Science.gov

Sample records for abdominal mri scan

  1. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you have: Artificial heart valves Brain aneurysm clips Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) ... which the test may be performed: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Carcinoma of the renal pelvis ...

  2. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from torn ...

  3. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative. PMID:26632714

  4. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  5. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... imaging - leg; Magnetic resonance imaging - lower extremity; MRI - ankle; Magnetic resonance imaging - ankle; MRI - femur; MRI - leg ... or bone scan Birth defects of the leg, ankle, or foot Bone pain and fever Broken bone ...

  6. Abdominal MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the inside of the ... No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  7. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors, including cancer Infections or injury Kidney stones Appendicitis ... also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal artery stenosis ...

  8. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses strong magnets to create pictures of the upper and lower ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  9. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging (MRI) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the lower part of ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  10. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the knee joint and ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  11. Leg MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... resonance imaging) scan of the leg uses strong magnets to create pictures of the leg. This may ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  12. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnetic resonance imaging) scan uses energy from strong magnets to create pictures of the part of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  13. Teratoma - MRI scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This MRI scan shows a tumor (teratoma) at the base of the spine (seen on the left lower edge of the screen), located in the sacrum and coccyx (sacrococcygeal) area. Teratomas are present at birth and may contain hair, teeth, and other tissues.

  14. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast MRI may be done in combination with mammography or ultrasound . It is not a replacement for mammography. ... breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography. CA Cancer J Clin . 2007;57:75-89. ...

  15. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... The table slides into the middle of the MRI machine. Small devices, called coils, may be placed around ... anxious. Or your provider may suggest an open MRI in which the machine is not as close to the body. Before ...

  16. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  17. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thomsen HS, Reimer P. Intravascular contrast media for radiology, CT, and MRI. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  18. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses energy from powerful magnets and to create pictures of the shoulder area. ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed in the room ...

  19. Emergency abdominal MRI: current uses and trends.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hei S; Gupta, Avneesh; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina

    2016-05-01

    When evaluating the abdomen in the emergency setting, CT and ultrasound are the imaging modalities of choice, mainly because of accessibility, speed and lower relative cost. CT has the added benefit of assessing the whole abdomen for a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal disease, whereas ultrasound has the benefit of avoiding ionizing radiation. MRI is another tool that has demonstrated increasing utility in the emergency setting and also avoids the use of ionizing radiation. MRI also has the additional advantage of excellent soft-tissue contrast. However, widespread use of MRI in the emergency setting is limited by availability and relative cost. Despite such limitations, advances in MRI technology, including improved pulse sequences and coil technology and increasing clinician awareness of MRI, have led to an increased demand in abdominal MRI in the emergency setting. This is particularly true in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis; choledocholithiasis with or without cholecystitis; acute appendicitis, particularly in pregnant patients; and, in some cases, Crohn's disease. In cases of pancreatitis and Crohn's disease, MRI also plays a role in subsequent follow-up examinations. PMID:26514590

  20. Emerging Applications of Abdominal 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Alzate, Alejandro; Francois, Christopher J.; Wieben, Oliver; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Comprehensive assessment of abdominal hemodynamics is crucial for many clinical diagnoses but is challenged by a tremendous complexity of anatomy, normal physiology, and a wide variety of pathologic abnormalities. This article introduces 4D flow MRI as a powerful technique for noninvasive assessment of the hemodynamics of abdominal vascular territories. CONCLUSION Four-dimensional flow MRI provides clinicians with a more extensive and straightforward approach to evaluate disorders that affect blood flow in the abdomen. This review presents a series of clinical cases to illustrate the utility of 4D flow MRI in the comprehensive assessment of the abdominal circulation. PMID:27187681

  1. How to scan polymer gels with MRI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The absorbed radiation dose fixated in a polymer gel dosimeter can be read out by several methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical CT, X-ray CT and ultrasound with MRI being the first method that was explored. Although MRI was considered as an elegant scanning technique, readily available in most hospitals, it was later found that using a non-optimized imaging protocol may result in unacceptable deviations in the obtained dose distribution. Although most medical physicists have an understanding of the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the optimization of quantitative imaging sequences and protocols is often perceived as the work of MRI experts. In this paper, we aim at providing the reader with some easy guidelines in how to obtain reliable quantitative MRI maps.

  2. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J

    2014-01-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC(intraobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD(intraobserver) = 3.6mm ± 1.5, DC(interobserver) = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD(interobserver) = 3.2mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy. PMID:24726701

  3. Segmentation precision of abdominal anatomy for MRI-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Zhu, Fan; Lee, Andrew Y.; Yanle, Hu; Parikh, Parag J.

    2014-10-01

    The limited soft tissue visualization provided by computed tomography, the standard imaging modality for radiotherapy treatment planning and daily localization, has motivated studies on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for better characterization of treatment sites, such as the prostate and head and neck. However, no studies have been conducted on MRI-based segmentation for the abdomen, a site that could greatly benefit from enhanced soft tissue targeting. We investigated the interobserver and intraobserver precision in segmentation of abdominal organs on MR images for treatment planning and localization. Manual segmentation of 8 abdominal organs was performed by 3 independent observers on MR images acquired from 14 healthy subjects. Observers repeated segmentation 4 separate times for each image set. Interobserver and intraobserver contouring precision was assessed by computing 3-dimensional overlap (Dice coefficient [DC]) and distance to agreement (Hausdorff distance [HD]) of segmented organs. The mean and standard deviation of intraobserver and interobserver DC and HD values were DC{sub intraobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.12, HD{sub intraobserver} = 3.6 mm ± 1.5, DC{sub interobserver} = 0.89 ± 0.15, and HD{sub interobserver} = 3.2 mm ± 1.4. Overall, metrics indicated good interobserver/intraobserver precision (mean DC > 0.7, mean HD < 4 mm). Results suggest that MRI offers good segmentation precision for abdominal sites. These findings support the utility of MRI for abdominal planning and localization, as emerging MRI technologies, techniques, and onboard imaging devices are beginning to enable MRI-based radiotherapy.

  4. Automated planning of MRI neuro scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stewart; Bystrov, Daniel; Netsch, Thomas; Bergmans, Rene; van Muiswinkel, Arianne; Visser, Fredy; Sprigorum, Rudolf; Gieseke, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    In clinical MRI examinations, the geometry of diagnostic scans is defined in an initial planning phase. The operator plans the scan volumes (off-centre, angulation, field-of-view) with respect to patient anatomy in 'scout' images. Often multiple plans are required within a single examination, distracting attention from the patient waiting in the scanner. A novel and robust method is described for automated planning of neurological MRI scans, capable of handling strong shape deviations from healthy anatomy. The expert knowledge required to position scan geometries is learned from previous example plans, allowing site-specific styles to be readily taken into account. The proposed method first fits an anatomical model to the scout data, and then new scan geometries are positioned with respect to extracted landmarks. The accuracy of landmark extraction was measured to be comparable to the inter-observer variability, and automated plans are shown to be highly consistent with those created by expert operators using clinical data. The results of the presented evaluation demonstrate the robustness and applicability of the proposed approach, which has the potential to significantly improve clinical workflow.

  5. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  6. Radiation dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Kamel, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    A clinical trial was designed to test whether a significantly lower radiation dose technique could be used for pediatric abdominal CT scanning without loss of diagnostic image quality. The study included pediatric patients referred to radiology from the Children's Hospital and clinics at The University of Michigan. Seventy-eight cases were included in the study, 36 cases in the experimental group and 42 in the control group. Patient characteristics in both groups were comparable in every respect except for the technical factors used to expose the pelvis. Patients in the experimental group were scanned with a technique using 80 mAs while those in the control group were scanned with the conventional technique of 240 mAs. Therefore, the radiation dose to the pelvis was three times higher in the control group than in the experimental group. Scans were evaluated by two experienced pediatric radiologists who assessed anatomical details, image resolution and the degree of confidence in reaching a diagnosis. The low-mAs technique did not result in reduction of diagnostic image quality or the confidence in reaching a diagnosis. In conclusion, the radiation dose resulting from pediatric CT of the pelvis may be reduced by a factor of three with equivalent medical benefit.

  7. MRI Scans - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resonance Imaging) (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像(MRI) - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) 核磁共振成像( ...

  8. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  9. On Unwarranted Performance of MRI Scans

    PubMed Central

    Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Summary Having read the paper by Oikarinen et al. in the penultimate issue of Insights into Imaging, the author discusses the absurdities of everyday work of the radiologist in the MRI unit, concluding that delayed terms of appointments, despite numerous facilities being available in Poland, are largely due to the unwarranted referrals of patients to MRI examinations, which makes the patients who truly require them wait very long or decide to pay for the examination out of their own pockets; radiologists should get involved in the fight against unwarranted studies, even through the use of such expressions as “anatomical variant”, “does not require further inspection”, “no clinical significance”, “MRI is not the first study in the diagnostic algorithm” in warranted cases and by contacting the referring physician (in agreement with the head of the unit/department) to politely explain the absurdity of referral and refuse the test in the most absurd cases. PMID:25097718

  10. US and MRI features in venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, F.; Maira, A.; Tarantino, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are classified as vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Venous vascular malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation. They may be isolated or multiple and they rarely affect the trunk. The authors report a rare case of isolated venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall with an emphasis on the related MRI and ultrasound (US) features. PMID:23450707

  11. Active learning based segmentation of Crohns disease from abdominal MRI.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Dwarikanath; Vos, Franciscus M; Buhmann, Joachim M

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel active learning (AL) framework, and combines it with semi supervised learning (SSL) for segmenting Crohns disease (CD) tissues from abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) images. Robust fully supervised learning (FSL) based classifiers require lots of labeled data of different disease severities. Obtaining such data is time consuming and requires considerable expertise. SSL methods use a few labeled samples, and leverage the information from many unlabeled samples to train an accurate classifier. AL queries labels of most informative samples and maximizes gain from the labeling effort. Our primary contribution is in designing a query strategy that combines novel context information with classification uncertainty and feature similarity. Combining SSL and AL gives a robust segmentation method that: (1) optimally uses few labeled samples and many unlabeled samples; and (2) requires lower training time. Experimental results show our method achieves higher segmentation accuracy than FSL methods with fewer samples and reduced training effort. PMID:27040833

  12. Audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Arm, J.; Keall, P.; Kim, T.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that audiovisual (AV) biofeedback can improve image quality and reduce scan time for respiratory-gated 3D thoracic MRI. For five healthy human subjects respiratory motion guidance in MR scans was provided using an AV biofeedback system, utilizing real-time respiratory motion signals. To investigate the improvement of respiratory-gated 3D MR images between free breathing (FB) and AV biofeedback (AV), each subject underwent two imaging sessions. Respiratory-related motion artifacts and imaging time were qualitatively evaluated in addition to the reproducibility of external (abdominal) motion. In the results, 3D MR images in AV biofeedback showed more anatomic information such as a clear distinction of diaphragm, lung lobes and sharper organ boundaries. The scan time was reduced from 401±215 s in FB to 334±94 s in AV (p-value 0.36). The root mean square variation of the displacement and period of the abdominal motion was reduced from 0.4±0.22 cm and 2.8±2.5 s in FB to 0.1±0.15 cm and 0.9±1.3 s in AV (p-value of displacement <0.01 and p-value of period 0.12). This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback improves image quality and reduces scan time for respiratory-gated 3D MRI. These results suggest that AV biofeedback has the potential to be a useful motion management tool in medical imaging and radiation therapy procedures.

  13. Abdominal MRI without Enteral Contrast Accurately Detects Intestinal Fibrostenosis in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jeremy G; Kalb, Bobby; Martin, Diego; Dhere, Tanvi; Perez, Sebastian D; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K

    2015-11-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presenting for surgical evaluation require thorough small bowel surveillance as it improves accuracy of diagnosis (ulcerative colitis versus Crohn's) and differentiates those who may respond to nonoperative therapy, preserving bowel length. MRI has not been validated conclusively against histopathology in IBD. Most protocols require enteral contrast. This study aimed to 1) evaluate the accuracy of MRI for inflammation, fibrosis, and extraluminal complications and 2) compare MRI without enteral contrast to standard magnetic resonance enterography. Adults with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis who underwent abdominal MRI and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Of 65 patients evaluated, 55 met inclusion criteria. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI for disease involvement localized by segment were 93 per cent (95% confidence interval = 89.4-95.0) and 95 per cent (95% confidence interval = 92.3-97.0), respectively (positive predictive value was 86%, negative predictive value was 98%). Sensitivity and specificity between MRI with and without oral and rectal contrast were similar (96% vs 91% and 99% vs 94%, P > 0.10). As were positive predictive value and negative predictive value (85% vs 96%, P = 0.16; 97% vs 99%, P = 0.42). Magnetic resonance is highly sensitive and specific for localized disease involvement and extraluminal abdominal sequelae of IBD. It accurately differentiates patients who have chronic transmural (fibrotic) disease and thus may require an operation from those with acute inflammation, whose symptoms may improve with aggressive medical therapy alone. MRI without contrast had comparable diagnostic yield to standard magnetic resonance enterography. PMID:26672581

  14. Analysis on the use of Multi-Sequence MRI Series for Segmentation of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selver, M. A.; Selvi, E.; Kavur, E.; Dicle, O.

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of abdominal organs from MRI data sets is a challenging task due to various limitations and artefacts. During the routine clinical practice, radiologists use multiple MR sequences in order to analyze different anatomical properties. These sequences have different characteristics in terms of acquisition parameters (such as contrast mechanisms and pulse sequence designs) and image properties (such as pixel spacing, slice thicknesses and dynamic range). For a complete understanding of the data, computational techniques should combine the information coming from these various MRI sequences. These sequences are not acquired in parallel but in a sequential manner (one after another). Therefore, patient movements and respiratory motions change the position and shape of the abdominal organs. In this study, the amount of these effects is measured using three different symmetric surface distance metrics performed to three dimensional data acquired from various MRI sequences. The results are compared to intra and inter observer differences and discussions on using multiple MRI sequences for segmentation and the necessities for registration are presented.

  15. Abdominal computed tomographic scan-merits and demerits over ultrasonography: evaluation of 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Ogunseyinde, A O; Agunloye, A M

    2002-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and Ultrasonography (USS) are commonly used to ascertain the cause of abdominal symptoms. In a retrospective study of 70 Nigerian patients who had abdominal ultrasonography prior to abdominal CT scans, the most frequent clinical feature was abdominal pain, which was reported in 20.8% of the patients. The prevalent ultrasonographic finding was hepatomegaly (12.2%) while bowel displacement was the most frequently reported CT finding (18.3%). There was no correlation between USS and CT findings in 11 patients (15.7%). There was some agreement in the findings of both tests in 75.7% of cases. Additional findings were noted in 38 (54.3%) of the latter group of patients on CT scans. Hundred percent agreement was reported in both imaging techniques in 5 radiological findings namely: dilated gall bladder, renal cysts, ascites, adrenal mass and utero-cervical mass. These findings suggest a high yield of diagnostic accuracy from abdominal sonography and increased diagnostic details provided by CT imaging. Our overall impression is that the diagnostic information provided by the two techniques are complimentary. PMID:12518911

  16. Spatially-constrained probability distribution model of incoherent motion (SPIM) for abdominal diffusion-weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the body enables characterization of the tissue microenvironment by measuring variations in the mobility of water molecules. The diffusion signal decay model parameters are increasingly used to evaluate various diseases of abdominal organs such as the liver and spleen. However, previous signal decay models (i.e., mono-exponential, bi-exponential intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and stretched exponential models) only provide insight into the average of the distribution of the signal decay rather than explicitly describe the entire range of diffusion scales. In this work, we propose a probability distribution model of incoherent motion that uses a mixture of Gamma distributions to fully characterize the multi-scale nature of diffusion within a voxel. Further, we improve the robustness of the distribution parameter estimates by integrating spatial homogeneity prior into the probability distribution model of incoherent motion (SPIM) and by using the fusion bootstrap solver (FBM) to estimate the model parameters. We evaluated the improvement in quantitative DW-MRI analysis achieved with the SPIM model in terms of accuracy, precision and reproducibility of parameter estimation in both simulated data and in 68 abdominal in-vivo DW-MRIs. Our results show that the SPIM model not only substantially reduced parameter estimation errors by up to 26%; it also significantly improved the robustness of the parameter estimates (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001) by reducing the coefficient of variation (CV) of estimated parameters compared to those produced by previous models. In addition, the SPIM model improves the parameter estimates reproducibility for both intra- (up to 47%) and inter-session (up to 30%) estimates compared to those generated by previous models. Thus, the SPIM model has the potential to improve accuracy, precision and robustness of quantitative abdominal DW-MRI analysis for clinical applications. PMID

  17. New Insights in Abdominal Pain in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH): A MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    De Cobelli, Francesco; Pezzetti, Giulio; Margari, Sergio; Esposito, Antonio; Giganti, Francesco; Agostini, Giulia; Del Maschio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal pain in PNH has never been investigated by in-vivo imaging studies. With MRI, we aimed to assess mesenteric vessels flow and small bowel wall perfusion to investigate the ischemic origin of abdominal pain. Materials and Methods Six PNH patients with (AP) and six without (NOP) abdominal pain underwent MRI. In a blinded fashion, mean flow (MF, quantity of blood moving through a vessel within a second, in mL·s-1) and stroke volume (SV, volume of blood pumped out at each heart contraction, in mL) of Superior Mesenteric Vein (SMV) and Artery (SMA), areas under the curve at 60 (AUC60) and 90 seconds (AUC90) and Ktrans were assessed by two operators. Results Mean total perfusion and flow parameters were lower in AP than in NOP group. AUC60: 84.81 ± 11.75 vs. 131.73 ± 18.89 (P < 0.001); AUC90: 102.33 ± 14.16 vs. 152.58 ± 22.70 (P < 0.001); Ktrans: 0.0346 min-1 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.0521 ± 0.0015 (P = 0.093 duodenum, 0.009 jejunum/ileum). SMV: MF 4.67 ml/s ± 0.85 vs. 8.32 ± 2.14 (P = 0.002); SV 3.85 ml ± 0.76 vs. 6.55 ± 1.57 (P = 0.02). SMA: MF 6.95 ± 2.61 vs. 11.2 ± 2.32 (P = 0.07); SV 6.52 ± 2.19 vs. 8.78 ± 1.63 (P = 0.07). We found a significant correlation between MF and SV of SMV and AUC60 (MF:ρ = 0.88, P < 0.001; SV: ρ = 0.644, P = 0.024), AUC90 (MF: ρ = 0.874, P < 0.001; SV:ρ = 0.774, P = 0.003) and Ktrans (MF:ρ = 0.734, P = 0.007; SV:ρ = 0.581, P = 0.047). Conclusions Perfusion and flow MRI findings suggest that the impairment of small bowel blood supply is significantly associated with abdominal pain in PNH. PMID:25897796

  18. The Comparison of Bone Scan and MRI in Osteoporotic Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Jong-In; Jang, Bo-Hoon; Seo, Jung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To estimate the usefulness of bone scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of new fracture in osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Overview of Literature The diagnosis of new fractrure in osteoporotic vertebral fractures requires simple X-ray and supplementary studies. Methods We analyzed 87 vertebrae in 44 patients, who diagnosed with osteoporotic vertebral fractures using bone scan and MRI within 2 months interval between August 2001 and July 2008. We compared hot uptakes in bone scan with MRI findings such as new fractures, old fractures and degenerative lesions. Results Hot uptakes in bone scan was matched to 48 new fractures, 26 old fractures and 13 degenerative lesions in MRI findings. It was 55% of concordance between hot uptakes in bone scan and new fractures in MRI. The rate of new vertebral fractures confirmed by MRI according to 1 level hot uptakes in bone scan was 96%, 2 levels was 50% and 3 more levels was 36%. Conclusions The diagnosis of new fracture in osteoporotic vertebral fractures requires simple X-ray and supplementary studies such as bone scan and MRI. We recommend more careful interpretation in multiple osteoporotic vertebral fracture patients about hot uptake lesions of bone scan. PMID:21165311

  19. Quantitative analysis of the breath-holding half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo technique in abdominal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    A consecutive series of 50 patients (28 males and 22 females) who underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from August to December 2011 were enrolled in this study. The appropriate parameters for abdominal MRI scans were determined by comparing the images (TE = 90 and 128 msec) produced using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) technique at different signal acquisition times. The patients consisted of 15 normal patients, 25 patients with a hepatoma and 10 patients with a hemangioma. The TE in a single patient was set to either 90 msec or 128 msec. This was followed by measurements using the four normal rendering methods of the biliary tract system and the background signal intensity using the maximal signal intensity techniques in the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, fat, muscles and hemangioma. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were obtained. The image quality was assessed subjectively, and the results were compared. The signal-to-noise and the contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher at TE = 128 msec than at TE = 90 when diseases of the liver, spleen, pancreas, gallbladder, and fat and muscles, hepatocellular carcinomas and hemangiomas, and rendering the hepatobiliary tract system based on the maximum signal intensity technique were involved (p < 0.05). In addition, the presence of artifacts, the image clarity and the overall image quality were excellent at TE = 128 msec (p < 0.05). In abdominal MRI, the breath-hold half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) was found to be effective in illustrating the abdominal organs for TE = 128 msec. Overall, the image quality at TE = 128 msec was better than that at TE = 90 msec due to the improved signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios. Overall, the HASTE technique for abdominal MRI based on a high-magnetic field (3.0 T) at a TE of 128 msec can provide useful data.

  20. A 54-Year-Old Man Presenting With an Abnormal Abdominal CT Scan 8 Months After Double Lung Transplant.

    PubMed

    Mistrot, Daniel P; Gemma, Vincent A; Gagliano, Ronald A; Omar, Ashraf; Panchabhai, Tanmay S

    2016-05-01

    A 54-year-old man who had undergone bilateral sequential lung transplant for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was admitted to the hospital for further evaluation of an abnormal abdominal CT scan. Three months previously a gastrojejunostomy tube had been placed after he was found to have evidence of silent aspiration with oral intake. At a recent clinic visit, he denied abdominal pain or problems with the feeding tube. He described frequent diarrhea since placement of the feeding tube. PMID:27157231

  1. Development of automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensink, Sanne D.; Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Belder, Ruben; Klaase, Joost M.; Bezooijen, Roland; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    This contribution describes a novel algorithm for the automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans of patients referred for colorectal resection. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes can accurately be measured with errors of 1.2 and 0.5%, respectively. Also the reproducibility of CT measurements is good; a disadvantage is the amount of radiation. In this study the diagnostic CT scans in the work - up of (colorectal) cancer were used. This implied no extra radiation. For the purpose of segmentation alone, a low dose protocol can be applied. Obesity is a well known risk factor for complications in and after surgery. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted indicator of obesity, but it is not specific for risk assessment of colorectal surgery. We report on an automated method to quantify visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes as a basic step in a clinical research project concerning preoperative risk assessment. The outcomes are to be correlated with the surgery results. The hypothesis is that the balance between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue together with the presence of calcifications in the major bloodvessels, is a predictive indicator for post - operatieve complications such as anastomotic leak. We start with four different computer simulated humanoid abdominal volumes with tissue values in the appropriate Hounsfield range at different dose levels. With satisfactory numerical results for this test, we have applied the algorithm on over a 100 patient scans and have compared results with manual segmentations by an expert for a smaller pilot group. The results are within a 5% difference. Compared to other studies reported in the literature, reliable values are obtained for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas.

  2. MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the ... in your eyes) Because the MRI contains strong magnets, metal objects are not allowed into the room ...

  3. Tumor Size on Abdominal MRI Versus Pathologic Specimen in Resected Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Implications for Radiation Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, William A.; Mikell, John L.; Mittal, Pardeep; Colbert, Lauren; Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kooby, David A.; Nickleach, Dana; Hanley, Krisztina; Sarmiento, Juan M.; Ali, Arif N.; Landry, Jerome C.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for determining tumor size by comparing the preoperative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted gradient echo (3-dimensional [3D] volumetric interpolated breath-hold [VIBE]) MRI tumor size with pathologic specimen size. Methods and Materials: The records of 92 patients who had both preoperative contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI images and detailed pathologic specimen measurements were available for review. Primary tumor size from the MRI was independently measured by a single diagnostic radiologist (P.M.) who was blinded to the pathology reports. Pathologic tumor measurements from gross specimens were obtained from the pathology reports. The maximum dimensions of tumor measured in any plane on the MRI and the gross specimen were compared. The median difference between the pathology sample and the MRI measurements was calculated. A paired t test was conducted to test for differences between the MRI and pathology measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to measure the association of disparity between the MRI and pathology sizes with the pathology size. Disparities relative to pathology size were also examined and tested for significance using a 1-sample t test. Results: The median patient age was 64.5 years. The primary site was pancreatic head in 81 patients, body in 4, and tail in 7. Three patients were American Joint Commission on Cancer stage IA, 7 stage IB, 21 stage IIA, 58 stage IIB, and 3 stage III. The 3D VIBE MRI underestimated tumor size by a median difference of 4 mm (range, −34-22 mm). The median largest tumor dimensions on MRI and pathology specimen were 2.65 cm (range, 1.5-9.5 cm) and 3.2 cm (range, 1.3-10 cm), respectively. Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced 3D VIBE MRI underestimates tumor size by 4 mm when compared with pathologic specimen. Advanced abdominal MRI sequences warrant further investigation for radiation therapy planning in pancreatic adenocarcinoma before

  4. Comparative analysis of the radiation shield effect in an abdominal CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Joon-Seok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lim, Chang-Seon

    2014-03-01

    This study measured and compared the dose on the eyeballs and the thyroid with and without the use of a shield by applying the abdominal examination protocol used in an actual examination to a 64-channel computed tomography (CT) scan. A dummy phantom manufactured from acryl was used to measure the dose to the eyeballs and the thyroid of a patient during a thoraco-abdominal CT scan. The dose was measured using three dosimeters (optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and photoluminescence dosimeter (PLD)) attached to the surfaces of three parts (left and right eyeballs and thyroid) in a phantom with and without the use of a shield for the eyeballs and the thyroid. Two types of shields (1-mm barium shielding sheet and 1-mm tungsten shielding sheet) were used for the measurements. The goggles and the lead shield, which are normally used in clinical practice, were used to compare the shield ratios of the shields. According to the results of the measurements made by using the OSLD, the shield ratios of the barium and the tungsten sheets were in the range of 34-36%. The measurements made by using the TLD showed that the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 6.25% higher than that of the tungsten sheet. When the PLD was used for the measurement, the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 33.34%, which was equivalent to that of the tungsten sheet. These results confirmed that the cheap barium sheet had a better shielding effect than the expensive tungsten sheet.

  5. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks. Clin. Anat. 29:165-174, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26032163

  6. Prediction of brain tumor progression using multiple histogram matched MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debrup; Tran, Loc; Li, Jiang; Shen, Yuzhong; McKenzie, Frederic; Wang, Jihong

    2011-03-01

    In a recent study [1], we investigated the feasibility of predicting brain tumor progression based on multiple MRI series and we tested our methods on seven patients' MRI images scanned at three consecutive visits A, B and C. Experimental results showed that it is feasible to predict tumor progression from visit A to visit C using a model trained by the information from visit A to visit B. However, the trained model failed when we tried to predict tumor progression from visit B to visit C, though it is clinically more important. Upon a closer look at the MRI scans revealed that histograms of MRI scans such as T1, T2, FLAIR etc taken at different times have slight shifts or different shapes. This is because those MRI scans are qualitative instead of quantitative so MRI scans taken at different times or by different scanners might have slightly different scales or have different homogeneities in the scanning region. In this paper, we proposed a method to overcome this difficulty. The overall goal of this study is to assess brain tumor progression by exploring seven patients' complete MRI records scanned during their visits in the past two years. There are ten MRI series in each visit, including FLAIR, T1-weighted, post-contrast T1-weighted, T2-weighted and five DTI derived MRI volumes: ADC, FA, Max, Min and Middle Eigen Values. After registering all series to the corresponding DTI scan at the first visit, we applied a histogram matching algorithm to non-DTI MRI scans to match their histograms to those of the corresponding MRI scans at the first visit. DTI derived series are quantitative and do not require the histogram matching procedure. A machine learning algorithm was then trained using the data containing information from visit A to visit B, and the trained model was used to predict tumor progression from visit B to visit C. An average of 72% pixel-wise accuracy was achieved for tumor progression prediction from visit B to visit C.

  7. Reconstruction of unbroken vasculature of mouse by varying the slope of the scan plane in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, S.; Cherevko, A.; Khe, A.; Akulov, A.; Savelov, A.; Tulupov, A.; Derevtsov, E.; Moshkin, M.; Chupakhin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Reconstruction of vascular net of small laboratory animals from MRI data is associated with some problems. This paper proposes a method of MRI data processing which allows to eliminate the fragmentation of reconstructed vascular net. Problem of vessels fragmentation occurs in the case when vessels are parallel to the scanning plane. Our approach is based on multiple scanning, object under consideration is probed by several sets of parallel planes. The algorithm is applied to real MRI data of small laboratory animals and shows good results.

  8. Co-registration of isotope bone scan with CT scan and MRI in the investigation of spinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Brazenor, Graeme A; Malham, Gregory M; Ballok, Zita E

    2014-09-01

    Image fusion software enables technetium(99m)-methylene diphosphonate (Tc(99m)-MDP) bone scan images to be co-registered with CT scan or MRI, allowing greater anatomical discrimination. We examined the role of bone scan images co-registered with CT scan or MRI in the investigation of patients presenting with axial spinal pain and/or limb pain. One hundred and thirty-nine consecutive patients were examined, and thereafter investigated with CT scan, MRI, and/or dynamic plain films. At this point diagnosis (pathology type and anatomical site) and treatment intention were declared. The co-registered Tc(99m)-MDP bone scan images were then studied, after which diagnosis (pathology type and anatomical site) and treatment intention were re-declared. This data were then analysed to determine whether the addition of co-registered bone scan images resulted in any change in diagnosis or treatment intention. The most significant change in diagnosis was pathology type (10%). Anatomical site changed markedly without overlap of the pre and post-isotope fields in 5%, and with overlap in 10%. Treatment intention had a major change in 3.6% and minor change in 8.6%. In the two groups where there was (i) no obvious pathology after full pre-isotope investigation, or (ii) a spinal fusion under suspicion, addition of the bone scan information led to a major change in the pathology and/or anatomical localisation in 18% and 19%, respectively. The addition of co-registered Tc(99m)-MDP bone scan images offers significant diagnostic assistance, particularly in the difficult diagnostic groups where a failed spinal fusion may be the suspected pain generator, or when no pain generator can otherwise be found. PMID:24798908

  9. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  10. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20-50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  11. Multiple 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Scans Showing Progression of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Nishimura, Masanori; Nakamura, Kunihide; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Although the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remain unclear, aortic wall inflammation has been implicated in AAA development. Several studies have reported the use of fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-FDG)/positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the nature of AAA.We present a case of 77-year-old Japanese male with juxta-anastomotic AAA who was followed up with multiple F-FDG-PET/CT scans over 7 years. The scans revealed chronological changes in aortic wall inflammation leading to progress and eventual rupture.This case supports a notion that aortic wall inflammation plays a role in AAA progression and rupture. PMID:27175690

  12. Accelerated motion corrected three‐dimensional abdominal MRI using total variation regularized SENSE reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, David; Buerger, Christian; Schaeffter, Tobias; Prieto, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Develop a nonrigid motion corrected reconstruction for highly accelerated free‐breathing three‐dimensional (3D) abdominal images without external sensors or additional scans. Methods The proposed method accelerates the acquisition by undersampling and performs motion correction directly in the reconstruction using a general matrix description of the acquisition. Data are acquired using a self‐gated 3D golden radial phase encoding trajectory, enabling a two stage reconstruction to estimate and then correct motion of the same data. In the first stage total variation regularized iterative SENSE is used to reconstruct highly undersampled respiratory resolved images. A nonrigid registration of these images is performed to estimate the complex motion in the abdomen. In the second stage, the estimated motion fields are incorporated in a general matrix reconstruction, which uses total variation regularization and incorporates k‐space data from multiple respiratory positions. The proposed approach was tested on nine healthy volunteers and compared against a standard gated reconstruction using measures of liver sharpness, gradient entropy, visual assessment of image sharpness and overall image quality by two experts. Results The proposed method achieves similar quality to the gated reconstruction with nonsignificant differences for liver sharpness (1.18 and 1.00, respectively), gradient entropy (1.00 and 1.00), visual score of image sharpness (2.22 and 2.44), and visual rank of image quality (3.33 and 3.39). An average reduction of the acquisition time from 102 s to 39 s could be achieved with the proposed method. Conclusion In vivo results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method showing similar image quality to the standard gated reconstruction while using data corresponding to a significantly reduced acquisition time. Magn Reson Med, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  13. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Look before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Nellensteijn, David R; Greuter, Marcel J; El Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B

    2016-08-01

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new information obtained by CT. CT scans for suspected pediatric abdominal injury performed in our accident and emergency department were retrieved from the radiology registry and analyzed for: injury and hemodynamic parameters, changes in therapy, and radiological interventions. The dose length product (DLP) was used to calculate the effective dose (ED) and with the BEIR VII report we calculated the estimated induced lifetime tumor and mortality risk. Seventy-two patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for suspicion of abdominal injury and eight patients were excluded for hemodynamic instability, leaving 64 hemodynamically stable patients. Four patients died (6%). On the remaining 60 patients, only one laparotomy was performed for suspicion of duodenal perforation. Only in three out of the 64 hemodynamically stable cases (5%), a CT scan brought forward an indication for intervention or change in management. One patient was suspected of a duodenal perforation and underwent a laparotomy. A grade II hepatic laceration, but no duodenal, injury was found. Two patients underwent embolization of the splenic artery. One for an arterial blush caused by splenic laceration as was observed on the contrast enhanced-CT. Patient remained stable and during the angiogram the blush had disappeared. The second patient underwent (prophylactic) selective arterial embolization for having sustained a grade V splenic injury. The median radiation dosage was 11.43 mSv (range 1.19-23.76 mSv) in our patients. The use of the BEIR VII methodology results in an estimated increase in the lifetime tumor incidence of 0.17% (range, 0.05-0.67%) and an estimated increase in lifetime tumor incidence of 0.08% (0

  14. Refractory Epilepsy-MRI, EEG and CT scan, a Correlative Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikodijevic, Dijana; Baneva–Dolnenec, Natalija; Petrovska-Cvetkovska, Dragana; Caparoska, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Refractory epilepsies (RE), as well as, the surgically correctable syndromes, are of great interest, since they affect the very young population of children and adolescents. The early diagnosis and treatment are very important in preventing the psychosocial disability. Therefore MRI and EEG are highly sensitive methods in the diagnosis and localization of epileptogenic focus, but also in pre-surgical evaluation of these patients. The aim of our study is to correlate the imaging findings of EEG, MRI and CT scan in refractory symptomatic epilepsies, and to determine their specificity in detecting the epileptogenic focus. METHODS: The study was prospective with duration of over two years, open-labelled, and involved a group of 37 patients that had been evaluated and diagnosed as refractory epilepsy patients. In the evaluation the type and frequency of seizures were considered, together with the etiologic factors and their association, and finally the risk for developing refractory epilepsy was weighted. EEG and MRI findings and CT scan results were evaluated for their specificity and sensitivity in detecting the epileptogenic focus, and the correlation between them was analyzed. RESULTS: Regarding the type of seizures considered in our study, the patients with PCS (partial complex seizures) dominated, as opposed to those with generalized seizures (GS) (D=1.178, p < 0.05). Positive MRI findings were registered in 28 patients (75.7%). Most of them were patients with hippocampal sclerosis, 12 (42.8%), and also they were found to have the highest risk of developing refractory epilepsy (RE) (Odds ratio = 5.7), and the highest association between the etiologic factor and refractory epilepsy (p < 0.01). In detecting the epileptogenic focus, a significant difference was found (p < 0.01) between MRI and CT scan findings, especially in patients with hippocampal sclerosis and cerebral malformations. There was a strong correlation between the MRI findings and the

  15. Machine learning for the automatic localisation of foetal body parts in cine-MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, Christopher; Nowlan, Niamh C.; Hayat, Tayyib T. A.; Malamateniou, Christina; Rutherford, Mary; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Rueckert, Daniel; Kainz, Bernhard

    2015-03-01

    Being able to automate the location of individual foetal body parts has the potential to dramatically reduce the work required to analyse time resolved foetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cine-MRI) scans, for example, for use in the automatic evaluation of the foetal development. Currently, manual preprocessing of every scan is required to locate body parts before analysis can be performed, leading to a significant time overhead. With the volume of scans becoming available set to increase as cine-MRI scans become more prevalent in clinical practice, this stage of manual preprocessing is a bottleneck, limiting the data available for further analysis. Any tools which can automate this process will therefore save many hours of research time and increase the rate of new discoveries in what is a key area in understanding early human development. Here we present a series of techniques which can be applied to foetal cine-MRI scans in order to first locate and then differentiate between individual body parts. A novel approach to maternal movement suppression and segmentation using Fourier transforms is put forward as a preprocessing step, allowing for easy extraction of short movements of individual foetal body parts via the clustering of optical flow vector fields. These body part movements are compared to a labelled database and probabilistically classified before being spatially and temporally combined to give a final estimate for the location of each body part.

  16. Respiratory Motion-Compensated Radial Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced (DCE)-MRI of Chest and Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei; Guo, Junyu; Rosen, Mark A.; Song, Hee Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is becoming an increasingly important tool for evaluating tumor vascularity and assessing the effectiveness of emerging antiangiogenic and antivascular agents. In chest and abdominal regions, however, respiratory motion can seriously degrade the achievable image quality in DCE-MRI studies. The purpose of this work is to develop a respiratory motion-compensated DCE-MRI technique that combines the self-gating properties of radial imaging with the reconstruction flexibility afforded by the golden-angle view-order strategy. Following radial data acquisition, the signal at k-space center is first used to determine the respiratory cycle, and consecutive views during the expiratory phase of each respiratory period (34–55 views, depending on the breathing rate) are grouped into individual segments. Residual intra-segment translation of lesion is subsequently compensated for by an autofocusing technique that optimizes image entropy, while intersegment translation (among different respiratory cycles) is corrected using 3D image correlation. The resulting motion-compensated, undersampled dynamic image series is then processed to reduce image streaking and to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) prior to perfusion analysis, using either the k-space-weighted image contrast (KWIC) radial filtering technique or principal component analysis (PCA). The proposed data acquisition scheme also allows for high framerate arterial input function (AIF) sampling and free-breathing baseline T1 mapping. The performance of the proposed radial DCE-MRI technique is evaluated in subjects with lung and liver lesions, and results demonstrate that excellent pixelwise perfusion maps can be obtained with the proposed methodology. PMID:18956465

  17. CT Hounsfield Numbers of Soft Tissues on Unenhanced Abdominal CT Scans: Variability Between Two Different Manufacturers’ MDCT Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Ramit; McGahan, John P.; Corwin, Michael T.; Li, Chin-Shang; Tran, Tien; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study is to determine whether Hounsfield numbers of soft tissues on unenhanced abdominal CT of the same patient vary on repeat scans done on two different manufacturers’ MDCT scanners. MATERIALS AND METHODS A database search was performed to identify patients older than 18 years who underwent unenhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed both on a Volume CT (GE Healthcare) and a Definition AS Plus (Siemens Healthcare) 64-MDCT scanner within 12 months of each other. After excluding those patients for whom Hounsfield unit measurements would be affected by mitigating factors, 48 patients (mean age, 58.8 years) were identified. Hounsfield unit measurements were obtained in nine different soft-tissue anatomic locations on each scan, and the location of these sites was kept identical on each scan pair. Data were analyzed to evaluate Hounsfield unit differences between these scanners. RESULTS In general, there was a low consistency in the Hounsfield unit measurements for each of these sites on scans obtained by the two scanners, with the subcutaneous fat in the left posterolateral flank showing the lowest correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.198). There were differences in the Hounsfield unit measurements obtained in all anatomic sites on scans obtained by both scanners. Mean Hounsfield unit measurements obtained on the Definition AS Plus scanner were lower than those obtained on the Volume CT scanner, with the intriguing exception of the anterior midline subcutaneous fat Hounsfield unit measurements, which were higher on the Definition AS Plus scanner. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION Hounsfield unit measurements for unenhanced abdominal soft tissues of the same patient vary between scanners of two common MDCT manufacturers. PMID:25341139

  18. MRI Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor if you Are pregnant Have pieces of metal in your body. You might have metal in your body if you have a shrapnel ... injury or if you are a welder. Have metal or electronic devices in your body, such as ...

  19. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum: A Case Report of MRI, CT, and 18F-FDG PET/CT Findings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-02-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum.A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved.This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH. PMID:26871848

  20. Empyema of the gallbladder detected by gallium scan and abdominal ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, O.M.; Kovac, A.; Plauche, W.E.

