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Sample records for abdominal multi-detector row

  1. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  2. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  3. T staging of gastric cancer: role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Seishi; Murakami, Takamichi; Kim, Tonsok; Hori, Masatoshi; Iannaccone, Riccardo; Nakata, Saki; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Osuga, Keigo; Tomoda, Kaname; Catalano, Carlo; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the accuracy of multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of serosal invasion in patients with gastric cancer. The Ethics Committee does not require approval or informed consent for retrospective studies. Forty-one consecutive patients (24 men, 17 women; mean age, 68 years) with gastric cancer were included in this study. All patients were given 600 mL of tap water to drink and were positioned prone or supine on the scanning table. The detector row configuration included four detector rows, a section thickness of 1.25 mm, a pitch of 6, and a reconstruction interval of 0.63 mm. Transverse and multiplanar reconstruction images were simultaneously evaluated by two independent observers to assess the depth of tumor invasion in the gastric wall (ie, T stage). T staging at multi-detector row CT was compared with T staging at histologic evaluation (reference standard), which was performed by means of surgical or histologic examination of the resected specimen. We also calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of multi-detector row CT for each observer in the assessment of serosal invasion. Analysis of interobserver agreement showed substantial or almost perfect agreement (nonweighted kappa value of 0.78 and weighted kappa value of 0.85). Correct assessment of gastric wall invasion was 80% and 85% for observers 1 and 2, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of multi-detector row CT in the assessment of serosal invasion were 90%, 95%, and 93%, respectively, for observer 1 and 80%, 97%, and 93%, respectively, for observer 2. Overstaging occurred in six patients, and understaging occurred in five patients. All understaged tumors were scirrhous subtype gastric cancer. Multi-detector row CT scanning of patients with gastric cancer gave 93% accuracy in the assessment of serosal invasion in patients with gastric cancer. RSNA, 2005

  4. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution. RSNA, 2006

  5. Multi-detector row computed tomography angiography of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Pattynama, Peter M. T.; Myriam Hunink, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), scan speed and image quality has improved considerably. Since the longitudinal coverage is no longer a limitation, multi-detector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) is increasingly used to depict the peripheral arterial runoff. Hence, it is important to know the advantages and limitations of this new non-invasive alternative for the reference test, digital subtraction angiography. Optimization of the acquisition parameters and the contrast delivery is important to achieve a reliable enhancement of the entire arterial runoff in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) using fast CT scanners. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different scanning and injection protocols using 4-, 16-, and 64-detector row CT scanners, to propose effective methods to evaluate and to present large data sets, to discuss its clinical value and major limitations, and to review the literature on the validity, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of multi-detector row CT in the evaluation of PAD. PMID:17882427

  6. Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomography Findings of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome Caused by Dilated Ovarian Veins

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Suat

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) on pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), which is often overlooked or poorly visualized with routine imaging examination. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the MDCT features of 40 patients with PCS (mean age, 45 years; range, 29–60 years) using axial, coronal, sagittal, 3D volume-rendered, and Maximum Intensity Projection MIP images. Results: MDCT revealed pelvic varices and ovarian vein dilatations in all patients. Bilateral ovarian vein dilatation was present in 25 patients, and 15 patients had unilateral dilatation. While 12 cases of secondary pelvic varices occurred simultaneously with a retroaortic left renal vein, 10 cases were due solely to a mass obstruction or stenosis of venous structures. Conclusion: MDCT is an effective tool in the evaluation of PCS, and it has more advantages than other imaging modalities. PMID:25610142

  7. Multi-detector row CT colonography: effect of collimation, pitch, and orientation on polyp detection in a human colectomy specimen.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stuart A; Halligan, Steve; Bartram, Clive I; Morgan, Paul R; Talbot, Ian C; Fry, Nicola; Saunders, Brian P; Khosraviani, Kirosh; Atkin, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the effects of orientation, collimation, pitch, and tube current setting on polyp detection at multi-detector row computed tomographic (CT) colonography and to determine the optimal combination of scanning parameters for screening. A colectomy specimen containing 117 polyps of different sizes was insufflated and imaged with a multi-detector row CT scanner at various collimation (1.25 and 2.5 mm), pitch (3 and 6), and tube current (50, 100, and 150 mA) settings. Two-dimensional multiplanar reformatted images and three-dimensional endoluminal surface renderings from the 12 resultant data sets were examined by one observer for the presence and conspicuity of polyps. The results were analyzed with Poisson regression and logistic regression to determine the effects of scanning parameters and of specimen orientation on polyp detection. The percentage of polyps that were detected significantly increased when collimation (P =.008) and table feed (P =.03) were decreased. Increased tube current resulted in improved detection only of polyps with a diameter of less than 5 mm. Polyps of less than 5 mm were optimally depicted with a collimation of 1.25 mm, a pitch of 3, and a tube current setting of 150 mA; polyps with a diameter greater than 5 mm were adequately depicted with 1.25-mm collimation and with either pitch setting and any of the three tube current settings. Small polyps in the transverse segment (positioned at a 90 degrees angle to the z axis of scanning) were significantly less visible than those in parallel or oblique orientations (P <.001). The effective radiation dose, calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation, was 1.4-10.0 mSv. Detection of small polyps (<5 mm) with multi-detector row CT is highly dependent on collimation, pitch, and, to a lesser extent, tube current. Collimation of 1.25 mm, combined with pitch of 6 and tube current of 50 mA, provides for reliable detection of polyps 5 mm or larger while limiting the effective radiation dose

  8. Evaluation of prosthetic valve thrombosis by 64-row multi-detector computed tomography. .

    PubMed

    Tarzia, Vincenzo; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Rubino, Maurizio; Gallo, Michele; Bottio, Tomaso; Gerosa, Gino

    2015-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), combined with retrospective electrocardiographic gating, permits cardiac imaging with high accuracy. Recent advances in MDCT have seemed to respond adequately to the need for a non-invasive and reliable assessment of the coronary artery lumen. Two patients with prosthetic aortic valves (one bioprosthetic, one mechanical) presented at the authors' institution with dyspnea and syncopal episodes. MDCT was performed to evaluate thrombus characteristics and exclude coronary artery disease (CAD). Based on the MDCT coronary artery assessment, neither patient underwent preoperative invasive coronary angiography, abolishing the risk of any iatrogenic thrombus fragmentation and subsequent embolization. One patient underwent surgical treatment without complications, while medical therapy was successful in the other case. MDCT can be used for the accurate imaging of thrombi on prosthetic aortic valves, and to correctly assess possible CAD.

  9. Differentiation of nonneoplastic and neoplastic gallbladder polyps 1 cm or bigger with multi-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Ko Woon; Kim, Seong Hyun; Choi, Seong Ho; Lee, Won Jae

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate useful computed tomographic features to differentiate nonneoplastic and neoplastic gallbladder polyps 1 cm or bigger. Thirty-one patients with 32 nonneoplastic polyps and 67 patients with 73 neoplastic polyps 1 cm or bigger underwent unenhanced and dual-phase (arterial and portal venous phases) multi-detector row computed tomography. Gallbladder polyps were diagnosed by cholecystectomy. Computed tomographic features including size (1.5 cm), surface (smooth or irregular), shape (pedunculated or sessile), accompanying wall thickening, basal indentation, perception on unenhanced images, and enhancement pattern between 2 groups were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. On univariate analysis, age 55 years or older (P = 0.0019), size bigger than 1.5 cm (P < 0.0001), irregular surface (P = 0.0033), sessile shape (P = 0.0016), accompanying wall thickening (P = 0.0056), basal indentation (P = 0.0236), and perception on unenhanced images (P < 0.0001) were significantly more frequent in neoplastic polyps as compared with nonneoplastic polyps. On multivariate analysis, size bigger than 1.5 cm (P = 0.0260), sessile shape (P = 0.0397), and perception on unenhanced images (P < 0.0001) were statistically significant. Size bigger than 1.5 cm, sessile shape, and perception on unenhanced images are the main factors that differentiate neoplastic from nonneoplastic gallbladder polyps 1 cm or bigger.

  10. Periportal low attenuation associated with liver metastasis from colorectal cancer: evaluation using multi-detector-row CT with pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Takaji, Ryo; Matsumoto, Shunro; Kiyonaga, Maki; Yamada, Yasunari; Mori, Hiromu; Iwashita, Yukio; Ohta, Masayuki; Inomata, Masafumi; Hijiya, Naoki; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Takaki, Hajime; Fukuzawa, Kengo; Yonemasu, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    Periportal low attenuation (PPLA) associated with metastatic liver cancer is occasionally seen on multi-detector-row CT (MDCT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the MDCT patterns of the PPLA and to correlate it with pathological findings. We retrospectively reviewed the MDCT images of 63 patients with metastatic liver cancers from colorectal adenocarcinoma. On MDCT scans, PPLA associated with liver metastasis was visualized in six patients with colorectal cancer. In these six patients who had undergone surgical resection, the radiologic-pathologic correlation was analyzed. All patients underwent a single contrast-enhanced MDCT within 1 month before surgical resection. The six liver cancers were pathologically proven to be moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. We assessed the PPLA on MDCT concerning the distribution patterns and contrast enhancement with pathological correlation. In five of the patients, the PPLA extended to the hilar side from metastatic liver cancer. Pathologically, there was no cancer invasion into the intra-hepatic periportal area; however, massive lymphedema and fibrosis occurred in all six cases. PPLA on the hilar and peripheral sides of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer may be present suggesting lymphedema and fibrosis of portal tracts not always indicating cancer infiltration.

  11. Craniofacial and dental malformations in Costello syndrome: A detailed evaluation using multi-detector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masashi; Ohashi, Hirofumi

    2013-06-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome caused by heterozygous germline HRAS mutations, which is characterized by intellectual disability, growth retardation, distinctive facies, loose skin, cardiomyopathy and a preposition to malignancies. Although teeth abnormalities have been encountered in nearly two-thirds of the patients in literature, the evaluation tended to be limited to the extent which can be obtained from physical examination. We investigated detailed craniofacial, oral and dental findings in four patients with Costello syndrome. In this study, images reconstructed by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) were used as substitutes for dental cast study and panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiograph studies to evaluate dental arches, tooth size, relationships between craniofacial and dental structures, and hypodontia. All four patients showed true/relative macrocephaly with facial bone hypoplasia and gingival hypertrophy. Occlusal attrition, malocclusion, small dental arches, microdontia, and convex face were noted in three patients. In addition, one patient showed dental caries, conic tooth and gingivitis, and another patient showed hypodontia. Our study suggests that craniofacial and dental abnormalities are common in Costello syndrome patients and comprehensive dental care should be provided from early infancy. To our knowledge, this is the first study of thorough craniofacial and dental evaluation by using MDCT in Costello syndrome. MDCT is a useful tool for precise evaluation of craniofacial and oral manifestations in patients with congenital anomaly/intellectual disability syndromes. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  12. Role of enhanced multi-detector-row computed tomography before urgent endoscopy in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Youichi; Amano, Yuji; Ueno, Sayaka; Izumi, Daisuke; Mikami, Hironobu; Yazaki, Tomotaka; Okimoto, Eiko; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Ito, Satoko; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Naruaki; Imaoka, Tomonori

    2014-04-01

    Multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has been reported to be a potentially useful modality for detection of the bleeding origin in patients with acute upper massive gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of MDCT as a routine method for detecting the origin of acute upper GI bleeding prior to urgent endoscopy. Five hundred seventy-seven patients with acute upper GI bleeding (514 nonvariceal patients, 63 variceal patients) who underwent urgent upper GI endoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups: enhanced MDCT, unenhanced MDCT, and no MDCT before endoscopy. The diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of the bleeding origin was evaluated, and the average procedure times needed to endoscopically identify the bleeding origin were compared between groups. Diagnostic accuracy among endoscopists was 55.3% and 14.7% for the enhanced MDCT and unenhanced MDCT groups, respectively. Among nonvariceal patients, accuracy was 50.2% in the enhanced MDCT group, which was significantly better than that in the unenhanced MDCT group (16.5%). In variceal patients, accuracy was significantly better in the enhanced MDCT group (96.4%) than in the unenhanced MDCT group (0.0%). These accuracies were similar to those achieved by expert radiologists. The average procedure time to endoscopic detection of the bleeding origin in the enhanced MDCT group was significantly faster than that in the unenhanced MDCT and no-MDCT groups. Enhanced MDCT preceding urgent endoscopy may be an effective modality for the detection of bleeding origin in patients with acute upper GI bleeding. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. [Study of radiation dose to the eye lens by multi-detector row computed tomography of the temporal bone].

    PubMed

    Hirakuri, Ayaka; Numasawa, Kanako; Takeishi, Hideki; Satomura, Minato; Takeda, Hiromitsu; Harada, Kuniaki; Asanuma, Osamu; Sakata, Motomichi

    2012-01-01

    The exposure of the eye lens caused by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) of the temporal bone is a serious problem. Our aim was to evaluate the radiation dose to the eye lens by different scan baselines (orbitomeatal line; OML, acanthiomeatal line; AML) and examine the difference of the depiction of the temporal bone structures. Measurement of the exposure to the eye lens was performed by means of MDCT of the temporal bone with a radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter using a rand phantom. Moreover, we studied only one volunteer (58-year-old male) who had no symptom and was not suspected of having any ear abnormalities with a two scan baseline. Visualization of the major anatomical structures of the temporal bone (the tympanic portion of the facial nerve canal, the body of the incus, stapes superstructures, vestibule etc.) was performed on the volunteer. The average absorbed dose was 6.42 mGy by the OML and 1.59 mGy by the AML, respectively. With regard to visualization of the temporal bone structures, all structures were of equal quality with the two scan baseline. With the AML line, the radiation dose to the eye lens was reduced to 75%. Therefore, the authors recommended an AML for use for MDCT of the temporal bone. In clinical practice, the optimization of scanning factor (kVp, mAs etc.) and the use of the radio-protection should be implemented for radiation dose reduction of the eye lens by MDCT of the temporal bone.

  14. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, K V; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4-10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time.

  15. Assessment of temporal resolution of multi-detector row computed tomography in helical acquisition mode using the impulse method.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Hara, Takanori; Urikura, Atsushi; Takata, Tadanori; Ohashi, Kazuya

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a method for assessing the temporal resolution (TR) of multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) (MDCT) in the helical acquisition mode using temporal impulse signals generated by a metal ball passing through the acquisition plane. An 11-mm diameter metal ball was shot along the central axis at approximately 5 m/s during a helical acquisition, and the temporal sensitivity profile (TSP) was measured from the streak image intensities in the reconstructed helical CT images. To assess the validity, we compared the measured and theoretical TSPs for the 4-channel modes of two MDCT systems. A 64-channel MDCT system was used to compare TSPs and image quality of a motion phantom for the pitch factors P of 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 with a rotation time R of 0.5 s, and for two R/P combinations of 0.5/1.2 and 0.33/0.8. Moreover, the temporal transfer functions (TFs) were calculated from the obtained TSPs. The measured and theoretical TSPs showed perfect agreement. The TSP narrowed with an increase in the pitch factor. The image sharpness of the 0.33/0.8 combination was inferior to that of the 0.5/1.2 combination, despite their almost identical full width at tenth maximum values. The temporal TFs quantitatively confirmed these differences. The TSP results demonstrated that the TR in the helical acquisition mode significantly depended on the pitch factor as well as the rotation time, and the pitch factor and reconstruction algorithm affected the TSP shape. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of pulmonary nodules on 64 row multi detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Prakashini, K; Babu, Satish; Rajgopal, KV; Kokila, K Raja

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To determine the overall performance of an existing CAD algorithm with thin-section computed tomography (CT) in the detection of pulmonary nodules and to evaluate detection sensitivity at a varying range of nodule density, size, and location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted on 20 patients with 322 suspected nodules who underwent diagnostic chest imaging using 64-row multi-detector CT. The examinations were evaluated on reconstructed images of 1.4 mm thickness and 0.7 mm interval. Detection of pulmonary nodules, initially by a radiologist of 2 years experience (RAD) and later by CAD lung nodule software was assessed. Then, CAD nodule candidates were accepted or rejected accordingly. Detected nodules were classified based on their size, density, and location. The performance of the RAD and CAD system was compared with the gold standard that is true nodules confirmed by consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. The overall sensitivity and false-positive (FP) rate of CAD software was calculated. Observations and Results: Of the 322 suspected nodules, 221 were classified as true nodules on the consensus of senior RAD and CAD together. Of the true nodules, the RAD detected 206 (93.2%) and 202 (91.4%) by the CAD. CAD and RAD together picked up more number of nodules than either CAD or RAD alone. Overall sensitivity for nodule detection with the CAD program was 91.4%, and FP detection per patient was 5.5%. The CAD showed comparatively higher sensitivity for nodules of size 4–10 mm (93.4%) and nodules in hilar (100%) and central (96.5%) location when compared to RAD's performance. Conclusion: CAD performance was high in detecting pulmonary nodules including the small size and low-density nodules. CAD even with relatively high FP rate, assists and improves RAD's performance as a second reader, especially for nodules located in the central and hilar region and for small nodules by saving RADs time. PMID:27578931

  17. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  18. Relevant incidental findings at abdominal multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography: A collateral screening?

    PubMed Central

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Mauri, Giovanni; Muzzupappa, Claudia; Poloni, Alessandro; Bandirali, Michele; Esseridou, Anastassia; Tritella, Stefania; Secchi, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of relevant incidental findings (RIFs) detected during routine abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CeCT). METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the reports of a consecutive series of abdominal CeCT studies performed between January and May 2013. For each report, patients’ age and sex, admission as inpatient or outpatient, clinical suspicion as indicated by the requesting physician, availability of a previous abdominal examination, and name of the reporting radiologist were recorded. Based on the clinical suspicion, the presence and features of any RIFs (if needing additional workup) was noted. RESULTS: One thousand forty abdominal CeCT were performed in 949 patients (528 males, mean age 66 ± 14 years). No significant difference was found between inpatients and outpatients age and sex distribution (P > 0.472). RIFs were found in 195/1040 (18.8%) CeCT [inpatients = 108/470 (23.0%); outpatients = 87/570 (15.2%); P = 0.002]. RIFs were found in 30/440 (6.8%) CeCT with a previous exam and in 165/600 (27.5%) without a previous exam (P < 0.001). Radiologists’ distribution between inpatients or outpatients was significantly different (P < 0.001). RIFs prevalence increased with aging, except for a peak in 40-49 year group. Most involved organs were kidneys, gallbladder, and lungs. CONCLUSION: A RIF is detected in 1/5 patients undergoing abdominal CeCT. Risk of overdiagnosis should be taken into account. PMID:26516432

  19. Quantification of myocardial blood flow using dynamic 320-row multi-detector CT as compared with ¹⁵O-H₂O PET.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuka; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Naya, Masanao; Manabe, Osamu; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Katoh, Chietsugu; Kudo, Kohsuke; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    This study introduces a method to calculate myocardium blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) using the relatively low-dose dynamic 320-row multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), validates the method against (15)O-H₂O positron-emission tomography (PET) and assesses the CFRs of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Thirty-two subjects underwent both dynamic CT perfusion (CTP) and PET perfusion imaging at rest and during pharmacological stress. In 12 normal subjects (pilot group), the calculation method for MBF and CFR was established. In the other 13 normal subjects (validation group), MBF and CFR obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared. Finally, the CFRs obtained by dynamic CTP and PET were compared between the validation group and CAD patients (n = 7). Correlation between MBF of MDCT and PET was strong (r = 0.95, P < 0.0001). CFR showed good correlation between dynamic CTP and PET (r = 0.67, P = 0.0126). CFRCT in the CAD group (2.3 ± 0.8) was significantly lower than that in the validation group (5.2 ± 1.8) (P = 0.0011). We established a method for measuring MBF and CFR with the relatively low-dose dynamic MDCT. Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP. • MBF and CFR can be calculated using dynamic CTP with 320-row MDCT. • MBF and CFR showed good correlation between dynamic CTP and PET. • Lower CFR was well demonstrated in CAD patients by dynamic CTP.

  20. Features of cranio-maxillofacial trauma in the massive Sichuan earthquake: analysis of 221 cases with multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zhi-gang; Yang, Zhi-gang; Dong, Zhi-hui; Chen, Tian-wu; Zhu, Zhi-yu; Deng, Wen; Xiao, Jia-he

    2011-10-01

    In a massive earthquake, cranio-maxillofacial trauma was common. The present study was to determine the features of cranio-maxillofacial trauma sustained in the massive Sichuan earthquake by multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT). The study included 221 consecutive patients (123 males and 98 females; age range, 1-83 years; median age, 35 years) with cranio-maxillofacial trauma in the Sichuan earthquake, who underwent cranio-maxillofacial MDCT scans. The image data were retrospectively reviewed focusing on the injuries of the cranio-maxillofacial soft tissue, facial bones and cranium. All patients had soft tissue injuries frequently with foreign bodies. Ninety-seven (43.9%) patients had fractures (1.5 involved sites per patient, range from 1 to 8) including single cranial fractures in 36 (37.1%) cases, single maxillofacial fractures were seen in 48 (49.5%) and cranio-maxillofacial fractures in 13 (13.4%). Single bone fracture was more common than multiple bone fractures (p<0.05). Nasal, ethmoid bones and the orbits were the most commonly involved sites of the craniofacial region. Thirty-eight (17.2%) patients had intracranial injuries, the commonest being subarachnoid haemorrhage and the commonest sites were the temporal and frontal regions. Coexisting intracranial injuries were more common in patients with cranial fractures than in patients with maxillofacial fractures (p<0.05). Our results indicate that the cranio-maxillofacial trauma arising from the massive Sichuan earthquake had some characteristic features, and a significant number of individuals had the potential for combined cranial and maxillofacial injuries, successful management of which required a multidisciplinary approach. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Evaluation of Slavic continuity for electrocardiograph (ECG)-gated non-helical scan using multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition system].

    PubMed

    Shiotani, Masataka; Ogawa, Masato; Watanabe, Ryo; Shinohara, Tamotsu

    2012-01-01

    Multi detector-row computed tomography with 64 data acquisition systems are widely used for coronary CT angiography with an electrocardiograph (ECG) gated helical scan (HS). Step and shoot with ECG gated non-helical scan (snap shot pulse: SSP) could reduce exposure dose but banding artifact-like discontinuity was observed between adjacent slabs on volume rendering (VR) and curved planner reconstruction (CPR). Therefore, we investigated the factors that influence continuity of VR and CPR images by calculating image properties of Z-axis direction of slab. The observer performance studies were performed for evaluating continuity of simulated blood vessels of VR and CPR images at simulated heart rates: 50, 55, 57 and 60 beat per minute (bpm). As a result, the value of SD at both slab edges in SSP were 20.5% lower than middle part of slab and differences of value of SD were up to 4.4 between adjacent slab edges. Slice thickness of both slab edges were 20.3% thinner than that of the peripheral part of slab. At the border of the adjacent slab, the position of the simulated blood vessel was shifted. VR images of SSP at 57 bpm was indicated as the highest score and HS was significantly superior to SSP at 55 and 60 bpm (p<0.05). In CPR images, there were no significant differences at all simulated heart rates. In conclusion, we considered that VR images of SSP were influenced heart rates except 57 bpm (resonance case) and there was little difference of visibility for discontinuity of both CPR images obtained by SSP and HS.

  2. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  3. Non-invasive detection of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by 64 slice multi-detector row computed tomography angiography

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis, often at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study we document for the first time that aortic and coronary atherosclerosis can be detected using 64 slice multiple detector row ...

  4. Correctness of multi-detector-row computed tomography for diagnosing mechanical prosthetic heart valve disorders using operative findings as a gold standard.

    PubMed

    Tsai, I-Chen; Lin, Yung-Kai; Chang, Yen; Fu, Yun-Ching; Wang, Chung-Chi; Hsieh, Shih-Rong; Wei, Hao-Ji; Tsai, Hung-Wen; Jan, Sheng-Ling; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Chen, Min-Chi; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2009-04-01

    The purpose was to compare the findings of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) in prosthetic valve disorders using the operative findings as a gold standard. In a 3-year period, we prospectively enrolled 25 patients with 31 prosthetic heart valves. MDCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were done to evaluate pannus formation, prosthetic valve dysfunction, suture loosening (paravalvular leak) and pseudoaneurysm formation. Patients indicated for surgery received an operation within 1 week. The MDCT findings were compared with the operative findings. One patient with a Björk-Shiley valve could not be evaluated by MDCT due to a severe beam-hardening artifact; thus, the exclusion rate for MDCT was 3.2% (1/31). Prosthetic valve disorders were suspected in 12 patients by either MDCT or TTE. Six patients received an operation that included three redo aortic valve replacements, two redo mitral replacements and one Amplatzer ductal occluder occlusion of a mitral paravalvular leak. The concordance of MDCT for diagnosing and localizing prosthetic valve disorders and the surgical findings was 100%. Except for images impaired by severe beam-hardening artifacts, MDCT provides excellent delineation of prosthetic valve disorders.

  5. Determining contrast medium dose and rate on basis of lean body weight: does this strategy improve patient-to-patient uniformity of hepatic enhancement during multi-detector row CT?

    PubMed

    Ho, Lisa M; Nelson, Rendon C; Delong, David M

    2007-05-01

    To prospectively evaluate the use of lean body weight (LBW) as the main determinant of the volume and rate of contrast material administration during multi-detector row computed tomography of the liver. This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. All patients gave written informed consent. Four protocols were compared. Standard protocol involved 125 mL of iopamidol injected at 4 mL/sec. Total body weight (TBW) protocol involved 0.7 g iodine per kilogram of TBW. Calculated LBW and measured LBW protocols involved 0.86 g of iodine per kilogram and 0.92 g of iodine per kilogram calculated or measured LBW for men and women, respectively. Injection rate used for the three experimental protocols was determined proportionally on the basis of the calculated volume of contrast material. Postcontrast attenuation measurements during portal venous phase were obtained in liver, portal vein, and aorta for each group and were summed for each patient. Patient-to-patient enhancement variability in same group was measured with Levene test. Two-tailed t test was used to compare the three experimental protocols with the standard protocol. Data analysis was performed in 101 patients (25 or 26 patients per group), including 56 men and 45 women (mean age, 53 years). Average summed attenuation values for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 419 HU +/- 50 (standard deviation), 443 HU +/- 51, 433 HU +/- 50, and 426 HU +/- 33, respectively (P = not significant for all). Levene test results for summed attenuation data for standard, TBW, calculated LBW, and measured LBW protocols were 40 +/- 29, 38 +/- 33 (P = .83), 35 +/- 35 (P = .56), and 26 +/- 19 (P = .05), respectively. By excluding highly variable but poorly perfused adipose tissue from calculation of contrast medium dose, the measured LBW protocol may lessen patient-to-patient enhancement variability while maintaining satisfactory hepatic and vascular enhancement.

  6. Computer-aided detection of acute pulmonary embolism with 64-slice multi-detector row computed tomography: impact of the scanning conditions and overall image quality in the detection of peripheral clots.

    PubMed

    Dewailly, Marion; Rémy-Jardin, Martine; Duhamel, Alain; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pontana, François; Deken, Valérie; Bakai, Anne-Marie; Remy, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for diagnosing peripheral acute pulmonary embolism (PE) with a 64-slice multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Two radiologists investigated the accuracy of a software aimed at detecting peripheral clots (PECAD prototype, version 7; Siemens Medical Systems, Forchheim, Germany) by applying this tool for the analysis of the pulmonary arterial bed of 74 CT angiograms obtained with 64-slice dual-source CT (Definition; Siemens Medical Systems). These cases were retrospectively selected from a database of CT studies performed on the same CT unit, with a similar collimation (64 x 0.6 mm) and similar injection protocols. Patient selection was based on a variety of (1) scanning conditions, namely, nongated (n = 30), electrocardiography-gated (n = 30), and dual-energy CT angiograms (n = 14), and (2) image quality (IQ), namely, scans of excellent IQ (n = 53) and lower IQ due to lower levels of arterial enhancement and/or presence of noise (n = 21). The standard of truth was based on the 2 radiologists' consensus reading and the results of CAD. The software detected 80 of 93 peripheral clots present in the 21 patients (42 segmental and 38 subsegmental clots). The overall sensitivity (95% confidence interval) of the CAD tool was 86% (77%-92%) for detecting peripheral clots, 78% (64.5%-88%) at the segmental level and 97% (85.5%-99.9%) at the subsegmental level. Assuming normal vascular anatomy with 20 segmental and 40 subsegmental arteries, overall specificity and positive and negative predictive values (95% confidence interval) of the software were 91.8% (91%-92.6%), 18.4% (15%-22.4%), and 99.7% (99.5%-99.8%), respectively. A mean of 5.4 false positives was found per patient (total, 354 false positives), mainly linked to the presence of perivascular connective tissue (n = 119; 34%) and perivascular airspace consolidation (n = 97; 27%). The sensitivities (95% confidence interval) for the CAD tool were

  7. Operative correction of abdominal rectus diastasis (ARD) reduces pain and improves abdominal wall muscle strength: A randomized, prospective trial comparing retromuscular mesh repair to double-row, self-retaining sutures.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, Peter; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Dahlstrand, Ursula; Strigård, Karin; Stark, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    The primary aim of this prospective, randomized, clinical, 2-armed trial was to evaluate the risk for recurrence using 2 different operative techniques for repair of abdominal rectus diastasis. Secondary aims were comparison of pain, abdominal muscle strength, and quality of life and to compare those outcomes to a control group receiving physical training only. Eighty-six patients were enrolled. Twenty-nine patients were allocated to retromuscular polypropylene mesh and 27 to double-row plication with Quill technology. Thirty-two patients participated in a 3-month training program. Diastasis was evaluated with computed tomography scan and clinically. Pain was assessed using the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, a quality-of-life survey, SF-36, and abdominal muscle strength using the Biodex System-4. One early recurrence occurred in the Quill group, 2 encapsulated seromas in the mesh group, and 3 in the suture group. Significant improvements in perceived pain, the ventral hernia pain questionnaire, and quality of life appeared at the 1-year follow-up with no difference between the 2 operative groups. Significant muscular improvement was obtained in all groups (Biodex System-4). Patient perceived gain in muscle strength assessed with a visual analog scale improved similarly in both operative groups. This improvement was significantly greater than that seen in the training group. Patients in the training group still experienced bodily pain at follow-up. There was no difference between the Quill technique and retromuscular mesh in the effect on abdominal wall stability, with a similar complication rate 1 year after operation. An operation improves functional ability and quality of life. Training strengthens the abdominal muscles, but patients still experience discomfort and pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rowing Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  9. Limitations of Airway Dimension Measurement on Images Obtained Using Multi-Detector Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Hirai, Toyohiro; Niimi, Akio; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Shigematsu, Michio; Nishimura, Takashi; Kubo, Yoshiro; Mishima, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives (a) To assess the effects of computed tomography (CT) scanners, scanning conditions, airway size, and phantom composition on airway dimension measurement and (b) to investigate the limitations of accurate quantitative assessment of small airways using CT images. Methods An airway phantom, which was constructed using various types of material and with various tube sizes, was scanned using four CT scanner types under different conditions to calculate airway dimensions, luminal area (Ai), and the wall area percentage (WA%). To investigate the limitations of accurate airway dimension measurement, we then developed a second airway phantom with a thinner tube wall, and compared the clinical CT images of healthy subjects with the phantom images scanned using the same CT scanner. The study using clinical CT images was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results Errors noted in airway dimension measurement were greater in the tube of small inner radius made of material with a high CT density and on images reconstructed by body algorithm (p<0.001), and there was some variation in error among CT scanners under different fields of view. Airway wall thickness had the maximum effect on the accuracy of measurements with all CT scanners under all scanning conditions, and the magnitude of errors for WA% and Ai varied depending on wall thickness when airways of <1.0-mm wall thickness were measured. Conclusions The parameters of airway dimensions measured were affected by airway size, reconstruction algorithm, composition of the airway phantom, and CT scanner types. In dimension measurement of small airways with wall thickness of <1.0 mm, the accuracy of measurement according to quantitative CT parameters can decrease as the walls become thinner. PMID:24116105

  10. [Evaluation of Dose Reduction of the Active Collimator in Multi Detector Row CT].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kosuke

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of active collimator by changing acquisition parameters and obtaining dose profiles in z-axis direction. Dose profiles along z-axis were obtained using XRQA2 Gafchromic film. As a result, the active collimator reduced overranging about 55% compared to that without the active collimator. In addition, by changing the combination of X-ray beam width (32 mm, 40 mm), pitch factor (1.4, 0.6), and the X-ray tube rotation time (0.5 s/rot, 1.0 s/rot), the overranging changed from 19.4 to 34.9 mm. Although the active collimator is effective for reducing overranging, it is necessary to adjust acquisition parameters by taking the properties of the active collimator for acquisition parameters, especially setting beam width, into consideration.

  11. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  12. Study of the renal segmental arterial anatomy with contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Francesco; Cozzi, Luigi Alberto; Cozzi, Gabriele

    2015-07-01

    To use triphasic multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) to study the renal segmental arterial anatomy and its relationship with the urinary tract to plan nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). One hundred and fifty nine patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced MDCT. We evaluated renal arteries and parenchymal vasculature. In 61 patients, the arteries and the urinary tract were represented simultaneously. 86.60% presented a single renal artery; 13.4%, multiple arteries. All single renal arteries divided into anterior and posterior branch before the hilum. The anterior artery branched into a superior, middle, and inferior branch. In 43.14%, the inferior artery arose before the others; in 45.75%, the superior artery arose before the others; in 9.80%, the branches shared a common trunk. In 26.80%, the posterior artery supplies the entire posterior surface; in 73.20%, it ends along the inferior calyx. In 96.73%, the upper pole was vascularized by the anterior superior branch and the posterior artery: the "tuning fork". MDCT showed four vascular segments in 96.73% and five in 3.27%. MDCT showed two avascular areas: the first along the projection of the inferior calyx on the posterior aspect, the second between the branches of the "tuning fork". The arterial phase provides the arterial tree representation; the delayed phase shows arteries and urinary tract simultaneously. MDCT provides a useful representation of the renal anatomy prior to intervascular-intrarenal NSS.

  13. Multi-detector CT features of acute intestinal ischemia and their prognostic correlations.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-05-28

    Acute intestinal ischemia is an abdominal emergency occurring in nearly 1% of patients presenting with acute abdomen. The causes can be occlusive or non occlusive. Early diagnosis is important to improve survival rates. In most cases of late or missed diagnosis, the mortality rate from intestinal infarction is very high, with a reported value ranging from 60% to 90%. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is a fundamental imaging technique that must be promptly performed in all patients with suspected bowel ischemia. Thanks to the new dedicated reconstruction program, its diagnostic potential is much improved compared to the past and currently it is superior to that of any other noninvasive technique. The increased spatial and temporal resolution, high-quality multi-planar reconstructions, maximum intensity projections, vessel probe, surface-shaded volume rending and tissue transition projections make MDCT the gold standard for the diagnosis of intestinal ischemia, with reported sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 64%-93%, 92%-100%, 90%-100% and 94%-98%, respectively. MDCT contributes to appropriate treatment planning and provides important prognostic information thanks to its ability to define the nature and extent of the disease. The purpose of this review is to examine the diagnostic and prognostic role of MDCT in bowel ischemia with special regard to the state of art new reconstruction software.

  14. Thoracic-abdominal imaging with a novel dual-layer spectral detector CT: intra-individual comparison of image quality and radiation dose with 128-row single-energy acquisition.

    PubMed

    Haneder, Stefan; Siedek, Florian; Doerner, Jonas; Pahn, Gregor; Grosse Hokamp, Nils; Maintz, David; Wybranski, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Background A novel, multi-energy, dual-layer spectral detector computed tomography (SDCT) is commercially available now with the vendor's claim that it yields the same or better quality of polychromatic, conventional CT images like modern single-energy CT scanners without any radiation dose penalty. Purpose To intra-individually compare the quality of conventional polychromatic CT images acquired with a dual-layer spectral detector (SDCT) and the latest generation 128-row single-energy-detector (CT128) from the same manufacturer. Material and Methods Fifty patients underwent portal-venous phase, thoracic-abdominal CT scans with the SDCT and prior CT128 imaging. The SDCT scanning protocol was adapted to yield a similar estimated dose length product (DLP) as the CT128. Patient dose optimization by automatic tube current modulation and CT image reconstruction with a state-of-the-art iterative algorithm were identical on both scanners. CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was compared between the SDCT and CT128 in different anatomic structures. Image quality and noise were assessed independently by two readers with 5-point-Likert-scales. Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ), and DLP were recorded and normalized to 68 cm acquisition length (DLP 68 ). Results The SDCT yielded higher mean CNR values of 30.0% ± 2.0% (26.4-32.5%) in all anatomic structures ( P < 0.001) and excellent scores for qualitative parameters surpassing the CT128 (all P < 0.0001) with substantial inter-rater agreement (κ ≥ 0.801). Despite adapted scan protocols the SDCT yielded lower values for CTDI vol (-10.1 ± 12.8%), DLP (-13.1 ± 13.9%), and DLP 68 (-15.3 ± 16.9%) than the CT128 (all P < 0.0001). Conclusion The SDCT scanner yielded better CT image quality compared to the CT128 and lower radiation dose parameters.

  15. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  16. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  17. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  18. Designing ROW Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1996-01-01

    There are many aspects to consider when designing a Rosenbrock-Wanner-Wolfbrandt (ROW) method for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) solving initial value problems (IVP's). The process can be simplified by constructing ROW methods around good Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The formulation of a new, simple, embedded, third-order, ROW method demonstrates this design approach.

  19. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clearinghouse What are abdominal adhesions? Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ... Esophagus Stomach Large intestine Adhesion Abdominal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can form between abdominal ...

  20. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Recurrent or Functional Abdominal Pain (RAP or FAP) What is abdominal pain? Abdominal pain , or stomachache, ... recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) or functional abdominal pain (FAP)? If your health care provider has ruled out ...

  1. Suicide on Death Row.

    PubMed

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2016-11-01

    Despite the level of supervision of inmates on death row, their suicide rate is higher than both the male prison population in the United States and the population of males over the age of 14 in free society. This study presents suicide data for death row inmates from 1978 through 2010. For the years 1978 through 2010, suicide rates on death row were higher than that for the general population of males over the age of 15 and for state prisons for all but 2 years. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  3. Control electronics for a multi-laser/multi-detector scanning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Mars Rover Laser Scanning system uses a precision laser pointing mechanism, a photodetector array, and the concept of triangulation to perform three dimensional scene analysis. The system is used for real time terrain sensing and vision. The Multi-Laser/Multi-Detector laser scanning system is controlled by a digital device called the ML/MD controller. A next generation laser scanning system, based on the Level 2 controller, is microprocessor based. The new controller capabilities far exceed those of the ML/MD device. The first draft circuit details and general software structure are presented.

  4. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  5. Measurement of positron annihilation lifetimes for positron burst by multi-detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. Y.; Kuang, P.; Liu, F. Y.; Han, Z. J.; Cao, X. Z.; Zhang, P.

    2018-03-01

    It is currently impossible to exploit the timing information in a gamma-ray pulse generated within nanoseconds when a high-intensity positron burst annihilation event occurs in a target using conventional single-detector methods. A state-of-the-art solution to the problem is proposed in this paper. In this approach, a multi-detector array composed of many independent detection cells mounted spherically around the target is designed to detect the time distribution of the annihilated gamma rays generated following, in particular, a positron burst emitting huge amounts of positrons in a short pulse duration, even less than a few nano- or picoseconds.

  6. Evaluation of simethicone-coated cellulose as a negative oral contrast agent for abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Sahani, Dushyant V; Jhaveri, Kartik S; D'souza, Roy V; Varghese, Jose C; Halpern, Elkan; Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Hahn, Peter F; Saini, Sanjay

    2003-05-01

    Because of the increased clinical use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging the abdominal vasculature and urinary tract, there is a need for negative contrast agents. The authors undertook this study to assess the suitability of simethicone-coated cellulose (SCC), which is approved for use as an oral contrast agent in sonography, for use as a negative oral contrast agent in abdominal CT. This prospective study involved 40 adult patients scheduled to undergo abdominal CT for the evaluation of hematuria. Prior to scanning, 20 subjects received 800 mL of SCC and 20 received 800 mL of water as an oral contrast agent. Imaging was performed with a multi-detector row helical scanner in two phases, according to the abdominal CT protocol used for hematuria evaluation at the authors' institution. The first, "early" phase began an average of 15 minutes after the ingestion of contrast material; the second, "late" phase began an average of 45 minutes after the ingestion of contrast material. Blinded analysis was performed by three abdominal radiologists separately, using a three-point scale (0 = poor, 1 = acceptable, 2 = excellent) to assess the effectiveness of SCC for marking the proximal, middle, and distal small bowel. Average scores for enhancement with SCC and with water were obtained and compared. Statistical analysis was performed with a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. SCC was assigned higher mean scores than water for enhancement in each segment of the bowel, both on early-phase images (0.8-1.35 for SCC vs 0.6-1.1 for water) and on late-phase images (1.1-1.4 vs 0.81-0.96). Bowel marking with SCC, particularly in the jejunum and ileum, also was rated better than that with water in a high percentage of patients. The differences between the scores for water and for SCC, however, were not statistically significant (P > .05). SCC is effective as a negative oral contrast agent for small bowel marking at CT.

  7. Novel wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter with multi-detectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-09-19

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter.

  8. Novel Wearable and Wireless Ring-Type Pulse Oximeter with Multi-Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng-Yang; Chan, Ming-Che; Chen, Chien-Yue; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2014-01-01

    The pulse oximeter is a popular instrument to monitor the arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2). Although a fingertip-type pulse oximeter is the mainstream one on the market at present, it is still inconvenient for long-term monitoring, in particular, with respect to motion. Therefore, the development of a wearable pulse oximeter, such as a finger base-type pulse oximeter, can effectively solve the above issue. However, the tissue structure of the finger base is complex, and there is lack of detailed information on the effect of the light source and detector placement on measuring SPO2. In this study, the practicability of a ring-type pulse oximeter with a multi-detector was investigated by optical human tissue simulation. The optimal design of a ring-type pulse oximeter that can provide the best efficiency of measuring SPO2 was discussed. The efficiency of ring-type pulse oximeters with a single detector and a multi-detector was also discussed. Finally, a wearable and wireless ring-type pulse oximeter was also implemented to validate the simulation results and was compared with the commercial fingertip-type pulse oximeter. PMID:25244586

  9. Multi-detector system approach for unattended uranium enrichment monitoring at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, A.; Lombardi, M.; MacArthur, D. W.; McCluskey, C.; Moss, C. E.; Paffett, M. T.; Ianakiev, K. D.

    2018-01-01

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. We describe our research to develop such a passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. We present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.

  10. Multi-detector system approach for unattended uranium enrichment monitoring at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    DOE PAGES

    Favalli, A.; Lombardi, M.; MacArthur, D. W.; ...

    2017-09-14

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. Here, we describe our research to develop such amore » passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. Finally, we present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.« less

  11. Multi-detector system approach for unattended uranium enrichment monitoring at gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, A.; Lombardi, M.; MacArthur, D. W.

    Improving the quality of safeguards measurements at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants while reducing the inspection effort is an important objective given the number of existing and new plants that need to be safeguarded. A useful tool in many safeguards approaches is the on-line monitoring of enrichment in process pipes. One requirement of such a monitor is a simple, reliable and precise passive measurement of the 186-keV line from 235U. The other information required is the amount of gas in the pipe, which can be obtained by a transmission or pressure measurement. Here, we describe our research to develop such amore » passive measurement system. Unfortunately, a complication arises in the interpretation of the gamma measurements, from the contribution of uranium deposits on the wall of the pipe to the 186-keV peak. A multi-detector approach to address this complication is presented where two measurements, one with signal primarily from gas and one with signal primarily from deposits, are performed simultaneously with different detectors and geometries. This allows a correction to be made to the 186-keV peak for the contribution from the deposit. Finally, we present the design of the multi-detector system and the results of the experimental calibration of the proof-of-principle prototype built at LANL.« less

  12. Collimated prompt gamma TOF measurements with multi-slit multi-detector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Henriquet, P.; La Tessa, C.; Létang, J. M.; Pleskač, R.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Richard, M. H.; Rinaldi, I.; Roellinghoff, F.; Schuy, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal prompt-gamma ray profiles have been measured with a multi-slit multi-detector configuration at a 75 MeV/u 13C beam and with a PMMA target. Selections in time-of-flight and energy have been applied in order to discriminate prompt-gamma rays produced in the target from background events. The ion ranges which have been extracted from each individual detector module agree amongst each other and are consistent with theoretical expectations. In a separate dedicated experiment with 200 MeV/u 12C ions the fraction of inter-detector scattering has been determined to be on the 10%-level via a combination of experimental results and simulations. At the same experiment different collimator configurations have been tested and the shielding properties of tungsten and lead for prompt-gamma rays have been measured.

  13. Multi-detector CT angiography of the aortic valve—Part 2: disease specific findings

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshan, Arul

    2014-01-01

    The aortic valve and adjacent structures should be routinely evaluated on all thoracic cross-sectional imaging studies. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the main imaging techniques used for assessment of the aortic valve and related pathology but multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can offer valuable complimentary information in some clinical scenarios. MDCT is the definite means of assessing aortic valvular calcification, acute aortic syndrome and for non-invasive assessment of the coronary arteries. MDCT also has an emerging role in the planning and follow-up of trans-catheter aortic valve replacement. This article reviews the spectrum of aortic valve disease highlighting the key MDCT imaging features. PMID:25202663

  14. Role of Multi Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) in Preoperative Staging of Pancreatic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Soumil; Prabhu, Nirmal Kumar; Sethi, Pulkit; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer related death in advanced countries and has shown rising trends in developing countries like India. Increase in the incidence has been linked to risk factors like lifestyle modification associated with increased alcohol consumption and rapid urbanization. Most patients at the time of diagnosis present with an advanced condition. Surgical resection offers the only chance for cure in them and imaging plays a crucial role in the early diagnosis of the condition. To compare the staging of pancreatic carcinoma by MDCT (Multi Detector Computed Tomography) with surgery in a preoperative setting in a tertiary referral centre in Kerala. A cross-sectional observational study was performed between November 2014 and October 2016, 25 patients (12 men, 13 women), with a mean age of 54.2 years, were evaluated. MDCT was performed using 16 slice, 64 slice and 256 slice multi detector CT machines. The gold standard for diagnosis was histopathology and operative data. All statistical analysis was done using IBM SPSS version 20.0. Validity parameters like sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Positive Predictive Value (PPV) / Negative Predictive Value (NPV) were computed for MDCT with respect to surgery. Of the 25 patients who were evaluated for surgery, 15 (60%) cases were classified as resectable tumours, 3 (12%) as borderline resectable and 7 (28%) as unresectable tumours. CT showed a sensitivity of 82.3% with a specificity of 87.5%. However, for assessing vascular invasion, CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 93.3% respectively. Three (12%) patients in the study who were classified as borderline resectable pancreatic tumours underwent surgery. Contrast-enhanced multiphase pancreatic imaging using MDCT plays a pivotal role in diagnosing and assessing resectability and vascular invasion of pancreatic tumours. It is very useful for determining borderline resectable tumours pre-operatively, which aids for

  15. Measures of rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, T Brett; Hopkins, Will G

    2012-04-01

    Accurate measures of performance are important for assessing competitive athletes in practi~al and research settings. We present here a review of rowing performance measures, focusing on the errors in these measures and the implications for testing rowers. The yardstick for assessing error in a performance measure is the random variation (typical or standard error of measurement) in an elite athlete's competitive performance from race to race: ∼1.0% for time in 2000 m rowing events. There has been little research interest in on-water time trials for assessing rowing performance, owing to logistic difficulties and environmental perturbations in performance time with such tests. Mobile ergometry via instrumented oars or rowlocks should reduce these problems, but the associated errors have not yet been reported. Measurement of boat speed to monitor on-water training performance is common; one device based on global positioning system (GPS) technology contributes negligible extra random error (0.2%) in speed measured over 2000 m, but extra error is substantial (1-10%) with other GPS devices or with an impeller, especially over shorter distances. The problems with on-water testing have led to widespread use of the Concept II rowing ergometer. The standard error of the estimate of on-water 2000 m time predicted by 2000 m ergometer performance was 2.6% and 7.2% in two studies, reflecting different effects of skill, body mass and environment in on-water versus ergometer performance. However, well trained rowers have a typical error in performance time of only ∼0.5% between repeated 2000 m time trials on this ergometer, so such trials are suitable for tracking changes in physiological performance and factors affecting it. Many researchers have used the 2000 m ergometer performance time as a criterion to identify other predictors of rowing performance. Standard errors of the estimate vary widely between studies even for the same predictor, but the lowest

  16. The Demise of Skid Row.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Harvey A.; Inciardi, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the history and evolution of the American skid row; analyzes the changes it has undergone, particularly in the face of urban renewal; and speculates on its future. Includes opinions of the inhabitants of skid row which were obtained from interviews. (MJL)

  17. Abdominal Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Weilitz, Pamela Becker

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints by patients, and assessment of abdominal pain and associated symptoms can be challenging for home healthcare providers. Reasons for abdominal pain are related to inflammation, organ distention, and ischemia. The history and physical examination are important to narrow the source of acute or chronic problems, identify immediate interventions, and when necessary, facilitate emergency department care.

