma induced by gunshot noise can cause permanent tinnitus and hearing loss. Hearing protection (bilateral earplugs) and environmental reform are necessary. PMID:21936701