    1981-08-01

    A case history of patient with a abnormal gallium uptake and sonogram in the region of the gallbladder is described. The abnormality was interpreted as empyema of the gallbladder and later proven surgically. A liver-spleen scan was normal except for slight prominence of the hilar structures. Gallium citrate Ga-67 scans done at 24 and 48 hours showed a persistent area of increased tracer localization around the gallbladder with a central clear zone in the latter scan. Ultrasonography revealed poor definition and slight thickening of the gallbladder wall. Because of the lack of specificity of gallium scans, the combination of ultrasonic imaging and gallium uptake scans appears much superior in diagnostic efficiency than either of the two alone. The sequence of performing these two examinations does not seem to be critical though it was prefered that the scintigraphy precede the sonography.

  1. Carotid plaque characterization using CT and MRI scans for synergistic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzin, Matthew; Xu, Yiqin; Rao, Arhant; Madi, Saaussan; Bahadur, Ali; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive determination of plaque vulnerability has been a holy grail of medical imaging. Despite advances in tomographic technologies , there is currently no effective way to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with high sensitivity and specificity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used, but neither provides sufficient information of plaque properties. Thus, we are motivated to combine CT and MRI imaging to determine if the composite information can better reflect the histological determination of plaque vulnerability. Two human endarterectomy specimens (1 symptomatic carotid and 1 stable femoral) were imaged using Scanco Medical Viva CT40 and Bruker Pharmascan 16cm 7T Horizontal MRI / MRS systems. μCT scans were done at 55 kVp and tube current of 70 mA. Samples underwent RARE-VTR and MSME pulse sequences to measure T1, T2 values, and proton density. The specimens were processed for histology and scored for vulnerability using the American Heart Association criteria. Single modality-based analyses were performed through segmentation of key imaging biomarkers (i.e. calcification and lumen), image registration, measurement of fibrous capsule, and multi-component T1 and T2 decay modeling. Feature differences were analyzed between the unstable and stable controls, symptomatic carotid and femoral plaque, respectively. By building on the techniques used in this study, synergistic CT+MRI analysis may provide a promising solution for plaque characterization in vivo.

  2. Treatment planning for resected abdominal tumors: Differences in organ position between diagnostic and radiation-planning computed tomography scans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aileen B.; Mamon, Harvey . E-mail: hmamon@lroc.harvard.edu

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether organ location, determined from preoperative diagnostic computed tomography scans (CTs), accurately reflects organ location when patients are positioned for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We identified patients with upper abdominal malignancies treated with surgery and/or radiation therapy. Comparisons of organ position relative to fixed bony landmarks were made among preoperative diagnostic CTs, postoperative diagnostic CTs, and radiation-planning CTs. We studied 18 patients who had CTs differing only in scanning technique, 11 patients who had CTs differing only in operative state, and 7 patients with CTs differing in both scanning technique and operative state. Results: For patients with diagnostic CTs and radiation-planning CTs that were either both preoperative or both postoperative, mean organ position, measured relative to a fixed bony landmark, ranged from 1.9 to 3.2 cm superior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p < 0.0001). Mean organ position ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 cm posterior on radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs (p {<=} 0.008). Shifts in the right-left direction were small and variable. For patients with pre- and postoperative diagnostic CTs, organ shifts were variable and not significant. Organ shifts for patients with preoperative diagnostic CTs and postoperative radiation-planning CTs were similar to shifts observed for the first group. Conclusions: Relative to bony landmarks, there are superior and posterior shifts in organ position for radiation-planning CTs compared with diagnostic CTs. These shifts should be considered during treatment planning for resected abdominal tumors.

  3. Mapping Alzheimer’s disease progression in 1309 MRI scans: Power estimates for different inter-scan intervals☆

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xue; Lee, Suh; Hibar, Derrek P.; Yanovsky, Igor; Leow, Alex D.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Reiman, Eric M.; Harvey, Danielle J.; Kornak, John; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene E.; Weiner, Michael W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging centers and pharmaceutical companies are working together to evaluate treatments that might slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a common but devastating late-life neuropathology. Recently, automated brain mapping methods, such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) of structural MRI, have outperformed cognitive measures in their precision and power to track disease progression, greatly reducing sample size estimates for drug trials. In the largest TBM study to date, we studied how sample size estimates for tracking structural brain changes depend on the time interval between the scans (6–24 months). We analyzed 1309 brain scans from 91 probable AD patients (age at baseline: 75.4±7.5 years) and 189 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; 74.6±7.1 years), scanned at baseline, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Statistical maps revealed 3D patterns of brain atrophy at each follow-up scan relative to the baseline; numerical summaries were used to quantify temporal lobe atrophy within a statistically-defined region-of-interest. Power analyses revealed superior sample size estimates over traditional clinical measures. Only 80, 46, and 39 AD patients were required for a hypothetical clinical trial, at 6, 12, and 24 months respectively, to detect a 25% reduction in average change using a two-sided test (α=0.05, power=80%). Correspondingly, 106, 79, and 67 subjects were needed for an equivalent MCI trial aiming for earlier intervention. A 24-month trial provides most power, except when patient attrition exceeds 15–16%/year, in which case a 12-month trial is optimal. These statistics may facilitate clinical trial design using voxel-based brain mapping methods such as TBM. PMID:20139010

  4. Fibre optic sensor for non-invasive monitoring of blood pressure during MRI scanning.

    PubMed

    Myllylä, Teemu S; Elseoud, Ahmed Abou; Sorvoja, Hannu S S; Myllylä, Risto A; Harja, Juha M; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2011-01-01

    This report focuses on designing and implementing a non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) measuring device capable of being used during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Based on measuring pulse wave velocity in arterial blood, the device uses the obtained result to estimate diastolic blood pressure. Pulse transit times are measured by two fibre optical accelerometers placed over the chest and carotid artery. The fabricated accelerometer contains two static fibres and a cantilever beam, whose free end is angled at 90 degrees to act as a reflecting surface. Optical fibres are used for both illuminating the surface and receiving the reflected light. When acceleration is applied to the sensor, it causes a deflection in the beam, thereby changing the amount of reflected light. The sensor's output voltage is proportional to the intensity of the reflected light. Tests conducted on the electronics and sensors inside an MRI room during scanning proved that the device is MR- compatible. No artifacts or distortions were detected. PMID:20401906

  5. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s) scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  6. MRBrainS Challenge: Online Evaluation Framework for Brain Image Segmentation in 3T MRI Scans

    PubMed Central

    Mendrik, Adriënne M.; Vincken, Koen L.; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Breeuwer, Marcel; Bouvy, Willem H.; de Bresser, Jeroen; Alansary, Amir; de Bruijne, Marleen; Carass, Aaron; El-Baz, Ayman; Jog, Amod; Katyal, Ranveer; Khan, Ali R.; van der Lijn, Fedde; Mahmood, Qaiser; Mukherjee, Ryan; van Opbroek, Annegreet; Paneri, Sahil; Pereira, Sérgio; Rajchl, Martin; Sarikaya, Duygu; Smedby, Örjan; Silva, Carlos A.; Vrooman, Henri A.; Vyas, Saurabh; Wang, Chunliang; Zhao, Liang; Biessels, Geert Jan; Viergever, Max A.

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed for tissue segmentation in brain MRI scans. The multitude of methods proposed complicates the choice of one method above others. We have therefore established the MRBrainS online evaluation framework for evaluating (semi)automatic algorithms that segment gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on 3T brain MRI scans of elderly subjects (65–80 y). Participants apply their algorithms to the provided data, after which their results are evaluated and ranked. Full manual segmentations of GM, WM, and CSF are available for all scans and used as the reference standard. Five datasets are provided for training and fifteen for testing. The evaluated methods are ranked based on their overall performance to segment GM, WM, and CSF and evaluated using three evaluation metrics (Dice, H95, and AVD) and the results are published on the MRBrainS13 website. We present the results of eleven segmentation algorithms that participated in the MRBrainS13 challenge workshop at MICCAI, where the framework was launched, and three commonly used freeware packages: FreeSurfer, FSL, and SPM. The MRBrainS evaluation framework provides an objective and direct comparison of all evaluated algorithms and can aid in selecting the best performing method for the segmentation goal at hand. PMID:26759553

  7. Three Dimensional Motion Compensation for Real-Time MRI Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, M.; De Senneville, B. D.; Roujol, S.; Hey, S.; Maclair, G.; Köhler, M. O.; Quesson, B.; Moonen, C. T. W.

    2010-03-01

    MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has evolved into a promising non-invasive technique for the ablation of pathological tissue in abdominal organs. However, since the high perfusion rates of these organs lead to effective cooling, sustained sonications of 30-90 s are required to achieve a sufficiently high temperature elevation to induce necrosis. This is complicated by the constant displacement of the target due to the respiratory cycle. This study proposes sub-second 3D HIFU-beam steering under MR-guidance for the near real-time compensation of respiratory motion as a possible solution. The target position is observed in 3D space by coupling rapid 2D MR-imaging with prospective slice tracking (PST) based on pencil-beam navigator echoes. Continuous real-time image processing provides temperature maps, thermal dose estimates and the target position at a frequency of 10 Hz and an update latency of less than 120 ms. The suggested method is evaluated with phantom experiments and its feasibility is verified in-vivo with an ablation experiment on a porcine kidney where it allows to achieve a thermal energy deposition which is comparable to static control experiments.

  8. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  9. High spatial and temporal resolution 4D FEM simulation of the thoracic bioimpedance using MRI scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbrich, Mark; Marleaux, Bastian; Mühlsteff, Jens; Schoth, Felix; Koos, Ralf; Teichmann, Daniel; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    In this work, a finite element model was created using MRI scans of the main author to analyze sources of the dynamic thoracic bioimpedance. This model can be used to identify limitations of impedance cardiography (ICG) in practice. Heart beat (8.3 ms temporal resolution) and aortic wave propagation (2.6 ms temporal resolution) were implemented. The static volume contains all major organs of the thorax in high spatial resolution. Simulations were successfully conducted and a high correlation (r = 0.9) between the simulated aortic ICG signal and a measured signal of the same subject was obtained.

  10. Dual registration of abdominal motion for motility assessment in free-breathing data sets acquired using dynamic MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menys, A.; Hamy, V.; Makanyanga, J.; Hoad, C.; Gowland, P.; Odille, F.; Taylor, S. A.; Atkinson, D.

    2014-08-01

    At present, registration-based quantification of bowel motility from dynamic MRI is limited to breath-hold studies. Here we validate a dual-registration technique robust to respiratory motion for the assessment of small bowel and colonic motility. Small bowel datasets were acquired in breath-hold and free-breathing in 20 healthy individuals. A pre-processing step using an iterative registration of the low rank component of the data was applied to remove respiratory motion from the free breathing data. Motility was then quantified with an existing optic-flow (OF) based registration technique to form a dual-stage approach, termed Dual Registration of Abdominal Motion (DRAM). The benefit of respiratory motion correction was assessed by (1) assessing the fidelity of automatically propagated segmental regions of interest (ROIs) in the small bowel and colon and (2) comparing parametric motility maps to a breath-hold ground truth. DRAM demonstrated an improved ability to propagate ROIs through free-breathing small bowel and colonic motility data, with median error decreased by 90% and 55%, respectively. Comparison between global parametric maps showed high concordance between breath-hold data and free-breathing DRAM. Quantification of segmental and global motility in dynamic MR data is more accurate and robust to respiration when using the DRAM approach.

  11. Correction of step artefact associated with MRI scanning of long bones.

    PubMed

    Rathnayaka, Kanchana; Cowin, Gary; Schuetz, Michael A; Sahama, Tony; Schmutz, Beat

    2013-07-01

    3D models of long bones are being utilised for a number of fields including orthopaedic implant design. Accurate reconstruction of 3D models is of utmost importance to design accurate implants to allow achieving a good alignment between two bone fragments. Thus for this purpose, CT scanners are employed to acquire accurate bone data exposing an individual to a high amount of ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a potential alternative to computed tomography (CT) for scanning of volunteers for 3D reconstruction of long bones, essentially avoiding the high radiation dose from CT. In MRI imaging of long bones, the artefacts due to random movements of the skeletal system create challenges for researchers as they generate inaccuracies in the 3D models generated by using data sets containing such artefacts. One of the defects that have been observed during an initial study is the lateral shift artefact occurring in the reconstructed 3D models. This artefact is believed to result from volunteers moving the leg during two successive scanning stages (the lower limb has to be scanned in at least five stages due to the limited scanning length of the scanner). As this artefact creates inaccuracies in the implants designed using these models, it needs to be corrected before the application of 3D models to implant design. Therefore, this study aimed to correct the lateral shift artefact using 3D modelling techniques. The femora of five ovine hind limbs were scanned with a 3T MRI scanner using a 3D vibe based protocol. The scanning was conducted in two halves, while maintaining a good overlap between them. A lateral shift was generated by moving the limb several millimetres between two scanning stages. The 3D models were reconstructed using a multi threshold segmentation method. The correction of the artefact was achieved by aligning the two halves using the robust iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, with the help of the overlapping

  12. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  13. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Servaes, Sabah; Naranjo, Arlene; Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. Materials and methods The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. Results The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P=0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P=1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P=0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P=1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. Conclusion CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco–regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. PMID:25135711

  14. Rapid evaluation of acute abdominal pain by hepatobiliary scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-iprofenin (PIPIDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.; Gulati, R.M.

    1980-10-03

    One hundred eighty-six patients with suspected acute cholecystitis (AC) underwent radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with technetium Tc 99m-iprofenin to assess the ability of this tracer to detect AC. After intravenous injection of 5 to 10 mCi of this agent, 500,000 count anterior images were obtained at ten-minute intervals for 60 minutes. An abnormal hepatobiliary scan (HBS) diagnostic of AC was defined as one in which the common bile duct, but not the gallbladder, visualized within one hour of tracer administration. In this series, the sensitivity and specificity for HBS in the detection of AC were 97 and 87%, respectively. The hepatobiliary scan should be the procedure of choice for the rapid detection of AC. It is simple, rapid, and safe to perform, enabling a diagnosis to be established within one hour.

  15. Dipyridamole thallium scanning in the evaluation of coronary artery disease in elective abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Strawn, D.J.; Guernsey, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Dipyridamole thallium scanning was routinely performed on 68 consecutive patients who presented for elective aortic surgery. All 68 patients were judged by clinical assessment to be at low risk for perioperative cardiac complications. In addition, 42 of 68 patients had a history of myocardial infarction, stable angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings (group 1). Twenty-six of 68 patients did not have a history of myocardial infarction, angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings (group 2). In group 1, 34 of 4 patients had positive results on dipyridamole thallium scanning, and 15 of these patients were found to have critical coronary artery disease on subsequent cardiac catheterization; nine underwent immediate coronary artery bypass grafting, and six had their coronary artery disease treated medically and their vascular operations cancelled. The remaining 27 patients in group 1 underwent elective operations, with six (22%) of 27 sustaining postoperative cardiac complications. None of the group 2 patients was found to have critical coronary artery disease. All patients in group 2 underwent aortic operation without cardiac complication. Routine dipyridamole thallium scanning detected a 22% (15 of 68) incidence of critical coronary artery disease overall. There was a 36% (15 of 42) incidence of critical coronary artery disease in group 1 patients vs 0% in group 2 patients (95% confidence interval, 21% to 50%). The authors conclude that the use of dipyridamole thallium scanning in low-risk patients for cardiac screening prior to elective aortic operations is beneficial in selected patients who have a history of myocardial infarction, angina, or abnormal echocardiographic findings, but is not necessary in patients with no history of coronary artery disease.

  16. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  17. Combining supine MRI and 3D optical scanning for improved surgical planning of breast conserving surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Poplack, Steven P.; Barth, Richard J., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-02-01

    Image-guided wire localization is the current standard of care for the excision of non-palpable carcinomas during breast conserving surgeries (BCS). The efficacy of this technique depends upon the accuracy of wire placement, maintenance of the fixed wire position (despite patient movement), and the surgeon's understanding of the spatial relationship between the wire and tumor. Notably, breast shape can vary significantly between the imaging and surgical positions. Despite this method of localization, re-excision is needed in approximately 30% of patients due to the proximity of cancer to the specimen margins. These limitations make wire localization an inefficient and imprecise procedure. Alternatively, we investigate a method of image registration and finite element (FE) deformation which correlates preoperative supine MRIs with 3D optical scans of the breast surface. MRI of the breast can accurately define the extents of very small cancers. Furthermore, supine breast MR reduces the amount of tissue deformation between the imaging and surgical positions. At the time of surgery, the surface contour of the breast may be imaged using a handheld 3D laser scanner. With the MR images segmented by tissue type, the two scans are approximately registered using fiducial markers present in both acquisitions. The segmented MRI breast volume is then deformed to match the optical surface using a FE mechanical model of breast tissue. The resulting images provide the surgeon with 3D views and measurements of the tumor shape, volume, and position within the breast as it appears during surgery which may improve surgical guidance and obviate the need for wire localization.

  18. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kanesan, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA), and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%). Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities from the

  19. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kanesan, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA), and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients’ benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%). Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities from the

  20. Automated prostate segmentation in whole-body MRI scans for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habes, Mohamad; Schiller, Thilo; Rosenberg, Christian; Burchardt, Martin; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The whole prostatic volume (PV) is an important indicator for benign prostate hyperplasia. Correlating the PV with other clinical parameters in a population-based prospective cohort study (SHIP-2) requires valid prostate segmentation in a large number of whole-body MRI scans. The axial proton density fast spin echo fat saturated sequence is used for prostate screening in SHIP-2. Our automated segmentation method is based on support vector machines (SVM). We used three-dimensional neighborhood information to build classification vectors from automatically generated features and randomly selected 16 MR examinations for validation. The Hausdorff distance reached a mean value of 5.048 ± 2.413, and a mean value of 5.613 ± 2.897 compared to manual segmentation by observers A and B. The comparison between volume measurement of SVM-based segmentation and manual segmentation of observers A and B depicts a strong correlation resulting in Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (ρ) of 0.936 and 0.859, respectively. Our automated methodology based on SVM for prostate segmentation can segment the prostate in WBI scans with good segmentation quality and has considerable potential for integration in epidemiological studies.

  1. Automated prostate segmentation in whole-body MRI scans for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Habes, Mohamad; Schiller, Thilo; Rosenberg, Christian; Burchardt, Martin; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The whole prostatic volume (PV) is an important indicator for benign prostate hyperplasia. Correlating the PV with other clinical parameters in a population-based prospective cohort study (SHIP-2) requires valid prostate segmentation in a large number of whole-body MRI scans. The axial proton density fast spin echo fat saturated sequence is used for prostate screening in SHIP-2. Our automated segmentation method is based on support vector machines (SVM). We used three-dimensional neighborhood information to build classification vectors from automatically generated features and randomly selected 16 MR examinations for validation. The Hausdorff distance reached a mean value of 5.048 ± 2.413, and a mean value of 5.613 ± 2.897 compared to manual segmentation by observers A and B. The comparison between volume measurement of SVM-based segmentation and manual segmentation of observers A and B depicts a strong correlation resulting in Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (ρ) of 0.936 and 0.859, respectively. Our automated methodology based on SVM for prostate segmentation can segment the prostate in WBI scans with good segmentation quality and has considerable potential for integration in epidemiological studies. PMID:23920310

  2. Preliminary evaluation of optical CT scanning versus MRI for nPAG gel dosimetry: The Ghent experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fast laser-scanning optical CT versus MRI for an nPAG gel dosimeter in terms of accuracy and precision. Three small cylindrical volumetric gel phantoms were fabricated and irradiated with photon beams. The gel dosimeters were scanned with an MR scanner and an in house developed laser scanning optical CT scanner. A comparison between MRI and optical CT scanning was performed based on the reconstructed images. Preliminary results show a fair correspondence in the MRI acquired and optical CT acquired dose maps. Still, ringing artifacts contaminate the reconstructed optical CT images. These may be related to sub-pixel misalignments between the blank projection and the acquired transmission projection of the gel phantom. Another artifact may be caused by refraction near the edges of the field. Further optimisation of our optical CT scanner is required to obtain the same accuracy as with MRI. To make a comparison between the two imaging modalities in terms of precision, the intrinsic dose precision on readout (IPD) was calculated which is independent of spatial resolution and acquisition time. It is shown that optical CT has a better intrinsic dose precision.

  3. Comparison of qualitative and quantitative analysis of T2-weighted MRI scans in chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Hans-Peter; Wagner, Simone; Koziol, James A.

    1998-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS), and for objective assessment of the extent of disease as a marker of treatment efficacy in MS clinical trials. The purpose of this study is to compare the evaluation of T2-weighted MRI scans in MS patients using a semi-automated quantitative technique with an independent assessment by a neurologist. Baseline, 6- month, and 12-month T2-weighted MRI scans from 41 chronic progressive MS patients were examined. The lesion volume ranged from 0.50 to 51.56 cm2 (mean: 8.08 cm2). Reproducibility of the quantitative technique was assessed by the re-evaluation of a random subset of 20 scans, the coefficient of variation of the replicate determinations was 8.2%. The reproducibility of the neurologist evaluations was assessed by the re-evaluation of a random subset of 10 patients. The rank correlation between the results of the two methods was 0.097, which did not significantly differ from zero. Disease-related activity in T2-weighted MRI scans is a multi-dimensional construct, and is not adequately summarized solely by determination of lesion volume. In this setting, image analysis software should not only support storage and retrieval as sets of pixels, but should also support links to an anatomical dictionary.

  4. ICA-based artifact removal diminishes scan site differences in multi-center resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Feis, Rogier A.; Smith, Stephen M.; Filippini, Nicola; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Dopper, Elise G. P.; Heise, Verena; Trachtenberg, Aaron J.; van Swieten, John C.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Mackay, Clare E.

    2015-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) has shown considerable promise in providing potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and drug response across a range of diseases. Incorporating R-fMRI into multi-center studies is becoming increasingly popular, imposing technical challenges on data acquisition and analysis, as fMRI data is particularly sensitive to structured noise resulting from hardware, software, and environmental differences. Here, we investigated whether a novel clean up tool for structured noise was capable of reducing center-related R-fMRI differences between healthy subjects. We analyzed three Tesla R-fMRI data from 72 subjects, half of whom were scanned with eyes closed in a Philips Achieva system in The Netherlands, and half of whom were scanned with eyes open in a Siemens Trio system in the UK. After pre-statistical processing and individual Independent Component Analysis (ICA), FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier (FIX) was used to remove noise components from the data. GICA and dual regression were run and non-parametric statistics were used to compare spatial maps between groups before and after applying FIX. Large significant differences were found in all resting-state networks between study sites before using FIX, most of which were reduced to non-significant after applying FIX. The between-center difference in the medial/primary visual network, presumably reflecting a between-center difference in protocol, remained statistically significant. FIX helps facilitate multi-center R-fMRI research by diminishing structured noise from R-fMRI data. In doing so, it improves combination of existing data from different centers in new settings and comparison of rare diseases and risk genes for which adequate sample size remains a challenge. PMID:26578859

  5. High prevalence of brain pathology in violent prisoners: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, Kolja; Witzel, Joachim G; Bausch-Hölterhoff, Josef; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and extent of brain anomalies in a large sample of incarcerated violent offenders not previously considered neuropsychiatrically ill, in comparison with non-violent offenders and non-offending controls. MRI and CT brain scans from 287 male prison inmates (162 violent and 125 non-violent) not diagnosed as mentally ill before that were obtained due to headache, vertigo or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal controls. Brain scans were rated qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1) or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Overall, offenders displayed a significantly higher rate of morphological abnormality, with the violent offenders scoring significantly higher than non-violent offenders and controls. This difference was statistically detectable for frontal/parietal cortex, medial temporal structures, third ventricle and the left but not the right lateral ventricle. The remarkable prevalence of brain pathology in convicted violent prisoners detectable by neuroradiological routine assessment not only highlights the importance of frontal and temporal structures in the control of social, and specifically of violent behaviour, but also raises questions on the legal culpability of violent offenders with brain abnormalities. The high proportion of undetected presence of structural brain damage emphasizes the need that in violent criminals, the comprehensive routine neuropsychiatric assessment usually performed in routine forensic psychiatric expertises should be complemented with brain imaging. PMID:23568089

  6. Computer simulation of RF liver ablation on an MRI scan data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturski, N.; Margenov, S.; Vutov, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) ablation is a low invasive technique for treatment of liver tumors. An RF-probe is inserted in the patient's liver and a ground pad is applied to the skin. Then the tumor is heated with RF current. The heat causes the destruction of tumor cells. We use the finite element method (FEM) to simulate and analyze various aspects of the procedure. A 3D image of the patient's liver is obtained from a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Then, the geometry for the RFprobe and the ground pad is added. Our focus is on the influence of the position of the ground pads on the ablation process. Our simulation is based on an unstructured mesh. The size of the mesh is large due to the complexity of the domain. We discretize and solve the problem on a parallel computer using MPI for the parallelization. The presented numerical tests are performed on IBM Blue Gene/P machine at BGSC. The parallel efficiency of the incorporated Boomer AMG solver is demonstrated as well.

  7. Clinical prediction from structural brain MRI scans: a large-scale empirical study.

    PubMed

    Sabuncu, Mert R; Konukoglu, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) methods have become an important tool in neuroimaging, revealing complex associations and yielding powerful prediction models. Despite methodological developments and novel application domains, there has been little effort to compile benchmark results that researchers can reference and compare against. This study takes a significant step in this direction. We employed three classes of state-of-the-art MVPA algorithms and common types of structural measurements from brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans to predict an array of clinically relevant variables (diagnosis of Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, autism, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder; age, cerebrospinal fluid derived amyloid-β levels and mini-mental state exam score). We analyzed data from over 2,800 subjects, compiled from six publicly available datasets. The employed data and computational tools are freely distributed ( https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/lab/mripredict), making this the largest, most comprehensive, reproducible benchmark image-based prediction experiment to date in structural neuroimaging. Finally, we make several observations regarding the factors that influence prediction performance and point to future research directions. Unsurprisingly, our results suggest that the biological footprint (effect size) has a dramatic influence on prediction performance. Though the choice of image measurement and MVPA algorithm can impact the result, there was no universally optimal selection. Intriguingly, the choice of algorithm seemed to be less critical than the choice of measurement type. Finally, our results showed that cross-validation estimates of performance, while generally optimistic, correlate well with generalization accuracy on a new dataset. PMID:25048627

  8. Role of Computed Tomography in Pediatric Abdominal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Anu; Gibikote, Sridhar

    2016-07-01

    In the pediatric patient, computed tomography (CT) scan as an imaging modality for evaluation of the abdomen is to be used judiciously. The use of correct scanning protocols, single phase scanning, scanning only when required are key factors to minimize radiation doses to the child, while providing diagnostic quality. CT is the preferred modality in the evaluation of trauma, to assess extent of solid organ or bowel injury. It is also useful in several inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel diseases and acute pancreatitis. CT also has an important role in evaluating intra-abdominal tumors, although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used as an alternative to CT. PMID:26964550

  9. Abdominal adipose tissue quantification on water-suppressed and non-water-suppressed MRI at 3T using semi-automated FCM clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valaparla, Sunil K.; Peng, Qi; Gao, Feng; Clarke, Geoffrey D.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate measurements of human body fat distribution are desirable because excessive body fat is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we hypothesized that the performance of water suppressed (WS) MRI is superior to non-water suppressed (NWS) MRI for volumetric assessment of abdominal subcutaneous (SAT), intramuscular (IMAT), visceral (VAT), and total (TAT) adipose tissues. We acquired T1-weighted images on a 3T MRI system (TIM Trio, Siemens), which was analyzed using semi-automated segmentation software that employs a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Sixteen contiguous axial slices, centered at the L4-L5 level of the abdomen, were acquired in eight T2DM subjects with water suppression (WS) and without (NWS). Histograms from WS images show improved separation of non-fatty tissue pixels from fatty tissue pixels, compared to NWS images. Paired t-tests of WS versus NWS showed a statistically significant lower volume of lipid in the WS images for VAT (145.3 cc less, p=0.006) and IMAT (305 cc less, p<0.001), but not SAT (14.1 cc more, NS). WS measurements of TAT also resulted in lower fat volumes (436.1 cc less, p=0.002). There is strong correlation between WS and NWS quantification methods for SAT measurements (r=0.999), but poorer correlation for VAT studies (r=0.845). These results suggest that NWS pulse sequences may overestimate adipose tissue volumes and that WS pulse sequences are more desirable due to the higher contrast generated between fatty and non-fatty tissues.

  10. The illusion of presence in immersive virtual reality during an fMRI brain scan.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Richards, Todd; Coda, Barbara; Richards, Anne; Sharar, Sam R

    2003-04-01

    The essence of immersive virtual reality (VR) is the illusion it gives users that they are inside the computer-generated virtual environment. This unusually strong illusion is theorized to contribute to the successful pain reduction observed in burn patients who go into VR during woundcare (www.vrpain.com) and to successful VR exposure therapy for phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present study demonstrated for the first time that subjects could experience a strong illusion of presence during an fMRI despite the constraints of the fMRI magnet bore (i.e., immobilized head and loud ambient noise). PMID:12804024

  11. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  12. Estimation of turbulent kinetic energy using 4D phase-contrast MRI: Effect of scan parameters and target vessel size.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Hwang, Dongha; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Baek, Jehyun; Kim, Young-Hak; Kim, Namkug; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Quantifying turbulence velocity fluctuation is important because it indicates the fluid energy dissipation of the blood flow, which is closely related to the pressure drop along the blood vessel. This study aims to evaluate the effects of scan parameters and the target vessel size of 4D phase-contrast (PC)-MRI on quantification of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Comprehensive 4D PC-MRI measurements with various velocity-encoding (VENC), echo time (TE), and voxel size values were carried out to estimate TKE distribution in stenotic flow. The total TKE (TKEsum), maximum TKE (TKEmax), and background noise level (TKEnoise) were compared for each scan parameter. The feasibility of TKE estimation in small vessels was also investigated. Results show that the optimum VENC for stenotic flow with a peak velocity of 125cm/s was 70cm/s. Higher VENC values overestimated the TKEsum by up to six-fold due to increased TKEnoise, whereas lower VENC values (30cm/s) underestimated it by 57.1%. TE and voxel size did not significantly influence the TKEsum and TKEnoise, although the TKEmax significantly increased as the voxel size increased. TKE quantification in small-sized vessels (3-5-mm diameter) was feasible unless high-velocity turbulence caused severe phase dispersion in the reference image. PMID:26968139

  13. There's more than one way to scan a cat: imaging cat auditory cortex with high-field fMRI using continuous or sparse sampling.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amee J; Brown, Trecia A; Grahn, Jessica A; Gati, Joseph S; Nixon, Pam L; Hughes, Sarah M; Menon, Ravi S; Lomber, Stephen G

    2014-03-15

    When conducting auditory investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), there are inherent potential confounds that need to be considered. Traditional continuous fMRI acquisition methods produce sounds >90 dB which compete with stimuli or produce neural activation masking evoked activity. Sparse scanning methods insert a period of reduced MRI-related noise, between image acquisitions, in which a stimulus can be presented without competition. In this study, we compared sparse and continuous scanning methods to identify the optimal approach to investigate acoustically evoked cortical, thalamic and midbrain activity in the cat. Using a 7 T magnet, we presented broadband noise, 10 kHz tones, or 0.5 kHz tones in a block design, interleaved with blocks in which no stimulus was presented. Continuous scanning resulted in larger clusters of activation and more peak voxels within the auditory cortex. However, no significant activation was observed within the thalamus. Also, there was no significant difference found, between continuous or sparse scanning, in activations of midbrain structures. Higher magnitude activations were identified in auditory cortex compared to the midbrain using both continuous and sparse scanning. These results indicate that continuous scanning is the preferred method for investigations of auditory cortex in the cat using fMRI. Also, choice of method for future investigations of midbrain activity should be driven by other experimental factors, such as stimulus intensity and task performance during scanning. PMID:24389047

  14. Feasibility of geometric-intensity based semi-automated delineation of the tentorium cerebelli from MRI scans

    PubMed Central

    Penumetcha, Neeraja; Kabadi, Suraj; Jedynak, Bruno; Walcutt, Charles; Gado, Mokhtar H.; Wang, Lei; Ratnanather, J. Tilak

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study of a method for delineating the tentorium cerebelli in MRI brain scans. The tentorium cerebelli is a thin sheet of dura matter covering the cerebellum and separating it from the posterior part of the temporal lobe and the occipital lobe of the cerebral hemispheres. Cortical structures such as the parahippocampal gyrus can be indistinguishable from tentorium in MPRAGE and T1 weighted magnetic resonance image scans. Similar intensities in these neighboring regions make it difficult to perform accurate cortical analysis in neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. A semi-automated, geometric, intensity-based procedure for delineating the tentorium from a whole brain scan is described. Initial and final curves are traced within the tentorium. A cost function, based on intensity and Euclidean distance, is computed between the two curves using the Fast Marching method. The initial curve is then evolved to the final curve based on the gradient of the computed costs, generating a series of intermediate curves. These curves are then used to generate a triangulated surface of the tentorium. For three scans, surfaces were found to be within 2 voxels from hand-segmentations. PMID:19659568

  15. Dynamic Glucose-Enhanced (DGE) MRI: Translation to Human Scanning and First Results in Glioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Knutsson, Linda; Hua, Jun; Kalyani, Rita; Hall, Erica; Laterra, John; Blakeley, Jaishri; Strowd, Roy; Pomper, Martin; Barker, Peter; Chan, Kannie; Liu, Guanshu; McMahon, Michael T.; Stevens, Robert D.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent animal studies have shown that D-glucose is a potential biodegradable MRI contrast agent for imaging glucose uptake in tumors. Here, we show the first translation of that use of D-glucose to human studies. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI at a single frequency offset optimized for detection of hydroxyl protons in D-glucose (glucoCEST) was used to image dynamic signal changes in the human brain at 7T during and after infusion of D-glucose. Dynamic glucose-enhanced (DGE) image data from four normal volunteers and three glioma patients showed strong signal enhancement in blood vessels, while the enhancement varied spatially over the tumor. Areas of enhancement differed spatially between DGE and conventional Gd-enhanced imaging, suggesting complementary image information content for these two types of agents. In addition, different tumor areas enhanced with D-glucose at different times post-infusion, suggesting a sensitivity to perfusion-related properties such as substrate delivery and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability. These preliminary results suggest that DGE MRI is feasible to study glucose uptake in humans, providing a time-dependent set of data that contains information regarding arterial input function (AIF), tissue perfusion, glucose transport across the BBB and cell membrane, and glucose metabolism. PMID:26779568

  16. SCAN+

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determinemore » the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.« less

  17. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  18. A genome-wide scan of selective sweeps in two broiler chicken lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genomic regions controlling abdominal fatness (AF) were studied in the Northeast Agricultural University broiler line divergently selected for AF. In this study, the chicken 60KSNP chip and extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) test were used to detect genome-wide signatures of AF. Results A total of 5357 and 5593 core regions were detected in the lean and fat lines, and 51 and 57 reached a significant level (P<0.01), respectively. A number of genes in the significant core regions, including RB1, BBS7, MAOA, MAOB, EHBP1, LRP2BP, LRP1B, MYO7A, MYO9A and PRPSAP1, were detected. These genes may be important for AF deposition in chickens. Conclusions We provide a genome-wide map of selection signatures in the chicken genome, and make a contribution to the better understanding the mechanisms of selection for AF content in chickens. The selection for low AF in commercial breeding using this information will accelerate the breeding progress. PMID:23241142

  19. Detection of abdominal aortic graft infection: comparison of CT and In-labeled white blood cell scans

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.S.; McCarthy, S.M.; Moss, A.A.; Price, D.

    1985-02-01

    Aortic graft infections are a rare but potentially lethal complication of aortic graft surgery. The diagnosis and assessment of the extent of a graft infection is difficult on clinical grounds. A prospective study compared CT and indium-labeled white blood cell (In-WBC) scans in the diagnosis of aortic graft infection. Five patients with aortic graft infection and three patients without aortic graft infection were studied by both methods. CT correctly detected the retroperitoneal extension of the infection in three patients with groin infection; In-WBC scans diagnosed the extension only in one patient. Both CT and In-WBC were positive in two patients with aortic graft infection but no groin infection. Both studies were negative in the three patients without evidence of aortic graft infection. The study suggests that CT is more sensitive than In-WBC in evaluating the extent of aortic graft infection and should be the imaging method of choice.

  20. Methods on Skull Stripping of MRI Head Scan Images-a Review.

    PubMed

    Kalavathi, P; Prasath, V B Surya

    2016-06-01

    The high resolution magnetic resonance (MR) brain images contain some non-brain tissues such as skin, fat, muscle, neck, and eye balls compared to the functional images namely positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) which usually contain relatively less non-brain tissues. The presence of these non-brain tissues is considered as a major obstacle for automatic brain image segmentation and analysis techniques. Therefore, quantitative morphometric studies of MR brain images often require a preliminary processing to isolate the brain from extra-cranial or non-brain tissues, commonly referred to as skull stripping. This paper describes the available methods on skull stripping and an exploratory review of recent literature on the existing skull stripping methods. PMID:26628083

  1. Imaging Non-Specific Wrist Pain: Interobserver Agreement and Diagnostic Accuracy of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, Bone Scan and Plain Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Huellner, Martin W.; Bürkert, Alexander; Strobel, Klaus; Pérez Lago, María del Sol; Werner, Lennart; Hug, Urs; von Wartburg, Urs; Seifert, Burkhardt; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chronic hand and wrist pain is a common clinical issue for orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. The purpose of this study was 1. To analyze the interobserver agreement of SPECT/CT, MRI, CT, bone scan and plain radiographs in patients with non-specific pain of the hand and wrist, and 2. to assess the diagnostic accuracy of these imaging methods in this selected patient population. Materials and Methods Thirty-two consecutive patients with non-specific pain of the hand or wrist were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had been imaged by plain radiographs, planar early-phase imaging (bone scan), late-phase imaging (SPECT/CT including bone scan and CT), and MRI. Two experienced and two inexperienced readers analyzed the images with a standardized read-out protocol. Reading criteria were lesion detection and localisation, type and etiology of the underlying pathology. Diagnostic accuracy and interobserver agreement were determined for all readers and imaging modalities. Results The most accurate modality for experienced readers was SPECT/CT (accuracy 77%), followed by MRI (56%). The best performing, though little accurate modality for inexperienced readers was also SPECT/CT (44%), followed by MRI and bone scan (38% each). The interobserver agreement of experienced readers was generally high in SPECT/CT concerning lesion detection (kappa 0.93, MRI 0.72), localisation (kappa 0.91, MRI 0.75) and etiology (kappa 0.85, MRI 0.74), while MRI yielded better results on typification of lesions (kappa 0.75, SPECT/CT 0.69). There was poor agreement between experienced and inexperienced readers in SPECT/CT and MRI. Conclusions SPECT/CT proved to be the most helpful imaging modality in patients with non-specific wrist pain. The method was found reliable, providing high interobserver agreement, being outperformed by MRI only concerning the typification of lesions. We believe it is beneficial to integrate SPECT/CT into the diagnostic imaging algorithm of chronic wrist

  2. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  3. Segmentation of MRI brain scans into gray matter, white matter, and CSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandor, Tamas; Ong, Hoo-Tee; Valtchinov, Vladimir I.; Albert, Marilyn; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1997-04-01

    An algorithm is described that can separate gray matter, white matter and CSF in brain scans taken with 3DFFT T1- weighted gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging. Although the algorithm is fully automated, it requires brain contours as input that utilize user-defined features. The inter- and intra-operator errors stemming from the variability of the contour definition and affecting the segmentation were assessed by using coronal brain scans of 19 subjects. The inter-operator errors were (1.61 plus or minus 2.38)% (P equals 0.01) for gray matter, (0.31 plus or minus 2.06)% (P equals 0.53) for white matter and (0.28 plus or minus 3.84)% (P equals 0.76) for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). the intra- operator error was (0.28 plus or minus 0.55)% (P greater than 0.04) for gray matter, (0.40 plus or minus 0.37)% (P equals 0.0002) for white matter and (0.26 plus or minus 1.31)% (P equals 0.39) for CSF.

  4. Correlation of the CT Compatible Stereotaxic Craniotomy with MRI Scans of the Patients for Removing Cranial Lesions Located Eloquent Areas and Deep Sites of Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gulsen, Salih

    2015-01-01

    The first goal in neurosurgery is to protect neural function as long as it is possible. Moreover, while protecting the neural function, a neurosurgeon should extract the maximum amount of tumoral tissue from the tumour region of the brain. So neurosurgery and technological advancement go hand in hand to realize this goal. Using of CT compatible stereotaxy for removing a cranial tumour is to be commended as a cornerstone of these technological advancements. Following CT compatible stereotaxic system applications in neurosurgery, different techniques have taken place in neurosurgical practice. These techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI compatible stereotaxis, frameless stereotaxy, volumetric stereotaxy, functional MRI, diffusion tensor (DT) imaging techniques (tractography of the white matter), intraoperative MRI and neuronavigation systems. However, to use all of this equipment having these technologies would be impossible because of economic reasons. However, when we correlated this technique with MRI scans of the patients with CT compatible stereotaxy scans, it is possible to provide gross total resection and protect and improve patients’ neural functions.