  18. Carotid stenosis assessment with multi-detector CT angiography: comparison between manual and automatic segmentation methods.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Patterson, Andrew J; Thomas, Owen M; Sadat, Umar; Graves, Martin J; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2013-04-01

    Luminal stenosis is used for selecting the optimal management strategy for patients with carotid artery disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the reproducibility of carotid stenosis quantification using manual and automated segmentation methods using submillimeter through-plane resolution Multi-Detector CT angiography (MDCTA). 35 patients having carotid artery disease with >30 % luminal stenosis as identified by carotid duplex imaging underwent contrast enhanced MDCTA. Two experienced CT readers quantified carotid stenosis from axial source images, reconstructed maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D-carotid geometry which was automatically segmented by an open-source toolkit (Vascular Modelling Toolkit, VMTK) using NASCET criteria. Good agreement among the measurement using axial images, MIP and automatic segmentation was observed. Automatic segmentation methods show better inter-observer agreement between the readers (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC): 0.99 for diameter stenosis measurement) than manual measurement of axial (ICC = 0.82) and MIP (ICC = 0.86) images. Carotid stenosis quantification using an automatic segmentation method has higher reproducibility compared with manual methods.

  19. Radiation dose of digital tomosynthesis for sinonasal examination: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yuhara, Toshiyuki; Tamura, Mieko; Numano, Tomokazu; Abe, Shinji; Sabol, John M; Suzuki, Shigeru; Ueno, Eiko

    2012-06-01

    Using an anthropomorphic phantom, we have investigated the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis (DT) of flat-panel detector (FPD) radiography to reduce radiation dose for sinonasal examination compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). A female Rando phantom was scanned covering frontal to maxillary sinus using the clinically routine protocol by both 64-detector CT (120 kV, 200 mAs, and 1.375-pitch) and DT radiography (80 kV, 1.0 mAs per projection, 60 projections, 40° sweep, and posterior-anterior projections). Glass dosimeters were used to measure the radiation dose to internal organs including the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, and the surface dose at various sites including the eyes during those scans. We compared the radiation dose to those anatomies between both modalities. In DT radiography, the doses of the thyroid gland, brain, submandibular gland, skin, and eyes were 230 ± 90 μGy, 1770 ± 560 μGy, 1400 ± 80 μGy, 1160 ± 2100 μGy, and 112 ± 6 μGy, respectively. These doses were reduced to approximately 1/5, 1/8, 1/12, 1/17, and 1/290 of the respective MDCT dose. For sinonasal examinations, DT radiography enables dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and dose to the head and neck region, particularly to the lens of the eye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Louisiana farm discussion: 8 foot row spacing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This year several tests in growers’ fields were used to compare traditional 6-foot row spacing to 8-foot row spacing. Cane is double-drilled in the wider row spacing. The wider row spacing would accommodate John Deere 3522 harvester. Field data indicate the sugarcane yields are very comparable in 8-...

  1. The vascularized groin lymph node flap (VGLN): Anatomical study and flap planning using multi-detector CT scanner. The golden triangle for flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Zeltzer, Assaf A; Anzarut, Alexander; Braeckmans, Delphine; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Hendrickx, Benoit; Van Hedent, Eddy; Hamdi, Moustapha

    2017-09-01

    A growing number of surgeons perform lymph node transfers for the treatment of lymphedema. When harvesting a vascularized lymph node groin flap (VGLNF) one of the major concerns is the potential risk of iatrogenic lymphedema of the donor-site. This article helps understanding of the lymph node distribution of the groin in order to minimize this risk. Fifty consecutive patients undergoing abdominal mapping by multi-detector CT scanner were included and 100 groins analyzed. The groin was divided in three zones (of which zone II is the safe zone) and lymph nodes were counted and mapped with their distances to anatomic landmarks. Further node units were plotted and counted. The average age was 48 years. A mean number of nodes of 6.5/groin was found. In zone II, which is our zone of interest a mean of 3.1 nodes were counted with a mean size of 7.8 mm. In three patients no nodes were found in zone II. In five patients nodes were seen in zone II but were not sufficient in size or number to be considered a lymph node unit. On average the lymph node unit in zone II was found to be 48.3 mm from the pubic tubercle when projected on a line from the pubic tubercle to the anterior superior iliac spine, 16.0 mm caudal to this line, and 20.4 mm above the groin crease. On average the lymph node unit was a mean of 41.7 mm lateral to the SCIV-SIEV confluence. This study provides increased understanding of the lymphatic anatomy in zone II of the groin flap and suggests a refined technique for designing the VGLNF. As with any flap there is a degree of individual patient variability. However, having information on the most common anatomy and flap design is of great value. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Comparison of dosimetric properties among four commercial multi-detector computed tomography scanners.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hatemura, Masahiro; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Okumura, Shuichiro; Ideguchi, Daichi; Honda, Keiichi; Kawata, Kenji

    2017-03-01

    This study compared dosimetric properties among four commercial multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners. The X-ray beam characteristics were obtained from photon intensity attenuation curves of aluminum and off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air, which were measured with four commercial MDCT scanners. The absorbed dose for MDCT scanners was evaluated with Farmer ionization chamber measurements at the center and four peripheral points in the body- and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. Measured collected charge was converted to absorbed dose using a 60 Co absorbed dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated correction factors. Four MDCT scanners were modeled to correspond with measured X-ray beam characteristics using GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software. Al half-value layers (Al-HVLs) with a body-bowtie filter determined from measured Al-attenuation curves ranged 7.2‒9.1mm at 120kVp and 6.1‒8.0mm at 100kVp. MC-calculated Al-HVLs and OCRs in air were in acceptable agreement within 0.5mm and 5% of measured values, respectively. The percentage difference between nominal and actual beam width was greater with decreasing collimation width. The absorbed doses for MDCT scanners at 120kVp ranged 5.1‒7.1mGy and 10.8‒17.5mGy per 100mAs at the center in the body- and head-type water phantoms, respectively. Measured doses at four peripheral points were within 5% agreement of MC-calculated values. The absorbed dose at the center in both water phantoms increased with decreasing Al-HVL for the same charge on the focus. In this study the X-ray beam characteristics and the absorbed dose were measured and compared with calculated values for four MDCT scanners. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Sido, B; Grenacher, L; Friess, H; Büchler, M W

    2005-09-01

    Blunt abdominal trauma is much more frequent than penetrating abdominal trauma in Europe. As a consequence of improved quality of computed tomography, even complex liver injuries are increasingly being treated conservatively. However, missed hollow viscus injuries still remain a problem, as they considerably increase mortality in multiply injured patients. Laparoscopy decreases the rate of unnecessary laparotomies in perforating abdominal trauma and helps to diagnose injuries of solid organs and the diaphragm. However, the sensitivity in detecting hollow viscus injuries is low and the role of laparoscopy in blunt abdominal injury has not been defined. If intra-abdominal bleeding is difficult to control in hemodynamically unstable patients, damage control surgery with packing of the liver, total splenectomy, and provisional closure of hollow viscus injuries is of importance. Definitive surgical treatment follows hemodynamic stabilization and restoration of hemostasis. Injuries of the duodenum and pancreas after blunt abdominal trauma are often associated with other intra-abdominal injuries and the treatment depends on their location and severity.

  4. Emerging role of multi-detector computed tomography in the diagnosis of hematuria following percutaneous nephrolithotomy: A case scenario.

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, S E; Mathew, Georgie; Bhat, Sanjay H

    2009-07-01

    Persistent hematuria is one of the most dreaded complications following percutanous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Although invasive, a catheter-based angiogram is usually used to localize the bleeding vessel and subsequently embolize it. Advances in imaging technology have now made it possible to use a non invasive multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) angiogram with 3-D reconstruction to establish the diagnosis. We report a case of post-PCNL hemorrhage due to a pseudo aneurysm that was missed by a conventional angiogram and subsequently detected on MDCT angiogram.

  5. Mechanical performance of aquatic rowing and flying.

    PubMed

    Walker, J A; Westneat, M W

    2000-09-22

    Aquatic flight, performed by rowing or flapping fins, wings or limbs, is a primary locomotor mechanism for many animals. We used a computer simulation to compare the mechanical performance of rowing and flapping appendages across a range of speeds. Flapping appendages proved to be more mechanically efficient than rowing appendages at all swimming speeds, suggesting that animals that frequently engage in locomotor behaviours that require energy conservation should employ a flapping stroke. The lower efficiency of rowing appendages across all speeds begs the question of why rowing occurs at all. One answer lies in the ability of rowing fins to generate more thrust than flapping fins during the power stroke. Large forces are necessary for manoeuvring behaviours such as accelerations, turning and braking, which suggests that rowing should be found in slow-swimming animals that frequently manoeuvre. The predictions of the model are supported by observed patterns of behavioural variation among rowing and flapping vertebrates.

  6. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  7. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    ... other symptoms do you have at the same time? For example, do you have abdominal pain ? You may have the following tests: Barium studies of the stomach and intestines (such as an upper GI series ) Blood tests Colonoscopy Gastroscopy Peritoneal lavage Stool studies ...

  8. Double-row vs single-row rotator cuff repair: a review of the biomechanical evidence.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Keener, Jay D; Brophy, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    A review of the current literature will show a difference between the biomechanical properties of double-row and single-row rotator cuff repairs. Rotator cuff tears commonly necessitate surgical repair; however, the optimal technique for repair continues to be investigated. Recently, double-row repairs have been considered an alternative to single-row repair, allowing a greater coverage area for healing and a possibly stronger repair. We reviewed the literature of all biomechanical studies comparing double-row vs single-row repair techniques. Inclusion criteria included studies using cadaveric, animal, or human models that directly compared double-row vs single-row repair techniques, written in the English language, and published in peer reviewed journals. Identified articles were reviewed to provide a comprehensive conclusion of the biomechanical strength and integrity of the repair techniques. Fifteen studies were identified and reviewed. Nine studies showed a statistically significant advantage to a double-row repair with regards to biomechanical strength, failure, and gap formation. Three studies produced results that did not show any statistical advantage. Five studies that directly compared footprint reconstruction all demonstrated that the double-row repair was superior to a single-row repair in restoring anatomy. The current literature reveals that the biomechanical properties of a double-row rotator cuff repair are superior to a single-row repair. Basic Science Study, SRH = Single vs. Double Row RCR.

  9. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in children: diagnosis using ratio of main pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter as determined by multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Caro-Domínguez, Pablo; Compton, Gregory; Humpl, Tilman; Manson, David E

    2016-09-01

    The ratio of the transverse diameter of the main pulmonary artery (MPA) to ascending aorta as determined at multi-detector CT is a tool that can be used to assess the pulmonary arterial size in cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children. To establish a ratio of MPA to ascending aorta diameter using multi-detector CT imaging suggestive of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children. We hypothesize that a defined ratio of MPA to ascending aorta is identifiable on multi-detector CT and that higher ratios can be used to reliably diagnose the presence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children. We calculated the multi-detector CT ratio of MPA to ascending aorta diameter in 44 children with documented pulmonary arterial hypertension by right heart catheterization and in 44 age- and gender-matched control children with no predisposing factors for pulmonary arterial hypertension. We compared this multi-detector-CT-determined ratio with the MPA pressure in the study group, as well as with the ratio of MPA to ascending aorta in the control group. A threshold ratio value was calculated to accurately identify children with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Children with documented primary pulmonary arterial hypertension have a significantly higher ratio of MPA to ascending aorta (1.46) than children without pulmonary arterial hypertension (1.11). A ratio of 1.3 carries a positive likelihood of 34 and a positive predictive value of 97% for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The pulmonary arteries were larger in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension than in a control group of normal children. A CT-measured ratio of MPA to ascending aorta of 1.3 should raise the suspicion of pulmonary arterial hypertension in children.

  10. Intra-Abdominal and Intra-Thoracic Pressures during Lifting and Jumping,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    12,15,16,20). The oblique and transverse abdominal muscles, but not the rectus abdominus, have been shown via electromyography (EM0) to be primary...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Intra- abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures during lifting and...pressure (ITP) and intra- abdominal pressure (lAP) during lifting and jumping, 11 males were monitored as they performed the dead lift (DL), slide row

  11. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Chu, Zhi-Gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; p<0.001). Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR=1.2; p<0.05) or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR=1.9; p<0.05) were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR= 1.7; p<0.01). Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR= 1.4; p<0.01). Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR=1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001). Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries.

  12. Thoracic Injuries in earthquake-related versus non-earthquake-related trauma patients: differentiation via Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi-hui; Yang, Zhi-gang; Chen, Tian-wu; Chu, Zhi-gang; Deng, Wen; Shao, Heng

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Massive earthquakes are harmful to humankind. This study of a historical cohort aimed to investigate the difference between earthquake-related crush thoracic traumas and thoracic traumas unrelated to earthquakes using a multi-detector Computed Tomography (CT). METHODS: We retrospectively compared an earthquake-exposed cohort of 215 thoracic trauma crush victims of the Sichuan earthquake to a cohort of 215 non-earthquake-related thoracic trauma patients, focusing on the lesions and coexisting injuries to the thoracic cage and the pulmonary parenchyma and pleura using a multi-detector CT. RESULTS: The incidence of rib fracture was elevated in the earthquake-exposed cohort (143 vs. 66 patients in the non-earthquake-exposed cohort, Risk Ratio (RR) = 2.2; p<0.001). Among these patients, those with more than 3 fractured ribs (106/143 vs. 41/66 patients, RR = 1.2; p<0.05) or flail chest (45/143 vs. 11/66 patients, RR = 1.9; p<0.05) were more frequently seen in the earthquake cohort. Earthquake-related crush injuries more frequently resulted in bilateral rib fractures (66/143 vs. 18/66 patients, RR = 1.7; p<0.01). Additionally, the incidence of non-rib fracture was higher in the earthquake cohort (85 vs. 60 patients, RR = 1.4; p<0.01). Pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries were more frequently seen in earthquake-related crush injuries (117 vs. 80 patients, RR = 1.5 for parenchymal and 146 vs. 74 patients, RR = 2.0 for pleural injuries; p<0.001). Non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries had significant positive correlation with rib fractures in these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic crush traumas resulting from the earthquake were life threatening with a high incidence of bony thoracic fractures. The ribs were frequently involved in bilateral and severe types of fractures, which were accompanied by non-rib fractures, pulmonary parenchymal and pleural injuries. PMID:21789386

  13. Rows=Wildlife Corridors: An Urban Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Darrell D.

    1983-01-01

    Linear strips of land associated with highways, electrical transmission lines, gas/oil pipelines (called right-of-way or ROWs) are inhibited by a variety of wildlife and offer a unique opportunity to study the wildlife in the urban setting. Types of wildlife found in and importance of ROWs are discussed. (JN)

  14. On Row Rank Equal Column Rank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalili, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    We will prove a well-known theorem in Linear Algebra, that is, for any "m x n" matrix the dimension of row space and column space are the same. The proof is based on the subject of "elementary matrices" and "reduced row-echelon" form of a matrix.

  15. Cardiac Multi-detector CT Segmentation Based on Multiscale Directional Edge Detector and 3D Level Set.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sofia; Esposito, Antonio; Palmisano, Anna; Colantoni, Caterina; Cerutti, Sergio; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2016-05-01

    Extraction of the cardiac surfaces of interest from multi-detector computed tomographic (MDCT) data is a pre-requisite step for cardiac analysis, as well as for image guidance procedures. Most of the existing methods need manual corrections, which is time-consuming. We present a fully automatic segmentation technique for the extraction of the right ventricle, left ventricular endocardium and epicardium from MDCT images. The method consists in a 3D level set surface evolution approach coupled to a new stopping function based on a multiscale directional second derivative Gaussian filter, which is able to stop propagation precisely on the real boundary of the structures of interest. We validated the segmentation method on 18 MDCT volumes from healthy and pathologic subjects using manual segmentation performed by a team of expert radiologists as gold standard. Segmentation errors were assessed for each structure resulting in a surface-to-surface mean error below 0.5 mm and a percentage of surface distance with errors less than 1 mm above 80%. Moreover, in comparison to other segmentation approaches, already proposed in previous work, our method presented an improved accuracy (with surface distance errors less than 1 mm increased of 8-20% for all structures). The obtained results suggest that our approach is accurate and effective for the segmentation of ventricular cavities and myocardium from MDCT images.

  16. The effects of emphysema on airway disease: correlations between multi-detector CT and pulmonary function tests in smokers.

    PubMed

    Yahaba, Misuzu; Kawata, Naoko; Iesato, Ken; Matsuura, Yukiko; Sugiura, Toshihiko; Kasai, Hajime; Sakurai, Yoriko; Terada, Jiro; Sakao, Seiichiro; Tada, Yuji; Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation caused by emphysema and small airway narrowing. Quantitative evaluation of airway dimensions by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has revealed a correlation between airway dimension and airflow limitation. However, the effect of emphysema on this correlation is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether emphysematous changes alter the relationships between airflow limitation and airway dimensions as measured by inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Ninety-one subjects underwent inspiratory and expiratory MDCT. Images were evaluated for mean airway luminal area (Ai), wall area percentage (WA%) from the third to the fifth generation of three bronchi (B1, B5, B8) in the right lung, and low attenuation volume percent (LAV%). Correlations between each airway index and airflow limitation were determined for each patient and compared between patients with and without evidence of emphysema. In patients without emphysema, Ai and WA% from both the inspiratory and expiratory scans were significantly correlated with FEV1. No correlation was detected in patients with emphysema. In addition, emphysematous COPD patients with GOLD stage 1 or 2 disease had significantly lower changes in B8 Ai than non-emphysematous patients. A significant correlation exists between airway parameters and FEV1 in patients without emphysema. Emphysema may influence airway dimensions even in patients with mild to moderate COPD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life ... familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: abdominal aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, abdominal pain, ...

  18. Single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair: techniques and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dines, Joshua S; Bedi, Asheesh; ElAttrache, Neal S; Dines, David M

    2010-02-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair techniques incorporate a medial and lateral row of suture anchors in the repair configuration. Biomechanical studies of double-row repair have shown increased load to failure, improved contact areas and pressures, and decreased gap formation at the healing enthesis, findings that have provided impetus for clinical studies comparing single-row with double-row repair. Clinical studies, however, have not yet demonstrated a substantial improvement over single-row repair with regard to either the degree of structural healing or functional outcomes. Although double-row repair may provide an improved mechanical environment for the healing enthesis, several confounding variables have complicated attempts to establish a definitive relationship with improved rates of healing. Appropriately powered rigorous level I studies that directly compare single-row with double-row techniques in matched tear patterns are necessary to further address these questions. These studies are needed to justify the potentially increased implant costs and surgical times associated with double-row rotator cuff repair.

  19. A comparative clinical evaluation of arthroscopic single-row versus double-row supraspinatus tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Buess, Eduard; Waibl, Bernhard; Vogel, Roger; Seidner, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Cadaveric studies and commercial pressure have initiated a strong trend towards double-row repair in arthroscopic cuff surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the biomechanical advantages of a double-row supraspinatus tendon repair would result in superior clinical outcome and higher abduction strength. A retrospective study of two groups of 32 single-row and 33 double-row repairs of small to medium cuff tears was performed. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a visual analog scale for pain were used to evaluate the outcome. The participation rate was 100%. A subset of patients was further investigated with the Constant Score (CS) including electronic strength measurement. The double-row repair patients had significantly more (p = 0.01) yes answers in the SST than the single-row group, and pain reduction was slightly better (p = 0.03). No difference was found for the relative CS (p = 0.86) and abduction strength (p = 0.74). Patient satisfaction was 100% for double-row and 97% for single-row repair. Single- and double-row repairs both achieved excellent clinical results. Evidence of superiority of double-row repair is still scarce and has to be balanced against the added complexity of the procedure and higher costs.

  20. Single-row versus double-row repair of the distal Achilles tendon: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Pilson, Holly; Brown, Philip; Stitzel, Joel; Scott, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Surgery for recalcitrant insertional Achilles tendinopathy often consists of partial or total release of the insertion site, debridement of the diseased portion of the tendon, calcaneal ostectomy, and reattachment of the Achilles to the calcaneus. Although single-row and double-row techniques exist for repair of the detached Achilles tendon, biomechanical data are lacking to support one technique over the other. Based on data extrapolated from the study of rotator cuff repairs, we hypothesized that a double-row construct would provide superior fixation strength over a single-row repair. Eighteen human cadaveric Achilles tendons (9 matched pairs) with attached calcanei were repaired with single-row or double-row techniques. Specimens were mounted in a servohydraulic materials testing machine, subjected to a preconditioning cycle, and loaded to failure. Failure was defined as suture breakage or pullout, midsubstance tendon rupture, or anchor pullout. Among the failures were 12 suture failures, 5 proximal-row anchor failures, and 1 distal-row anchor failure. No midsubstance tendon ruptures or testing apparatus failures were observed. There were no statistically significant differences in the peak load to failure between the single-row and double-row repairs (p = .46). Similarly, no significant differences were observed with regards to mean energy expenditure to failure (p = .069). The present study demonstrated no biomechanical advantages of the double-row repair over a single-row repair. Despite the lack of a clear biomechanical advantage, there may exist clinical advantages of a double-row repair, such as reduction in knot prominence and restoration of the Achilles footprint. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Memory hierarchy using row-based compression

    DOEpatents

    Loh, Gabriel H.; O'Connor, James M.

    2016-10-25

    A system includes a first memory and a device coupleable to the first memory. The device includes a second memory to cache data from the first memory. The second memory includes a plurality of rows, each row including a corresponding set of compressed data blocks of non-uniform sizes and a corresponding set of tag blocks. Each tag block represents a corresponding compressed data block of the row. The device further includes decompression logic to decompress data blocks accessed from the second memory. The device further includes compression logic to compress data blocks to be stored in the second memory.

  2. Mary Budd Rowe: a storyteller of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Julie A.

    2008-12-01

    This article examines Mary Budd Rowe's groundbreaking and far-reaching contributions to science education. Rowe is best known for her research on wait-time: the idea that teachers can improve the quality and length of classroom discussions by waiting at least 3 s before and after student responses. Her wait-time research grew from and helped inform her staunch advocacy of science education as inquiry; Rowe saw wonder and excitement as central to the teaching and learning of science. She spent much of her professional life designing professional development experiences and innovative curriculum materials to help teachers, particularly elementary school teachers, enact inquiry in their classrooms.

  3. Detection of secondary and backscattered electrons for 3D imaging with multi-detector method in VP/ESEM.

    PubMed

    Slówko, Witold; Wiatrowski, Artur; Krysztof, Michał

    2018-01-01

    The paper considers some major problems of adapting the multi-detector method for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of wet bio-medical samples in Variable Pressure/Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (VP/ESEM). The described method pertains to "single-view techniques", which to create the 3D surface model utilise a sequence of 2D SEM images captured from a single view point (along the electron beam axis) but illuminated from four directions. The basis of the method and requirements resulting from them are given for the detector systems of secondary (SE) and backscattered electrons (BSE), as well as designs of the systems which could work in variable conditions. The problems of SE detection with application of the Pressure Limiting Aperture (PLA) as the signal collector are discussed with respect to secondary electron backscattering by a gaseous environment. However, the authors' attention is turned mainly to the directional BSE detection, realized in two ways. The high take off angle BSE were captured through PLA with use of the quadruple semiconductor detector placed inside the intermediate chamber, while BSE starting at lower angles were detected by the four-folded ionization device working in the sample chamber environment. The latter relied on a conversion of highly energetic BSE into low energetic SE generated on walls and a gaseous environment of the deep discharge gap oriented along the BSE velocity direction. The converted BSE signal was amplified in an ionising avalanche developed in the electric field arranged transversally to the gap. The detector system operation is illustrated with numerous computer simulations and examples of experiments and 3D images. The latter were conducted in a JSM 840 microscope with its combined detector-vacuum equipment which could extend capabilities of this high vacuum instrument toward elevated pressures (over 1kPa) and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Denver screening protocol for blunt cerebrovascular injury reduces the use of multi-detector computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Andrei M; Barber, P Alan; Marshall, Roger J; Civil, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) occurs in 0.2-2.7% of blunt trauma patients and has up to 30% mortality. Conventional screening does not recognize up to 20% of BCVI patients. To improve diagnosis of BCVI, both an expanded battery of screening criteria and a multi-detector computed tomography angiography (CTA) have been suggested. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the use of CTA restricted to the Denver protocol screen-positive patients would reduce the unnecessary use of CTA as a pre-emptive screening tool. This is a registry-based study of blunt trauma patients admitted to Auckland City Hospital from 1998 to 2012. The diagnosis of BCVI was confirmed or excluded with CTA, magnetic resonance angiography and, if these imaging were non-conclusive, four-vessel digital subtraction angiography. Thirty (61%) BCVI and 19 (39%) non-BCVI patients met eligibility criteria. The Denver protocol applied to our cohort of patients had a sensitivity of 97% (95% confidence interval (CI): 83-100%) and a specificity of 42% (95% CI: 20-67%). With a prevalence of BCVI in blunt trauma patients of 0.2% and 2.7%, post-test odds of a screen-positive test were 0.03 (95% CI: 0.002-0.005) and 0.046 (95% CI: 0.314-0.068), respectively. Application of the CTA to the Denver protocol screen-positive trauma patients can decrease the use of CTA as a pre-emptive screening tool by 95-97% and reduces its hazards. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. North Region ROW tool implementation workshop.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-08-02

    Welcome to the North Region ROW Tool Workshop. This workshop is funded under an implementation project sponsored by TxDOTs Research & Technology Implementation Office (RTI). This is the second of four regional workshops being planned for this summ...

  6. Incidence of retear with double-row versus single-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Tang, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Jun-Zu; Zou, Guo-Yao; Xiao, Rong-Chi

    2014-11-01

    Rotator cuff tears have a high recurrence rate, even after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Although some biomechanical evidence suggests the superiority of the double-row vs the single-row technique, clinical findings regarding these methods have been controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the double-row repair method results in a lower incidence of recurrent tearing compared with the single-row method. Electronic databases were systematically searched to identify reports of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) comparing single-row with double-row rotator cuff repair. The primary outcome assessed was retear of the repaired cuff. Secondary outcome measures were the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder score, the Constant shoulder score, and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score. Heterogeneity between the included studies was assessed. Six studies involving 428 patients were included in the review. Compared with single-row repair, double-row repair demonstrated a lower retear incidence (risk ratio [RR]=1.71 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.49]; P=.005; I(2)=0%) and a reduced incidence of partial-thickness retears (RR=2.16 [95% CI, 1.26-3.71]; P=.005; I(2)=26%). Functional ASES, Constant, and UCLA scores showed no difference between single- and double-row cuff repairs. Use of the double-row technique decreased the incidence of retears, especially partial-thickness retears, compared with the single-row technique. The functional outcome was not significantly different between the 2 techniques. To improve the structural outcome of the repaired rotator cuff, surgeons should use the double-row technique. However, further long-term RCTs on this topic are needed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Developing Formulas by Skipping Rows in Pascal's Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buonpastore, Robert J.; Osler, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    A table showing the first thirteen rows of Pascal's triangle, where the rows are, as usual numbered from 0 to 12 is presented. The entries in the table are called binomial coefficients. In this note, the authors systematically delete rows from Pascal's triangle and, by trial and error, try to find a formula that allows them to add new rows to the…

  8. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF CROSS ROW BUILDING (in background), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF CROSS ROW BUILDING (in background), LOOKING SOUTHWEST. The building at right is Brick Row (Old Beersheba Inn, Brick Row, HABS No. TN-54 B) - Old Beersheba Inn, Cross Row (Boarding Cabin), Armsfield Avenue, Beersheba Springs, Grundy County, TN

  9. Comparison between single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Milano, Giuseppe; Grasso, Andrea; Zarelli, Donatella; Deriu, Laura; Cillo, Mario; Fabbriciani, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical behavior under cyclic loading test of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair with suture anchors in an ex-vivo animal model. For the present study, 50 fresh porcine shoulders were used. On each shoulder, a crescent-shaped full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus was performed. Width of the tendon tear was 2 cm. The lesion was repaired using metal suture anchors. Shoulders were divided in four groups, according the type of repair: single-row tension-free repair (Group 1); single-row tension repair (Group 2); double-row tension-free repair (Group 3); double-row tension repair (Group 4); and a control group. Specimens were subjected to a cyclic loading test. Number of cycles at 5 mm of elongation and at failure, and total elongation were calculated. Single-row tension repair showed significantly poorest results for all the variables considered, when compared with the other groups. Regarding the mean number of cycles at 5 mm of elongation and at failure, there was a nonsignificant difference between Groups 3 and 4, and both of them were significantly greater than Group 1. For mean total elongation, the difference between Groups 1, 3, and 4 was not significant, but all of them were significantly lower than the control group. A single-row repair is particularly weak when performed under tension. Double-row repair is significantly more resistant to cyclic displacement than single-row repair in both tension-free and tension repair. Double-row repair technique can be primarily considered for large, unstable rotator cuff tears to improve mechanical strength of primary fixation of tendons to bone.

  10. Contribution of diffusion weighted MRI to diagnosis and staging in gastric tumors and comparison with multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Harun; Fatih Özbay, Mehmet; Çallı, İskan; Doğan, Erkan; Çelik, Sebahattin; Batur, Abdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Özgökçe, Mesut; Çetin Kotan, Mehmet

    2017-03-01

    Diagnostic performance of Diffusion-Weighted magnetic resonance Imaging (DWI) and Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) for TNM (Tumor, Lymph node, Metastasis) staging of gastric cancer was compared. We used axial T2-weighted images and DWI (b-0,400 and b-800 s/mm2) protocol on 51 pre-operative patients who had been diagnosed with gastric cancer. We also conducted MDCT examinations on them. We looked for a signal increase in the series of DWI images. The depth of tumor invasion in the stomach wall (tumor (T) staging), the involvement of lymph nodes (nodal (N) staging), and the presence or absence of metastases (metastatic staging) in DWI and CT images according to the TNM staging system were evaluated. In each diagnosis of the tumors, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative accuracy rates of DWI and MDCT examinations were found through a comparison with the results of the surgical pathology, which is the gold standard method. In addition to the compatibilities of each examination with surgical pathology, kappa statistics were used. Sensitivity and specificity of DWI and MDCT in lymph node staging were as follows: N1: DWI: 75.0%, 84.6%; MDCT: 66.7%, 82%;N2: DWI: 79.3%, 77.3%; MDCT: 69.0%, 68.2%; N3: DWI: 60.0%, 97.6%; MDCT: 50.0%, 90.2%. The diagnostic tool DWI seemed more compatible with the gold standard method (surgical pathology), especially in the staging of lymph node, when compared to MDCT. On the other hand, in T staging, the results of DWI and MDCT were better than the gold standard when the T stage increased. However, DWI did not demonstrate superiority to MDCT. The sensitivity and specificity of both imaging techniques for detecting distant metastasis were 100%. The diagnostic accuracy of DWI for TNM staging in gastric cancer before surgery is at a comparable level with MDCT and adding DWI to routine protocol of evaluating lymph nodes metastasis might increase diagnostic accuracy.

  11. Comparisons of single-row and twin-row soybean production in the Mid South

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A Maturity Group (MG) IV and MG V soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr] cultivar were planted in single-rows and twin-rows on 102 cm beds at 20, 30, 40, and 50 seeds m-2 in a Beulah fine sandy loam (coarse-loamy, mixed thermic Typic Dystrochrepts) in 2008, 2009, 2010 and Sharkey clay (Vertic Haplaquept) i...

  12. Outcomes of single-row and double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saridakis, Paul; Jones, Grant

    2010-03-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a common procedure that is gaining wide acceptance among orthopaedic surgeons because it is less invasive than open repair techniques. However, there is little consensus on whether to employ single-row or double-row fixation. The purpose of the present study was to systematically review the English-language literature to see if there is a difference between single-row and double-row fixation techniques in terms of clinical outcomes and radiographic healing. PubMed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and EMBASE were reviewed with the terms "arthroscopic rotator cuff," "single row repair," and "double row repair." The inclusion criteria were a level of evidence of III (or better), an in vivo human clinical study on arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and direct comparison of single-row and double-row fixation. Excluded were technique reports, review articles, biomechanical studies, and studies with no direct comparison of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques. On the basis of these criteria, ten articles were found, and a review of the full-text articles identified six articles for final review. Data regarding demographic characteristics, rotator cuff pathology, surgical techniques, biases, sample sizes, postoperative rehabilitation regimens, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, University of California at Los Angeles scores, Constant scores, and the prevalence of recurrent defects noted on radiographic studies were extracted. Confidence intervals were then calculated for the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, University of California at Los Angeles, and Constant scores. Quality appraisal was performed by the two authors to identify biases. There was no significant difference between the single-row and double-row groups within each study in terms of postoperative clinical outcomes. However, one study divided each of the groups into patients with small-to-medium tears (< 3 cm in length) and those with

  13. Monitoring of performance and training in rowing.

    PubMed

    Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Jaak; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2005-01-01

    Rowing is a strength-endurance type of sport and competition performance depends on factors such as aerobic and anaerobic power, physical power, rowing technique and tactics. Therefore, a rower has to develop several capacities in order to be successful and a valid testing battery of a rower has to include parameters that are highly related to rowing performance. Endurance training is the mainstay in rowing. For the 2000 m race, power training at high velocities should be preferred to resistance training at low velocities in order to train more specifically during the off-season. The specific training of the international rower has to be approximately 70% of the whole training time. Several studies have reported different biochemical parameters for monitoring the training of rowers. There is some evidence that plasma leptin is more sensitive to training volume changes than specific stress hormones (e.g. cortisol, testosterone, growth hormone). In rowing, the stress hormone reactions to training volume and/or intensity changes are controversial. The Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes measures both stress and recovery, and may therefore be more effective than the previously used Borg ratio scale or the Profile of Mood States, which both focus mainly on the stress component. In the future, probably the most effective way to evaluate the training of rowers is to monitor both stress and recovery components at the same time, using both psychometric data together with the biochemical and performance parameters.

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of a single-row versus double-row repair for complete subscapularis tears.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Wiebringhaus, Philipp; Lodde, Ina; Waizy, Hazibullah; Becher, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Petersen, Wolf

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare a single-row repair and a double-row repair technique for the specific characteristics of a complete subscapularis lesion. Ten pairs of human cadaveric shoulder human shoulder specimens were tested for stiffness and ultimate tensile strength of the intact tendons in a load to failure protocol. After a complete subscapularis tear was provoked, the specimens were assigned to two treatment groups: single-row repair (1) and a double-row repair using a "suture bridge" technique (2). After repair cyclic loading a subsequent load to failure protocol was performed to determine the ultimate tensile load, the stiffness and the elongation behaviour of the reconstructions. The intact subscapularis tendons had a mean stiffness of 115 N/mm and a mean ultimate load of 720 N. The predominant failure mode of the intact tendons was a tear at the humeral insertion site (65%). The double-row technique restored 48% of the ultimate load of the intact tendons (332 N), while the single-row technique revealed a significantly lower ultimate load of 244 N (P = 0.001). In terms of the stiffness, the double-row technique showed a mean stiffness of 81 N/mm which is significantly higher compared to the stiffness of the single-row repairs of 55 N/mm (P = 0.001). The double-row technique has been shown to be stronger and stiffer when compared to a conventional single-row repair. Therefore, this technique is recommended from a biomechanical point of view irrespectively if performed by an open or arthroscopic approach.

  15. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    DOEpatents

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  16. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... plaque buildup causes the walls of the abdominal aorta to become weak and bulge outward like a ... treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, is a ...

  17. Steady motion of a rowing boat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Marat Z.; Klimina, Liubov A.

    2018-05-01

    A boat with a crank rowing mechanism is considered. The boat is equipped with two rowing oars positioned symmetrically about the symmetry axis of the shell. Oars move synchronously. With the use of numerical-analytical methods it is shown that the dependence of the average speed of the boat on the magnitude of the engine torque at stationary modes of motion is close to the square root function with a certain factor depending on the model parameters. This result agrees with the results of the experiments.

  18. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  19. Medial-row failure after arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro; Katsuo, Shin-ichi; Mizuno, Katsunori; Arakawa, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Seigaku

    2010-03-01

    We report 4 cases of medial-row failure after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) without arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASAD), in which there was pullout of mattress sutures of the medial row and knots were caught between the cuff and the greater tuberosity. Between October 2006 and January 2008, 49 patients underwent double-row ARCR. During this period, ASAD was not performed with ARCR. Revision arthroscopy was performed in 8 patients because of ongoing symptoms after the index operation. In 4 of 8 patients the medial rotator cuff failed; the tendon appeared to be avulsed at the medial row, and there were exposed knots on the bony surface of the rotator cuff footprint. It appeared that the knots were caught between the cuff and the greater tuberosity. Three retear cuffs were revised with the arthroscopic transtendon technique, and one was revised with a single-row technique after completing the tear. ASAD was performed in all patients. Three of the four patients showed improvement of symptoms and returned to their preinjury occupation. Impingement of pullout knots may be a source of pain after double-row rotator cuff repair. Copyright 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of bronchial wall thickness and lumen diameter in human adults using multi-detector computed tomography: comparison with theoretical models

    PubMed Central

    Montaudon, M; Desbarats, P; Berger, P; de Dietrich, G; Marthan, R; Laurent, F

    2007-01-01

    A thickened bronchial wall is the morphological substratum of most diseases of the airway. Theoretical and clinical models of bronchial morphometry have so far focused on bronchial lumen diameter, and bronchial length and angles, mainly assessed from bronchial casts. However, these models do not provide information on bronchial wall thickness. This paper reports in vivo values of cross-sectional wall area, lumen area, wall thickness and lumen diameter in ten healthy subjects as assessed by multi-detector computed tomography. A validated dedicated software package was used to measure these morphometric parameters up to the 14th bronchial generation, with respect to Weibel's model of bronchial morphometry, and up to the 12th according to Boyden's classification. Measured lumen diameters and homothety ratios were compared with theoretical values obtained from previously published studies, and no difference was found when considering dichotomic division of the bronchial tree. Mean wall area, lumen area, wall thickness and lumen diameter were then provided according to bronchial generation order, and mean homothety ratios were computed for wall area, lumen area and wall thickness as well as equations giving the mean value of each parameter for a given bronchial generation with respect to its value in generation 0 (trachea). Multi-detector computed tomography measurements of bronchial morphometric parameters may help to improve our knowledge of bronchial anatomy in vivo, our understanding of the pathophysiology of bronchial diseases and the evaluation of pharmacological effects on the bronchial wall. PMID:17919291

  1. 2012 ROW fatality & trespass prevention workshop

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-08-31

    Trespassing along railroad and transit rights-of-way (ROW) is the leading cause of rail-related deaths in America. Nationally, more than 550 trespass fatalities and nearly as many injuries occur each year. The vast majority of these incidents are pre...

  2. 2015 ROW Fatality & Trespass Prevention Workshop

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-12-01

    Trespassing along railroad rights-of-way (ROW) is the leading cause of rail-related deaths. More than 500 preventable trespass fatalities and nearly as many injuries occur each year in the United States, and most of these incidents involve pedestrian...

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs: double-row compared with single-row fixation.

    PubMed

    Ma, C Benjamin; Comerford, Lyn; Wilson, Joseph; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2006-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs can have higher rates of failure than do open repairs. Current methods of rotator cuff repair have been limited to single-row fixation of simple and horizontal stitches, which is very different from open repairs. The objective of this study was to compare the initial cyclic loading and load-to-failure properties of double-row fixation with those of three commonly used single-row techniques. Ten paired human supraspinatus tendons were split in half, yielding four tendons per cadaver. The bone mineral content at the greater tuberosity was assessed. Four stitch configurations (two-simple, massive cuff, arthroscopic Mason-Allen, and double-row fixation) were randomized and tested on each set of tendons. Specimens were cyclically loaded between 5 and 100 N at 0.25 Hz for fifty cycles and then loaded to failure under displacement control at 1 mm/sec. Conditioning elongation, peak-to-peak elongation, ultimate tensile load, and stiffness were measured with use of a three-dimensional tracking system and compared, and the failure type (suture or anchor pull-out) was recorded. No significant differences were found among the stitches with respect to conditioning elongation. The mean peak-to-peak elongation (and standard error of the mean) was significantly lower for the massive cuff (1.1 +/- 0.1 mm) and double-row stitches (1.1 +/- 0.1 mm) than for the arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitch (1.5 +/- 0.2 mm) (p < 0.05). The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher for double-row fixation (287 +/- 24 N) than for all of the single-row fixations (p < 0.05). Additionally, the massive cuff stitch (250 +/- 21 N) was found to have a significantly higher ultimate tensile load than the two-simple (191 +/- 18 N) and arthroscopic Mason-Allen (212 +/- 21 N) stitches (p < 0.05). No significant differences in stiffness were found among the stitches. Failure mechanisms were similar for all stitches. Rotator cuff repairs in the

  4. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  5. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  6. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal ... intestine (jejunum and ileum), the large intestine (colon), the liver, the spleen, the gallbladder, the pancreas, the uterus, ...

  7. Strength and conditioning practices in rowing.

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; Olsen, Peter D; Berger, Nicolas J; Golby, Jim; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-03-01

    There is limited published research on the practices of strength and conditioning (S &C) coaches in Great Britain. Information about training program design would be useful in developing models of good practice and ecologically valid intervention studies. The aim of this research was to quantify the training practices of coaches responsible for the S&C of rowing athletes. A questionnaire was developed that consisted of 6 sections: (a) personal details, (b) physical testing, (c) strength and power development, (d) flexibility development, (e) unique aspects of the program, and (f) any further relevant comments regarding the athletes prescribed training program. Twenty-two rowing and 10 S&C coaches with an average of 10.5 ± 7.2 years' experience agreed to complete the questionnaire. Approximately, 34% coached rowers of Olympic standard, 34% coached national standard, 3% coached regional standard, 19% coached club standard, and 10% coached university standard rowers. All coaches agreed that strength training enhanced rowing performance and the majority (74%) indicated that athletes' strength trained 2-3 times a week. Almost all coaches (94%) reported their rowers performed strength training, with 81% using Olympic lifting, and 91% employing a periodized training model. The clean (63%) and squat (27%) were rated the most important prescribed exercises. Approximately 50% of coaches used plyometrics such as depth jumps, box drills, and standing jumps. Ninety-four percent indicated they conducted physical testing on their rowers, typically assessing cardiovascular endurance (80%), muscular power (70%), muscular strength (70%), and anaerobic capacity (57%). This research represents the only published survey to date on the S&C practices in rowing within Great Britain.

  8. Feasibility of tissue characterization of coronary plaques using 320-detector row computed tomography: comparison with integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shigekiyo; Kawasaki, Masanori; Miyata, Shusaku; Suzuki, Keita; Yamaura, Makoto; Ido, Takahisa; Aoyama, Takuma; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) with 320-detector rows (DR) has become available in the clinical settings. The purpose of the present study was to determine the cutoff values of Hounsfield unit (HU) for discrimination of plaque components by comparing HU of coronary plaques with integrated backscatter intravascular ultrasound (IB-IVUS) serving as a gold standard. Seventy-seven coronary atherosclerotic lesions in 77 patients with angina were visualized by both 320-DR CT (Aquilion One, Toshiba, Japan) and IB-IVUS at the same site. To determine the thresholds for discrimination of plaque components, we compared HU with IB values as a gold standard. Optimal thresholds were determined from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves analysis. The HU values of lipid pool (n = 115), fibrosis (n = 93), vessel lumen and calcification (n = 73) were 28 ± 19 HU (range -18 to 69 HU), 98 ± 31 HU (44 to 195 HU), 357 ± 65 HU (227 to 534 HU) and 998 ± 236 HU (366 to 1,489 HU), respectively. The thresholds of 56 HU, 210 HU and 490 HU were the most reliable predictors of lipid pool, fibrosis, vessel lumen and calcification, respectively. Lipid volume measured by 320-DR CT was correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS (r = 0.63, p < 0.05), whereas fibrous volume measured by 320-DR CT was not. Lipid volume measured by 320-DR CT was correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS, whereas fibrous volume was not correlated with that measured by IB-IVUS because manual exclusion of the outside of vessel hindered rigorous discrimination between fibrosis and extravascular components.

  9. Effects of dose reduction on multi-detector computed tomographic images in evaluating the maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Hiroshi; Sur, Jaideep; Seki, Kenji; Nakajima, Koh; Sano, Tsukasa; Okano, Tomohiro

    2010-08-01

    To assess effects of dose reduction on image quality in evaluating maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning using cadavers. Six cadavers were used for the study using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) operated at 120 kV and the variable tube current of 80, 40, 20 and 10 mA. A slice thickness of 0.625 mm and pitch 1 were used. Multi-planar images perpendicular and parallel to dentitions were created. The images were evaluated by five oral radiologists in terms of visibility of the anatomical landmarks including alveolar crest, mandibular canal, floors of the maxillary sinus and nasal cavity, contours/cortical layer of jaw bones and the details of trabecular bone. Observers were asked to determine the quality of the images in comparison with 80 mA images based on the criteria: excellent, good, fair or non-diagnostic. The average scores of all observers were calculated for each specimen in all exposure conditions. The 40 mA images could visualize such landmarks and were evaluated to be same or almost equivalent in quality to the 80 mA images. Even the 20 mA images could be accepted just for diagnostic purpose for implant with substantial deterioration of the image quality. The 10 mA images may not be accepted because of the obscured contour caused by image noise. Significant dose reduction by lowering mA can be utilized for pre-surgical implant planning in multi-detector CT.

  10. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome after Abdominal Wall Reconstruction: Quaternary Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, A W; Nickerson, D; Roberts, D J; Rosen, M J; McBeth, P B; Petro, C C; Berrevoet, Frederik; Sugrue, M; Xiao, Jimmy; Ball, C G

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction with reconstitution of the container function of the abdominal compartment is increasingly being performed in patients with massive ventral hernia previously deemed inoperable. This situation places patients at great risk of severe intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome if organ failure ensues. Intra-abdominal hypertension and especially abdominal compartment syndrome may be devastating systemic complications with systematic and progressive organ failure and death. We thus reviewed the pathophysiology and reported clinical experiences with abnormalities of intra-abdominal pressure in the context of abdominal wall reconstruction. Bibliographic databases (1950-2015), websites, textbooks, and the bibliographies of previously recovered articles for reports or data relating to intra-abdominal pressure, intra-abdominal hypertension, and the abdominal compartment syndrome in relation to ventral, incisional, or abdominal hernia repair or abdominal wall reconstruction. Surgeons should thus consider and carefully measure intra-abdominal pressure and its resultant effects on respiratory parameters and function during abdominal wall reconstruction. The intra-abdominal pressure post-operatively will be a result of the new intra-peritoneal volume and the abdominal wall compliance. Strategies surgeons may utilize to ameliorate intra-abdominal pressure rise after abdominal wall reconstruction including temporizing paralysis of the musculature either temporarily or semi-permanently, pre-operative progressive pneumoperitoneum, permanently removing visceral contents, or surgically releasing the musculature to increase the abdominal container volume. In patients without complicating shock and inflammation, and in whom the abdominal wall anatomy has been so functionally adapted to maximize compliance, intra-abdominal hypertension may be transient and tolerable. Intra-abdominal hypertension/abdominal compartment syndrome in the specific setting of

  11. Abdominal Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Borioni, Raoul; Garofalo, Mariano; De Paulis, Ruggero; Nardi, Paolo; Scaffa, Raffaele; Chiariello, Luigi

    2005-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissections are rare events. Their anatomic and clinical features are different from those of atherosclerotic aneurysms. We report 4 cases of isolated abdominal aortic dissection that were successfully treated with surgical or endovascular intervention. The anatomic and clinical features and a review of the literature are also presented. PMID:15902826

  12. Abdominal Trauma Revisited.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, David V

    2017-11-01

    Although abdominal trauma has been described since antiquity, formal laparotomies for trauma were not performed until the 1800s. Even with the introduction of general anesthesia in the United States during the years 1842 to 1846, laparotomies for abdominal trauma were not performed during the Civil War. The first laparotomy for an abdominal gunshot wound in the United States was finally performed in New York City in 1884. An aggressive operative approach to all forms of abdominal trauma till the establishment of formal trauma centers (where data were analyzed) resulted in extraordinarily high rates of nontherapeutic laparotomies from the 1880s to the 1960s. More selective operative approaches to patients with abdominal stab wounds (1960s), blunt trauma (1970s), and gunshot wounds (1990s) were then developed. Current adjuncts to the diagnosis of abdominal trauma when serial physical examinations are unreliable include the following: 1) diagnostic peritoneal tap/lavage, 2) surgeon-performed ultrasound examination; 3) contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis; and 4) diagnostic laparoscopy. Operative techniques for injuries to the liver, spleen, duodenum, and pancreas have been refined considerably since World War II. These need to be emphasized repeatedly in an era when fewer patients undergo laparotomy for abdominal trauma. Finally, abdominal trauma damage control is a valuable operative approach in patients with physiologic exhaustion and multiple injuries.

  13. Abdominal hernias: Radiological features

    PubMed Central

    Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

  14. Functional and structural outcomes of single-row versus double-row versus combined double-row and suture-bridge repair for rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Chisato; Fukunishi, Kunimoto; Ohue, Mutsumi; Tsujimura, Tomoyuki; Fujiwara, Kenta; Kinoshita, Mitsuo

    2011-10-01

    Although previous biomechanical research has demonstrated the superiority of the suture-bridge rotator cuff repair over double-row repair from a mechanical point of view, no articles have described the structural and functional outcomes of this type of procedure. The structural and functional outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair may be different between the single-row, double-row, and combined double-row and suture-bridge (compression double-row) techniques. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. There were 206 shoulders in 201 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Eleven patients were lost to follow-up. Sixty-five shoulders were repaired using the single-row, 23 shoulders using the double-row, and 107 shoulders using the compression double-row techniques. Clinical outcomes were evaluated at an average of 38.5 months (range, 24-74 months) after rotator cuff repair. Postoperative cuff integrity was determined using Sugaya's classification of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The retear rates after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were 10.8%, 26.1%, and 4.7%, respectively, for the single-row, double-row, and compression double-row techniques. In the subcategory of large and massive rotator cuff tears, the retear rate in the compression double-row group (3 of 40 shoulders, 7.5%) was significantly less than those in the single-row group (5 of 8 shoulders, 62.5%, P < .001) and the double-row group (5 of 12 shoulders, 41.7%, P < .01). Postoperative clinical outcomes in patients with a retear were significantly lower than those in patients without a retear for all 3 techniques. The additional suture bridges decreased the retear rate for large and massive tears. The combination of the double-row and suture-bridge techniques, which had the lowest rate of postoperative retear, is an effective option for arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff tendons because the postoperative functional outcome in patients

  15. Meta-analysis of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes After Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Perser, Karen; Godfrey, David; Bisson, Leslie

    2011-05-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair methods have improved biomechanical performance when compared with single-row repairs. To review clinical outcomes of single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair with the hypothesis that double-row rotator cuff repair will result in better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Published literature from January 1980 to April 2010. Key terms included rotator cuff, prospective studies, outcomes, and suture techniques. The literature was systematically searched, and 5 level I and II studies were found comparing clinical outcomes of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Coleman methodology scores were calculated for each article. Meta-analysis was performed, with treatment effect between single row and double row for clinical outcomes and with odds ratios for radiographic results. The sample size necessary to detect a given difference in clinical outcome between the 2 methods was calculated. Three level I studies had Coleman scores of 80, 74, and 81, and two level II studies had scores of 78 and 73. There were 156 patients with single-row repairs and 147 patients with double-row repairs, both with an average follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-40 months). Double-row repairs resulted in a greater treatment effect for each validated outcome measure in 4 studies, but the differences were not clinically or statistically significant (range, 0.4-2.2 points; 95% confidence interval, -0.19, 4.68 points). Double-row repairs had better radiographic results, but the differences were also not statistically significant (P = 0.13). Two studies had adequate power to detect a 10-point difference between repair methods using the Constant score, and 1 study had power to detect a 5-point difference using the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) score. Double-row rotator cuff repair does not show a statistically significant improvement in clinical outcome or radiographic healing with short-term follow-up.

  16. Blade row interaction effects on flutter and forced response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buffum, Daniel H.

    1993-01-01

    In the flutter or forced response analysis of a turbomachine blade row, the blade row in question is commonly treated as if it is isolated from the neigboring blade rows. Disturbances created by vibrating blades are then free to propagate away from this blade row without being disturbed. In reality, neighboring blade rows will reflect some portion of this wave energy back toward the vibrating blades, causing additional unsteady forces on them. It is of fundamental importance to determine whether or not these reflected waves can have a significant effect on the aeroelastic stability or forced response of a blade row. Therefore, a procedure to calculate intra-blade-row unsteady aerodynamic interactions was developed which relies upon results available from isolated blade row unsteady aerodynamic analyses. In addition, an unsteady aerodynamic influence coefficient technique is used to obtain a model for the vibratory response in which the neighboring blade rows are also flexible. The flutter analysis shows that interaction effects can be destabilizing, and the forced response analysis shows that interaction effects can result in a significant increase in the resonant response of a blade row.

  17. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  18. Single-row versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in small- to medium-sized tears.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nuri; Kocaoglu, Baris; Guven, Osman

    2010-07-01

    Double-row rotator cuff repair leads to superior cuff integrity and clinical results compared with single-row repair. The study enrolled 68 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear who were divided into 2 groups of 34 patients according to repair technique. The patients were followed-up for at least 2 years. The results were evaluated by Constant score. Despite the biomechanical studies and cadaver studies that proved the superiority of double-row fixation over single-row fixation, our clinical results show no difference in functional outcome between the two methods. It is evident that double-row repair is more technically demanding, expensive, and time-consuming than single-row repair, without providing a significant improvement in clinical results. Comparison between groups did not show significant differences. At the final follow-up, the Constant score was 82.2 in the single-row group and 78.8 in the double-row group. Functional outcome was improved in both groups after surgery, but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant. At long-term follow-up, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the double-row technique showed no significant difference in clinical outcome compared with single-row repair in small to medium tears. 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... are, or may be, pregnant. Alternative Names Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, ...

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this problem include: Smoking High blood pressure Male gender Genetic factors An abdominal aortic aneurysm is most ... body from an aortic aneurysm, you will need surgery right away. If the aneurysm is small and ...

  1. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... An abdominal CT scan makes detailed pictures of the structures inside your belly very quickly. This test may be used to look ...

  2. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood clots to the lungs) Abdominal or chest wall pain: Shingles (herpes zoster infection) Costochondritis (inflammation of ... or tumors), fat (evidence of impaired digestion and absorption of food), and the presence of germs. X- ...

  3. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  4. Abdominal cocoon: sonographic features.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy; Sendhilkumar, Karuppusamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    An abdominal cocoon is a rare condition in which the small bowel is encased in a membrane. The diagnosis is usually established at surgery. Here we describe the sonographic features of this condition.

  5. Total transverse rupture of the duodenum after blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cesare; Di Marco, Carluccio; Loponte, Margherita; Savino, Grazia

    2014-05-11

    Complete transverse rupture of the duodenum as an isolated lesion in blunt trauma can be considered as exceptional. The aim of this report is to discuss diagnostic procedures and surgical options in such an infrequent presentation. We report on a 37 year old man who had a total transverse rupture of the duodenum after blunt abdominal trauma. Diagnosis was suspected after contrast enhanced CT scan and confirmed at laparotomy; duodenal rupture was repaired by an end to end duodenal-duodenal anastomosis, after Kocher maneuver. The patient had fast and complete recovery. A high index of suspicion is necessary for timely diagnosis. Multi detector contrast enhanced CT scan is the gold standard for that aim. Surgical management must be tailored on an individual basis, since many techniques are available for both reconstruction and duodenum decompression. Kocher maneuver is essential for complete inspection of the pancreatic duodenal block and for appropriate reconstruction. Management of isolated duodenal rupture can be difficult. Contrast enhanced TC scans is essential for timely diagnosis. Primary repair can be achieved by an end to end duodenum anastomosis after Kocher maneuver, although alternative techniques are available for tailored solutions. Complex duodenum decompression techniques are not mandatory.

  6. Biomechanical comparison of a single-row versus double-row suture anchor technique for rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, David H; Elattrache, Neal S; Tibone, James E; Jun, Bong-Jae; DeLaMora, Sergai N; Kvitne, Ronald S; Lee, Thay Q

    2006-03-01

    Reestablishment of the native footprint during rotator cuff repair has been suggested as an important criterion for optimizing healing potential and fixation strength. A double-row rotator cuff footprint repair will demonstrate superior biomechanical properties compared with a single-row repair. Controlled laboratory study. In 9 matched pairs of fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders, the supraspinatus tendon from 1 shoulder was repaired with a double-row suture anchor technique: 2 medial anchors with horizontal mattress sutures and 2 lateral anchors with simple sutures. The tendon from the contralateral shoulder was repaired using a single lateral row of 2 anchors with simple sutures. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading from 10 to 180 N for 200 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure. Gap formation and strain over the footprint area were measured using a video digitizing system; stiffness and failure load were determined from testing machine data. Gap formation for the double-row repair was significantly smaller (P < .05) when compared with the single-row repair for the first cycle (1.67 +/- 0.75 mm vs 3.10 +/- 1.67 mm, respectively) and the last cycle (3.58 +/- 2.59 mm vs 7.64 +/- 3.74 mm, respectively). The initial strain over the footprint area for the double-row repair was nearly one third (P < .05) the strain of the single-row repair. Adding a medial row of anchors increased the stiffness of the repair by 46% and the ultimate failure load by 48% (P < .05). Footprint reconstruction of the rotator cuff using a double-row repair improved initial strength and stiffness and decreased gap formation and strain over the footprint when compared with a single-row repair. To achieve maximal initial fixation strength and minimal gap formation for rotator cuff repair, reconstructing the footprint attachment with 2 rows of suture anchors should be considered.

  7. Validation of the Australian diagnostic reference levels for paediatric multi detector computed tomography: a comparison of RANZCR QUDI data and subsequent NDRLS data from 2012 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Anna, Hayton; Wallace, Anthony; Thomas, Peter

    2017-03-01

    The national diagnostic reference level service (NDRLS), was launched in 2011, however no paediatric data were submitted during the first calendar year of operation. As such, Australian national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), for paediatric multi detector computed tomography (MDCT), were established using data obtained from a Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR), Quality Use of Diagnostic Imaging (QUDI), study. Paediatric data were submitted to the NDRLS in 2012 through 2015. An analysis has been made of the NDRLS paediatric data using the same method as was used to analyse the QUDI data to establish the Australian national paediatric DRLs for MDCT. An analysis of the paediatric NDRLS data has also been made using the method used to calculate the Australian national adult DRLs for MDCT. A comparison between the QUDI data and subsequent NDRLS data shows the NDRLS data to be lower on average for the Head and AbdoPelvis protocol and similar for the chest protocol. Using an average of NDRLS data submitted between 2012 and 2015 implications for updated paediatric DRLS are considered.

  8. Cochlear Implant Electrode Localization Using an Ultra-High Resolution Scan Mode on Conventional 64-Slice and New Generation 192-Slice Multi-Detector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Leng, Shuai; Diehn, Felix E; Witte, Robert J; Krecke, Karl N; Grimes, Josh; Koeller, Kelly K; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H; Lane, John I

    2017-08-01

    A new generation 192-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) clinical scanner provides enhanced image quality and superior electrode localization over conventional MDCT. Currently, accurate and reliable cochlear implant electrode localization using conventional MDCT scanners remains elusive. Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric temporal bones were implanted with full-length cochlear implant electrodes. Specimens were subsequently scanned with conventional 64-slice and new generation 192-slice MDCT scanners utilizing ultra-high resolution modes. Additionally, all specimens were scanned with micro-CT to provide a reference criterion for electrode position. Images were reconstructed according to routine temporal bone clinical protocols. Three neuroradiologists, blinded to scanner type, reviewed images independently to assess resolution of individual electrodes, scalar localization, and severity of image artifact. Serving as the reference standard, micro-CT identified scalar crossover in one specimen; imaging of all remaining cochleae demonstrated complete scala tympani insertions. The 192-slice MDCT scanner exhibited improved resolution of individual electrodes (p < 0.01), superior scalar localization (p < 0.01), and reduced blooming artifact (p < 0.05), compared with conventional 64-slice MDCT. There was no significant difference between platforms when comparing streak or ring artifact. The new generation 192-slice MDCT scanner offers several notable advantages for cochlear implant imaging compared with conventional MDCT. This technology provides important feedback regarding electrode position and course, which may help in future optimization of surgical technique and electrode design.

  9. 19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE TWO ROWS OF COKE OVENS, LOOKING EAST. THE OVENS LIE TO THE EAST OF THE MINE BUILDINGS. BEEHIVE OVENS FORM THE ROW ON THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THE RECTANGULAR OVENS ARE ON THE RIGHT. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  10. Improving Spectral Results Using Row-by-Row Fourier Transform of Spatial Heterodyne Raman Spectrometer Interferogram.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Patrick D; Strange, K Alicia; Angel, S Michael

    2017-06-01

    This work describes a method of applying the Fourier transform to the two-dimensional Fizeau fringe patterns generated by the spatial heterodyne Raman spectrometer (SHRS), a dispersive interferometer, to correct the effects of certain types of optical alignment errors. In the SHRS, certain types of optical misalignments result in wavelength-dependent and wavelength-independent rotations of the fringe pattern on the detector. We describe here a simple correction technique that can be used in post-processing, by applying the Fourier transform in a row-by-row manner. This allows the user to be more forgiving of fringe alignment and allows for a reduction in the mechanical complexity of the SHRS.

  11. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Functional Electrical Stimulation Rowing: The Rowstim Series.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Brian; Gibbons, Robin; Wheeler, Garry

    2017-11-01

    Potentially, functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted exercise may have an important therapeutic role in reducing comorbidities associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we present an overview of these secondary life-threatening conditions, discuss the rationale behind the development of a hybrid exercise called FES rowing, and describe our experience in developing FES rowing technology. FES rowing and sculling are unique forms of adaptive rowing for those with SCI. The paralyzed leg musculature is activated by multiple channels of electrical pulses delivered via self-adhesive electrodes attached to the skin. The stimulated muscle contractions are synchronized with voluntary rowing movements of the upper limbs. A range of steady-state FES rowing exercise intensities have been demonstrated from 15.2 ± 1.8 mL/kg/min in tetraplegia to 22.9 ±7.1 mL/kg/min in paraplegia. We expect that such high levels may help some to achieve significant reductions in the risks to their health, particularly where a dose-response relationship exists as is the case for cardiovascular disease and Type II diabetes. Furthermore, preliminary results suggest that cyclical forces more than 1.5 times body weight are imposed on the leg long bones which may help to reduce the risk of fragility fractures. We have demonstrated the feasibility of FES rowing on land and water using adapted rowing technology that includes; a fixed stretcher indoor ergometer (adapted Concept 2, Model E), a floating stretcher indoor ergometer (adapted Concept 2 Dynamic), a turbine powered water rowing tank, a custom hydraulic sculling simulator and a single scull (adapted Alden 16). This has involved volunteers with paraplegia and tetraplegia with SCI ranging from C4 to T12 AIS A using at least 4-channels of surface electrical stimulation. FES rowers, with SCI, have competed alongside non-SCI rowers over the Olympic distance of 2000 m at the British Indoor Rowing Championships in 2004, 2005, and 2006

  13. Magnetic 4d monoatomic rows on Ag vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, V.; Papanikolaou, N.; Zeller, R.; Dederichs, P. H.

    2001-09-01

    The magnetic properties of 4d monoatomic rows on Ag substrates have been studied by ab initio calculations using the screened Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SKKR) Green's function method within density functional theory (DFT) in its local spin density approximation (LSDA). The rows were placed at step-edge (step decoration) and on terrace positions of different vicinal Ag surfaces, i.e., fcc (711), fcc (410), and fcc (221). The results for the magnetic moments are explained in terms of the different coordination numbers of the row atoms and the different hybridization between the rather extended 4d orbitals of the row atoms and the sp-like valence electrons of the Ag substrates. For the fcc (711) vicinal surface, we explore the possibility of antiferromagnetic coupling between the atoms in each row and discuss, by means of total energy calculations, the stability of the antiferromagnetic solutions with respect to the ferromagnetic ones.

  14. Cyclic loading of rotator cuff reconstructions: single-row repair with modified suture configurations versus double-row repair.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, Olaf; Bachelier, Felix; Vees, Jochen; Kohn, Dieter; Pape, Dietrich

    2008-08-01

    Double-row repair is suggested to have superior biomechanical properties in rotator cuff reconstruction compared with single-row repair. However, double-row rotator cuff repair is frequently compared with simple suture repair and not with modified suture configurations. Single-row rotator cuff repairs with modified suture configurations have similar failure loads and gap formations as double-row reconstructions. Controlled laboratory study. We created 1 x 2-cm defects in 48 porcine infraspinatus tendons. Reconstructions were then performed with 4 single-row repairs and 2 double-row repairs. The single-row repairs included transosseous simple sutures; double-loaded corkscrew anchors in either a double mattress or modified Mason-Allen suture repair; and the Magnum Knotless Fixation Implant with an inclined mattress. Double-row repairs were either with Bio-Corkscrew FT using modified Mason-Allen stitches or a combination of Bio-Corkscrew FT and PushLock anchors using the SutureBridge Technique. During cyclic load (10 N to 60-200 N), gap formation was measured, and finally, ultimate load to failure and type of failure were recorded. Double-row double-corkscrew anchor fixation had the highest ultimate tensile strength (398 +/- 98 N) compared to simple sutures (105 +/- 21 N; P < .0001), single-row corkscrews using a modified Mason-Allen stitch (256 +/- 73 N; P = .003) or double mattress repair (290 +/- 56 N; P = .043), the Magnum Implant (163 +/- 13 N; P < .0001), and double-row repair with PushLock and Bio-Corkscrew FT anchors (163 +/- 59 N; P < .0001). Single-row double mattress repair was superior to transosseous sutures (P < .0001), the Magnum Implant (P = .009), and double-row repair with PushLock and Bio-Corkscrew FT anchors (P = .009). Lowest gap formation was found for double-row double-corkscrew repair (3.1 +/- 0.1 mm) compared to simple sutures (8.7 +/- 0.2 mm; P < .0001), the Magnum Implant (6.2 +/- 2.2 mm; P = .002), double-row repair with PushLock and Bio

  15. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of— Test... and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley varieties not meeting the requirements of this section shall be...

  16. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of— Test... and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley varieties not meeting the requirements of this section shall be...

  17. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of— Test... and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley varieties not meeting the requirements of this section shall be...

  18. 7 CFR 810.204 - Grades and grade requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. 810.204 Section 810.204 Agriculture Regulations of the... requirements for Six-rowed Malting barley and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley. Grade Minimum limits of— Test... and Six-rowed Blue Malting barley varieties not meeting the requirements of this section shall be...

  19. Abdominal pregnancy - Case presentation.

    PubMed

    Bohiltea, R; Radoi, V; Tufan, C; Horhoianu, I A; Bohiltea, C

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy, a rare diagnosis, belongs to the ectopic pregnancy group, the leading cause of pregnancy related exitus. The positive diagnosis is very difficult to establish most often in an acute setting, leading to a staggering percent of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality. We present the case of 26-weeks-old abdominal pregnancy with partial feto-placental detachment in a patient, after hysteroscopy and in vitro fertilization, which until the acute symptoms that led to emergency laparotomy went unrecognized. The patient recovered completely and satisfactorily after surgery and, due to the high risk of uterine rupture with regard to a second pregnancy, opted for a surrogate mother. Abdominal pregnancy can be regarded as a difficult to establish diagnosis, with a greater chance in case of increased awareness. It is compulsory to be well informed in order not to be surprised by the diagnosis and to apply the correct treatment immediately as the morbidity and mortality rate is elevated.

  20. Meta-analysis of Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes After Arthroscopic Single-Row Versus Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Perser, Karen; Godfrey, David; Bisson, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Context: Double-row rotator cuff repair methods have improved biomechanical performance when compared with single-row repairs. Objective: To review clinical outcomes of single-row versus double-row rotator cuff repair with the hypothesis that double-row rotator cuff repair will result in better clinical and radiographic outcomes. Data Sources: Published literature from January 1980 to April 2010. Key terms included rotator cuff, prospective studies, outcomes, and suture techniques. Study Selection: The literature was systematically searched, and 5 level I and II studies were found comparing clinical outcomes of single-row and double-row rotator cuff repair. Coleman methodology scores were calculated for each article. Data Extraction: Meta-analysis was performed, with treatment effect between single row and double row for clinical outcomes and with odds ratios for radiographic results. The sample size necessary to detect a given difference in clinical outcome between the 2 methods was calculated. Results: Three level I studies had Coleman scores of 80, 74, and 81, and two level II studies had scores of 78 and 73. There were 156 patients with single-row repairs and 147 patients with double-row repairs, both with an average follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-40 months). Double-row repairs resulted in a greater treatment effect for each validated outcome measure in 4 studies, but the differences were not clinically or statistically significant (range, 0.4-2.2 points; 95% confidence interval, –0.19, 4.68 points). Double-row repairs had better radiographic results, but the differences were also not statistically significant (P = 0.13). Two studies had adequate power to detect a 10-point difference between repair methods using the Constant score, and 1 study had power to detect a 5-point difference using the UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) score. Conclusions: Double-row rotator cuff repair does not show a statistically significant improvement in clinical

  1. Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ser Yee; Pormento, James G; Koong, Heng Nung

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal paracentesis and thoracocentesis are common bedside procedures with diagnostic, therapeutic and palliative roles. We describe a useful and familiar a useful and familiar technique with the use of a multiple lumen catheter commonly used for central venous line insertion for drainage of ascites or moderate to large pleural effusions. The use of a multiple lumen catheter allows easier and more rapid aspiration of fluid with a smaller probability of the side holes being blocked as compared to the standard needle or single catheter methods. This is particularly useful in situations where the dedicated commercial kits for thoracocentesis and abdominal paracentesis are not readily available.

  2. Staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Taviloglu, Korhan

    2003-07-01

    To review the current developments in staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma. To overview the steps of damage control laparotomy. The ever increasing importance of the resuscitation phase with current intensive care unit (ICU) support techniques should be emphasized. General surgeons should be familiar to staged abdominal re-operation for abdominal trauma and collaborate with ICU teams, interventional radiologists and several other specialties to overcome this entity.

  3. A comparative study of FDG PET/CT and enhanced multi-detector CT for detecting liver metastasis according to the size and location.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Mi; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Sang Won; Lee, Sang Mi; Kim, Hyun Gi; Kim, Shin Young; Shin, Hyung Chul

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnosability between (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT and enhanced multi-detector CT (MDCT) for the detection of liver metastasis (LM) according to the size and location in liver and to evaluate standard maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) of all liver metastatic lesions. One hundred two consecutive patients with malignancy who underwent both FDG PET/CT and MDCT for LM evaluation were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, 56 patients with LM were enrolled in this study. LM was confirmed by follow-up imaging studies after at least 6 months or by histopathology. FDG PET/CT and MDCT images were visually analyzed using three-point scale by the consensus of two radiologists and two nuclear medicine physicians. The size and location (central vs. sub-capsular) of the all liver lesions were evaluated using MDCT images. Furthermore, SUVmax of all liver lesions on FDG PET/CT images were calculated. A total of 146 liver lesions were detected by FDG PET/CT and MDCT and 142 of the lesions were diagnosed as LM. The detection rates of MDCT and FDG PET/CT for LM by visual analysis were 77 and 78%, respectively. There was no significant difference of detection rate according to the overall location and size of the lesions. However, FDG PET/CT was more sensitive than MDCT for detecting small and sub-capsular LM. The detection rate of FDG PET/CT for LM was 68% by the cutoff SUVmax of 2.7. Although the diagnosabilities of MDCT and FDG PET/CT for detecting LM were comparable, FDG PET/CT is superior to MDCT for detecting small LM located in the sub-capsular portion of liver.

  4. Functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Grover, Madhusudan; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-10-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a relatively less common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder defined by the presence of constant or frequently recurring abdominal pain that is not associated with eating, change in bowel habits, or menstrual periods (Drossman Gastroenterology 130:1377-1390, 2006), which points to a more centrally targeted (spinal and supraspinal) basis for the symptoms. However, FAPS is frequently confused with irritable bowel syndrome and other functional GI disorders in which abdominal pain is associated with eating and bowel movements. FAPS also differs from chronic abdominal pain associated with entities such as chronic pancreatitis or chronic inflammatory bowel disease, in which the pain is associated with peripherally acting factors (eg, gut inflammation or injury). Given the central contribution to the pain experience, concomitant psychosocial disturbances are common and strongly influence the clinical expression of FAPS, which also by definition is associated with loss of daily functioning. These factors make it critical to use a biopsychosocial construct to understand and manage FAPS, because gut-directed treatments are usually not successful in managing this condition.

  5. A biomechanical comparison of 2 technical variations of double-row rotator cuff fixation: the importance of medial row knots.

    PubMed

    Busfield, Benjamin T; Glousman, Ronald E; McGarry, Michelle H; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown comparable biomechanical properties of double-row fixation versus double-row fixation with a knotless lateral row. SutureBridge is a construct that secures the cuff with medial row mattress suture anchors and knotless lateral row fixation of the medial suture ends. Recent completely knotless constructs may lead to lesser clinical outcomes if the construct properties are compromised from lack of suture knots. A completely knotless construct without medial row knots will compromise the biomechanical properties in both cyclic and failure-testing parameters. Controlled laboratory study. Six matched pairs of cadaveric shoulders were randomized to 2 groups of double row fixation with SutureBridge: group 1 with medial row knots, and group 2 without medial row knots. The specimens were placed in a materials test system at 30 degrees of abduction. Cyclic testing to 180 N at 1 mm/sec for 30 cycles was performed, followed by tensile testing to failure at 1 mm/sec. Data included cyclic and failure data from the materials test system and gap data using a video digitizing system. All data from paired specimens were compared using paired Student t tests. Group 1 had a statistically significant difference (P < .05) for gap formation for the 1st (3.47 vs 5.05 mm) and 30th cycle (4.22 vs 8.10 mm) and at yield load (5.2 vs 9.1 mm). In addition, there was a greater energy absorbed (2805 vs 1648 N-mm), yield load (233 vs 183.1 N), and ultimate load (352.9 vs 253.9 N) for group 1. The mode of failure for the majority (4/6) of group 2 was lateral row failure, whereas all group 1 specimens failed at the clamp. Although lateral row knotless fixation has been shown not to sacrifice structural integrity of this construct, the addition of a knotless medial row compromises the construct leading to greater gapping and failure at lower loads. This may raise concerns regarding recently marketed completely knotless double row constructs.

  6. Abdominal Wall Endometriosis Mimicking Metastases.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Rakul; Anoop, T M; Mony, Rari P

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal wall lesions can be broadly divided into nontumorous and tumorous conditions. Nontumorous lesions include congenital lesion, abdominal wall hernia, inflammation and infection, vascular lesions, and miscellaneous conditions like hematoma. Tumorous lesions include benign and malignant neoplasms. Here, we report an unusual case of abdominal wall endometriosis mimicking metastases in a patient with breast carcinoma.

  7. The cost-effectiveness of single-row compared with double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Genuario, James W; Donegan, Ryan P; Hamman, Daniel; Bell, John-Erik; Boublik, Martin; Schlegel, Theodore; Tosteson, Anna N A

    2012-08-01

    Interest in double-row techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has increased over the last several years, presumably because of a combination of literature demonstrating superior biomechanical characteristics and recent improvements in instrumentation and technique. As a result of the increasing focus on value-based health-care delivery, orthopaedic surgeons must understand the cost implications of this practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair compared with traditional single-row repair. A decision-analytic model was constructed to assess the cost-effectiveness of double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair compared with single-row repair on the basis of the cost per quality-adjusted life year gained. Two cohorts of patients (one with a tear of <3 cm and the other with a tear of ≥3 cm) were evaluated. Probabilities for retear and persistent symptoms, health utilities for the particular health states, and the direct costs for rotator cuff repair were derived from the orthopaedic literature and institutional data. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for double-row compared with single-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was $571,500 for rotator cuff tears of <3 cm and $460,200 for rotator cuff tears of ≥3 cm. The rate of radiographic or symptomatic retear alone did not influence cost-effectiveness results. If the increase in the cost of double-row repair was less than $287 for small or moderate tears and less than $352 for large or massive tears compared with the cost of single-row repair, then double-row repair would represent a cost-effective surgical alternative. On the basis of currently available data, double-row rotator cuff repair is not cost-effective for any size rotator cuff tears. However, variability in the values for costs and probability of retear can have a profound effect on the results of the model and may create an environment in which double-row repair

  8. THERMALWATER FLOW METER. Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THERMAL-WATER FLOW METER. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  9. General view of building in context showing row of residences ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of building in context showing row of residences adjacent to golf course, facing northeast. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Officers' Quarters, 800' West of Bruja Road, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  10. Coordination with railroads to facilitate acquisition of ROW

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-06-01

    It has been observed by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Real Estate Services (HEPR) that there has been an emerging national trend for increasingly difficult and time consuming right-of-way (ROW) access agreements and acquisitions...

  11. 26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING ROW OF TIMBER SUPPORT TOWERS BUILT AS TEMPORARY TRUSS REINFORCEMENT (NOTE STEEL STRUCTURES ATOP TIMBER BRACING) - Oakland Army Base, Transit Shed, East of Dunkirk Street & South of Burma Road, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  12. 4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW NORTHWEST, INTERIOR OF GATEHOUSE, SHOWING ROW OF GATE OPERATING MECHANISMS; HEIGHT OF STEMS INDICATES FOREGROUND GATE IS OPEN - Norwich Water Power Company, Headgates, West bank of Shetucket River opposite Fourteenth Street, Greenville section, Norwich, New London County, CT

  13. PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM NORTHEAST OF 8 HILLSIDE ROAD (ROW HOUSES). ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW FROM NORTHEAST OF 8 HILLSIDE ROAD (ROW HOUSES). NOTE UTILITY CLOSETS AND GARAGE ENTRANCE FOR "SERVICE" SIDE OF STRUCTURE. - Old Greenbelt, Crescent Road and Southway, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  14. Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven, looking from the "Death Row" exercise yard, facing north (note cell block fifteen to the right and cell block fourteen in the distance_ - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. Detail, starpattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, star-pattern balustrade of north span, from northwest, showing row of four star-pattern railing slabs bracketed by simple molded concrete balusters - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  16. 7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Row of pumps against first floor interior west wall. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Oil House, 650 feet Southeast of Cliff & Mechanic Streets, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  17. General view of building in context showing row of residences ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of building in context showing row of residences on Canfield Avenue, facing northwest. - Albrook Air Force Station, Company Officer's Quarters, East side of Canfield Avenue, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  18. INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR SECOND FLOOR- EAST END LOOKING WEST AT NORTH ROW OF MUSHROOM COLUMNS. - Colt Fire Arms Company, South Armory Building, 36-150 Huyshope Avenue, 17-170 Van Dyke Avenue, 49 Vredendale Avenue, Hartford, Hartford County, CT

  19. 1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking southeast down senior officer row. Building 6 on left and senior officer housing on right. Galaxy Street in foreground. - Chanute Air Force Base, East of Route 45 & south of Rantoul, Rantoul, Champaign County, IL

  20. Unsteady Blade Row Interaction in a Transonic Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data from jet-engine tests have indicated that unsteady blade row interaction effects can have a significant impact on the performance of multiple-stage turbines. The magnitude of blade row interaction is a function of both blade-count ratio and axial spacing. In the current research program, numerical simulations have been used to quantify the effects of blade count ratio on the performance of an advanced turbine geometries.

  1. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Validation of multi-detector computed tomography as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Appt, Susan E; Werre, Stephen R; Tan, Joshua C; Kaplan, Jay R

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate low radiation dose, contrast-enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques. Computed tomography scans of four known-volume phantoms and nine mature female cynomolgus macaques were acquired using a previously described, low radiation dose scanning protocol, intravenous contrast enhancement, and a 32-slice MDCT scanner. Immediately following MDCT, ovaries were surgically removed and the ovarian weights were measured. The ovarian volumes were determined using water displacement. A veterinary radiologist who was unaware of actual volumes measured ovarian CT volumes three times, using a laptop computer, pen display tablet, hand-traced regions of interest, and free image analysis software. A statistician selected and performed all tests comparing the actual and CT data. Ovaries were successfully located in all MDCT scans. The iliac arteries and veins, uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, ureters, urinary bladder, rectum, and colon were also consistently visualized. Large antral follicles were detected in six ovaries. Phantom mean CT volume was 0.702+/-SD 0.504 cc and the mean actual volume was 0.743+/-SD 0.526 cc. Ovary mean CT volume was 0.258+/-SD 0.159 cc and mean water displacement volume was 0.257+/-SD 0.145 cc. For phantoms, the mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 2.5%. For ovaries, the least squares mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 5.4%. The ovarian CT volume was significantly associated with actual ovarian volume (ICC coefficient 0.79, regression coefficient 0.5, P=0.0006) and the actual ovarian weight (ICC coefficient 0.62, regression coefficient 0.6, P=0.015). There was no association between the CT volume accuracy and mean ovarian CT density (degree of intravenous contrast enhancement), and there was no proportional or fixed bias in the CT volume measurements. Findings from this study indicate that MDCT is a valid non

  3. Summary of Meta-Analyses Dealing with Single-Row versus Double-Row Repair Techniques for Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Spiegl, U.J.; Euler, S.A.; Millett, P.J.; Hepp, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials have been performed to analyze whether double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) provides superior clinical outcomes and structural healing compared to single-row (SR) repair. The purpose of this study was to sum up the results of meta-analysis comparing SR and DR repair with respect on clinical outcomes and re-tear rates. Methods: A literature search was undertaken to identify all meta-analyses dealing with randomized controlled trials comparing clinical und structural outcomes after SR versus DR RCR. Results: Eight meta-analyses met the eligibility criteria: two including Level I studies only, five including both Level I and Level II studies, and one including additional Level III studies. Four meta-analyses found no differences between SR and DR RCR for patient outcomes, whereas four favored DR RCR for tears greater than 3 cm. Two meta-analyses found no structural healing differences between SR and DR RCR, whereas six found DR repair to be superior for tears greater than 3 cm tears. Conclusion: No clinical differences are seen between single-row and double-row repair for small and medium rotator cuff tears after a short-term follow-up period with a higher re-tear rate following single-row repairs. There seems to be a trend to superior results with double-row repair in large to massive tear sizes. PMID:27708735

  4. The extension of a uniform canopy reflectance model to include row effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The effect of row structure is assumed to be caused by the variation in density of vegetation across rows rather than to a profile in canopy height. The calculation of crop reflectance using vegetation density modulation across rows follows a parallel procedure to that for a uniform canopy. Predictions using the row model for wheat show that the effect of changes in sun to row azimuth are greatest in Landsat Band 5 (red band) and can result in underestimation of crop vigor.

  5. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-02

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain.

  6. Real-time correction of beamforming time delay errors in abdominal ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, K. W.

    2000-04-01

    The speed of sound varies with tissue type, yet commercial ultrasound imagers assume a constant sound speed. Sound speed variation in abdominal fat and muscle layers is widely believed to be largely responsible for poor contrast and resolution in some patients. The simplest model of the abdominal wall assumes that it adds a spatially varying time delay to the ultrasound wavefront. The adequacy of this model is controversial. We describe an adaptive imaging system consisting of a GE LOGIQ 700 imager connected to a multi- processor computer. Arrival time errors for each beamforming channel, estimated by correlating each channel signal with the beamsummed signal, are used to correct the imager's beamforming time delays at the acoustic frame rate. A multi- row transducer provides two-dimensional sampling of arrival time errors. We observe significant improvement in abdominal images of healthy male volunteers: increased contrast of blood vessels, increased visibility of the renal capsule, and increased brightness of the liver.

  7. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...abdominal complications was 25%, with Curl- ng’s ulcer the most common malady (54% of the total), ollowed by esophageal lesions (17%), hemorrhagic...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large

  9. Chronic abdominal wall pain misdiagnosed as functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Assen, Tijmen; de Jager-Kievit, Jenneke W A J; Scheltinga, Marc R; Roumen, Rudi M H

    2013-01-01

    The abdominal wall is often neglected as a cause of chronic abdominal pain. The aim of this study was to identify chronic abdominal wall pain syndromes, such as anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), in a patient population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain, including irritable bowel syndrome, using a validated 18-item questionnaire as an identification tool. In this cross-sectional analysis, 4 Dutch primary care practices employing physicians who were unaware of the existence of ACNES were selected. A total of 535 patients ≥18 years old who were registered with a functional abdominal pain diagnosis were approached when they were symptomatic to complete the questionnaire (maximum 18 points). Responders who scored at least the 10-point cutoff value (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.92) underwent a diagnostic evaluation to establish their final diagnosis. The main outcome was the presence and prevalence of ACNES in a group of symptomatic patients diagnosed with functional abdominal pain. Of 535 patients, 304 (57%) responded; 167 subjects (31%) recently reporting symptoms completed the questionnaire. Of 23 patients who scored above the 10-point cutoff value, 18 were available for a diagnostic evaluation. In half of these subjects (n = 9) functional abdominal pain (including IBS) was confirmed. However, the other 9 patients were suffering from abdominal wall pain syndrome, 6 of whom were diagnosed with ACNES (3.6% prevalence rate of symptomatic subjects; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.6), whereas the remaining 3 harbored a painful lipoma, an abdominal herniation, and a painful scar. A clinically relevant portion of patients previously diagnosed with functional abdominal pain syndrome in a primary care environment suffers from an abdominal wall pain syndrome such as ACNES.

  10. Validated biomechanical model for efficiency and speed of rowing.

    PubMed

    Pelz, Peter F; Vergé, Angela

    2014-10-17

    The speed of a competitive rowing crew depends on the number of crew members, their body mass, sex and the type of rowing-sweep rowing or sculling. The time-averaged speed is proportional to the rower's body mass to the 1/36th power, to the number of crew members to the 1/9th power and to the physiological efficiency (accounted for by the rower's sex) to the 1/3rd power. The quality of the rowing shell and propulsion system is captured by one dimensionless parameter that takes the mechanical efficiency, the shape and drag coefficient of the shell and the Froude propulsion efficiency into account. We derive the biomechanical equation for the speed of rowing by two independent methods and further validate it by successfully predicting race times. We derive the theoretical upper limit of the Froude propulsion efficiency for low viscous flows. This upper limit is shown to be a function solely of the velocity ratio of blade to boat speed (i.e., it is completely independent of the blade shape), a result that may also be of interest for other repetitive propulsion systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutrition and Supplements for Elite Open-Weight Rowing.

    PubMed

    Boegman, Susan; Dziedzic, Christine E

    2016-01-01

    Competitive rowing events are raced over 2,000 m requiring athletes to have highly developed aerobic and anaerobic systems. Elite rowers therefore undertake training sessions focused on lactate tolerance, strength and power as well as aerobic and anaerobic capacity development, that can amount to a 24-h training week. The training stimuli and consequent metabolic demands of each session in a rowing training program differ depending on type, length, and intensity. Nutrition guidelines for endurance- and power-based sports should be drawn upon; however, individualized and flexible nutrition plans are critical to successfully meet the daily, weekly, and cyclic nutrient requirements of a rower. This review will provide an overview of key nutritional strategies to optimize training and enhance adaptation, and briefly discuss supplement strategies that may support health and enhance performance in elite rowing.

  12. Physics of cardiac imaging with multiple-row detector CT.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Cody, Dianna D

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac imaging with multiple-row detector computed tomography (CT) has become possible due to rapid advances in CT technologies. Images with high temporal and spatial resolution can be obtained with multiple-row detector CT scanners; however, the radiation dose associated with cardiac imaging is high. Understanding the physics of cardiac imaging with multiple-row detector CT scanners allows optimization of cardiac CT protocols in terms of image quality and radiation dose. Knowledge of the trade-offs between various scan parameters that affect image quality--such as temporal resolution, spatial resolution, and pitch--is the key to optimized cardiac CT protocols, which can minimize the radiation risks associated with these studies. Factors affecting temporal resolution include gantry rotation time, acquisition mode, and reconstruction method; factors affecting spatial resolution include detector size and reconstruction interval. Cardiac CT has the potential to become a reliable tool for noninvasive diagnosis and prevention of cardiac and coronary artery disease. (c) RSNA, 2007.

  13. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  14. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms ofmore » peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.« less

  15. Functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Clouse, Ray E; Mayer, Emeran A; Aziz, Qasim; Drossman, Douglas A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Mönnikes, Hubert; Naliboff, Bruce D

    2006-04-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) differs from the other functional bowel disorders; it is less common, symptoms largely are unrelated to food intake and defecation, and it has higher comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. The etiology and pathophysiology are incompletely understood. Because FAPS likely represents a heterogeneous group of disorders, peripheral neuropathic pain mechanisms, alterations in endogenous pain modulation systems, or both may be involved in any one patient. The diagnosis of FAPS is made on the basis of positive symptom criteria and a longstanding history of symptoms; in the absence of alarm symptoms, an extensive diagnostic evaluation is not required. Management is based on a therapeutic physician-patient relationship and empirical treatment algorithms using various classes of centrally acting drugs, including antidepressants and anticonvulsants. The choice, dose, and combination of drugs are influenced by psychiatric comorbidities. Psychological treatment options include psychotherapy, relaxation techniques, and hypnosis. Refractory FAPS patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary pain clinic approach.

  16. Single-row versus double-row capsulolabral repair: a comparative evaluation of contact pressure and surface area in the capsulolabral complex-glenoid bone interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Sup; Yoon, Yeo-Seung; Chung, Hoi-Jeong

    2011-07-01

    Despite the attention that has been paid to restoration of the capsulolabral complex anatomic insertion onto the glenoid, studies comparing the pressurized contact area and mean interface pressure at the anatomic insertion site between a single-row repair and a double-row labral repair have been uncommon. The purpose of our study was to compare the mean interface pressure and pressurized contact area at the anatomic insertion site of the capsulolabral complex between a single-row repair and a double-row repair technique. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders (mean age, 61 ± 8 years; range, 48-71 years) were used for this study. Two types of repair were performed on each specimen: (1) a single-row repair and (2) a double-row repair. Using pressure-sensitive films, we examined the interface contact area and contact pressure. The mean interface pressure was greater for the double-row repair technique (0.29 ± 0.04 MPa) when compared with the single-row repair technique (0.21 ± 0.03 MPa) (P = .003). The mean pressurized contact area was also significantly greater for the double-row repair technique (211.8 ± 18.6 mm(2), 78.4% footprint) compared with the single-row repair technique (106.4 ± 16.8 mm(2), 39.4% footprint) (P = .001). The double-row repair has significantly greater mean interface pressure and pressurized contact area at the insertion site of the capsulolabral complex than the single-row repair. The double-row repair may be advantageous compared with the single-row repair in restoring the native footprint area of the capsulolabral complex.

  17. Rowing Sport in Learning Fractions of the Fourth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasution, Marhamah Fajriyah; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Zulkardi

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to produce learning trajectory with rowing context that can help students understand addition and subtraction of fractions. Subject of the research were students IV MIN 2 Palembang. The method used was research design with three stages, those are preparing for the experiment, the design experiments, and the retrospective analysis.…

  18. Reeling in the textiles at Row Clothing Enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, H.

    1997-12-01

    While a handful of textile processing centers in operation today can date their roots back to the turn of this century or before, Row Clothing Enterprises (Baltimore) first opened its doors in 1985. Soon after, it climbed its way to becoming one of the premier textile processing businesses in the country. And what they want most of all is usable clothing--the discards of American secondhand clothing stores. The company exports 100% of the usable clothing it recovers paying institutions as much as $150 a ton for the material. Graders also sort the material into piles headed for the mutilating, ormore » fiber-shredding, machine. While not all the material is shredded, it does provide more opportunities for resale. Whatever Row cannot resell as clothing--because it is soiled or torn--gets processed into industrial wiping cloths, if it is cotton. Clothing made from wool and polyester is sent to woolen and polyester fiber mills to be made into new clothing. While 80% of Row`s wiper market is domestic, 80% of its fiber market is overseas.« less

  19. Profitability of cover crops for single and twin row cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the increased interest in cover crops, the impact of adoption on profitability of cash crops is a common question from producers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the profitability of cover crops for single and twin row cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) in Alabama. This experiment inclu...

  20. Relation of baseflow to row crop intensity in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing baseflow and baseflow percentage over the second half of the 20th century in Iowa has contributed to increasing nitrate-nitrogen concentrations measured in Iowa rivers because nitrate is primarily delivered to streams as baseflow and tile drainage. The relation of baseflow and baseflow percentage to row crop land use was evaluated for 11 Iowa rivers and their watersheds for their period of streamflow record (58-73 years period). Results indicated increasing baseflow in Iowa's rivers is significantly related to increasing row crop intensity. A 13-52% increase in row crop percentage in many Iowa watersheds has contributed to an increase of 33-135 mm increase in baseflow and 7-31% increase in baseflow percentage. Limited historical water quality data from two larger Iowa rivers (Cedar and Raccoon rivers) suggest that increasing row crop land use over the 20th century has produced more baseflow and contributed to increasing nitrate concentrations in Iowa's rivers. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Spatiotemporal throughfall patterns beneath an urban tree row

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogeholz, P.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Hildebrandt, A.; Friesen, J.; Dibble, M.; Norman, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Much recent research has focused on throughfall patterns in natural forests as they can influence the heterogeneity of surface ecohydrological and biogeochemical processes. However, to the knowledge of the authors, no work has assessed how urban forest structures affect the spatiotemporal variability of throughfall water flux. Urbanization greatly alters not only a significant portion of the land surface, but canopy structure, with the most typical urban forest configuration being landscaped tree rows along streets, swales, parking lot medians, etc. This study examines throughfall spatiotemporal patterns for a landscaped tree row of Pinus elliottii (Engelm., slash pine) on Georgia Southern University's campus (southeastern, USA) using 150 individual observations per storm. Throughfall correlation lengths beneath this tree row were similar to, but appeared to be more stable across storm size than, observations in past studies on natural forests. Individual tree overlap and the planting interval also may more strongly drive throughfall patterns in tree rows. Meteorological influences beyond storm magnitude (intensity, intermittency, wind conditions, and atmospheric moisture demand) are also examined.