  5. Brain tissue- and region-specific abnormalities on volumetric MRI scans in 21 patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a heterogeneous human disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, and characterized by the primary findings of obesity, polydactyly, hypogonadism, and learning and behavioural problems. BBS mouse models have a neuroanatomical phenotype consisting of third and lateral ventriculomegaly, thinning of the cerebral cortex, and reduction in the size of the corpus striatum and hippocampus. These abnormalities raise the question of whether humans with BBS have a characteristic morphologic brain phenotype. Further, although behavioral, developmental, neurological and motor defects have been noted in patients with BBS, to date, there are limited reports of brain findings in BBS. The present study represents the largest systematic evaluation for the presence of structural brain malformations and/or progressive changes, which may contribute to these functional problems. Methods A case-control study of 21 patients, most aged 13-35 years, except for 2 patients aged 4 and 8 years, who were diagnosed with BBS by clinical criteria and genetic analysis of known BBS genes, and were evaluated by qualitative and volumetric brain MRI scans. Healthy controls were matched 3:1 by age, sex and race. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS language with SAS STAT procedures. Results All 21 patients with BBS were found to have statistically significant region- and tissue-specific patterns of brain abnormalities. There was 1) normal intracranial volume; 2) reduced white matter in all regions of the brain, but most in the occipital region; 3) preserved gray matter volume, with increased cerebral cortex volume in only the occipital lobe; 4) reduced gray matter in the subcortical regions of the brain, including the caudate, putamen and thalamus, but not in the cerebellum; and 5) increased cerebrospinal fluid volume. Conclusions There are distinct and characteristic abnormalities in tissue- and region- specific volumes of the brain in patients

  6. Automatic skull-stripping of rat MRI/DTI scans and atlas building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguz, Ipek; Lee, Joohwi; Budin, Francois; Rumple, Ashley; McMurray, Matthew; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin

    2011-03-01

    3D Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) have become important noninvasive tools for the study of animal models of brain development and neuropathologies. Fully automated analysis methods adapted to rodent scale for these images will allow highthroughput studies. A fundamental first step for most quantitative analysis algorithms is skullstripping, which refers to the segmentation of the image into two tissue categories, brain and non-brain. In this manuscript, we present a fully automatic skull-stripping algorithm in an atlasbased manner. We also demonstrate how to either modify an external atlas or to build an atlas from the population itself to present a self-contained approach. We applied our method to three datasets of rat brain scans, at different ages (PND5, PND14 and adult), different study groups (control, ethanol exposed, intrauterine cocaine exposed), as well as different image acquisition parameters. We validated our method by comparing the automated skull-strip results to manual delineations performed by our expert, which showed a discrepancy of less than a single voxel on average. We thus demonstrate that our algorithm can robustly and accurately perform the skull-stripping within one voxel of the manual delineation, and in a fraction of the time it takes a human expert.

  7. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  8. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  9. SU-E-J-220: Assessment of MRI Geometric Distortion in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Scanned in Immobilized Radiation Treatment Position

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C; Mohamed, A; Weygand, J; Ding, Y; Fuller, C; Frank, S; Wang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uncertainties about geometric distortion have somewhat hindered MRI simulation in radiation therapy. Most of the geometric distortion studies were performed with phantom measurements but another major aspect of MR distortion is patient related. We studied the geometric distortion in patient images by comparing their MRI scans with the corresponding CT, using CT as the non-distorted gold standard. Methods: Ten H&N cancer patients were imaged with MRI as part of a prospective IRB approved study. All patients had their treatment planning CT done on the same day or within one week of the MRI. MR Images were acquired with a T2 SE sequence (1×1×2.5mm voxel size) in the same immobilization position as in the CT scans. MRI to CT rigid registration was then done and geometric distortion comparison was done by measuring the corresponding anatomical landmarks on both the MRI and the CT images by two observers. Several skin to skin (9 landmarks), bone to bone (8 landmarks), and soft tissue (3 landmarks) were measured at specific levels in horizontal and vertical planes of both scans. Results: The mean distortion for all landmark measurements in all scans was 1.8±1.9mm. For each patient 11 measurements were done in the horizontal plane while 9 were done in the vertical plane. The measured geometric distortion were significantly lower in the horizontal axis compared to the vertical axis (1.3±0.16 mm vs 2.2±0.19 mm, respectively, P=0.003*). The magnitude of distortion was lower in the bone to bone landmarks compared to the combined soft tissue and skin to skin landmarks (1.2±0.19 mm vs 2.3±0.17 mm, P=0.0006*). The mean distortion measured by observer one was not significantly different compared toobserver 2 (2.3 vs 2.4 mm, P=0.4). Conclusion: MRI geometric distortions were quantified in H&N patients with mean error of less than 2 mm. JW received a corporate sponsored research grant from Elekta.

  10. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  11. Discordance between MRI and bone scan findings in a child with acute complicated osteomyelitis: scintigraphic features that contribute to the early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mpalaris, V; Arsos, G; Iakovou, I; Dalpa, E; Karatzas, N

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of acute osteomyelitis are of paramount importance in children because they can prevent irreversible bone damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with its superior spatial resolution and lack of ionizing radiation is routinely preferred over bone scan for this purpose. Increased blood flow, hyperemia and focally increased tracer uptake shown by "three phase" bone scan are the typical scintigraphic findings of acute osteomyelitis. In addition, diffuse uptake along the shaft of long bones and focal "cold" lesions are two special features that may be highly suggestive of infective periostitis, soft tissue sepsis and subperiosteal abscess formation, due to the loose attachment of periosteum to bone during childhood. We present a case of complicated osteomyelitis in a child with inconclusive MRI correctly diagnosed on the basis of these special scintigraphic findings resulting in treatment change from double i.v. Vancomycin--Ceftriaxone scheme to surgical intervention. PMID:23938190

  12. Construction and investigation of 3D vessels net of the brain according to MRI data using the method of variation of scanning plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevko, A. A.; Yankova, G. S.; Maltseva, S. V.; Parshin, D. V.; Akulov, A. E.; Khe, A. K.; Chupakhin, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    The blood realizes the transport of substances, which are necessary for livelihoods, throughout the body. The assumption about the relationship genotype and structure of vasculature (in particular of brain) is natural. In the paper we consider models of vessel net for two genetic lines of laboratory mice. Vascular net obtained as a result of preprocessing MRI data. MRI scanning is realized using the method of variation of slope of scanning plane, i.e. by several sets of parallel planes specified by different normal vectors. The following special processing allowed to construct models of vessel nets without fragmentation. The purpose of the work is to compare the vascular network models of two different genetic lines of laboratory mice.

  13. Shoulder MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, ...

  14. Cervical MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not be able to ... artificial joints Certain types of vascular stents Worked with ...

  15. Knee MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  16. Sinus MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  17. Arm MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  18. Breast MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the breast and surrounding ... No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of ...

  19. Pelvis MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... that uses a machine with powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the area between the ... area. These devices help send and receive the radio waves, and improve the quality of the images. If ...

  20. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging method that uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create pictures of the heart. It does ... radiation involved in MRI. The magnetic fields and radio waves used during the scan have not been shown ...

  1. Surveillance of HCC Patients after Liver RFA: Role of MRI with Hepatospecific Contrast versus Three-Phase CT Scan-Experience of High Volume Oncologic Institute.

    PubMed

    Granata, Vincenza; Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; de Lutio di Castelguidone, Elisabetta; Catalano, Orlando; Piccirillo, Mauro; Albino, Vittorio; Izzo, Francesco; Petrillo, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of hepatospecific contrast-enhanced MRI versus triple-phase CT scan after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Methods. Thirty-four consecutive HCC patients (42 hepatic nodules) were treated with percutaneous RFA and underwent MR and CT scans. All patients were enrolled in a research protocol that included CT with iodized contrast medium injection and MR with hepatospecific contrast medium injection. All patients were restaged within four weeks and at 3 months from ablation. The images were reviewed by four different radiologists to evaluate tumor necrosis, residual or recurrence disease, and evidence of new foci. Results. Thirty-two nodules were necrotic after treatment; 10 showed residual disease. Six new HCCs were identified. At first month followup CT has identified 34 necrotic lesions and 8 residual diseases; no new foci were recognized. At MRI instead, 32 complete necrotic lesions were identified, 10 lesions showed residual disease, and 2 new HCCs were found. At three months, CT demonstrated 33 completely necrotic lesions, 9 residual diseases, and 2 new HCCs. MR showed 31 complete necrotic lesions, 11 cases of residual disease, and 6 new HCCs. Conclusions. Hepatospecific contrast-enhanced MRI is more effective than multiphase CT in assessment of HCC treated with RFA. PMID:24324487

  2. TU-F-17A-04: Respiratory Phase-Resolved 3D MRI with Isotropic High Spatial Resolution: Determination of the Average Breathing Motion Pattern for Abdominal Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Yang, W; Yue, Y; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Li, D; Fan, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a retrospective 4D-MRI technique (respiratory phase-resolved 3D-MRI) for providing an accurate assessment of tumor motion secondary to respiration. Methods: A 3D projection reconstruction (PR) sequence with self-gating (SG) was developed for 4D-MRI on a 3.0T MRI scanner. The respiration-induced shift of the imaging target was recorded by SG signals acquired in the superior-inferior direction every 15 radial projections (i.e. temporal resolution 98 ms). A total of 73000 radial projections obtained in 8-min were retrospectively sorted into 10 time-domain evenly distributed respiratory phases based on the SG information. Ten 3D image sets were then reconstructed offline. The technique was validated on a motion phantom (gadolinium-doped water-filled box, frequency of 10 and 18 cycles/min) and humans (4 healthy and 2 patients with liver tumors). Imaging protocol included 8-min 4D-MRI followed by 1-min 2D-realtime (498 ms/frame) MRI as a reference. Results: The multiphase 3D image sets with isotropic high spatial resolution (1.56 mm) permits flexible image reformatting and visualization. No intra-phase motion-induced blurring was observed. Comparing to 2D-realtime, 4D-MRI yielded similar motion range (phantom: 10.46 vs. 11.27 mm; healthy subject: 25.20 vs. 17.9 mm; patient: 11.38 vs. 9.30 mm), reasonable displacement difference averaged over the 10 phases (0.74mm; 3.63mm; 1.65mm), and excellent cross-correlation (0.98; 0.96; 0.94) between the two displacement series. Conclusion: Our preliminary study has demonstrated that the 4D-MRI technique can provide high-quality respiratory phase-resolved 3D images that feature: a) isotropic high spatial resolution, b) a fixed scan time of 8 minutes, c) an accurate estimate of average motion pattern, and d) minimal intra-phase motion artifact. This approach has the potential to become a viable alternative solution to assess the impact of breathing on tumor motion and determine appropriate treatment margins

  3. Heredity characteristics of schizophrenia shown by dynamic functional connectivity analysis of resting-state functional MRI scans of unaffected siblings.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianpo; Shen, Hui; Zeng, Ling-Li; Qin, Jian; Liu, Zhening; Hu, Dewen

    2016-08-01

    Previous static resting-state functional connectivity (FC) MRI (rs-fcMRI) studies have suggested certain heredity characteristics of schizophrenia. Recently, dynamic rs-fcMRI analysis, which can better characterize the time-varying nature of intrinsic activity and connectivity and may therefore unveil the special connectivity patterns that are always lost in static FC analysis, has shown a potential neuroendophenotype of schizophrenia. In this study, we have extended previous static rs-fcMRI studies to a dynamic study by exploring whether healthy siblings share aberrant dynamic FC patterns with schizophrenic patients, which may imply a potential risk for siblings to develop schizophrenia. We utilized the dynamic rs-fcMRI method using a sliding window approach to evaluate FC discrepancies within transient states across schizophrenic patients, unaffected siblings, and matched healthy controls. Statistical analysis showed five trait-related connections that are related to cingulo-opercular, occipital, and default mode networks, reflecting the shared connectivity alterations between schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings. The findings suggested that schizophrenic patients and their unaffected siblings shared common transient functional disconnectivity, implying a potential risk for the healthy siblings of developing schizophrenia. PMID:27295028

  4. Investigation of a method for generating synthetic CT models from MRI scans of the head and neck for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Huang, Ke; Feng, Mary; Balter, James M

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images often provide superior anatomic and functional information over computed tomography (CT) images, but generally are not used alone without CT images for radiotherapy treatment planning and image guidance. This study aims to investigate the potential of probabilistic classification of voxels from multiple MRI contrasts to generate synthetic CT ('MRCT') images. The method consists of (1) acquiring multiple MRI volumes: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, two echoes from a ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence, and calculated fat and water image volumes using a Dixon method, (2) classifying tissues using fuzzy c-means clustering with a spatial constraint, (3) assigning attenuation properties with weights based on the probability of individual tissue classes being present in each voxel, and (4) generating a MRCT image volume from the sum of attenuation properties in each voxel. The capability of each MRI contrast to differentiate tissues of interest was investigated based on a retrospective analysis of ten patients. For one prospective patient, the correlation of skull intensities between CT and MR was investigated, the discriminatory power of MRI in separating air from bone was evaluated, and the generated MRCT image volume was qualitatively evaluated. Our analyses showed that one MRI volume was not sufficient to separate all tissue types, and T2-weighted images was more sensitive to bone density variation compared to other MRI image types. The short echo UTE image showed significant improvement in contrasting air versus bone, but could not completely separate air from bone without false labeling. Generated MRCT and CT images showed similar contrast between bone and soft/solid tissues. These results demonstrate the potential of the presented method to generate synthetic CT images to support the workflow of radiation oncology treatment planning and image guidance. PMID:24217183

  5. Investigation of a method for generating synthetic CT models from MRI scans of the head and neck for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Cao, Yue; Huang, Ke; Feng, Mary; Balter, James M.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images often provide superior anatomic and functional information over computed tomography (CT) images, but generally are not used alone without CT images for radiotherapy treatment planning and image guidance. This study aims to investigate the potential of probabilistic classification of voxels from multiple MRI contrasts to generate synthetic CT (‘MRCT’) images. The method consists of (1) acquiring multiple MRI volumes: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, two echoes from a ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence, and calculated fat and water image volumes using a Dixon method, (2) classifying tissues using fuzzy c-means clustering with a spatial constraint, (3) assigning attenuation properties with weights based on the probability of individual tissue classes being present in each voxel, and (4) generating a MRCT image volume from the sum of attenuation properties in each voxel. The capability of each MRI contrast to differentiate tissues of interest was investigated based on a retrospective analysis of ten patients. For one prospective patient, the correlation of skull intensities between CT and MR was investigated, the discriminatory power of MRI in separating air from bone was evaluated, and the generated MRCT image volume was qualitatively evaluated. Our analyses showed that one MRI volume was not sufficient to separate all tissue types, and T2-weighted images was more sensitive to bone density variation compared to other MRI image types. The short echo UTE image showed significant improvement in contrasting air versus bone, but could not completely separate air from bone without false labeling. Generated MRCT and CT images showed similar contrast between bone and soft/solid tissues. These results demonstrate the potential of the presented method to generate synthetic CT images to support the workflow of radiation oncology treatment planning and image guidance.

  6. Pituitary stalk thickening on MRI: when is the best time to re-scan and how long should we continue re-scanning for?

    PubMed

    Di Iorgi, Natascia; Morana, Giovanni; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be an essential tool in the assessment of pituitary stalk lesions including lymphocytic infundibulo-hypophysitis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), germ cell tumours, nongerminomatous germ cell tumours, pituicytomas and other tumours, metastases from lymphoma or breast cancer, Wegener's hypophysitis, neurosarcoidosis and inflammatory infiltrations by infectious diseases. The diagnosis of lesions determining pituitary stalk thickness is challenging, and the identification of the underlying condition may require a long-term follow-up. Thus, clinicians should readily recognize that, when the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus has been established, specific MRI sequences should be used in the assessment of the hypothalamic-pituitary region, and whole-brain evaluation is recommended. For clinical practice, a timely diagnosis is advisable to avoid central nervous system damage, pituitary defects and the risk of dissemination of germ cell tumours or organ involvement by LCH. Proper aetiological diagnosis can be achieved via a series of steps that start with careful observation of several neuroimaging predictors and endocrine dysfunction and then progress to more sophisticated and advanced imaging techniques. PMID:25759231

  7. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  8. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  9. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  10. Mechanisms of Cognitive Impairment in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Multimodal MRI Results from the St George's Cognition and Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew J.; Patel, Bhavini; Morris, Robin G.; MacKinnon, Andrew D.; Rich, Philip M.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a common cause of vascular cognitive impairment. A number of disease features can be assessed on MRI including lacunar infarcts, T2 lesion volume, brain atrophy, and cerebral microbleeds. In addition, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to disruption of white matter ultrastructure, and recently it has been suggested that additional information on the pattern of damage may be obtained from axial diffusivity, a proposed marker of axonal damage, and radial diffusivity, an indicator of demyelination. We determined the contribution of these whole brain MRI markers to cognitive impairment in SVD. Consecutive patients with lacunar stroke and confluent leukoaraiosis were recruited into the ongoing SCANS study of cognitive impairment in SVD (n = 115), and underwent neuropsychological assessment and multimodal MRI. SVD subjects displayed poor performance on tests of executive function and processing speed. In the SVD group brain volume was lower, white matter hyperintensity volume higher and all diffusion characteristics differed significantly from control subjects (n = 50). On multi-predictor analysis independent predictors of executive function in SVD were lacunar infarct count and diffusivity of normal appearing white matter on DTI. Independent predictors of processing speed were lacunar infarct count and brain atrophy. Radial diffusivity was a stronger DTI predictor than axial diffusivity, suggesting ischaemic demyelination, seen neuropathologically in SVD, may be an important predictor of cognitive impairment in SVD. Our study provides information on the mechanism of cognitive impairment in SVD. PMID:23613774

  11. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  12. [Diagnostic value of MRI versus 99Tcm-MDP bone scan in osseous metastasis of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Zhou, Luyi; Jia, Zhiyun; Zhang, Wenjie; Wang, Qiao; Deng, Houfu

    2014-08-01

    This paper is aimed to assess the diagnostic value of MRI versus 99 Tcm-methylene diphosphonate (99 Tcm- MDP) bone scan (BS) for osseous metastases in patients with prostate cancer. The computer-based retrieval was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library and Ovid data bases to search for trials about diagnosing osseous metastases of prostate cancer with MRI and 99Tc"m-MDP BS. Selected with time acceptance and time exclusion criteria, the data quality were evaluated with QUADAS quality assessment tool and collected. We used the Meta-Disc software to conduct meta-analysis, and then calculated the pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), drew the summary receiving operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and measured the area under curve (AUC) and Q value. Then five studies were included, involving 353 patients. The pooled sensitivity of MRI and BS was 0. 95 (95% CI 0. 90~0. 98) and 0. 67 (95% CI 0. 58~0. 75), respectively. The pooled specificity was 0. 97 (95% CI 0. 94~0. 99) and 0. 88 (95% CI 0. 83~0. 91), respectively. The pooled DOR was 402.99 (95% CI 119. 05 ~1364. 15) and 23. 85 (95% CI 1. 32~431. 48), respectively. The AUC was 0. 990 1 and 0. 624 1, respectively. The Q was 0. 958 7 and 0. 593 8. It can well be concluded that MRI is more effective than 99 Tcm-MDP BS in the diagnosis of osseous metastases in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25464807

  13. [Diagnostic value of MRI versus 99Tcm-MDP bone scan in osseous metastasis of prostate cancer: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Guohua; Zhou, Luyi; Jia, Zhiyun; Zhang, Wenjie; Wang, Qiao; Deng, Houfu

    2014-08-01

    This paper is aimed to assess the diagnostic value of MRI versus 99 Tcm-methylene diphosphonate (99 Tcm- MDP) bone scan (BS) for osseous metastases in patients with prostate cancer. The computer-based retrieval was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Knowledge, the Cochrane Library and Ovid data bases to search for trials about diagnosing osseous metastases of prostate cancer with MRI and 99Tc"m-MDP BS. Selected with time acceptance and time exclusion criteria, the data quality were evaluated with QUADAS quality assessment tool and collected. We used the Meta-Disc software to conduct meta-analysis, and then calculated the pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), drew the summary receiving operating characteristic (SROC) curve, and measured the area under curve (AUC) and Q value. Then five studies were included, involving 353 patients. The pooled sensitivity of MRI and BS was 0. 95 (95% CI 0. 90~0. 98) and 0. 67 (95% CI 0. 58~0. 75), respectively. The pooled specificity was 0. 97 (95% CI 0. 94~0. 99) and 0. 88 (95% CI 0. 83~0. 91), respectively. The pooled DOR was 402.99 (95% CI 119. 05 ~1364. 15) and 23. 85 (95% CI 1. 32~431. 48), respectively. The AUC was 0. 990 1 and 0. 624 1, respectively. The Q was 0. 958 7 and 0. 593 8. It can well be concluded that MRI is more effective than 99 Tcm-MDP BS in the diagnosis of osseous metastases in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:25508438

  14. Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Analysis on Intra- and Interobserver and Scan-Rescan Performance of Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyi; Su, Zihua; Ye, Huiyi; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Duan, Feixue; Song, Yuanyuan; Lambrou, Tryphon; Ma, Lin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the intra- and interobserver as well as scan-rescan reproducibility of quantitative parameters of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A total of 21 patients with clear cell RCCs (17 men, 4 woman; age 37-69 years, mean age 54.6 years, mean size, 5.0 ± 2.2 cm) were prospectively recruited from September 2012 to November 2012. Patients underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The extended-Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters. Three observers defined the 2-dimensional whole-tumor region of interest at the slice with the maximum diameter of the RCC. Intraobserver and scan-rescan differences were assessed using paired t tests, whereas interobserver differences using two-way analysis of variance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using within-subject coefficient of variation (wCoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There were no significant intra-, interobserver, or scan-rescan differences in parameters (all P > 0.05). All ICCs for intra- and interobserver agreements were >0.75 (P < 0.05), whereas the scan-rescan agreement was moderate to good; V(e) (0.764, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.378-0.925) and K(ep) (0.906, 95% CI: 0.710-0.972) had higher ICC than K(trans) (0.686; 95% CI: 0.212-0.898) and V(p) (0.657; 95% CI: 0.164-0.888). In intra- and interobserver variability analyses, all parameters except V(p) had low wCoV values. K(trans) and V(e) had slightly lower intraobserver wCoV (1.2% and 0.9%) compared with K(ep) (3.7%), whereas all 3 of these parameters had similar interobserver wCoV values (2.5%, 3.1%, and 2.9%, respectively). Regarding scan-rescan variability, K(trans) and K(ep) showed slightly higher variation (15.6% and 15.4%) than V(e) (10.1%). V(p) had the largest

  15. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  16. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  17. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  18. A study on a method to reduce the effect of the cross-talk artifact in a simultaneous, multiple-slice, plane, oblique MRI scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sun-Yeob; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Moo-Seong; Park, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Eng-Chan; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Shin, Jae-Woo; Kim, Young-Jae; Cho, Young-Kuk

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the effect of cross-talk artifacts on the region of interest (ROI) and to improve the diagnostic value of an image by conducting an examination using the linear (series) method, rather than the interleave method, based on the time concept, which is a basic principle of MRI, with a focus on the T1-weighted image, which has a strong effect on the cross-talk artifact. A water phantom was placed in the center of a brain coil before using the interleave method and the linear method to obtain cross-sectional images. A sagittal oblique scan was conducted to ensure that the slice groups intersected one another. A reference image was also acquired at TR (time of repetition) = 500 msec. Subsequently, the TR was changed to 600 and 700 msec to conduct scans. The analysis method was to use the interleave method and the linear method to compare the effects of the cross-talk artifacts and the TR. As scanned images were suggested, the SNR (signal to noise ratio) for the ROI was measured. According to the study results, the effects of cross-talk artifacts were reduced more significantly in the image scanned using the linear method than in that using the interleave method. When the SNRs of the images scanned in the interleave method and the linear method were compared, the image scanned in the linear method showed higher SNRs for the anterior and the posterior parts at TR = 500, 600, and 700 msec. On the other hand, the image scanned in the interleave method showed an increase in the SNR for the middle part, where the cross-talk artifacts did not appear. This means that the cross-talk artifacts were reduced in the image scanned using the linear method, which resulted in an increase in the SNR. Overall, the SNRs of each image for the interleave method and the linear method were highest at TR = 700 msec. In conclusion, the linear method is selected to reduce the effects of cross-talk artifacts in a simultaneous and multiple slice plane oblique scan

  19. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  20. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  1. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  2. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  3. Studies on the application of a low-voltage peak to the postsurgical follow-up CT scan in abdominal cancer patients in order to reduce the exposure of patients to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H. J.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the radiation dose, computed tomography (CT) number, contrast and image quality of patients requiring periodic follow-up abdominal CT examinations at various tube voltages. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients who underwent a clinical analysis and the other group was a phantom one. Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Twenty patients who underwent a periodic follow-up examination by CT were selected randomly. The tube current was fixed to 150 mA, and the tube voltage was adjusted according to the appropriate value of each examination. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values were measured. The CT number of each organ was measured by setting up a 1 cm diameter return on investment (ROI) in the abdominal organs at the same height of the first lumbar vertebra using images of the arterial phase. Two radiologists in consensus graded the quality of the abdominal images into three groups. An abdomen-shaped acrylic phantom was used in the phantom study. An ion chamber was inserted into the holes located at the center and periphery of the phantom, where the radiation dose was automatically displayed on the reader. Tube voltages of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were applied to the phantom (diluted contrast medium with water at 1:10 ratio) and the phantom was scanned. The CT number was measured from a 1 cm diameter ROI at the center of the image. The CTDI value decreased by 36% at 100 kVp (7.50 mGy) compared with that at 120 kVp (11.70 mGy). According to the radiologists' evaluation, there were 17 equivalent, 3 acceptable and 0 unacceptable levels in the group of 20 subjects. The radiation dose in the phantom study decreased with increasing tube voltages from 80 to 140 kVp. The peripheral and central doses decreased by 38% and 41%, respectively. The CT numbers at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were 1365.9±4.4, 1046.1±3.7, 862.8±3.2 and 737.5±3.0 HU, respectively. In conclusion, in a follow

  4. Pathological Alterations and Stress Responses near DBS Electrodes after MRI Scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T: An In Vivo Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Da-Wei; Li, Shao-Wu; Liu, Huan-Guang; Li, Jun-Ju; Wang, Xiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathological alterations and the stress responses around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T. Materials and Methods DBS devices were stereotactically implanted into the brains of New Zealand rabbits, targeting the left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami, while on the right side, a puncture passage pointing to the same target was made. MRI scans at 7.0T, 3.0T and 1.5T were performed using transmit/receive head coils. The pathological alterations of the surrounding tissue were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining (H&E staining) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The levels of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP-70), Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) and Caspase-3 were determined by western-blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) to assess the stress responses near the DBS electrodes. Results H&E staining and TEM showed that the injury around the DBS electrodes was featured by a central puncture passage with gradually weakened injurious alterations. Comparisons of the injury across the groups manifested similar pathological alterations near the DBS electrodes in each group. Moreover, western-blotting and QPCR assay showed that the level of HSP-70 was not elevated by MRI scans (p>0.05), and the levels of NeuN and Caspase-3 were equal in each group, regardless of the field strengths applied (p>0.05). Conclusions Based on these findings, it is reasonable to conclude that in this study the MRI scans at multiple levels failed to induce additional tissue injury around the DBS electrodes. These preliminary data furthered our understanding of MRI-related DBS heating and encouraged revisions of the current MRI guidelines for patients with DBS devices. PMID:24988329

  5. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures.

  6. Abdominal trauma by ostrich

    PubMed Central

    Usurelu, Sergiu; Bettencourt, Vanessa; Melo, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ostriches typically avoid humans in the wild, since they correctly assess humans as potential predators, and, if approached, often run away. However, ostriches may turn aggressive rather than run when threatened, especially when cornered, and may also attack when they feel the need to defend their offspring or territories. Presentation of case A 71-year-old male patient presented with intra abdominal injury sustained from being kicked in the abdominal wall by an ostrich. During laparotomy, were found free peritoneal effusion and perforation of the small intestine. Discussion The clinical history and physical examination are extremely important for diagnostic and therapeutic decision making. CT-scan is the most accurate exam for making diagnosis. Surgery is the treatment of choice, and is always indicated when there is injury to the hollow viscera. In general it is possible to suture the defect. Conclusion In cases of blunt abdominal trauma by animals is necessary to have a low threshold of suspicion for acute abdomen. PMID:25685344

  7. SU-D-18C-02: Feasibility of Using a Short ASL Scan for Calibrating Cerebral Blood Flow Obtained From DSC-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P; Chang, T; Huang, K; Yeh, C; Chien, C; Wai, Y; Lee, T; Liu, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using a short arterial spin labeling (ASL) scan for calibrating the dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI in a group of patients with internal carotid artery stenosis. Methods: Six patients with unilateral ICA stenosis enrolled in the study on a 3T clinical MRI scanner. The ASL-cerebral blood flow (-CBF) maps were calculated by averaging different number of dynamic points (N=1-45) acquired by using a Q2TIPS sequence. For DSC perfusion analysis, arterial input function was selected to derive the relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) map and the delay (Tmax) map. Patient-specific CF was calculated from the mean ASL- and DSC-CBF obtained from three different masks: (1)Tmax< 3s, (2)combined gray matter mask with mask 1, (3)mask 2 with large vessels removed. One CF value was created for each number of averages by using each of the three masks for calibrating the DSC-CBF map. The CF value of the largest number of averages (NL=45) was used to determine the acceptable range(< 10%, <15%, and <20%) of CF values corresponding to the minimally acceptable number of average (NS) for each patient. Results: Comparing DSC CBF maps corrected by CF values of NL (CBFL) in ACA, MCA and PCA territories, all masks resulted in smaller CBF on the ipsilateral side than the contralateral side of the MCA territory(p<.05). The values obtained from mask 1 were significantly different than the mask 3(p<.05). Using mask 3, the medium values of Ns were 4(<10%), 2(<15%) and 2(<20%), with the worst case scenario (maximum Ns) of 25, 4, and 4, respectively. Conclusion: This study found that reliable calibration of DSC-CBF can be achieved from a short pulsed ASL scan. We suggested use a mask based on the Tmax threshold, the inclusion of gray matter only and the exclusion of large vessels for performing the calibration.

  8. Abdominal exploration

    MedlinePlus

    ... these are aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), vitamin E, warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), or ticlopidine (Ticlid). Ask your ... Biopsy Cancer Chronic pancreatitis CT scan Diverticulitis Ectopic pregnancy Endometriosis Hodgkin lymphoma Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) Peritonitis - ...

  9. Predictive equations for central obesity via anthropometrics, stereovision imaging, and MRI in adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jane J; Freeland-Graves, Jeanne H; Pepper, M Reese; Yao, Ming; Xu, Bugao

    2013-01-01

    Objective Abdominal visceral adiposity is related to risks for insulin resistance and metabolic perturbations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography are advanced instruments that quantify abdominal adiposity; yet field use is constrained by their bulkiness and costliness. The purpose of this study is to develop prediction equations for total abdominal, subcutaneous, and visceral adiposity via anthropometrics, stereovision body imaging (SBI), and MRI. Design and Methods Participants (67 men and 55 women) were measured for anthropometrics, and abdominal adiposity volumes evaluated by MRI umbilicus scans. Body circumferences and central obesity were obtained via SBI. Prediction models were developed via multiple linear regression analysis, utilizing body measurements and demographics as independent predictors, and abdominal adiposity as a dependent variable. Cross-validation was performed by the data-splitting method. Results The final total abdominal adiposity prediction equation was –470.28+7.10waist circumference–91.01gender+5.74sagittal diameter (R²=89.9%); subcutaneous adiposity was –172.37+8.57waist circumference–62.65gender–450.16stereovision waist-to-hip ratio (R²=90.4%); and visceral adiposity was –96.76+11.48central obesity depth–5.09 central obesity width+204.74stereovision waist-to-hip ratio–18.59gender (R²=71.7%). R² significantly improved for predicting visceral fat when SBI variables were included, but not for total abdominal or subcutaneous adiposity. Conclusions SBI is effective for predicting visceral adiposity and the prediction equations derived from SBI measurements can assess obesity. PMID:23613161

  10. Increased frequency of brain pathology in inmates of a high-security forensic institution: a qualitative CT and MRI scan study.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Joachim G; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schiltz, Kolja

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to assess whether brain pathology might be more abundant in forensic inpatients in a high-security setting than in non-criminal individuals. By using a previously used reliable approach, we explored the frequency and extent of brain pathology in a large group of institutionalized offenders who had not previously been considered to be suffering from structural brain damage and compare it to healthy, non-offending subjects. MRI and CT brain scans from 148 male inpatients of a high-security mental health institution (offense type: 51 sex, 80 violent, 9 arson, and 8 nonviolent) that were obtained due to headache, vertigo, or psychological complaints during imprisonment were assessed and compared to 52 non-criminal healthy controls. Brain scans were assessed qualitatively with respect to evidence of structural brain damage. Each case received a semiquantitative rating of "normal" (=0), "questionably abnormal" (=1), or "definitely abnormal" (=2) for the lateral ventricles, frontal/parietal cortex, and medial temporal structures bilaterally as well as third ventricle. Forensic inpatients displayed signs of brain damage to a significantly higher degree than healthy controls (p < 0.001). Even after adjustment for age, in the patients, being younger than the controls (p < 0.05), every offender type group displayed a higher proportion of subjects with brain regions categorized as definitely abnormal than the non-criminal controls. Within the forensic inpatients, offense type groups did not significantly differ in brain pathology. The astonishingly high prevalence of brain pathology in institutionalized inmates of a high-security mental health institution who previously had not been considered to be suffering from an organic brain syndrome raises questions on whether such neuroradiological assessment might be considered as a routine procedure in newly admitted patients. Furthermore, it highlights that organic changes, detectable under clinical routine

  11. Large Abdominal Wall Endometrioma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borncamp, Erik; Mehaffey, Philip; Rotman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common condition in women that affects up to 45% of patients in the reproductive age group by causing pelvic pain. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and is rarely found subcutaneously or in abdominal incisions, causing it to be overlooked in patients with abdominal pain. Methods: A 45-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain 2 years following a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. She was found to have incidental cholelithiasis and a large abdominal mass suggestive of a significant ventral hernia on CT scan. Results: Due to the peculiar presentation, surgical intervention took place that revealed a large 9cm×7.6cm×6.2cm abdominal wall endometrioma. Conclusion: Although extrapelvic endometriosis is rare, it should be entertained in the differential diagnosis for the female patient who presents with an abdominal mass and pain and has a previous surgical history. PMID:21902990

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  13. Susceptibility Variants for Waist Size in Relation to Abdominal, Visceral and Hepatic Adiposity in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Unhee; Ernst, Thomas; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Albright, Cheryl L.; Lum-Jones, Annette; Seifried, Ann; Buchthal, Steven D.; Novotny, Rachel; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Chang, Linda; Cheng, Iona; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common genetic variants that may contribute specifically to the risk of abdominal adiposity, as measured by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio. However, it is unknown whether these genetic risk factors affect relative body fat distribution in the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous compartments. The association between imaging-based abdominal fat mass and waist size risk variants in the FTO, LEPR, LYPLAL1, MSRA, NRXN3, and TFAP2B genes was investigated. A cross-sectional sample of 60 women were selected among study participants of Multiethnic Cohort, who were of ages 60–65 years, of European or Japanese descent, and with body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 40 kg/m2. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to measure adiposity. After adjustments for age, ethnicity and total fat mass, the FTO variants showed an association with less abdominal subcutaneous fat and a higher visceral-to-subcutaneous abdominal fat ratio, with the variant rs9941349 showing significant associations most consistently (p=0.003 and 0.03, respectively). Similarly, the LEPR rs1137101 variant was associated with less subcutaneous fat (p=0.01) and a greater visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (p=0.03) and percent liver fat (p=0.007). MSRA rs545854 variant carriers had a lower percent leg fat. Our findings provide initial evidence that some of the genetic risk factors identified for larger waist size may also contribute to disproportionately greater intra-abdominal and liver fat distribution in postmenopausal women. If replicated, these genetic variants may be incorporated with other biomarkers to predict high-risk body fat distribution. PMID:22889634

  14. Diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm using 67-gallium citrate

    SciTech Connect

    Blumoff, R.L.; McCartney, W.; Jaques, P.; Johnson, G. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Mycotic aneurysms of the abdominal aorta are uncommon, but potentially lethal problems. Clinical subtleties may suggest their presence, but in the past, definitive diagnosis has been dependent on surgical exploration or autopsy findings. A case is presented in which 67-gallium citrate abdominal scanning localized the site of sepsis in an abdominal aortic aneurysm and allowed for prompt and successful surgical therapy. This noninvasive technique is recommended as a adjunct in the diagnosis of mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  15. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  16. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... tell your health care provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips Certain types of artificial heart valves ...

  17. Detection of subjects and brain regions related to Alzheimer's disease using 3D MRI scans based on eigenbrain and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Dong, Zhengchao; Phillips, Preetha; Wang, Shuihua; Ji, Genlin; Yang, Jiquan; Yuan, Ti-Fei

    2015-01-01

    literatures. Conclusion: The eigenbrain method was effective in AD subject prediction and discriminant brain-region detection in MRI scanning. PMID:26082713

  18. Brain PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) and computed tomography ( CT ) scans only reveal the structure of the ... a PET/CT. Alternative Names ... PT, Rijntjes M, Weiller C. Neuroimaging: Functional neuroimaging. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic ...

  19. MRI of the shoulder

    SciTech Connect

    Zlatkin, M.B.; Iannotti, J.P.; Schnall, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating shoulder disorders. The book gives detailed information on MRI techniques and shoulder anatomy, describes and illustrates MRI findings for a wide range of shoulder disorders, and explains how abnormalities seen on MIR images relate to pathophysiology and clinical signs. Special attention is given to imaging of rotator cuff disease and shoulder instability conditions for which MRI is the imaging procedure of choice. Complementing the text are 365 high-quality scans depicting normal shoulder anatomy and showing the wide variety of pathologic findings encountered in practice.

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ... blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most often seen in males over age ...

  1. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal pain Acute cholecystitis Acute kidney failure Addison disease Adenomyosis Annular pancreas Aplastic anemia Appendicitis Ascariasis Atheroembolic renal disease Biliary atresia Blind loop syndrome Cholangitis Chronic ...

  2. SU-E-J-240: Development of a Novel 4D MRI Sequence for Real-Time Liver Tumor Tracking During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, L; Burmeister, J; Ye, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Novel 4D MRI Technique that is feasible for realtime liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy. Methods: A volunteer underwent an abdominal 2D fast EPI coronal scan on a 3.0T MRI scanner (Siemens Inc., Germany). An optimal set of parameters was determined based on image quality and scan time. A total of 23 slices were scanned to cover the whole liver in the test scan. For each scan position, the 2D images were retrospectively sorted into multiple phases based on breathing signal extracted from the images. Consequently the 2D slices with same phase numbers were stacked to form one 3D image. Multiple phases of 3D images formed the 4D MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle. Results: The optimal set of scan parameters were: TR= 57ms, TE= 19ms, FOV read= 320mm and flip angle= 30°, which resulted in a total scan time of 14s for 200 frames (FMs) per slice and image resolution of (2.5mm,2.5mm,5.0mm) in three directions. Ten phases of 3D images were generated, each of which had 23 slices. Based on our test scan, only 100FMs were necessary for the phase sorting process which may lower the scan time to 7s/100FMs/slice. For example, only 5 slices/35s are necessary for a 4D MRI scan to cover liver tumor size ≤ 2cm leading to the possibility of tumor trajectory tracking every 35s during treatment. Conclusion: The novel 4D MRI technique we developed can reconstruct a 4D liver MRI sequence representing one breathing cycle (7s/ slice) without an external monitor. This technique can potentially be used for real-time liver tumor tracking during radiotherapy.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bruises: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Neil E I; Ross, Claire G; Byard, Roger W

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be used to image the presence of hemosiderin in bruises and if there was the potential for this technique to be applied as a non-invasive method to estimate the age of bruises. To achieve this aim an animal model to produce lesions resembling bruises was created by injecting blood obtained from the tail vein subcutaneously into an area of the abdominal wall. The animals were euthanized at 3, 6, 12 h, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days post injection and the skin of the abdominal wall was excised for MRI scanning and histological examination. The injected blood appeared as hypointense (dark) areas on the T2* MRI at 3 and 6 h. The image of the injected areas became indistinct at 12 h and continued to be indistinct at 1 and 2 days, although there appeared to be transitioning from hypointensity to hyperintensity (light). The magnetic resonance image appeared to better correspond to the histological appearance at 3 and 5 days, with the "bruise" appearing hyperintense (white); however, some hypointense (darker) areas at 3 day possibly corresponded to the development of hemosiderin. At 7 day the injected blood had been converted to hemosiderin with possible correlation between areas of blue staining in Perls' stained histologic sections and areas of extreme hypointensity in the T2* magnetic resonance image. This study has shown that a series of changes occur on MRI of bruises in an animal model that may relate to histological changes. Although variability in the intensity of the MRI signal and considerable soft tissue artifact currently make interpretations difficult, this may be a technique worth pursuing in the non-invasive evaluation of bruises. PMID:23760862

  4. Abdominal Compartment Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maluso, Patrick; Olson, Jody; Sarani, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare but potentially morbid diagnoses. Clinical index of suspicion for these disorders should be raised following massive resuscitation, abdominal wall reconstruction/injury, and in those with space-occupying disorders in the abdomen. Gold standard for diagnosis involves measurement of bladder pressure, with a pressure greater than 12 mm Hg being consistent with IAH and greater than 25 mm Hg being consistent with ACS. Decompressive laparotomy is definitive therapy but paracentesis can be equally therapeutic in properly selected patients. Left untreated, ACS can lead to multisystem organ failure and death. PMID:27016163

  5. Abdominal Circulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Dagar, Gaurav; Taneja, Amit; Nanchal, Rahul S

    2016-04-01

    The abdominal compartment is separated from the thoracic compartment by the diaphragm. Under normal circumstances, a large portion of the venous return crosses the splanchnic and nonsplanchnic abdominal regions before entering the thorax and the right side of the heart. Mechanical ventilation may affect abdominal venous return independent of its interactions at the thoracic level. Changes in pressure in the intra-abdominal compartment may have important implications for organ function within the thorax, particularly if there is a sustained rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It is important to understand the consequences of abdominal pressure changes on respiratory and circulatory physiology. This article elucidates important abdominal-respiratory-circulatory interactions and their clinical effects. PMID:27016167

  6. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal cysts in children].