  2. Exploring Multiplication: Three-in-a-Row Lucky Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, James A.

    2018-01-01

    Three-in-a-Row Lucky Numbers is an engaging, enjoyable, mathematically meaningful, game-based activity involving dice and a hundred chart, which can be used to introduce students to multiplication. The game provides a mechanism for students to explore the structure of multiplication, experiment with the distributive property, and begin to…

  3. 12. NORTH FACADE, OPERATOR'S COTTAGE, SILK STOCKING ROW, NEWHALEM. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. NORTH FACADE, OPERATOR'S COTTAGE, SILK STOCKING ROW, NEWHALEM. THE HOUSES WERE CONSTRUCTED SO THAT WHAT APPEARS TO BE THE FRONT OF THE HOUSE FACES THE RIVER AND THE FACADE FACING THE STREET LOOKS LIKE A BACK, 1989. - Skagit Power Development, Skagit River & Newhalem Creek Hydroelectric Project, On Skagit River, Newhalem, Whatcom County, WA

  4. Abdominal elephantiasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Dominique; Cloutier, Richard; Lapointe, Roch; Desgagné, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    Elephantiasis is a well-known condition in dermatology usually affecting the legs and external genitalia. It is characterized by chronic inflammation and obstruction of the lymphatic channels and by hypertrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The etiology is either idiopathic or caused by a variety of conditions such as chronic filarial disease, leprosy, leishmaniasis, and chronic recurrent cellulites. Elephantiasis of the abdominal wall is very rare. A complete review of the English and French literature showed only two cases reported in 1966 and 1973, respectively. We report a third case of abdominal elephantiasis and we briefly review this entity. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who had progressively developed an enormous pediculated abdominal mass hanging down her knees. The skin was thickened, hyperpigmented, and fissured. She had a history of multiple abdominal cellulites. She underwent an abdominal lipectomy. Histopathology of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal elephantiasis. Abdominal elephantiasis is a rare disease that represents end-stage failure of lymph drainage. Lipectomy should be considered in the management of this condition.

  5. Rowing Crew Coordination Dynamics at Increasing Stroke Rates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In rowing, perfect synchronisation is important for optimal performance of a crew. Remarkably, a recent study on ergometers demonstrated that antiphase crew coordination might be mechanically more efficient by reducing the power lost to within-cycle velocity fluctuations of the boat. However, coupled oscillator dynamics predict the stability of the coordination to decrease with increasing stroke rate, which in case of antiphase may eventually yield breakdowns to in-phase. Therefore, this study examined the effects of increasing stroke rate on in- and antiphase crew coordination in rowing dyads. Eleven experienced dyads rowed on two mechanically coupled ergometers on slides, which allowed the ergometer system to move back and forth as one ‘boat’. The dyads performed a ramp trial in both in- and antiphase pattern, in which stroke rates gradually increased from 30 strokes per minute (spm) to as fast as possible in steps of 2 spm. Kinematics of rowers, handles and ergometers were captured. Two dyads showed a breakdown of antiphase into in-phase coordination at the first stroke rate of the ramp trial. The other nine dyads reached between 34–42 spm in antiphase but achieved higher rates in in-phase. As expected, the coordinative accuracy in antiphase was worse than in in-phase crew coordination, while, somewhat surprisingly, the coordinative variability did not differ between the patterns. Whereas crew coordination did not substantially deteriorate with increasing stroke rate, stroke rate did affect the velocity fluctuations of the ergometers: fluctuations were clearly larger in the in-phase pattern than in the antiphase pattern, and this difference significantly increased with stroke rate. Together, these results suggest that although antiphase rowing is less stable (i.e., less resistant to perturbation), potential on-water benefits of antiphase over in-phase rowing may actually increase with stroke rate. PMID:26185987

  6. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  7. Acute exhaustive rowing exercise reduces skin microvascular dilator function in young adult rowing athletes.

    PubMed

    Stupin, Marko; Stupin, Ana; Rasic, Lidija; Cosic, Anita; Kolar, Luka; Seric, Vatroslav; Lenasi, Helena; Izakovic, Kresimir; Drenjancevic, Ines

    2018-02-01

    The effect of acute exhaustive exercise session on skin microvascular reactivity was assessed in professional rowers and sedentary subjects. A potential involvement of altered hemodynamic parameters and/or oxidative stress level in the regulation of skin microvascular blood flow by acute exercise were determined. Anthropometric, biochemical, and hemodynamic parameters were measured in 18 young healthy sedentary men and 20 professional rowers who underwent a single acute exercise session. Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH), endothelium-dependent acetylcholine (ACh), and endothelium-independent sodium nitroprusside (SNP) microvascular responses were assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry in skin microcirculation before and after acute exercise. Serum lipid peroxidation products and plasma antioxidant capacity were measured using spectrophotometry. At baseline, rowers had significantly lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR), and higher stroke volume (SV), PORH, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation than sedentary. Acute exercise caused a significant increase in systolic blood pressure, DBP, HR, and SV and a decrease in total peripheral resistance in both groups. Acute exercise induced a significant impairment in PORH and ACh-induced response in rowers, but not in sedentary, whereas the SNP-induced vasodilation was not affected by acute exercise in any group. Antioxidant capacity significantly increased only in sedentary after acute exercise. Single acute exercise session impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in rowers but not in sedentary, possibly due to (1) more rowing grades and higher exercise intensity achieved by rowers; (2) a higher increase in arterial pressure in rowers than in sedentary men; and (3) a lower antioxidant capacity in rowers.

  8. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Low-contrast detectability in volume rendering: a phantom study on multidetector-row spiral CT data.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hoen-Oh; Falck, Christian V; Galanski, Michael

    2004-02-01

    To cope with the increasing amount of CT data, there is growing interest in direct volume-rendering techniques (VRT) as a diagnostic tool. The aim of this phantom study was to analyze the low-contrast detectability (LCD) of VRT compared with multi-planar reformations (MPR). Soft tissue lesions were simulated by spheres of different diameters (3-8 mm). The average lesion density was 15 HU compared with a background density of 35 HU. Two different CT protocols with 40 and 150 mAs were performed on a multi-detector row CT. The scanning parameters were as following: 140 kV; 2x0.5-mm slice collimation; pitch 2 (table movement per rotation/single slice collimation), and reconstruction with 0.5-mm slice thickness at 0.5-mm interval. A B30 kernel was used for reconstruction. The VRT was performed by mapping Hounsfield values to gray levels equal to a CT window (center: 60 HU; window: 370 HU ). A linear ramp was applied for the opacity transfer function varying the maximum opacity between 0.1 and 1.0. A statistical method based on the Rose model was used to calculate the detection threshold depending on lesion size and image noise. Additionally, clinical data of 2 patients with three liver lesions of different sizes and density were evaluated. In VRT, LCD was most dependent on object size. Regarding lesions larger than 5 mm, VRT is significantly superior to MPR (p<0.05) for all opacity settings. In lesions sized 3-5 mm a maximum opacity level approximately 40-50% showed a near equivalent detectability in VRT and MPR. For higher opacity levels VRT was superior to MPR. Only for 3-mm lesions MPR performed slightly better in low-contrast detectability (p<0.05). Compared with MPR, VRT shows similar performance in LCD. Due to noise suppression effects, it is suited for visualization of data with high noise content.

  11. Micromanaging Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Maegdefessel, Lars; Spin, Joshua M.; Adam, Matti; Raaz, Uwe; Toh, Ryuji; Nakagami, Futoshi; Tsao, Philip S.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease to human morbidity and mortality has increased in the aging, industrialized world. In response, extraordinary efforts have been launched to determine the molecular and pathophysiological characteristics of the diseased aorta. This work aims to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to limit AAA expansion and, ultimately, rupture. Contributions from multiple research groups have uncovered a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory milieu, which is believed to be essential for maintaining aortic vascular homeostasis. Recently, novel small noncoding RNAs, called microRNAs, have been identified as important transcriptional and post-transcriptional inhibitors of gene expression. MicroRNAs are thought to “fine tune” the translational output of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by promoting mRNA degradation or inhibiting translation. With the discovery that microRNAs act as powerful regulators in the context of a wide variety of diseases, it is only logical that microRNAs be thoroughly explored as potential therapeutic entities. This current review summarizes interesting findings regarding the intriguing roles and benefits of microRNA expression modulation during AAA initiation and propagation. These studies utilize disease-relevant murine models, as well as human tissue from patients undergoing surgical aortic aneurysm repair. Furthermore, we critically examine future therapeutic strategies with regard to their clinical and translational feasibility. PMID:23852016

  12. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Abdominal aortic feminism

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. PMID:25398912

  14. Simulation of design-unbiased point-to-particle sampling compared to alternatives on plantation rows

    Treesearch

    Thomas B. Lynch; David Hamlin; Mark J. Ducey

    2016-01-01

    Total quantities of tree attributes can be estimated in plantations by sampling on plantation rows using several methods. At random sample points on a row, either fixed row lengths or variable row lengths with a fixed number of sample trees can be assessed. Ratio of means or mean of ratios estimators can be developed for the fixed number of trees option but are not...

  15. Higher association of coronary artery calcification with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease than with abdominal obesity in middle-aged Korean men: the Kangbuk Samsung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Kyung; Park, Hye-Jeong; Jeon, Won Seon; Park, Se Eun; Park, Cheol-Young; Lee, Won-Young; Oh, Ki-Won; Park, Sung-Woo; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2015-07-15

    It is uncertain whether non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) or abdominal obesity is more associated with atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether NAFLD or abdominal obesity is more strongly associated with subclinical atherosclerosis represented by coronary artery calcification (CAC). A total of 21,335 male participants in a health screening program (mean age 41 years) were enrolled. Ultrasonographic measurements of fatty liver and multi-detector computed tomography were performed to determine the coronary artery calcium score (CACS). The presence of CAC was defined as CACS > 0. Subjects were divided into four groups according to the presence or absence of NAFLD and/or abdominal obesity as assessed by waist-hip ratio (WHR) > 0.9. The presence of CAC was detected in 2,385 subjects (11.2%). The proportion of subjects with CAC was highest in the abdominal obesity only group (23.2%). After adjustment for age, diabetes history, hypertension, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity, the odds ratio (OR) for CAC was the highest in the group with both abnormalities [1.465 (1.324-1.623)]. The NAFLD only group showed significantly increased OR for CAC compared to that in the abdominal obesity only group [1.286 (1.151-1.436) vs. 1.076 (0.939-1.233)]. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is more closely associated with CAC than abdominal obesity as assessed by the WHR. NAFLD could be considered an independent determinant of subclinical atherosclerosis as assessed by CAC.

  16. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  17. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  18. Alternate row placement is ineffective for cultural control of Meloidogyne incognita in cotton

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if planting cotton into the space between the previous year's rows reduces crop loss due to Meloidogyne incognita compared to planting in the same row every year. Row placement had a significant (P ≤ 0.05) effect on nematode population levels only on 8 July 2005. Plots receiving 1,3-dichloropropene plus aldicarb had lower nematode population levels than non-fumigated plots on 24 May and 8 July in 2005, but not in 2004. The effect of nematicide treatment on nematode populations was not affected by row placement. Row placement did not have a significant effect on root galling or yield in 2004 or 2005. Nematicide treatment decreased root galling in all years, and the decrease was not influenced by row placement. Yield was increased by nematicide application in 2004 and 2005, and the increase was not affected by row placement. Percentage yield loss was not affected by row placement. Changing the placement of rows reduced nematode population levels only on one sampling date in one year, but end-of-season root galling and lint yield were not affected by changing the placement of rows, nor was the effect of fumigation on yield influenced by row placement. Therefore, row placement is unlikely to contribute to M. incognita management in cotton. PMID:19440259

  19. Growth and yield of valencia, spanish, virginia and runner market type peanuts in various row spacings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently, the majority of peanuts grown in New Mexico and West Texas are planted in single rows on beds 36 to 40 inches apart. In 2006-2008, several field studies were conducted with Valencia peanuts comparing single row, twin row, and diamond planting patterns in various populations. The basic c...

  20. 78 FR 24063 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI..., during, and immediately after the Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta. This special local regulation will establish... this boat race. It is also unnecessary to solicit public comments because the Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta...

  1. 77 FR 25073 - Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI..., during, and immediately after the Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta. This special local regulation will establish....35T09-0340 Special Local Regulation; Hebda Cup Rowing Regatta, Wyandotte, MI. (a) Regulated area. A...

  2. Cultural practices to improve in-row weed control with cultivation in organic peanut production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cultivation is a proven effective means of weed control in organic peanut. However, weeds in-row often escape control. Research trials were conducted in Ty Ty, GA to modify cultural practices to help peanut suppress weed emergence in-row. Modified cultural practices were three row pattern/seeding...

  3. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- Versus Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair for Shoulder Instability: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Matthew John; Bicos, James

    2017-12-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body. Failure rates of capsulolabral repair have been reported to be approximately 8%. Recent focus has been on restoration of the capsulolabral complex by a double-row capsulolabral repair technique in an effort to decrease redislocation rates after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair. To present a review of the biomechanical literature comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repairs and discuss the previous case series of double-row fixation. Narrative review. A simple review of the literature was performed by PubMed search. Only biomechanical studies comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repair were included for review. Only those case series and descriptive techniques with clinical results for double-row repair were included in the discussion. Biomechanical comparisons evaluating the native footprint of the labrum demonstrated significantly superior restoration of the footprint through double-row capsulolabral repair compared with single-row repair. Biomechanical comparisons of contact pressure at the repair interface, fracture displacement in bony Bankart lesion, load to failure, and decreased external rotation (suggestive of increased load to failure) were also significantly in favor of double- versus single-row repair. Recent descriptive techniques and case series of double-row fixation have demonstrated good clinical outcomes; however, no comparative clinical studies between single- and double-row repair have assessed functional outcomes. The superiority of double-row capsulolabral repair versus single-row repair remains uncertain because comparative studies assessing clinical outcomes have yet to be performed.

  4. 32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. TYPICAL BRYANT ITEMS FROM THE 1930S; TOP ROW LEFT TO RIGHT: PORCELAIN CASED SWITCH, ROTARY SWITCH, SHORTING PLUG TO BYPASS FUSE; SECOND ROW: BRASS INCANDESCENT LAMP SURFACE RECEPTACLE, INCANDESCENT LAMPHOLDER WITH ADAPTER FOR GLASS GLOBE; THIRD ROW: PORCELAIN BASE ROTARY SWITCH, APPLIANCE BREAKER WITH COVER REMOVED, APPLIANCE BREAKER - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  5. Effects of stroke resistance on rowing economy in club rowers post-season.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Mackenzie, S J; Jensen, R L; Watts, P B

    2013-02-01

    In the sport of rowing, increasing the impulse applied to the oar handle during the stroke can result in greater boat velocities; this may be facilitated by increasing the surface area of the oar blade and/or increasing the length of the oars. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different rowing resistances on the physiological response to rowing. 5 male and 7 female club rowers completed progressive, incremental exercise tests on an air-braked rowing ergometer, using either low (LO; 100) or high (HI; 150) resistance (values are according to the adjustable "drag factor" setting on the ergometer). Expired air, blood lactate concentration, heart rate, rowing cadence, and ergometer power output were monitored during the tests. LO rowing elicited significantly greater cadences (P<0.01) and heart rates (P<0.05), whereas rowing economy (J · L O(2) equivalents(-1)) was significantly greater during HI rowing (P<0.05). These results suggest that economically, rowing with a greater resistance may be advantageous for performance. Moreover, biomechanical analysis of ergometer rowing support the notion that the impulse generated during the stroke increases positively as a function of rowing resistance. We conclude that an aerobic advantage associated with greater resistance parallels the empirical trend toward larger oar blades in competitive rowing. This may be explained by a greater stroke impulse at the higher resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Fever Hospital, Cairo, In the past, abdominal tuberculous ýileocaecal: was Egypt, are prospectively evaluated by the US Naval one of the commonest forms...8217. females of child-bearing age) indicated that 9 of 20 40%, were diagnosed as extrapulmonary tuberculosis. isolates from 91 tuberculous peritonitis

  7. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  8. Biomechanical comparison of double-row versus transtendon single-row suture anchor technique for repair of the grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Gang; Zhao, De-Wei; Wang, Wei-Ming; Ren, Ming-Fa; Li, Rui-Xin; Yang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Peng

    2010-11-01

    For partial-thickness tears of the rotator cuff, double-row fixation and transtendon single-row fixation restore insertion site anatomy, with excellent results. We compared the biomechanical properties of double-row and transtendon single-row suture anchor techniques for repair of grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears. In 10 matched pairs of fresh-frozen sheep shoulders, the infraspinatus tendon from 1 shoulder was repaired with a double-row suture anchor technique. This comprised placement of 2 medial anchors with horizontal mattress sutures at an angle of ≤ 45° into the medial margin of the infraspinatus footprint, just lateral to the articular surface, and 2 lateral anchors with horizontal mattress sutures. Standardized, 50% partial, articular-sided infraspinatus lesions were created in the contralateral shoulder. The infraspinatus tendon from the contralateral shoulder was repaired using two anchors with transtendon single-row mattress sutures. Each specimen underwent cyclic loading from 10 to 100 N for 50 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure. Gap formation and strain over the footprint area were measured using a motion capture system; stiffness and failure load were determined from testing data. Gap formation for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P < 0.05) when compared with the double-row repair for the first cycle ((1.74 ± 0.38) mm vs. (2.86 ± 0.46) mm, respectively) and the last cycle ((3.77 ± 0.45) mm vs. (5.89 ± 0.61) mm, respectively). The strain over the footprint area for the transtendon single-row repair was significantly smaller (P < 0.05) when compared with the double-row repair. Also, it had a higher mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness. For grade III partial articular-sided rotator cuff tears, transtendon single-row fixation exhibited superior biomechanical properties when compared with double-row fixation.

  9. Three-dimensional evaluation of cyclic displacement in single-row and double-row rotator cuff reconstructions under static external rotation.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, Olaf; Kieb, Matthias; Raber, Florian; Busch, Lüder C; Kohn, Dieter M; Pape, Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    The double-row suture bridge repair was recently introduced and has demonstrated superior biomechanical results and higher yield load compared with the traditional double-row technique. It therefore seemed reasonable to compare this second generation of double-row constructs to the modified single-row double mattress reconstruction. The repair technique, initial tear size, and tendon subregion will have a significant effect on 3-dimensional (3D) cyclic displacement under additional static external rotation of a modified single-row compared with a double-row rotator cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. Rotator cuff tears (small to medium: 25 mm; medium to large: 35 mm) were created in 24 human cadaveric shoulders. Rotator cuff repairs were performed as modified single-row or double-row repairs, and cyclic loading (10-60 N, 10-100 N) was applied under 20° of external rotation. Radiostereometric analysis was used to calculate cyclic displacement in the anteroposterior (x), craniocaudal (y), and mediolateral (z) planes with a focus on the repair constructs and the initial tear size. Moreover, differences in cyclic displacement of the anterior compared with the posterior tendon subregions were calculated. Significantly lower cyclic displacement was seen in small to medium tears for the single-row compared with double-row repair at 60 and 100 N in the x plane (P = .001) and y plane (P = .001). The results were similar in medium to large tears at 100 N in the x plane (P = .004). Comparison of 25-mm versus 35-mm tears did not show any statistically significant differences for the single-row repairs. In the double-row repairs, lower gap formation was found for the 35-mm tears (P ≤ .05). Comparison of the anterior versus posterior tendon subregions revealed a trend toward higher anterior gap formation, although this was statistically not significant. The tested single-row reconstruction achieved superior results in 3D cyclic displacement to the tested double-row

  10. Single versus double-row repair of the rotator cuff: does double-row repair with improved anatomical and biomechanical characteristics lead to better clinical outcome?

    PubMed

    Pauly, Stephan; Gerhardt, Christian; Chen, Jianhai; Scheibel, Markus

    2010-12-01

    Several techniques for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff defects have been introduced over the past years. Besides established techniques such as single-row repairs, new techniques such as double-row reconstructions have gained increasing interest. The present article therefore provides an overview of the currently available literature on both repair techniques with respect to several anatomical, biomechanical, clinical and structural endpoints. Systematic literature review of biomechanical, clinical and radiographic studies investigating or comparing single- and double-row techniques. These results were evaluated and compared to provide an overview on benefits and drawbacks of the respective repair type. Reconstructions of the tendon-to-bone unit for full-thickness tears in either single- or double-row technique differ with respect to several endpoints. Double-row repair techniques provide more anatomical reconstructions of the footprint and superior initial biomechanical characteristics when compared to single-row repair. With regard to clinical results, no significant differences were found while radiological data suggest a better structural tendon integrity following double-row fixation. Presently published clinical studies cannot emphasize a clearly superior technique at this time. Available biomechanical studies are in favour of double-row repair. Radiographic studies suggest a beneficial effect of double-row reconstruction on structural integrity of the reattached tendon or reduced recurrent defect rates, respectively.

  11. Does double-row rotator cuff repair improve functional outcome of patients compared with single-row technique? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    DeHaan, Alexander M; Axelrad, Thomas W; Kaye, Elizabeth; Silvestri, Lorenzo; Puskas, Brian; Foster, Timothy E

    2012-05-01

    The advantage of single-row versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair techniques has been a controversial issue in sports medicine and shoulder surgery. There is biomechanical evidence that double-row techniques are superior to single-row techniques; however, there is no clinical evidence that the double-row technique provides an improved functional outcome. When compared with single-row rotator cuff repair, double-row fixation, although biomechanically superior, has no clinical benefit with respect to retear rate or improved functional outcome. Systematic review. The authors reviewed prospective studies of level I or II clinical evidence that compared the efficacy of single- and double-row rotator cuff repairs. Functional outcome scores included the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder scale, the Constant shoulder score, and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder rating scale. Radiographic failures and complications were also analyzed. A test of heterogeneity for patient demographics was also performed to determine if there were differences in the patient profiles across the included studies. Seven studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The test of heterogeneity across these studies showed no differences. The functional ASES, Constant, and UCLA outcome scores revealed no difference between single- and double-row rotator cuff repairs. The total retear rate, which included both complete and partial retears, was 43.1% for the single-row repair and 27.2% for the double-row repair (P = .057), representing a trend toward higher failures in the single-row group. Through a comprehensive literature search and meta-analysis of current arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs, we found that the single-row repairs did not differ from the double-row repairs in functional outcome scores. The double-row repairs revealed a trend toward a lower radiographic proven retear rate, although the data did not reach statistical significance. There

  12. Monitoring and evaluation of rowing performance using mobile mapping data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mpimis, A.; Gikas, V.

    2011-12-01

    Traditionally, the term mobile mapping refers to a means of collecting geospatial data using mapping sensors that are mounted on a mobile platform. Historically, this process was mainly driven by the need for highway infrastructure mapping and transportation corridor inventories. However, the recent advances in mapping sensor and telecommunication technologies create the opportunity that, completely new, emergent application areas of mobile mapping to evolve rapidly. This article examines the potential of mobile mapping technology (MMT) in sports science and in particular in competitive rowing. Notably, in this study the concept definition of mobile mapping somehow differs from the traditional one in a way that, the end result is not relevant to the geospatial information acquired as the moving platform travels in space. In contrast, the interest is placed on the moving platform (rowing boat) itself and on the various subsystems which are also in continuous motion.

  13. Optimisation of the mean boat velocity in rowing.

    PubMed

    Rauter, G; Baumgartner, L; Denoth, J; Riener, R; Wolf, P

    2012-01-01

    In rowing, motor learning may be facilitated by augmented feedback that displays the ratio between actual mean boat velocity and maximal achievable mean boat velocity. To provide this ratio, the aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an algorithm calculating an individual maximal mean boat velocity. The algorithm optimised the horizontal oar movement under constraints such as the individual range of the horizontal oar displacement, individual timing of catch and release and an individual power-angle relation. Immersion and turning of the oar were simplified, and the seat movement of a professional rower was implemented. The feasibility of the algorithm, and of the associated ratio between actual boat velocity and optimised boat velocity, was confirmed by a study on four subjects: as expected, advanced rowing skills resulted in higher ratios, and the maximal mean boat velocity depended on the range of the horizontal oar displacement.

  14. Astronaut Hammond gets microgravity exercise on rowing machine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-10

    STS064-09-026 (9-20 Sept. 1994) --- Astronaut L. Blaine Hammond, STS-64 pilot, gets microgravity exercise on the rowing machine. This area of the space shuttle Discovery's middeck was also used for the treadmill exercising device. Blaine and five other NASA astronauts spent almost 11 days in Earth orbit in support of the mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  15. A review of turbomachinery blade-row interaction research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Todd E.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical and experimental research in the area of unsteady aerodynamics of turbomachinery has conventionally been applied to blading which oscillates when placed in a uniformly flowing fluid. Comparatively less effort has been offered for the study of blading which is subjected to nonuniformities within the flow field. The fluid dynamic environment of a blade-row embedded within multi-stage turbomachines is dominated by such highly unsteady fluid flow conditions. The production of wakes and circumferential pressure variations from adjacent blade-rows causes large unsteady energy transfers between the fluid and the blades. Determination of the forced response of a blade requires the ability to predict the unsteady loads which are induced by these aerodynamic sources. A review of research publications was done to determine recent investigations of the response of turbomachinery blading subjected to aerodynamic excitations. Such excitations are a direct result of the blade-row aerodynamic interaction which occurs between adjacent cascades of blades. The reports and papers reviewed have been organized into areas emphasizing experimental or analytical efforts.

  16. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dirk; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas; Mutze, Sven

    2015-09-14

    Ultrasonography (performed by means of a four-quadrant, focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST)) is regarded as a key instrument for the initial assessment of patients with suspected blunt abdominal and thoraco-abdominal trauma in the emergency department setting. FAST has a high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting and excluding visceral injuries. Proponents of FAST argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of unnecessary multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scans, and enable quicker triage to surgical and non-surgical care. Given the proven accuracy, increasing availability of, and indication for, MDCT among patients with blunt abdominal and multiple injuries, we aimed to compile the best available evidence of the use of FAST-based assessment compared with other primary trauma assessment protocols. To assess the effects of diagnostic algorithms using ultrasonography including in FAST examinations in the emergency department in relation to the early, late, and overall mortality of patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. The most recent search was run on 30th June 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Participants were patients with blunt torso, abdominal, or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. The intervention was diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). The control was diagnostic algorithms without US examinations (for example, primary computed tomography (CT) or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL)). Outcomes were mortality, use of CT or invasive procedures (DPL

  17. Rectal cancer staging: Multidetector-row computed tomography diagnostic accuracy in assessment of mesorectal fascia invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Drago, Silvia Girolama; Franzesi, Cammillo Talei; Fior, Davide; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as compared with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in identifying mesorectal fascia (MRF) invasion in rectal cancer patients. METHODS: Ninety-one patients with biopsy proven rectal adenocarcinoma referred for thoracic and abdominal CT staging were enrolled in this study. The contrast-enhanced MDCT scans were performed on a 256 row scanner (ICT, Philips) with the following acquisition parameters: tube voltage 120 KV, tube current 150-300 mAs. Imaging data were reviewed as axial and as multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) images along the rectal tumor axis. MRI study, performed on 1.5 T with dedicated phased array multicoil, included multiplanar T2 and axial T1 sequences and diffusion weighted images (DWI). Axial and MPR CT images independently were compared to MRI and MRF involvement was determined. Diagnostic accuracy of both modalities was compared and statistically analyzed. RESULTS: According to MRI, the MRF was involved in 51 patients and not involved in 40 patients. DWI allowed to recognize the tumor as a focal mass with high signal intensity on high b-value images, compared with the signal of the normal adjacent rectal wall or with the lower tissue signal intensity background. The number of patients correctly staged by the native axial CT images was 71 out of 91 (41 with involved MRF; 30 with not involved MRF), while by using the MPR 80 patients were correctly staged (45 with involved MRF; 35 with not involved MRF). Local tumor staging suggested by MDCT agreed with those of MRI, obtaining for CT axial images sensitivity and specificity of 80.4% and 75%, positive predictive value (PPV) 80.4%, negative predictive value (NPV) 75% and accuracy 78%; while performing MPR the sensitivity and specificity increased to 88% and 87.5%, PPV was 90%, NPV 85.36% and accuracy 88%. MPR images showed higher diagnostic accuracy, in terms of MRF involvement, than native axial images

  18. Spectrum of Abdominal Aortic Disease in a Tertiary Health Care Setup: MDCT Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, DG Santosh; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal aortic disease is an important cause of clinical disability that requires early detection by imaging methods for prompt and effective management. Understanding regional disease pattern and prevalence has a bearing on healthcare management and resource planning. Non-invasive, conclusive imaging strategy plays an important role in the detection of disease. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) with its technological developments provides affordable, accurate and comprehensive imaging solution. Aim To evaluate regional demography of abdominal aortic disease spectrum detected using MDCT imaging data in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods A descriptive study was conducted based on MDCT imaging data of patients who were investigated with clinical diagnosis of abdominal aortic disease, from March 2008-2010, over a period of 24 months. Patients were examined with the contrast-enhanced MDCT examination. Morphological diagnosis of the aortic disease was based on changes in relative aortic caliber, luminal irregularity, presence of wall calcification, dissection or thrombus and evidence of major branch occlusion. Patients were categorized into four groups based on imaging findings. MDCT information and associated clinical parameters were examined and correlated to management of patient. Descriptive statistical data, namely mean, standard deviation and frequency of disease were evaluated. Results A total of 90 out of 210 patients (43%) were detected with the abdominal aortic abnormality defined by imaging criteria. Group I, comprising of patients with atherosclerosis –including those with complications, constituted 65.5% of the patients. Group II represented patients with aneurysms (45.5%). Group III, consisting of 32.2% of the patients, contained those with dissections. The rest of the patients, including patients with aorto-arteritis, were classified as group IV. Eight patients with aneurysm and one patient with aorto-arteritis were

  19. Secondary abdominal appendicular ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nama, Vivek; Gyampoh, Bright; Karoshi, Mahantesh; McRae, Reynold; Opemuyi, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Although the case fatality rate for ectopic pregnancies has decreased to 0.08% in industrialized countries, it still represents 3.8% of maternal mortality in the United States alone. In developing countries, the case fatality rate varies from 3% to 27%. Laparoscopic management of tubal pregnancies is now the standard form of treatment where this technology is available. Abdominal pregnancies are rare, and secondary implantation of tubal ectopic pregnancies is the most common cause of abdominal gestations. We present an interesting case of secondary implantation of a tubal ectopic pregnancy to highlight the appendix as a possible secondary implantation site after a tubal ectopic pregnancy.

  20. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  1. Penetrating abdominal injuries: management controversies

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Muhammad U; Zacharias, Nikolaos; Velmahos, George C

    2009-01-01

    Penetrating abdominal injuries have been traditionally managed by routine laparotomy. New understanding of trajectories, potential for organ injury, and correlation with advanced radiographic imaging has allowed a shift towards non-operative management of appropriate cases. Although a selective approach has been established for stab wounds, the management of abdominal gunshot wounds remains a matter of controversy. In this chapter we describe the rationale and methodology of selecting patients for non-operative management. We also discuss additional controversial issues, as related to antibiotic prophylaxis, management of asymptomatic thoracoabdominal injuries, and the use of colostomy vs. primary repair for colon injuries. PMID:19374761

  2. Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair Increases Load to Failure and Decreases Excessive Motion.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lucas S; Thompson, Matthew; Altchek, David W; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q; Rocchi, Vanna J; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-11-01

    Using a cadaver shoulder instability model and load-testing device, we compared biomechanical characteristics of double-row and single-row capsulolabral repairs. We hypothesized a greater reduction in glenohumeral motion and translation and a higher load to failure in a mattress double-row capsulolabral repair than in a single-row repair. In 6 matched pairs of cadaveric shoulders, a capsulolabral injury was created. One shoulder was repaired with a single-row technique, and the other with a double-row mattress technique. Rotational range of motion, anterior-inferior translation, and humeral head kinematics were measured. Load-to-failure testing measured stiffness, yield load, deformation at yield load, energy absorbed at yield load, load to failure, deformation at ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load. Double-row repair significantly decreased external rotation and total range of motion compared with single-row repair. Both repairs decreased anterior-inferior translation compared with the capsulolabral-injured condition, however, no differences existed between repair types. Yield load in the single-row group was 171.3 ± 110.1 N, and in the double-row group it was 216.1 ± 83.1 N (P = .02). Ultimate load to failure in the single-row group was 224.5 ± 121.0 N, and in the double-row group it was 373.9 ± 172.0 N (P = .05). Energy absorbed at ultimate load in the single-row group was 1,745.4 ± 1,462.9 N-mm, and in the double-row group it was 4,649.8 ± 1,930.8 N-mm (P = .02). In cases of capsulolabral disruption, double-row repair techniques may result in decreased shoulder rotational range of motion and improved load-to-failure characteristics. In cases of capsulolabral disruption, repair techniques with double-row mattress repair may provide more secure fixation. Double-row capsulolabral repair decreases shoulder motion and increases load to failure, yield load, and energy absorbed at yield load more than single-row repair. Published by

  3. Film cooling: case of double rows of staggered jets.

    PubMed

    Dorignac, E; Vullierme, J J; Noirault, P; Foucault, E; Bousgarbiès, J L

    2001-05-01

    An experimental investigation of film cooling of a wall in a case of double rows of staggered hot jets (65 degrees C) in an ambient air flow. The wall is heated at a temperature value between the one of the jets and the one of the main flow. Experiments have been carried out for different injection rates, the main flow velocity is maintained at 32 m/s. Association of the measures of temperature profiles by cold wire and the measures of wall temperature by infrared thermography allows us to describe the behaviour of the flows and to propose the best injection which assures a good cooling of the plate.

  4. Plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of row crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data from the first Earth Resource Technology Satellite (LANDSAT-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) were used to develop three plant canopy models (Kubelka-Munk (K-M), regression, and combined K-M and regression models) for extracting plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of cropped fields. The combined model gave the best correlation between MSS data and ground truth, by accounting for essentially all of the reflectance of plants, soil, and shadow between crop rows. The principles presented can be used to better forecast crop yield and to estimate acreage.

  5. 9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Detail view of columns on first floor. This row of columns indicates the former location of the exterior mill wall before World War II era expansion. The unusual column and beam connection was a key part of the mill structural system patented by Providence, Rhode Island engineers Charles Praray and Charles Makepeace in 1894. Each column was originally located in the apex of triangular window bay, but not connected to the exterior wall. Modifications on the right side of each column support the beams of the addition. - Dixie Cotton Mill, 710 Greenville Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  6. Abdominal ultrasound and medical education.

    PubMed

    García de Casasola Sánchez, G; Torres Macho, J; Casas Rojo, J M; Cubo Romano, P; Antón Santos, J M; Villena Garrido, V; Diez Lobato, R

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound is a very versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization of multiple internal organs. It is of invaluable help for the physical examination of the patients. To assess if ultrasound can be incorporated into medical education and if the students can perform a basic abdominal ultrasound examination without the necessity of a long period of training. Twelve medical students were trained in basic abdominal ultrasound during a 15-h training program including a 5-h theoretical and practical course and supervised practice in 20 selected patients. Subsequently, we conducted an evaluation test that assessed the ability of students to obtain the ultrasound views and to detect various pathologies in five different patients. The students were able to correctly identify the abdominal views more than 90% of the times. This percentage was only lower (80%) in the right subcostal view to locate the gallbladder. The accuracy or global efficiency of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of relevant pathological findings of the patients was greater than 90% (91.1% gallstones, abdominal aortic aneurysm 100%; splenomegaly 98.3%, ascites 100%; dilated inferior vena cava 100%; acute urinary retention 100%). The ultrasound may be a feasible learning tool in medical education. Ultrasound can help students to improve the physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. How many CT detector rows are necessary to perform adequate three dimensional visualization?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Lars; Tetzlaff, Ralf; Schöbinger, Max; Radeleff, Boris; Bruckner, Thomas; Meinzer, H P; Büchler, M W; Schemmer, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The technical development of computer tomography (CT) imaging has experienced great progress. As consequence, CT data to be used for 3D visualization is not only based on 4 row CTs and 16 row CTs but also on 64 row CTs, respectively. The main goal of this study was to examine whether the increased amount of CT detector rows is correlated with improved quality of the 3D images. All CTs were acquired during routinely performed preoperative evaluation. Overall, there were 12 data sets based on 4 detector row CT, 12 data sets based on 16 detector row CT, and 10 data sets based on 64 detector row CT. Imaging data sets were transferred to the DKFZ Heidelberg using the CHILI teleradiology system. For the analysis all CT scans were examined in a blinded fashion, i.e. both the name of the patient as well as the name of the CT brand were erased. For analysis, the time for segmentation of liver, both portal and hepatic veins as well as the branching depth of portal veins and hepatic veins was recorded automatically. In addition, all results were validated in a blinded fashion based on given quality index. Segmentation of the liver was performed in significantly shorter time (p<0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test) in the 16 row CT (median 479 s) compared to 4 row CT (median 611 s), and 64 row CT (median 670 s), respectively. The branching depth of the portal vein did not differ significantly among the 3 different data sets (p=0.37, Kruskal-Wallis test). However, the branching depth of the hepatic veins was significantly better (p=0.028, Kruskal-Wallis test) in the 4 row CT and 16 row CT compared to 64 row CT. The grading of the quality index was not statistically different for portal veins and hepatic veins (p=0.80, Kruskal-Wallis test). Even though the total quality index was better for the vessel tree based on 64 row CT data sets (mean scale 2.6) compared to 4 CT row data (mean scale 3.25) and 16 row CT data (mean scale 3.0), these differences did not reach statistical difference (p=0

  8. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  9. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique.

    PubMed

    Mook, William R; Greenspoon, Joshua A; Millett, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears.

  10. Arthroscopic Double-Row Transosseous Equivalent Rotator Cuff Repair with a Knotless Self-Reinforcing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Mook, William R.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder morbidity. Surgical techniques for repair have evolved to optimize the biologic and mechanical variables critical to tendon healing. Double-row repairs have demonstrated superior biomechanical advantages to a single-row. Methods: The preferred technique for rotator cuff repair of the senior author was reviewed and described in a step by step fashion. The final construct is a knotless double row transosseous equivalent construct. Results: The described technique includes the advantages of a double-row construct while also offering self reinforcement, decreased risk of suture cut through, decreased risk of medial row overtensioning and tissue strangulation, improved vascularity, the efficiency of a knotless system, and no increased risk for subacromial impingement from the burden of suture knots. Conclusion: Arthroscopic knotless double row rotator cuff repair is a safe and effective method to repair rotator cuff tears. PMID:27733881

  11. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  12. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. PMID:25239980

  13. Abdominal cocoon secondary to disseminated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Radha; Sripathi, Smiti; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Koteshwar, Prakashini; Singh, Jyoti

    2014-09-19

    Abdominal cocoon, also known as sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis, represents a rare entity where a variable length of the small bowel is enveloped by a fibrocollagenous membrane giving the appearance of a cocoon. It may be asymptomatic and is often diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. We present a rare case of abdominal cocoon due to abdominal tuberculosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Abdominal shotgun trauma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos G; Larentzakis, Andreas; Drimousis, Panagiotis; Riga, Maria; Theodorou, Dimitrios; Katsaragakis, Stylianos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction One of the most lethal mechanisms of injury is shotgun wound and particularly the abdominal one. Case presentation We report a case of a 45 years old male suffering abdominal shotgun trauma, who survived his injuries. Conclusion The management of the abdominal shotgun wounds is mainly dependent on clinical examination and clinical judgment, while requires advanced surgical skills. PMID:18625076

  15. Biomechanical Comparison of Single- Versus Double-Row Capsulolabral Repair for Shoulder Instability: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Matthew John; Bicos, James

    2017-01-01

    Background: The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint in the body. Failure rates of capsulolabral repair have been reported to be approximately 8%. Recent focus has been on restoration of the capsulolabral complex by a double-row capsulolabral repair technique in an effort to decrease redislocation rates after arthroscopic capsulolabral repair. Purpose: To present a review of the biomechanical literature comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repairs and discuss the previous case series of double-row fixation. Study Design: Narrative review. Methods: A simple review of the literature was performed by PubMed search. Only biomechanical studies comparing single- versus double-row capsulolabral repair were included for review. Only those case series and descriptive techniques with clinical results for double-row repair were included in the discussion. Results: Biomechanical comparisons evaluating the native footprint of the labrum demonstrated significantly superior restoration of the footprint through double-row capsulolabral repair compared with single-row repair. Biomechanical comparisons of contact pressure at the repair interface, fracture displacement in bony Bankart lesion, load to failure, and decreased external rotation (suggestive of increased load to failure) were also significantly in favor of double- versus single-row repair. Recent descriptive techniques and case series of double-row fixation have demonstrated good clinical outcomes; however, no comparative clinical studies between single- and double-row repair have assessed functional outcomes. Conclusion: The superiority of double-row capsulolabral repair versus single-row repair remains uncertain because comparative studies assessing clinical outcomes have yet to be performed. PMID:29230427

  16. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF BIOMECHANICS OF PROXIMAL ROW CARPAL INSTABILITY].

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhai; Huang, Fuguo

    2015-01-01

    To review the research progress of the biomechanics of proximal row carpal instability (IPRC). The related literature concerning IPRC was extensively reviewed. The biomechanical mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue in maintaining the stability of the proximal row carpal (PRC) was analyzed, and the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC were summarized from two aspects including basic biomechanics and clinical biomechanics. The muscles and ligaments of the PRC are critical to its stability. Most scholars have reached a consensus about biomechanical mechanism of the PRC, but there are still controversial conclusions on the biomechanics mechanism of the surrounding soft tissue to stability of distal radioulnar joint when the triangular fibrocartilage complex are damaged and the biomechanics mechanism of the scapholunate ligament. At present, there is no unified standard about the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of the PRC. So, it is difficult for clinical practice. Some strides have been made in the basic biomechanical study on muscle and ligament and clinical biomechanical study on the methods to repair or reconstruct the stability and function of PRC, but it will be needed to further study the morphology of carpal articular surface and the adjacent articular surface, the pressure of distal carpals to proximal carpal and so on.

  17. Pitfalls in 16-detector row CT of the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tadashi; Kayashima, Yasuyo; Inoue, Rintaro; Sumii, Kotaro; Gomyo, Yukihiko

    2005-01-01

    Recently developed 16-detector row computed tomography (CT) has been introduced as a reliable noninvasive imaging modality for evaluating the coronary arteries. In most cases, with appropriate premedication that includes beta-blockers and nitroglycerin, ideal data sets can be acquired from which to obtain excellent-quality coronary CT angiograms, most often with multiplanar reformation, thin-slab maximum intensity projection, and volume rendering. However, various artifacts associated with data creation and reformation, postprocessing methods, and image interpretation can hamper accurate diagnosis. These artifacts can be related to pulsation (nonassessable segments, pseudostenosis) as well as rhythm disorders, respiratory issues, partial volume averaging effect, high-attenuation entities, inappropriate scan pitch, contrast material enhancement, and patient body habitus. Some artifacts have already been resolved with technical advances, whereas others represent partially inherent limitations of coronary CT angiography. Familiarity with the pitfalls of coronary angiography with 16-detector row CT, coupled with the knowledge of both the normal anatomy and anatomic variants of the coronary arteries, can almost always help radiologists avoid interpretive errors in the diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  18. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine

    PubMed Central

    Žiliukas, Pranas

    2016-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke. PMID:27293479

  19. Development of Magnetorheological Resistive Exercise Device for Rowing Machine.

    PubMed

    Grigas, Vytautas; Šulginas, Anatolijus; Žiliukas, Pranas

    2015-01-01

    Training equipment used by professional sportsmen has a great impact on their sport performance. Most universal exercisers may help only to improve the general physical condition due to the specific kinematics and peculiar resistance generated by their loading units. Training of effective techniques and learning of psychomotor skills are possible only when exercisers conform to the movements and resistance typical for particular sports kinematically and dynamically. Methodology of developing a magnetorheological resistive exercise device for generating the desired law of passive resistance force and its application in a lever-type rowing machine are described in the paper. The structural parameters of a controllable hydraulic cylinder type device were found by means of the computational fluid dynamics simulation performed by ANSYS CFX software. Parameters describing the magnetorheological fluid as non-Newtonian were determined by combining numerical and experimental research of the resistance force generated by the original magnetorheological damper. A structural scheme of the device control system was developed and the variation of the strength of magnetic field that affects the magnetorheological fluid circulating in the device was determined, ensuring a variation of the resistance force on the oar handle adequate for the resistance that occurs during a real boat rowing stroke.

  20. Lower extremity muscle function of front row rugby union scrummaging.

    PubMed

    Yaghoubi, Mostafa; Lark, Sally D; Page, Wyatt H; Fink, Philip W; Shultz, Sarah P

    2018-05-16

    A rugby scrum's front row must act uniformly to transfer maximal horizontal force and improve performance. This study investigated the muscle activation patterns of lower extremity muscles in front row forwards during live and machine scrums at professional and amateur levels. Electromyography was collected bilaterally on vastus lateralis, rectus femoris and gastrocnemius muscles of 75 male rugby prop players during live and machine scrums. ANOVAs compared muscle reaction time, rate of change in muscle amplitude and muscle amplitude between groups and conditions. Cross-correlation analysis explored muscle synchronicity. There were significantly greater rates of change in each muscle amplitude in professional players than amateur players. Additionally, there was significantly quicker muscle reaction time in all muscles, and greater amplitude in vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius, during the live scrum vs. machine condition. The professional props produced more synchronised muscle activation than amateur players and all players produced more synchronised muscle activation against the scrum machine vs. live scrummage. The results indicate a higher skill proficiency and muscle synchronicity in professional players. While scrum machine training is ideally suited for functional muscle strengthening during practice, to truly simulate the requirements of the scrum, training should incorporate the live situation as much as possible.

  1. Directional reflectance factor distributions of a cotton row crop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Newcomb, W. W.; Schutt, J. B.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Jackson, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    The directional reflectance factor distribution spanning the entire exitance hemisphere was measured for a cotton row crop (Gossypium barbadense L.) with 39 percent ground cover. Spectral directional radiances were taken in NOAA satellite 7 AVHRR bands 1 and 2 using a three-band radiometer with restricted 12 deg full angle field of view at half peak power points. Polar co-ordinate system plots of directional reflectance factor distributions and three-dimensional computer graphic plots of scattered flux were used to study the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of spectral band, geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith and azimuth angles, and optical properties of the leaves and soil. The factor distribution of the incomplete row crops was highly polymodal relative to that for complete vegetation canopies. Besides the enhanced reflectance for the antisolar point, a reflectance minimum was observed towards the forwardscatter direction in the principle plane of the sun. Knowledge of the mechanics of the observed dynamics of the data may be used to provide rigorous validation for two- or three-dimensional radiative transfer models, and is important in interpreting aircraft and satellite data where the solar angle varies widely.