    PubMed

    Józsa, Gergő; Mohay, Gabriella; Pintér, András; Vástyán, Attila

    2015-09-13

    19 children were diagnosed with abdominal cysts of different origin in the Surgical Unit of the Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Pécs, Hungary between 2010 and 2013. The authors discuss the details of representative cases of a parovarial cyst, an intestinal duplication, and an omental cyst with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, diagnostic tools, and surgical interventions. The authors conclude that abdominal cysts often cause mild symptoms only, and they are discovered accidentally by ultrasound imaging performed for other reasons. In some cases, the cyst can cause severe complaints or even acute abdomen requiring emergency surgery. Laporoscopy may be a valuable method both in diagnosis and surgical therapy. Abdominal CT or MRI are not required in the majority of the patients. PMID:26552027

  7. [Abdominal splenosis: an often underdiagnosed entity].

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Bello-Arqués, P; Pelegrí-Martínez, L; Hervás-Benito, I; Loaiza-Góngora, J L; Falgas-Lacueva, M; Ruiz-Llorca, C; Pérez-Velasco, R; Mateo-Navarro, A

    2011-01-01

    Splenosis is defined as the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue because of a ruptured spleen due to trauma or surgery. It is a benign and incidental finding, although imaging tests may sometimes orient toward malignancy simulating renal tumors, abdominal lymphomas, endometriosis, among other. We report the case of a 42-year old male in whom a MRI was performed after a study due to abdominal pain. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed in the abdomen, suggestive of lymphoproliferative disease. As an important background, splenectomy was carried out due to abdominal trauma at age 9. After several studies, it was decided to perform a (99m)Tc-labeled heat-damaged red blood cell scintigraphy that showed multiple pathological deposits distributed throughout the abdomen, and even the pelvis, being consistent with splenosis. PMID:20570413

  8. Abdominal and hepatic uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Caride, V.J.; Touloukian, R.J.; Ablow, R.C.; Lange, R.C.; Matthews, T.

    1981-04-01

    Abdominal /sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/Tc-PYP) scans were obtained in 15 neonates: 12 with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), two with osteomyelitis, and one with myocarditis. Ten of the babies with NEC had at least one positive scan; of these 10 studies, seven (Group A) showed both diffuse abdominal uptake and localized hepatic activity, two (Group B) showed abdominal uptake and questionable hepatic uptake, and one (Group C) demonstrated diffuse abdominal uptake only. The other two babies with NEC had normal scans (Group D). All NEC patients had normal scans. A patient with myocarditis had hepatic uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-PYP while the abdominal scan in the two infants with osteomyelitis was normal. These preliminary observations suggest that further study of a relationship between abdominal scan findings and the course of NEC is warranted.

  9. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  11. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  12. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  13. [Normal abdominal ultrasound anatomy. Examination procedure].

    PubMed

    Salcedo Joven, I; Segura Grau, A; Rodríguez Lorenzo, A; Segura Cabral, J M

    2014-01-01

    To carry out an abdominal ultrasound examination with the highest degree of accuracy and thoroughness, it is essential to have a good knowledge of the anatomy and the normal measurements of the different organs. In this way, we can determine their normal condition and identify the pathology and its location more easily. It is very important to adopt a correct examination procedure, systematically sweeping the scan in the same direction and not leaving any organ unexamined. We suggest a procedure consisting of longitudinal, cross-sectional and oblique scans to view all the abdominal organs, starting the examination in the epigastric region, scanning first the right upper quadrant, then the left upper quadrant, both iliac fossa, and lastly the hypogastric region. PMID:24746380

  14. A Giant Intra Abdominal Mass Mimicking Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Rare Presentation of Renal Angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Haque, M E; Rahman, M A; Kaisar, I; Islam, M F; Salam, M A

    2016-07-01

    Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor commonly found in kidney than extra renal sites. Most of the small renal angiomyolipomas are diagnosed incidentally on ultrasound and other imaging studies. Some renal AMLs present clinically when become very big, giant renal angiomyolipoma. Although almost all cases are benign, a relatively rare variant of epitheloid angiomyolipoma has got malignant potential and can even metastasize. Ultrasonography, CT and MRI scan are usually used for diagnosis of angiomyolipoma with high level of accuracy; even though some lesions may be confused as renal cell carcinoma on imaging studies. Here, a 48 year old man presented with a large intra-abdominal mass preoperatively diagnosed as a case of right renal cell carcinoma and radical nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed epitheloid angiomyolipoma (EAML). PMID:27612907

  15. Imaging the pregnant patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graham W; Davis, Melissa A; Semelka, Richard C; Fielding, Julia R

    2012-10-01

    Imaging of pregnant patients with non-obstetric abdominal pain is reviewed, with an accompanying pictorial essay of cases with concentration on magnetic resonance imaging. Non-obstetric causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy are similar to those of non-pregnant patients. The most common causes are appendicitis and cholecystitis. Other causes are myriad and include biliary, gastrointestinal, infectious, inflammatory, and malignant etiologies, among others. The approach to imaging in pregnant patient is unique, as it is imperative to minimize potentially harmful radiation exposures to the fetus. Ultrasound and MRI are the primary modalities for evaluation of the pregnant patient with abdominal pain. The use of intravenous contrast is discouraged, except in highly-selected patients where there is no other way to obtain vital diagnostic information. CT is still used as the mainstay of evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma and is commonly used for diagnosis of small bowel obstruction, stone disease, and work-up of malignancy during pregnancy. A discussion of test selection and underlying rationale is presented. PMID:22160283

  16. Abdominal exploration - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical exploration of the abdomen, also called an exploratory laparotomy, may be recommended when there is abdominal ... blunt trauma"). Diseases that may be discovered by exploratory laparotomy include: inflammation of the appendix (acute appendicitis) ...

  17. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  18. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  20. Unique MRI findings for differentiation of an early stage of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takanori; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Yabuki, Hidehiko; Ito, Akira

    2015-01-01

    CT scan and ultrasonography images revealed two small uniformly low-density and hypoechoic lesions in the liver, respectively, 7 years after curative resection of rectal cancer, in a 74-year-old man. The area of the liver including the two lesions was segmentally resected. Two lesions were histopathologically confirmed as early but active stage alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by accidental ingestion of eggs of the fox tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis. This case is very unique and rare, since early stage hepatic AE cases have only accidentally been confirmed from cases in which malignant hepatic tumours were suspected, and because two independent AE lesions were detected. Abdominal MRI showed two isointense tumour lesions with small areas of high-signal intensity in their centres on T2-weighted images. MRI findings appear to reflect the macroscopic view and microscopic findings of early stage AE with active cyst in the centre of each hepatic lesion well. PMID:25697300

  1. Giant Cell Arteritis: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed with the Use of MRI Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in western countries in individuals over the age of 50. It is typically characterised by the granulomatous involvement of large and medium sized blood vessels branching of the aorta with particular tendencies for involving the extracranial branches of the carotid artery. Generally the diagnosis is straightforward when characteristic symptoms such as headache, jaw claudication, or other ischemic complications are present. Atypical presentations of GCA without “overt” cranial ischemic manifestations have become increasingly recognised but we report for the first time a case of GCA presenting as mild upper abdominal pain and generalized weakness in the context of hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of vasculitis that was subsequently diagnosed by MRI scanning. This case adds to the literature and emphasises the importance of MRI in the evaluation of GCA patients without “classic” cranial ischemic symptoms. PMID:27493825

  2. The Paramagnetic Pillared Bentonites as Digestive Tract MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojović, Miloš; Daković, Marko; Omerašević, Mia; Mojović, Zorica; Banković, Predrag; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra; Jovanović, Dušan

    The increased use of imaging techniques in diagnostic studies, such as MRI, has contributed to the development of the wide range of new materials which could be successfully used as image improving agents. However, there is a lack of such substances in the area of gastrointestinal tract MRI. Many of the traditionally popular relaxation altering agents show poor results and disadvantages provoking black bowel, side effects of diarrhea and the presence of artifacts arising from clumping. Paramagnetic species seem to be potentially suitable agents for these studies, but contrast opacification has been reported and less than 60% of the gastrointestinal tract magnetic resonance scans showed improved delineation of abdominal pathologies. The new solution has been proposed as zeolites or smectite clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) enclosing of paramagnetic metal ions obtained by ion-exchange methods. However, such materials have problems of leakage of paramagnetic ions causing the appearance of the various side-effects. In this study we show that Co+2 and Dy+3 paramagnetic-pillared bentonites could be successfully used as MRI digestive tract non-leaching contrast agents, altering the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of fluids in contact with the clay minerals.

  3. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe kidney problems. People have been harmed in MRI machines when they did not remove metal objects from their clothes or when metal objects were left in the room by others. MRI is most often not recommended for traumatic injuries. ...

  4. Abdominal Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma Associated With Lymphangiomatosis Involving Mesentery and Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yang; He, Tianlin; Zuo, Changjing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KH) is a rare vascular tumor of intermediate malignancy that occurs mainly in the childhood. Adult patients with KH are rare. Imaging findings of KH have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in an adult patient with KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. A 22-year-old female complained of a 9-month history of intermittent melena, weakness, and palpitation. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and hypoproteinemia. Fecal occult blood test was positive. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed a large abdominal mass involving mesentery and ileum. On enhanced MRI, there were many hypervascular nodules in the mass. On FDG PET/CT, the mass and the nodules showed slight FDG uptake. Small bowel capsule endoscopy showed numerous grape-shaped red nodules in the luminal wall of the involved ileum. The patient underwent resection of the abdominal mass and a segment of the ileum invaded by the abdominal mass. KH arising within lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum was confirmed by pathology. After surgery, the patient's symptoms improved. This is the first case of KH associated with lymphangiomatosis involving mesentery and ileum. In this case, the lymphangiomatosis overshadowed the small tumor nodules resulting in unusual imaging findings. Familiarity with these imaging findings is helpful for diagnosis and differential diagnosis of KH. PMID:26871848

  5. Scanning, Scanning, Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekhaml, Leticia; Myers, Brenda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses uses of scanning (process of copying or converting text, images, and objects into information that the computer can recognize and manipulate) in schools and notes possible desktop publishing projects. Describes popular scanners and ways to edit a scanned image. A sidebar gives costs and telephone numbers for nine scanners. (AEF)

  6. Abdominal trauma. Emphasis on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Raptopoulos, V

    1994-09-01

    CT scans have been the champion in the diagnosis and management of abdominal injuries, and their use has decreased the number of negative exploratory laparotomies. Traditional areas for the use of CT scans include the assessment of injuries to the spleen and the liver and to signs of organ rupture into the peritoneal cavity. New technologic advances and increased experience have expanded the value of this modality to less than hemodynamically stable patients as well as to less common and more difficult to diagnose injuries of the pancreas, bowel, and the mesentery. PMID:8085007

  7. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  8. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  9. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  10. Association of Habitual Patterns and Types of Physical Activity and Inactivity with MRI-Determined Total Volumes of Visceral and Subcutaneous Abdominal Adipose Tissue in a General White Population

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Karina; Rüttgers, Daniela; Müller, Hans-Peter; Jacobs, Gunnar; Kassubek, Jan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Nöthlings, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Population-based evidence for the role of habitual physical activity (PA) in the accumulation of visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAAT) abdominal adipose tissue is limited. We investigated if usual patterns and types of self-reported PA and inactivity were associated with VAT and SAAT in a general white population. Total volumes of VAT and SAAT were quantified by magnetic resonance imaging in 583 men and women (61 ± 11.9 y; BMI 27.2 ± 4.4 kg/m2). Past-year PA and inactivity were self-reported by questionnaire. Exploratory activity patterns (APAT) were derived by principal components analysis. Cross-sectional associations between individual activities, total PA in terms of metabolic equivalents (PA MET), or overall APAT and either VAT or SAAT were analyzed by multivariable-adjusted robust or generalized linear regression models. Whereas vigorous-intensity PA (VPA) was negatively associated with both VAT and SAAT, associations between total PA MET, moderate-intensity PA (MPA), or inactivity and VAT and/or SAAT depended on sex. There was also evidence of a threshold effect in some of these relationships. Total PA MET was more strongly associated with VAT in men (B = -3.3 ± 1.4; P = 0.02) than women (B = -2.1 ± 1.1; P = 0.07), but was more strongly associated with SAAT in women (B = -5.7 ± 2.5; P = 0.05) than men (B = -1.7 ± 1.6; P = 0.3). Men (-1.52 dm3 or -1.89 dm3) and women (-1.15 dm3 or -2.61 dm3) in the highest (>6.8 h/wk VPA) or second (4.0–6.8 h/wk VPA) tertile of an APAT rich in VPA, had lower VAT and SAAT, respectively, than those in the lowest (<4.0 h/wk VPA) tertile (P ≤ 0.016; Ptrend ≤ 0.0005). They also had lower VAT and SAAT than those with APAT rich in MPA and/or inactivity only. In conclusion, our results suggest that in white populations, habitual APAT rich in MPA might be insufficient to impact on accumulation of VAT or SAAT. APAT including ≥4.0–6.8 h/wk VPA, by contrast, are more strongly associated with lower VAT and SAAT. PMID

  11. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  12. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  13. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  14. Chest MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy Superior vena cava (SVC) obstruction Thoracic aortic aneurysm Thymus tumor Tumors of the chest Consult your ... Restrictive cardiomyopathy SVC obstruction Swollen lymph nodes Thoracic aortic aneurysm Patient Instructions Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge ...

  15. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  16. Component separation in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Rawstorne, Edward; Smart, Christopher J; Fallis, Simon A; Suggett, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Component separation is established for complex hernia repairs. This case presents early component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath to facilitate closure of the abdominal wall following emergency laparotomy, reinforcing the repair with a biological mesh. On Day 11 following an emergency laparotomy for penetrating trauma, this patient underwent component separation and release of the anterior and posterior sheath. An intra-abdominal biological mesh was secured, and the fascia and skin closed successfully. Primary abdominal closure can be achieved in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma with the use of component separation and insertion of intra-abdominal biological mesh, where standard closure is not possible. PMID:24876334

  17. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  18. Abdominal applications of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Where do we stand

    PubMed Central

    Morani, Ajaykumar C; Elsayes, Khaled M; Liu, Peter S; Weadock, William J; Szklaruk, Janio; Dillman, Jonathan Russell; Khan, Asra; Chenevert, Thomas L; Hussain, Hero K

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is one of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences providing qualitative as well as quantitative information at a cellular level. It has been widely used for various applications in the central nervous system. Over the past decade, various extracranial applications of DWI have been increasingly explored, as it may detect changes even before signal alterations or morphological abnormalities become apparent on other pulse sequences. Initial results from abdominal MRI applications are promising, particularly in oncological settings and for the detection of abscesses. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinically relevant basic concepts of DWI, techniques to perform abdominal DWI, its analysis and applications in abdominal visceral MR imaging, in addition to a brief overview of whole body DWI MRI. PMID:23671743

  19. Subtle Radiological Features of Splenic Avulsion following Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, S. A.; Dagash, H.; Godbole, P. P.; Raghavan, A.; Murthi, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    Splenic trauma in children following blunt abdominal injury is usually treated by nonoperative management (NOM). Splenectomy following abdominal trauma is rare in children. NOM is successful as in the majority of instances the injury to the spleen is contained within its capsule or a localised haematoma. Rarely, the spleen may suffer from an avulsion injury that causes severe uncontrollable bleeding and necessitates an emergency laparotomy and splenectomy. We report two cases of children requiring splenectomy following severe blunt abdominal injury. In both instances emergency laparotomy was undertaken for uncontrollable bleeding despite resuscitation. The operating team was unaware of the precise source of bleeding preoperatively. Retrospective review of the computed tomography (CT) scans revealed subtle radiological features that indicate splenic avulsion. We wish to highlight these radiological features of splenic avulsion as they can help to focus management decisions regarding the need/timing for a laparotomy following blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:21209813

  20. What does an MRI scan cost?

    PubMed

    Young, David W

    2015-11-01

    Historically, hospital departments have computed the costs of individual tests or procedures using the ratio of cost to charges (RCC) method, which can produce inaccurate results. To determine a more accurate cost of a test or procedure, the activity-based costing (ABC) method must be used. Accurate cost calculations will ensure reliable information about the profitability of a hospital's DRGs. PMID:26685437

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Furey, Elizabeth A; Bailey, April A; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2014-08-01

    Evaluation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and radiologists alike. The differential diagnosis includes obstetric and nonobstetric conditions unique to pregnancy, in addition to causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain unrelated to the pregnancy. The clinical presentation and course of disease may be altered in pregnancy, and several pathologies are exacerbated by pregnancy. Discriminating clinical features in the diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic pain are often confounded by expected anatomic and physiologic changes in pregnancy. Moreover, while diagnostic pathways may be altered in pregnancy, the necessity for a timely and accurate diagnosis must be underscored, as delay in treatment may result in an undesirable increase in morbidity and/or mortality for both the patient and fetus. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through faster acquisition and motion-insensitive techniques, coupled with increased awareness and education regarding the value of MRI in diagnosing a wide range of pathology, have established MRI as a valuable strategy in the investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in the pregnant patient. This review presents a practical approach to common obstetric and nonobstetric causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during pregnancy, as well as safety considerations for performing MRI in this patient population. PMID:25099561

  2. Solid organ abdominal ischemia, part I: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings, and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Stein, Marjorie W; Kaul, Bindu; Flusberg, Milana; Chernyak, Victoria; Rozenblit, Alla M; Mazzariol, Fernanda A

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ abdominal ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and often requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, most solid organ ischemia is due to arterial or venous occlusion and, less frequently, a low-flow state. Radiologic diagnosis is critical, as clinical presentations are often nonspecific. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice (except in adnexal torsion) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) useful in equivocal cases or follow-up of ischemic disease. This article will provide a pictorial review of the CT and MRI features of solid abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, etiology, and management. PMID:27317217

  3. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    OTOMARU, Konosuke; FUJIKAWA, Takuro; SAITO, Yasuo; ANDO, Takaaki; OBI, Takeshi; MIURA, Naoki; KUBOTA, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery. PMID:25924971

  4. Musculoskeletal MRI.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jaime E; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    MRI has the unique ability to detect abnormal fluid content, and is therefore unparalleled in its role of detection, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment planning and follow-up evaluation of musculoskeletal disease. MRI in companion animals should be considered in the following circumstances: a definitive diagnosis cannot be made on radiographs; a patient is nonresponsive to medical or surgical therapy; prognostic information is desired; assessing surgical margins and traumatic and/or infectious joint and bone disease; ruling out subtle developmental or early aggressive bone lesions. The MRI features of common disorders affecting the shoulder, elbow, stifle, carpal, and tarsal joints are included in this chapter. PMID:26928749

  5. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy R; Johnson, Philip L; Meyer, Mark C

    2002-04-15

    Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), accurate diagnosis and preoperative evaluation are essential for improved patient outcomes. Ultrasonography is the standard method of screening and monitoring AAAs that have not ruptured. In the past, aortography was commonly used for preoperative planning in the repair of AAAs. More recently, computed tomography (CT) has largely replaced older, more invasive methods. Recent advances in CT imaging technology, such as helical CT and CT angiography, offer significant advantages over traditional CT. These methods allow for more rapid scans and can produce three-dimensional images of the AAA and important adjacent vascular structures. Use of endovascular stent grafts has increased recently and is less invasive for the repair of AAAs in selected cases. Aortography and CT angiography can precisely determine the size and surrounding anatomy of the AAA to identify appropriate candidates for the use of endovascular stent grafts. Helical CT and CT angiography represent an exciting future in the preoperative evaluation of AAAs. However, this technology is not the standard of care because of the lack of widespread availability, the cost associated with obtaining new equipment, and the lack of universal protocols necessary for acquisition and reconstruction of these images. PMID:11989632

  6. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  7. Peripheral embolisation after an abdominal massage.

    PubMed

    Tak, Sandeep; Tak, Shubhanjali; Gupta, Alok

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man presented with a history of acute onset pain in toes of the right foot immediately after an abdominal massage by a 'local healer'. General physical examination and systemic examination were normal except for discolouration of the fourth and fifth toes and cold toes. Investigations including complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, renal function tests, liver profile, lipid profile, antinuclear antibody, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, ECG, chest X-ray, ultrasound abdomen, cardiac echocardiography, lower limb Doppler and CT scan of the abdomen were normal. The patient was treated with regular heparin infusion, aspirin and tramadol. Recovery was complete in 5 days. PMID:24928926

  8. Obstetric MRI.

    PubMed

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-07-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice for pregnant patients. However, MRI is increasingly utilized in patients in whom the sonographic diagnosis is unclear. These include maternal conditions unique to pregnancy such as ectopic pregnancy, placenta accreta, and uterine dehiscence. MRI is also being increasingly utilized in the assessment of abdominopelvic pain in pregnancy, in particular in assessment for appendicitis. Fetal MRI is performed to assess central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and patients who are considering fetal surgery for conditions such as neural tube defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and masses that obstruct the airway. In the future, functional MRI and fetal volumetry may provide additional information that can aid in our care of complicated pregnancies. PMID:16736491

  9. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  10. CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan; Computed axial tomography scan; Computed tomography scan ... Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, et al. eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ...

  11. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  12. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  13. The PRESTO technique for fMRI

    PubMed Central

    van Gelderen, P.; Duyn, J.H.; Ramsey, N.F.; Liu, G.; Moonen, C.T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In the early days of BOLD fMRI, the acquisition of T2* weighted data was greatly facilitated by rapid scan techniques such as EPI. The latter, however, was only available on a few MRI systems that were equipped with specialized hardware that allowed rapid switching of the imaging gradients. For this reason, soon after the invention of fMRI, the scan technique PRESTO was developed to make rapid T2* weighted scanning available on standard clinical scanning. This method combined echo shifting, which allows for echo times longer than the sequence repetition time, with acquisition of multiple k-space lines per excitation. These two concepts were combined in order to achieve a method fast enough for fMRI, while maintaining a sufficiently long echo time for optimal contrast. PRESTO has been primarily used for 3D scanning, which minimized the contribution of large vessels due to inflow effects. Although PRESTO is still being used today, its appeal has lessened somewhat due to increased gradient performance of modern MRI scanners. Compared to 2D EPI, PRESTO may have somewhat reduced temporal stability, which is a disadvantage for fMRI that may not outweigh the advantage of reduced inflow effects provided by 3D scanning. In this overview, the history of the development of the PRESTO is presented, followed by a qualitative comparison with EPI. PMID:22245350

  14. Diagnosis of abdominal abscesses in patients with major trauma: the use of computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, N.O.; Shatney, C.H.

    1983-04-01

    The usefulness of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing abdominal abscesses was evaluated prospectively in 69 septic patients who had suffered massive trauma. For the 82 abdominal CT scans obtained, the accuracy rate was 84%, the sensitivity was 92%, and the specificity was 79%. With the use of abdominal CT, 32 patients were spared a ''blind'' laparotomy in the search for the focus of infection. It is concluded that CT is of significant value in the diagnosis of abdominal abscess in the septic trauma patient.

  15. Fast interactive exploration of 4D MRI flow data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennemuth, A.; Friman, O.; Schumann, C.; Bock, J.; Drexl, J.; Huellebrand, M.; Markl, M.; Peitgen, H.-O.

    2011-03-01

    1- or 2-directional MRI blood flow mapping sequences are an integral part of standard MR protocols for diagnosis and therapy control in heart diseases. Recent progress in rapid MRI has made it possible to acquire volumetric, 3-directional cine images in reasonable scan time. In addition to flow and velocity measurements relative to arbitrarily oriented image planes, the analysis of 3-dimensional trajectories enables the visualization of flow patterns, local features of flow trajectories or possible paths into specific regions. The anatomical and functional information allows for advanced hemodynamic analysis in different application areas like stroke risk assessment, congenital and acquired heart disease, aneurysms or abdominal collaterals and cranial blood flow. The complexity of the 4D MRI flow datasets and the flow related image analysis tasks makes the development of fast comprehensive data exploration software for advanced flow analysis a challenging task. Most existing tools address only individual aspects of the analysis pipeline such as pre-processing, quantification or visualization, or are difficult to use for clinicians. The goal of the presented work is to provide a software solution that supports the whole image analysis pipeline and enables data exploration with fast intuitive interaction and visualization methods. The implemented methods facilitate the segmentation and inspection of different vascular systems. Arbitrary 2- or 3-dimensional regions for quantitative analysis and particle tracing can be defined interactively. Synchronized views of animated 3D path lines, 2D velocity or flow overlays and flow curves offer a detailed insight into local hemodynamics. The application of the analysis pipeline is shown for 6 cases from clinical practice, illustrating the usefulness for different clinical questions. Initial user tests show that the software is intuitive to learn and even inexperienced users achieve good results within reasonable processing

  16. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    You may feel a sharp sting when the needle with the tracer is placed into your vein. A PET scan causes no pain. The table may be ... The amount of radiation used in a PET scan is about the same amount as used in most CT scans. These scans use ...

  17. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  18. Intra-Abdominal Hematoma Following Enoxaparin Injection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Tong

    2016-01-01

    An elderly patient, who was being treated for therapeutic enoxaparin for a couple of days due to suspected deep vein thrombosis, was admitted to hospital following a collapse and severe abdominal pain. She was in hypovolemic shock and was fluid resuscitated. Ultrasound scan and computed tomography (CT) scan showed a large pelvic hematoma. Radiologists also suspected a possibility of bleeding from inferior epigastric artery following a CT angiogram. The patient was stabilized and transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for further hemodynamic supports and close monitoring. The patient was then transferred back to the general ward when she was stable. She was managed conservatively as there were no more signs of active bleeding. Unfortunately, she died of recurrent bleeding three days after ICU discharge. PMID:27158226

  19. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  20. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominalPa in inCh ildre n What is functional abdominal pain, and why does it happen? Most otherwise-healthy ... stomachaches for two months or more have functional abdominal pain. The term “functional” refers to the fact that ...

  1. Falx Cerebri Ossification: CT and MRI Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridis, I; Natsis, K; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, K; Tarazi, L; Chondromatidou, S; Papapostolou, P; Papastergiou, C; Emmanouilidou, M

    2006-11-30

    During the last three years, CT and MRI brain scans of 40 patients revealed falx cerebri partial ossification as an incidental finding. The patients had been admitted for brain CT and MRI for several reasons. In most cases, there was no problem in the differential diagnosis of falx cerebri ossification during interpretation of the cases. In a few cases, the lesion should be distinguished from calcified meningioma, small hematoma in the interhemispheric fissure and in one case there was also meningeal infiltration of breast cancer. In these cases both CT and MRI scans of the brain were evaluated and a definite diagnosis was made. PMID:24351265

  2. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  3. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  4. Treatment options for traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the paravisceral abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Sonny; Rowe, Vincent L; Rao, Rajeev; Hood, Douglas B; Harrell, Donald; Weaver, Fred A

    2005-09-01

    Penetrating gunshot wounds (GSWs) to the abdominal aorta are frequently lethal. Alternative management options for treatment of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta are illustrated by three patient case histories. Patient A sustained two GSWs to the abdomen (midepigastrium, right subcostal region). He was hypotensive in the field. Emergent laparotomy was undertaken with suture ligature of a celiac injury and distal pancreatectomy/splenectomy for a pancreatic injury. Postoperative abdominal CT for an intraabdominal infection with leukocytosis revealed a 4 cm traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta that extended from the suprarenal aorta to the level of the renal arteries. Six weeks later, he underwent an open repair. Patient B sustained multiple GSWs to his right arm and right upper quadrant. He was hemodynamically stable. He underwent abdominal exploration for a grade 3 liver laceration. Postoperative abdominal CT revealed a supraceliac abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm. An aortogram demonstrated a 1.5 cm defect in the aortic wall above the celiac trunk communicating with the inferior vena cava (IVC). He underwent endovascular repair with covered aortic stent graft. Patient C sustained multiple thoracoabdominal GSWs. He was hemodynamically stable. Emergent laparotomy revealed multiple left colonic perforations, two duodenal lacerations, and an unsalvageable left kidney laceration. Postoperatively, he developed a duodenal-cutaneous fistula with multiple intraabdominal abscesses. Serial CT scans revealed an enlarging infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm. He underwent angiographic coil embolization and intraarterial injection of thrombin into the pseudoaneurysm sac. The average time from injury to surgical treatment was 46 days (range 29-67). Postoperatively, none of the patients developed paraplegia. Advances in endovascular techniques have provided options to deal with traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the abdominal aorta. In a hemodynamically stable

  5. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established. PMID:25616589

  6. Portable MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle A.

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  7. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  8. Added value of lung window in detecting drug mules on non-contrast abdominal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Motlagh, Hooman; Vakilian, Fatemeh; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Pourghorban, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the added value of lung window in non-contrast computed tomography (CT) of suspected body packers or stuffers. Forty suspected drug mules who were referred to our tertiary toxicology center were included. The final diagnosis of drug mule was based on the detection of packs in stool examination or surgery. Non-contrast CT scans were retrospectively interpreted by two blinded radiologists in consensus before and after reviewing the lung window images. The diagnostic performance of abdominal window scans alone and scans in both abdominal and lung windows were subsequently compared. Seven body packers and 21 body stuffers were identified. The sensitivity, negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy of scans in detection of drug mules (either drug packers or stuffers) raised from 60.7, 52.1, and 72.5 to 64.2, 54.5, and 75.0 %, respectively, with a more number of packs being detected (114 vs. 105 packs). In the body packers group, the diagnostic performance of both abdominal windows scans and combined abdominal and lung windows scans were 100 %. In the body stuffers group, the sensitivity, NPV, and diagnostic accuracy of scans increased from 47.6, 52.1, and 55.0 to 52.3, 54.5, and 57.5 %, respectively, after the addition of lung windows. Reviewing the lung window on non-contrast abdominal CT can be helpful in detection of drug mules. PMID:26830789

  9. Acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy: ESUR recommendations.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Derchi, Lorenzo; McHugo, Josephine; Rockall, Andrea; Vock, Peter; Weston, Michael; Spencer, John

    2013-12-01

    Acute abdominal pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the fetus from X-rays due to their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the fetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. This article reviews the evolving imaging and clinical literature on appropriate investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during established intrauterine pregnancy, addressing its common causes. Guidelines based on the current literature and on the accumulated clinico-radiological experience of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) working group are proposed for imaging these suspected conditions. PMID:23990045

  10. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. PMID:24035086

  11. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  12. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. How ... a 3-phase bone scan. To evaluate metastatic bone disease, images are taken only after the 3- to ...

  13. Thyroid scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Anaplastic thyroid cancer Cancer Goiter - simple Hyperthyroidism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) II PET scan Skin ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Nuclear Scans Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Diseases Thyroid ...

  14. Bone scan

    MedlinePlus

    A bone scan is an imaging test used to diagnose bone diseases and find out how severe they are. ... A bone scan involves injecting a very small amount of radioactive material (radiotracer) into a vein. The substance travels through ...

  15. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  16. Gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    Liver gallium scan; Bony gallium scan ... You will get a radioactive material called gallium injected into your vein. The gallium travels through the bloodstream and collects in the bones and certain organs. Your health care provider will ...

  17. Bone scanning.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, L D; Bennett, L R

    1975-03-01

    Scanning is based on the uptake of a nuclide by the crystal lattice of bone and is related to bone blood flow. Cancer cells do not take up the tracer. Normally, the scan visualizes the highly vascular bones. Scans are useful and are indicated in metastatic bone disease, primary bone tumors, hematologic malignancies and some non-neoplastic diseases. The scan is more sensitive than x-ray in the detection of malignant diseases of the skeleton. PMID:1054210

  18. Micromanaging abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to "fine tune" the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  19. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S.; Hamid, Mohd.

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  20. Duodenal Transection without Pancreatic Injury following Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket Subhash; Gosavi, Vikas S; Hamid, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    With the inventions of faster cars and even more faster motorbikes there is a worldwide increase in road traffic accidents, which has increased the incidence of blunt abdominal trauma but still duodenal injury following a blunt abdominal trauma is uncommon and can pose a formidable challenge to the surgeon and failure to manage it properly can result in devastating results. It may typically occur in isolation or with pancreatic injury. Here, we report a case of an isolated transection of the third part of the duodenum with normal pancreas following a blunt abdominal trauma. The initial clinical changes in isolated duodenal injury may be extremely subtle before life-threatening, peritonitis develops. Hence, a high index of suspicion, on the basis of mechanism of injury and physical examination is the key in early detection of duodenal injury especially in a rural hospital like ours where the facilities for computed tomography scan are not available. PMID:25598947

  1. Intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst in an adult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Wan; Sohn, Tai Il; Shim, Hyo Sup; Kim, Choong Bai

    2005-12-31

    Esophageal duplication cysts are congenital anomalies of the foregut that are rarely found in the abdomen. An accurate preoperative diagnosis is not always possible, so the definitive diagnosis can be made by histologic examination of the surgical specimen. We experienced a case of Intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst in a 52-year-old female, who initially presented with an esophageal submucosal tumor on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. She did not have any gastrointestinal symptoms. Barium esophagography, chest computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated the cystic lesion in the intra-abdominal esophagus. Transhiatal enucleation of the lesion was performed successfully via the abdominal approach with no postoperative complications. Histologic study showed that the cyst wall contained a two-layered muscle coat and the surface of the lumen was lined by pseudo-ciliated columnar epithelium. The patient has been doing well without any complaints for 3 months of follow-up period. PMID:16385665

  2. Giant adrenal hemangioma: Unusual cause of huge abdominal mass

    PubMed Central

    Tarchouli, Mohamed; Boudhas, Adil; Ratbi, Moulay Brahim; Essarghini, Mohamed; Njoumi, Noureddine; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is an extremely rare benign and non-functioning neoplasm of the adrenal gland. We report a case of a 71-year-old woman admitted for intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distension associated with vomiting and chronic constipation for 5 years. Physical examination revealed a large abdominal mass. Both computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging suggested hemangioma in the right lobe of the liver. Laboratory examinations and tumour markers were within normal limits, except for hypochromic microcytic anemia. The mass was removed intact by conventional surgery and histopathology revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland with no signs of malignancy. Surgical resection was curative, with no recurrence at the 2-year follow-up. PMID:26600897

  3. JAMA Patient Page: Abdominal Hernia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an operation. Umbilical hernia Abdominal wall Intestinal loop Peritoneum Skin Peritoneum Umbilical annulus SYMPTOMS The first symptom of a ... vomiting, or constipation. Inguinal hernia Indirect inguinal hernia Peritoneum Deep inguinal ring Inguinal canal Superficial inguinal ring ...