  2. Pacing patterns in competitive rowing adopted in different race categories.

    PubMed

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Melges, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    Data from 7 World Rowing Championships between 2001 and 2009 were analyzed to determine the time distribution during 2,000-m heavyweight races (from 500-m quarter times) and to assess whether pacing patterns differ between boat classes (single vs. team boats) and qualifying rounds (heats vs. finals). Analyses of variance with repeated measures on quarter times revealed that pacing patterns in heat races were better described (i.e., higher amount of variance explained) by a linear trend line with a positive slope (women: η² = 0.76, men: η² = 0.68) but followed a quadratic trend line (parabolic-shaped pattern) during finals (women: η² = 0.81, men: η² = 0.60). Not using a spurt at the end of the heat races may indicate an attempt to conserve energy for subsequent rounds or reflect reduced effort made by losing crews or both aspects. In single boats, the pacing pattern was better represented by a linear trend line with a positive slope (women: η² = 0.76, men: η² = 0.68), but the amount of variance explained was virtually the same for both the linear and the quadratic trend component in team boats. The absence of a final spurt in single boat races suggests that the physiological status of the athlete plays an important role to control the timing and rate of decline in rowing speed.

  3. Women's religious conversions on death row: theorizing religion and state.

    PubMed

    Cooey, P M

    2002-01-01

    Most scholars of religion who approach the phenomena associated with religious conversion in order to theorize religion tend to ignore the legal and political implications of the actual context in which conversion occurs for theorizing religion itself. Meanwhile, political and legal theorists who attend to the implications of executing convicted murderers who undergo religious conversion on death row err in a different direction. They virtually ignore the significance of the claims made by the converts and their associates about the conversion themselves for theorizing the state. Scholars across disciplines increasingly address issues of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation in respect to theorizing religion and theorizing the state independently of one another. At the same time, they do not seize the opportunity to incorporate their analyses into a wider study of the sociocultural production of religion and state in relation to each other. I examine the religious conversion of Karla Faye Tucker and Wanda Jean Allen on death row, as well as the scholarship that their convictions, conversions, and executions have generated across academic disciplines and fields. Close examination illustrates well the necessity for theorizing religion and the state in relation to one another in order to understand either adequately.

  4. Estimation of oxygen consumption during cycling and rowing.

    PubMed

    Baig, Dur-e-Zehra; Savkin, Andrey V; Celler, Branko G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop estimator that can predict oxygen consumption (V(O2)) during cycling and rowing exercises, by using non-invasive and easily measurable quantities such as heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RespR) and frequency of exercising activity. The frequency of exercise is quantified as a universal measure of exercise intensity and is known as Exercise Rate (ER). This ER is responsible for deviation in V(O2) (ΔV(O2)), HR (ΔHR), and RespR (ΔRespR) from their respective baseline measurements during exercise. Therefore, ΔV(O2) can be estimated from Δ, ΔRespR and ER. The resting measured of V(O2) is referred as V(O(2rest)); this is computed from the physical fitness of an individual. The Hammerstein model is adopted for the estimation of ΔV(O2). Results in this study demonstrate that the developed estimators for each type of exercise are capable of estimating V(O2) by adding up V(O(2rest)) and ΔV(O2) at various intensities during cycling and rowing.

  5. A biomechanical comparison of single and double-row fixation in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher D; Alexander, Susan; Hill, Adam M; Huijsmans, Pol E; Bull, Anthony M J; Amis, Andrew A; De Beer, Joe F; Wallace, Andrew L

    2006-11-01

    The optimal method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not yet known. The hypothesis of the present study was that a double-row repair would demonstrate superior static and cyclic mechanical behavior when compared with a single-row repair. The specific aims were to measure gap formation at the bone-tendon interface under static creep loading and the ultimate strength and mode of failure of both methods of repair under cyclic loading. A standardized tear of the supraspinatus tendon was created in sixteen fresh cadaveric shoulders. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were performed with use of either a double-row technique (eight specimens) or a single-row technique (eight specimens) with nonabsorbable sutures that were double-loaded on a titanium suture anchor. The repairs were loaded statically for one hour, and the gap formation was measured. Cyclic loading to failure was then performed. Gap formation during static loading was significantly greater in the single-row group than in the double-row group (mean and standard deviation, 5.0 +/- 1.2 mm compared with 3.8 +/- 1.4 mm; p < 0.05). Under cyclic loading, the double-row repairs failed at a mean of 320 +/- 96.9 N whereas the single-row repairs failed at a mean of 224 +/- 147.9 N (p = 0.058). Three single-row repairs and three double-row repairs failed as a result of suture cut-through. Four single-row repairs and one double-row repair failed as a result of anchor or suture failure. The remaining five repairs did not fail, and a midsubstance tear of the tendon occurred. Although more technically demanding, the double-row technique demonstrates superior resistance to gap formation under static loading as compared with the single-row technique. A double-row reconstruction of the supraspinatus tendon insertion may provide a more reliable construct than a single-row repair and could be used as an alternative to open reconstruction for the treatment of isolated tears.

  6. Analysis of straw row in the image to control the trajectory of the agricultural combine harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkanaev, Aleksandr Yurievich; Polevoy, Dmitry Valerevich; Panchenko, Aleksei Vladimirovich; Krokhina, Darya Alekseevna; Nailevish, Sadekov Rinat

    2018-04-01

    The paper proposes a solution to the automatic operation of the combine harvester along the straw rows by means of the images from the camera, installed in the cab of the harvester. The U-Net is used to recognize straw rows in the image. The edges of the row are approximated in the segmented image by the curved lines and further converted into the harvester coordinate system for the automatic operating system. The "new" network architecture and approaches to the row approximation has improved the quality of the recognition task and the processing speed of the frames up to 96% and 7.5 fps, respectively. Keywords: Grain harvester,

  7. Triple-Loaded Single-Row Versus Suture-Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair With Platelet-Rich Plasma Fibrin Membrane: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan

    2016-05-01

    To compare the structural healing and clinical outcomes of triple-loaded single-row with suture-bridging double-row repairs of full-thickness rotator cuff tendons when both repair constructs are augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. A prospective, randomized, consecutive series of patients diagnosed with full-thickness rotator cuff tears no greater than 3 cm in anteroposterior length were treated with a triple-loaded single-row (20) or suture-bridging double-row (20) repair augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. The primary outcome measure was cuff integrity by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 12 months postoperatively. Secondary clinical outcome measures were American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, Rowe, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant, and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores. The mean MRI interval was 12.6 months (range, 12-17 months). A total of 3 of 20 single-row repairs and 3 of 20 double-row repairs (15%) had tears at follow-up MRI. The single-row group had re-tears in 1 single tendon repair and 2 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed at the original attachment site (Cho type 1). In the double-row group, re-tears were found in 3 double tendon repairs. All 3 tears failed medial to the medial row near the musculotendinous junction (Cho type 2). All clinical outcome measures were significantly improved from the preoperative level (P < .0001), but there was no statistical difference between groups postoperatively. There is no MRI difference in rotator cuff tendon re-tear rate at 12 months postsurgery between a triple-loaded single-row repair or a suture-bridging double-row repair when both are augmented with platelet-rich plasma fibrin membrane. No difference could be demonstrated between these repairs on clinical outcome scores. I, Prospective randomized study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  8. Abdominal compartment syndrome related to noninvasive ventilation.

    PubMed

    De Keulenaer, Bart L; De Backer, Adelard; Schepens, Dirk R; Daelemans, Ronny; Wilmer, Alexander; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2003-07-01

    To study the effects of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) on intra-abdominal pressure. Single case report from a tertiary teaching hospital. A 65-year-old man who experienced a sudden respiratory and cardiovascular collapse during NIPPV. This was caused by gastric overdistension due to aerophagia followed by raised intra-abdominal pressure leading to intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome. The respiratory and cardiovascular problems resolved immediately after the introduction of a nasogastric tube. This resulted in normalization of IAP. This is the first case reported of an abdominal compartment syndrome related to NIPPV. Clinicians should be aware of this possible complication while using NIPPV.

  9. Bridging suture makes consistent and secure fixation in double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Tetsutaro; Mihata, Teruhisa; Jun, Bong Jae; Neo, Masashi

    2017-09-01

    Inconsistent tension distribution may decrease the biomechanical properties of the rotator cuff tendon after double-row repair, resulting in repair failure. The purpose of this study was to compare the tension distribution along the repaired rotator cuff tendon among three double-row repair techniques. In each of 42 fresh-frozen porcine shoulders, a simulated infraspinatus tendon tear was repaired by using 1 of 3 double-row techniques: (1) conventional double-row repair (no bridging suture); (2) transosseous-equivalent repair (bridging suture alone); and (3) compression double-row repair (which combined conventional double-row and bridging sutures). Each specimen underwent cyclic testing at a simulated shoulder abduction angle of 0° or 40° on a material-testing machine. Gap formation and tendon strain were measured during the 1st and 30th cycles. To evaluate tension distribution after cuff repair, difference in gap and tendon strain between the superior and inferior fixations was compared among three double-row techniques. At an abduction angle of 0°, gap formation after either transosseous-equivalent or compression double-row repair was significantly less than that after conventional double-row repair (p < 0.01). During the 30th cycle, both transosseous-equivalent repair (p = 0.02) and compression double-row repair (p = 0.01) at 0° abduction had significantly less difference in gap formation between the superior and inferior fixations than did conventional double-row repair. After the 30th cycle, the difference in longitudinal strain between the superior and inferior fixations at 0° abduction was significantly less with compression double-row repair (2.7% ± 2.4%) than with conventional double-row repair (8.6% ± 5.5%, p = 0.03). Bridging sutures facilitate consistent and secure fixation in double-row rotator cuff repairs, suggesting that bridging sutures may be beneficial for distributing tension equally among all sutures during double-row repair

  10. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical Performance of Medial Row Suture Placement Relative to the Musculotendinous Junction in Transosseous Equivalent Suture Bridge Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Bruce, Benjamin; Hussey, Kristen E; Thomas, Jacqueline M; Luthringer, Tyler A; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Wang, Vincent M; Verma, Nikhil N; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    To compare the biomechanical performance of medial row suture placement relative to the musculotendinous junction (MTJ) in a cadaveric transosseous equivalent suture bridge (TOE-SB) double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) model. A TOE-SB DR technique was used to reattach experimentally created supraspinatus tendon tears in 9 pairs of human cadaveric shoulders. The medial row sutures were passed either near the MTJ (MTJ group) or 10 mm lateral to the MTJ (rotator cuff tendon [RCT] group). After the supraspinatus repair, the specimens underwent cyclic loading and load to failure tests. The localized displacement of the markers affixed to the tendon surface was measured with an optical tracking system. The MTJ group showed a significantly higher (P = .03) medial row failure (5/9; 3 during cyclic testing and 2 during load to failure testing) compared with the RCT group (0/9). The mean number of cycles completed during cyclic testing was lower in the MTJ group (77) compared with the RCT group (100; P = .07) because 3 specimens failed in the MTJ group during cyclic loading. There were no significant differences between the 2 study groups with respect to biomechanical properties during the load to failure testing. In a cadaveric TOE-SB DR RCR model, medial row sutures through the MTJ results in a significantly higher rate of medial row failure. In rotator cuff tears with tendon tissue loss, passage of medial row sutures through the MTJ should be avoided in a TOE-SB RCR technique because of the risk of medial row failure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Solid particle dynamic behavior through twisted blade rows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.

    1982-01-01

    The particle trajectory calculations provide the essential information which is required for predicting the pattern and intensity of turbomachinery erosion. Consequently, the evaluation of the machine performance deterioration due to erosion is extremely sensitive to the accuracy of the flow field and blade geometry representation in the trajectory computational model. A model is presented that is simple and efficient yet versatile and general to be applicable to axial, radial and mixed flow machines, and to inlets, nozzles, return passages and separators. The results of the computations are presented for the particle trajectories through a row of twisted vanes in the inlet flow field. The effect of the particle size on their trajectories, blade impacts, and on their redistribution and separation are discussed.

  13. Deterministic blade row interactions in a centrifugal compressor stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Beach, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional viscous flow in a low speed centrifugal compressor stage is simulated using an average passage Navier-Stokes analysis. The impeller discharge flow is of the jet/wake type with low momentum fluid in the shroud-pressure side corner coincident with the tip leakage vortex. This nonuniformity introduces periodic unsteadiness in the vane frame of reference. The effect of such deterministic unsteadiness on the time-mean is included in the analysis through the average passage stress, which allows the analysis of blade row interactions. The magnitude of the divergence of the deterministic unsteady stress is of the order of the divergence of the Reynolds stress over most of the span, from the impeller trailing edge to the vane throat. Although the potential effects on the blade trailing edge from the diffuser vane are small, strong secondary flows generated by the impeller degrade the performance of the diffuser vanes.

  14. Transfer of Complex Skill Learning from Virtual to Real Rowing

    PubMed Central

    Rauter, Georg; Sigrist, Roland; Koch, Claudio; Crivelli, Francesco; van Raai, Mark; Riener, Robert; Wolf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Simulators are commonly used to train complex tasks. In particular, simulators are applied to train dangerous tasks, to save costs, and to investigate the impact of different factors on task performance. However, in most cases, the transfer of simulator training to the real task has not been investigated. Without a proof for successful skill transfer, simulators might not be helpful at all or even counter-productive for learning the real task. In this paper, the skill transfer of complex technical aspects trained on a scull rowing simulator to sculling on water was investigated. We assume if a simulator provides high fidelity rendering of the interactions with the environment even without augmented feedback, training on such a realistic simulator would allow similar skill gains as training in the real environment. These learned skills were expected to transfer to the real environment. Two groups of four recreational rowers participated. One group trained on water, the other group trained on a simulator. Within two weeks, both groups performed four training sessions with the same licensed rowing trainer. The development in performance was assessed by quantitative biomechanical performance measures and by a qualitative video evaluation of an independent, blinded trainer. In general, both groups could improve their performance on water. The used biomechanical measures seem to allow only a limited insight into the rowers' development, while the independent trainer could also rate the rowers' overall impression. The simulator quality and naturalism was confirmed by the participants in a questionnaire. In conclusion, realistic simulator training fostered skill gains to a similar extent as training in the real environment and enabled skill transfer to the real environment. In combination with augmented feedback, simulator training can be further exploited to foster motor learning even to a higher extent, which is subject to future work. PMID:24376518

  15. Spray deposition inside multiple-row nursery trees with a laser-guided sprayer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multiple-row container-grown trees require specially designed sprayers to achieve efficient spray delivery quality. A five-port air-assisted sprayer with both automatic and manual control modes was developed to discharge adequate spray deposition inside multiple-row tree plants. The sprayer resulted...

  16. STS-42 Commander Grabe uses DTO 653 MK1 Rowing Machine on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-01-30

    STS042-05-037 (30 Jan 1992) --- Astronaut Ronald J. Grabe, STS-42 commander, exercises using MK1 Rowing Machine on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Grabe is using the exercise device as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 653, Evaluation of MK1 Rowing Machine. The forward lockers appear at Grabe's right and the sleep station behind him.

  17. STS-42 Commander Grabe uses DTO 653 MK1 Rowing Machine on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-42 Commander Ronald J. Grabe exercises using MK1 Rowing Machine on the middeck of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. Grabe is using the exercise device as part of Development Test Objective (DTO) 653, Evaluation of MK1 Rowing Machine. The forward lockers appear at Grabe's right and the sleep station behind him.

  18. A transport model for the deterministic stresses associated with turbomachinery blade row interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wall, Allan George

    The unsteady process resulting from the interaction of upstream vortical structures with a downstream blade row in turbomachines can have a significant impact on the machine efficiency. A transport model assuming incompressible flow and using linear theory was developed to take this process into account in the computation of time-average multistage turbomachinery flows. The upstream vortical structures are transported by the mean flow of the downstream blade row, redistributing the time-average unsteady kinetic energy (Uke ) associated with the incoming disturbance. The model was applied to compressor and turbine geometry. For compressors, the Uke associated with upstream 2-D wakes and 3-D tip clearance flows is reduced as a result of the interaction with a downstream blade row. This reduction results from inviscid effects as well as viscous effects and reduces the loss associated with the upstream disturbance. Any disturbance passing through a compressor blade row results in a smaller loss than if the disturbance was mixed-out prior to entering the blade row. For turbines, the Uke associated with upstream 2-D wakes and 3-D tip clearance flows are significantly amplified by inviscid effects as a result of the interaction with a downstream turbine blade row. Viscous effects act to reduce the amplification of the Uke by inviscid effects but results in a substantial loss. Any disturbance passing through a turbine blade row results in a larger loss than if the disturbance was mixedout prior to entering the blade row.

  19. Radiometer footprint model to estimate sunlit and shaded components for row crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper describes a geometric model for computing the relative proportion of sunlit vegetation, shaded vegetation, sunlit soil, and shaded soil appearing in a circular or elliptical radiometer footprint for row crops, where the crop rows were modeled as continuous ellipses. The model was validate...

  20. Assessment of modification factors for a row of bolts or timber connectors

    Treesearch

    Thomas Lee Wilkinson

    1980-01-01

    When bolts or timber connectors are used in a row, with load applied parallel to the row, load will be unequally distributed among the fasteners. This study assessed methods of predicting this unequal load distribution, looked at how joint variables can affect the distribution, and compared the predictions with data existing in the literature. Presently used design...

  1. 77 FR 74237 - T. Rowe Price Associates, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Investment Company Act Release No. 30299; 812-13726] T. Rowe... Investment Company Act of 1940 (``Act'') for an exemption from sections 2(a)(32), 5(a)(1), 22(d) and 22(e) of... Price Institutional Income Funds, Inc. (the ``Corporation'') and T. Rowe Price Investment Services, Inc...

  2. Effects of an Aerobic Rowing Training Regimen in Young Adults with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Ana Maria; Sardinha, Luis Bettencount; Pitetti, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Eight young adult males with Down syndrome received a 16-week rowing ergometry training regimen. Following training, no changes in cardiovascular fitness were found but participants did achieve significantly higher levels of work performance on both treadmill and rowing ergometer tests than did a control group. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  3. Building Generalized Inverses of Matrices Using Only Row and Column Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix "A" has an inverse if and only if "rref"("A"), the reduced row echelon form of "A", is the identity matrix I[subscript n]. That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix…

  4. Implements and cultivation frequency to improve in-row weed control in organic peanut production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly, which limits expansion of the production system. Sweep cultivation in the row middles is effective, but weeds remain in the crop row causing yield loss. Research trials were conducted in Tifton, GA to evaluate implements and freque...

  5. 30 CFR 285.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row Grants and Rue... one electronic copy of a request for a new or modified ROW grant or RUE grant. You must submit a...

  6. Single- and double-row repair for rotator cuff tears - biology and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Zampogna, Biagio; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    We critically review the existing studies comparing the features of single- and double-row repair, and discuss suggestions about the surgical indications for the two repair techniques. All currently available studies comparing the biomechanical, clinical and the biological features of single and double row. Biomechanically, the double-row repair has greater performances in terms of higher initial fixation strength, greater footprint coverage, improved contact area and pressure, decreased gap formation, and higher load to failure. Results of clinical studies demonstrate no significantly better outcomes for double-row compared to single-row repair. Better results are achieved by double-row repair for larger lesions (tear size 2.5-3.5 cm). Considering the lack of statistically significant differences between the two techniques and that the double row is a high cost and a high surgical skill-dependent technique, we suggest using the double-row technique only in strictly selected patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Death row inmate characteristics, adjustment, and confinement: a critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mark D; Vigen, Mark P

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews and summarizes research on death row inmates. The contributions and weaknesses of death row demographic data, clinical studies, and research based on institutional records are critiqued. Our analysis shows that death row inmates are overwhelmingly male and disproportionately Southern. Racial representation remains controversial. Frequently death row inmates are intellectually limited and academically deficient. Histories of significant neurological insult are common, as are developmental histories of trauma, family disruption, and substance abuse. Rates of psychological disorder among death row inmates are high, with conditions of confinement appearing to precipitate or aggravate these disorders. Contrary to expectation, the extant research indicates that the majority of death row inmates do not exhibit violence in prison even in more open institutional settings. These findings have implications for forensic mental health sentencing evaluations, competent attorney representation, provision of mental health services, racial disparity in death sentences, death row security and confinement policies, and moral culpability considerations. Future research directions on death row populations are suggested. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Biomechanical advantages of triple-loaded suture anchors compared with double-row rotator cuff repairs.

    PubMed

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Schroeder, F Alexander; Aziz-Jacobo, Jorge; Mays, Matthew M; Rapley, Jay H

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the strength and suture-tendon interface security of various suture anchors triply and doubly loaded with ultrahigh-molecular weight polyethylene-containing sutures and to evaluate the relative effectiveness of placing these anchors in a single-row or double-row arrangement by cyclic loading and then destructive testing. The infraspinatus muscle was reattached to the original humeral footprint by use of 1 of 5 different repair patterns in 40 bovine shoulders. Two single-row repairs and three double-row repairs were tested. High-strength sutures were used for all repairs. Five groups were studied: group 1, 2 triple-loaded screw suture anchors in a single row with simple stitches; group 2, 2 triple-loaded screw anchors in a single row with simple stitches over a fourth suture passed perpendicularly ("rip-stop" stitch); group 3, 2 medial and 2 lateral screw anchors with a single vertical mattress stitch passed from the medial anchors and 2 simple stitches passed from the lateral anchors; group 4, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors capturing the medial sutures in a "crisscross" spanning stitch; and group 5, 2 medial double-loaded screw anchors tied in 2 mattress stitches and 2 push-in lateral anchors creating a "suture-bridge" stitch. The specimens were cycled between 10 and 180 N at 1.0 Hz for 3,500 cycles or until failure. Endpoints were cyclic loading displacement (5 and 10 mm), total displacement, and ultimate failure load. A single row of triply loaded anchors was more resistant to stretching to a 5- and 10-mm gap than the double-row repairs with or without the addition of a rip-stop suture (P < .05). The addition of a rip-stop stitch made the repair more resistant to gap formation than a double row repair (P < .05). The crisscross double row created by 2 medial double-loaded suture anchors and 2 lateral push-in anchors stretched more than any other group (P < .05). Double-row repairs with

  9. Positive ions of the first- and second-row transition metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical dissociation energies for the first- and second-row transition metal hydride positive ions are critically compared against recent experimental values obtained from ion beam reactive scattering methods. Theoretical spectroscopic parameters and dipole moments are presented for the ground and several low-lying excited states. The calculations employ large Gaussian basis sets and account for electron correlation using the single-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction and coupled-pair-functional methods. The Darwin and mass-velocity contributions to the relativistic energy are included in the all-electron calculations on the first-row systems using first-order perturbation theory, and in the second-row systems using the Hay and Wadt relativistic effective core potentials. The theoretical D(0) values for the second-row transition metal hydride positive ions should provide a critical measure of the experimental values, which are not as refined as many of those in the first transition row.

  10. Don’t Rock the Boat: How Antiphase Crew Coordination Affects Rowing

    PubMed Central

    de Brouwer, Anouk J.; de Poel, Harjo J.; Hofmijster, Mathijs J.

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min−1 on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair’s coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance. PMID:23383024

  11. Don't rock the boat: how antiphase crew coordination affects rowing.

    PubMed

    de Brouwer, Anouk J; de Poel, Harjo J; Hofmijster, Mathijs J

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that crew rowing requires perfect synchronization between the movements of the rowers. However, a long-standing and somewhat counterintuitive idea is that out-of-phase crew rowing might have benefits over in-phase (i.e., synchronous) rowing. In synchronous rowing, 5 to 6% of the power produced by the rower(s) is lost to velocity fluctuations of the shell within each rowing cycle. Theoretically, a possible way for crews to increase average boat velocity is to reduce these fluctuations by rowing in antiphase coordination, a strategy in which rowers perfectly alternate their movements. On the other hand, the framework of coordination dynamics explicates that antiphase coordination is less stable than in-phase coordination, which may impede performance gains. Therefore, we compared antiphase to in-phase crew rowing performance in an ergometer experiment. Nine pairs of rowers performed a two-minute maximum effort in-phase and antiphase trial at 36 strokes min(-1) on two coupled free-floating ergometers that allowed for power losses to velocity fluctuations. Rower and ergometer kinetics and kinematics were measured during the trials. All nine pairs easily acquired antiphase rowing during the warm-up, while one pair's coordination briefly switched to in-phase during the maximum effort trial. Although antiphase interpersonal coordination was indeed less accurate and more variable, power production was not negatively affected. Importantly, in antiphase rowing the decreased power loss to velocity fluctuations resulted in more useful power being transferred to the ergometer flywheels. These results imply that antiphase rowing may indeed improve performance, even without any experience with antiphase technique. Furthermore, it demonstrates that although perfectly synchronous coordination may be the most stable, it is not necessarily equated with the most efficient or optimal performance.

  12. A cost analysis of single-row versus double-row and suture bridge rotator cuff repair methods.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Leslie; Zivaljevic, Nikola; Sanders, Samuel; Pula, David

    2015-02-01

    To calculate the costs to the US healthcare system of transition from single-row (SR) to double-row (DR) rotator cuff repair (RCR) and to calculate the decrease in re-operations for re-tear that DR RCR would need to accomplish in order to render the transition cost-neutral. Standard accounting methods were used to determine the cost of a single RCR, the annual cost to the US healthcare system of rotator cuff surgery, the cost of a single-revision RCR, and the decrease in revision for re-tear rate necessary to make DR or suture bridge (SB) methods cost-neutral in comparison with SR methods. We varied tear size, operating room cost, time required for implant placement, annual tear size distribution, and repair method. The cost of RCR ranged from $7,572 (SR, <1 cm tear) to $12,979 (DR, >5 cm tear). Complete conversion from SR RCR to a DR technique without an associated decrease in revision surgeries would increase the annual US healthcare cost between $80 million and $262 million per year. To obtain cost neutrality, use of DR or SB methods would need to result in one fewer revision in every 17 primary repairs (for tears <1 cm) to one fewer in every four primary repairs (for tears >5 cm). Conversion from SR to DR or SB RCR techniques would result in considerable increases in healthcare expenditures. Since the large decreases in revision surgery rates necessary to justify DR or SB repairs purely on a cost basis may not be realistic or even possible, the use of these methods should be supported by evidence of improved structural healing rates and quality-adjusted life years in comparison with SR methods. IV.

  13. Single-row modified mason-allen versus double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical and surface area comparison.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Cory O; Sileo, Michael J; Grossman, Mark G; Serra-Hsu, Frederick

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the time-zero biomechanical strength and the surface area of repair between a single-row modified Mason-Allen rotator cuff repair and a double-row arthroscopic repair. Six matched pairs of sheep infraspinatus tendons were repaired by both techniques. Pressure-sensitive film was used to measure the surface area of repair for each configuration. Specimens were biomechanically tested with cyclic loading from 20 N to 30 N for 20 cycles and were loaded to failure at a rate of 1 mm/s. Failure was defined at 5 mm of gap formation. Double-row suture anchor fixation restored a mean surface area of 258.23 +/- 69.7 mm(2) versus 148.08 +/- 75.5 mm(2) for single-row fixation, a 74% increase (P = .025). Both repairs had statistically similar time-zero biomechanics. There was no statistical difference in peak-to-peak displacement or elongation during cyclic loading. Single-row fixation showed a higher mean load to failure (110.26 +/- 26.4 N) than double-row fixation (108.93 +/- 21.8 N). This was not statistically significant (P = .932). All specimens failed at the suture-tendon interface. Double-row suture anchor fixation restores a greater percentage of the anatomic footprint when compared with a single-row Mason-Allen technique. The time-zero biomechanical strength was not significantly different between the 2 study groups. This study suggests that the 2 factors are independent of each other. Surface area and biomechanical strength of fixation are 2 independent factors in the outcome of rotator cuff repair. Maximizing both factors may increase the likelihood of complete tendon-bone healing and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. For smaller tears, a single-row modified Mason-Allen suture technique may provide sufficient strength, but for large amenable tears, a double row can provide both strength and increased surface area for healing.

  14. Early post-operative weight loss after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy correlates with the volume of the excised stomach and not with that of the sleeve! Preliminary data from a multi-detector computed tomography-based study.

    PubMed

    Pawanindra, Lal; Vindal, Anubhav; Midha, Manoj; Nagpal, Prashant; Manchanda, Alpana; Chander, Jagdish

    2015-10-01

    Pre- and post-operative stomach volumes can be important determinants for effectiveness of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in causing weight loss. There is little existing data on the volumes of stomach preoperatively and that excised during LSG. This study was designed to evaluate the change in gastric volume after LSG using multi-detector CT and to correlate it with early post-operative weight loss. Twenty consecutive patients with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and medical comorbidities underwent LSG between October 2011 and October 2013 and were analysed prospectively. The pre-operative stomach volume was measured by MDCT done 1-3 days before the surgery. LSG was performed in the standard manner using a 36F bougie. The volume of excised stomach was measured by distending the specimen with saline. MDCT of the upper abdomen was repeated 3 months postoperatively to calculate the gastric sleeve volume. Weight loss and resolution of comorbidities were documented. The mean pre-operative weight of patients was 123.90 kg, and the mean pre-operative stomach volume on MDCT was 1,067 ml. The stomach volume on pre-operative MDCT correlated with pre-operative weight and BMI. The mean volume of the excised stomach was 859 ml when measured by distension of the specimen and 850 ml on MDCT. After 3 months post surgery, the mean volume of gastric sleeve on MDCT was 217 ml, and the mean weight of the patients was 101.22 kg. The volume of the excised stomach calculated by MDCT correlated with the weight loss achieved 3 months postoperatively. However, no correlation was seen between the gastric sleeve volume 3 months postoperatively and weight loss during this period. MDCT is a good method to measure gastric volume before and after LSG. Early post-operative weight loss (3 months) correlates well with the volume of the excised stomach but not with that of the gastric sleeve.

  15. Health economic evaluation of Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI vs ECCM-MRI and multi-detector computed tomography in patients with suspected hepatocellular carcinoma in Thailand and South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Phongkitkarun, Sith; Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Holtorf, Anke-Peggy; Rinde, Harald; Bergmann, Karsten

    2016-08-01

    The effectiveness of treatment decisions and economic outcomes of using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI) were compared with extracellular contrast media-enhanced MRI (ECCM-MRI) and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as initial procedures in patients with suspected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in South Korea and Thailand. A decision-tree model simulated the clinical pathway for patients with suspected HCC from the first imaging procedure to a confirmed treatment decision. Input data (probabilities and resource consumptions) were estimated and validated by clinical experts. Costs for diagnostic alternatives and related treatment options were derived from published sources, taking into account both payer's and hospital's perspectives. All experts from Korea and Thailand agreed that Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI yields the highest diagnostic certainty and minimizes the need for additional confirmatory diagnostic procedures in HCC. In Korea, from the payer's perspective, total cost was USD $3087/patient to reach a confirmed treatment decision using Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI (vs $3205/patient for MDCT and $3403/patient for ECCM-MRI). From the hospital's perspective, Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI incurred the lowest cost ($2289/patient vs $2320/patient and $2528/patient, respectively). In Thailand, Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI was the least costly alternative for the payer ($702/patient vs $931/patient for MDCT and $873/patient for ECCM-MRI). From the hospital's perspective, costs were $1106/patient, $1178/patient, and $1087/patient for Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI, MDCT, and ECCM-MRI, respectively. Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI as an initial imaging procedure in patients with suspected HCC provides better diagnostic certainty and relevant statutory health insurance cost savings in Thailand and Korea, compared with ECCM-MRI and MDCT.

  16. Evaluation of the levels of metalloproteinsase-2 in patients with abdominal aneurysm and abdominal hernias.

    PubMed

    Antoszewska, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms and abdominal hernias become an important health problems of our times. Abdominal aortic aneurysm and its rupture is one of the most dangerous fact in vascular surgery. There are some theories pointing to a multifactoral genesis of these kinds of diseases, all of them assume the attenuation of abdominal fascia and abdominal aortic wall. The density and continuity of these structures depend on collagen and elastic fibers structure. Reducing the strength of the fibers may be due to changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) by the proteolytic enzymes-matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. These enzymes play an important role in the development of many disease: malignant tumors (colon, breast, lung, pancreas), cardiovascular disease (myocardial infarction, ischemia-reperfusion injury), connective tissue diseases (Ehler-Danlos Syndrome, Marfan's Syndrome), complications of diabetes (retinopathy, nephropathy). One of the most important is matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The aim of the study was an estimation of the MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia, and in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. The study involved 88 patients aged 42 to 89 years, including 75 men and 13 women. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia (45 persons, representing 51.1% of all group) and patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm (43 persons, representing 48,9% of all group). It was a statistically significant increase in MMP-2 blood levels in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia compared to patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm. It was a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of POCHP in patients with only abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and primary abdominal hernia. Statistically significant

  17. Abdominal Sarcoidosis Mimicking Peritoneal Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Won Seok; Lee, Seungho; Park, Ji Hyun; Kang, Jeonghyun

    2018-04-01

    We present a patient diagnosed with skin sarcoidosis, breast cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, and peritoneal sarcoidosis with a past history of colorectal cancer. During stage work up for breast cancer, suspicious lesions on peritoneum were observed in imaging studies. Considering our patient's history and imaging findings, we initially suspected peritoneal carcinomatosis. However, the peritoneal lesion was diagnosed as sarcoidosis in laparoscopic biopsy. This case demonstrates that abdominal sarcoidosis might be considered as a differential diagnosis when there is a lesion suspected of being peritoneal carcinomatosis with nontypical clinical presentations.

  18. [Internationalization and innovation of abdominal acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Characteristics of abdominal acupuncture are analyzed through three aspects of inheriting and innovation, collaborated research as well as international visual field. It is pointed that abdominal acupuncture is based on clinical practice, focuses on enhancing the therapeutic effect and expending the clinical application. It also promots the thinking on how to recall the tradition and how to inherit tradition availably. The modern medical problems should be studied and innovation resolutions should be searched, which can help the internationalization and modernization of abdominal acupuncture.

  19. Does a bout of strength training affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power 24 h later?

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; French, Duncan N; Howatson, Glyn; Payton, Stephen J; Berger, Nicolas J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    Rowers regularly undertake rowing training within 24 h of performing bouts of strength training; however, the effect of this practice has not been investigated. This study evaluated the impact of a bout of high-intensity strength training on 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power. Eight highly trained male club rowers performed baseline measures of five separate, static squat jumps (SSJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing ergometer power strokes (PS) and a single 2,000 m rowing ergometer test (2,000 m). Subsequently, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session consisting of various multi-joint barbell exercises. The 2,000 m test was repeated at 24 and 48 h post-ST, in addition SSJ, CMJ and PS tests were performed at these time points and also at 2 h post-ST. Muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed pre-ST and 2, 24 and 48 h post-ST. Following the ST, there were significant elevations in muscle soreness (2 and 24 h, P < 0.01), CK (2, 24 and 48 h, P < 0.01), and LDH (2 h, P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline values. There were significant decrements across all time points for SSJ, CMJ and PS, which ranged between 3 and 10% (P < 0.05). However, 2,000 m performance and related measurements of heart rate and blood lactate were not significantly affected by ST. In summary, a bout of high-intensity strength training resulted in symptoms of muscle damage and decrements in rowing-specific maximal power, but this did not affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance in highly trained rowers.

  20. Effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, E.; Farkas, Cs.; Gelybó, Gy.; Lagzi, I.

    2012-04-01

    We examined the effect of inter-row cultivation on soil CO2 emission in a peach plantation planted in 1991. The soil is Ramann type brown forest soil /Mollic Cambisol/ developed on sandy loam. Every second row in the orchard is covered with undisturbed grass, and every other row is disked (depth: 12-15cm) with a two-three-week frequency. The humus content varies from 1,69% to 2,28% in the upper 20 cm layer, where the sand, loam and clay contents are 58%, 21% and 19 %, respectively. The average annual precipitation total is 570 mm (330 mm for the growing season) at the site. During the vegetation period of 2009 soil CO2 emission measurements were carried out with static chamber method in the differently managed rows. Parallel with CO2 measurements soil volumetric water content and soil temperature were also determined. Soil microbiological properties water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and water-extractable nitrogen (WEN) as well as substrate-induced respiration (SIR) were determined from disturbed soil samples collected on the first measurement day. The measured soil physical properties showed that different soil management practices influence soil water content, bulk density and soil temperature as well. Soil water content was higher in the grass covered row on 10 of the 13 measurement days, the difference - which reached 10 v% - was the highest on the warmest days. Soil temperature is also different in case of disked and grass covered rows, found to be lower in the grass covered rows on every measurement days. SIR, WEOC and WEN were all higher in the grass covered row (19.45 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 36.91 μg g-1 soil, 139.36 μg g-1 soil, respectively) than in the disked row (4.88 μg CO2-C g-1 soil 25.43 μg C g-1 soil, 61.25 μg N g-1 soil, respectively) in 2009. Soil CO2 emission also differed between the two rows, grass covered rows produced higher emission in all measurements days without exemption. The difference between CO2 fluxes from the two cultivation

  1. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  2. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Phillip D; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    With an aging population, emergency department clinicians can expect an increase in geriatric patients presenting with abdominal pain. Compared with younger patients, this patient population is less likely to present with classic symptoms, physical examination findings, and laboratory values of abdominal disease. However, the morbidity and mortality associated with elderly patients presenting with abdominal pathologic conditions are significant. For this reason, the clinician must be familiar with some subtle and not so subtle differences when caring for the geriatric patient with abdominal pain to ensure timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of the Multidetector-row Computed Tomographic Angiography Axial and Coronal Planes' Usefulness for Detecting Thoracodorsal Artery Perforators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Background During the planning of a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) free flap, preoperative multidetector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) angiography is valuable for predicting the locations of perforators. However, CT-based perforator mapping of the thoracodorsal artery is not easy because of its small diameter. Thus, we evaluated 1-mm-thick MDCT images in multiple planes to search for reliable perforators accurately. Methods Between July 2010 and October 2011, 19 consecutive patients (13 males, 6 females) who underwent MDCT prior to TDAP free flap operations were enrolled in this study. Patients ranged in age from 10 to 75 years (mean, 39.3 years). MDCT images were acquired at a thickness of 1 mm in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. Results The thoracodorsal artery perforators were detected in all 19 cases. The reliable perforators originating from the descending branch were found in 14 cases, of which 6 had transverse branches. The former were well identified in the coronal view, and the latter in the axial view. The location of the most reliable perforators on MDCT images corresponded well with the surgical findings. Conclusions Though MDCT has been widely used in performing the abdominal perforator free flap for detecting reliable perforating vessels, it is not popular in the TDAP free flap. The results of this study suggest that multiple planes of MDCT may increase the probability of detecting the most reliable perforators, along with decreasing the probability of missing available vessels. PMID:22872839

  4. 77 FR 25077 - Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI..., during, and immediately after the Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta. This special local regulation will establish....35T09-0342 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Wyandotte, MI. (a) Regulated Area. A...

  5. 78 FR 25572 - Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Trenton Channel; Detroit River, Wyandotte, MI..., during, and immediately after the Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta. This special local regulation will establish... to read as follows: Sec. 100.T09-0287 Special Local Regulation; Wy-Hi Rowing Regatta, Wyandotte, MI...

  6. Volume and crown characteristics of juvenile loblolly pine grown at various ratios of between and within row spacings

    Treesearch

    John R. Britt; Jason P. Reynolds

    2013-01-01

    In plantation forestry, several silvicultural treatments can be row oriented. When rows are treated individually, planting trees in wider rows may result in lower silvicultural treatment cost, facilitate future operations, such as thinning and fire fighting, and provide a longer period with open canopy conditions. All these scenarios could provide benefit to landowners...

  7. Recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Fang Kuan; How, Choon How; Ong, Christina

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain in childhood is common, and continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is usually attributed to a functional gastrointestinal disorder rather than an organic disease. In most cases, a comprehensive history and physical examination should enable one to make a positive diagnosis of functional disorder. The presence of alarm symptoms and signs, such as weight loss, gastrointestinal bleeding and chronic severe diarrhoea, warrants further investigations and referral to a paediatric gastrointestinal specialist. The mainstay of therapy in functional abdominal pain is education, reassurance and avoidance of triggering factors. While symptom-based pharmacological therapy may be helpful in patients who do not respond to simple management, it is best used on a time-limited basis due to the lack of good evidence of its efficacy. The primary goal of therapy is a return to normal daily activities rather than complete elimination of pain. In recalcitrant cases, psychological interventions such as cognitive behaviour therapy and relaxation training have proven to be efficacious.

  8. Direction-specific recruitment of rotator cuff muscles during bench press and row.

    PubMed

    Wattanaprakornkul, Duangjai; Halaki, Mark; Cathers, Ian; Ginn, Karen A

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that rotator cuff (RC) muscles are recruited in a reciprocal, direction-specific pattern during shoulder flexion and extension exercises. The main purpose of this study was to determine if similar reciprocal RC recruitment occurs during bench press (flexion-like) and row (extension-like) exercises. In addition, shoulder muscle activity was comprehensively compared between bench press and flexion; row and extension; and bench press and row exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from 9 shoulder muscles sites in 15 normal volunteers. All exercises were performed at 20, 50 and 70% of subjects' maximal load. EMG data were normalized to standard maximal voluntary contractions. Infraspinatus activity was significantly higher than subscapularis during bench press, with the converse pattern during the row exercise. Significant differences in activity levels were found in pectoralis major, deltoid and trapezius between the bench press and flexion exercises and in lower trapezius between the row and extension exercises. During bench press and row exercises, the recruitment pattern in each active muscle did not vary with load. During bench press and row exercises, RC muscles contract in a reciprocal direction-specific manner in their role as shoulder joint dynamic stabilizers to counterbalance antero-posterior translation forces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of native bees as pollinators of cucurbit crops under floating row covers.

    PubMed

    Minter, Logan M; Bessin, Ricardo T

    2014-10-01

    Production of cucurbit crops presents growers with numerous challenges. Several severe pests and diseases can be managed through the use of rotation, trap cropping, mechanical barriers, such as row covers, and chemical applications. However, considerations must also be made for pollinating insects, as adequate pollination affects the quantity and quality of fruit. Insecticides may negatively affect pollinators; a concern enhanced in recent years due to losses in managed Apis melifera L. colonies. Row covers can be used in place of chemical control before pollination, but when removed, pests have access to fields along with the pollinators. If pollination services of native bees could be harnessed for use under continuous row covers, both concerns could be balanced for growers. The potential of two bee species which specialize on cucurbit flowers, Peponapis pruinosa Say and Xenoglossa strenua Cresson, were assessed under continuous row covers, employed over acorn squash. Experimental treatments included plots with either naturally or artificially introduced bees under row covers and control plots with row covers either permanently removed at crop flowering, or employed continuously with no added pollinating insects. Pests in plots with permanently removed row covers were managed using standard practices used in certified organic production. Marketable yields from plots inoculated with bees were indistinguishable from those produced under standard practices, indicating this system would provide adequate yields to growers without time and monetary inputs of insecticide applications. Additionally, application of this technique was investigated for muskmelon production and discussed along with considerations for farm management.

  10. Double row equivalent for rotator cuff repair: A biomechanical analysis of a new technique.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sean; Krigbaum, Henry; Kramer, Jon; Purviance, Connor; Parrish, Robin; Donahue, Joseph

    2018-06-01

    There are numerous configurations of double row fixation for rotator cuff tears however, there remains to be a consensus on the best method. In this study, we evaluated three different double-row configurations, including a new method. Our primary question is whether the new anchor and technique compares in biomechanical strength to standard double row techniques. Eighteen prepared fresh frozen bovine infraspinatus tendons were randomized to one of three groups including the New Double Row Equivalent, Arthrex Speedbridge and a transosseous equivalent using standard Stabilynx anchors. Biomechanical testing was performed on humeri sawbones and ultimate load, strain, yield strength, contact area, contact pressure, and a survival plots were evaluated. The new double row equivalent method demonstrated increased survival as well as ultimate strength at 415N compared to the remainder testing groups as well as equivalent contact area and pressure to standard double row techniques. This new anchor system and technique demonstrated higher survival rates and loads to failure than standard double row techniques. This data provides us with a new method of rotator cuff fixation which should be further evaluated in the clinical setting. Basic science biomechanical study.

  11. Single-Versus Double-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair in Massive Tears

    PubMed Central

    Wang, EnZhi; Wang, Liang; Gao, Peng; Li, ZhongJi; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, SongGang

    2015-01-01

    Background It is a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons to treat massive rotator cuff tears. The optimal management of massive rotator cuff tears remains controversial. Therefore, the goal of this study was to compare arthroscopic single- versus double-row rotator cuff repair with a larger sample size. Material/Methods Of the subjects with massive rotator cuff tears, 146 were treated using single-row repair, and 102 were treated using double-row repair. Pre- and postoperative functional outcomes and radiographic images were collected. The clinical outcomes were evaluated for a minimum of 2 years. Results No significant differences were shown between the groups in terms of functional outcomes. Regarding the integrity of the tendon, a lower rate of post-treatment retear was observed in patients who underwent double-row repair compared with single-row repair. Conclusions The results suggest that double-row repair is relatively superior in shoulder ROM and the strength of tendon compared with single-row repair. Future studies involving more patients in better-designed randomized controlled trials will be required. PMID:26017641

  12. High School Rowing Injuries: National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network (NATION)

    PubMed Central

    Baugh, Christine M.; Kerr, Zachary Y.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Data on high school (HS) rowing injuries are lacking. Objective:  To describe the epidemiology of HS boys' and girls' rowing injuries during the 2011–2012 through 2013–2014 academic years. Design:  Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting:  Injury and exposure data from 8 and 11 boys' and girls' rowing programs providing 13 and 17 team-seasons of data, respectively. Patients or Other Participants:  High school boys' and girls' varsity rowing student-athletes. Intervention(s):  High school rowing data from the National Athletic Treatment, Injury and Outcomes Network. Main Outcome Measure(s):  Injury rates and rate ratios were reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results:  In HS boys' and girls' rowing, 59 and 190 injuries were reported, respectively, for rates of 2.39/1000 athlete-exposures (95% CI = 1.78, 3.00) and 8.60/1000 athlete-exposures (95% CI = 7.38, 9.82). The girls' rowing injury rate was 3.60 times that of boys' (95% CI = 2.69, 4.82). Conclusions:  These findings suggest a higher injury rate among HS female rowers than HS male rowers. Additional research exploring reasons for the sex difference is warranted. PMID:27049926

  13. Application of multidetector-row computed tomography in propeller flap planning.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shimpei; Chung, Kevin C; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Ogawa, Rei; Takami, Yoshihiro; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2011-02-01

    The propeller flap is defined as (1) being island-shaped, (2) having an axis that includes the perforators, and (3) having the ability to be rotated around an axis. The advantage of the propeller flap is that it is a pedicle flap that can be applied to cover defects located at the distal ends of the extremities. The specific aims of the authors' study were (1) to evaluate the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography in the planning of propeller flaps and (2) to present a clinical case series of propeller flap reconstructions that were planned preoperatively using multidetector-row computed tomography. The authors retrospectively analyzed all cases between April of 2007 and April of 2010 at Nippon Medical School Hospital in Tokyo, where multidetector-row computed tomography was used preoperatively to plan surgical reconstructions using propeller flaps. Thirteen patients underwent 16 flaps using the propeller flap technique. The perforators were identified accurately by multidetector-row computed tomography preoperatively in all cases. This is the first report describing the application of multidetector-row computed tomography in the planning of propeller flaps. Multidetector-row computed tomography is superior to other imaging methods because it demonstrates more precisely the perforator's position and subcutaneous course using high-resolution three-dimensional images. By using multidetector-row computed tomography to preoperatively identify a flap's perforators, the surgeon can better plan the flap design to efficiently conduct the flap surgery.

  14. The effect of row structure on soil moisture retrieval accuracy from passive microwave data.

    PubMed

    Xingming, Zheng; Kai, Zhao; Yangyang, Li; Jianhua, Ren; Yanling, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Row structure causes the anisotropy of microwave brightness temperature (TB) of soil surface, and it also can affect soil moisture retrieval accuracy when its influence is ignored in the inversion model. To study the effect of typical row structure on the retrieved soil moisture and evaluate if there is a need to introduce this effect into the inversion model, two ground-based experiments were carried out in 2011. Based on the observed C-band TB, field soil and vegetation parameters, row structure rough surface assumption (Q p model and discrete model), including the effect of row structure, and flat rough surface assumption (Q p model), ignoring the effect of row structure, are used to model microwave TB of soil surface. Then, soil moisture can be retrieved, respectively, by minimizing the difference of the measured and modeled TB. The results show that soil moisture retrieval accuracy based on the row structure rough surface assumption is approximately 0.02 cm(3)/cm(3) better than the flat rough surface assumption for vegetated soil, as well as 0.015 cm(3)/cm(3) better for bare and wet soil. This result indicates that the effect of row structure cannot be ignored for accurately retrieving soil moisture of farmland surface when C-band is used.

  15. Biomechanical characteristics of single-row repair in comparison to double-row repair with consideration of the suture configuration and suture material.

    PubMed

    Baums, M H; Buchhorn, G H; Spahn, G; Poppendieck, B; Schultz, W; Klinger, H-M

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the time zero mechanical properties of single- versus double-row configuration for rotator cuff repair in an animal model with consideration of the stitch technique and suture material. Thirty-two fresh-frozen sheep shoulders were randomly assigned to four repair groups: suture anchor single-row repair coupled with (1) braided, nonabsorbable polyester suture sized USP No. 2 (SRAE) or (2) braided polyblend polyethylene suture sized No. 2 (SRAH). The double-row repair was coupled with (3) USP No. 2 (DRAE) or (4) braided polyblend polyethylene suture No. 2 (DRAH). Arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches were used (single-row) and combined with medial horizontal mattress stitches (double-row). Shoulders were cyclically loaded from 10 to 180 N. Displacement to gap formation of 5- and 10-mm at the repair site, cycles to failure, and the mode of failure were determined. The ultimate tensile strength was verified in specimens that resisted to 3,000 cycles. DRAE and DRAH had a lower frequency of 5- (P = 0.135) and 10-mm gap formation (P = 0.135). All DRAE and DRAH resisted 3,000 cycles while only three SRAE and one SRAH resisted 3,000 cycles (P < 0.001). The ultimate tensile strength in double-row specimens was significantly higher than in others (P < 0.001). There was no significant variation in using different suture material (P > 0.05). Double-row suture anchor repair with arthroscopic Mason-Allen/medial mattress stitches provides initial strength superior to single-row repair with arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches under isometric cyclic loading as well as under ultimate loading conditions. Our results support the concept of double-row fixation with arthroscopic Mason-Allen/medial mattress stitches in rotator cuff tears with improvement of initial fixation strength and ultimate tensile load. Use of new polyblend polyethylene suture material seems not to increase the initial biomechanical aspects of the repair construct.

  16. Biomechanical comparison of double-row locking plates versus single- and double-row non-locking plates in a comminuted metacarpal fracture model.

    PubMed

    Gajendran, Varun K; Szabo, Robert M; Myo, George K; Curtiss, Shane B

    2009-12-01

    Open or unstable metacarpal fractures frequently require open reduction and internal fixation. Locking plate technology has improved fixation of unstable fractures in certain settings. In this study, we hypothesized that there would be a difference in strength of fixation using double-row locking plates compared with single- and double-row non-locking plates in comminuted metacarpal fractures. We tested our hypothesis in a gap metacarpal fracture model simulating comminution using fourth-generation, biomechanical testing-grade composite sawbones. The metacarpals were divided into 6 groups of 15 bones each. Groups 1 and 4 were plated with a standard 6-hole, 2.3-mm plate in AO fashion. Groups 2 and 5 were plated with a 6-hole double-row 3-dimensional non-locking plate with bicortical screws aimed for convergence. Groups 3 and 6 were plated with a 6-hole double-row 3-dimensional locking plate with unicortical screws. The plated metacarpals were then tested to failure against cantilever apex dorsal bending (groups 1-3) and torsion (groups 4-6). The loads to failure in groups 1 to 3 were 198 +/- 18, 223 +/- 29, and 203 +/- 19 N, respectively. The torques to failure in groups 4 to 6 were 2,033 +/- 155, 3,190 +/- 235, and 3,161 +/- 268 N mm, respectively. Group 2 had the highest load to failure, whereas groups 5 and 6 shared the highest torques to failure (p < .05). Locking and non-locking double-row plates had equivalent bending and torsional stiffness, significantly higher than observed for the single-row non-locking plate. No other statistical differences were noted between groups. When subjected to the physiologically relevant forces of apex dorsal bending and torsion in a comminuted metacarpal fracture model, double-row 3-dimensional non-locking plates provided superior stability in bending and equivalent stability in torsion compared with double-row 3-dimensional locking plates, whereas single-row non-locking plates provided the least stability.

  17. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    PubMed

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  18. Characterization of Genome-Wide Variation in Four-Row Wax, a Waxy Maize Landrace with a Reduced Kernel Row Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanmei; Wang, Xuewen; Wei, Bin; Wang, Yongbin; Liu, Yinghong; Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Yufeng; Yu, Guowu; Li, Jian; Xu, Zhanbin; Huang, Yubi

    2016-01-01

    In southwest China, some maize landraces have long been isolated geographically, and have phenotypes that differ from those of widely grown cultivars. These landraces may harbor rich genetic variation responsible for those phenotypes. Four-row Wax is one such landrace, with four rows of kernels on the cob. We resequenced the genome of Four-row Wax, obtaining 50.46 Gb sequence at 21.87× coverage, then identified and characterized 3,252,194 SNPs, 213,181 short InDels (1–5 bp) and 39,631 structural variations (greater than 5 bp). Of those, 312,511 (9.6%) SNPs were novel compared to the most detailed haplotype map (HapMap) SNP database of maize. Characterization of variations in reported kernel row number (KRN) related genes and KRN QTL regions revealed potential causal mutations in fea2, td1, kn1, and te1. Genome-wide comparisons revealed abundant genetic variations in Four-row Wax, which may be associated with environmental adaptation. The sequence and SNP variations described here enrich genetic resources of maize, and provide guidance into study of seed numbers for crop yield improvement. PMID:27242868

  19. Does management intensity in inter rows effect soil physical properties in Austrian and Romanian vineyards?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Stiper, Katrin; Klipa, Vladimir; Popescu, Daniela; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2016-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly influenced by soil and climate. The availability of water during the growing season highly influences wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded most of the winegrowers keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, these greening strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management differ from farm to farm and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. However to what extent different inter row management practices affect soil physical properties are not clearly understood yet. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected paired vineyards with different inter row management in Austria and Romania. In total more than 7000 soil analysis were conducted for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, water stable aggregates, total organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorous, soil texture, bulk density and water infiltration. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with one soil disturbance every second inter row per year and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not improve for the upper soil layer (3-8cm). This is in contrast to general perceptions of improved soil physical properties due to low intensity of inter row management, i.e. permanent vegetated inter rows. This may be attributed to long term and high frequency mechanical stress by agricultural machinery in inter rows.

  20. On the transonic aerodynamics of a compressor blade row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, J. C., Jr.; Lordi, J. A.; Rae, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Linearized analyses have been carried out for the induced velocity and pressure fields within a compressor blade row operating in an infinite annulus at transonic Mach numbers of the flow relative to the blades. In addition, the relationship between the induced velocity and the shape of the mean blade surface has been determined. A computational scheme has been developed for evaluating the blade mean surface ordinates and surface pressure distributions. The separation of the effects of a specified blade thickness distribution from the effects of a specified distribution of the blade lift has been established. In this way, blade mean surface shapes that are necessary for the blades to be locally nonlifting have been computed and are presented for two examples of blades with biconvex parabolic arc sections of radially tapering thickness. Blade shapes that are required to achieve a zero thickness, uniform chordwise loading, constant work spanwise loading are also presented for two examples. In addition, corresponding surface pressure distributions are given. The flow relative to the blade tips has a high subsonic Mach number in the examples that have been computed. The results suggest that at near-sonic relative tip speeds the effective blade shape is dominated by the thickness distribution, with the lift distribution playing only a minor role.

  1. Deconvolution Methods for Multi-Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-30

    in [7). We will say sometimes that the family of distributions jI,..,’m is strongly coprime. It might be useful to explain why is (4) called a...form g In the variable ?. given by n 3(11) g q(z~t,p):= 1 kz()(k k=1 Given a family of m entire holomorphic functions f n’*If m its zero set Z is defined...write g1 g jdk" Recall the k=l coefficients gi are holomorphic in both z and t. Let F be the vector valued holomorphic function F: - (f1 ’..’,f ) we

  2. The relationship of nitrate concentrations in streams to row crop land use in Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Libra, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between row crop land use and nitrate N concentrations in surface water was evaluated for 15 Iowa watersheds ranging from 1002 to 2774 km2 and 10 smaller watersheds ranging from 47 to 775 km2 for the period 1996 to 1998. The percentage of land in row crop varied from 24 to >87% in the 15 large watersheds, and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10.8 mg/L. In the small watersheds, row crop percentage varied from 28 to 87% and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 10.5 mg/L. In both cases, nitrate N concentrations were directly related to the percentage of row crop in the watershed (p 87% in the 15 large watersheds, and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 10.8 mg/L. In the small watersheds, row crop percentage varied from 28 to 87% and mean annual NO3-N concentrations ranged from 3.0 to 10.5 mg/L. In both cases, nitrate N concentrations were directly related to the percentage of row crop in the watershed (p<0.0003). Linear regression showed similar slope for both sets of watersheds (0.11) suggesting that average annual surface water nitrate concentrations in Iowa, and possibly similar agricultural areas in the midwestern USA, can be approximated by multiplying a watershed's row crop percentage by 0.1. Comparing the Iowa watershed data with similar data collected at a subwatershed scale in Iowa (0.1 to 8.1 km2) and a larger midcontinent scale (7300 to 237 100 km2) suggests that watershed scale affects the relationship of nitrate concentration and land use. The slope of nitrate concentration versus row crop percentage decreases with increasing watershed size.Mean nitrate concentrations and row crop land use were summarized for 15 larger and ten smaller watersheds in Iowa, and the relationship between NO3 concentration and land use was examined. Linear regression of mean NO3 concentration and percent row crop was highly significant for both sets of watershed data, but a stronger correlation was noted in the

  3. Biomechanical comparison of 4 double-row suture-bridging rotator cuff repair techniques using different medial-row configurations.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Stephan; Kieser, Bettina; Schill, Alexander; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus

    2010-10-01

    Biomechanical comparison of different suture-bridge configurations of the medial row with respect to initial construct stability (time 0, porcine model). In 40 porcine fresh-frozen shoulders, the infraspinatus tendons were dissected from their insertions. All specimens were operated on by use of the suture-bridge technique, only differing in terms of the medial-row suture-grasping configuration, and randomized into 4 groups: (1) single-mattress (SM) technique, (2) double-mattress (DM) technique, (3) cross-stitch (CS) technique, and (4) double-pulley (DP) technique. Identical suture anchors were used for all specimens (medial: Bio-Corkscrew FT 5.5 [Arthrex, Naples, FL]; lateral: Bio-PushLock 3.5 [Arthrex]). All repairs were cyclically loaded from 10 to 60 N until 10 to 200 N (20-N stepwise increase after 50 cycles each) with a material testing machine. Forces at 3 and 5 mm of gap formation, mode of failure, and maximum load to failure were recorded. The DM technique had the highest ultimate tensile strength (368.6 ± 99.5 N) compared with the DP (248.4 ± 122.7 N), SM (204.3 ± 90 N), and CS (184.9 ± 63.8 N) techniques (P = .004). The DM technique provided maximal force resistance until 3 and 5 mm of gap formation (90.0 ± 18.1 N and 128.0 ± 32.3 N, respectively) compared with the CS (72 ± 8.9 N and 108 ± 20.2 N, respectively), SM (66.0 ± 8.9 N and 90.0 ± 26.9 N, respectively), and DP (62.2 ± 6.2 N and 71 ± 13.2 N, respectively) techniques (P < .05 for each 3 and 5 mm of gap formation). The main failure mode was suture cutting through the tendon. Comparing the 4 different suture-bridge techniques, we found that modified application of suture-bridge repair with double medial mattress stitches significantly enhanced biomechanical construct stability at time 0 in this porcine ex vivo model. This technique increases initial stability and resistance to suture cutting through the rotator cuff tendon after arthroscopic suture-bridge repair. Copyright © 2010

  4. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. Methods The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. Results The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no

  5. Single-row vs. double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: clinical and 3 Tesla MR arthrography results.

    PubMed

    Tudisco, Cosimo; Bisicchia, Salvatore; Savarese, Eugenio; Fiori, Roberto; Bartolucci, Dario A; Masala, Salvatore; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-27

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has become popular in the last few years because it avoids large skin incisions and deltoid detachment and dysfunction. Earlier arthroscopic single-row (SR) repair methods achieved only partial restoration of the original footprint of the tendons of the rotator cuff, while double-row (DR) repair methods presented many biomechanical advantages and higher rates of tendon-to-bone healing. However, DR repair failed to demonstrate better clinical results than SR repair in clinical trials. MR imaging at 3 Tesla, especially with intra-articular contrast medium (MRA), showed a better diagnostic performance than 1.5 Tesla in the musculoskeletal setting. The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical and 3 Tesla MRA results in two groups of patients operated on for a medium-sized full-thickness rotator cuff tear with two different techniques. The first group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the SR technique; the second group consisted of 20 patients operated on with the DR technique. All patients were evaluated at a minimum of 3 years after surgery. The primary end point was the re-tear rate at 3 Tesla MRA. The secondary end points were the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores, surgical time and implant expense. The mean follow-up was 40 months in the SR group and 38.9 months in the DR group. The mean postoperative CMS was 70 in the SR group and 68 in the DR group. The mean SST score was 9.4 in the SR group and 10.1 in the DR group. The re-tear rate was 60% in the SR group and 25% in the DR group. Leakage of the contrast medium was observed in all patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3 Tesla MRA in the evaluation of two different techniques of rotator cuff repair. DR repair resulted in a statistically significant lower re-tear rate, with longer surgical time and higher implant expense, despite no difference in clinical outcomes. We think that

  6. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm: An update

    PubMed

    Chuen, Jason; Theivendran, Mayo

    2018-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) remains one of the hallmark pathologies in vascular surgery and an area of intense research interest. Treatment options have expanded in recent years to increase the range of morphology suitable for endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), and with potential implications on treatment thresholds. This article is the first of two that will outline current treatment options for AAA, including areas of controversy and research in AAA disease, to inform the development of Australasian clinical guidelines and health policy. Medical therapy options remain limited and no aneurysm-specific pharmacotherapy is currently available. Recent years have witnessed a significant shift in AAA surgery from open repair to EVAR and expansion of EVAR techniques. General management of cardiovascular risk factors remains key to reducing all-cause mortality for patients with AAA.

  8. Da Vinci-assisted abdominal cerclage.

    PubMed

    Barmat, Larry; Glaser, Gretchen; Davis, George; Craparo, Frank

    2007-11-01

    To report the first placement of an abdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage using the da Vinci robot. Case report. Tertiary-care hospital. A 39-year-old female with a history of cervical insufficiency who required a cerclage and was not a candidate for transvaginal cerclage placement. Abdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage placement using the da Vinci robot. Ability to safely and successfully place an abdominal cerclage using the da Vinci robot. Abdominal cerclage was successfully placed using the da Vinci robot. The patient had minimal blood loss and was discharged to home on the same day as surgery. Da Vinci robot-assisted abdominal cerclage placement is an innovative application of robotic surgery and may alter the standard of care for women who require this surgery.

  9. Functional and structural comparisons of the arthroscopic knotless double-row suture bridge and single-row repair for anterosuperior rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Ide, Junji; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Okamoto, Nobukazu; Taniwaki, Takuya; Oka, Kiyoshi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We compared the outcomes of knotless double-row suture bridge and single-row repairs in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair for anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. We included 61 full-thickness anterosuperior rotator cuff tears treated by arthroscopic repair, namely, single-row repair (group 1: 25 shoulders; mean patient age, 64 years) and the knotless double-row suture bridge repair (group 2: 36 shoulders; mean patient age, 62 years). Preoperative and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging was performed for all shoulders. Clinical outcomes were evaluated for mean follow-up periods of 81 months (range, 72-96 months) in group 1 and 34 months (range, 24-42 months) in group 2, using the University of California, Los Angeles and Japanese Orthopaedic Association assessments. At the final follow-up, both groups showed improvement in the average University of California, Los Angeles and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and range of motion, although no intergroup differences were observed. Both groups showed improved abduction strength, and the average score was higher in group 2 (P = .0112). The lift-off and belly-press test results were improved in both groups. Postoperatively, the incidence of positive lift-off tests tended to be lower (P = .075) and that of positive belly-press tests was lower in group 2, P = .049). The repair failure rate tended to be lower in group 2 (14% [5 of 36]) than in group 1 (32% [8 of 25]; P = .0839). Arthroscopic knotless double-row suture bridge repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears yielded functional outcomes equivalent to those of single-row repair and may be useful for improving subscapularis function, abduction strength, and tendon healing. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spreadsheet Calculations for Jets in Crossflow: Opposed Rows of Inline and Staggered Holes and Single and Opposed Rows with Alternating Hole Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this jet-in-crossflow study was to calculate expected results for two configurations for which limited or no experimental results have been published: (1) cases of opposed rows of closely-spaced jets from inline and staggered round holes and (2) rows of jets from alternating large and small round holes. Simulations of these configurations were performed using an Excel (Microsoft Corporation) spreadsheet implementation of a NASA-developed empirical model which had been shown in previous publications to give excellent representations of mean experimental scalar results suggesting that the NASA empirical model for the scalar field could confidently be used to investigate these configurations. The supplemental Excel spreadsheet is posted with the current report on the NASA Glenn Technical Reports Server (http://gltrs.grc.nasa.gov) and can be accessed from the Supplementary Notes section as TM-2010-216100-SUPPL1.xls. Calculations for cases of opposed rows of jets with the orifices on one side shifted show that staggering can improve the mixing, particularly for cases where jets would overpenetrate slightly if the orifices were in an aligned configuration. The jets from the larger holes dominate the mixture fraction for configurations with a row of large holes opposite a row of smaller ones although the jet penetration was about the same. For single and opposed rows with mixed hole sizes, jets from the larger holes penetrated farther. For all cases investigated, the dimensionless variance of the mixture fraction decreased significantly with increasing downstream distance. However, at a given downstream distance, the variation between cases was small.

  11. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Copyright © 2014 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [A commonly seen cause of abdominal pain: abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Solmaz, Ilker; Talay, Mustafa; Tekindur, Şükrü; Kurt, Ercan

    2012-01-01

    Although abdominal cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES) is accepted as a rare condition, it is a syndrome that should be diagnosed more commonly when the clinical signs cannot explain the cause of abdominal pain. Abdominal pain is commonly considered by physicians to be based on intra-abdominal causes. Consequently, redundant tests and consultations are requested for these patients, and unnecessary surgical procedures may be applied. Patients with this type of pain are consulted to many clinics, and because their definitive diagnoses cannot be achieved, they are assessed as psychiatric patients. Actually, a common cause of abdominal wall pain is nerve entrapment on the lateral edge of the rectus abdominis muscle. In this paper, we would like to share information about the diagnosis and treatment of a patient who, prior to presenting to us, had applied to different clinics for chronic abdominal pain and had undergone many tests and consultations; abdominal surgery was eventually decided.

  13. Six-rowed barley originated from a mutation in a homeodomain-leucine zipper I-class homeobox gene

    PubMed Central

    Komatsuda, Takao; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; He, Congfen; Azhaguvel, Perumal; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Perovic, Dragan; Stein, Nils; Graner, Andreas; Wicker, Thomas; Tagiri, Akemi; Lundqvist, Udda; Fujimura, Tatsuhito; Matsuoka, Makoto; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yano, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    Increased seed production has been a common goal during the domestication of cereal crops, and early cultivators of barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) selected a phenotype with a six-rowed spike that stably produced three times the usual grain number. This improved yield established barley as a founder crop for the Near Eastern Neolithic civilization. The barley spike has one central and two lateral spikelets at each rachis node. The wild-type progenitor (H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum) has a two-rowed phenotype, with additional, strictly rudimentary, lateral rows; this natural adaptation is advantageous for seed dispersal after shattering. Until recently, the origin of the six-rowed phenotype remained unknown. In the present study, we isolated vrs1 (six-rowed spike 1), the gene responsible for the six-rowed spike in barley, by means of positional cloning. The wild-type Vrs1 allele (for two-rowed barley) encodes a transcription factor that includes a homeodomain with a closely linked leucine zipper motif. Expression of Vrs1 was strictly localized in the lateral-spikelet primordia of immature spikes, suggesting that the VRS1 protein suppresses development of the lateral rows. Loss of function of Vrs1 resulted in complete conversion of the rudimentary lateral spikelets in two-rowed barley into fully developed fertile spikelets in the six-rowed phenotype. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the six-rowed phenotype originated repeatedly, at different times and in different regions, through independent mutations of Vrs1. PMID:17220272

  14. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3.0-Tesla MRI findings for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions: Comparison with iodine-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyong-Hu; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Im, In-Chul; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Moon-Jib; Kwak, Byung-Joon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Dong, Kyung-Rae

    2012-12-01

    The safety of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic-acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) has been confirmed, but more study is needed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for whom surgical treatment is considered or with a metastatic hepatoma. Research is also needed to examine the rate of detection of hepatic lesions compared to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which is used most frequently to localize and characterize a HCC. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI and iodine-enhanced MDCT imaging were compared for the preoperative detection of focal liver lesions. The clinical usefulness of each method was examined. The current study enrolled 79 patients with focal liver lesions who preoperatively underwent MRI and MDCT. In these patients, there was less than one month between the two diagnostic modalities. Imaging data were taken before and after contrast enhancement in both methods. To evaluate the images, we analyzed the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lesions and the liver parenchyma. To compare the sensitivity of the two methods, we performed a quantitative analysis of the percentage signal intensity of the liver (PSIL) on a high resolution picture archiving and communication system (PACS) monitor (paired-samples t-test, p < 0.05). The enhancement was evaluated based on a consensus of four observers. The enhancement pattern and the morphological features during the arterial and the delayed phases were correlated between the Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI findings and the iodine-enhanced MDCT by using an adjusted x2 test. The SNRs, CNRs, and PSIL all had a greater detection rate in Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRI than in iodine-enhanced MDCT. Hepatocyte-selective uptake was observed 20 minutes after the injection in the focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH, 9/9), adenoma (9/10), and highly-differentiated HCC (grade G1, 27/30). Rim

  15. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  16. KRN4 Controls Quantitative Variation in Maize Kernel Row Number

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Du, Yanfang; Shen, Xiaomeng; Li, Manfei; Sun, Wei; Huang, Juan; Liu, Zhijie; Tao, Yongsheng; Zheng, Yonglian; Yan, Jianbing; Zhang, Zuxin

    2015-01-01

    Kernel row number (KRN) is an important component of yield during the domestication and improvement of maize and controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTL). Here, we fine-mapped a major KRN QTL, KRN4, which can enhance grain productivity by increasing KRN per ear. We found that a ~3-Kb intergenic region about 60 Kb downstream from the SBP-box gene Unbranched3 (UB3) was responsible for quantitative variation in KRN by regulating the level of UB3 expression. Within the 3-Kb region, the 1.2-Kb Presence-Absence variant was found to be strongly associated with quantitative variation in KRN in diverse maize inbred lines, and our results suggest that this 1.2-Kb transposon-containing insertion is likely responsible for increased KRN. A previously identified A/G SNP (S35, also known as Ser220Asn) in UB3 was also found to be significantly associated with KRN in our association-mapping panel. Although no visible genetic effect of S35 alone could be detected in our linkage mapping population, it was found to genetically interact with the 1.2-Kb PAV to modulate KRN. The KRN4 was under strong selection during maize domestication and the favorable allele for the 1.2-Kb PAV and S35 has been significantly enriched in modern maize improvement process. The favorable haplotype (Hap1) of 1.2-Kb-PAV-S35 was selected during temperate maize improvement, but is still rare in tropical and subtropical maize germplasm. The dissection of the KRN4 locus improves our understanding of the genetic basis of quantitative variation in complex traits in maize. PMID:26575831

  17. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-07-01

    There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods.

  18. Clinical outcomes of arthroscopic single and double row repair in full thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Shafi, Mohamed; Kim, Weon-Yoo; Kim, Young-Yul

    2010-01-01

    Background: There has been a recent interest in the double row repair method for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair following favourable biomechanical results reported by some studies. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical results of arthroscopic single row and double row repair methods in the full-thickness rotator cuff tears. Materials and Methods: 22 patients of arthroscopic single row repair (group I) and 25 patients who underwent double row repair (group II) from March 2003 to March 2005 were retrospectively evaluated and compared for the clinical outcomes. The mean age was 58 years and 56 years respectively for group I and II. The average follow-up in the two groups was 24 months. The evaluation was done by using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) rating scale and the shoulder index of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES). Results: In Group I, the mean ASES score increased from 30.48 to 87.40 and the mean ASES score increased from 32.00 to 91.45 in the Group II. The mean UCLA score increased from the preoperative 12.23 to 30.82 in Group I and from 12.20 to 32.40 in Group II. Each method has shown no statistical clinical differences between two methods, but based on the sub scores of UCLA score, the double row repair method yields better results for the strength, and it gives more satisfaction to the patients than the single row repair method. Conclusions: Comparing the two methods, double row repair group showed better clinical results in recovering strength and gave more satisfaction to the patients but no statistical clinical difference was found between 2 methods. PMID:20697485

  19. Mapping wide row crops with video sequences acquired from a tractor moving at treatment speed.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Costa, Nadir; Ribeiro, Angela; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mapping method for wide row crop fields. The resulting map shows the crop rows and weeds present in the inter-row spacing. Because field videos are acquired with a camera mounted on top of an agricultural vehicle, a method for image sequence stabilization was needed and consequently designed and developed. The proposed stabilization method uses the centers of some crop rows in the image sequence as features to be tracked, which compensates for the lateral movement (sway) of the camera and leaves the pitch unchanged. A region of interest is selected using the tracked features, and an inverse perspective technique transforms the selected region into a bird's-eye view that is centered on the image and that enables map generation. The algorithm developed has been tested on several video sequences of different fields recorded at different times and under different lighting conditions, with good initial results. Indeed, lateral displacements of up to 66% of the inter-row spacing were suppressed through the stabilization process, and crop rows in the resulting maps appear straight.

  20. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  1. Laparoscopy In Unexplained Abdominal Pain: Surgeon's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Muhammad Tariq; Waqar, Shahzad Hussain; Zahid, Muhammad Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Unexplained abdominal pain is a common but difficult presenting feature faced by the clinicians. Such patients can undergo a number of investigations with failure to reach any diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of laparoscopy in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad from January 2009 to December 2013. This study included 91 patients of unexplained abdominal pain not diagnosed by routine clinical examination and investigations. These patients were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy for evaluation of their conditions and to confirm the diagnosis. These patients presented 43% of patients undergoing investigations for abdominal pain. Patients diagnosed with gynaecological problems were excluded to see surgeon's perspective. The findings and the outcomes of the laparoscopy were recorded and data was analyzed. Unexplained abdominal pain is common in females than in males. The most common laparoscopic findings were abdominal tuberculosis followed by appendicitis. Ninety percent patients achieved pain relief after laparoscopic intervention. Laparoscopy is both beneficial and safe in majority of patients with unexplained abdominal pain. General surgeons should acquire training and experience in laparoscopic surgery to provide maximum benefit to these difficult patients.

  2. Intra-abdominal pressure during swimming.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, S; Ogita, F; Huang, Z; Kurobe, K; Nagira, A; Tanaka, T; Takahashi, H; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the intra-abdominal pressure during front crawl swimming at different velocities in competitive swimmers and to clarify the relationships between stroke indices and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. The subjects were 7 highly trained competitive collegiate male swimmers. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured during front crawl swimming at 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4 m · s(-1) and during the Valsalva maneuver. Intra-abdominal pressure was taken as the difference between minimum and maximum values, and the mean of 6 stable front crawl stroke cycles was used. Stroke rate and stroke length were also measured as stroke indices. There were significant differences in stroke rate among all velocities (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in stroke length by velocity. Significant within-subject correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke rate or stroke length (P < 0.01) were observed, although there were no significant correlations between intra-abdominal pressure and stroke indices when controlling for swimming velocity. These findings do not appear to support the effectiveness of trunk training performed by competitive swimmers aimed at increasing intra-abdominal pressure. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  4. Review article: the functional abdominal pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sperber, A D; Drossman, D A

    2011-03-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is a debilitating disorder with constant or nearly constant abdominal pain, present for at least 6 months and loss of daily functioning. To review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of FAPS. A literature review using the keywords: functional abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome and functional gastrointestinal disorders. No epidemiological studies have focused specifically on FAPS. Estimates of prevalence range from 0.5% to 1.7% and tend to show a female predominance. FAPS pathophysiology appears unique in that the pain is caused primarily by amplified central perception of normal visceral input, rather than by enhanced peripheral stimulation from abdominal viscera. The diagnosis of FAPS is symptom-based in accordance with the Rome III diagnostic criteria. These criteria are geared to identify patients with severe symptoms as they require constant or nearly constant abdominal pain with loss of daily function and are differentiated from IBS based on their non-association with changes in bowel habit, eating or other gut-related events. As cure is not feasible, the aims of treatment are reduced suffering and improved quality of life. Treatment is based on a biopsychosocial approach with a therapeutic patient-physician partnership at its base. Therapeutic options include central nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities and peripheral modalities. These can be combined to produce an augmentation effect. Although few studies have assessed functional abdominal pain syndrome or its treatment specifically, the treatment strategies outlined in this paper appear to be effective. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-11-01

    Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. A systematic review was conducted. The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma formation and physical function. A total of 50 publications were identified; 42 publications were excluded leaving eight publications counting a total of 578 patients for analysis. Generally, the scientific quality of the studies was poor. Use of abdominal binder revealed a non-significant tendency to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases with the use of abdominal binders. Reduction of pulmonary function during use of abdominal binders has not been revealed. Abdominal binders reduce post-operative psychological distress, but their effect on post-operative pain after laparotomy and seroma formation after ventral hernia repair remains unclear. Due to the sparse evidence and poor quality of the literature, solid conclusions may be difficult to make, and procedure-specific, high-quality randomised clinical trials are warranted.

  6. Abdominal epilepsy as an unusual cause of abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Yilmaz; Sefer, Ustebay; Dondu, Ulker Ustebay; Ismail, Ozanli; Yusuf, Ehi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain, in etiology sometimes difficult to be defined, is a frequent complaint in childhood. Abdominal epilepsy is a rare cause of abdominal pain. In this article, we report on 5 year old girl patient with abdominal epilepsy. Some investigations (stool investigation, routine blood tests, ultrasonography (USG), electrocardiogram (ECHO) and electrocardiograpy (ECG), holter for 24hr.) were done to understand the origin of these complaints; but no abnormalities were found. Finally an EEG was done during an episode of abdominal pain and it was shown that there were generalized spikes especially precipitated by hyperventilation. The patient did well on valproic acid therapy and EEG was normal 1 month after beginning of the treatment. The cause of chronic recurrent paroxymal abdominal pain is difficult for the clinicians to diagnose in childhood. A lot of disease may lead to paroxysmal gastrointestinal symptoms like familial mediterranean fever and porfiria. Abdominal epilepsy is one of the rare but easily treatable cause of abdominal pain. In conclusion, abdominal epilepsy should be suspected in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

  7. Management of intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at risk of developing of intra abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Aim: This review seeks to define IAH and ACS, identify the aetiology and presentation of IAH and ACS, identify IAP measurement techniques, identify current management and discuss the implications of IAH and ACS for nursing practice. A search of the electronic databases was supervised by a health librarian. The electronic data bases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Medline, EMBASE, and the World Wide Web was undertaken from 1996- January 2011 using MeSH and key words which included but not limited to: abdominal compartment syndrome, intra -abdominal hypertension, intra-abdominal pressure in adult populations met the search criteria and were reviewed by three authors using a critical appraisal tool. Data derived from the retrieved material are discussed under the following themes: (1) etiology of intra-abdominal hypertension; (2) strategies for measuring intra-abdominal pressure (3) the manifestation of abdominal compartment syndrome; and (4) the importance of nursing assessment, observation and interventions. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) have the potential to alter organ perfusion and compromise organ function. PMID:24499574

  8. Treatment strategy for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Davidovic, L

    2014-07-01

    Rupture is the most serious and lethal complication of the abdominal aortic aneurysm. Despite all improvements during the past 50 years, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are still associated with very high mortality. Namely, including patients who die before reaching the hospital, the mortality rate due to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is 90%. On the other hand, during the last twenty years, the number of abdominal aortic aneurysms significantly increased. One of the reasons is the fact that in majority of countries the general population is older nowadays. Due to this, the number of degenerative AAA is increasing. This is also the case for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. Age must not be the reason of a treatment refusal. Optimal therapeutic option ought to be found. The following article is based on literature analysis including current guidelines but also on my Clinics significant experience. Furthermore, this article show cases options for vascular medicine in undeveloped countries that can not apply endovascular procedures at a sufficient level and to a sufficient extent. At this moment the following is evident. Thirty-day-mortality after repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms is significantly lower in high-volume hospitals. Due to different reasons all ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are not suitable for EVAR. Open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm should be performed by experienced open vascular surgeons. This could also be said for the treatment of endovascular complications that require open surgical conversion. There is no ideal procedure for the treatment of AAA. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages, its own limits and complications, as well as indications and contraindications. Future reductions in mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms will depend on implementation of population-based screening; on strategies to prevent postoperative organ injury and also on new medical technology

  9. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanical Comparison of Arthroscopic Single- and Double-Row Repair Techniques for Acute Bony Bankart Lesions.

    PubMed

    Spiegl, Ulrich J; Smith, Sean D; Todd, Jocelyn N; Coatney, Garrett A; Wijdicks, Coen A; Millett, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Single- and double-row arthroscopic reconstruction techniques for acute bony Bankart lesions have been described in the literature. The double-row fixation technique would provide superior reduction and stability of a simulated bony Bankart lesion at time zero in a cadaveric model compared with the single-row technique. Controlled laboratory study. Testing was performed on 14 matched pairs of glenoids with simulated bony Bankart fractures with a defect width of 25% of the glenoid diameter. Half of the fractures were repaired with a double-row technique, while the contralateral glenoids were repaired with a single-row technique. The quality of fracture reduction was measured with a coordinate measuring machine. To determine the biomechanical stability of the repairs, specimens were preconditioned with 10 sinusoidal cycles between 5 and 25 N at 0.1 Hz and then pulled to failure in the anteromedial direction at a rate of 5 mm/min. Loads at 1 mm and 2 mm of fracture displacement were determined. The double-row technique required significantly higher forces to achieve fracture displacements of 1 mm (mean, 60.6 N; range, 39.0-93.3 N; P = .001) and 2 mm (mean, 94.4 N; range, 43.4-151.2 N; P = .004) than the single-row technique (1 mm: mean, 30.2 N; range, 14.0-54.1 N and 2 mm: mean, 63.7 N; range, 26.6-118.8 N). Significantly reduced fracture displacement was seen after double-row repair for both the unloaded condition (mean, 1.1 mm; range, 0.3-2.4 mm; P = .005) and in response to a 10-N anterior force applied to the defect (mean, 1.6 mm; range, 0.5-2.7 mm; P = .001) compared with single-row repair (unloaded: mean, 2.1 mm; range, 1.3-3.4 mm and loaded: mean, 3.4 mm; range, 1.9-4.7 mm). The double-row fixation technique resulted in improved fracture reduction and superior stability at time zero in this cadaveric model. This information may influence the surgical technique used to treat large osseous Bankart fractures and the postoperative rehabilitation protocols

  11. APT Blanket Thermal Analyses of Top Horizontal Row 1 Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A.

    1999-09-20

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) cavity flood system (CFS) is designed to be the primary safeguard for the integrity of the blanket modules during loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). For certain large break LOCAs the CFS also provides backup for the residual heat removal systems (RHRs) in cooling the target assemblies. In the unlikely event that the internal flow passages in a blanket module or target assembly dryout, decay heat in the metal structures will be dissipated to the CFS through the module or assembly walls (i.e., rung outer walls). The target assemblies consist of tungsten targets encased inmore » steel conduits, and they can safely sustain high metal temperatures. Under internally dry conditions, the cavity flood fluid will cool the target assemblies with vigorous nucleate boiling on the external surfaces. However, the metal structures in the blanket modules consist of lead cladded in aluminum, and they have a long-term exposure temperature limit currently set to 150 degrees C. Simultaneous LOCAs in both the target and blanket heat removal systems (HRS) could result in dryout of the target ladders, as well as the horizontal blanket modules above the target. The cavity flood coolant would boil on the outside surfaces of the target ladder rungs, and the resultant steam could reduce the effectiveness of convection heat transfer from the blanket modules to the cavity flood coolant. A two-part analysis was conducted to ascertain if the cavity flood system can adequately cool the blanket modules above the targets, even when boiling is occurring on the outer surfaces of the target ladder rungs. The first part of the analysis was to model transient thermal conduction in the front top horizontal row 1 module (i.e. top horizontal modules nearest the incoming beam), while varying parametrically the convection heat transfer coefficient (htc) for the external surfaces exposed to the cavity flood flow. This part of the analysis demonstrated that the

  12. Investigating the Effects of Typical Rowing Strength Training Practices on Strength and Power Development and 2,000 m Rowing Performance

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Nicholas; Christian Gibbon, Karl; Howatson, Glyn; Grant Thompson, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the effects of a short-term, strength training intervention, typically undertaken by club-standard rowers, on 2,000 m rowing performance and strength and power development. Twenty-eight male rowers were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. All participants performed baseline testing involving assessments of muscle soreness, creatine kinase activity (CK), maximal voluntary contraction (leg-extensors) (MVC), static-squat jumps (SSJ), counter-movement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing power strokes (PS) and a 2,000 m rowing ergometer time-trial (2,000 m) with accompanying respiratory-exchange and electromyography (EMG) analysis. Intervention group participants subsequently performed three identical strength training (ST) sessions, in the space of five days, repeating all assessments 24 h following the final ST. The control group completed the same testing procedure but with no ST. Following ST, the intervention group experienced significant elevations in soreness and CK activity, and decrements in MVC, SSJ, CMJ and PS (p < 0.01). However, 2,000 m rowing performance, pacing strategy and gas exchange were unchanged across trials in either condition. Following ST, significant increases occurred for EMG (p < 0.05), and there were non-significant trends for decreased blood lactate and anaerobic energy liberation (p = 0.063 – 0.086). In summary, club-standard rowers, following an intensive period of strength training, maintained their 2,000 m rowing performance despite suffering symptoms of muscle damage and disruption to muscle function. This disruption likely reflected the presence of acute residual fatigue, potentially in type II muscle fibres as strength and power development were affected. PMID:28149354

  13. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, J. J.; Brown, S. J.; Beeman, R. W.; Denell, R. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  14. The Tribolium homeotic gene Abdominal is homologous to abdominal-A of the Drosophila bithorax complex.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J J; Brown, S J; Beeman, R W; Denell, R E

    1993-01-01

    The Abdominal gene is a member of the single homeotic complex of the beetle, Tribolium castaneum. An integrated developmental genetic and molecular analysis shows that Abdominal is homologous to the abdominal-A gene of the bithorax complex of Drosophila. abdominal-A mutant embryos display strong homeotic transformations of the anterior abdomen (parasegments 7-9) to PS6, whereas developmental commitments in the posterior abdomen depend primarily on Abdominal-B. In beetle embryos lacking Abdominal function, parasegments throughout the abdomen are transformed to PS6. This observation demonstrates the general functional significance of parasegmental expression among insects and shows that the control of determinative decisions in the posterior abdomen by homeotic selector genes has undergone considerable evolutionary modification.

  15. [Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, H; Henriksen, L O; Medgyesi, S; Waever, E

    1994-02-07

    Four cases of muscle-aponeurotic fibroadenomatosis (desmoid) of the abdominal wall are reported. The etiological factors, the recurrence rate, the treatment and the pre- and postoperative examinations are discussed.

  16. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... Long-term Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-term Ankle Problems Breast Problems in Men Breast Problems in Women Chest Pain in Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: abdominal wall defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... are two main types of abdominal wall defects: omphalocele and gastroschisis . Omphalocele is an opening in the center of the ... covering the exposed organs in gastroschisis. Fetuses with omphalocele may grow slowly before birth (intrauterine growth retardation) ...

  18. Correlation between intra-abdominal pressure and pulmonary volumes after superior and inferior abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cleva, Roberto de; Assumpção, Marianna Siqueira de; Sasaya, Flavia; Chaves, Natalia Zuniaga; Santo, Marco Aurelio; Fló, Claudia; Lunardi, Adriana C; Jacob Filho, Wilson

    2014-07-01

    Patients undergoing abdominal surgery are at risk for pulmonary complications. The principal cause of postoperative pulmonary complications is a significant reduction in pulmonary volumes (FEV1 and FVC) to approximately 65-70% of the predicted value. Another frequent occurrence after abdominal surgery is increased intra-abdominal pressure. The aim of this study was to correlate changes in pulmonary volumes with the values of intra-abdominal pressure after abdominal surgery, according to the surgical incision in the abdomen (superior or inferior). We prospectively evaluated 60 patients who underwent elective open abdominal surgery with a surgical time greater than 240 minutes. Patients were evaluated before surgery and on the 3rd postoperative day. Spirometry was assessed by maximal respiratory maneuvers and flow-volume curves. Intra-abdominal pressure was measured in the postoperative period using the bladder technique. The mean age of the patients was 56 ± 13 years, and 41.6% 25 were female; 50 patients (83.3%) had malignant disease. The patients were divided into two groups according to the surgical incision (superior or inferior). The lung volumes in the preoperative period showed no abnormalities. After surgery, there was a significant reduction in both FEV1 (1.6 ± 0.6 L) and FVC (2.0 ± 0.7 L) with maintenance of FEV1/FVC of 0.8 ± 0.2 in both groups. The maximum intra-abdominal pressure values were similar (p=0.59) for the two groups. There was no association between pulmonary volumes and intra-abdominal pressure measured in any of the groups analyzed. Our results show that superior and inferior abdominal surgery determines hypoventilation, unrelated to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Patients at high risk of pulmonary complications should receive respiratory care even if undergoing inferior abdominal surgery.

  19. Row distance method sowing of forage Kochia, eastern saltwort and winterfat.

    PubMed

    Zadbar, M; Dormanov, D N; Shariph-abad, H Heidari; Dorikov, M; Jalilvand, H

    2007-05-15

    In this study, we used three native range species of eastern saltwort, winterfat and forage Kochia. These species are extremely adapted to dry lands and have high productivity comparison with other forage species. In order to increase range production in poor, dry and sub dry land in the province of Khorasan (Sabzevar) the seeds of these species naturally were sowed. They were sowed individually on rows and mixed of the two by 2 or 3 species on the alternative rows. The research was carried out statistically in Completely Randomized Block Design (CRBD) as a factorial experiment by two factors. The first factor was row distance of seeding (three levels, 50, 75 and 100 cm distance between each row) and the second was kinds of intercropping methods (seven level of individual seeding by three mentioned species and mixed alternative rows of two by 2 and 3 species together) with four replicates (3x7x4). Number of seed was accounted by the number of bushes were germinated or died in each experimental unit. The results showed that maximum abundant of seed germination of all treatments was occurred from late April to late May. Sowing in the row spaces of 50 cm had highly statistically significant production than the ones of 75 and 100 cm spaces. Also, by comparing relative frequency percentage of germinated seeds and relative germinated died seed revealed that individual sowing seed of Salsola orientalis and Eurotia ceratoides, by 50 cm row space in Sabzevar region had better result, respectively, because of lowest mortality of plants and highest productivity of biomass.

  20. A Comparative Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Double-Row, Distal Triceps Tendon Repairs.

    PubMed

    Dorweiler, Matthew A; Van Dyke, Rufus O; Siska, Robert C; Boin, Michael A; DiPaola, Mathew J

    2017-05-01

    Triceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries that almost always require surgical repair. This study tests the biomechanical properties of an original anchorless double-row triceps repair against a previously reported knotless double-row repair. The anchorless double-row triceps repair technique will yield similar biomechanical properties when compared with the knotless double-row repair technique. Controlled laboratory study. Eighteen cadaver arms were randomized into 2 groups. One group received the anchorless repair and the other received the knotless anchor repair. A materials testing system (MTS) machine was used to cycle the repaired arms from 0° to 90° with a 2.5-pound weight for 1500 cycles at 0.25 Hz. Real-time displacement of the tendon was measured during cycling using a probe. Load to failure was performed after completion of cyclic loading. The mean displacement with the anchorless technique was 0.77 mm (SD, 0.25 mm) at 0° (full elbow extension) and 0.76 mm (SD, 0.38 mm) at 90° (elbow flexion). The mean displacement with the anchored technique was 0.83 mm (SD, 0.57 mm) at 0° and 1.01 mm (SD, 0.62 mm) at 90°. There was no statistically significant difference for tendon displacement at 0º ( P = .75) or 90º ( P = .31). The mean load to failure with the anchorless technique was 618.9 N (SD, 185.6 N), while it was 560.5 N (SD, 154.1 N) with the anchored technique, again with no statistically significant difference ( P = .28). Our anchorless double-row triceps repair technique yields comparable biomechanical properties to previously described double-row triceps tendon repair techniques, with the added benefit of avoiding the cost of suture anchors. This anchorless double-row triceps tendon repair can be considered as an acceptable alternative to a knotless anchor repair for triceps tendon ruptures.

  1. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Hip Arthroscopy Justin Fowler, M.D., and Brett D. Owens, M.D. Abstract: As hip arthroscopy becomes a more common procedure, more complications may occur...We present a case of abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from fluid extravasation in a 42-year-old man who underwent routine hip arthroscopy

  2. [Late primary abdominal pregnancy. Case report].

    PubMed

    Farías, Emigdio Torres; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Allegre, René Márquez; Higareda, Salvador Hernández

    2008-09-01

    Abdominal advanced pregnancy is an obstetric complication that put at risk maternal and fetal life. We report a case of advanced abdominal pregnancy with intact ovaries and fallopian tubes, without ureteroperitoneal fistulae and, late prenatal diagnosis, in a multiparous patient without risk factors, with alive newborn, and whose pregnancy was attended at Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad, Hospital de Gineco-Obstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente del IMSS, Guadalajara, Jalisco, México.

  3. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  5. The value of plain abdominal radiographs in management of abdominal emergencies in Luth.