  4. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  5. Fat Imaging via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Young Children (Ages 1-4 Years) without Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Shearrer, Grace E.; House, Benjamin T.; Gallas, Michelle C.; Luci, Jeffrey J.; Davis, Jaimie N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This pilot study developed techniques to perform Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of specific fat deposition in 18 children (age 18 months to 4 years). Methods The children engaged in a series of practice tests to become acclimated to the scanner noises, reduce claustrophobia, and rehearse holding still for a set time. The practice tests assessed if the child could remain still for two minutes while watching a video, first while lying on a blanket, second, on the blanket with headphones, and third, in the mock scanner. The children who passed the three practice tests were then scanned with a 3T Siemens Skyra magnet. Abdominal fat distribution (region of interest (ROI) from the top of the ileac crest to the bottom of the ribcage) volume was measured using 2-point DIXON technique. This region was chosen to give an indication of the body composition around the liver. Results Twelve out of eighteen participants successfully completed the actual MRI scan. Chi-squared test showed no significant difference between male and female pass-fail rates. The median age of completed scans was 36 months, whereas the median age for children unable to complete a scan was 28 months. The average total trunk fat was 240.9±85.2mL and the average total VAT was 37.7±25.9mLand liver fat was not quantifiable due to physiological motion. Several strategies (modeling, videos, and incentives) were identified to improve pediatric imaging in different age ranges. Conclusion Using an age-specific and tailored protocol, we were able to successfully use MRI for fat imaging in a majority of young children. Development of such protocols enables researchers to better understand the etiology of fat deposition in young children, which can be used to aid in the prevention and treatment of adiposity. PMID:26901881

  6. Possible harmful effects of high intra-abdominal pressure on the pelvic girdle.

    PubMed

    Mens, Jan; Hoek van Dijke, Gilbert; Pool-Goudzwaard, Annelies; van der Hulst, Victor; Stam, Henk

    2006-01-01

    The present study explores the hypothesis that a high intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) loads the ligaments of the pelvic girdle to such an extent that frequent periods of high IAP might cause pain and/or interfere with recovery of patients with pelvic girdle pain (PGP). In a theoretical model the size of the load of IAP on the pelvic girdle was computed. The diameters of abdomen and pelvis needed for the calculations were measured on MRI scans; the IAP values during activities were gained from literature. In slim, healthy subjects the calculated load on the pelvic ring during activities of daily living was 26.0-52.0 N with peaks to 135 N. During straining, vigorous work or heavy exercises the load could increase to values ranging from 104 to 520 N. The load is higher in subjects with pain or fatigue, or in case of a distended abdomen. When the load on the pelvic ring induced by IAP is larger than 100 N, the force exceeds the force at which a pelvic belt relieves complaints in PGP; at 90 N, the force is larger than the force at which isometric hip adduction provokes pain in PGP. We conclude that the size of the load induced by IAP on the pelvic girdle seems to be sufficient to cause pain in patients with PGP and might interfere with recovery. It seems worthwhile to give patients with PGP instructions to reduce IAP as much as possible during activities. PMID:16439232

  7. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  8. Abdominal intrauterine vacuum aspiration.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, W A A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating and "cleaning" of the uterine cavity is probably the most performed operation in women. It is done for several reasons: abortion, evaluation of irregular bleeding in premenopausal period, and postmenopausal bleeding. Abortion is undoubtedly the number one procedure with more than 44 million pregnancies terminated every year. This procedure should not be underestimated and a careful preoperative evaluation is needed. Ideally a sensitive pregnancy test should be done together with an ultrasound in order to confirm a uterine pregnancy, excluding extra-uterine pregnancy, and to detect genital and/or uterine malformations. Three out of four abortions are performed by surgical methods. Surgical methods include a sharp, blunt, and suction curettage. Suction curettage or vacuum aspiration is the preferred method. Despite the fact that it is a relative safe procedure with major complications in less than one percent of cases, it is still responsible for 13% of all maternal deaths. All the figures have not declined in the last decade. Trauma, perforation, and bleeding are a danger triage. When there is a perforation, a laparoscopy should be performed immediately, in order to detect intra-abdominal lacerations and bleeding. The bleeding should be stopped as soon as possible in order to not destabilize the patient. When there is a perforation in the uterus, this "entrance" can be used to perform the curettage. This is particularly useful if there is trauma of the isthmus and uterine wall, and it is difficult to identify the uterine canal. A curettage is a frequent performed procedure, which should not be underestimated. If there is a perforation in the uterus, then this opening can safely be used for vacuum aspiration. PMID:25134300

  9. Association between abdominal aortic plaque and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Luo, Songyuan; Luo, Jianfang; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Currently, the association between abdominal aortic plaques and coronary artery disease (CAD) has not yet been clarified clearly. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques by ultrasound imaging and to explore its association with CAD in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Between October 2014 and June 2015, a prospective study was conducted in the Department of Cardiology at Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China. Ultrasound scanning of the abdominal aortas was performed in 1,667 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Clinical characteristics and coronary profile were collected from the patients. Results Of the 1,667 study patients (male, 68.9%; mean age, 63±11 years) undergoing coronary angiography, 1,268 had CAD. Compared with 399 patients without CAD, 1,268 patients with CAD had higher prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques (37.3% vs 17%, P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the presence of CAD (odds ratio =2.08; 95% confidence interval =1.50–2.90; P<0.001). Of the 1,268 patients with CAD, the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was 27.0% (98/363) in patients with one-vessel disease, 35.0% (107/306) in patients with two-vessel disease, and 44.7% (268/599) in patients with three-vessel disease. Stepwise increases in the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaque was found depending on the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001; P-value for trend <0.001). In an ordinal logistic regression model, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the severity of CAD according to the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was higher in patients with CAD than in those without CAD. Abdominal aortic plaque was an independent factor associated with the presence and severity of CAD. PMID:27279740

  10. Battlefield MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  11. Quantitative functional MRI in a clinical orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer in immunocompetent Lewis rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoli; Zheng, Linfeng; Li, Weiguo; Gordon, Andrew C; Huan, Yi; Shangguan, Junjie; Procissi, Daniel; Bentrem, David J; Larson, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate feasibility of performing quantitative MRI measurements in an immuno-competent rat model of pancreatic cancer by comparing in vivo anatomic and quantitative imaging measurements to tumor dissemination observations and histologic assays at necropsy. Meterials and methods: Rat ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma DSL-6A/C1 cell line and Lewis rats were used for these studies. 108 DSL-6A/C1 cells were injected subcutaneously into the right flank of donor rats. Donor tumors reaching 10 mm were excised, and 1 mm3 tumor fragments were implanted within recipient rat pancreas during mini-laparotomy. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI were performed using a Bruker 7.0T ClinScan. After MRI, all animals underwent autopsy. Primary tumor size was measured, and dissemination score was used to assess local invasion and distant metastasis. Primary tumor and all sites of metastases were harvested and fixed for H&E, Masson’s trichrome, and rat anti-CD34 staining. Trichrome slides were scanned and digitized for measurement of fibrotic tissue areas. Anti-CD34 slides were used for microvessel density (MVD) measurements. Results: Primary tumors, local invasion, and distant metastases were confirmed for all rats. No significant differences were found between in vivo MRI measurements (48.7 ± 5.3 mm) and ex vivo caliper measurements (43.6 ± 3.6 mm) of primary tumor sizes (p > .05). Spleen, liver, diaphragm, peritoneum, and abdominal wall metastases were observed on MRI but smaller lung, mediastinum, omen, and mesentery metastases were only observed at necropsy. Contrast uptake observed during DCE measurements was significantly greater in both primary and metastatic tumor tissues compared to skeletal muscle and normal liver tissues. Both primary and metastatic tumors were hyper-intense in T2-weighted images and hypo-intense in T1-weighted images, but no differences were found between quantitative T2 measurements in

  12. Invisible fat on CT: making it visible by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh; Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay

    2016-01-01

    Presence of fat in a lesion significantly narrows the differential diagnosis. Small quantities of macroscopic fat and intracellular fat are invisible on computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal any fatty change in a lesion and can also differentiate macroscopic fat from intracellular and intravoxel fat. Hypodensity on CT may be a sign of invisible fat and MRI can help to diagnose even minute amounts of fat in liver, pancreas, adrenal, musculoskeletal, and omental pseudolesions and lesions. This article will review the superiority of MRI over CT in demonstrating fat in abdominal lesions. PMID:26782156

  13. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Beau

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Design A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Setting Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. Participants The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. Main outcome measures A focused “quick screen,” which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (ie, a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Results Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Conclusion Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point

  14. Readjustment of abdominal computed tomography protocols in a university hospital: impact on radiation dose*

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Ricardo Francisco Tavares; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Torres, Lucas Rios; Bretas, Elisa Almeida Sathler; Bekhor, Daniel; Caldana, Rogério Pedreschi; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the reduction of estimated radiation dose in abdominal computed tomography following the implementation of new scan protocols on the basis of clinical suspicion and of adjusted images acquisition parameters. Materials and Methods Retrospective and prospective review of reports on radiation dose from abdominal CT scans performed three months before (group A – 551 studies) and three months after (group B – 788 studies) implementation of new scan protocols proposed as a function of clinical indications. Also, the images acquisition parameters were adjusted to reduce the radiation dose at each scan phase. The groups were compared for mean number of acquisition phases, mean CTDIvol per phase, mean DLP per phase, and mean DLP per scan. Results A significant reduction was observed for group B as regards all the analyzed aspects, as follows: 33.9%, 25.0%, 27.0% and 52.5%, respectively for number of acquisition phases, CTDIvol per phase, DLP per phase and DLP per scan (p < 0.001). Conclusion The rational use of abdominal computed tomography scan phases based on the clinical suspicion in conjunction with the adjusted images acquisition parameters allows for a 50% reduction in the radiation dose from abdominal computed tomography scans. PMID:26543280

  15. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  16. Tree Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.; Maxwell, Taylor; Posada, David; Stengård, Jari H.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    We use evolutionary trees of haplotypes to study phenotypic associations by exhaustively examining all possible biallelic partitions of the tree, a technique we call tree scanning. If the first scan detects significant associations, additional rounds of tree scanning are used to partition the tree into three or more allelic classes. Two worked examples are presented. The first is a reanalysis of associations between haplotypes at the Alcohol Dehydrogenase locus in Drosophila melanogaster that was previously analyzed using a nested clade analysis, a more complicated technique for using haplotype trees to detect phenotypic associations. Tree scanning and the nested clade analysis yield the same inferences when permutation testing is used with both approaches. The second example is an analysis of associations between variation in various lipid traits and genetic variation at the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in three human populations. Tree scanning successfully identified phenotypic associations expected from previous analyses. Tree scanning for the most part detected more associations and provided a better biological interpretative framework than single SNP analyses. We also show how prior information can be incorporated into the tree scan by starting with the traditional three electrophoretic alleles at APOE. Tree scanning detected genetically determined phenotypic heterogeneity within all three electrophoretic allelic classes. Overall, tree scanning is a simple, powerful, and flexible method for using haplotype trees to detect phenotype/genotype associations at candidate loci. PMID:15371364

  17. Imaging of Chest and Abdominal Trauma in Children.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Susie J; Flanagan, Sean G; McDonald, Kirsteen

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of death in children over a year old. The injuries sustained and management of these children differs to adults, due to differences in anatomy and physiology. Careful thought must also be given to exposing children to radiation, and CT scans should be performed only in select patients. This article reviews these important points and explains the imaging findings in chest and abdominal trauma. PMID:26219741

  18. Impact of incorporating visual biofeedback in 4D MRI.

    PubMed

    To, David T; Kim, Joshua P; Price, Ryan G; Chetty, Indrin J; Glide-Hurst, Carri K

    2016-01-01

    Precise radiation therapy (RT) for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and suboptimal soft tissue contrast in 4D CT. 4D MRI offers improved con-trast although long scan times and irregular breathing patterns can be limiting. To address this, visual biofeedback (VBF) was introduced into 4D MRI. Ten volunteers were consented to an IRB-approved protocol. Prospective respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted, coronal 4D MRIs were acquired on an open 1.0T MR-SIM. VBF was integrated using an MR-compatible interactive breath-hold control system. Subjects visually monitored their breathing patterns to stay within predetermined tolerances. 4D MRIs were acquired with and without VBF for 2- and 8-phase acquisitions. Normalized respiratory waveforms were evaluated for scan time, duty cycle (programmed/acquisition time), breathing period, and breathing regularity (end-inhale coefficient of variation, EI-COV). Three reviewers performed image quality assessment to compare artifacts with and without VBF. Respiration-induced liver motion was calculated via centroid difference analysis of end-exhale (EE) and EI liver contours. Incorporating VBF reduced 2-phase acquisition time (4.7 ± 1.0 and 5.4 ± 1.5 min with and without VBF, respectively) while reducing EI-COV by 43.8% ± 16.6%. For 8-phase acquisitions, VBF reduced acquisition time by 1.9 ± 1.6 min and EI-COVs by 38.8% ± 25.7% despite breathing rate remaining similar (11.1 ± 3.8 breaths/min with vs. 10.5 ± 2.9 without). Using VBF yielded higher duty cycles than unguided free breathing (34.4% ± 5.8% vs. 28.1% ± 6.6%, respectively). Image grading showed that out of 40 paired evaluations, 20 cases had equivalent and 17 had improved image quality scores with VBF, particularly for mid-exhale and EI. Increased liver excursion was observed with VBF, where superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right EE-EI displacements were 14.1± 5.8, 4.9 ± 2.1, and 1.5 ± 1.0 mm, respectively, with VBF compared to 11.9

  19. Conservative management of an abdominal gunshot injury with a peritoneal breach: wisdom or absurdity?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Salma; Pardhan, Amyn; Bawa, Tufail; Haroon, Naveed

    2013-01-01

    Surgical exploration has been the standard of care for abdominal gunshot injuries. The authors report a case of a 28-year-old man who sustained a transabdominal gunshot injury, which entered the anterior abdominal wall and exited adjacent to the T12 vertebra posteriorly with a tangential trajectory. On presentation, the patient was haemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Based on trajectory of the bullet, intra-abdominal injury was suspected. Therefore a CT scan abdomen with intravenous and rectal contrast was performed. The CT scan revealed no extravasation of the rectal contrast but showed free air specks behind the descending colon. Delayed renal images of the left ureter were also normal. Based on the clinical findings, the patient was managed non-operatively with nothing per oral, intravenous antibiotics and frequent abdominal assessments. He made an uneventful recovery without necessitating laparotomy. PMID:24272989

  20. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor wants to perform a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam, there is a possibility that your ...

  1. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  2. MODEL-BASED IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION FOR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sophisticated and versatile medical imaging modality. Traditionally, MR images are reconstructed from the raw measurements by a simple inverse 2D or 3D fast Fourier transform (FFT). However, there are a growing number of MRI applications where a simple inverse FFT is inadequate, e.g., due to non-Cartesian sampling patterns, non-Fourier physical effects, nonlinear magnetic fields, or deliberate under-sampling to reduce scan times. Such considerations have led to increasing interest in methods for model-based image reconstruction in MRI. PMID:21135916

  3. Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Näyhä, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood. Methods We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression. Results A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females. Conclusion Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males. PMID:23418543

  4. A mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a patient with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Gunst, Jesper Damsgaard; Jensen-Fangel, Søren

    2014-01-01

    A 65-year-old man with HIV infection presented with acute severe abdominal pain radiating to the back. A CT scan revealed an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and an aortobifemoral bypass was undertaken. Subsequently, tissue specimens from the aortic wall grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient received 8 weeks of intravenous antibiotic treatment followed by oral sulfotrim as secondary prophylaxis and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:24443338

  5. PET/MRI: A luxury or a necessity?

    PubMed

    Carreras-Delgado, J L; Pérez-Dueñas, V; Riola-Parada, C; García-Cañamaque, L

    2016-01-01

    PET/MRI is a new multimodality technique with a promising future in diagnostic imaging. Technical limitations are being overcome. Interference between the two systems (PET and MRI) seems to have been resolved. MRI-based PET attenuation correction can be performed safely. Scan time is acceptable and the study is tolerable, with claustrophobia prevalence similar to that of MRI. Quantification with common parameters, such as Standardized Uptake Value (SUV), shows a fairly good correlation between both systems. However, PET/CT currently provides better results in scan time, scan costs, and patient comfort. Less patient radiation exposure is a big advantage of PET/MRI over PET/CT, which makes it particularly recommended in paediatric and adolescent patients requiring one or more studies. PET/MRI indications are the same as those of PET/CT, given that in cases where MRI is superior to CT, PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT. This superiority is clear in many soft tissue tumours. Moreover, it is common to perform both PET/CT and MRI in neurological diseases, as well as in some tumours, such as breast cancer. A single PET/MRI study replaces both with obvious benefit. MRI also allows other MRI-based PET corrections, such as motion or partial volume effect corrections. The better spatial resolution of MRI allows the transfer of well-defined MRI areas or small volumes of interest to PET image, in order to measure PET biomarkers in these areas. The richness of information of both techniques opens up immense possibilities of synergistic correlation between them. PMID:27349326

  6. Abdominal bloating: pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Seo, A Young; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  7. Abdominal pain with a twist

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Malrotation in children is due to either an incomplete or non-rotation of the foetal mid-gut during perinatal development. Presentation is usually in the first few weeks of life, often with life-threatening volvulus and ischaemia. However, it can be a rare cause of abdominal pain in older children and young adults. We present such a case, as a reminder to emergency physicians that malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or chronic abdominal pain not only in children but also in adolescents. PMID:21635723

  8. Ultrasonographic diagnosis in abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, M; Moosa, I; Hussein, F M; Qurttom, M A; Behbehani, A I

    1999-05-01

    Sonographic findings were retrospectively analysed in 39 patients with proven abdominal tuberculosis (TB). The patients were treated over 15 years at a major teaching hospital, Mubarak Al-Kabber Hospital, in Kuwait. The findings included clear or complex ascites with fine strands, loculations and debris. The other findings were lymphadenopathy, bowel wall thickening, omental mass, focal lesions in the liver and spleen and psoas abscess. The sonographic findings in abdominal TB are not specific but may give valuable information to prevent unnecessary laparotomy. PMID:10901897

  9. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  10. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy. PMID:17630175

  11. Sudden death in advanced abdominal pregnancy: a case report and discussion of the related medicolegal issues.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, M; Sreenivas, M; Singh, Bajrang; Behera, C; Dikshit, P C

    2013-04-01

    We report sudden unexpected death in a 35-year-old woman with pregnancy of seven months duration. There was an allegation by the parents of the woman that she was subjected to an assault prior to death. Autopsy examination showed an abdominal pregnancy with a dead fetus, ruptured gestational sac, massive haemorrhage and secondary placental attachment. During her antenatal check-ups, she had persistently complained of abdominal pain and loose stools, but the diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy was missed clinically and on ultrasound scan. In this paper we discuss the diagnostic difficulties and medicolegal issues in such cases. PMID:23362236

  12. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  13. Resting state BOLD fMRI for pre-surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Mudassar; Hacker, Carl D; Allen, Monica G; Mitchell, Timothy J; Leuthardt, Eric C; Snyder, Abraham Z; Shimony, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) measures spontaneous fluctuations in the BOLD signal and can be used to elucidate the brain’s functional organization. It can be used to simultaneously assess multiple distributed resting state networks. Unlike task fMRI, rsfMRI does not require task performance and thus can be performed in any subject that can obtain an MRI scan. In this article we present a brief introduction of rsfMRI processing methods followed by a detailed discussion on the use of rsfMRI in pre-surgical planning. Example cases are provided to highlight the strengths and limitations of the technique. PMID:25441506

  14. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions inside your body. They use a special camera that detects radioactivity. Before the test, you receive ... you lie still on a table while the camera makes images. Most scans take 20 to 45 ...

  15. Testicular Ectopia in the Anterior Abdominal Wall of a Neonate: A Rare Site of Ectopic Testis

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Salman Atiq; Marei, Tamer Ibrahim; Al-Makhaita, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 3-day Final Diagnosis: Ectopic right testis in anterior abdominal wall Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Testicular ultrasound and MRI abdomen Specialty: Radiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Abnormal testicular descent can either be undescended or, less commonly, ectopic. Most undescended testes complete the course of descent by the first year of life only if these remain in the normal path of descent. The deviation of the testis may occur to an ectopic location during the transinguinal phase. Of the known ectopic sites, the anterior abdominal wall is the rarest site of testicular ectopia and to our knowledge only 3 cases of this nature have been reported in the available literature to date. Case Report: This rare case of testicular ectopia occurred in a 3-day-old boy in whom the right scrotal sac was empty; on abdominal ultrasound, the right testis was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the right antero-lateral abdominal wall. These findings were confirmed on abdominal MRI, where the right testis was seen beneath the skin between the subcutaneous tissues and external oblique aponeurosis. No aponeurotic or muscular defect was appreciable under the abdominal wall. The neonate underwent orchiopexy at the age of 6 months and remained uneventful postoperatively. Conclusions: Preoperative imaging is recommended to detect and confirm the ectopic site as well as the morphology of testis, thereby increasing the chance of surveillance and preservation of an ectopic testis. Imaging can serve as preoperative road mapping to localize the exact site for surgical exploration of an ectopic testis if there is no apparent or palpable swelling over the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:27411886

  16. Practical MRI atlas of neonatal brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Barkovich, A.J.; Truwit, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    This book is an anatomical reference for cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in neonates and infants. It contains 122 clear, sharp MRI scans and drawings showing changes in the normal appearance of the brain and skull during development. Sections of the atlas depict the major processes of maturation: brain myelination, development of the corpus callosum, development of the cranial bone marrow, and iron deposition in the brain. High-quality scans illustrate how these changes appear on magnetic resonance images during various stages of development.

  17. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  19. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  20. Testicular Ectopia in the Anterior Abdominal Wall of a Neonate: A Rare Site of Ectopic Testis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Salman Atiq; Marei, Tamer Ibrahim; Al-Makhaita, Ghada

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Abnormal testicular descent can either be undescended or, less commonly, ectopic. Most undescended testes complete the course of descent by the first year of life only if these remain in the normal path of descent. The deviation of the testis may occur to an ectopic location during the transinguinal phase. Of the known ectopic sites, the anterior abdominal wall is the rarest site of testicular ectopia and to our knowledge only 3 cases of this nature have been reported in the available literature to date.  CASE REPORT This rare case of testicular ectopia occurred in a 3-day-old boy in whom the right scrotal sac was empty; on abdominal ultrasound, the right testis was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the right antero-lateral abdominal wall. These findings were confirmed on abdominal MRI, where the right testis was seen beneath the skin between the subcutaneous tissues and external oblique aponeurosis. No aponeurotic or muscular defect was appreciable under the abdominal wall. The neonate underwent orchiopexy at the age of 6 months and remained uneventful postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS Preoperative imaging is recommended to detect and confirm the ectopic site as well as the morphology of testis, thereby increasing the chance of surveillance and preservation of an ectopic testis. Imaging can serve as preoperative road mapping to localize the exact site for surgical exploration of an ectopic testis if there is no apparent or palpable swelling over the anterior abdominal wall. PMID:27411886

  1. Hollow organ abdominal ischemia, part II: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Mazzariol, Fernanda S; Kaul, Bindu; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Stein, Marjorie W; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2016-01-01

    Acute hollow organ ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and almost always requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, ischemia is commonly due to low flow states but can also be due to arterial and venous occlusion. Radiologic diagnosis is critical as many present with nonspecific symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred in suspected appendicitis in pregnant patients and is superior in biliary necrosis. This article provides a pictorial review of the CT/MRI features of hollow abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, pathogenesis, and management. PMID:27317221

  2. Diagnostic Imaging of Fetal and Neonatal Abdominal and Soft Tissue Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Usha D; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and staging of prenatal and neonatal tumors, and is essential in treatment planning. Though obstetrical ultrasound is the first choice prenatally, fetal MRI continues to play an increasing role as experience with this imaging modality increases. In the neonate, in addition to ultrasound and MRI, CT and nuclear medicine studies can also play an important role. We describe the prenatal and neonatal imaging findings of some of the most common congenital abdominal and soft tissue neoplasms including neuroblastoma, renal, liver and soft tissue tumors. PMID:26168940

  3. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  4. Familial aggregation of abdominal visceral fat level: results from the Quebec family study.

    PubMed

    Pérusse, L; Després, J P; Lemieux, S; Rice, T; Rao, D C; Bouchard, C

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the importance of familial aggregation in abdominal visceral fat (AVF) level as assessed by computed tomography (CT). Four measures of abdominal adipose tissue, obtained from an abdominal scan between the fourth and fifth Lumbar vertebrae (L4-L5) taken in 366 adult subjects from 100 French-Canadian nuclear families, were considered in this study. Total abdominal fat, AVF, subcutaneous abdominal fat, obtained by computing the difference between total and AVF tissue areas, and the visceral to total abdominal fat ratio were measured. Spouses, parent-offspring, and sibling correlations were computed by maximum likelihood methods after adjustment of the four phenotypes for age and for age and total fat mass (FM) derived from underwater weighing. Significant familial aggregation was found for all phenotypes, whether adjusted or not for body FM. However, after adjustment of data for body FM, in addition to age, all spouse correlations became nonsignificant, suggesting that the familial aggregation of abdominal fat is primarily genetic. Heritability estimates reached 42% and 56% for subcutaneous fat and AVF, respectively. These results suggest that genetic factors are major determinants of the familial aggregation observed in the amount of abdominal fat, irrespective of total body fat content, and that AVF seems more influenced by genetic factors than abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. These findings imply that some individuals are more at risk than others to exhibit the various metabolic complications associated with upper-body obesity because of their inherited tendency to store abdominal fat in the visceral depot rather than in the subcutaneous depot. PMID:8606647

  5. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  6. [Abdominal bruit associated with hypertension].

    PubMed

    Fontseré, N; Bonet, J; Bonal, J; Romero, R

    2004-01-01

    First cause of secondary hypertension is renovascular hypertension which presents abdominal bruit in 16 to 20% of cases. This clinical sign is also associated with other vascular disease of the abdomen such as celiac trunk stenosis and/or aneurysms located on the pancreaticoduodenal or gastroduodenal arcs level, with little representation among aneurysm. They usually appear on a context of digestive complications like neoplasias, chronic pancreatitis or gastric obstructions possibly with obstructive icterus, hemorrhage and acute abdomen episodes. Its presentation in other contexts is rare and constitutes a diagnostic challenge. Diagnosis is made by abdominal arteriography which is the best method because you can locate the problem as well as intervene therapeutically with embolization of the aneurysme. We would like to emphasize the importance of a quick diagnosis due to the risk of rupture and the high morbi-mortality associated. PMID:15219082

  7. 2. Newer aids in the diagnosis of blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, B.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of a case of blunt abdominal trauma can be complicated by many factors, and the resultant inaccurate or delayed diagnoses have contributed to the unacceptable mortality for this type of injury. Recently several useful diagnostic techniques have been developed that, if applied intelligently, may be instrumental in decreasing the high mortality among patients who present with ambiguous abdominal signs after sustaining blunt trauma. Although hematologic investigation and routine radiography have facilitated detection of intraperitoneal injury, peritoneal lavage has become the single most helpful aid. Scanning procedures are sometimes useful in recognizing splenic and hepatic defects especially; these may be confirmed or clarified by angiography. Although ultrasonography may be no more valuable than scintigraphy in outlining splenic and hepatic abnormalities, it is an important technique, especially in the diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses of traumatic origin. Laparoscopy also may be helpful in investigation if surgeons become more familiar with the procedure. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:608158

  8. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  9. Management of voluminous abdominal incisional hernia.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, J-L; Poghosyan, T; Pogoshian, T; Corigliano, N; Canard, G; Veyrie, N

    2012-10-01

    Incisional hernia is one of the classic complications after abdominal surgery. The chronic, gradual increase in size of some of these hernias is such that the hernia ring widens to a point where there is a loss of substance in the abdominal wall, herniated organs can become incarcerated or strangulated while poor abdominal motility can alter respiratory function. The surgical treatment of small (<5 cm) incisional hernias is safe and straightforward, by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. For large hernias, surgical repair is often difficult. After reintegration of herniated viscera into the abdominal cavity, the abdominal wall defect must be closed anatomically in order to restore the function to the abdominal wall. Prosthetic reinforcement of the abdominal wall is mandatory for long-term successful repair. There are multiple techniques for prosthetic hernia repair, but placement of Dacron mesh in the retromuscular plane is our preference. PMID:23137643

  10. [A case of abdominal wall actinomycosis].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Jin Soo; Cho, Hyeong Jun; Choi, Seung Bong; Cheung, Dae Young; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, In Kyu

    2015-04-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic suppurative granulomatous infectious disease caused by actinomyces species that is characterized by formation of characteristic clumps called as sulfur granules. Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare disease and is often difficult to diagnose before operation. Abdominal actinomycosis infiltrating into the abdominal wall and adhering to the colon is even rarer. Most abdominal actinomycosis develops after operation, trauma or inflammatory bowel disease, and is also considered as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patient with underlying malignancy, diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus infection, etc. Actinomycosis is diagnosed based on histologic demonstration of sulfur granules in surgically resected specimen or pus, and treatment consists of long-term penicillin based antibiotics therapy with or without surgical resection. Herein, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall actinomycosis which developed in a patient after acupuncture and presented as abdominal wall mass that was first mistaken for abdominal wall invasion of diverticulum perforation. PMID:25896158

  11. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  12. Primary aortoenteric fistula to the sigmoid colon in association with intra-abdominal abscess.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonho; Jung, Chul Min; Cho, Eun-Hee; Ryu, Dong Ryeol; Choi, Daehee; Kim, Jaihwan

    2014-04-01

    Primary aortoenteric fistula (PAEF) is a rare but catastrophic cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis of PAEF is difficult to make and is frequently delayed without strong clinical suspicion. Timely surgical intervention is essential for patient's survival. We report on a case of an 86-year-old woman with no history of abdominal surgery, who presented with abdominal pain. Initially, computed tomography scan showed an intra-abdominal abscess, located anterior to the aortic bifurcation. However, she was discharged without treatment because of spontaneous improvement on a follow-up computed tomography scan, which showed a newly developed right common iliac artery aneurysm. One week later, she was readmitted due to recurrent abdominal pain. On the second day of admission, sudden onset of gastrointestinal bleeding occurred for the first time. After several endoscopic examinations, an aortoenteric fistula bleeding site was found in the sigmoid colon, and aortography showed progression of a right common iliac artery aneurysm. We finally concluded that intra-abdominal abscess induced an infected aortic aneurysm and enteric fistula to the sigmoid colon. This case demonstrated an extremely rare type of PAEF to the sigmoid colon caused by an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm, which has rarely been reported. PMID:24755749

  13. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  14. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Endovascular Repair of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkatesh K.; Karmarkar, Parag V.; Guttman, Michael A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Peters, Dana C.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Pessanha, Breno S. S.; Thompson, Richard B.; Raval, Amish N.; DeSilva, Ranil; Aviles, Ronnier J.; Atalar, Ergin; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study tested the hypotheses that endografts can be visualized and navigated in vivo solely under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance to repair experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in swine, and that MRI can provide immediate assessment of endograft apposition and aneurysm exclusion. BACKGROUND Endovascular repair for AAA is limited by endoleak caused by inflow or outflow malapposition. The ability of rtMRI to image soft tissue and flow may improve on X-ray guidance of this procedure. METHODS Infrarenal AAA was created in swine by balloon overstretch. We used one passive commercial endograft, imaged based on metal-induced MRI artifacts, and several types of homemade active endografts, incorporating MRI receiver coils (antennae). Custom interactive rtMRI features included color coding the catheter-antenna signals individually, simultaneous multislice imaging, and real-time three-dimensional rendering. RESULTS Eleven repairs were performed solely using rtMRI, simultaneously depicting the device and soft-tissue pathology during endograft deployment. Active devices proved most useful. Intraprocedural MRI provided anatomic confirmation of stent strut apposition and functional corroboration of aneurysm exclusion and restoration of laminar flow in successful cases. In two cases, there was clear evidence of contrast accumulation in the aneurysm sac, denoting endoleak. CONCLUSIONS Endovascular AAA repair is feasible under rtMRI guidance. Active endografts facilitate device visualization and complement the soft tissue contrast afforded by MRI for precise positioning and deployment. Magnetic resonance imaging also permits immediate post-procedural anatomic and functional evaluation of successful aneurysm exclusion. PMID:15963411

  15. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  16. Blunt Abdominal Wall Disruption by Seatbelt Injury; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Maarten Philip; van Buijtenen, Jesse; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Bloemers, Frank; Geeraedts Jr., Leo

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of the use of seatbelts in cars, mortality following motor vehicle crashes has decreased significantly. However, two patterns of injuries, the ‘seatbelt sign’ and ‘seatbelt syndrome’ have emerged. Injuries may consist of traumatic abdominal wall disruption. We present two cases of severe abdominal wall disruption caused by a seatbelt injury and treated with primary repair. A review of the literature is provided. Two patients were brought in after a high velocity Motor Vehicle Collision. Both presented with an acute abdomen and a seatbelt sign upon which the decision was made to perform emergency laparotomies. Both patients had an abdominal wall disruption along the seatbelt sign. These disruptions were primarily closed and during six months of follow-up no complications occurred. A disruption of the abdominal wall is a rare complication. However, it is a diagnosis that may not be missed as patients have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. CT-scanning is an accurate method to detect disruptions. Closure of blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption can be done primarily with sutures or addition of a mesh. In both cases of the severe abdominal wall disruption, primary repair without mesh in the acute phase was successful. When a laparotomy is not indicated, the abdominal wall must be assessed for disruption. If there is a disruption primary repair is a good option. PMID:27331068

  17. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  18. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    PubMed Central

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy. PMID:27299142

  19. Abdominal organ motion measured using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Brandner, Edward D.; Wu, Andrew . E-mail: andrew.wu@jefferson.edu; Chen, Hungcheng; Heron, Dwight; Kalnicki, Shalom; Komanduri, Krishna; Gerszten, Kristina; Burton, Steve; Ahmed, Irfan; Shou, Zhenyu

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To measure respiration-induced abdominal organ motion using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning and to examine the organ paths. Methods and Materials: During 4D CT scanning, consecutive CT images are acquired of the patient at each couch position. Simultaneously, the patient's respiratory pattern is recorded using an external marker block taped to the patient's abdomen. This pattern is used to retrospectively organize the CT images into multiple three-dimensional images, each representing one breathing phase. These images are analyzed to measure organ motion between each phase. The displacement from end expiration is compared to a displacement limit that represents acceptable dosimetric results (5 mm). Results: The organs measured in 13 patients were the liver, spleen, and left and right kidneys. Their average superior to inferior absolute displacements were 1.3 cm for the liver, 1.3 cm for the spleen, 1.1 cm for the left kidney, and 1.3 cm for the right kidney. Although the organ paths varied among patients, 5 mm of superior to inferior displacement from end expiration resulted in less than 5 mm of displacement in the other directions for 41 of 43 organs measured. Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT scanning can accurately measure abdominal organ motion throughout respiration. This information may result in greater organ sparing and planning target volume coverage.

  20. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W; Greer, Peter B

    2015-04-21

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation.A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor's 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs.The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT. PMID:25803177

  1. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-04-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

  2. A rare pediatric case of grossly dilated ureter presenting as abdominal mass.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Govindarajan, Krishna Kumar; Chakkalakkoombil, Sunitha Vellathussery; Halanaik, Dhanapathi

    2016-01-01

    Renal masses account for 55% of cases presenting as palpable abdominal mass in children.[1] An eight year male presented with palpable abdominal mass and pain. The patient underwent renal dynamic scan, which raised possibility of left duplex kidney with non-functioning moiety, as the size of left kidney was smaller than seen on Ultrasonography (USG). Magnetic resonance (MR)urography confirmed the findings with patient undergoing left hemi-nephrectomy and is doing well. In case of discrepancy in size of kidney on USG and renal scan, duplex kidney should be considered as differential, other causes being, renal cyst, benign/malignant mass and renal calculi. Gross hydro-ureter presenting as palpable abdominal mass is very rare with few reported cases.[234]. PMID:26917905

  3. What Is Chest MRI?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive ... creates detailed pictures of the structures in your chest, such as your chest wall, heart, and blood ...

  4. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  5. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Tepas, J J

    1993-06-01

    The growing popularity of nonoperative treatment of children with splenic injuries has seduced some physicians into a false sense of security regarding care of the injured child. Although it has been established that hemodynamically stable children with splenic, hepatic, and even renal injuries can safely be treated "expectantly," this concept cannot be applied indiscriminately. Accurate diagnosis and effective care of the child with blunt abdominal trauma is an exercise of clinical precision that demands attention to detail and thorough evaluation. This review addresses this process in light of recent advances in diagnostic imaging and in consideration of recent reports analyzing different protocols for therapeutic decision making. PMID:8374651

  6. BIOMECHANICS OF ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURYSM

    PubMed Central

    Vorp, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a condition whereby the terminal aorta permanently dilates to dangerous proportions, risking rupture. The biomechanics of AAA has been studied with great interest since aneurysm rupture is a mechanical failure of the degenerated aortic wall and is a significant cause of death in developed countries. In this review article, the importance of considering the biomechanics of AAA is discussed, and then the history and the state-of-the-art of this field is reviewed - including investigations into the biomechanical behavior of AAA tissues, modeling AAA wall stress and factors which influence it, and the potential clinical utility of these estimates in predicting AAA rupture. PMID:17254589

  7. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  8. Optical textile tests MRI patients from afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Paula

    2008-11-01

    Researchers in Europe have developed a wearable textile fitted with optical sensors that could be used to remotely monitor a patient's breathing patterns while they undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. The new textile will allow medical staff to keep an eye on children and other vulnerable patients who often have to be calmed with sedatives or anaesthetic drugs to keep them still during a scan. The technique will be particularly useful if proposed European Union (EU) legislation that is designed to protect medical staff from being exposed to the high magnetic fields of MRI systems comes into force in 2012. The new rules would prevent nurses from being in the room where the scan is taking place.

  9. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  10. Imaging patterns with 99mTc-PIPIDA in evaluating abdominal pain

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.F.; Gordon, L.; Selby, J.B. Sr.

    1983-11-01

    A random retrospective review of hepatobiliary scans on 86 adult patients with abdominal pain revealed four distinct imaging patterns: normal, cystic duct obstruction, obstructive, and sick liver pattern. A normal pattern was found to exclude acute cholecystitis and was the pattern most frequently observed.

  11. Abdominal wall reconstruction with implantable meshes.

    PubMed

    Masden, Derek; Felder, John M; Iorio, Matthew L; Bhanot, Parag; Attinger, Christopher E

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects present a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Over the years, numerous implantable materials have becomes available to aid the surgeon in recreating the abdominal wall. This spectrum of implants includes permanent synthetic meshes, absorbable meshes, composite meshes and biomaterials. This review includes the pros and cons for the commercially available abdominal wall implants as well as a review of the literature regarding outcomes for each material. This review will provide the surgeon with current evidence-based information on implantable abdominal materials to be able to make a more informed decision about which implant to use. PMID:21663579

  12. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of abdominal compression on the interfraction variation in tumor position in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a larger series of patients with large tumor motion amplitude.Methods: Thirty patients with lung tumor motion exceeding 8 mm who underwent SBRT were included in this study. After translational and rotational initial setup error was corrected based on bone anatomy, CBCT images were acquired for each fraction. The residual interfraction variation was defined as the difference between the centroid position of the visualized target in three dimensions derived from CBCT scans and those derived from averaged intensity projection images. The authors compared the magnitude of the interfraction variation in tumor position between patients treated with [n= 16 (76 fractions)] and without [n= 14 (76 fractions)] abdominal compression.Results: The mean ± standard deviation (SD) of the motion amplitude in the longitudinal direction before abdominal compression was 19.9 ± 7.3 (range, 10–40) mm and was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced to 12.4 ± 5.8 (range, 5–30) mm with compression. The greatest variance of the interfraction variation with abdominal compression was observed in the longitudinal direction, with a mean ± SD of 0.79 ± 3.05 mm, compared to −0.60 ± 2.10 mm without abdominal compression. The absolute values of the 95th percentile of the interfraction variation for one side in each direction were 3.97/6.21 mm (posterior/anterior), 4.16/3.76 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.90/2.32 mm (right/left) without abdominal compression, and 2.14/5.03 mm (posterior/anterior), 3.93/9.23 mm (caudal/cranial), and 2.37/5.45 mm (right/left) with abdominal compression. An absolute interfraction variation greater than 5 mm was observed in six (9.2%) fractions without and 13 (17.1%) fractions with abdominal compression.Conclusions: Abdominal compression was effective for reducing the amplitude

  13. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:27075018

  14. Multiple giant intra abdominal lipomas: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Ashok Y.; Nangare, Nitin R.; Gupta, Vaibhav; Vekariya, Mayank A.; Patankar, Ritvij; Mahna, Abhishek; Wader, J.V.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Solitary or multiple lipomas, composed of mature fat, represents by far the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm occurring throughout the whole body, but they rarely originate in the intestinal mesentery. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old male presented with left sided abdominal distension and pain since 4 months, ultrasonography and computerized tomography abdomen was suggestive of multiple well-defined fat density lesions in the lower abdomen and pelvis. USG guided fine needle aspiration cytology was conclusive of a spindle cell lesion. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and multiple major fat tissue swellings were excised. Histopathology confirmed it to be spindle cell type of lipoma. DISCUSSION Because of the silent nature the exact prevalence of lipomas is unknown. It can arise in any location in which fat is normally present, reported intra abdominal lipomas have been very rare. Clinical manifestations depend on the size and location of the growth. In most patients, symptoms are few or absent. USG and CT scan abdomen are used for the diagnosis. Complete surgical excision being the only treatment. CONCLUSION Intra abdominal lipoma is a very rare entity, and many cases might be ignored due to their silent nature. They might or might not present with any symptoms. Complete surgical excision being the only treatment, with a very good prognosis. PMID:24862028

  15. Heart CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - heart; Computed axial tomography scan - heart; Computed tomography scan - heart; Calcium scoring; Multi-detector CT scan - heart; Electron beam computed tomography - heart; Agaston score; Coronary calcium scan

  16. Directly detected 55Mn MRI: Application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized 13C MRI development

    PubMed Central

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D.; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 (55Mn) MRI using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized 13C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the 55Mn and 13C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective “13C” MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, 55Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical 13C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large 13C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d= 8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7M) was scanned rapidly by 55Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for 13C, using a balanced SSFP acquisition. The requisite penetration of RF magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for 55Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image SNR of ~60 at 0.5cm3 spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP 13C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  17. An MRI-based attenuation correction method for combined PET/MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hesheng

    2009-02-01

    We are developing MRI-based attenuation correction methods for PET images. PET has high sensitivity but relatively low resolution and little anatomic details. MRI can provide excellent anatomical structures with high resolution and high soft tissue contrast. MRI can be used to delineate tumor boundaries and to provide an anatomic reference for PET, thereby improving quantitation of PET data. Combined PET/MRI can offer metabolic, functional and anatomic information and thus can provide a powerful tool to study the mechanism of a variety of diseases. Accurate attenuation correction represents an essential component for the reconstruction of artifact-free, quantitative PET images. Unfortunately, the present design of hybrid PET/MRI does not offer measured attenuation correction using a transmission scan. This problem may be solved by deriving attenuation maps from corresponding anatomic MR images. Our approach combines image registration, classification, and attenuation correction in a single scheme. MR images and the preliminary reconstruction of PET data are first registered using our automatic registration method. MRI images are then classified into different tissue types using our multiscale fuzzy C-mean classification method. The voxels of classified tissue types are assigned theoretical tissue-dependent attenuation coefficients to generate attenuation correction factors. Corrected PET emission data are then reconstructed using a threedimensional filtered back projection method and an order subset expectation maximization method. Results from simulated images and phantom data demonstrated that our attenuation correction method can improve PET data quantitation and it can be particularly useful for combined PET/MRI applications.

  18. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  19. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  20. Hypoxia inhibits abdominal expiratory nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Fregosi, R F; Knuth, S L; Ward, D K; Bartlett, D

    1987-07-01

    Our purpose was to examine the influence of steady-state changes in chemical stimuli, as well as discrete peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation, on abdominal expiratory motor activity. In decerebrate, paralyzed, vagotomized, and ventilated cats that had bilateral pneumothoraces, we recorded efferent activity from a phrenic nerve and from an abdominal nerve (cranial iliohypogastric nerve, L1). All cats showed phasic expiratory abdominal nerve discharge at normocapnia [end-tidal PCO2 38 +/- 2 Torr], but small doses (2-6 mg/kg) of pentobarbital sodium markedly depressed this activity. Hyperoxic hypercapnia consistently enhanced abdominal expiratory activity and shortened the burst duration. Isocapnic hypoxia caused inhibition of abdominal nerve discharge in 11 of 13 cats. Carotid sinus nerve denervation (3 cats) exacerbated the hypoxic depression of abdominal nerve activity and depressed phrenic motor output. Stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with NaCN increased abdominal nerve discharge in 7 of 10 cats, although 2 cats exhibited marked inhibition. Four cats with intact neuraxis, but anesthetized with ketamine, yielded qualitatively similar results. We conclude that when cats are subjected to steady-state chemical stimuli in isolation (no interference from proprioceptive inputs), hypercapnia potentiates, but hypoxia attenuates, abdominal expiratory nerve activity. Mechanisms to explain the selective inhibition of expiratory motor activity by hypoxia are proposed, and physiological implications are discussed. PMID:3624126

  1. Traumatic rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum due to blunt abdominal trauma in a soccer game: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, W.S.; van der Vorst, J.R.; Swank, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction a Meckel’s diverticulum is one of the most common congenital anomalies of the digestive tract. The reported lifetime complication rate is 4%, mostly due to hemorrhage, obstruction, perforation or inflammation. A symptomatic Meckel’s diverticulum due to rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is very rare. We believe this case report is the first reporting a rupture of a Meckel’s diverticulum after a low velocity blunt abdominal trauma and outlining the importance of a thorough and complete examination of the patient after blunt abdominal trauma. Presentation of case a 17-year-old male presented with abdominal pain after blunt abdominal trauma during a soccer game. Physical examination showed signs of peritonitis in all quadrants of the abdomen. During admission the patient deteriorated with decreasing blood pressure and raising pulse rate. A CT-scan showed free abdominal fluid. Our patient was scheduled for an emergent laparotomy where a perforated Meckel’s diverticulum with fecal spill was found. A segmental ileal resection was performed. Post-operative, patient developed a pneumonia and also intra-abdominal abscesses treated with percutaneous drainage. After an admission period of 17-days the patient was discharged. Conclusion perforation of a Meckel’s diverticulum is rarely suspected as a cause of acute deterioration following blunt abdominal trauma. This case shows the importance of awareness of this kind of injury especially in male patients. PMID:26701844

  2. Autotransfusion utilization in abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Smith, L A; Barker, D E; Burns, R P

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to investigate the utility of autotransfusion in trauma patients in the past 3 years. A retrospective review was conducted of the charts for whom the Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device (Haemonetics Corp., Natick, MA) was utilized between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1995. The estimated blood loss and quantity of blood transfused were noted for abdominal trauma patients. Costs of autotransfusion were then compared to estimated blood bank costs for this group. The Haemonetics Cell Saver autotransfusion device was requested for 592 cases from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 1995. Nonorthopedic trauma cases comprised 25 per cent of all autotransfusion cases. One hundred twenty-six patients had isolated abdominal trauma and had a mean estimated blood loss of 4864 +/- 6070 cc. The average volume of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood transfused (autotransfusion) per patient was 1547 +/- 2359 cc, or a bank blood equivalent of 6.9 units of packed red blood cells. The total cost of autotransfusion in these patients was $63,252.00. Had bank blood been used instead of salvaged autologous blood, the cost would have been $114,523.00; thus, autotransfusion resulted in a savings of $51,271.00. The use of salvaged autologous blood comprised 45 per cent of total blood transfused. On a case-by-case basis, 75 per cent of cases were cost-effective compared to blood bank costs for an equivalent transfusion. Transfusion of intraoperatively salvaged autologous blood (autotransfusion) is a cost-effective, efficient way to provide blood products to operative trauma patients. PMID:8985070

  3. The Accuracy of Urinalysis in Predicting Intra-Abdominal Injury Following Blunt Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Safari, Saeed; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Shirvani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of blunt abdominal traumas, predicting the possible intra-abdominal injuries is still a challenge for the physicians involved with these patients. Therefore, this study was designed, to evaluate the accuracy of urinalysis in predicting intra-abdominal injuries. Methods: Patients aged 15 to 65 years with blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted to emergency departments were enrolled. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous contrast and urinalysis were requested for all the included patients. Demographic data, trauma mechanism, the results of urinalysis, and the results of abdominopelvic CT scan were gathered. Finally, the correlation between the results of abdominopelvic CT scan, and urinalysis was determined. Urinalysis was considered positive in case of at least one positive value in gross appearance, blood in dipstick, or red blood cell count. Results: 325 patients with blunt abdominal trauma were admitted to the emergency departments (83% male with the mean age of 32.63±17.48 years). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of urinalysis, were 77.9% (95% CI: 69.6-84.4), 58.5% (95% CI: 51.2-65.5), 56% (95% CI: 48.5-63.3), 79.6% (95% CI: 71.8-85.7), 1.27% (95% CI: 1.30-1.57), and 0.25% (95% CI: 0.18-0.36), respectively. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of urinalysis in prediction of blunt traumatic intra-abdominal injuries is low and it seems that it should be considered as an adjuvant diagnostic tool, in conjunction with other sources such as clinical findings and imaging. PMID:26862543

  4. Children, CT Scan and Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bajoghli, Morteza; Bajoghli, Farshad; Tayari, Nazila; Rouzbahani, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. Computerized tomography (CT) consists of 25 % of all medical imaging. It was estimated that more than 2% of all carcinomas in the USA are due to CT scans. There is an ongoing focus on the reduction of CT scan radiation dose. Awareness about risk-benefits of CT has increased. Reduction of radiological exam is an important issue because the accumulation effects of radiation can be hazardous. In addition, proper protocol should be followed for diagnostic procedures of ionization radiation and computerized tomography. Effective radiation dose should range from 0.8 to 10.5 millisievert. The same protocol should be followed in different hospitals as well. Basic principles of radiation protection should be monitored. As much as possible, both technician and radiologist must be present during computerized tomography for children, and MRI and ultrasound should be replaced if possible. PMID:21566776

  5. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, Jason A.; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen; Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  6. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  7. Use of In-labeled autologous leukocytes to image an abdominal abscess in a horse

    SciTech Connect

    Koblik, P.D.; Lofstedt, J.; Jakowski, R.M.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-06-15

    Indium 111-labeled autologous leukocytes were used to image an abdominal abscess in a horse with a palpable abdominal mass and history of Streptococcus equi infection. A focal area of radioactivity was identified in the location corresponding to the abscess. Imaging of this focal uptake was optimal 48 hours after injection. Similar scans obtained in 2 clinically normal horses revealed no evidence of focal radioactivity in this region. The cell labeling procedure gave acceptable labeling efficiency (87.5%) but an excessive number of damaged WBC, resulting in persistent lung radioactivity on all images. No adverse effects were noted. Radiation measured in the horse and its excreta were well within acceptable limits.

  8. Delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Ferrella, T J

    1992-04-01

    The case of a 46-year-old man complaining of acute abdominal discomfort is presented. The patient fell 3 ft and injured his abdomen in the right upper quadrant four days before his emergency department visit. The complete workup revealed an acutely ruptured middle colic artery. The presenting symptoms, laboratory work, differential diagnosis, computed tomography scan, treatment, and follow-up are reviewed. This case is unusual in that delayed rupture of the middle colic artery secondary to blunt abdominal trauma had not been described previously. PMID:1554184

  9. Gallbladder radionuclide scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gallbladder scan; Biliary scan; Cholescintigraphy: HIDA; Hepatobiliary nuclear imaging scan ... test results. This test is combined with other imaging (such as CT or ultrasound). After the gallbladder ...

  10. A decision aid for diagnosis of liver lesions on MRI.

    PubMed Central

    Tombropoulos, R.; Shiffman, S.; Davidson, C.

    1993-01-01

    Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the evaluation of liver abnormalities. The interpretation of MR images requires expert training in a rapidly changing field. DAFODILL (Decision Aid for Diagnosing Liver Lesions) is a decision-support tool designed to aid radiologists in the diagnosis of hepatic lesions seen on MRI. DAFODILL uses a knowledge base of MRI findings and a belief-network inference engine to generate probabilistic differential diagnoses of the most commonly encountered hepatic lesions. DAFODILL performs limited image processing to identify clinically relevant features, which are presented to the user for confirmation before they are used by the network. Preliminary evaluation of an initial version of the system suggests that DAFODILL may be a useful tool for radiology residents and nonexpert radiologists in interpreting MR images of the liver. PMID:8130512

  11. Correction of MRI-induced geometric distortions in whole-body small animal PET-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Frohwein, Lynn J. Schäfers, Klaus P.; Hoerr, Verena; Faber, Cornelius

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The fusion of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data can be a challenging task in whole-body PET-MRI. The quality of the registration between these two modalities in large field-of-views (FOV) is often degraded by geometric distortions of the MRI data. The distortions at the edges of large FOVs mainly originate from MRI gradient nonlinearities. This work describes a method to measure and correct for these kind of geometric distortions in small animal MRI scanners to improve the registration accuracy of PET and MRI data. Methods: The authors have developed a geometric phantom which allows the measurement of geometric distortions in all spatial axes via control points. These control points are detected semiautomatically in both PET and MRI data with a subpixel accuracy. The spatial transformation between PET and MRI data is determined with these control points via 3D thin-plate splines (3D TPS). The transformation derived from the 3D TPS is finally applied to real MRI mouse data, which were acquired with the same scan parameters used in the phantom data acquisitions. Additionally, the influence of the phantom material on the homogeneity of the magnetic field is determined via field mapping. Results: The spatial shift according to the magnetic field homogeneity caused by the phantom material was determined to a mean of 0.1 mm. The results of the correction show that distortion with a maximum error of 4 mm could be reduced to less than 1 mm with the proposed correction method. Furthermore, the control point-based registration of PET and MRI data showed improved congruence after correction. Conclusions: The developed phantom has been shown to have no considerable negative effect on the homogeneity of the magnetic field. The proposed method yields an appropriate correction of the measured MRI distortion and is able to improve the PET and MRI registration. Furthermore, the method is applicable to whole-body small animal

  12. A Prototype Body-Mounted MRI-Compatible Robot for Needle Guidance in Shoulder Arthrography.

    PubMed

    Monfaredi, R; Seifabadi, R; Iordachita, I; Sze, R; Safdar, N M; Sharma, K; Fricke, S; Krieger, A; Cleary, K

    2014-08-01

    A novel compact and lightweight patient-mounted MRI-compatible robot has been designed for MRI image-guided interventions. This robot is intended to enable MRI-guided needle placement as done in shoulder arthrography. The robot could make needle placement more accurate and simplify the current workflow by converting the traditional two-stage arthrography procedure (fluoroscopy-guided needle insertion followed by a diagnostic MRI scan) to a one-stage procedure (streamlined workflow all in MRI suite). The robot has 4 degrees of freedom (DOF), two for orientation of the needle and two for needle positioning. The mechanical design was based on several criteria including rigidity, MRI compatibility, compact design, sterilizability, and adjustability. The proposed workflow is discussed and initial MRI compatibility experiments are presented. The results show that artifacts in the region of interest are minimal and that MRI images of the shoulder were not adversely affected by placing the robot on a human volunteer. PMID:25473653

  13. A Prototype Body-Mounted MRI-Compatible Robot for Needle Guidance in Shoulder Arthrography

    PubMed Central

    Monfaredi, R.; Seifabadi, R.; Iordachita, I.; Sze, R.; Safdar, N. M.; Sharma, K.; Fricke, S.; Krieger, A.; Cleary, K.

    2014-01-01

    A novel compact and lightweight patient-mounted MRI-compatible robot has been designed for MRI image-guided interventions. This robot is intended to enable MRI-guided needle placement as done in shoulder arthrography. The robot could make needle placement more accurate and simplify the current workflow by converting the traditional two-stage arthrography procedure (fluoroscopy-guided needle insertion followed by a diagnostic MRI scan) to a one-stage procedure (streamlined workflow all in MRI suite). The robot has 4 degrees of freedom (DOF), two for orientation of the needle and two for needle positioning. The mechanical design was based on several criteria including rigidity, MRI compatibility, compact design, sterilizability, and adjustability. The proposed workflow is discussed and initial MRI compatibility experiments are presented. The results show that artifacts in the region of interest are minimal and that MRI images of the shoulder were not adversely affected by placing the robot on a human volunteer. PMID:25473653

  14. Conspicuity of Bone Metastases on Fast Dixon-Based Multisequence Whole Body MRI: Clinical Utility per Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Costelloe, Colleen M.; Madewell, John E.; Kundra, Vikas; Harrell, Robyn K.; Bassett, Roland L.; Ma, Jingfei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the conspicuity of bone metastases on each of the numerous sequences produced by fast Dixon-based multisequence whole-body (WB) MRI scanning in order to determine the most clinically useful sequences overall and per anatomic region. Materials and Methods Twenty-seven breast cancer patients with bone metastases were prospectively studied with fast Dixon-based WB MRI including head/neck, chest, abdominal, pelvic, thigh, calf/feet, and either cervical, thoracic and lumbar or cervical/thoracic and thoracic/lumbar regions. Sequences included coronal T2, axial T1 without and with intravenous gadolinium (+C), sagittal T1 spine +C, each associated fat only (FO) and fat saturated (FS) sequence, axial DWI and STIR. Blinded reviewers evaluated lesion conspicuity, a surrogate of clinical utility, on a 5 point scale per anatomic region. Sequences were compared using ANOVA, differences detected with Tukey’s HSD, and the four sequences with highest mean conspicuity were compared to the remainder overall and per anatomic region. Results Overall, a significant lesion conspicuity difference was found (P<0.0001), and lesion conspicuity was significantly higher on FS T1 +C, FO T1 +C, T1 +C sagittal, FS T1 +C axial sequences (P<0.0001). Per region results were the same in head/neck. Other sequences overlapped with these and included: Chest/abdomen-FO T2, DWI; pelvis- DWI, FO T2; thigh-FS T2, FO T2, FO T1 +C; calf/feet-FS T2, DWI, FO T2, STIR. Conclusion Overall, bone lesions were most conspicuous on FS T1 +C sagittal, FO T1 +C sagittal, T1 +C sagittal and FS T1 +C axial fast Dixon WB MRI sequences. PMID:23290478

  15. [The patient with intra-abdominal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sakka, Samir G

    2016-01-01

    An intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) defined as a pathological increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is commonly found on ICU admission or during the ICU stay. Several studies confirmed that an IAH is an independent predictor for mortality of critically ill patients. The abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) which is defined as a sustained IAP>20 mmHg (with or without an abdominal perfusion pressure [APP]<60mmHg) that is associated with new organ dysfunction or failure has a mortality of up to 60%. In general, an IAH may be induced by several intra-abdominal as well as extra-abdominal conditions. Reduced abdominal wall compliance, intra-abdominal pathologies (either of the peritoneal space or parenchymateous organs) may lead to an IAH. Most commonly, intra-abdominal infections and/or sepsis and severe trauma or burns are predisposing for an IAH. An early sign may be a decrease in urinary output. The effects of an increased IAP on cardiovascular function are well recognized and include negative effects on preload, afterload and contractility. However, all other compartments of the body may be affected by an IAH. Thus, by an increase of the respective compartment pressure, e.g. intracranial pressure, a poly-compartment syndrome may result. Adequate prevention, a forward-looking strategy, and objective techniques for measurement of IAP are required to avoid or early detect an IAH or ACS. Finally, an immediate and consequent interdisciplinary management using conservative, interventional and operative options are necessary to solve an IAH or ACS. PMID:26863642

  16. Abscess scan - radioactive

    MedlinePlus

    Radioactive abscess scan; Abscess scan; Indium Scan; Indium-labelled white blood cell scan ... the white blood cells are tagged with a radioactive substance called indium. The cells are then injected ...

  17. Arm CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - arm; Computed axial tomography scan - arm; Computed tomography scan - arm; CT scan - arm ... Mosby; 2013:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  18. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  19. Leg CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - leg; Computed axial tomography scan - leg; Computed tomography scan - leg; CT scan - leg ... Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  20. Pelvic CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - pelvis; Computed axial tomography scan - pelvis; Computed tomography scan - pelvis; CT scan - pelvis ... gov/pubmed/18381118 . Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Grainger RC, Allison D, Adam, Dixon AK, ...

  1. Shoulder CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... Mosby; 2012:chap 57. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  2. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial ... or other growth (mass) Cerebral atrophy (loss of brain tissue) ... with the hearing nerve Stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA)

  3. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  4. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  5. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  6. [Diagnostic laparocentesis in closed abdominal injury].

    PubMed

    Berkutov, A N; Deriabin, I I; Zakurdaev, V E

    1976-09-01

    To improve the diagnosis of closed abdominal trauma since 1966 the authors have been widely employing laparocentesis. The results of using abdominal punctures an 260 patients are reported. The method proved to be reliable in 97.7%. The use of laparocentesis enabled the authors to reduce the number of errors by 7.3 times, to shorten the terms of establishing the diagnosis by 4 times as compared with the control group of patients (190 subjects in whom the recognition of abdominal injuries is based on common clinical symptoms). PMID:136785

  7. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  8. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  9. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm(3) was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  10. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  11. The Effects of Cadaver Orientation on the Relative Position of the Abdominal Organs

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Meghan K.; Hardy, Warren N.; Beillas, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Biplane x-ray was used to image two cadavers in upright and inverted postures, and the three-dimensional variation in the relative abdominal organ position was quantified. The abdominal organs of each surrogate were instrumented with radiopaque markers using a minimally invasive approach. Imaging was performed with a known stomach volume, with residual air removed from the abdominal cavity, and with ventilation and perfusion. Marker positions were determined in two planar x-ray perspectives using target tracking software and projected into calibrated three-dimensional coordinates. Intuitive changes in organ position were observed with the effect of gravity in the upright orientation; in the superior-inferior direction, the separation between the most cranial and caudal diaphragm and liver markers was 95 mm to 169 mm. When inverted, the abdominal organs shifted cranially and fell within 66 to 81 mm in the superior-inferior direction. The relative change in position of the diaphragm markers, determined as the vector magnitude from the upright to the inverted position, was 99 to 121 mm. These data were scaled and compared to positional MRI data from nine human subjects in seated postures and the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) model geometry. The overall shapes and relative positions of the inverted cadaver organs compared better to the human subjects and model geometry. These results give rise to several issues for consideration when interpreting cadaver test results and comparing them to finite element simulations and their associated injury prediction abilities. PMID:24406959

  12. A 7 years old girl with abdominal lump and per-vaginal bleeding of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Roy, N; Nahar, K; Begum, B; Sarker, U K; Akter, F; Roy, J; Chakrabarty, R

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disorder resulting from decreased secretion of thyroid hormone. The diagnosis of hypothyroidism is suggested from the clinical and laboratory findings. Here we present a case report on this disease with rare presentation of abdominal lump and pervaginal bleeding in childhood. A 7 years old girl admitted in a tertiary level hospital with abdominal lump and irregular per vaginal bleeding. Abdominal swelling was gradually increasing in size & associated with lower abdominal pain for last 5 months. On examination the girl was moderately anaemic, mildly oedematous, distended lower abdomen and a mass in left iliac region. Her thyroid function test, serum FSH, serum LH, serum Prolactin was done and high FSH, LH, Prolactin levels were found. Ultrasonography of lower abdomen revealed bulky uterus and bilateral ovarian cysts. MRI of Brain showed feature of pituitary microadenoma. Finally the patient was diagnosed as primary hypothyroidism and bilateral follicular ovarian cyst with pituitary adenoma developed as its consequence. The case is reported for clinical awareness & to share our experience. PMID:25725684

  13. Monoparesis after graft replacement of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hitoshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Saito, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2006-10-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Preoperative CT revealed cylindrical calcification of the abdominal aorta and the patent internal iliac arteries (IIAs). At the elective surgery, a cylinder-shaped and severely calcified intimal layer was found, and the lumbar arteries were totally occluded. Hypotension caused by the loose iliac clamp due to severe calcification continued for 15 minutes and long-time cross clamp was necessary. Monoparesis of the left lower extremity and dysuria occurred postoperatively. Spinal MRI revealed small infarction at the Th10 level. Symptoms improved and he could walk with a cane and within a few months no uninary catheter support was needed. Thoracic spinal cord infarction after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and a severely calcified abdominal aorta indicated the importance of the blood flow in the IIA as the significant source of spinal blood supply. To prevent spinal cord injury (SCI) which is rare but significant complication of AAA surgery, understanding of the spinal blood supply, quick surgery, and complete revascularization of pelvic arteries are important. PMID:17095985

  14. Comparison of spirometry and abdominal height as four-dimensional computed tomography metrics in lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Wei; Low, Daniel A.; Parikh, Parag J.; Nystrom, Michelle M.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Wahab, Sasha H.; Handoko, Maureen; Fooshee, David; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2005-07-15

    An important consideration in four-dimensional CT scanning is the selection of a breathing metric for sorting the CT data and modeling internal motion. This study compared two noninvasive breathing metrics, spirometry and abdominal height, against internal air content, used as a surrogate for internal motion. Both metrics were shown to be accurate, but the spirometry showed a stronger and more reproducible relationship than the abdominal height in the lung. The abdominal height was known to be affected by sensor placement and patient positioning while the spirometer exhibited signal drift. By combining these two, a normalization of the drift-free metric to tidal volume may be generated and the overall metric precision may be improved.

  15. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... size and can usually be diagnosed early in fetal development, typically between the tenth and fourteenth weeks of ... organs at the abdominal wall opening late in fetal development may also contribute to organ injury. Intestinal damage ...

  17. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... this kind of pain when they have a stomach virus, indigestion, gas, or when they become constipated. ...

  18. Familial abdominal chemodectomas with associated cutaneous angiolipomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, S P; Nicholson, G I; Hitchcock, G

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of cutaneous angiolipomas and intra-abdominal retroperitoneal chemodectomas in two brothers is described. Both died from malignant dissemination of the chemodectomas. It is possible but speculative that two other brothers suffered from the same syndrome. PMID:195258

  19. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Cleva, Roberto; de Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C.; Filho, Wilson Jacob

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). METHODS: We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 56±13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6±0.6 L) and FVC (2.0±0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8±0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p = 0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery. PMID:25029580

  20. Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine: Impact of a Simple Educational Intervention on Appropriate Abdominal Imaging at a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Matthew F.; Agan, Donna L.; Liu, Yang; Johnson, John O.; Shaw, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising costs pose a major threat to US health care. Residency programs are being asked to teach residents how to provide cost-conscious medical care. Methods An educational intervention incorporating the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria with lectures on cost-consciousness and on the actual hospital charges for abdominal imaging was implemented for residents at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, CA. We hypothesized that residents would order fewer abdominal imaging examinations for patients with complaints of abdominal pain after the intervention. We analyzed the type and number of abdominal imaging studies completed for patients admitted to the inpatient teaching service with primary abdominal complaints for 18 months before (738 patients) and 12 months following the intervention (632 patients). Results There was a significant reduction in mean abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans per patient (1.7–1.4 studies per patient, P < .001) and total abdominal radiology studies per patient (3.1–2.7 studies per patient, P  =  .02) following the intervention. The avoidance of charges solely due to the reduction in abdominal CT scans following the intervention was $129 per patient or $81,528 in total. Conclusions A simple educational intervention appeared to change the radiologic test-ordering behavior of internal medicine residents. Widespread adoption of similar interventions by residency programs could result in significant savings for the health care system. PMID:24404274

  1. Can lab data be used to reduce abdominal computed tomography (CT) usage in young adults presenting to the emergency department with nontraumatic abdominal pain?

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Mahadevia, Soham; Stein, Evan G; Freeman, Katherine; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine whether laboratory parameters could be found, predictive of a negative abdominal CT scan in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Following institutional review board approval, we evaluated CT reports of 522 patients, aged 21-35 years old, who presented to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Bivariate analyses relating ten laboratory parameters to whether the CT detected a cause for abdominal pain were conducted. A multivariate logistic regression model was then derived, with all variables in the final model significant at p < 0.05. Variables were dichotomized to yield odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 522 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 45% had a cause for pain demonstrated by CT. Predictors of a negative CT in men were normal hematocrit and negative urine blood (p = 0.045, p = 0.016, respectively), and in women normal hematocrit, granulocyte percent, and alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.023, p = 0.039, p < 0.0001, respectively). When standard normal values were used to calculate descriptive statistics, only granulocyte percent in women had a significant confidence interval (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.6-4.0). Among the 208 women with normal granulocyte percent, the final clinical diagnosis was appendicitis, cholecystitis, and diverticulitis, in three, three, and two cases, respectively (4% combined). In summary, no laboratory test was sufficient to offer reassurance that a CT is not necessary in a young adult patient with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Alternative strategies should be considered to decrease the use of CT, and its associated radiation exposure, in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:20306104

  2. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  3. Using abdominal massage in bowel management.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michelle; Hunt, Catherine; Lindley, Alison; Adams, John

    2014-07-15

    This article describes the introduction of abdominal massage techniques by a community team as part of a total bowel management programme for people with learning disabilities. A trust-wide audit of prescribed laxative use by this client group raised concerns, and led to a more systematic approach to managing constipation in people with learning disabilities. An education programme for carers proved to be successful. Some reported that adopting abdominal massage provided further opportunity to develop the therapeutic relationship. PMID:25005415

  4. Traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta.

    PubMed

    Barchiche, R; Bové, T; Demanet, H; Goldstein, J P; Deuvaert, F E

    1999-08-01

    A traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta is a rare entity, occurring as the result of a missed aortic lesion at the time of the initial injury. Therefore, clinical suspicion and careful abdominal exploration at first laparotomy is mandatory to prevent aortic pseudoaneurysm formation and its risk of delayed rupture. We present a case of successful surgical treatment of a suprarenal aortic false aneurysm, presenting 4 weeks after a life-threatening gunshot wound in a 13-year-old child. PMID:10499389

  5. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug resistant infections such as

  6. Jujitsu kick to the abdomen: a case of blunt abdominal trauma resulting in hematochezia and transient ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Hans; Beck, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is a common presentation to the emergency department. Ischemic colitis is a rare complication of this and its possible sequelae are important for an emergency physician to recognize. A 21-year-old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and hourly episodes of bright red blood per rectum shortly after being kicked in the stomach at his jujitsu class. He had no significant medical history, and results of his systems review were otherwise unremarkable. On examination, he appeared well, with normal vital signs. He had mild lower abdominal tenderness, but there were no peritoneal signs present. There was blood on the digital rectal examination. His hemoglobin, platelet, and international normalized ratio levels were normal and his abdominal radiograph was unremarkable. The gastroenterology service was contacted because of the hematochezia and a flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed. The sigmoidoscopy showed erythema, ulceration, and edema of a segment in the left colon, consistent with ischemic colitis. This was later confirmed on biopsy. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen was conducted, which revealed left colonic inflammation consistent with colonic ischemia. There was no mesenteric vascular thrombosis or mesenteric hematoma found on CT. His hematochezia and abdominal pain subsided spontaneously, and he was discharged home. This case illustrates transient ischemic colitis as a potential presentation of blunt abdominal trauma, and emergency physicians should consider this uncommon diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting after abdominal trauma. PMID:21392850

  7. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  8. Susceptibility variants for waist size in relation to abdominal, visceral, and hepatic adiposity in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lim, Unhee; Ernst, Thomas; Wilkens, Lynne R; Albright, Cheryl L; Lum-Jones, Annette; Seifried, Ann; Buchthal, Steven D; Novotny, Rachel; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chang, Linda; Cheng, Iona; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2012-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified common genetic variants that can contribute specifically to the risk of abdominal adiposity, as measured by waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio. However, it is unknown whether these genetic risk factors affect relative body fat distribution in the abdominal visceral and subcutaneous compartments. The association between imaging-based abdominal fat mass and waist-size risk variants in the FTO, LEPR, LYPLAL1, MSRA, NRXN3, and TFAP2B genes was investigated. A cross-sectional sample of 60 women was selected among study participants of The Multiethnic Cohort, who were aged 60 to 65 years, of European or Japanese descent, and with a body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) between 18.5 and 40. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to measure adiposity. After adjustments for age, ethnicity, and total fat mass, the FTO variants showed an association with less abdominal subcutaneous fat and a higher visceral-to-subcutaneous abdominal fat ratio, with the variant rs9941349 showing significant associations most consistently (P=0.003 and 0.03, respectively). Similarly, the LEPR rs1137101 variant was associated with less subcutaneous fat (P=0.01) and a greater visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio (P=0.03) and percent liver fat (P=0.007). MSRA rs545854 variant carriers had a lower percent of leg fat. Our findings provide initial evidence that some of the genetic risk factors identified for larger waist size might also contribute to disproportionately greater intra-abdominal and liver fat distribution in postmenopausal women. If replicated, these genetic variants can be incorporated with other biomarkers to predict high-risk body fat distribution. PMID:22889634

  9. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  11. Endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm as a late complication of inferior vena cava filter placement.

    PubMed

    Medina, Carlos R; Indes, Jeffrey; Smith, Christopher

    2006-06-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of abdominal aorta after inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placement are uncommon, with associated morbidity and mortality. We report a case in which an abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm resulted from erosion of a Bird's Nest (Cook, Bloomington, IN) IVC filter into the wall of the abdominal aorta. A 64-year-old woman with an IVC filter placed 10 years prior presented to the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a 1.4-cm x 2.0-cm infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysm adjacent to the IVC filter site. A Zenith endograft (Cook) was used via an open femoral artery exposure to successfully treat the pseudoaneurysm. PMID:16765254

  12. Acute Intestinal Obstruction Complicating Abdominal Pregnancy: Conservative Management and Successful Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Udigwe, Gerald Okanandu; Ihekwoaba, Eric Chukwudi; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Egeonu, Richard Obinwanne; Okwuosa, Ayodele Obianuju

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute intestinal obstruction during pregnancy is a very challenging and unusual nonobstetric surgical entity often linked with considerable fetomaternal morbidity and mortality. When it is synchronous with abdominal pregnancy, it is even rarer. Case Presentation. A 28-year-old lady in her second pregnancy was referred to Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Nigeria, at 27 weeks of gestation due to vomiting, constipation, and abdominal pain. Examination and ultrasound scan revealed a single live intra-abdominal extrauterine fetus. Plain abdominal X-ray was diagnostic of intestinal obstruction. Conservative treatment was successful till the 34-week gestational age when she had exploratory laparotomy. At surgery, the amniotic sac was intact and the placenta was found to be adherent to the gut. There was also a live female baby with birth weight of 2.3 kg and Apgar scores of 9 and 10 in the 1st and 5th minutes, respectively, with the baby having right clubbed foot. Adhesiolysis and right adnexectomy were done. The mother and her baby were well and were discharged home nine days postoperatively. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of abdominal pregnancy as the cause of acute intestinal obstruction in the published literature. Management approach is multidisciplinary. PMID:27313923

  13. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain. PMID:26169928

  14. Mechanical small bowel obstruction following a blunt abdominal trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zirak-Schmidt, Samira; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal obstruction following abdominal trauma has previously been described. However, in most reported cases pathological finding was intestinal stenosis. Presentation of the case A 51-year-old male was admitted after a motor vehicle accident. Initial focused abdominal sonogram for trauma and enhanced computerized tomography were normal, however there was a fracture of the tibia. Three days later, he complained of abdominal pain, constipation, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy showed bleeding from the omentum and mechanical small bowel obstruction due to a fibrous band. Discussion The patient had prior abdominal surgery, but clinical and radiological findings indicate that the impact of the motor vehicle accident initiated his condition either by causing rotation of a bowel segment around the fibrous band, or by formation of a fibrous band secondary to minimal bleeding from the omentum. Conclusion High index of suspicion of intestinal obstruction is mandatory in trauma patients presenting with complaints of abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation despite uneventful CT scan. PMID:26566436

  15. 4D MRI for the Localization of Parathyroid Adenoma: A Novel Method in Evolution.

    PubMed

    Merchavy, Shlomo; Luckman, Judith; Guindy, Michal; Segev, Yoram; Khafif, Avi

    2016-03-01

    The sestamibi scan (MIBI) and ultrasound (US) are used for preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma (PTA), with sensitivity as high as 90%. We developed 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4D MRI) as a novel tool for identifying PTAs. Eleven patients with PTA were enrolled. 4D MRI from the mandible to the aortic arch was used. Optimization of the timing of image acquisition was obtained by changing dynamic and static sequences. PTAs were identified in all except 1 patient. In 9 patients, there was a complete match between the 4D MRI and the US and MIBI, as well as with the operative finding. In 1 patient, the adenoma was correctly localized by 4D MRI, in contrast to the US and MIBI scan. The sensitivity of the 4D MRI was 90% and after optimization, 100%. Specificity was 100%. We concluded that 4D MRI is a reliable technique for identification of PTAs, although more studies are needed. PMID:26598499

  16. TH-A-BRF-12: Assessment of 4D-MRI for Robust Motion and Volume Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C; Kim, J; Wen, N; Chetty, I; Hu, Y; Mutic, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Precise radiation therapy for abdominal lesions is complicated by respiratory motion and poor soft tissue contrast from 4DCT whereas 4DMRI provides superior tissue discrimination. We evaluated a novel 4D-MRI algorithm for MR-SIM motion management. Methods: Respiratory-triggered, T2-weighted single-shot Turbo Spin Echo 4D-MRI was evaluated for open high-field 1.0T MR-SIM. A programmable platform pulled objects on a trolley ∼2 cm superior-inferior (S-I) for “regular” (sinusoidal, (1-cos{sup 2}), 3-5 second periods) and “irregular” breathing patterns (exaggerated (1-cos{sup 2}) and patient curves), while a respiratory waveform was generated via a pressure sensor device. Coronal 4D-MRIs (2–12;10 phases, TE/TR/α = 35−61/6100 ms/90°, voxel=1×1×4 mm{sup 3}) were acquired for 54 unique phantom cases. Abdominal 4D−MRIs were evaluated for 5 healthy volunteers and 1 liver cancer patient (6–10 phases, TE/TR/α = 30−96/4500−6100 ms/90°, voxel=1×1×5–10 mm{sup 3}) on an IRB-approved protocol. Duty cycle, scan time, and excursion were evaluated between phase acquisitions and compared to coronal cine-MRI (∼1 frame/sec). Maximum intensity projections (MIPs) were analyzed. Results: In phantom, average duty cycle was 42.6 ± 11.4% (range: 23.6–69.1%). Regular, periodic breathing (sinusoidal, (1-cos{sup 2})) yielded higher duty cycles than irregular (48.5% and 35.9%, respectively, p<0.001) and fast periods had higher duty cycles than slow (50.4% for 3s and 39.4% for 5s, p<0.001). ∼4-fold acquisition time increase was measured for 10-phase versus 2-phase. MIP renderings revealed that SI object extent was underestimated a maximum of 4% (3mm) and 8% (6mm) for cine and 2-phase 4D-MRI, respectively, with respect to 10-phases. However, this was waveform dependent. A highly irregular breathing volunteer yielded lowest duty cycle (23%) and longest 10-phase scan time (∼14 minutes), although 6-phase acquisition for a liver cancer patient was

  17. Normal findings on brain FLAIR MRI scans at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Neema, Mohit; Guss, Zachary D.; Stankiewicz, James M.; Arora, Ashish; Healy, Brian C.; Bakshi, Rohit

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging of the brain has become a routine tool for assessing lesions in patients with suspected neurologic disorders. There is growing interest in 3T brain FLAIR MR imaging but little normative data are available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and topography of cerebral hyperintensities seen with FLAIR MR imaging of the brain at 3T in a normal population and compare those findings to 1.5T. MATERIALS AND METHODS Whole-brain 2D FLAIR MR imaging was performed in 22 healthy controls (mean age, 44 ± 8 years; range, 30–53 years) at 3T. Fifteen of these subjects also underwent 2D FLAIR at 1.5T, with similar optimized parameters and voxel size. Cerebral hyperintense areas, including discrete foci, anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse parenchymal hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and CSF flow artifacts were assessed. The Spearman rank test assessed the correlation between discrete hyperintense foci and age. The Wilcoxon signed rank test compared foci detectability at 3T versus 1.5T. RESULTS FLAIR at 3T commonly showed hyperintensities such as discrete foci (mean, 10.68 per subject; at least 1 present in 68% of subjects), anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse posterior white matter hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and ventricular CSF flow artifacts. FLAIR at 3T showed a higher hyperintense foci volume (170 ± 243 versus 93 ± 152 mm3, P < .01) and number (9.4 ± 13 versus 5.5 ± 9.2, P < .01) than at 1.5T. No significant differences (P = .68) in the length/diameter of individual discrete hyperintense foci were seen between 3T and 1.5T. Discrete foci volume (r = 0.72 at 3T, r = 0.70 at 1.5T) and number (r = 0.74 at 3T; r = 0.69 at 1.5T) correlated with age to a similar degree on both platforms. All discrete foci were confined to the noncallosal supratentorial white matter. The other nonfocal hyperintensities (anterior and posterior periventricular capping, diffuse parenchymal hyperintensity, septal hyperintensity, corticospinal tract hyperintensity, and CSF flow artifacts) were generally more common and prominent at 3T than at 1.5T. CONCLUSIONS Discrete and diffuse parenchymal brain white matter FLAIR hyperintensities are more common and prominent at 3T than at 1.5T in healthy volunteers. PMID:19369605

  18. Scanning with iodine-131 MIBG in children with solid tumors: an initial appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G.P.; Rabe, E.

    1986-05-01

    Twelve children with malignant disease in whom there was either a clinical, radiologic, or histologic differential diagnosis including neuroblastoma were investigated using iodine-131 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scanning. In six children in whom a final diagnosis of neuroblastoma was substantiated, scans were positive; in five children with other malignancies, scans were negative. In one child, clinically and radiologically tumor free following excision on an abdominal neuroblastoma, scans were also negative. MIBG scanning proved of value as a discriminant of malignant undifferentiated tumors in children, and in the diagnosis and staging of neuroblastoma. During treatment, MIBG scans in two patients correlated with contemporaneous computed tomographic scans and may allow noninvasive monitoring of therapeutic response and completeness of surgical excision. Primary and recurrent abdominal tumors, and visceral, osseous, and marrow deposits were demonstrated using this technique.

  19. Feasibility of automated pancreas segmentation based on dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gou, S; Wu, J; Liu, F; Lee, P; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: MRI-guided radiotherapy is particularly attractive for abdominal targets with low CT contrast. To fully utilize this modality for pancreas tracking, automated segmentation tools are needed. A hybrid gradient, region growth and shape constraint (hGReS) method to segment two-dimensional (2D) upper abdominal dynamic MRI (dMRI) is developed for this purpose. Methods: 2D coronal dynamic MR images of two healthy volunteers were acquired with a frame rate of 5 frames per second. The regions of interest (ROIs) included the liver, pancreas and stomach. The first frame was used as the source where the centres of the ROIs were manually annotated. These centre locations were propagated to the next dMRI frame. Four-neighborhood region transfer growth was performed from these initial seeds before refinement using shape constraints. Results from hGReS and two other automated segmentation methods using integrated edge detection and region growth (IER) and level set, respectively, were compared with manual contours using Dice's index (DI). Results: For the first patient, the hGReS resulted in the organ segmentation accuracy as a measure by the DI (0.77) for the pancreas, superior to the level set method (0.72) and IER (0.71). The hGReS was shown to be reproducible on the second subject, achieving a DI of 0.82, 0.92 and 0.93 for the pancreas, stomach and liver, respectively. Motion trajectories derived from the hGReS were highly correlated to respiratory motion. Conclusion: We have shown the feasibility of automated segmentation of the pancreas anatomy on dMRI. Advances in knowledge: Using the hybrid method improves segmentation robustness of low-contrast images. PMID:25270713

  20. Postherpetic pseudohernia: delayed onset of paresis of abdominal muscles due to herpes zoster causing an ipsilateral abdominal bulge.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shunsuke; Togawa, Yasuhiro; Chiku, Tsuyoshi; Sano, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Postherpetic pseudohernia causes an abdominal bulge as well as an abdominal wall herniation. This disease is one of the neurological complications of herpes zoster and essentially consists of paresis of ipsilateral abdominal muscles. Postherpetic pseudohernia may be mistaken for abdominal wall herniation because it is not well known. We describe two cases presenting an abdominal bulge. The ipsilateral abdominal bulge appeared after recovery from abdominal zoster. Abdominal CT showed no evidence of a herniation or mass. We diagnosed a postherpetic pseudohernia. One of the patients recovered spontaneously 4 months after the onset, and the other partially recovered after 2 months. This disease can be expected to disappear spontaneously, unlike abdominal herniation requiring surgery. It has been reported that 79.3% of patients eventually recovered spontaneously. For surgeons and general practitioners, it is beneficial to keep this disease in mind when examining a patient presenting an abdominal bulge. PMID:27229900

  1. Comprehensive MRI simulation methodology using a dedicated MRI scanner in radiation oncology for external beam radiation treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Eric S.; Erickson, Beth; Schultz, Chris; Allen Li, X.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiation oncology is expanding rapidly, and more clinics are integrating MRI into their radiation therapy workflows. However, radiation therapy presents a new set of challenges and places additional constraints on MRI compared to diagnostic radiology that, if not properly addressed, can undermine the advantages MRI offers for radiation treatment planning (RTP). The authors introduce here strategies to manage several challenges of using MRI for virtual simulation in external beam RTP. Methods: A total of 810 clinical MRI simulation exams were performed using a dedicated MRI scanner for external beam RTP of brain, breast, cervix, head and neck, liver, pancreas, prostate, and sarcoma cancers. Patients were imaged in treatment position using MRI-optimal immobilization devices. Radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations and scan protocols were optimized based on RTP constraints. Off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity-induced geometric distortions were minimized or corrected prior to using images for RTP. A multidisciplinary MRI simulation guide, along with window width and level presets, was created to standardize use of MR images during RTP. A quality assurance program was implemented to maintain accuracy and repeatability of MRI simulation exams. Results: The combination of a large bore scanner, high field strength, and circumferentially wrapped, flexible phased array RF receive coils permitted acquisition of thin slice images with high contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and image intensity uniformity, while simultaneously accommodating patient setup and immobilization devices. Postprocessing corrections and alternative acquisition methods were required to reduce or correct off-resonance and gradient nonlinearity induced geometric distortions. Conclusions: The methodology described herein contains practical strategies the authors have implemented through lessons learned performing clinical MRI simulation exams. In

  2. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  3. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies. PMID:26039773

  4. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  5. Abdominal pain as initial presentation of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eisa, Naseem; Alhafez, Bishr; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated spleen metastasis (ISM) in general is very rare with a reported incidence of 2.3–7.1% for all solid cancers. Lung cancers rarely metastasise to the spleen. It is very atypical for ISM to be the initial presentation of lung cancer as well. In our case, a 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of left-sided abdominal fullness and dull pain. Workup was remarkable for splenic mass that turns out to be adenocarcinoma with unknown primary tumour. Biopsy of the mass with immunohistochemistry and whole body position emission tomography scan was able to identify lung cancer as the primary tumour. The patient underwent splenectomy, wedge resection of the lung mass along with short-course of chemotherapy. She never had any recurrences since then. PMID:24835801

  6. Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms does not increase psychological morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Khaira, H. S.; Herbert, L. M.; Crowson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Screening can lead to harmful psychological effects in the screened population--an argument used against abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. However, there is no evidence for this in AAA screening. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to a group of men undergoing screening for AAA. The HADS questionnaire was completed by subjects found not to have AAA, subjects with known small aneurysms attending for follow-up scans, subjects with known AAA on waiting lists for surgery, and controls not involved in the screening programme. The groups were well matched for age and the number of additional diseases. There was no significant difference in the distribution of patients for anxiety and depression according to the HADS questionnaire (chi 2 test, P > 0.1). The results from this study suggest that AAA screening does not increase anxiety or depression in the screened subjects--contrary to the argument put forward against screening for this condition. PMID:9849335

  7. Ethical and Practical Considerations in the Management of Incidental Findings in Pediatric MRI Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumra, Sanjiv; Ashtari, Manzar; Anderson, Britt; Cervellione, Kelly L.; Kan, Li

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the ethical and practical management issues resulting from the detection of incidental abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research studies in healthy pediatric volunteers. Method: A retrospective examination of the findings from 60 clinical reports of research MRI scans from a cohort of healthy…

  8. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  9. Development of a new illumination procedure for photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyon, Laurie; Claude Lesage, Jean; Betrouni, Nacim; Mordon, Serge

    2012-03-01

    A homogeneous illumination of intra-abdominal organs is essential for successful photodynamic therapy of the abdominal cavity. Considering the current lack of outstanding light-delivery systems, a new illumination procedure was assessed. A rat model of peritoneal carcinomatosis was used. Four hours after intraperitoneal injection of hexaminolevulinate, a square illuminating panel connected to a 635-nm laser source was inserted vertically into the abdominal cavity. The abdominal incision was sutured and a pneumoperitoneum created prior to illumination. Light dosimetry was based on the calculation of the peritoneal surface by MRI. The rats were treated with a light dose of 20, 10, 5 or 2.5 J/cm2 administered continuously with an irradiance of 7 mW/cm2. The homogeneity of the cavity illumination was assessed by quantification of the photobleaching of the tumor lesions according to their localization and by scoring of that of the liver and of the bowel immediately after treatment. Photobleaching quantification for tumor lesions relied on the calculation of the fluorescence intensity ratio (after/before treatment) after recording of the lesions during blue-light laparoscopy and determination of their fluorescence intensity with Sigmascan Pro software. The procedure led to a homogeneous treatment of the abdominal cavity. No statistical difference was observed for the photobleaching values according to the localization of the lesions on the peritoneum (p=0.59) and photobleaching of the liver and of the intestine was homogeneous. We conclude that this procedure can successfully treat the major sites involved in peritoneal carcinomatosis.