    PubMed

    Ashindoitiang, J A; Atoyebi, A O; Arogundade, R A

    2008-01-01

    The plain abdominal x-ray is still the first imaging modality in diagnosis of acute abdomen. The aim of this study was to find the value of plain abdominal x-ray in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos university teaching hospital. The accurate diagnosis of the cause of acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging undertakings in emergency medicine. This is due to overlapping of clinical presentation and non-specific findings of physical and even laboratory data of the multifarious causes. Plain abdominal radiography is one investigation that can be obtained readily and within a short period of time to help the physician arrive at a correct diagnosis The relevance of plain abdominal radiography was therefore evaluated in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos over a 12 month period (April 2002 to March 2003). A prospective study of 100 consecutively presenting patients with acute abdominal conditions treated by the general surgical unit of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was undertaken. All patients had supine and erect abdominal x-ray before any therapeutic intervention was undertaken. The diagnostic features of the plain films were compared with final diagnosis to determine the usefulness of the plain x-ray There were 54 males and 46 females (M:F 1.2:1). Twenty-four percent of the patients had intestinal obstruction, 20% perforated typhoid enteritis; gunshot injuries and generalized peritonitis each occurred in 13%, blunt abdominal trauma in 12%, while 8% and 10% had acute appendicitis and perforated peptic ulcer disease respectively. Of 100 patients studied, 54% had plain abdominal radiographs that showed positive diagnostic features. Plain abdominal radiograph showed high sensitivity in patients with intestinal obstruction 100% and perforated peptic ulcer 90% but was less sensitive in patients with perforated typhoid, acute appendicitis, and blunt abdominal trauma and generalized peritonitis. In conclusion, this study

  6. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  7. Mechanisms and management of functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Aziz, Qasim

    2014-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome is characterised by frequent or continuous abdominal pain associated with a degree of loss of daily activity. It has a reported population prevalence of between 0.5% and 1.7%, with a female preponderance. The pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is incompletely understood although it has been postulated that peripheral sensitisation of visceral afferents, central sensitisation of the spinal dorsal horn and aberrancies within descending modulatory systems may have an important role. The management of patients with functional abdominal pain requires a tailored multidisciplinary approach in a supportive and empathetic environment in order to develop an effective therapeutic relationship. Patient education directed towards an explanation of the pathophysiology of functional abdominal pain is in our opinion a prerequisite step and provides the rationale for the introduction of interventions. Interventions can usefully be categorised into general measures, pharmacotherapy, psychological interventions and 'step-up' treatments. Pharmacotherapeutic/step-up options include tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors and the gabapentinoids. Psychological treatments include cognitive behavioural therapy and hypnotherapy. However, the objective evidence base for these interventions is largely derived from other chronic pain syndrome, and further research is warranted in adult patients with functional abdominal pain. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  8. Genes and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2011-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since the first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, approximately 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. These studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, only when appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called contactin-3, which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. However, two follow-up studies could not replicate this association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33, were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense ribonucleic acid that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute toward AAA pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    PubMed

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  10. A comparison of electromyography and stroke kinematics during ergometer and on-water rowing.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Neil; Donne, Bernard; Mahony, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed muscle recruitment patterns and stroke kinematics during ergometer and on-water rowing to validate the accuracy of rowing ergometry. Male rowers (n = 10; age 21 ± 2 years, height 1.90 ± 0.05 m and body mass 83.3 ± 4.8 kg) performed 3 × 3 min exercise bouts, at heart and stroke rates equivalent to 75, 85 and 95% VO2peak, on both dynamic and stationary rowing ergometers, and on water. During exercise, synchronised data for surface electromyography (EMG) and 2D kinematics were recorded. Overall muscle activity was quantified by the integration of rmsEMG and averaged for each 10% interval of the stroke cycle. Muscle activity significantly increased in rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM) (P <0.01), as exercise intensity increased. Comparing EMG data across conditions revealed significantly (P <0.05) greater RF and VM activity during on-water rowing at discrete 10% intervals of stroke cycle. In addition, the drive/recovery ratio was significantly lower during dynamic ergometry compared to on-water (40 ± 1 vs. 44 ± 1% at 95%, P <0.01). Results suggest that significant differences exist while comparing recruitment and kinematic patterns between on-water and ergometer rowing. These differences may be due to altered acceleration and deceleration of moving masses on-ergometer not perfectly simulating the on-water scenario.

  11. Experiments in dilution jet mixing effects of multiple rows and non-circular orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E. B.; Meyers, G. D.; White, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and empirical model results are presented that extend previous studies of the mixing of single-sided and opposed rows of jets in a confined duct flow to include effects of non-circular orifices and double rows of jets. Analysis of the mean temperature data obtained in this investigation showed that the effects of orifice shape and double rows are significant only in the region close to the injection plane, provided that the orifices are symmetric with respect to the main flow direction. The penetration and mixing of jets from 45-degree slanted slots is slightly less than that from equivalent-area symmetric orifices. The penetration from 2-dimensional slots is similar to that from equivalent-area closely-spaced rows of holes, but the mixing is slower for the 2-D slots. Calculated mean temperature profiles downstream of jets from non-circular and double rows of orifices, made using an extension developed for a previous empirical model, are shown to be in good agreement with the measured distributions.

  12. Experiments in dilution jet mixing - Effects of multiple rows and non-circular orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.; Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E. B.; Meyers, G. D.; White, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and empirical model results are presented that extend previous studies of the mixing of single-sided and opposed rows of jets in a confined duct flow to include effects of non-circular orifices and double rows of jets. Analysis of the mean temperature data obtained in this investigation showed that the effects of orifice shape and double rows are significant only in the region close to the injection plane, provided that the orifices are symmetric with respect to the main flow direction. The penetration and mixing of jets from 45-degree slanted slots is slightly less than that from equivalent-area symmetric orifices. The penetration from two-dimensional slots is similar to that from equivalent-area closely-spaced rows of holes, but the mixing is slower for the 2-D slots. Calculated mean temperature profiles downstream of jets from non-circular and double rows of orifices, made using an extension developed for a previous empirical model, are shown to be in good agreement with the measured distributions.

  13. Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China.

    PubMed

    Allison, Kirk C; Caplan, Arthur; Shapiro, Michael E; Els, Charl; Paul, Norbert W; Li, Huige

    2015-12-03

    In December 2014, China announced that only voluntarily donated organs from citizens would be used for transplantation after January 1, 2015. Many medical professionals worldwide believe that China has stopped using organs from death-row prisoners. In the present article, we briefly review the historical development of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China and comprehensively analyze the social-political background and the legal basis of the announcement. The announcement was not accompanied by any change in organ sourcing legislations or regulations. As a fact, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China. Even after January 2015, key Chinese transplant officials have repeatedly stated that death-row prisoners have the same right as regular citizens to "voluntarily donate" organs. This perpetuates an unethical organ procurement system in ongoing violation of international standards. Organ sourcing from death-row prisoners has not stopped in China. The 2014 announcement refers to the intention to stop the use of organs illegally harvested without the consent of the prisoners. Prisoner organs procured with "consent" are now simply labelled as "voluntarily donations from citizens". The semantic switch may whitewash sourcing from both death-row prisoners and prisoners of conscience. China can gain credibility only by enacting new legislation prohibiting use of prisoner organs and by making its organ sourcing system open to international inspections. Until international ethical standards are transparently met, sanctions should remain.

  14. [Rotator cuff repair: single- vs double-row. Clinical and biomechanical results].

    PubMed

    Baums, M H; Kostuj, T; Klinger, H-M; Papalia, R

    2016-02-01

    The goal of rotator cuff repair is a high initial mechanical stability as a requirement for adequate biological recovery of the tendon-to-bone complex. Notwithstanding the significant increase in publications concerning the topic of rotator cuff repair, there are still controversies regarding surgical technique. The aim of this work is to present an overview of the recently published results of biomechanical and clinical studies on rotator cuff repair using single- and double-row techniques. The review is based on a selective literature research of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Database on the subject of the clinical and biomechanical results of single- and double-row repair. In general, neither the biomechanical nor the clinical evidence can recommend the use of a double-row concept for the treatment for every rotator cuff tear. Only tears of more than 3 cm seem to benefit from better results on both imaging and in clinical outcome studies compared with the use of single-row techniques. Despite a significant increase in publications on the surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears in recent years, the clinical results were not significantly improved in the literature so far. Unique information and algorithms, from which the optimal treatment of this entity can be derived, are still inadequate. Because of the cost-effectiveness and the currently vague evidence, the double-row techniques cannot be generally recommended for the repair of all rotator cuff tears.

  15. Testing functional and morphological interpretations of enamel thickness along the deciduous tooth row in human children.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The significance of a gradient in enamel thickness along the human permanent molar row has been debated in the literature. Some attribute increased enamel thickness from first to third molars to greater bite force during chewing. Others argue that thicker third molar enamel relates to a smaller crown size facilitated by a reduced dentin component. Thus, differences in morphology, not function, explains enamel thickness. This study draws on these different interpretive models to assess enamel thickness along the entire human deciduous tooth row. Average enamel thickness (AET), the area and proportion of crown enamel and dentin, and a crown size proxy are calculated for incisors, canines, and molars. Allometric scaling relationships are assessed within each tooth class, and then comparisons are undertaken along the row. Generally, AET was correlated with crown size and scaled with isometry, except for second molars which scaled with positive allometry. Mean AET increased along the row and was greater on molars, where bite forces are reported to be higher. Second molars combined the largest crown size with the thickest enamel and the smallest proportion of dentin, which is consistent with a reduction in the potential for cusp fracture under high bite forces. Resistance to wear may also account for some enamel thickness variation between tooth classes. Dental reduction did not explain the trend in AET from central to lateral incisors, or from first to second molars. The gradient in AET along the deciduous tooth row is partly consistent with a functional interpretation of enamel thickness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Compensated Row-Column Ultrasound Imaging System Using Fisher Tippett Multilayered Conditional Random Field Model

    PubMed Central

    Ben Daya, Ibrahim; Chen, Albert I. H.; Shafiee, Mohammad Javad; Wong, Alexander; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    3-D ultrasound imaging offers unique opportunities in the field of non destructive testing that cannot be easily found in A-mode and B-mode images. To acquire a 3-D ultrasound image without a mechanically moving transducer, a 2-D array can be used. The row column technique is preferred over a fully addressed 2-D array as it requires a significantly lower number of interconnections. Recent advances in 3-D row-column ultrasound imaging systems were largely focused on sensor design. However, these imaging systems face three intrinsic challenges that cannot be addressed by improving sensor design alone: speckle noise, sparsity of data in the imaged volume, and the spatially dependent point spread function of the imaging system. In this paper, we propose a compensated row-column ultrasound image reconstruction system using Fisher-Tippett multilayered conditional random field model. Tests carried out on both simulated and real row-column ultrasound images show the effectiveness of our proposed system as opposed to other published systems. Visual assessment of the results show our proposed system’s potential at preserving detail and reducing speckle. Quantitative analysis shows that our proposed system outperforms previously published systems when evaluated with metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Coefficient of Correlation, and Effective Number of Looks. These results show the potential of our proposed system as an effective tool for enhancing 3-D row-column imaging. PMID:26658577

  17. Influence of the initial rupture size and tendon subregion on three-dimensional biomechanical properties of single-row and double-row rotator cuff reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O; Pape, D; Raber, F; Busch, L C; Kohn, D; Kieb, M

    2012-11-01

    Influence of the initial rotator cuff tear size and of different subregions of the SSP tendon on the cyclic loading behavior of a modified single-row reconstruction compared to a suture-bridging double-row repair. Artificial tears (25 and 35 mm) were created in the rotator cuff of 24 human cadaver shoulders. The reconstructions were performed as a single-row repair (SR) using a modified suture configuration or a suture-bridge double-row repair (DR). Radiostereometric analysis was used under cyclic loading (50 cycles, 10–180 N, 10–250 N) to calculate cyclic displacement in three different planes (anteroposterior (x), craniocaudal (y) and mediolateral (z) level). Cyclic displacement was recorded, and differences in cyclic displacement of the anterior compared to the posterior subregions of the tendon were calculated. In small-to-medium tears (25 mm) and medium-to-large tears (35 mm), significant lower cyclic displacement was seen for the SR-reconstruction compared to the DR-repair at 180 N (p ≤ 0.0001; p = 0.001) and 250 N (p = 0.001; p = 0.007) in the x-level. These results were confirmed in the y-level at 180 N (p = 0.001; p = 0.0022) and 250 N (p = 0.005; p = 0.0018). Comparison of the initial tear sizes demonstrated significant differences in cyclic displacement for the DR technique in the x-level at 180 N (p = 0.002) and 250 N (p = 0.004). Comparison of the anterior versus the posterior subregion of the tendon revealed significant lower gap formation in the posterior compared to the anterior subregions in the x-level for both tested rotator cuff repairs (p ≤ 0.05). The tested single-row repair using a modified suture configuration achieved superior results in three-dimensional measurements of cyclic displacement compared to the tested double-row suture-bridge repair. The results were dependent on the initial rupture size of the rotator cuff tear. Furthermore, significant differences were found between tendon subregions of the rotator cuff with

  18. Management of complex abdominal wall defects associated with penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Arul, G Suren; Sonka, B J; Lundy, J B; Rickard, R F; Jeffery, S L A

    2015-03-01

    The paradigm of Damage Control Surgery (DCS) has radically improved the management of abdominal trauma, but less well described are the options for managing the abdominal wall itself in an austere environment. This article describes a series of patients with complex abdominal wall problems managed at the UK-led Role 3 Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan. Contemporaneous review of a series of patients with complex abdominal wall injuries who presented to the Role 3 MTF between July and November 2012. Five patients with penetrating abdominal trauma associated with significant damage to the abdominal wall were included. All patients were managed using DCS principles, leaving the abdominal wall open at the end of the first procedure. Subsequent management of the abdominal wall was determined by a multidisciplinary team of general and plastic surgeons, intensivists and specialist nurses. The principles of management identified included minimising tissue loss on initial laparotomy by joining adjacent wounds and marginal debridement of dead tissue; contraction of the abdominal wall was minimised by using topical negative pressure dressing and dermal-holding sutures. Definitive closure was timed to allow oedema to settle and sepsis to be controlled. Closure techniques include delayed primary closure with traction sutures, components separation, and mesh closure with skin grafting. A daily multidisciplinary team discussion was invaluable for optimal decision making regarding the most appropriate means of abdominal closure. Dermal-holding sutures were particularly useful in preventing myostatic contraction of the abdominal wall. A simple flow chart was developed to aid decision making in these patients. This flow chart may prove especially useful in a resource-limited environment in which returning months or years later for closure of a large ventral hernia may not be possible. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use

  19. Relation of Pericardial Fat, Intrathoracic Fat, and Abdominal Visceral Fat with Incident Atrial Fibrillation (From the Framingham Heart Study)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jane J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Hoffmann, Udo; Fox, Caroline S.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF). Different fat depots may have differential associations with cardiac pathology. We examined the longitudinal associations between pericardial, intrathoracic, and visceral fat with incident AF. We studied Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation Cohorts who participated in the multi-detector computed tomography sub-study examination 1. We constructed multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models for risk of incident AF. Body mass index (BMI) was included in the multivariable-adjusted model as a secondary adjustment. We included 2,135 participants (53.3% women; mean age 58.8 years). During a median follow-up of 9.7 years, we identified 162 cases of incident AF. Across the increasing tertiles of pericardial fat volume, age- and sex-adjusted incident AF rate per 1000 person-years of follow-up were 8.4, 7.5, and 10.2. Based on an age- and sex-adjusted model, greater pericardial fat [hazard ratio (HR) 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.34] and intrathoracic fat (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.45) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. The HRs (95% CI) for incident AF were 1.13 (0.99-1.30) for pericardial fat, 1.19 (1.01-1.40) for intrathoracic fat, and 1.09 (0.93-1.28) for abdominal visceral fat after multivariable adjustment. After additional adjustment of BMI, none of the associations remained significant (all p>0.05). Our findings suggest that cardiac ectopic fat depots may share common risk factors with AF, which may have led to a lack of independence in the association between pericardial fat with incident AF. PMID:27666172

  20. Predictors of abdominal injuries in blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Farrath, Samiris; Parreira, José Gustavo; Perlingeiro, Jacqueline A G; Solda, Silvia C; Assef, José Cesar

    2012-01-01

    To identify predictors of abdominal injuries in victims of blunt trauma. retrospective analysis of trauma protocols (collected prospectively) of adult victims of blunt trauma in a period of 15 months. Variables were compared between patients with abdominal injuries (AIS>0) detected by computed tomography or/and laparotomy (group I) and others (AIS=0, group II). Student's t, Fisher and qui-square tests were used for statistical analysis, considering p<0.05 as significant. A total of 3783 cases were included, with a mean age of 39.1 ± 17.7 years (14-99), 76.1% being male. Abdominal injuries were detected in 130 patients (3.4%). Patients sustaining abdominal injuries had significantly lower mean age (35.4 + 15.4 vs. 39.2 + 17.7), lower mean systolic blood pressure on admission (114.7 + 32.4 mmHg vs. 129.1 + 21.7 mmHg), lower mean Glasgow coma scale (12.9 + 3.9 vs. 14.3 + 2.0), as well as higher head AIS (0.95 + 1.5 vs. 0.67 + 1.1), higher thorax AIS (1.10 + 1.5 vs. 0.11 + 0.6) and higher extremities AIS (1.70 ± 1.8 vs. 1.03 ± 1.2). Patients sustaining abdominal injuries also presented higher frequency of severe injuries (AIS>3) in head (18.5% vs. 7.9%), thorax (29.2% vs. 2.4%) and extremities (40.0% vs. 13.7%). The highest odds ratios for the diagnosis of abdominal injuries were associated flail chest (21.8) and pelvic fractures (21.0). Abdominal injuries were more frequently observed in patients with hemodynamic instability, changes in Glasgow coma scale and severe lesions to the head, chest and extremities.

  1. [Implementationof a low FODMAP dietforfunctional abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Baranguán Castro, María Luisa; Ros Arnal, Ignacio; García Romero, Ruth; Rodríguez Martínez, Gerardo; Ubalde Sainz, Eduardo

    2018-04-20

    The low FODMAP diet (fermentable oligosaccharides, monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polyols) has shown to be effective in adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome, but there are few studies on paediatric patients. The aim of this study is to assess the implementation and the outcomes of a low FODMAP diet in the treatment of functional abdominal pain in children from a Mediterranean area. A table was designed in which foods were classified according to their FODMAP content, as well as a 'Symptoms and Stools Diary'. A prospective study was conducted on children with functional abdominal pain in our Paediatric Gastroenterology Unit. A total of 22 patients were enrolled in the trial, and 20 completed it. Data were collected of the abdominal pain features over a period of 3 days, and then patients followed a two-week low FODMAP diet. Afterwards, information about abdominal pain features was collected again. After the diet, they showed fewer daily abdominal pain episodes compared to baseline (1.16 [IQR: 0.41-3.33] versus 2 [IQR: 1.33-6.33] daily episodes, P=.024), less pain severity compared to baseline (1.41cm [IQR: 0.32-5.23] versus 4.63cm [IQR: 2.51-6.39] measured by 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale, P=.035), less interference with daily activities, and less gastrointestinal symptoms. Only 15% of patients found it difficult to follow the diet. The implementation of a low FODMAP diet for 2 weeks in a Mediterranean paediatric population diagnosed with functional abdominal pain is possible with adapted diets. It was highly valued by patients, and they showed an improvement in abdominal pain symptoms assessed by objective methods. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  2. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  3. On the Mixing of Single and Opposed Rows of Jets With a Confined Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.; Lear, William E.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were 1) to demonstrate that contour plots could be made using the data interface in the NASA GRC jet-in-crossflow (JIC) spreadsheet, and 2) to investigate the suitability of using superposition for the case of opposed rows of jets with their centerlines in-line. The current report is similar to NASA/TM-2005-213137 but the "basic" effects of a confined JIC that are shown in profile plots there are shown as contour plots in this report, and profile plots for opposed rows of aligned jets are presented here using both symmetry and superposition models. Although superposition was found to be suitable for most cases of opposed rows of jets with jet centerlines in-line, the calculation procedure in the JIC spreadsheet was not changed and it still uses the symmetry method for this case, as did all previous publications of the NASA empirical model.

  4. Chronic abdominal wall pain and ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration: a case series.

    PubMed

    Kanakarajan, Saravanakumar; High, Kristina; Nagaraja, Ravi

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain occurs in about 10-30% of patients presenting with chronic abdominal pain. Entrapment of abdominal cutaneous nerves at the lateral border of the rectus abdominis muscle has been attributed as a cause of abdominal wall pain. We report our experience of treating such patients using ultrasound-guided abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration. We conducted a retrospective audit of abdominal cutaneous nerve infiltration performed in the period between September 2008 to August 2009 in our center. All patients had received local anesthetic and steroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The response to the infiltration was evaluated in the post-procedure telephone review as well as in the follow-up clinic. Brief pain inventory (BPI) and numerical rating scale pain scores were collated from two points: the initial outpatient clinic and the follow up clinic up to 5 months following the injection. Nine patients had abdominal cutaneous nerve injections under ultrasound guidance in the period under review. Six patients reported 50% pain relief or more (responders) while three patients did not. Pain and BPI scores showed a decreasing trend in responders. The median duration of follow-up was 12 weeks. Ultrasound can reliably be used for infiltration of the abdominal cutaneous nerves. This will improve the safety as well as diagnostic utility of the procedure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in pediatrics. A review.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Farah Chedly; Ejike, Janeth Chiaka

    2017-10-01

    To consolidate pediatric intensivists' understanding of the pathophysiology, definition, incidence, monitoring, and management of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS); and to highlight the characteristics related to the pediatric population. This is a narrative review article that utilized a systematic search of the medical literature published in the English language between January 1990 and august 2016. Studies were identified by conducting a comprehensive search of Pub Med databases. Search terms included "intra-abdominal hypertension and child", "intra-abdominal hypertension and pediatrics", "abdominal compartment syndrome and child", and "abdominal compartment syndrome and pediatrics". Intra-abdominal hypertension and ACS are associated with a number of pathophysiological disturbances and increased morbidity and mortality. These conditions have been well described in critically ill adults. In children, the IAH and the ACS have a reported incidence of 13% and 0.6 to 10% respectively; they carry similar prognostic impact but are still under-diagnosed and under-recognized by pediatric health care providers. Intra-abdominal hypertension and ACS are conditions that are regularly encountered in critically ill children. They are associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition, prevention and timely management of this critical condition are necessary to improve its outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of Blade-row Flow Distributions in Axial-flow-compressor Stage Consisting of Guide Vanes and Rotor-blade Row

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, John J; Dugan, Paul D; Budinger, Raymond E; Goelzer, H Fred

    1950-01-01

    A 30-inch tip-diameter axial-flow compressor stage was investigated with and without rotor to determine individual blade-row performance, interblade-row effects, and outer-wall boundary-layer conditions. Velocity gradients at guide-vane outlet without rotor approximated design assumptions, when the measured variation of leaving angle was considered. With rotor in operation, Mach number and rotor-blade effects changed flow distribution leaving guide vanes and invalidated design assumption of radial equilibrium. Rotor-blade performance correlated interpolated two-dimensional results within 2 degrees, although tip stall was indicated in experimental and not two-dimensional results. Boundary-displacement thickness was less than 1.0 and 1.5 percent of passage height after guide vanes and after rotor, respectively, but increased rapidly after rotor when tip stall occurred.

  7. Arthroscopic single-row modified mason-allen repair versus double-row suture bridge reconstruction for supraspinatus tendon tears: a matched-pair analysis.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Christian; Hug, Konstantin; Pauly, Stephan; Marnitz, Tim; Scheibel, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Arthroscopic double-row fixation of supraspinatus tendon tears compared with single-row techniques is still a matter of debate. Arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair using the suture bridge technique provides better clinical results and lower retear rates than does single-row repair using a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique. Cohort study; Level of evidence 3. Forty patients underwent either an arthroscopic single-row modified Mason-Allen stitch (SR) (n = 20; mean age ± SD, 61.5 ± 7.4 y) or a modified suture bridge double-row repair (DR) (n = 20; age, 61.2 ± 7.5 y). The anteroposterior extension was classified as Bateman I in 10% and Bateman II in 90% of patients in the SR group and as Bateman II in 80% and Bateman III in 20% of patients in the DR group. Patients were matched for sex and age. The subjective shoulder value (SSV), Constant-Murley score (CS), and Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) were used for clinical follow-up. Furthermore, MRI scans were conducted for analysis of tendon integrity, muscle atrophy, and fatty infiltration via semiquantitative signal intensity analysis. In addition, re-defect patterns were evaluated. The mean follow-up time in the SR group was 16.8 ± 4.6 months. The mean SSV was 91.0% ± 8.8%, mean CS was 82.2 ± 8.1 (contralateral side, 88.8 ± 5.3), and mean WORC score was 96.5% ± 3.2%. The mean follow-up time in the DR group was 23.4 ± 2.9 months, with patients achieving scores of 92.9% ± 9.6% for the SSV, 77.0 ± 8.6 for the CS (contralateral side, 76.7 ± 17.1), and 90.7% ± 12.6% for the WORC (P > .05). No significant differences were detected in the clinical outcome between groups. Tendon integrity was as follows. Type 1, none in either group; type 2, 4 SR and 5 DR; type 3, 9 SR and 10 DR; type 4, 3 SR and 3 DR; and type 5, 3 SR and 2 DR. The failure rate was 31.6% (n = 6) in the SR group and 25% (n = 5) in the DR group (P > .05). No significant differences were obtained for muscular atrophy or fatty

  8. Girls in the boat: Sex differences in rowing performance and participation.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kevin G; Senefeld, Jonathon W; Hunter, Sandra K

    2018-01-01

    Men outperform women in many athletic endeavors due to physiological and anatomical differences (e.g. larger and faster muscle); however, the observed sex differences in elite athletic performance are typically larger than expected, and may reflect sex-related differences in opportunity or incentives. As collegiate rowing in the United States has been largely incentivized for women over the last 20 years, but not men, the purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in elite rowing performance over that timeframe. Finishing times from grand finale races for collegiate championship on-water performances (n = 480) and junior indoor performances (n = 1,280) were compared between men and women across 20 years (1997-2016), weight classes (heavy vs. lightweight) and finishing place. Participation of the numbers of men and women rowers were also quantified across years. Men were faster than women across all finishing places, weight classes and years of competition and performance declined across finishing place for both men and women (P<0.001). Interestingly, the reduction in performance time across finishing place was greater (P<0.001) for collegiate men compared to women in the heavyweight division. This result is opposite to other sports (e.g. running and swimming), and to lightweight rowing in this study, which provides women fewer incentives than in heavyweight rowing. Correspondingly, participation in collegiate rowing has increased by ~113 women per year (P<0.001), with no change (P = 0.899) for collegiate men. These results indicate that increased participation and incentives within collegiate rowing for women vs. men contribute to sex differences in athletic performance.

  9. Girls in the boat: Sex differences in rowing performance and participation

    PubMed Central

    Senefeld, Jonathon W.; Hunter, Sandra K.

    2018-01-01

    Men outperform women in many athletic endeavors due to physiological and anatomical differences (e.g. larger and faster muscle); however, the observed sex differences in elite athletic performance are typically larger than expected, and may reflect sex-related differences in opportunity or incentives. As collegiate rowing in the United States has been largely incentivized for women over the last 20 years, but not men, the purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in elite rowing performance over that timeframe. Finishing times from grand finale races for collegiate championship on-water performances (n = 480) and junior indoor performances (n = 1,280) were compared between men and women across 20 years (1997–2016), weight classes (heavy vs. lightweight) and finishing place. Participation of the numbers of men and women rowers were also quantified across years. Men were faster than women across all finishing places, weight classes and years of competition and performance declined across finishing place for both men and women (P<0.001). Interestingly, the reduction in performance time across finishing place was greater (P<0.001) for collegiate men compared to women in the heavyweight division. This result is opposite to other sports (e.g. running and swimming), and to lightweight rowing in this study, which provides women fewer incentives than in heavyweight rowing. Correspondingly, participation in collegiate rowing has increased by ~113 women per year (P<0.001), with no change (P = 0.899) for collegiate men. These results indicate that increased participation and incentives within collegiate rowing for women vs. men contribute to sex differences in athletic performance. PMID:29352279

  10. Editorial Commentary: "Knot" Less Strength at Half the Cost-Is It Time to Abandon Medial Row Anchors in Shoulder Double-Row Rotator Cuff Repair?

    PubMed

    Sherman, Seth L

    2018-01-01

    Transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair is an expensive construct that has demonstrated biomechanical superiority when compared with other rotator cuff repair techniques. A novel transosseous knotless repair that substitutes medial row anchors for a transosseous tunnel rivals the biomechanical advantages of transosseous equivalent rotator cuff repair at half the cost and with reduced dependence on bone quality. Surgeons should carefully consider if "knotless transosseous is more." Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intra-abdominal pressure: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Milanesi, Rafaela; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing request for measuring intra-abdominal pressure in critically ill patients with acute abdominal pain to be clarified. Summarizing the research results on measurement of vesical intra-abdominal pressure and analyzing the level of evidence were the purposes of this integrative literature review, carried out based on the databases LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, from 2005 to July 2012. Twenty articles were identified, in that, 12 literature reviews, 4 descriptive and exploratory studies, 2 expert opinions, one prospective cohort study and one was an experience report. The vesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement was considered gold standard. There are variations in the technique however, but some common points were identified: complete supine position, in absence of abdominal contracture, in the end of expiration and expressed in mmHg. Most research results indicate keeping the transducer zeroed at the level of the mid-axillary line at the iliac crest level, and instill 25mL of sterile saline. Strong evidence must be developed. RESUMO Em pacientes críticos com quadros abdominais agudos a esclarecer é crescente a solicitação da aferição da pressão intra-abdominal. Sintetizar resultados de pesquisas sobre a mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal pela via vesical e analisar o nível de evidência foram os objetivos desta revisão integrativa da literatura, realizada nas bases LILACS, MEDLINE e PubMed, no período de 2005 a julho de 2012. Identificaram-se 20 artigos, sendo 12 revisões de literatura, 4 estudos exploratório-descritivos, 2 opiniões de especialistas, 1 estudo de coorte prospectivo e 1 relato de experiência. O método vesical para mensuração da pressão intra-abdominal foi considerado padrão-ouro. Existem variações na técnica, entretanto pontos em comum foram identificados: posição supina completa, na ausência de contratura abdominal, ao final da expiração e expressa em mmHg. A maioria indica posicionar o ponto zero do

  12. Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) preprocessing program (PREROWS2.EXE). User's manual and program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum is a user's manual with additional program documentation for the computer program PREROWS2.EXE. PREROWS2 works with data collected by an ocean wave spectrometer that uses radar (ROWS) as an active remote sensor. The original ROWS data acquisition subsystem was replaced with a PC in 1990. PREROWS2.EXE is a compiled QuickBasic 4.5 program that unpacks the recorded data, displays various variables, and provides for copying blocks of data from the original 8mm tape to a PC file.

  13. Locomotion on the water surface: hydrodynamic constraints on rowing velocity require a gait change

    PubMed

    Suter; Wildman

    1999-10-01

    Fishing spiders, Dolomedes triton (Araneae, Pisauridae), propel themselves across the water surface using two gaits: they row with four legs at sustained velocities below 0.2 m s(-)(1) and they gallop with six legs at sustained velocities above 0.3 m s(-)(1). Because, during rowing, most of the horizontal thrust is provided by the drag of the leg and its associated dimple as both move across the water surface, the integrity of the dimple is crucial. We used a balance, incorporating a biaxial clinometer as the transducer, to measure the horizontal thrust forces on a leg segment subjected to water moving past it in non-turbulent flow. Changes in the horizontal forces reflected changes in the status of the dimple and showed that a stable dimple could exist only under conditions that combined low flow velocity, shallow leg-segment depth and a long perimeter of the interface between the leg segment and the water. Once the dimple disintegrated, leaving the leg segment submerged, less drag was generated. Therefore, the disintegration of the dimple imposes a limit on the efficacy of rowing with four legs. The limited degrees of freedom in the leg joints (the patellar joints move freely in the vertical plane but allow only limited flexion in other planes) impose a further constraint on rowing by restricting the maximum leg-tip velocity (to approximately 33 % of that attained by the same legs during galloping). This confines leg-tip velocities to a range at which maintenance of the dimple is particularly important. The weight of the spider also imposes constraints on the efficacy of rowing: because the drag encountered by the leg-cum-dimple is proportional to the depth of the dimple and because dimple depth is proportional to the supported weight, only spiders with a mass exceeding 0.48 g can have access to the full range of hydrodynamically possible dimple depths during rowing. Finally, the maximum velocity attainable during rowing is constrained by the substantial drag

  14. Segmentation of images of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Kamath, Markad V; Noseworthy, Michael D; Boylan, Colm; Poehlman, Skip

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation, which is, the delineation of organ areas in the abdomen, plays an important role in the process of radiological evaluation. Attempts to automate segmentation of abdominal organs will aid radiologists who are required to view thousands of images daily. This review outlines the current state-of-the-art semi-automated and automated methods used to segment abdominal organ regions from computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MEI), and ultrasound images. Segmentation methods generally fall into three categories: pixel based, region based and boundary tracing. While pixel-based methods classify each individual pixel, region-based methods identify regions with similar properties. Boundary tracing is accomplished by a model of the image boundary. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of the above algorithms with an emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages for abdominal organ segmentation. Several evaluation metrics that compare machine-based segmentation with that of an expert (radiologist) are identified and examined. Finally, features based on intensity as well as the texture of a small region around a pixel are explored. This review concludes with a discussion of possible future trends for abdominal organ segmentation.

  15. Intra-abdominal pressure: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Milanesi, Rafaela; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is a growing request for measuring intra-abdominal pressure in critically ill patients with acute abdominal pain to be clarified. Summarizing the research results on measurement of vesical intra-abdominal pressure and analyzing the level of evidence were the purposes of this integrative literature review, carried out based on the databases LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, from 2005 to July 2012. Twenty articles were identified, in that, 12 literature reviews, 4 descriptive and exploratory studies, 2 expert opinions, one prospective cohort study and one was an experience report. The vesical intra-abdominal pressure measurement was considered gold standard. There are variations in the technique however, but some common points were identified: complete supine position, in absence of abdominal contracture, in the end of expiration and expressed in mmHg. Most research results indicate keeping the transducer zeroed at the level of the mid-axillary line at the iliac crest level, and instill 25mL of sterile saline. Strong evidence must be developed. PMID:26958978

  16. Abdominal Wall Desmoid during Pregnancy: Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Awwad, Johnny; Hammoud, Nadine; Farra, Chantal; Fares, Farah; Abi Saad, George; Ghazeeri, Ghina

    2013-01-01

    Background. Desmoids are benign tumors, with local invasive features and no metastatic potential, which have rarely been described to be pregnancy associated. Case. We described the rapid growth of an anterior abdominal wall mass in a 40-year-old pregnant woman. Due to its close proximity to the enlarged uterus, it was misdiagnosed to be a uterine leiomyoma by ultrasound examination. Final tissue diagnosis and radical resection were done at the time of abdominal delivery. Conclusion. Due to the diagnostic limitations of imaging techniques, desmoids should always be considered when the following manifestations are observed in combination: progressive growth of a solitary abdominal wall mass during pregnancy and well-delineated smooth tumor margins demonstrated by imaging techniques. This case emphasizes the importance of entertaining uncommon medical conditions in the differential diagnosis of seemingly common clinical manifestations. PMID:23346436

  17. Bioprosthetic Mesh in Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesh materials have undergone a considerable evolution over the last several decades. There has been enhancement of biomechanical properties, improvement in manufacturing processes, and development of antiadhesive laminate synthetic meshes. The evolution of bioprosthetic mesh materials has markedly changed our indications and methods for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. The authors review the optimal properties of bioprosthetic mesh materials, their evolution over time, and their indications for use. The techniques to optimize outcomes are described using bioprosthetic mesh for complex abdominal wall reconstruction. Bioprosthetic mesh materials clearly have certain advantages over other implantable mesh materials in select indications. Appropriate patient selection and surgical technique are critical to the successful use of bioprosthetic materials for abdominal wall repair. PMID:23372454

  18. Modified Multivisceral Transplant After Acute Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Alaa Eldin, Ahmed; Aliakbarian, Mohsen; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Gholami, Siavash; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-04-01

    A 50-year-old man sustained blunt abdominal trauma in a motor vehicle accident. He underwent exploratory laparotomy on the day of trauma, and severe bleeding from the base of the small bowel mesentery was controlled by mass ligation and through-and-through suturing. After transfer to our center, repeat exploratory laparotomy showed ischemic small intestine, ischemic right colon, and severe pancreatic trauma. The severely injured organs were excised including the entire small bowel, pancreas, spleen, stomach, and right hemicolon. The next day, a modified multivisceral transplant was performed including stomach, pancreaticoduodenal complex, and small bowel transplant. Postoperative complications included an intra-abdominal collection that was drained percutaneously with ultrasonographic guidance and severe rejection that was treated with anti-thymocyte globulin. In summary, for select patients who have severe abdominal trauma may be treated with acute multivisceral transplant.

  19. Extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma of the abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, L. Ben; Ghariani, B.; Rabeh, A.; Dali, N.; Said, W.; Hendaoui, L.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Ewing sarcoma is most commonly a bone tumour which has usually extended into the soft tissues at the time of diagnosis. Exceptionally, this tumour can have an extraskeletal origin. Clinical or imaging findings are non-specific and diagnosis is based on histology. We report a case of an extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma developed in the soft tissues of the abdominal wall in a 35-year-old woman who presented a painful abdominal wall tumefaction. Ultrasongraphy and computed tomography showed a large, well-defined soft tissue mass developed in the left anterolateral muscle group of the abdominal wall. Surgical biopsy was performed and an extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma was identified histologically. PMID:18818133

  20. [Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children].

    PubMed

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-12-01

    To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos/SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-0 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Plain abdominal radiography in acute abdominal pain; past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gans, Sarah L; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that a diagnosis based solely on a patient’s medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests is not reliable enough, despite the fact that these aspects are essential parts of the workup of a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. Traditionally, imaging workup starts with abdominal radiography. However, numerous studies have demonstrated low sensitivity and accuracy for plain abdominal radiography in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain as well as various specific diseases such as perforated viscus, bowel obstruction, ingested foreign body, and ureteral stones. Computed tomography, and in particular computed tomography after negative ultrasonography, provides a better workup than plain abdominal radiography alone. The benefits of computed tomography lie in decision-making for management, planning of a surgical strategy, and possibly even avoidance of negative laparotomies. Based on abundant available evidence, major advances in diagnostic imaging, and changes in the management of certain diseases, we can conclude that there is no place for plain abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute abdominal pain presenting in the emergency department in current practice. PMID:22807640

  2. Automated anatomical labeling method for abdominal arteries extracted from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Hoang, Bui Huy; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents an automated anatomical labeling method of abdominal arteries. In abdominal surgery, understanding of blood vessel structure concerning with a target organ is very important. Branching pattern of blood vessels differs among individuals. It is required to develop a system that can assist understanding of a blood vessel structure and anatomical names of blood vessels of a patient. Previous anatomical labbeling methods for abdominal arteries deal with either of the upper or lower abdominal arteries. In this paper, we present an automated anatomical labeling method of both of the upper and lower abdominal arteries extracted from CT images. We obtain a tree structure of artery regions and calculate feature values for each branch. These feature values include the diameter, curvature, direction, and running vectors of a branch. Target arteries of this method are grouped based on branching conditions. The following processes are separately applied for each group. We compute candidate artery names by using classifiers that are trained to output artery names. A correction process of the candidate anatomical names based on the rule of majority is applied to determine final names. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of 3D abdominal CT images. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is able to perform nomenclature of entire major abdominal arteries. The recall and the precision rates of labeling are 79.01% and 80.41%, respectively.

  3. 30 CFR 285.315 - What deposits are required for a competitive ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ROW grant or RUE grant? 285.315 Section 285.315 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Financial Requirements for Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.315 What deposits are...

  4. 30 CFR 285.303 - How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant remain in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in effect? 285.303 Section 285.303 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.303 How long will my ROW grant or RUE grant...

  5. 30 CFR 285.302 - What are the general requirements for ROW grant and RUE grant holders?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and RUE grant holders? 285.302 Section 285.302 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.302 What are the general requirements for ROW...

  6. Considerations for site-specific implementation of active downforce and seeding depth technologies on row-crop planters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planter technology continues to rapidly advance including row-by-row control of parameters such as applied downforce and seeding depth that permit real-time adjustment to varying field conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship of seeding depth and applied downfo...

  7. In vitro comparison of intra-abdominal hypertension development after different temporary abdominal closure techniques.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Emanuel; Labler, Ludwig; Seifert, Burkhardt; Trentz, Otmar; Menger, Michael D; Meier, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    To compare volume reserve capacity (VRC) and development of intra-abdominal hypertension after different in vitro temporary abdominal closure (TAC) techniques. A model of the abdomen was designed. The abdominal wall was simulated with polychloroprene, a synthetic rubber compound. A lentil-shaped defect of 150 cm(2) was cut into the anterior aspect of the abdominal wall. TAC of this defect was performed by a zipper system (ZS), a bag silo closure (BSC), or a vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with subatmospheric pressures ranging from 0- to 200 mmHg. The model with intact abdominal wall served as reference. The model was filled with water to baseline level. The intra-abdominal pressure was increased in 2 mmHg steps from baseline level (6 mmHg) to 40 mmHg by adding volume to the system according to a standardized protocol. VRC with corresponding intra-abdominal pressure were analyzed and compared for the different TAC techniques. VRC was the highest after BSC at all pressure levels studied (P < 0.05). VAC and ZS resulted in significantly lower VRC compared with BSC and reference (P < 0.05). The magnitude of negative pressure on the VAC did not significantly influence the VRC. In the present in vitro model, BSC demonstrated the highest VRC of all evaluated TAC techniques. Different levels of subatmospheric pressures applied to the VAC did not affect VRC. The results for ZS and VAC indicate that these TAC techniques may increase the risk for recurrent intra-abdominal hypertension and should therefore not be used in high-risk patients during the initial phase after abdominal decompression.

  8. Row width influences wheat yield, but has little effect on wheat quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Growers are interested in wide-row wheat production due to reductions in equipment inventory (lack of grain drill) and to allow intercropping of soybean into wheat. A trial was established during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 growing seasons in Wayne County and Wood County, Ohio to evaluate the effec...

  9. 30 CFR 285.316 - What payments are required for ROW grants or RUE grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RUE grants? 285.316 Section 285.316 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Financial Requirements for Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.316 What payments are...

  10. 30 CFR 585.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....301 Section 585.301 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and...

  11. 30 CFR 585.301 - What do ROW grants and RUE grants include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....301 Section 585.301 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Row Grants and...

  12. 30 CFR 285.309 - When will MMS issue a noncompetitive ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or RUE grant? 285.309 Section 285.309 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING... Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row Grants and Rue Grants § 285.309 When will MMS issue a...

  13. 30 CFR 585.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....305 Section 585.305 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row...

  14. 30 CFR 585.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....305 Section 585.305 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row...

  15. Soil quality parameters for row-crop and grazed pasture systems with agroforestry buffers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Incorporation of trees and establishment of buffers are practices that can improve soil quality. Soil enzyme activities and water stable aggregates are sensitive indices for assessing soil quality by detecting early changes in soil management. However, studies comparing grazed pasture and row crop...

  16. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  17. Leapfrog Diffusion Mechanism for One-Dimensional Chains on Missing-Row Reconstructed Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalenti, F.; Ferrando, R.

    1999-02-01

    We analyze the in-channel diffusion of dimers and longer n-adatom chains on Au and Pt (110) \\(1×2\\) surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations. From our calculations it arises that, on the missing-row reconstructed surface, a novel diffusion process, called leapfrog, dominates over concerted jumps, thus becoming the most frequent diffusion mechanism.

  18. Injury severity data for front and second row passengers in frontal crashes.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Theresa; Leszek Gawarecki; Tavakoli, Massoud

    2016-06-01

    The data contained here were obtained from the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration׳s National Automotive Sampling System - Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 2008-2014. This publically available data set monitors motor vehicle crashes in the United States, using a stratified random sample frame, resulting in information on approximately 5000 crashes each year that can be utilized to create national estimates for crashes. The NASS-CDS data sets document vehicle, crash, and occupant factors. These data can be utilized to examine public health, law enforcement, roadway planning, and vehicle design issues. The data provided in this brief are a subset of crash events and occupants. The crashes provided are exclusively frontal crashes. Within these crashes, only restrained occupants who were seated in the right front seat position or the second row outboard seat positions were included. The front row and second row data sets were utilized to construct occupant pairs crashes where both a right front seat occupant and a second row occupant were available. Both unpaired and paired data sets are provided in this brief.

  19. Injury severity data for front and second row passengers in frontal crashes

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Theresa; Leszek Gawarecki; Tavakoli, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    The data contained here were obtained from the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration׳s National Automotive Sampling System – Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) for the years 2008–2014. This publically available data set monitors motor vehicle crashes in the United States, using a stratified random sample frame, resulting in information on approximately 5000 crashes each year that can be utilized to create national estimates for crashes. The NASS-CDS data sets document vehicle, crash, and occupant factors. These data can be utilized to examine public health, law enforcement, roadway planning, and vehicle design issues. The data provided in this brief are a subset of crash events and occupants. The crashes provided are exclusively frontal crashes. Within these crashes, only restrained occupants who were seated in the right front seat position or the second row outboard seat positions were included. The front row and second row data sets were utilized to construct occupant pairs crashes where both a right front seat occupant and a second row occupant were available. Both unpaired and paired data sets are provided in this brief. PMID:27077084

  20. The Blue Glow from the Back Row: Live Theater and the Wireless Teen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Every year the author and his colleagues take their grade 12 English students to see four plays at one of Canada's major theaters. Chatting about the series on the last day of class, his students asked him if he had seen "the blue glow from the back row." Laughing at his bewilderment, they told him that during the performances so many…

  1. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops in the Midwestern US

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate ‘regulators’ due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observati...

  2. 126. MOTOR CONTROL CENTER 1 (MCC1), FACING NORTH IN ROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. MOTOR CONTROL CENTER 1 (MCC-1), FACING NORTH IN ROW OF ELECTRICAL CABINETS JUST SOUTH OF TRANSFORMER SUBSTATION CABINETS IN TRANSFORMER ROOM (112), LSB (BLDG. 770) - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Row and forage crop rotation effects on maize mineral nutrition and yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extended crop rotations provide many attributes in support of sustainable agriculture. Objectives were to investigate rotations that included row crops and forages in terms of their effects on soil characteristics as well as on maize (Zea mays L.) stover biomass, grain yield, and mineral components...

  4. Effect of skip row planting configuration on grain sorghum water use

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. [Moench]) is grown as a dryland crop in the semi-arid Central Great Plains. Growing the crop in a skip row configuration has been proposed as a means of delaying water use during the vegetative stage such that more water will be available to be used during the more ...

  5. Effects of acoustic feedback training in elite-standard Para-Rowing.

    PubMed

    Schaffert, Nina; Mattes, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Assessment and feedback devices have been regularly used in technique training in high-performance sports. Biomechanical analysis is mainly visually based and so can exclude athletes with visual impairments. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of auditory feedback on mean boat speed during on-water training of visually impaired athletes. The German National Para-Rowing team (six athletes, mean ± s, age 34.8 ± 10.6 years, body mass 76.5 ± 13.5 kg, stature 179.3 ± 8.6 cm) participated in the study. Kinematics included boat acceleration and distance travelled, collected with Sofirow at two intensities of training. The boat acceleration-time traces were converted online into acoustic feedback and presented via speakers during rowing (sections with and without alternately). Repeated-measures within-participant factorial ANOVA showed greater boat speed with acoustic feedback than baseline (0.08 ± 0.01 m·s(-1)). The time structure of rowing cycles was improved (extended time of positive acceleration). Questioning of athletes showed acoustic feedback to be a supportive training aid as it provided important functional information about the boat motion independent of vision. It gave access for visually impaired athletes to biomechanical analysis via auditory information. The concept for adaptive athletes has been successfully integrated into the preparation for the Para-Rowing World Championships and Paralympics.