  10. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... A PET scan requires a small amount of radioactive material (tracer). This tracer is given through a vein (IV), ...

  11. Knee CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - knee; Computed axial tomography scan - knee; Computed tomography scan - knee ... Saunders; 2015:chap 93. Shaw AS, Prokop M. Computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ...

  12. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  13. Coronary Calcium Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  14. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  15. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... some MRI exams, intravenous (IV) drugs, such as gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are used to change the contrast of the MR image. Gadolinium-based contrast agents are rare earth metals that ...

  16. MRI of the Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a supplemental tool to breast screening with mammography or ultrasound. It may be used to screen ... following diagnosis, or further evaluate abnormalities seen on mammography. Breast MRI does not use ionizing radiation, and ...

  17. Towards MRI microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hall, Andrew; Mundell, Victoria J; Blanco-Andujar, Cristina; Bencsik, Martin; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Cave, Gareth W V

    2010-04-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanometre scale particles have been utilised as contrast agents to image staked target binding oligonucleotide arrays using MRI to correlate the signal intensity and T(2)* relaxation times in different NMR fluids. PMID:20379545

  18. Simultaneous fMRI-PET of the Opioidergic Pain System in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Catana, Ciprian; Hooker, Jacob M.; Dougherty, Darin D.; Knudsen, Gitte M.; Wang, Danny JJ.; Chonde, Daniel B; Rosen, Bruce R.; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    MRI and PET provide complementary information for studying brain function. While the potential use of simultaneous MRI/PET for clinical diagnostic and disease staging has been demonstrated recently; the biological relevance of concurrent functional MRI-PET brain imaging to dissect neurochemically distinct components of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has not yet been shown. We obtained sixteen fMRI-PET data sets from eight healthy volunteers. Each subject participated in randomized order in a pain scan and a control (nonpainful pressure) scan on the same day. Dynamic PET data were acquired with an opioid radioligand, [11C]Diprenorphine, to detect endogenous opioid releases in response to pain. BOLD fMRI data were collected at the same time to capture hemodynamic responses. In this simultaneous human fMRI-PET imaging study, we show co-localized responses in thalamus and striatum related to pain processing, while modality specific brain networks were also found. Co-localized fMRI and PET signal changes in the thalamus were positively correlated suggesting pain-induced changes in opioid neurotransmission contribute a significant component of the fMRI signal change in this region. Simultaneous fMRI-PET provides unique opportunities allowing us to relate specific neurochemical events to functional hemodynamic activation and to investigate the impacts of neurotransmission on neurovascular coupling of the human brain in vivo. PMID:25107855

  19. Multiscan MRI-based virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongqing; Li, Bin; Huang, Wei; Liang, Zach

    2000-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) based virtual cystoscopy (VC) has been studied as a potential tool for screening bladder cancer. It is accurate in localizing tumor of size larger than 1 cm and less expensive, as compared to fiberoptic cystoscopy. However, it is invasive and difficult to perform due to using Foley catheter for bladder insufflating with air. In a previous work, we investigated a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based VC scheme with urine as a natural contrast solution, in which a MRI acquisition protocol and an adaptive segmentation method were utilized. Both bladder lumen and wall were successfully delineated. To suppress motion artifact and insight pathological change on the bladder wall images, a multi-scan MRI scheme was presented in this study. One transverse and another coronal acquisitions of T1-weighted that cover the whole bladder were obtained twice, at one time the bladder is full of urine and at another time it is near the empty. Four bladder volumes extracted from those 4 datasets were registered first using a flexible three- dimensional (3D) registration algorithm. Then, associated 4 lumen surfaces were viewed simultaneously with the help of an interactive 3D visualization system. This MRI-based VC was tested on volunteers and demonstrated the feasibility to mass screening for bladder cancer.

  20. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-09-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. PMID:26346145

  1. Optogenetic Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  2. Optogenetic Functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter; Fang, Zhongnan; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The investigation of the functional connectivity of precise neural circuits across the entire intact brain can be achieved through optogenetic functional magnetic resonance imaging (ofMRI), which is a novel technique that combines the relatively high spatial resolution of high-field fMRI with the precision of optogenetic stimulation. Fiber optics that enable delivery of specific wavelengths of light deep into the brain in vivo are implanted into regions of interest in order to specifically stimulate targeted cell types that have been genetically induced to express light-sensitive trans-membrane conductance channels, called opsins. fMRI is used to provide a non-invasive method of determining the brain's global dynamic response to optogenetic stimulation of specific neural circuits through measurement of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal, which provides an indirect measurement of neuronal activity. This protocol describes the construction of fiber optic implants, the implantation surgeries, the imaging with photostimulation and the data analysis required to successfully perform ofMRI. In summary, the precise stimulation and whole-brain monitoring ability of ofMRI are crucial factors in making ofMRI a powerful tool for the study of the connectomics of the brain in both healthy and diseased states. PMID:27167840

  3. Slice profile distortions in single slice continuously moving table MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Saikat; Smith, David S.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    Continuously Moving Table (CMT) MRI is a rapid imaging technique that allows scanning of extended fields of view (FOVs) such as the whole-body in a single continuous scan.1 A highly efficient approach to CMT MRI is single slice imaging, where data are continuously acquired from a single axial slice at isocenter with concurrent movement of the patient table.2 However, the continuous motion of the scanner table and supply of fresh magnetization into the excited slice can introduce deviations in the slice magnetization profile. The goal of this work is to investigate and quantify the distortion in the slice profile in CMT MRI. CMT MRI with a table speed of 20 mm/s was implemented on a 3 Tesla whole-body MRI scanner, with continuous radial data acquisition. Simulations were performed to characterize the transient and steady state slice profiles and magnetization effects. Simulated slice profiles were compared to actual slice profile measurements performed in the scanner. Both simulations and experiments revealed an asymmetric slice profile characterized by a skew towards the lagging edge of the moving table, in contrast to the nominal profiles associated with scanning a stationary object. The true excited slice width (FWHM) and pitch of the acquisition was observed to be dependent on table velocity, with larger table speeds resulting in larger slice profile deviations from the nominal shape.

  4. MRI simulator: a teaching tool for radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, Debra A.; Kishore, Sheel; Seshadri, Sridhar B.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    1990-08-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost-effectively teach Mill scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the Radiology Department has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The Simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa scanner's user-interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module which permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in five seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh-Il computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user-interface is implemented in HyperCard. All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the MPW 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics and images are tracked using an Oracle database. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort.

  5. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    PubMed

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. PMID:25179135

  6. Thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis in a horse.

    PubMed

    Toribio, R E; Kohn, C W; Lawrence, A E; Hardy, J; Hutt, J A

    1999-05-01

    A 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare was examined because of lethargy, fever, and weight loss of 1 month's duration. Thoracic auscultation revealed decreased lung sounds cranioventrally. Thoracic ultrasonography revealed bilateral anechoic areas with hyperechoic strands, consistent with pleural effusion and fibrin tags. A large amount of free fluid was evident during abdominal ultrasonography. Abnormalities included anemia, hyperproteinemia, hyperglobulinemia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Thoracic radiography revealed alveolar infiltrates in the cranial and caudoventral lung fields. A cavitary mass, consistent with an abscess, could be seen caudodorsal to the crura of the diaphragm. Ultrasonographic evaluation of this area revealed a hypoechoic mass with septations. Bilateral thoracocentesis was performed. Bacterial culture of the pleural fluid did not yield growth, but Blastomyces dermatitidis was isolated from pleural fluid, abdominal fluid, and an aspirate of the abscess. The mare was euthanatized, and a diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal blastomycosis was confirmed at necropsy. PMID:10319179

  7. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease. PMID:17580053

  8. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  9. Flap Coverage of Anterior Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Justin M.; Broyles, Justin M.; Baumann, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex defects of the anterior abdomen is both challenging and technically demanding for reconstructive surgeons. Advancements in the use of pedicle and free tissue transfer along with the use of bioprosthetic and synthetic meshes have provided for novel approaches to these complex defects. Accordingly, detailed knowledge of abdominal wall and lower extremity anatomy in combination with insight into the design, implementation, and limitations of various flaps is essential to solve these complex clinical problems. Although these defects can be attributed to a myriad of etiologic factors, the objectives in abdominal wall reconstruction are consistent and include the restoration of abdominal wall integrity, protection of intraabdominal viscera, and the prevention of herniation. In this article, the authors review pertinent anatomy and the various local, regional, and distant flaps that can be utilized in the reconstruction of these complex clinical cases of the anterior abdomen. PMID:23372457

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm--the forgotten diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Contini, S.; McMaster, P.

    1980-01-01

    A review of all cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting to Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, in a 4-year period revealed that there were 118 such patients and confirmed the relatively low operative mortality for elective aneurysmal surgery (6.6%) compared with the high mortality (66.6%) for ruptured or leaking abdominal aneurysm. In only 50% of the cases was the correct diagnosis made during the lifetime of the patient; nor was the correct diagnosis always made after admission to hospital. The need for an early and accurate diagnosis of abdominal aneurysms is stressed and an increased awareness of this condition, based on well established clinical features, would undoubtedly reduce the overall mortality. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7393787

  11. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    PubMed

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  12. Epiploic Appendagitis: A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain in Children. Report of a Case and Review of the Pediatric Literature.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Paul; Sawaya, David E; Miller, Kristen H; Nowicki, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with acute onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. History, physical examination, and initial laboratory testing failed to provide a diagnosis. A computed tomography scan revealed the rare finding of epiploic appendagitis. We review the literature of this rare, but increasingly recognized, condition that mimics appendicitis and needs to be considered in the child with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26427946

  13. Chronic rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Thomas; Thomas, Kotsis; Tympa, Aliki; Aliki, Tympa; Kalinis, Aris; Aris, Kalinis; Vasilopoulos, Ioannis; Ioannis, Vasilopoulos; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Kassiani, Theodoraki

    2011-10-01

    Although the mortality rate after abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture approximates 90% despite the urgent management, a few cases of chronic rupture and delayed repair have been reported in the world literature; anatomic and hemodynamic reasons occasionally allow for the fortunate course of these patients. We report in this article the case of 76-year-old man with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm who was transferred to our facility 4 weeks after his initial hospitalization in a district institution and who finally had a successful open repair. PMID:21620664

  14. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  15. Bayesian segmentation of brainstem structures in MRI.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen; Bhatt, Priyanka; Casillas, Christen; Dutt, Shubir; Schuff, Norbert; Truran-Sacrey, Diana; Boxer, Adam; Fischl, Bruce

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present a method to segment four brainstem structures (midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata and superior cerebellar peduncle) from 3D brain MRI scans. The segmentation method relies on a probabilistic atlas of the brainstem and its neighboring brain structures. To build the atlas, we combined a dataset of 39 scans with already existing manual delineations of the whole brainstem and a dataset of 10 scans in which the brainstem structures were manually labeled with a protocol that was specifically designed for this study. The resulting atlas can be used in a Bayesian framework to segment the brainstem structures in novel scans. Thanks to the generative nature of the scheme, the segmentation method is robust to changes in MRI contrast or acquisition hardware. Using cross validation, we show that the algorithm can segment the structures in previously unseen T1 and FLAIR scans with great accuracy (mean error under 1mm) and robustness (no failures in 383 scans including 168 AD cases). We also indirectly evaluate the algorithm with a experiment in which we study the atrophy of the brainstem in aging. The results show that, when used simultaneously, the volumes of the midbrain, pons and medulla are significantly more predictive of age than the volume of the entire brainstem, estimated as their sum. The results also demonstrate that the method can detect atrophy patterns in the brainstem structures that have been previously described in the literature. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to detect differential effects of AD on the brainstem structures. The method will be implemented as part of the popular neuroimaging package FreeSurfer. PMID:25776214

  16. Evaluation of five image registration tools for abdominal CT: pitfalls and opportunities with soft anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  17. [Abdominal migraine as a cause of chronic recurrent abdominal pain in a 9-years-old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Jarosław; Piasecki, Leszek; Kasner, Jacek; Karczewska, Krystyna

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal migraine is a rarely recognized functional intestinal disorder, manifesting as recurrent paroxysmal abdominal pain of neurogenic origin. The authors describe the 9-years old girl referred to the hospital because of chronic paroxysmal abdominal pain. She did not improve after medication used commonly in functional abdominal disorders (drotaverine, mebeverine, trimebutine). On the ground of various investigations organic causes of abdominal pain were excluded. Carefully completed anamnesis, as well as precise description of the clinical picture of abdominal pain attacks, has lead to the diagnosis of abdominal migraine. According to advice of neurologist the treatment with amitriptyline was introduced. Thereafter a significant improvement was observed. Abdominal migraine has to be taken in to account when diagnosing chronic abdominal pain in children. PMID:16245431

  18. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma response evaluation with MRI texture classification

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lara CV; Luukkaala, Tiina; Pertovaara, Hannu; Saarinen, Tuomas O; Heinonen, Tomi T; Järvenpää, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa I; Eskola, Hannu J; Dastidar, Prasun

    2009-01-01

    Background To show magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture appearance change in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) during treatment with response controlled by quantitative volume analysis. Methods A total of 19 patients having NHL with an evaluable lymphoma lesion were scanned at three imaging timepoints with 1.5T device during clinical treatment evaluation. Texture characteristics of images were analyzed and classified with MaZda application and statistical tests. Results NHL tissue MRI texture imaged before treatment and under chemotherapy was classified within several subgroups, showing best discrimination with 96% correct classification in non-linear discriminant analysis of T2-weighted images. Texture parameters of MRI data were successfully tested with statistical tests to assess the impact of the separability of the parameters in evaluating chemotherapy response in lymphoma tissue. Conclusion Texture characteristics of MRI data were classified successfully; this proved texture analysis to be potential quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during chemotherapy response monitoring. PMID:19545438

  19. Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges.

    PubMed

    Farah, Martha J; Hutchinson, J Benjamin; Phelps, Elizabeth A; Wagner, Anthony D

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI)-based lie detection has been marketed as a tool for enhancing personnel selection, strengthening national security and protecting personal reputations, and at least three US courts have been asked to admit the results of lie detection scans as evidence during trials. How well does fMRI-based lie detection perform, and how should the courts, and society more generally, respond? Here, we address various questions — some of which are based on a meta-analysis of published studies — concerning the scientific state of the art in fMRI-based lie detection and its legal status, and discuss broader ethical and societal implications. We close with three general policy recommendations. PMID:24588019

  20. Advances in 4D Treatment Planning for Scanned Particle Beam Therapy — Report of Dedicated Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Christoph; Graeff, Christian; Riboldi, Marco; Nill, Simeon; Baroni, Guido; Knopf, Antje-Christin

    2014-01-01

    We report on recent progress in the field of mobile tumor treatment with scanned particle beams, as discussed in the latest editions of the 4D treatment planning workshop. The workshop series started in 2009, with about 20 people from 4 research institutes involved, all actively working on particle therapy delivery and development. The first workshop resulted in a summary of recommendations for the treatment of mobile targets, along with a list of requirements to apply these guidelines clinically. The increased interest in the treatment of mobile tumors led to a continuously growing number of attendees: the 2012 edition counted more than 60 participants from 20 institutions and commercial vendors. The focus of research discussions among workshop participants progressively moved from 4D treatment planning to complete 4D treatments, aiming at effective and safe treatment delivery. Current research perspectives on 4D treatments include all critical aspects of time resolved delivery, such as in-room imaging, motion detection, beam application, and quality assurance techniques. This was motivated by the start of first clinical treatments of hepato cellular tumors with a scanned particle beam, relying on gating or abdominal compression for motion mitigation. Up to date research activities emphasize significant efforts in investigating advanced motion mitigation techniques, with a specific interest in the development of dedicated tools for experimental validation. Potential improvements will be made possible in the near future through 4D optimized treatment plans that require upgrades of the currently established therapy control systems for time resolved delivery. But since also these novel optimization techniques rely on the validity of the 4DCT, research focusing on alternative 4D imaging technique, such as MRI based 4DCT generation will continue. PMID:24354749

  1. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  2. Image Registration for Quantitative Analysis of Kidney Function using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sance, Rosario; Ledesma-Carbayo, María J.; Lundervold, Arvid; Santos, Andrés

    2006-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the possibilities of registration algorithms to compensate respiratory motion and deformation in abdominal DCE-MRI 3D temporary series. The final objective is that from registered data, appropriate intensity curves of local renal activity along the time could be represented for each kidney voxel. Assuming a relation between the voxel intensity and the contrast media concentration, this non-invasive renographic method could be used to evaluate the local renal function, and to calculate typical renal parameters like glomerular filtration rate.

  3. Patch-based generation of a pseudo CT from conventional MRI sequences for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Hansen, Rasmus H.; Andersen, Jon A. L.; Edmund, Jens M.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy (RT) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the only modality, the information on electron density must be derived from the MRI scan by creating a so-called pseudo computed tomography (pCT). This is a nontrivial task, since the voxel-intensities in an MRI scan are not uniquely related to electron density. To solve the task, voxel-based or atlas-based models have typically been used. The voxel-based models require a specialized dual ultrashort echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization and the atlas-based models require deformable registrations of conventional MRI scans. In this study, we investigate the potential of a patch-based method for creating a pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans without using deformable registrations. We compare this method against two state-of-the-art methods within the voxel-based and atlas-based categories. Methods: The data consisted of CT and MRI scans of five cranial RT patients. To compare the performance of the different methods, a nested cross validation was done to find optimal model parameters for all the methods. Voxel-wise and geometric evaluations of the pCTs were done. Furthermore, a radiologic evaluation based on water equivalent path lengths was carried out, comparing the upper hemisphere of the head in the pCT and the real CT. Finally, the dosimetric accuracy was tested and compared for a photon treatment plan. Results: The pCTs produced with the patch-based method had the best voxel-wise, geometric, and radiologic agreement with the real CT, closely followed by the atlas-based method. In terms of the dosimetric accuracy, the patch-based method had average deviations of less than 0.5% in measures related to target coverage. Conclusions: We showed that a patch-based method could generate an accurate pCT based on conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI sequences and without deformable registrations. In our evaluations, the method performed better than existing voxel-based and

  4. Functional MRI compliance in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Sirel; Dinçer, Elvin Doğutepe; Ceylan, Arzu Özkan; Tileylioğlu, Emre; Karakaş, Hakkı Muammer; Talı, E. Turgut

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to test the effect of prescan training and orientation in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and to investigate whether fMRI compliance was modified by state anxiety. METHODS Subjects included 77 males aged 6–12 years; there were 53 patients in the ADHD group and 24 participants in the healthy control group. Exclusion criteria included neurological and/or psychiatric comorbidities (other than ADHD), the use of psychoactive drugs, and an intelligence quotient outside the normal range. Children were individually subjected to prescan orientation and training. Data were acquired using a 1.5 Tesla scanner and an 8-channel head coil. Functional scans were performed using a standard neurocognitive task. RESULTS The neurocognitive task led to reliable fMRI maps. Compliance was not significantly different between ADHD and control groups based on success, failure, and repetition rates of fMRI. Compliance of ADHD patients with extreme levels of anxiety was also not significantly different. CONCLUSION The fMRI compliance of ADHD children is typically lower than that of healthy children. However, compliance can be increased to the level of age-matched healthy control children by addressing concerns about the technical and procedural aspects of fMRI, providing orientation programs, and performing on-task training. In patients thus trained, compliance does not change with the level of state anxiety suggesting that the anxiety hypothesis of fMRI compliance is not supported. PMID:25519454

  5. The Incidence, Clinical Outcomes, and Risk Factors of Thrombocytopenia in Intra-Abdominal Infection Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qin; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Li, Guanwei; Gu, Guosheng; Wu, Xiuwen; Li, Yuan; Chen, Jun; Zhao, Yunzhao; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies on the incidence and risk factors of thrombocytopenia among intra-abdominal infection patients remain absent, hindering efficacy assessments regarding thrombocytopenia prevention strategies. Methods We retrospectively studied 267 consecutively enrolled patients with intra-abdominal infections. Occurrence of thrombocytopenia was scanned for all patients. All-cause 28-day mortality was recorded. Variables from univariate analyses that were associated with occurrence of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia were included in a multivariable logistic regression analysis to determine thrombocytopenia predictors. Results Median APACHE II score and SOFA score of the whole cohort was 12 and 3 respectively. The overall ICU mortality was 7.87% and the 28-day mortality was 8.98%. The incidence of thrombocytopenia among intra-abdominal infection patients was 21.73%. Regardless of preexisting or hospital-acquired one, thrombocytopenia is associated with an increased ICU mortality and 28-day mortality as well as length of ICU or hospital stay. A higher SOFA and ISTH score at admission were significant hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia risk factors. Conclusions This is the first study to identify a high incidence of thrombocytopenia in patients with intra-abdominal infections. Our findings suggest that the inflammatory milieu of intra-abdominal infections may uniquely predispose those patients to thrombocytopenia. More effective thrombocytopenia prevention strategies are necessary in intra-abdominal infection patients. PMID:26808492

  6. Real-time cardiac MRI using DSP's.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P N; Iannuzzelli, R J; Epstein, F H; Balaban, R S

    1999-07-01

    A real-time cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system has been implemented using digital signal processing (DSP) technology. The system enables real-time acquisition, processing, and display of ungated cardiac movies at moderate video rates of 20 images/s. A custom graphical user interface (GUI) provides interactive control of data acquisition parameters and image display functions. Images can be compressed into moving-picture experts group (MPEG) movies, but are displayed on the console without compression during the scan. Compared to existing real-time MRI systems, implementation with DSP's allows rapid parallel computations, fast data transfers, and greater system flexibility, including the ability to scale to multiple channels, at the expense of somewhat higher component cost. PMID:10504098

  7. Towards MRI-guided linear accelerator control: gating on an MRI accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crijns, S. P. M.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2011-08-01

    To boost the possibilities of image guidance in radiotherapy by providing images with superior soft-tissue contrast during treatment, we pursue diagnostic quality MRI functionality integrated with a linear accelerator. Large respiration-induced semi-periodic target excursions hamper treatment of cancer of the abdominal organs. Methods to compensate in real time for such motion are gating and tracking. These strategies are most effective in cases where anatomic motion can be visualized directly, which supports the use of an integrated MRI accelerator. We establish here an infrastructure needed to realize gated radiation delivery based on MR feedback and demonstrate its potential as a first step towards more advanced image guidance techniques. The position of a phantom subjected to one-dimensional periodic translation is tracked with the MR scanner. Real-time communication with the MR scanner and control of the radiation beam are established. Based on the time-resolved position of the phantom, gated radiation delivery to the phantom is realized. Dose distributions for dynamic delivery conditions with varying gating windows are recorded on gafchromic film. The similarity between dynamically and statically obtained dose profiles gradually increases as the gating window is decreased. With gating windows of 5 mm, we obtain sharp dose profiles. We validate our gating implementation by comparing measured dose profiles to theoretical profiles calculated using the knowledge of the imposed motion pattern. Excellent correspondence is observed. At the same time, we show that real-time on-line reconstruction of the accumulated dose can be performed using time-resolved target position information. This facilitates plan adaptation not only on a fraction-to-fraction scale but also during one fraction, which is especially valuable in highly accelerated treatment strategies. With the currently established framework and upcoming improvements to our prototype-integrated MRI accelerator

  8. Excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Iijima, Tatsuo; Yoshimi, Fuyo; Nagai, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Here, we report the surgical excision of the urachal remnant using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy with a camera port in the umbilicus, combined with a small Pfannenstiel incision to optimally treat the bladder apex. Presentation of case A 21-year-old woman presented with periumbilical discharge and pain on urination. Contrast enhanced CT and MRI showed an abscess in the umbilical region that was connected to the bladder via a long tube-like structure. It was diagnosed as an infected urachal sinus. Partial excision of the umbilical fossa followed by dissection of the urachal remnant was easily performed using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy from the umbilicus down to the bladder without pneumoperitoneum or additional trocar placement. A Pfannenstiel incision was made above the pubis to get access to the junction between the urachal remnant and the bladder. Under direct vision, we succeeded in accurately dividing the remnant tract, and we adequately closed the bladder opening with absorbable sutures. This method has the advantage of easily closing peritoneal defects after excision of the urachal remnant with direct sutures under a laparoscopic view from the umbilicus. Cosmetic satisfaction was obtained postoperatively. Discussion and conclusion Urachal sinus excision using the abdominal wall-lift laparoscopy seems to surpass the previously reported methods in term of safety, cosmetics, and adequacy of surgical procedures. PMID:27064744

  9. Delineating potential epileptogenic areas utilizing resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Ricardo; Nair, Veena; Meier, Timothy; Holdsworth, Ryan; Tunnell, Evelyn; Rutecki, Paul; Sillay, Karl; Meyerand, Mary E; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-08-01

    Seizure localization includes neuroimaging like electroencephalogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with limited ability to characterize the epileptogenic network. Temporal clustering analysis (TCA) characterizes epileptogenic network congruent with interictal epileptiform discharges by clustering together voxels with transient signals. We generated epileptogenic areas for 12 of 13 epilepsy patients with TCA, congruent with different areas of seizure onset. Resting functional MRI (fMRI) scans are noninvasive, and can be acquired quickly, in patients with different levels of severity and function. Analyzing resting fMRI data using TCA is quick and can complement clinical methods to characterize the epileptogenic network. PMID:27362339

  10. Cardiopulmonary monitoring in intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malbrain, Manu L N G; Ameloot, Koen; Gillebert, Carl; Cheatham, Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Cardiopulmonary dysfunction and failure are commonly encountered in the patient with intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) or abdominal compartment syndrome. Accurate assessment and optimization of preload, contractility, and afterload in conjunction with appropriate goal-directed resuscitation and assessment of fluid responsiveness are essential to restore end-organ perfusion. In patients with IAH, the traditional "barometric" preload indicators such as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure are erroneously increased. Volumetric monitoring techniques have been proven to be superior in directing the appropriate resuscitation together with targeted abdominal perfusion pressure. If such limitations are not recognized, misinterpretation of the patient's cardiac status is likely, resulting in inappropriate and potentially detrimental therapy. IAH also markedly affects the mechanical properties of the chest wall and consequently also the respiratory function. Altered mechanical properties of the chest wall may limit ventilation, influence the work of breathing, affect the interaction between the respiratory muscles, hasten the development of respiratory failure, and interfere with gas exchange. Pulmonary monitoring is important to understand the relationships between intra-abdominal pressure and chest wall mechanics and the impact of IAH on ventilator-induced lung injury, lung distention, recruitment, and lung edema. PMID:21944448

  11. Intra-abdominal sepsis after hepatic resection.

    PubMed Central

    Pace, R F; Blenkharn, J I; Edwards, W J; Orloff, M; Blumgart, L H; Benjamin, I S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and thirty hepatic resections performed over an 8-year period were reviewed for evidence of postoperative intra-abdominal sepsis. Of 126 patients who survived for more than 24 hours after operation, 36 developed culture positive intra-abdominal collections (28.6%). Significant independent variables associated with the development of intra-abdominal sepsis were diagnoses of trauma or cholangiocarcinoma, and the need for reoperation to control hemorrhage during the postoperative period. Before 1984, infected fluid collections were treated predominantly by operative drainage, but this has largely been replaced by percutaneous methods, which have proven effective in most cases. Eighteen (50%) of the infections were caused by a mixed bacterial culture, with Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli being the most common isolates. Six patients with clinical signs of sepsis had a sterile fluid collection drained with complete relief of symptoms. This review suggests that intra-abdominal sepsis is a frequent complication after hepatic resection, and can often be managed successfully by nonoperative percutaneous drainage. PMID:2493775

  12. Acute abdominal complications following hip surgery.

    PubMed

    Deleanu, B; Prejbeanu, R; Vermesan, D; Haragus, H; Icma, I; Predescu, V

    2014-01-01

    Hip surgeries are some of the most common and successful orthopedic procedures. Although rarely, abdominal complications do occur and are associated with unfavorable outcomes.We aimed to identify and describe the severe abdominal complications that appear in patients under-going elective or traumatic hip surgery. A four year retrospective electronic database research identified 408 elective primary hip replacements,51 hip revisions and 1040 intra and extracapsular proximal femur fractures. Out of these, three males and 4 females between 64 - 84 years old were identified to have developed acute abdominal complications: perforated acute ulcer (3),acute cholecystitis (2), volvulus (1), toxic megacolon with peritonitis (1) and acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (1).Complications debuted 3 - 10 days after index orthopedic surgery. Acute perioperative abdominal complications are rarely encountered during orthopedic surgery. When these do occur, they do so almost exclusively in patients with hippathology, comorbidities and most often lead to life threatening situations. We thus emphasize the need for early identification and appropriate management by both orthopedic and general surgery doctors in order to improve patient safety. PMID:24742414

  13. Abdominal injury due to child abuse.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter M; Norton, Catherine M; Dunstan, Frank D; Kemp, Alison M; Yates, David W; Sibert, Jonathan R

    Diagnosis of abuse in children with internal abdominal injury is difficult because of limited published work. We aimed to ascertain the incidence of abdominal injury due to abuse in children age 0-14 years. 20 children (identified via the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit) had abdominal injuries due to abuse and 164 (identified via the Trauma Audit and Research Network) had injuries to the abdomen due to accident (112 by road-traffic accidents, 52 by falls). 16 abused children were younger than 5 years. Incidence of abdominal injury due to abuse was 2.33 cases per million children per year (95% CI 1.43-3.78) in children younger than 5 years. Six abused children died. 11 abused children had an injury to the gut (ten small bowel) compared with five (all age >5 years) who were injured by a fall (relative risk 5.72 [95% CI 2.27-14.4]; p=0.0002). We have shown that small-bowel injuries can arise accidentally as a result of falls and road-traffic accidents but they are significantly more common in abused children. Therefore, injuries to the small bowel in young children need special consideration, particularly if a minor fall is the explanation. PMID:16023514

  14. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. PMID:25666642

  15. Abdominal wall herniae and their underlying pathology

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Emma; Al-Akash, Musallam

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of pseudomyxoma peritonei presenting as a strangulated inguinal hernia. We review the current literature regarding the incidence of underlying pathology in patients presenting with abdominal wall herniae and discuss the need for histological assessment of the hernia sac in selected patients. We highlight the importance of assessing for and being aware of significant underlying pathology in certain patients. PMID:26855074

  16. Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Helicobacter cinaedi

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, Takamasa; Tamura, Atsushi; Lefor, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is a rare human pathogen which has various clinical manifestations such as cellulitis, bacteremia, arthritis, meningitis, and infectious endocarditis. We report an abdominal aortic aneurysm infected with Helicobacter cinaedi, treated successfully with surgical repair and long-term antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26885430

  17. Geometric validation of self-gating k-space-sorted 4D-MRI vs 4D-CT using a respiratory motion phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Yong Yang, Wensha; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Tuli, Richard; Wallace, Robert; Fraass, Benedick; Fan, Zhaoyang; Pang, Jianing; Deng, Zixin; Li, Debiao

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: MRI is increasingly being used for radiotherapy planning, simulation, and in-treatment-room motion monitoring. To provide more detailed temporal and spatial MR data for these tasks, we have recently developed a novel self-gated (SG) MRI technique with advantage of k-space phase sorting, high isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution. The current work describes the validation of this 4D-MRI technique using a MRI- and CT-compatible respiratory motion phantom and comparison to 4D-CT. Methods: The 4D-MRI sequence is based on a spoiled gradient echo-based 3D projection reconstruction sequence with self-gating for 4D-MRI at 3 T. Respiratory phase is resolved by using SG k-space lines as the motion surrogate. 4D-MRI images are reconstructed into ten temporal bins with spatial resolution 1.56 × 1.56 × 1.56 mm{sup 3}. A MRI-CT compatible phantom was designed to validate the performance of the 4D-MRI sequence and 4D-CT imaging. A spherical target (diameter 23 mm, volume 6.37 ml) filled with high-concentration gadolinium (Gd) gel is embedded into a plastic box (35 × 40 × 63 mm{sup 3}) and stabilized with low-concentration Gd gel. The phantom, driven by an air pump, is able to produce human-type breathing patterns between 4 and 30 respiratory cycles/min. 4D-CT of the phantom has been acquired in cine mode, and reconstructed into ten phases with slice thickness 1.25 mm. The 4D images sets were imported into a treatment planning software for target contouring. The geometrical accuracy of the 4D MRI and CT images has been quantified using target volume, flattening, and eccentricity. The target motion was measured by tracking the centroids of the spheres in each individual phase. Motion ground-truth was obtained from input signals and real-time video recordings. Results: The dynamic phantom has been operated in four respiratory rate (RR) settings, 6, 10, 15, and 20/min, and was scanned with 4D-MRI and 4D-CT. 4D-CT images have target

  18. Dental MRI: Making the Invisible Visible

    PubMed Central

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Moeller, Steen; Prasad, Hari S.; Garwood, Michael; Nixdorf, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Clinical dentistry is in need of non-invasive and accurate diagnostic methods to better evaluate dental pathosis. The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of a recently developed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, called SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transform (SWIFT), to visualize dental tissues. Methods Three in vitro teeth, representing a limited range of clinical conditions of interest, imaged using a 9.4T system with scanning times ranging from 100 seconds to 25 minutes. In vivo imaging of a subject was performed using a 4T system with a 10-minute scanning time. SWIFT images were compared with traditional two-dimensional radiographs, three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), gradient-echo MR imaging technique, and histological sections. Results A resolution of 100 microns was obtained from in vitro teeth. SWIFT also identified the presence and extent of dental caries and fine structures of the teeth, including cracks and accessory canals, which are not visible with existing clinical radiography techniques. Intraoral positioning of the radiofrequency coil produced initial images of multiple adjacent teeth at a resolution of 400 microns. Conclusions SWIFT MRI offers simultaneous three-dimensional hard and soft tissue imaging of teeth without the use of ionizing radiation. Further, it has the potential to image minute dental structures within clinically relevant scanning times. This technology has implications for endodontists since it offers a potential method to longitudinally evaluate teeth where pulp and root structures have been regenerated. PMID:21787482

  19. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  20. ABDOMINAL OBESITY, MUSCLE COMPOSITION, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The independent relationships between visceral and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) depots, muscle composition, and insulin sensitivity were examined in 40 abdominally obese, premenopausal women. Measurements included glucose disposal by euglycemic clamp, muscle composition by computed to...

  1. fMRI Scanner Noise Interaction with Affective Neural Processes

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Stavros; Gray, Marcus; Critchley, Hugo; Koelsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was the investigation of interaction effects between functional MRI scanner noise and affective neural processes. Stimuli comprised of psychoacoustically balanced musical pieces, expressing three different emotions (fear, neutral, joy). Participants (N=34, 19 female) were split into two groups, one subjected to continuous scanning and another subjected to sparse temporal scanning that features decreased scanner noise. Tests for interaction effects between scanning group (sparse/quieter vs continuous/noisier) and emotion (fear, neutral, joy) were performed. Results revealed interactions between the affective expression of stimuli and scanning group localized in bilateral auditory cortex, insula and visual cortex (calcarine sulcus). Post-hoc comparisons revealed that during sparse scanning, but not during continuous scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for fear, as well as stronger for fear than for neutral in bilateral auditory cortex. During continuous scanning, but not during sparse scanning, BOLD signals were significantly stronger for joy than for neutral in the left auditory cortex and for joy than for fear in the calcarine sulcus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show a statistical interaction effect between scanner noise and affective processes and extends evidence suggesting scanner noise to be an important factor in functional MRI research that can affect and distort affective brain processes. PMID:24260420

  2. Abdominal Lymphatic Malformation Presenting as Acute Abdominal Pain: A Common Pediatric Complaint, but an Unusual Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Christopher I; Farrell, Caitlin A; Nelson, Kyle A; Levy, Jason A

    2016-05-01

    We present the clinical and radiological findings involving a mesenteric lymphatic malformation causing volvulus in a toddler presenting with acute abdominal pain, as well as its treatment options. PMID:27139293

  3. An in vivo OctreoScan-negative adrenal pheochromocytoma expresses somatostatin receptors and responds to somatostatin analogs treatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, M C; Piccin, D; Bondanelli, M; Tagliati, F; De Carlo, E; Culler, M D; Uberti, E C degli

    2003-06-01

    A 52-yr-old woman presented with hypertension, elevated urinary vanillylmandelic acid, metanephrines, normetanephrines, and plasma chromogranin A (CgA), but normal urinary catecholamine levels. Abdominal ultrasonography and subsequent MRI imaging showed a 3 cm nodular lesion of the right adrenal gland also visualized by 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy consistent with a pheochromocytoma (PC). Her OctreoScan was negative. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy and histological examination showed a PC. The adrenal medulla tissue was examined for somatostatin (SRIH) receptor subtypes 1 to 5 (SSTR1 to 5) expression by RT-PCR. Cultured tumor cells were treated with either SRIH, Lanreotide (Lan), or an SSTR2 (BIM-23 120) or SSTR5 (BIM-23 206) selective agonist. CgA secretion was measured in the medium by ELISA and catecholamine levels by HPLC after 6h. Cell viability was assessed after 48h. RT-PCR analysis showed that SSTR1, 2, 3 and 4 were expressed. CgA secretion was significantly reduced by SRIH (- 80 %), Lan (- 35 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 65 %). Norepinephrine secretion was reduced by SRIH (- 66 %), Lan (- 40 %), and BIM-23 120 (- 70 %). Epinephrine and dopamine secretion was also inhibited by treatment with SRIH (- 90 % and - 93 %, respectively) and BIM-23 120 (- 33 % and - 75 %, respectively) but not by Lan. Cell viability was also significantly reduced by SRIH (- 30 %), Lan (- 10 %), and the SSTR2 selective agonist (- 20 %). The SSTR5 selective agonist did not modify either CgA and catecholamine secretion or cell viability. Our data show that SSTRs may be present in a PC although OctreoScan is negative in vivo, and that SRIH and its analogs may reduce both differentiated and proliferative functions in chromaffin cells in vitro. These findings suggest that SRIH analogs with enhanced SSTR2 affinity might be useful in the medical therapy of PC, even when an OctreoScan is negative. PMID:12920656

  4. Abdominal Lipectomy: A Prospective Outcomes Study

    PubMed Central

    Semer, Nadine B; Ho, Wan C; Mills, Sharrie; Rajashekara, BM; Taylor, Jason R; Trung, Nguyen B; Young, Henry; Kivuls, Juris

    2008-01-01

    Context/objective: Abdominal lipectomy is performed by plastic surgeons to provide symptomatic, functional, and cosmetic relief for patients with excess abdominal tissue. However, there are few clinical outcome studies looking at the utility of this procedure: this is the first prospective oucomes study. Design: Patients who underwent abdominal lipectomy at the Bellflower Medical Center during a 12-month period (September 2004 through September 2005) were prospectively studied. Data were collected at the preoperative visit, during surgery, and at the one-week, one-month, and six-month postoperative visits. Outcome measures: Complications, both major (requiring rehospitalization or reoperation) and minor (requiring local outpatient care) were identified. To evaluate the impact on our patients' perceived health and well-being as well as body image, we administered the Short Form–36 Health Survey (SF-36) and the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ) to participants at their preoperative and six-month postoperative visits. Results: For the 72 patients enrolled in the study, the postoperative major complication rate was 5.6% (four patients) and the minor complication rate was 27.8% (20 patients); 98.3% were happy to have had the surgery. Two components of the MBSRQ, feelings of attractiveness and body area satisfaction, showed significant improvement (p < 0.0001 for each) at six-month postoperative testing. No component of the SF-36 reached statistical significance between pre- and postoperative testing. Conclusion: Because the complication rate for cosmetic abdominoplasty in our study did not significantly differ from rates reported for other studies, and given our data on perceived patient satisfaction and improvement in outcomes, our study validates the utility of abdominal lipectomy for patients with symptomatic lower abdominal pannus. PMID:21364808

  5. Peritoneal Breach as an Indication for Exploratory Laparotomy in Penetrating Abdominal Stab Injury: Operative Findings in Haemodynamically Stable Patients

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Victor; Martin, Kate; Varma, Dinesh; Fitzgerald, Mark; Pilgrim, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Management of haemodynamically stable patients with penetrating abdominal injuries varies from nonoperative to operative management. The aim was to investigate whether peritoneal breach when used as an indication for exploratory laparotomy appropriately identified patients with intra-abdominal visceral injury. Methods. We conducted retrospective cohort study of all patients presenting with PAI at a major trauma centre from January 2007 to December 2011. We measured the incidence of peritoneal breach and correlated this with intra-abdominal visceral injury diagnosed at surgery. Results. 252 patients were identified with PAI. Of the included patients, 71 were managed nonoperatively and 118 operatively. The operative diagnoses included nonperitoneal-breaching injuries, intraperitoneal penetration without organ damage, or intraperitoneal injury with organ damage. The presenting trauma CT scan was reported as normal in 63%, 34%, and 2% of these groups, respectively. The total negative laparotomy/laparoscopy rate for all patients presented with PAI was 21%, almost half of whom had a normal CT scan. Conclusion. We found that peritoneal breach on its own does not necessarily always equate to intra-abdominal visceral injury. Observation with sequential examination for PAI patients with a normal CT scan may be more important than exclusion of peritoneal breach via laparoscopy. PMID:26064688

  6. [Value of abdominal ultrasound and skeletal scintigraphy in TNM classification of tumors in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Dost, P; Schrader, M; Talanow, D

    1994-07-01

    After establishing the diagnosis of carcinoma in the head and neck, routine examinations comprise chest x-ray, bone scan and abdominal ultrasound and are often initiated to exclude or confirm metastatic disease. Data are few on the frequency of metastases at the time of initial diagnosis and reliability of bone scanning and sonography to detect metastases. The aim of the present retrospective study was to define criteria for the use of these latter two methods of examination. The medical records of 382 patients with squamous cell carcinoma who were examined for the first time were analyzed during a four-year period. Bone scanning was performed on 360 patients, but suspect scintigraphic evidence of bone metastasis could be confirmed in only one patient. Only three of 367 patients undergoing abdominal ultrasound were found to have hepatic metastases. Reasons for a practical use of these two methods of examination are discussed. PMID:7928432

  7. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:22882988

  8. A Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Analysis of Multiorgan Abdominal Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, Joshua L.; Mori, Shinichiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Hong, Theodore S.; Chen, George T.Y.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify multiorgan respiration-induced motion in the abdomen in liver and pancreatic cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 18 patients treated for abdominal tumors. Contours of multiple abdominal organs were drawn by the radiation oncologist at one respiratory phase; these contours were propagated to other respiratory phases by deformable registration. Three-dimensional organ models were generated from the resulting contours at each phase. Motions of the bounding box and center of mass were extracted and analyzed for the clinical target volume and organs at risk. Results: On average, the center of mass motion for liver clinical target volumes was 9.7 mm (SD 5 mm) in the superior-inferior direction, with a range of 3 to 18 mm; for pancreatic tumors, the average was 5 mm (SD 1 mm) m with a range of 3 to 7 mm. Abdominal organs move in unison, but with varying amplitudes. Gating near exhale (T40-T60) reduces the range of motion by a factor of {approx}10. Conclusion: We have used deformable registration to calculate the trajectories of abdominal organs in four dimensions, based on center of mass and bounding box motion metrics. Our results are compared with previously reported studies. Possible reasons for differences are discussed.

  9. The relationship between wall shear stress distributions and intimal thickening in the human abdominal aorta

    PubMed Central

    Bonert, Michael; Leask, Richard L; Butany, Jagdish; Ethier, C Ross; Myers, Jerry G; Johnston, K Wayne; Ojha, Matadial

    2003-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this work was to determine wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the human abdominal aorta and to compare these patterns to measurements of intimal thickness (IT) from autopsy samples. Methods The WSS was experimentally measured using the laser photochromic dye tracer technique in an anatomically faithful in vitro model based on CT scans of the abdominal aorta in a healthy 35-year-old subject. IT was quantified as a function of circumferential and axial position using light microscopy in ten human autopsy specimens. Results The histomorphometric analysis suggests that IT increases with age and that the distribution of intimal thickening changes with age. The lowest WSS in the flow model was found on the posterior wall inferior to the inferior mesenteric artery, and coincided with the region of most prominent IT in the autopsy samples. Local geometrical features in the flow model, such as the expansion at the inferior mesenteric artery (common in younger individuals), strongly influenced WSS patterns. The WSS was found to correlate negatively with IT (r2 = 0.3099; P = 0.0047). Conclusion Low WSS in the abdominal aorta is co-localized with IT and may be related to atherogenesis. Also, rates of IT in the abdominal aorta are possibly influenced by age-related geometrical changes. PMID:14641919

  10. MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT in primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Zhai, Zhijun; Wang, Yang; Zuo, Changjing

    2015-01-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (PRMC) is an extremely rare neoplasm. We present a case of PRMC with MRI, enhanced CT, and FDG PET/CT findings. Abdominal MRI showed a cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum with a mural nodule. The mural nodule showed progressive enhancement on enhanced CT and intense FDG uptake on early PET/CT with increased SUVmax on delayed PET/CT. Laparoscopy was performed. Retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma was confirmed histopathologically. Metastasis from gastrointestinal tract or ovary was excluded. This case indicates, although rare, PRMC should be considered when a hypermetabolic retroperitoneal cystic lesion with bilateral normal ovaries is found on FDG PET/CT. PMID:24445275

  11. OHVIRA: Uterus didelphys, blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis: Advantage MRI.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Sunil K; Misra, Ritu; Thukral, Brij B; Gupta, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    We present here a case of an uncommon complex uterine anomaly - Obstructed HemiVagina with Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis (OHVIRA), also known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome in a 14-year-old girl along with sonographic (trans-abdominal and trans labial), and MRI findings. The patient underwent surgery wherein imaging findings were confirmed. An MRI has proved to be of great help in correct diagnosis avoiding surgical interventions/ laparoscopy, which were needed in past to diagnose this rare anomaly. We also discuss the development of this anomaly with the help of a relatively new theory of uro-genital development by Acien and review the literature. PMID:22870020

  12. OHVIRA: Uterus didelphys, blind hemivagina and ipsilateral renal agenesis: Advantage MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sunil K; Misra, Ritu; Thukral, Brij B; Gupta, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    We present here a case of an uncommon complex uterine anomaly – Obstructed HemiVagina with Ipsilateral Renal Agenesis (OHVIRA), also known as Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome in a 14-year-old girl along with sonographic (trans-abdominal and trans labial), and MRI findings. The patient underwent surgery wherein imaging findings were confirmed. An MRI has proved to be of great help in correct diagnosis avoiding surgical interventions/ laparoscopy, which were needed in past to diagnose this rare anomaly. We also discuss the development of this anomaly with the help of a relatively new theory of uro-genital development by Acien and review the literature. PMID:22870020

  13. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents. PMID:25088309

  14. The role of computed tomography in evaluating body composition and the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gibson, D J; Burden, S T; Strauss, B J; Todd, C; Lal, S

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that there were 3.45 million new cases and 1.75 million deaths from cancer in Europe in 2012. Colorectal cancer was one of the most common cancers, accounting for 13% of new cases and 12.2% of all deaths. Conditions causing reduced muscle mass, such as sarcopenia, can increase the morbidity and mortality of people with cancer. Computed tomography (CT) scans can provide accurate, high-quality information on body composition, including muscle mass. To date, there has been no systematic review on the role of CT scans in identifying sarcopenia in abdominal cancer. This review aimed to examine the role of CT scans in determining the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal cancer. A systematic review of English-language articles published in 2000 or later was conducted. Articles included cohort, randomised controlled trials and validation studies. Participants were people diagnosed with abdominal cancer who had undergone a CT scan. Data extraction and critical appraisal were undertaken. Ten cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies demonstrated that low muscle mass was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome, with six specifically demonstrating reduced survival rates. Eight studies demonstrated that a greater number of patients (27.3-66.7%) were identified as sarcopenic using CT scans compared with numbers identified as malnourished using body mass index. CT scans can identify reduced muscle mass and predict negative cancer outcomes in people with abdominal malignancies, where traditional methods of assessment are less effective. PMID:25782424

  15. What is the clinical and ethical importance of incidental abnormalities found by knee MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Rebecca; Stuckey, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Richard; Davis, Susan R; Ebeling, Peter R; Wluka, Anita E

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to examine joints for research purposes. It may detect both suspected and unsuspected abnormalities. This raises both clinical and ethical issues, especially when incidental abnormalities are detected. The prevalence of incidental, potentially clinically significant abnormalities identified by MRI and their clinical significance in a population undergoing knee MRI in research studies are unknown. Methods We examined the prevalence of such lesions in healthy asymptomatic adults and those with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing knee MRI with limited sequences for the purpose of research. The MRI findings in 601 asymptomatic subjects and 132 with knee OA who underwent at least one limited knee MRI scan for cartilage volume measurement were examined by an MRI radiologist for the presence of potentially clinically significant abnormalities. Results These were present in 2.3% of healthy and 2.3% of OA subjects. All required further investigation to exclude non-benign disease, including four with bone marrow expansion (0.7%), requiring further investigation and management. A single potentially life-threatening lesion, a myeloma lesion, was identified in a subject with symptomatic knee OA on their second MRI scan in a longitudinal study. Conclusion As musculoskeletal MRI is increasingly used clinically and for research purposes, the potential for detecting unsuspected abnormalities that require further investigation should be recognized. Incorporating a system to detect these, to characterize unexpected findings, and to facilitate appropriate medical follow-up when designing studies using this technology should be considered ethical research practice. PMID:18252003

  16. [Abdominal CSF pseudocyst recurrence in a 14-year-old patient with ventricular-peritoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Laurent, P; Hennecker, J-L; Schillaci, A; Scordidis, V

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare complication of ventricular-peritoneal shunt (VPS) but needs to be considered in every patient with abdominal complaints or signs of intracranial hypertension (IH). The pathogenesis of pseudocysts remains unclear. Diverse predisposing factors have been proposed such as previous abdominal surgeries, multiple VPS revisions, infections, history of necrotizing enterocolitis, and nonspecific inflammatory processes. We report the case of a 14-year-old patient, known to have a VPS as intraventricular hemorrhage treatment, presenting cephalalgia, vomiting, apathy, and an indurate abdominal mass without fever. The first abdominal CSF pseudocyst diagnosis had been established 3 months earlier. Abdominal ultrasounds confirmed a large homogeneous cyst with the shunt tip within the pseudocyst. Cerebral CT revealed an increased ventricular size. An exploratory laparotomy with cyst aspiration, lysis of adhesions, excision of cystic walls, and repositioning of the peritoneal catheter was performed. No antibiotics were initiated given that the cultures were negative. Ultrasonography proved to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of VPS abdominal complications, especially CSF pseudocyst. CT can also reliably confirm the pseudocyst. In case of IH signs, a cerebral CT scan can be performed to evaluate the ventricular distension and to check the shunt position. Various methods to process the cyst have been described in the medical literature, but the recurrence rate remains elevated (25-100%). Then the probability of an infection without any clinical sign has to be considered. In case of suspected infection, the VPS is removed and replaced by an external ventricular drain. Antibiotics are started and adjusted to the results of the CSF culture. If there is no direct sign of infection, only the distal catheter is externalized and antibiotics are introduced until infection is treated. Depending on the peritoneal absorption state

  17. Abdominal Organ Location, Morphology, and Rib Coverage for the 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile Males and Females in the Supine and Seated Posture using Multi-Modality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ashley R.; Gayzik, F. Scott; Moreno, Daniel P.; Martin, R. Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use data from a multi-modality image set of males and females representing the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (n=6) to examine abdominal organ location, morphology, and rib coverage variations between supine and seated postures. Medical images were acquired from volunteers in three image modalities including Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and upright MRI (uMRI). A manual and semi-automated segmentation method was used to acquire data and a registration technique was employed to conduct a comparative analysis between abdominal organs (liver, spleen, and kidneys) in both postures. Location of abdominal organs, defined by center of gravity movement, varied between postures and was found to be significant (p=0.002 to p=0.04) in multiple directions for each organ. In addition, morphology changes, including compression and expansion, were seen in each organ as a result of postural changes. Rib coverage, defined as the projected area of the ribs onto the abdominal organs, was measured in frontal, lateral, and posterior projections, and also varied between postures. A significant change in rib coverage between postures was measured for the spleen and right kidney (p=0.03 and p=0.02). The results indicate that posture affects the location, morphology and rib coverage area of abdominal organs and these implications should be noted in computational modeling efforts focused on a seated posture. PMID:24406951

  18. Effects of ovariohysterectomy on intra-abdominal pressure and abdominal perfusion pressure in cats.

    PubMed

    Bosch, L; Rivera del Álamo, M M; Andaluz, A; Monreal, L; Torrente, C; García-Arnas, F; Fresno, L

    2012-12-15

    Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal perfusion pressure (APP) have shown clinical relevance in monitoring critically ill human beings submitted to abdominal surgery. Only a few studies have been performed in veterinary medicine. The aim of this study was to assess how pregnancy and abdominal surgery may affect IAP and APP in healthy cats. For this purpose, pregnant (n=10) and non-pregnant (n=11) queens undergoing elective spaying, and tomcats (n=20, used as controls) presented for neutering by scrotal orchidectomy were included in the study. IAP, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), APP, heart rate and rectal temperature (RT) were determined before, immediately after, and four hours after surgery. IAP increased significantly immediately after abdominal surgery in both female groups when compared with baseline (P<0.05) and male (P<0.05) values, and returned to initial perioperative readings four hours after surgery. Tomcats and pregnant females (P<0.05) showed an increase in MAP and APP immediately after surgery decreasing back to initial perioperative values four hours later. A significant decrease in RT was appreciated immediately after laparotomy in both pregnant and non-pregnant queens. IAP was affected by abdominal surgery in this study, due likely to factors, such as postoperative pain and hypothermia. Pregnancy did not seem to affect IAP in this population of cats, possibly due to subjects being in early stages of pregnancy. PMID:23118052

  19. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cellular Inflammation in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    McBride, O.M.B.; Joshi, N.V.; Robson, J.M.J.; MacGillivray, T.J.; Gray, C.D.; Fletcher, A.M.; Dweck, M.R.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Rudd, J.H.F.; Newby, D.E.; Semple, S.I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. Combined 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive methods of assessing tissue inflammation. The aim of this study was to compare these techniques in patients with AAA. Materials and methods Fifteen patients with asymptomatic AAA with diameter 46 ± 7 mm underwent PET-CT with 18F-FDG, and T2*-weighted MRI before and 24 hours after administration of USPIO. The PET-CT and MRI data were then co-registered. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated to measure 18F-FDG activity, and USPIO uptake was determined using the change in R2*. Comparisons between the techniques were made using a quadrant analysis and a voxel-by-voxel evaluation. Results When all areas of the aneurysm were evaluated, there was a modest correlation between the SUV on PET-CT and the change in R2* on USPIO-enhanced MRI (n = 70,345 voxels; r = .30; p < .0001). Although regions of increased 18F-FDG and USPIO uptake co-localised on occasion, this was infrequent (kappa statistic 0.074; 95% CI 0.026–0.122). 18F-FDG activity was commonly focused in the shoulder region whereas USPIO uptake was more apparent in the main body of the aneurysm. Maximum SUV was lower in patients with mural USPIO uptake. Conclusions Both 18F-FDG PET-CT and USPIO-MRI uptake identify vascular inflammation associated with AAA. Although they demonstrate a modest correlation, there are distinct differences in the pattern and distribution of uptake, suggesting a differential detection of macrophage glycolytic and phagocytic activity respectively. PMID:26919936

  20. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  1. MRI Catheterization in Cardiopulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Toby; Ratnayaka, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and prognostication in patients with complex cardiopulmonary disease can be a clinical challenge. A new procedure, MRI catheterization, involves invasive right-sided heart catheterization performed inside the MRI scanner using MRI instead of traditional radiographic fluoroscopic guidance. MRI catheterization combines simultaneous invasive hemodynamic and MRI functional assessment in a single radiation-free procedure. By combining both modalities, the many individual limitations of invasive catheterization and noninvasive imaging can be overcome, and additional clinical questions can be addressed. Today, MRI catheterization is a clinical reality in specialist centers in the United States and Europe. Advances in medical device design for the MRI environment will enable not only diagnostic but also interventional MRI procedures to be performed within the next few years. PMID:24394821

  2. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  3. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  4. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  5. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  6. Gadofullerene MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bolskar, Robert D

    2008-04-01

    A promising new class of MRI contrast-enhancing agents with high relaxivities is based on gadolinium-containing metallofullerenes, which are also termed gadofullerenes. Detailed study of the water-proton relaxivity properties and intermolecular nanoclustering behavior of gadofullerene derivatives has revealed valuable information about their relaxivity mechanisms and given a deeper understanding of this new class of paramagnetic contrast agent. Here, the latest findings on water-solubilized gadofullerene materials and how these findings relate to their future applications in MRI are reviewed and discussed. PMID:18373426

  7. Interfraction Liver Shape Variability and Impact on GTV Position During Liver Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Abdominal Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: For patients receiving liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), abdominal compression can reduce organ motion, and daily image guidance can reduce setup error. The reproducibility of liver shape under compression may impact treatment delivery accuracy. The purpose of this study was to measure the interfractional variability in liver shape under compression, after best-fit rigid liver-to-liver registration from kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to planning computed tomography (CT) scans and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) position. Methods and Materials: Evaluable patients were treated in a Research Ethics Board-approved SBRT six-fraction study with abdominal compression. Kilovoltage CBCT scans were acquired before treatment and reconstructed as respiratory sorted CBCT scans offline. Manual rigid liver-to-liver registrations were performed from exhale-phase CBCT scans to exhale planning CT scans. Each CBCT liver was contoured, exported, and compared with the planning CT scan for spatial differences, by use of in house-developed finite-element model-based deformable registration (MORFEUS). Results: We evaluated 83 CBCT scans from 16 patients with 30 GTVs. The mean volume of liver that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 21.7%. Excluding 1 outlier, the maximum volume that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 36.3% in a single patient. Over all patients, the absolute maximum deformations in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions were 10.5 mm (SD, 2.2), 12.9 mm (SD, 3.6), and 5.6 mm (SD, 2.7), respectively. The absolute mean predicted impact of liver volume displacements on GTV by use of center of mass displacements was 0.09 mm (SD, 0.13), 0.13 mm (SD, 0.18), and 0.08 mm (SD, 0.07) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusions: Interfraction liver deformations in patients undergoing SBRT under abdominal compression after rigid liver

  8. Incidentalomas associated with abdominal and pelvic CT angiograms for abdominal-based breast free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ho, Olivia A; Bagher, Shaghayegh; Jaskolka, Jeff; Tan, Marcus; Butler, Kate; O'Neill, Anne C; Zhong, Toni; Hofer, Stefan O

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is routinely performed prior to breast reconstruction using deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps to provide better surgical planning and improve preoperative decision making. These investigations occasionally result in unexpected findings in otherwise asymptomatic women. Unexpected findings on imaging in a population of women with previous breast cancer or strong breast cancer risk factors can lead to undue stress and anxiety. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of unexpected findings in preoperative CT angiograms and to correlate these with patient and breast cancer characteristics. A retrospective chart review from May 2008 to December 2012 was performed reviewing all patients who underwent DIEP flap breast reconstruction. Radiology reports of their preoperative CT angiograms, details of unexpected findings, patients' past medical and cancer history, additional radiological investigations, outcomes, and interventions were reviewed. In total, 360 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. Sixty-four percent of the patients who underwent CTA imaging had incidental findings. Further imaging was suggested in 48% of this group. The most common incidentalomas were hepatic (47%), bone (24%), and renal (20%). "Incidentalomas" were associated with patients' underlying comorbidities (p = 0.001) and age (p = 0.01). "Radiographically suspicious incidentalomas" were associated with the underlying comorbidities (p = 0.001). The radiologists most commonly suggested investigation methods such as ultrasound (41%), another CT (28%), bone scan (21%), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 14%). No incidentalomas were found to be malignant on further recommended investigation in this study and no breast cancer reconstruction was delayed as a result of the discovery of incidentalomas or their subsequent investigations. It is important to counsel patients of the possibility of incidental findings and the

  9. Predictors of unsuccessful magnetic resonance imaging scanning in older generalized anxiety disorder patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Mohlman, Jan; Eldreth, Dana A; Price, Rebecca B; Chazin, Daniel; Glover, Dorie A

    2012-02-01

    A thorough understanding of the neurobiology of late life anxiety is likely to depend on the use of brain imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders in older adults, and is thus a focus for neurobiological studies using MRI. This study tested 1-3 weeks predictors of unsuccessful scan outcomes (i.e., scan trials in which the participant moved excessively or prematurely terminated the scan) in older adults with GAD (n = 39) and age- and sex-matched nonanxious controls (n = 21). It was hypothesized that successful completion of a prior MRI scan, clinical status (GAD versus control), and scores on the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI; Peterson et al. 1986), a measure tapping psychological aspects of medical interventions, would predict scan outcome when current diagnoses of claustrophobia were controlled. In logistic regression analyses, unsuccessful scan outcome was predicted by prior MRI completion and ASI Mental Concerns subscale scores, but not clinical status. This model correctly classified 91% of successful and 71% of unsuccessful scans. An alternative model that included a single ASI item rather than Mental Concerns subscale scores showed similar performance, and a model including categorical anxiety sensitivity groups was also effective but slightly less accurate. Implications for improving the success rates of MRI with older adults are discussed. PMID:21318410

  10. Acute vertigo in an anesthesia provider during exposure to a 3T MRI scanner

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Andrew; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Pavlicek, William; Thunberg, Christopher A; Seamans, David

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo induced by exposure to the magnetic field of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is a well-known phenomenon within the radiology community but is not widely appreciated by other clinical specialists. Here, we describe a case of an anesthetist experiencing acute vertigo while providing sedation to a patient undergoing a 3 Tesla MRI scan. After discussing previous reports, and the evidence surrounding MRI-induced vertigo, we review potential etiologies that include the effects of both static and time-varying magnetic fields on the vestibular apparatus. We conclude our review by discussing the occupational standards that exist for MRI exposure and methods to minimize the risks of MRI-induced vertigo for clinicians working in the MRI environment. PMID:25792858

  11. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-01

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  12. A review of MRI evaluation of demyelination in cuprizone murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Krutenkova, E. Pan, E.; Khodanovich, M.

    2015-11-17

    The cuprizone mouse model of non-autoimmune demyelination reproduces some phenomena of multiple sclerosis and is appropriate for validation and specification of a new method of non-invasive diagnostics. In the review new data which are collected using the new MRI method are compared with one or more conventional MRI tools. Also the paper reviewed the validation of MRI approaches using histological or immunohistochemical methods. Luxol fast blue histological staining and myelin basic protein immunostaining is widespread. To improve the accuracy of non-invasive conventional MRI, multimodal scanning could be applied. The new quantitative MRI method of fast mapping of the macromolecular proton fraction is a reliable biomarker of myelin in the brain and can be used for research of demyelination in animals. To date, a validation of MPF method on the CPZ mouse model of demyelination is not performed, although this method is probably the best way to evaluate demyelination using MRI.

  13. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  14. Computed tomography for pancreatic injuries in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Almaramhy, Hamdi Hameed; Guraya, Salman Yousuf

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of computed tomography scan in diagnosing and grading the pattern of pancreatic injuries in children. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study to review medical files of children admitted with blunt pancreatic injuries to the Maternity and Children Hospital Al-Madina Al-Munawwarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The demographic details and mechanisms of injury were recorded. From the database of the Picture Archiving and Communication System of the radiology department, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images of the pancreatic injuries, severity, type of injuries and grading of pancreatic injuries were established. RESULTS: Seven patients were recruited in this study over a period of 5 years; 5 males and 2 females with a mean age of 7 years (age range 5-12 years). Fall from height was the most frequent mechanism of injury, reported in 5 (71%), followed by road traffic accident (1 patient, 14%) and cycle handlebar (1 patient, 14%) injuries. According to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grading system, 1 (14%) patient sustained Grade I, 1 (14%) Grade II, 3 (42%) Grade III and 2 (28%) patients were found to have Grade V pancreatic injuries. This indicated a higher incidence of severe pancreatic injuries; 5 (71.4%) patients were reported to have Grade III and higher on the injury scale. Three (42%) patients had associated abdominal organ injuries. CONCLUSION: Pediatric pancreatic injuries due to blunt abdominal trauma are rare. The majority of the patients sustained extensive pancreatic injuries. MDCT findings are helpful and reliable in diagnosing and grading the pancreatic injuries. PMID:22905284

  15. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  16. RBC nuclear scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003835.htm RBC nuclear scan To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An RBC nuclear scan uses small amounts of radioactive material to ...

  17. Bone density scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone the higher the risk of fractures. A bone scan, along with a patient's medical history, is a ... and whether any preventative treatment is needed. A bone density scan has the advantage of being painless and exposing ...

  18. Breast PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007469.htm Breast PET scan To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. A breast positron emission tomography (PET) scan is an imaging test that uses a radioactive ...

  19. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... any concerns you have about radiation with the health care provider who recommends the test. ... Usually the health care provider will recommend this scan based on ... the scan. For this reason, this test is not often done anymore.

  20. Orbit CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may mean: Bleeding Broken eye socket bone Graves disease Infection Tumor Risks CT scans and other x- ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 66. Read More CT scan Graves disease Tumor Update Date 1/18/2015 Updated by: ...

  1. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Experimental Atherosclerosis with the USPIO-Enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chun-Mei; Du, Lili; Wu, Wei-Heng; Li, Dong-Ye; Hao, Ji; Gong, Lei; Deng, Liangrong; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study's goal was to assess the diagnostic value of the USPIO-(ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in abdominal aorta in experimental atherosclerosis. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group comprised 15 animals which were fed with high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks and then subjected to balloon-induced endothelial injury of the abdominal aorta. After another 8 weeks, animals in Group B received adenovirus carrying p53 gene that was injected through a catheter into the aortic segments rich in plaques. Two weeks later, all rabbits were challenged with the injection of Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Pre-contrast images and USPIO-enhanced MRI images were obtained after pharmacological triggering with injection of USPIO for 5 days. Blood specimens were taken for biochemical and serological tests at 0 and 18 weeks. Abdominal aorta was histologically studied. The levels of serum ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Vulnerable plaques appeared as a local hypo-intense signal on the USPIO-enhanced MRI, especially on T2*-weighted sequences. The signal strength of plaques reached the peak at 96 h. Lipid levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both Group A and B compared with the levels before the high cholesterol diet. The ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Group B compared with Group A. The USPIO-enhanced MRI efficiently identifies vulnerable plaques due to accumulation of USPIO within macrophages in abdominal aorta plaques. PMID:27352319

  2. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  3. MRI driven magnetic microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Kósa, Gábor; Jakab, Péter; Székely, Gábor; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Capsule endoscopy is a promising technique for diagnosing diseases in the digestive system. Here we design and characterize a miniature swimming mechanism that uses the magnetic fields of the MRI for both propulsion and wireless powering of the capsule. Our method uses both the static and the radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields inherently available in MRI to generate a propulsive force. Our study focuses on the evaluation of the propulsive force for different swimming tails and experimental estimation of the parameters that influence its magnitude. We have found that an approximately 20 mm long, 5 mm wide swimming tail is capable of producing 0.21 mN propulsive force in water when driven by a 20 Hz signal providing 0.85 mW power and the tail located within the homogeneous field of a 3 T MRI scanner. We also analyze the parallel operation of the swimming mechanism and the scanner imaging. We characterize the size of artifacts caused by the propulsion system. We show that while the magnetic micro swimmer is propelling the capsule endoscope, the operator can locate the capsule on the image of an interventional scene without being obscured by significant artifacts. Although this swimming method does not scale down favorably, the high magnetic field of the MRI allows self propulsion speed on the order of several millimeter per second and can propel an endoscopic capsule in the stomach. PMID:22037673

  4. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient With Cloacal Exstrophy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caleb E; Kennedy, Alfred P; Smith, D Preston

    2016-07-01

    We present a rare complication of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a child undergoing complex urologic reconstruction. A 10-year-old female born with the abdominal wall defect cloacal exstrophy who had previously undergone multiple abdominal procedures then developed findings consistent with ACS following a complex Mitrofanoff procedure. Although intravesical pressures were not documented because of the nature of her reconstruction, her ACS-type findings were (1) abdominal pain, (2) melena, (3) pulmonary hypoinflation, (4) renal insufficiency, (5) tachycardia, and (6) segmental ischemic small bowel. Management consisted of abdominal decompression, segmental bowel resections, and wound vacuum-assisted-closure management. Patient was eventually discharged home. PMID:26921644

  5. Multipurpose binocular scanning apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, F. R.; Parker, G. L.

    1969-01-01

    Optical gimballing apparatus directs narrow fields of view throughout solid angle approaching 4 pi steradians. Image rotation produced by scanning can be eliminated or altered by gear trains directly linked to the scanning drive assembly. It provides the basis for a binocular scanning capability.

  6. Optical scanning cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a technique called optical scanning cryptography (OSC). The technique can perform encryption on-the-fly using laser beams and can be implemented using an optical heterodyne scanning. We shall first describe the optical heterodyne scanning system and then provide some computer simulations to clarify and confirm the idea of encryption and decryption.

  7. Abdominal closure using nonabsorbable mesh after massive resuscitation prevents abdominal compartment syndrome and gastrointestinal fistula.

    PubMed

    Ciresi, D L; Cali, R F; Senagore, A J

    1999-08-01

    Patients who receive high-volume resuscitation after massive abdominopelvic trauma, or emergent repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA), are at a significant risk for postoperative abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Absorbable prosthetic closure of the abdominal wall has been recommended as a means of managing ACS. However, use of absorbable prosthetic has been associated with very high rates of intestinal fistula formation and ventral hernia formation. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review our experience with the use of nonabsorbable prosthetic abdominal closures in patients with documented ACS or at high risk for ACS. All patients managed by this technique from July 1995 through July 1997 after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm or massive abdominopelvic trauma were evaluated. A total of 18 patients were identified: 15 primary prosthetic placements (Gore-Tex patch, 12; Marlex mesh, 2; and silastic mesh, 1) and 3 delayed prosthetic placements for ACS (Gore-Tex, 1 and Marlex, 2). The mortality rate was 22 percent (4 of 18) and resulted from multisystem organ failure (2 patients), cardiac arrest 1 hour postoperatively (1 patient), and severe closed head injury (1 patient). Secondary closure and prosthetic removal was possible in 16 of 18 patients, including the 2 patients who died of multisystem organ failure within the same hospitalization. Delayed abdominal closure at a subsequent admission was performed in two cases. This same patient developed an enterocutaneous fistula 2 months after discharge. Importantly, only 1 of 18 closed in this manner developed ACS requiring reoperation. The results indicate that use of a nonabsorbable prosthetic, particularly with Gore-Tex, is efficacious in the prevention of postoperative ACS in high-risk patients, while it enhances the possibility for delayed abdominal closure and minimizes the risk of gastrointestinal fistulization associated with other techniques. PMID:10432080

  8. Color Doppler ultrasonography of the abdominal aorta

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, S.; Danesino, G.M.; Danesino, V.; Castellani, S.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations of the abdominal aorta are relatively common, particularly in older people. Technological advances in the fields of ultrasonography, computed tomography, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging have greatly increased the imaging options for the assessment of these lesions. Because it can be done rapidly and is also non-invasive, ultrasonography plays a major role in the exploration of the abdominal aorta, from its emergence from the diaphragm to its bifurcation. It is indicated for the diagnosis and follow-up of various aortic diseases, especially aneurysms. It can be used to define the shape, size, and location of these lesions, the absence or presence of thrombi and their characteristics. It is also useful for monitoring the evolution of the lesion and for postoperative follow-up. However, its value is limited in surgical planning and in emergency situations. PMID:23396814

  9. [Case report: strongyloidiosis with chronic abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Tamer, Gülden Sönmez; Dündar, Devrim

    2008-01-01

    The case was presented here in order to point out that an immunocompetent child might have Strongyloidiosis infection that might be misdiagnosed. A 9 year old male patient who had chronic abdominal pain with a feeling of weakness was treated several times for urinary tract infection. He had never been tested for the presence of parasites. After the patient's complaints occurred again, he presented at our hospital. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were observed in his feces by microscopy. Albendazol (400 mg/day for three days) was prescribed. After 10 days, the feces of the patient was reexamined and no Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were detected. For this reason, it is important to investigate the possibility of intestinal parasitic infections in children with chronic abdominal pain. PMID:18645954

  10. Laparoscopic excision of abdominal wall desmoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed; Al-Zahrani, Hana; Ewies, Tarek

    2016-02-01

    Open surgical resection is the mainstay treatment for desmoid tumors. Laparoscopic resection is rarely used and not well described in the literature. We report a case of a single, 35-year-old woman who presented with palpable abdominal wall desmoid tumor. The patient had had laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 years earlier, and the tumor was at the insertion site of the right upper quadrant trocar. The diagnosis was made by a Tru-Cut biopsy at another institution, after the lesion had increased in size and caused increased discomfort. The patient underwent successful laparoscopic resection of the tumor. This report aimed to promote laparoscopic resection of abdominal wall desmoid tumors, whenever feasible, and describe the laparoscopic technique. We believe this is the second case of laparoscopic excision of desmoid tumor reported in the English-language literature. PMID:26781534

  11. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  12. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  13. Reconstruction option of abdominal wounds with large tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abdominal wall defects result from trauma, abdominal wall tumors, necrotizing infections or complications of previous abdominal surgeries. Apart from cosmetics, abdominal wall defects have strong negative functional impact on the patients. Many different techniques exist for abdominal wall repair. Most problematic and troublesome are defects, where major part of abdominal wall had to be resected and tissue for transfer or reconstruction is absent. Case presentation Authors of the article present operative technique, in which reconstruction of abdominal wall was managed by composite polypropylene mesh with absorbable collagen film, creation of granulation tissue with use of NPWT (negative pressure wound therapy), and subsequent split skin grafting. Three patients with massive abdominal wall defect were successfully managed and abdominal wall reconstruction was performed by mentioned technique. Functional and cosmetic effect is acceptable and patients have good postoperative quality of life. Conclusions Patients with giant abdominal defects can benefit from described technique. It serves as the only option, with which abdominal wall is fully reconstructed without need for the secondary intervention. PMID:25103782

  14. Angiography and embolisation for solid abdominal organ injury in adults - a current perspective

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there has been a shift towards non-operative management (NOM) for haemodynamically stable patients with abdominal trauma. Embolisation can achieve haemostasis and salvage organs without the morbidity of surgery, and the development and refinement of embolisation techniques has widened the indications for NOM in the management of solid organ injury. Advances in computed tomography (CT) technology allow faster scanning times with improved image quality. These improvements mean that whilst surgery is still usually recommended for patients with penetrating injuries, multiple bleeding sites or haemodynamic instability, the indications for NOM are expanding. We present a current perspective on angiography and embolisation in adults with blunt and penetrating abdominal trauma with illustrative examples from our practice including technical advice. PMID:20584325

  15. Extensive Abdominal Wall Incisional Heterotopic Ossification Reconstructed with Component Separation and Strattice Inlay

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Nergis Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Symptomatic heterotopic ossification of abdominal surgical incisions is a rare occurrence. We present a 67-year-old man with severe discomfort caused by heterotopic ossification extending from the xiphoid to the umbilicus. The patient underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair 3 years before our treatment. A 13 × 3.5 cm ossified lesion was excised. The resulting midline defect was closed using component separation and inlay Strattice. Tension-free midline adaptation of the recti muscles was achieved. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen 6 months after the surgery showed no recurrence or hernias. Heterotopic ossification in symptomatic patients has previously been treated with excision and primary closure. We believe that tension-free repair is important to prevent recurrence. Acellular dermal matrix may add to this effect and also compartmentalize the process. PMID:27536495

  16. Laparoscopic drainage of abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Vincent; Ram, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    We present a case on abdominal wall abscess from spilled stones post-cholecystectomy and describe laparoscopic drainage as our choice of management. Mr M is a 75-year-old male who presented on multiple occasions to the hospital with right upper quadrant pain and fever post-laparoscopic cholecystectomy. He also required multiple courses of antibiotics. Subsequent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan confirmed a number of retained stone with signs of chronic inflammation. Hence, 6 months after his initial laparoscopic cholecystectomy, he proceeded to an exploratory laparoscopy. We found an abscess cavity measuring 3 × 4 cm over the anterior abdominal wall. The cavity was de-roofed, drained and washed out. The tissue culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Laparoscopic approach is optimal as the abscess cavity can be clearly identified, stones visualized and removed under direct vision. Patient does not require a laparotomy. PMID:26183574

  17. Extensive Abdominal Wall Incisional Heterotopic Ossification Reconstructed with Component Separation and Strattice Inlay.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Nergis Nina; Sandberg, Lars Johan Marcus

    2016-07-01

    Symptomatic heterotopic ossification of abdominal surgical incisions is a rare occurrence. We present a 67-year-old man with severe discomfort caused by heterotopic ossification extending from the xiphoid to the umbilicus. The patient underwent an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair 3 years before our treatment. A 13 × 3.5 cm ossified lesion was excised. The resulting midline defect was closed using component separation and inlay Strattice. Tension-free midline adaptation of the recti muscles was achieved. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen 6 months after the surgery showed no recurrence or hernias. Heterotopic ossification in symptomatic patients has previously been treated with excision and primary closure. We believe that tension-free repair is important to prevent recurrence. Acellular dermal matrix may add to this effect and also compartmentalize the process. PMID:27536495

  18. Spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Sivarajah, Surendra; Fiscus, Valena; York, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease who presented to the emergency department with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, flank pain with nausea and no history of preceding trauma. The patient had finished a course of azithromycin and oral methylprednisolone 1 day prior to presentation. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan identified changes suggestive of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. The patient did not show signs of acute adrenal insufficiency but was started on steroid replacement therapy because of concerns about possible disease progression. All recognised causes of adrenal haemorrhage were excluded suggesting this was a case of spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage, a rarely reported phenomenon in the literature. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement following 6 days in hospital, taking oral steroid replacement. PMID:27166002

  19. High-quality breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  20. Cameraless Peritoneal Entry in Abdominal Laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, William H.; Tully, Griffeth; Rajguru, Amit; Burnett, Dan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Despite significant advances in laparoscopic instrumentation and techniques, injury to intraabdominal structures remains a potentially serious complication of peritoneal access. Consensus on the best method to obtain peritoneal access is lacking. A safe technique that does not rely on direct visualization of the abdominal layers could shorten the learning curve for surgeons and potentially be adopted by other physicians for a variety of nonsurgical indications for peritoneal entry. Methods: A prospective series of 99 consecutive patients who underwent upper-abdominal laparoscopic surgery performed by a single surgeon between January 2009 and June 2010 was reviewed. The method used to obtain peritoneal access was the fluid-based peritoneal entry indication technique (C-PET) with the EndoTIP trocar. Results: Successful abdominal entry using C-PET was achieved in 90 (90.9%) of the patients; no trocar-related injuries or other injuries associated with peritoneal access occurred. The mean time from incision to confirmed peritoneal access was 21.4 s (range, 12 to 65). Of the 9 cases in which C-PET did not successfully gain entry, 6 occurred during the first 20 surgeries and only 3 in the final 79. Conclusions: C-PET is simple, safe, timely, and effective for gaining peritoneal access during laparoscopic abdominal surgeries. In this series, C-PET produced no complications and proved effective across a wide variety of patients, including the obese and those who had had previous surgery. Furthermore, C-PET does not require visual recognition of anatomic layers and potentially could easily be taught to nonsurgeon physicians who perform peritoneal access. PMID:23484564