  6. Pathways to Death Row for America's Disabled Youth: Three Case Studies Driving Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Julie; Guin, Cecile C.; Chaisson, Rebecca; Houchins, David

    2004-01-01

    This article uses the case study method to examine the lives of three youths with disabilities living in the southern part of the United States who have followed a pathway to death row. An empirically established developmental and theoretical framework is used to examine issues related to the influence of disabilities and race on children and…

  7. GIS least-cost analysis approach for siting gas pipeline ROWs

    SciTech Connect

    Sydelko, P.J.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1994-09-01

    Geographic-information-system applications for the siting and monitoring of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) were developed for areas near Rio Vista, California. The data layers developed for this project represent geographic features, such as landcover, elevation, aspect, slope, soils, hydrography, transportation corridors, endangered species habitats, wetlands, and public line surveys. A geographic information system was used to develop and store spatial data from several sources; to manipulate spatial data to evaluate environmental and engineering issues associated with the siting, permitting, construction, maintenance, and monitoring of gas-pipeline ROWS; and to graphically display analysis results. Examples of these applications include (1) determination of environmentallymore » sensitive areas, such as endangered species habitat, wetlands, and areas of highly erosive soils; (2) evaluation of engineering constraints, including shallow depth to bedrock, major hydrographic features, and shallow water table; (3) classification of satellite imagery for landuse/landcover that will affect ROWS; and (4) identification of alternative ROW corridors that avoid environmentally sensitive areas or areas with severe engineering constraints.« less

  8. Using Google SketchUp to simulate tree row azimuth effects on alley shading

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Effect of row azimuth on alley crop illumination is difficult to determine empirically. Our objective was to determine if Google SketchUp (Trimble Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) could be used to simulate effect of azimuth orientation on illumination of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) alleys. Simulations were...

  9. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations, Row Crops and their Relationship to Nitrate in Eastern Iowa Rivers

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, Mark B.; Hornbuckle, Keri C.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) and fertilizer application to row crops may contribute to poor water quality in surface waters. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated nutrient concentrations and fluxes in four Eastern Iowa watersheds sampled between 1996-2004. We found that these watersheds contribute nearly 10% of annual nitrate flux entering the Gulf of Mexico, while representing only 1.5% of the contributing drainage basin. Mass budget analysis shows stream flow to be a major loss of nitrogen (18% of total N output), second only to crop harvest (63%). The major watershed inputs of nitrogen include applied fertilizer for corn (54% of total N input) and nitrogen fixation by soybeans (26%). Despite the relatively small input from animal manure (~5%), the results of spatial analysis indicate that row crop and CAFO densities are significantly and independently correlated to higher nitrate concentration in streams. Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.59 and 0.89 were found between nitrate concentration and row crop and CAFO density, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis produced a correlation for nitrate concentration with an R2 value of 85%. High spatial density of row crops and CAFOs are linked to the highest river nitrate concentrations (up to 15 mg/l normalized over five years). PMID:16749677

  10. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Spanwise angled injection from multiple rows of holes. [gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckey, D. W.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The stagnation region of a cylinder in a cross flow was used in experiments conducted with both a single row and multiple rows of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio with a freestream to wall temperature ratio approximately equal to 1.7 and R(eD) = 90,000. Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, 58.7 deg from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d(o) = 5 and 10. Three multiple row configurations were also investigated. Data are presented for a uniform blowing distribution and for a nonuniform blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply. The data for local Stanton Number reduction demonstrated a lack of lateral spreading by the coolant jets. Heat flux levels larger than those without film cooling were observed directly behind the coolant holes as the blowing ratio exceeded a particular value. The data were spanwise averaged to illustrate the influence of injection location, blowing ratio and hole spacing. The large values of blowing ratio for the blowing distribution simulating a plenum supply resulted in heat flux levels behind the holes in excess of the values without film cooling. An increase in freestream turbulence intensity from 4.4 to 9.5 percent had a negligible effect on the film cooling performance.

  11. The cervical spine of professional front-row rugby players: correlation between degenerative changes and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hogan, B A; Hogan, N A; Vos, P M; Eustace, S J; Kenny, P J

    2010-06-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine (C-spine) are among the most serious in rugby and are well documented. Front-row players are particularly at risk due to repetitive high-intensity collisions in the scrum. This study evaluates degenerative changes of the C-spine and associated symptomatology in front-row rugby players. C-spine radiographs from 14 professional rugby players and controls were compared. Players averaged 23 years of playing competitive rugby. Two consultant radiologists performed a blind review of radiographs evaluating degeneration of disc spaces and apophyseal joints. Clinical status was assessed using a modified AAOS/NASS/COSS cervical spine outcomes questionnaire. Front-row rugby players exhibited significant radiographic evidence of C-spine degenerative changes compared to the non-rugby playing controls (P < 0.005). Despite these findings the rugby players did not exhibit increased symptoms. This highlights the radiologic degenerative changes of the C-spine of front-row rugby players. However, these changes do not manifest themselves clinically or affect activities of daily living.

  12. Water, sediment, and metolachlor transport between wide- and narrow row cotton production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planting cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)] in narrow rather than wide rows could reduce erosion and off-site agrochemical transport, but this hypothesis needs to be evaluated under Mid-South cropping conditions. Field studies were conducted near Stoneville, MS on a Dundee silty clay loam from 2006 t...

  13. Some Half-Row Sums from Pascal's Triangle via Laplace Transforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dence, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents some identities on the sum of the entries in the first half of a row in Pascal's triangle. The results were discovered while the author was working on a problem involving Laplace transforms, which are used in proving of the identities.

  14. 30 CFR 585.305 - How do I request an ROW grant or RUE grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....305 Section 585.305 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Rights-of-Way Grants and Rights-of-Use and Easement Grants for Renewable Energy Activities Obtaining Row...

  15. Crewmember in the middeck exercising on the MK-1 rowing machine (DTO 653).

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-04-20

    STS059-11-014 (9-20 April 1994) --- Astronaut Michael R. (Rich) Clifford, mission specialist, uses the rowing machine temporarily deployed on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's middeck. Many of the crew members put in time on the device during the week and a half mission.

  16. Skip-row Planting Patterns Stabilize Corn Grain Yields in the Central Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The highly variable climate of the Central Great Plains makes dryland corn (Zea mays) production a risky enterprise. Twenty-three field trials were conducted across the Central Great Plains from 2004 through 2006 to quantify the effect of various skip-row planting patterns and plant populations on g...

  17. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE...

  18. Radio/antenna mounting system for wireless networking under row-crop agriculture conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Interest in and deployment of wireless monitoring systems is increasing in many diverse environments, including row-crop agricultural fields. While many studies have been undertaken to evaluate various aspects of wireless monitoring and networking, such as electronic hardware components, data-colle...

  19. Basilar membrane vibration after targeted removal of the third row of OHCs and Deiters cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Anping; Udagawa, Tomokatsu; Raphael, Patrick D.; Cheng, Alan G.; Steele, Charles R.; Applegate, Brian E.; Oghalai, John S.

    2018-05-01

    The mammalian cochlea has three rows of outer hair cells (OHCs) that amplify the basilar membrane (BM) traveling wave with high gain and exquisite sharpness. However, it is unclear why three rows of OHCs are needed to achieve this. We used a novel transgenic mouse with the diphtheria toxin receptor in Lgr5-positive cells (Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mouse) that allowed us to ablate the third row of OHCs and Deiters cells (D) in adulthood via DT injection, after normal cochlear function had developed. We then used volumetric optical coherence tomography (VOCTV) to investigate the impacts of this manipulation of cochlear amplification in the apical turn. As expected, Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ control mice had sharply-tuned vibratory responses. However, Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mice had broad tuning with a 20 dB increase in vibratory thresholds. The Q10dB was ˜1 in Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mice, whereas it was ˜3 in control mice. The characteristic frequency was lower in Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mice compared to controls (7.5 vs. 9.0 kHz). The gain of cochlear amplification was substantially lower in Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mice compared to controls (22 vs. 50). In the post-mortem period, the vibratory responses in Lgr5DTR-EGFP/+ mice were identical to controls. Together, these results demonstrate the substantial importance of the third row of OHCs and Deiters cells to normal cochlear amplification.

  20. 77 FR 60482 - Yankee Atomic Electric Company; Yankee Rowe Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation, Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Company; Yankee Rowe Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation, Staff Evaluation; Exemption 1.0... exemption requests, the NRC staff believes that YAEC should be granted exemptions from the following.... Additional information regarding the NRC (staff) evaluation is documented in a Safety Evaluation Report that...

  1. The impact of fluctuations in boat velocity during the rowing cycle on race time.

    PubMed

    Hill, H; Fahrig, S

    2009-08-01

    In competitive rowing, the fluctuations in boat velocity during the rowing cycle are associated with an increased water resistance of the boat as compared with a boat moving at a constant velocity. We aimed to quantify the influence of the increased water resistance on race time using a mathematical approximation, based on the increase in physiological power being proportional to the 2nd power of boat speed. Biomechanical data (oar force, rowing angle, boat velocity, and boat acceleration) were measured when eight elite coxless pair crews performed a rowing test with a stepwise increasing stroke rate (SR: 20, 24, 28, and 32 min(-1)) that successively increased the mean boat speed. The results revealed a +4.59 s (SR 24.2) to +5.05 s (SR 31.5) 2000-m race-time difference compared with a boat hypothetically moving without velocity fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations were highly correlated with SR (r=0.93) because the accelerations of the rowers' body mass and the mass of the counteracting boat increase with SR. The possibilities to reduce velocity fluctuations and therefore race time are limited. For elite rowers, race time may be slightly reduced by a moderate reduction in SR that is compensated by an increased force output for each stroke.

  2. An analysis of spectral discrimination between corn and soybeans using a row crop reflectance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suits, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Reflectance calculations of soybeans and corn crops at two times during the growing season indicate that the high sensitivity of the thematic mapper mid-infrared band to exposed bare soil between soybean rows is most likely responsible for early season spectral discrimination of corn and soybean crops by this band.

  3. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    although the risk is high in this population of osteoporosis -related bone fracture. This study aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower... Osteoporosis , FES-rowing, zoledronic acid, exercise, bone health 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...9 Introduction Serious spinal cord injury (SCI) causes osteoporosis in the lower extremities, significantly increasing

  4. A Historical Analysis of Library Access for Death Row Inmates in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrolenk, Lisa

    A historical study was conducted to determine what type of access to the prison legal library is received by prisoners now housed on death row at the Mansfield Correctional Institution (MaCI) (Mansfield, Ohio) that were formerly housed at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility (SOCF) (Lucasville, Ohio). A satellite law library had been created…

  5. Registration of ‘Kardia’, a Two-Rowed Spring Food Barley

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Kardia’ (Reg. No. XXXX, XXXX), a two-rowed spring food barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) developed by the USDA-ARS, Aberdeen, ID, in cooperation with the University of Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, was released in 2015. Kardia is derived from the cross of ‘03AH3054 / 98Ab12019’ and was advanced...

  6. Re: Penetration Behavior of Opposed Rows of Staggered Secondary Air Jets Depending on Jet Penetration Coefficient and Momentum Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain why the extension of the previously published C = (S/Ho)sqrt(J) scaling for opposed rows of staggered jets wasn't directly successful in the study by Choi et al. (2016). It is not surprising that staggered jets from opposite sides do not pass each other at the expected C value, because Ho/D and sqrt(J) are much larger than the maximum in previous studies. These, and large x/D's, tend to suggest development of 2-dimensional flow. Although there are distinct optima for opposed rows of in-line jets, single-side injection, and opposed rows of staggered jets based on C, opposed rows of staggered jets provide as good or better mixing performance, at any C value, than opposed rows of in-line jets or jets from single-side injection.

  7. Influence of different length of core suture purchase among suture row on the strength of 6-strand tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hirotaka; Kusano, Nozomu; Kinjo, Masaki; Kanaya, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    In multi-strand suture methods consisting of several suture rows, the different length of core suture purchase between each suture row may affect the strength of repairs. We evaluated the influence of the different length of core suture purchase between each suture row on the strength of 6-strand tendon repairs. Rabbit flexor tendons were repaired by using a triple-looped suture technique in which the suture purchase length in each suture row was modified. Group 1, all lengths are 8-mm. Group 2, all lengths are 10-mm. Group 3, two are 10-mm and one is 8-mm. Group 4, one is 10-mm and two are 8-mm. The repaired tendons were subjected to load-to-failure test. The gap strength was significantly greater in Group 1 and Group 2 than in Group 3 and Group 4. This study demonstrates that maintaining equal core suture purchase lengths of each suture row increases the gap resistance.

  8. How does vineyard management intensity affect inter-row plant diversity and associated root parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Silvia; Labuda, Thomas; Probus, Sandra; Penke, Nicole; Himmelbauer, Margarita; Loiskandl, Willibald; Strauss, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Popescu, Daniela; Comsa, Maria; Bunea, Claudiu-Ioan; Zaller, Johann G.; Kriechbaum, Monika

    2017-04-01

    Vineyard management has changed dramatically in the last 50 years. In many wine-growing regions, vineyard inter-rows are kept clean of vegetation by frequent tillage or use of herbicides to establish bare soil systems. In the last thirty years, policy-makers and several winegrowers have realized that temporary or permanent vegetation cover between the vine rows may increase ecosystem services like soil erosion mitigation, soil fertility and biodiversity conservation. The inter-row area of a vineyard can host a diverse flora providing habitat and food resources for pollinating insects and natural enemies of pests. The goal of this study was to analyze the influence of different soil management intensities on plant diversity and root parameters in the vineyard inter-rows. We investigated 15 vineyards in Romania and 14 in Austria to study the effects of three different management intensities on plant diversity, above and below-ground plant biomass, total root length and surface area of roots. Management intensity ranged from bare soil inter-rows to alternative soil tillage every second year to permanent vegetation cover for more than five years. In each vineyard inter-row, six soil samples (7 cm diameter and 10 cm height) of the upper soil layer were extracted for root analyses. Root were separated from the soil, stained and finally scanned and analyzed with the WinRHIZO software. Finally, roots were dried at 70°C to obtain dry matter of the root samples. Vegetation cover and vascular plant diversity was recorded in four 1 m2 plots within each vineyard inter-row two times a year. The most intensive bare soil management regime in Romania significantly reduced root biomass, total root length and surface area in comparison to the alternative and permanent vegetation cover management. Plant biodiversity was also reduced by intensive management, but differences were not significant. While alternative tillage every second year showed the highest values of plant species

  9. A Comparative Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Double-Row, Distal Triceps Tendon Repairs

    PubMed Central

    Dorweiler, Matthew A.; Van Dyke, Rufus O.; Siska, Robert C.; Boin, Michael A.; DiPaola, Mathew J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries that almost always require surgical repair. This study tests the biomechanical properties of an original anchorless double-row triceps repair against a previously reported knotless double-row repair. Hypothesis: The anchorless double-row triceps repair technique will yield similar biomechanical properties when compared with the knotless double-row repair technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Eighteen cadaver arms were randomized into 2 groups. One group received the anchorless repair and the other received the knotless anchor repair. A materials testing system (MTS) machine was used to cycle the repaired arms from 0° to 90° with a 2.5-pound weight for 1500 cycles at 0.25 Hz. Real-time displacement of the tendon was measured during cycling using a probe. Load to failure was performed after completion of cyclic loading. Results: The mean displacement with the anchorless technique was 0.77 mm (SD, 0.25 mm) at 0° (full elbow extension) and 0.76 mm (SD, 0.38 mm) at 90° (elbow flexion). The mean displacement with the anchored technique was 0.83 mm (SD, 0.57 mm) at 0° and 1.01 mm (SD, 0.62 mm) at 90°. There was no statistically significant difference for tendon displacement at 0º (P = .75) or 90º (P = .31). The mean load to failure with the anchorless technique was 618.9 N (SD, 185.6 N), while it was 560.5 N (SD, 154.1 N) with the anchored technique, again with no statistically significant difference (P = .28). Conclusion: Our anchorless double-row triceps repair technique yields comparable biomechanical properties to previously described double-row triceps tendon repair techniques, with the added benefit of avoiding the cost of suture anchors. Clinical Relevance: This anchorless double-row triceps tendon repair can be considered as an acceptable alternative to a knotless anchor repair for triceps tendon ruptures. PMID:28607942

  10. Does on-water resisted rowing increase or maintain lower-body strength?

    PubMed

    Lawton, Trent W; Cronin, John B; McGuigan, Michael R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past 30 years, endurance volumes have increased by >20% among the rowing elite; therefore, informed decisions about the value of weight training over other possible activities in periodized training plans for rowing need to be made. The purpose of this study was to quantify the changes in lower-body strength development after two 14-week phases of intensive resisted on-water rowing, either incorporating weight training or rowing alone. Ten elite women performed 2 resisted rowing ("towing ropes," e.g., 8 × 3 minutes) plus 6 endurance (e.g., 16-28 km at 70-80% maximum heart rate) and 2 rate-regulated races (e.g., 8,000 m at 24 strokes per minute) on-water each week. After a 4-week washout phase, the 14-week phase was repeated with the addition of 2 weight-training sessions (e.g., 3-4 sets × 6-15 reps). Percent (±SD) and standardized differences in effects (effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence limit) for 5-repetition leg pressing and isometric pulling strength were calculated from data ratio scaled for body mass, log transformed and adjusted for pretest scores. Resisted rowing alone did not increase leg pressing (-1.0 ± 5.3%, p = 0.51) or isometric pulling (5.3 ± 13.4%, p = 0.28) strength. In contrast, after weight training, a moderately greater increase in leg pressing strength was observed (ES = 0.72 ± 0.49, p = 0.03), although differences in isometric pulling strength were unclear (ES = 0.56 ± 1.69, p = 0.52). In conclusion, intensive on-water training including resisted rowing maintained but did not increase lower-body strength. Elite rowers or coaches might consider the incorporation of high-intensity nonfatiguing weight training concurrent to endurance exercise if increases in lower-body strength without changes in body mass are desired.

  11. Effects of inter row management intensity on soil physical properties in European vineyards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Strauss, Peter; Kumpan, Monika; Guzmán, Gema; Gómez, Jose A.; Stiper, Katrin; Popescou, Daniela; Guernion, Muriel; Nicolai, Annegret; Winter, Silvia; Zaller, Johann G.

    2017-04-01

    Successful viticulture is mainly depending on soil, climate and management capabilities of vine growers. These factors influence on the availability of water during the growing season which in turn impacts on wine quality and quantity. To protect soil from being eroded many winegrowers try to keep the inter row zones of the vineyards green for as much time as possible. Greening also helps to provide water-stress to the grapes for harvesting high quality wines. However, the management strategies concerning the intensity of inter row management are widely different across Europe. They differ within regions, between regions and between countries and are mainly based on personal experience of the winegrowers. To measure possible effects of inter row management in vineyards on soil physical parameters we selected vineyards with different inter row management intensities in Austria, Romania, France and Spain. In total more than 700 undisturbed core samples (from 3 to 8 cm depth) out of 50 individual vineyards were analysed for saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, aggregate stability, total organic carbon, soil texture and bulk density. The comparison between high intensity management with at least one soil disturbance per year, medium intensity with less frequent soil disturbance and low intensity management with no soil disturbance since at least 5 years indicates that investigated soil physical properties did not necessarily improve for the upper soil layer in every region. The results indicate that the influence of long term and high frequency mechanical stress imposed on soil by use of agricultural machinery in inter rows as well as different fertilization strategies may in some cases exhibit higher impacts on soil physical properties than the different tillage strategies.

  12. On the 2-Row Rule for Infectious Disease Transmission on Aircraft.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Vicki Stover; Weiss, Howard

    With over two billion airline passengers annually, in-flight transmission of infectious diseases is an important global health concern. Many instances of in-flight transmission have been documented, but the relative influence of the many factors (see below) affecting in-flight transmission has not been quantified. Long-standing guidance by public health agencies is that the primary transmission risk associated with air travel for most respiratory infectious diseases is associated with sitting within two rows of an infectious passenger. The effect of proximity may be one of these factors. The aim of this study was to determine the risk of infection within and beyond the 2-row rule given by public health guidance. We searched the literature for reports of in-flight transmission of infection which included seat maps indicating where the infectious and infected passengers were seated. There is a ∼ 6% risk to passengers seated within the 2-rows of infected individual(s) and there is ∼ 2% risk to passengers seated beyond 2-rows from the infectious individual. Contact tracing limited to passengers within 2-rows of the infectious individual(s) could fail to detect other cases of infections. This has important consequences for assessing the spread of infectious diseases. Infection at a distance from the index case indicates other factors, such as airflow, movement of passenger/crew members, fomites and contacts between passengers in the departure gate before boarding, or after deplaning, are involved. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of inspiratory muscle warm-up on submaximal rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Arend, Mati; Mäestu, Jarek; Kivastik, Jana; Rämson, Raul; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2015-01-01

    Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters. Ten competitive male rowers aged between 19 and 27 years (age, 23.1 ± 3.8 years; height, 188.1 ± 6.3 cm; body mass, 85.6 ± 6.6 kg) were tested 3 times. During the first visit, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) assessment and the incremental rowing test were performed to measure maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (Pamax). A submaximal intensity (90% Pamax) rowing test was performed twice with the standard rowing warm-up as test 1 and with the standard rowing warm-up and specific inspiratory muscle warm-up as test 2. During the 2 experimental tests, distance, duration, heart rate, breathing frequency, ventilation, peak oxygen consumption, and blood lactate concentration were measured. The only value that showed a significant difference between the test 1 and test 2 was breathing frequency (52.2 ± 6.8 vs. 53.1 ± 6.8, respectively). Heart rate and ventilation showed a tendency to decrease and increase, respectively, after the inspiratory muscle warm-up (p < 0.1). Despite some changes in respiratory parameters, the use of 40% MIP intensity warm-up is not suggested if the mean intensity of the competition is at submaximal level (at approximately 90% maximal oxygen consumption). In conclusion, the warm-up protocol of the respiratory muscles used in this study does not have a significant influence on submaximal endurance performance in highly trained male rowers.

  14. Suture spanning augmentation of single-row rotator cuff repair: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Early, Nicholas A; Elias, John J; Lippitt, Steven B; Filipkowski, Danielle E; Pedowitz, Robert A; Ciccone, William J

    2017-02-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the biomechanical benefit of adding spanning sutures to single-row rotator cuff repair. Mechanical testing was performed to evaluate 9 pairs of cadaveric shoulders with complete rotator cuff repairs, with a single-row technique used on one side and the suture spanning technique on the other. The spanning technique included sutures from 2 lateral anchors securing tendon near the musculotendinous junction, spanning the same anchor placement from single-row repair. The supraspinatus muscle was loaded to 100 N at 0.25 Hz for 100 cycles, followed by a ramp to failure. Markers and a video tracking system measured anterior and posterior gap formation across the repair at 25-cycle intervals. The force at which the stiffness decreased by 50% and 75% was determined. Data were compared using paired t-tests. One single-row repair failed at <25 cycles. Both anterior and posterior gap distances tended to be 1 to 2 mm larger for the single-row repairs than for the suture spanning technique. The difference was statistically significant at all cycles for the posterior gap formation (P ≤ .02). The trends were not significant for the anterior gap (P ≥ .13). The loads at which the stiffness decreased by 50% and 75% did not differ significantly between the 2 types of repair (P ≥ .10). The suture spanning technique primarily improved posterior gap formation. Decreased posterior gap formation could reduce failure rates for rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does extensive on-water rowing increase muscular strength and endurance?

    PubMed

    Lawton, Trent W; Cronin, John B; McGuigan, Mike R

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in aerobic condition, strength, and muscular endurance following 8 weeks of endurance rowing alone or in combination with weight-training. Twenty-two elite rowers were assigned to (1) rowing (n = 10, 250-270 km · week⁻¹) or (2) rowing (n = 12, 190-210 km · week⁻¹) plus four weight-training sessions each week. Pre and post mean and standardized effect-size (ES) differences in aerobic condition (watts at 4 mmol · L⁻¹) and strength (isometric pull, N), prone bench-pull (6-repetition maximum, 6-RM), 5- and 30-repetition leg-press and 60-repetition seated-arm-pull (J, performed on a dynamometer) normalized by body mass and log-transformed were analysed, after adjusting for gender. The standardized differences between groups were trivial for aerobic condition (ES [±90% CI] = 0.15; ±0.28, P = 0.37) and prone bench-pull (ES = 0.27; ±0.33, P = 0.18), although a moderate positive benefit in favour of rowing only was observed for the seated-arm-pull (ES = 0.42; ±0.4, P = 0.08). Only the weight-training group improved isometric pull (12.4 ± 8.9%, P < 0.01), 5-repetition (4.0 ± 5.7%, P < 0.01) and 30-repetition (2.4 ± 5.4%, P < 0.01) leg-press. In conclusion, while gains in aerobic condition and upper-body strength were comparable to extensive endurance rowing, weight-training led to moderately greater lower-body muscular-endurance and strength gains.

  16. Factors affecting healing rates after arthroscopic double-row rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Hollins, Anthony M; Kim, Hyun-Min; Teefey, Sharlene A; Middleton, William D; Steger-May, Karen; Galatz, Leesa M; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2010-12-01

    Double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs were developed to improve initial biomechanical strength of repairs to improve healing rates. Despite biomechanical improvements, failure of healing remains a clinical problem. To evaluate the anatomical results after double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with ultrasound to determine postoperative repair integrity and the effect of various factors on tendon healing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-eight patients (49 shoulders) who had a complete arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (double-row technique) were evaluated with ultrasound at a minimum of 6 months after surgery. Outcome was evaluated at a minimum of 1-year follow-up with standardized history and physical examination, visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, and preoperative and postoperative shoulder scores according to the system of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and the Simple Shoulder Test. Quantitative strength was measured postoperatively. Ultrasound and physical examinations were performed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery (mean, 16 months; range, 6 to 36 months) and outcome questionnaire evaluations at a minimum of 12 months after surgery (mean, 29 months; range, 12 to 55 months). Of 49 repairs, 25 (51%) were healed. Healing rates were 67% in single-tendon tears (16 of 24 shoulders) and 36% in multitendon tears (9 of 25 shoulders). Older age and longer duration of follow-up were correlated with poorer tendon healing (P < .03). Visual analog scale for pain, active forward elevation, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, and Simple Shoulder Test scores all had significant improvement from baseline after repair (P < .0001). Increased age and longer duration of follow-up were associated with lower healing rates after double-row rotator cuff repair. The biological limitation at the repair site, as reflected by the effects of age on healing, appears to be the most important factor influencing tendon healing

  17. Load response and gap formation in a single-row cruciate suture rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Lachlan; Richardson, Martin; Sobol, Tony; Caldow, Jonathon; Ackland, David C

    2017-06-01

    Double-row rotator cuff tendon repair techniques may provide superior contact area and strength compared with single-row repairs, but are associated with higher material expenses and prolonged operating time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate gap formation, ultimate tensile strength and stiffness of a single-row cruciate suture rotator cuff repair construct, and to compare these results with those of the Mason-Allen and SutureBridge repair constructs. Infraspinatus tendons from 24 spring lamb shoulders were harvested and allocated to cruciate suture, Mason-Allen and SutureBridge repair groups. Specimens were loaded cyclically between 10 and 62 N for 200 cycles, and gap formation simultaneously measured using a high-speed digital camera. Specimens were then loaded in uniaxial tension to failure, and construct stiffness and repair strength were evaluated. Gap formation in the cruciate suture repair was significantly lower than that of the Mason-Allen repair (mean difference = 0.6 mm, P = 0.009) and no different from that of the SutureBridge repair (P > 0.05). Both the cruciate suture repair (mean difference = 15.7 N/mm, P = 0.002) and SutureBridge repair (mean difference = 15.8 N/mm, P = 0.034) were significantly stiffer than that of the Mason-Allen repair; however, no significant differences in ultimate tensile strength between repair groups were discerned (P > 0.05). The cruciate suture repair construct, which may represent a simple and cost-effective alternative to double-row and double-row equivalent rotator cuff repairs, has comparable biomechanical strength and integrity with that of the SutureBridge repair, and may result in improved construct longevity and tendon healing compared with the Mason-Allen repair. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Physical activity and abdominal obesity in youth.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoonMyung; Lee, SoJung

    2009-08-01

    Childhood obesity continues to escalate despite considerable efforts to reverse the current trends. Childhood obesity is a leading public health concern because overweight-obese youth suffer from comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease, conditions once considered limited to adults. This increasing prevalence of chronic health conditions in youth closely parallels the dramatic increase in obesity, in particular abdominal adiposity, in youth. Although mounting evidence in adults demonstrates the benefits of regular physical activity as a treatment strategy for abdominal obesity, the independent role of regular physical activity alone (e.g., without calorie restriction) on abdominal obesity, and in particular visceral fat, is largely unclear in youth. There is some evidence to suggest that, independent of sedentary activity levels (e.g., television watching or playing video games), engaging in higher-intensity physical activity is associated with a lower waist circumference and less visceral fat. Several randomized controlled studies have shown that aerobic types of exercise are protective against age-related increases in visceral adiposity in growing children and adolescents. However, evidence regarding the effect of resistance training alone as a strategy for the treatment of abdominal obesity is lacking and warrants further investigation.

  19. Twin abdominal pregnancy - A rare scenario.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Faiqa

    2017-05-01

    Twin abdominal pregnancy is rarely encountered by gynaecologists throughout their professional career. It poses a challenge in terms of diagnosis and management. This case report is about a patient who was diagnosed and successfully managed for this complication at a peripheral hospital of Pakistan Armed Forces.

  20. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  1. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition.

  2. Splenic trauma during abdominal wall liposuction: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Paul; Koak, Yashwant; Baker, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    Summary A 35-year-old woman collapsed 18 hours after undergoing abdominal wall liposuction. Abdominal CT scan revealed a punctured spleen. She underwent an emergency splenectomy and made an uneventful recovery. PMID:18387911

  3. Prophylactic antibiotics for penetrating abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Brand, Martin; Grieve, Andrew

    2013-11-18

    Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs when the peritoneal cavity is breached. Routine laparotomy for penetrating abdominal injuries began in the 1800s, with antibiotics first being used in World War II to combat septic complications associated with these injuries. This practice was marked with a reduction in sepsis-related mortality and morbidity. Whether prophylactic antibiotics are required in the prevention of infective complications following penetrating abdominal trauma is controversial, however, as no randomised placebo controlled trials have been published to date. There has also been debate about the timing of antibiotic prophylaxis. In 1972 Fullen noted a 7% to 11% post-surgical infection rate with pre-operative antibiotics, a 33% to 57% infection rate with intra-operative antibiotic administration and 30% to 70% infection rate with only post-operative antibiotic administration. Current guidelines state there is sufficient class I evidence to support the use of a single pre-operative broad spectrum antibiotic dose, with aerobic and anaerobic cover, and continuation (up to 24 hours) only in the event of a hollow viscus perforation found at exploratory laparotomy. To assess the benefits and harms of prophylactic antibiotics administered for penetrating abdominal injuries for the reduction of the incidence of septic complications, such as septicaemia, intra-abdominal abscesses and wound infections. Searches were not restricted by date, language or publication status. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, issue 12 of 12), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (CPCI-S) and PubMed. Searches were last conducted in January 2013. All randomised controlled trials of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with penetrating abdominal trauma versus no

  4. [Abdominal traumatic evisceration: reconstruction abdominal wall with biologic mesh and negative pressure therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Gómez, M; Betancor Rivera, N; Lima Sánchez, J; Hernández Hernández, J R

    2016-04-10

    Abdominal traumatic evisceration as a result of high energy trauma is uncommon. Once repaired the possible internal damage, an abdominal wall defect of high complexity may exist, whose reconstruction represents a surgical challenge. Politraumatized male with important abdominal muculocutaneous avulsion and evisceration. After initial repair, the patient developed a big eventration in which we use a porcine dermis-derived mesh (Permacol TM ), a safe and effective alternative in abdominal wall repair, thanks to its seamless integration with other tissues, even when exposed. Negative pressure therapy has been used for the management of wound complications after surgical implantation of PermacolTM mesh. We describe our experience with the use of PermacolTM mesh and negative pressure therapy to aid the wound closure after skin necrosis and exposed mesh.

  5. Biomechanical comparison of four double-row speed-bridging rotator cuff repair techniques with or without medial or lateral row enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pauly, Stephan; Fiebig, David; Kieser, Bettina; Albrecht, Bjoern; Schill, Alexander; Scheibel, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Biomechanical comparison of four different Speed-Bridge configurations with or without medial or lateral row reinforcement. Reinforcement of the knotless Speed-Bridge double-row repair technique with additional medial mattress- or lateral single-stitches was hypothesized to improve biomechanical repair stability at time zero. Controlled laboratory study: In 36 porcine fresh-frozen shoulders, the infraspinatus tendons were dissected and shoulders were randomized to four groups: (1) Speed-Bridge technique with single tendon perforation per anchor (STP); (2) Speed-Bridge technique with double tendon perforation per anchor (DTP); (3) Speed-Bridge technique with medial mattress-stitch reinforcement (MMS); (4) Speed-Bridge technique with lateral single-stitch reinforcement (LSS). All repairs were cyclically loaded from 10-60 N up to 10-200 N (20 N stepwise increase) using a material testing device. Forces at 3 and 5 mm gap formation, mode of failure and maximum load to failure were recorded. The MMS-technique with double tendon perforation showed significantly higher ultimate tensile strength (338.9 ± 90.0 N) than DTP (228.3 ± 99.9 N), LSS (188.9 ± 62.5 N) and STP-technique (122.2 ± 33.8 N). Furthermore, the MMS-technique provided increased maximal force resistance until 3 and 5 mm gap formation (3 mm: 77.8 ± 18.6 N; 5 mm: 113.3 ± 36.1 N) compared with LSS, DTP and STP (P < 0.05 for each 3 and 5 mm gap formation). Failure mode was medial row defect by tendon sawing first, then laterally. No anchor pullout occurred. Double tendon perforation per anchor and additional medial mattress stitches significantly enhance biomechanical construct stability at time zero in this ex vivo model when compared with the all-knotless Speed-Bridge rotator cuff repair.

  6. Temporary Abdominal Closure Combined With an Irrigating System Utilizing Hypochlorous Acid Solution to Decrease Abdominal Mucopurulence

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marc R.; Quan, Asia N.; Weir, Alexandra S.; Foster, Kevin N.; Caruso, Daniel M.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Leaving the abdominal cavity open is a well-described and frequently utilized technique in the treatment of severe intra-abdominal sepsis. Irrigation through a negative pressure wound therapy device is a technique employed to assist in the closure of wounds as well as the reduction of bacterial contamination. Furthermore, hypochlorous acid has been found to be safe and effective in microorganismal elimination from extremity wounds. There is no literature regarding the infusion of hypochlorous solution into the abdominal cavity for intra-abdominal sepsis or mucopurulent abscesses or biofilm. Objectives: A 47-year-old man with granulomatosis polyangiitis was started on weekly rituximab. After 4 infusions, skin sloughing, ultimately diagnosed as toxic epidermal necrolysis, developed. During the hospital course, he developed sepsis and bowel perforation necessitating an exploratory laparotomy. The abdomen was left open with a temporary abdominal closure using the Abthera open abdomen negative wound therapy device; however, the abdomen remained infected with visually diffuse, thickening mucopurulence despite multiple washouts. Therefore, a VAC Vera-Flo irrigation device was combined with the Abthera open abdomen negative wound therapy device and cyclical irrigation of hypochlorous acid. After 72 hours, the purulence visually was improved and no adverse events were recorded with the placement of intra-abdominal hypochlorous acid. Conclusions: The combination of two medical devices for the intra-abdominal instillation of irrigation is considered “off-label use” from the manufacturer's recommendations. In addition, the repeated instillation of hypochlorous acid solution has not been described but was noted to have visually decreased the contaminated effluent within the intra-abdominal fluid. PMID:29527250

  7. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in association with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in the endovascular era: vigilance remains critical.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, Matthew C; Ross, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events.

  8. Intra-Abdominal Hypertension and Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in Association with Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Endovascular Era: Vigilance Remains Critical

    PubMed Central

    Bozeman, Matthew C.; Ross, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are common complications of ruptured abdominal aortoiliac aneurysms (rAAAs) and other abdominal vascular catastrophes even in the age of endovascular therapy. Morbidity and mortality due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ failure (MOF) are significant. Recognition and management of IAH are key critical care measures which may decrease morbidity and improve survival in these vascular patients. Two strategies have been utilized: expectant management with prompt decompressive laparotomy upon diagnosis of threshold levels of IAH versus prophylactic, delayed abdominal closure based upon clinical parameters at the time of initial repair. Competent management of the abdominal wound with preservation of abdominal domain is also an important component of the care of these patients. In this review, we describe published experience with IAH and ACS complicating abdominal vascular catastrophes, experience with ACS complicating endovascular repair of rAAAs, and techniques for management of the abdominal wound. Vigilance and appropriate management of IAH and ACS remains critically important in decreasing morbidity and optimizing survival following catastrophic intra-abdominal vascular events. PMID:22454763

  9. [Chronic pancreatitis: which is the role of 320-row CT for the staging?].

    PubMed

    Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Rubini, Giuseppe; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Ambriola, Angela; Rella, Leonarda; Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Moschetta, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of multi-planar and volumetric reconstructions obtained from isotropic data by using 16-slice computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis and staging of chronic pancreatitis. In a group of 42 patients CT images were evaluated searching for alterations in morphology and structure of the pancreas, alterations of the Wirsung duct, dilatation of the bile ducts, fluid collections, and vascular involvement of the digestive tract. The disease was then staged in mild, moderate and severe and correlated with the clinical staging. CT allowed the recognition of chronic pancreatitis in all cases. The staging was correct in 25/42 patients, with an accuracy rate of 59.5%. In the staging of moderate and severe forms, CT correlation with clinical and laboratory data was valid, but in mild forms it appeared less significant. Multi-detector CT is accurate in the recognition of moderate, advanced forms of chronic pancreatitis and in the identification of its complications, while it is poorly correlated with the clinical staging in mild forms of the disease.

  10. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  11. Transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair: a systematic review on the biomechanical importance of tying the medial row.

    PubMed

    Mall, Nathan A; Lee, Andrew S; Chahal, Jaskarndip; Van Thiel, Geoffrey S; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2013-02-01

    Double-row and transosseous-equivalent repair techniques have shown greater strength and improved healing than single-row techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tying of the medial-row sutures provides added stability during biomechanical testing of a transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair. We performed a systematic review of studies directly comparing biomechanical differences. Five studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Of the 5 studies, 4 showed improved biomechanical properties with tying the medial-row anchors before bringing the sutures laterally to the lateral-row anchors, whereas the remaining study showed no difference in contact pressure, mean failure load, or gap formation with a standard suture bridge with knots tied at the medial row compared with knotless repairs. The results of this systematic review and quantitative synthesis indicate that the biomechanical factors ultimate load, stiffness, gap formation, and contact area are significantly improved when medial knots are tied as part of a transosseous-equivalent suture bridge construct compared with knotless constructs. Further studies comparing the clinical healing rates and functional outcomes between medial knotted and knotless repair techniques are needed. This review indicates that biomechanical factors are improved when the medial row of a transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff is tied compared with a knotless repair. However, this has not been definitively proven to translate to improved healing rates clinically. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Ahmad Vaqas; Qazi, Saqib Hamid; Khan, Muhammad Arif Mateen; Akhtar, Wassem; Majeed, Amina

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the role of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in blunt paediatric abdominal trauma patients, and to see if the role of computed tomography scan could be limited to only those cases in which sonography was positive. The retrospective study covered 10 years, from January 1,2000 to December 31,2009, and was conducted at the Department of Radiology and Department of Emergency Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised cases of 174 children from birth to 14 years who had presented with blunt abdominal trauma and had focussed abdominal sonography for trauma done at the hospital. The findings were correlated with computed tomography scan of the abdomen and clinical follow-up. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of focussed abdominal sonography for trauma were calculated for blunt abdominal trauma. SPSS 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the total 174 cases, 31 (17.81%) were later confirmed by abdominal scan. Of these 31 children, sonography had been positive in 29 (93.54%) children. In 21 (67.74%) of the 31 children, sonograpy had been true positive; 8 (25%) (8/31) were false positive; and 2 (6%) (2/31) were false negative. There were 6 (19.3%) children in which sonography was positive and converted to laparotomy. There was no significant difference on account of gender (p>0.356). Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma in the study had sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 95%, positive predictive value of 73%, and negative predictive value of 73% with accuracy of 94%. All patients who had negative sonography were discharged later, and had no complication on clinical follow-up. Focussed abdominal sonography for trauma is a fairly reliable mode to assess blunt abdominal trauma in children. It is a useful tool to pick high-grade solid and hollow viscous injury. The results suggest that the role of computed tomography scan can be limited to those cases in which focussed

  13. Intra-abdominal abscess demonstrating an unusually large intra-abdominal pattern on an indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Black, R.R.; Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; ter Penning, B.

    1988-12-01

    Indium-111 WBC imaging of a patient with occult septicemia revealed a large focal pattern of radiopharmaceutical distribution within the abdominal cavity at 24 hours post radiopharmaceutical administration. This finding was felt to represent a large intra-abdominal abscess. A five liter peritoneal abscess was found at surgery. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of an intra-abdominal abscess.

  14. SU-E-T-458: Determining Threshold-Of-Failure for Dead Pixel Rows in EPID-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, J; Wiant, D

    Purpose: A pixel correction map is applied to all EPID-based applications on the TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). When dead pixels are detected, an interpolative smoothing algorithm is applied using neighboring-pixel information to supplement missing-pixel information. The vendor suggests that when the number of dead pixels exceeds 70,000, the panel should be replaced. It is common for entire detector rows to be dead, as well as their neighboring rows. Approximately 70 rows can be dead before the panel reaches this threshold. This study determines the number of neighboring dead-pixel rows that would create a large enough deviation inmore » measured fluence to cause failures in portal dosimetry (PD). Methods: Four clinical two-arc VMAT plans were generated using Eclipse's AXB algorithm and PD plans were created using the PDIP algorithm. These plans were chosen to represent those commonly encountered in the clinic: prostate, lung, abdomen, and neck treatments. During each iteration of this study, an increasing number of dead-pixel rows are artificially applied to the correction map and a fluence QA is performed using the EPID (corrected with this map). To provide a worst-case-scenario, the dead-pixel rows are chosen so that they present artifacts in the highfluence region of the field. Results: For all eight arc-fields deemed acceptable via a 3%/3mm gamma analysis (pass rate greater than 99%), VMAT QA yielded identical results with a 5 pixel-width dead zone. When 10 dead lines were present, half of the fields had pass rates below the 99% pass rate. With increasing dead rows, the pass rates were reduced substantially. Conclusion: While the vendor still suggests to request service at the point where 70,000 dead rows are measured (as recommended by the vendor), the authors suggest that service should be requested when there are greater than 5 consecutive dead rows.« less

  15. Increasing the field-of-view of row-column-addressed ultrasound transducers: implementation of a diverging compound lens.

    PubMed

    Engholm, Mathias; Beers, Christopher; Bouzari, Hamed; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2018-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate compound lenses for row-column-addressed (RCA) ultrasound transducers for increasing the field-of-view (FOV) to a curvilinear volume region, while retaining a flat sole to avoid trapping air between the transducer sole and the patient, which would otherwise lead to unwanted reflections. The primary motivation behind this research is to develop a RCA ultrasound transducer for abdominal or cardiac imaging, where a curvilinear volume region is a necessity. RCA transducers provide 3-D ultrasound imaging with fewer channels than fully-addressed 2-D arrays (2N instead of N 2 ), but they have inherently limited FOV. By increasing the RCA FOV, these transducers can be used for the same applications as fully-addressed transducers while retaining the same price range as conventional 2-D imaging due to the lower channel count. Analytical and finite element method (FEM) models were employed to evaluate design options. Composite materials were developed by loading polymers with inorganic powders to satisfy the corresponding speed of sound and specific acoustical impedance requirements. A Bi 2 O 3 powder with a density of 8.9g/cm 3 was used to decrease the speed of sound of a room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone, RTV615, from 1.03mm/μs to 0.792mm/μs. Using micro-balloons in RTV615 and a urethane, Hapflex 541, their speeds of sound were increased from 1.03mm/μs to 1.50mm/μs and from 1.52mm/μs to 1.93mm/μs, respectively. A diverging add-on lens was fabricated of a Bi 2 O 3 loaded RTV615 and an unloaded Hapflex 541. The lens was tested using a RCA probe, and a FOV of 32.2° was measured from water tank tests, while the FEM model yielded 33.4°. A wire phantom with 0.15mm diameter wires was imaged at 3MHz down to a depth of 14cm using a synthetic aperture imaging sequence with single element transmissions. The beamformed image showed that wires outside the array footprint were visible, demonstrating the increased FOV. Copyright

  16. Biomechanical comparison of single-row, double-row, and transosseous-equivalent repair techniques after healing in an animal rotator cuff tear model.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Ryan J; Gupta, Akash; Oh, Joo-Han; Chung, Kyung-Chil; McGarry, Michelle H; Gupta, Ranjan; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-08-01

    The transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair technique increases failure loads and contact pressure and area between tendon and bone compared to single-row (SR) and double-row (DR) repairs, but no study has investigated if this translates into improved healing in vivo. We hypothesized that a TOE repair in a rabbit chronic rotator cuff tear model would demonstrate a better biomechanical profile than SR and DR repairs after 12 weeks of healing. A two-stage surgical procedure was performed on 21 New Zealand White Rabbits. The right subscapularis tendon was transected and allowed to retract for 6 weeks to simulate a chronic tear. Repair was done with the SR, DR, or TOE technique and allowed to heal for 12 weeks. Cyclic loading and load to failure biomechanical testing was then performed. The TOE repair showed greater biomechanical characteristics than DR, which in turn were greater than SR. These included yield load (p < 0.05), energy absorbed to yield (p < 0.05), and ultimate load (p < 0.05). For repair of a chronic, retracted rotator cuff tear, the TOE technique was the strongest biomechanical construct after healing followed by DR with SR being the weakest. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  17. A biomechanical analysis of point of failure during lateral-row tensioning in transosseous-equivalent rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Goldstein, Jordan L; Hammond, Kyle E; Karas, Spero G

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the maximum load and point of failure of the construct during tensioning of the lateral row of a transosseous-equivalent (TOE) rotator cuff repair. In 6 fresh-frozen human shoulders, a TOE rotator cuff repair was performed, with 1 suture from each medial anchor passed through the tendon and tied in a horizontal mattress pattern. One of 2 limbs from each of 2 medial anchors was pulled laterally over the tendon. After preparation of the lateral bone for anchor placement, the 2 limbs were passed through the polyether ether ketone (PEEK) eyelet of a knotless anchor and tied to a tensiometer. The lateral anchor was placed into the prepared bone tunnel but not fully seated. Tensioning of the lateral-row repair was simulated by pulling the tensiometer to tighten the suture limbs as they passed through the eyelet of the knotless anchor. The mode of failure and maximum tension were recorded. The procedure was then repeated for the second lateral-row anchor. The mean load to failure during lateral-row placement in the TOE model was 80.8 ± 21.0 N (median, 83 N; range, 27.2 to 115.8 N). There was no statistically significant difference between load to failure during lateral-row tensioning for the anterior and posterior anchors (P = .84). Each of the 12 constructs failed at the eyelet of the lateral anchor. Retrieval analysis showed no failure of the medial anchors, no medial suture cutout through the rotator cuff tendon, and no signs of gapping at the repair site. Our results suggest that the medial-row repair does not appear vulnerable during tensioning of the lateral row of a TOE rotator cuff repair with the implants tested. However, surgeons should exercise caution when tensioning the lateral row, especially when lateral-row anchors with PEEK eyelets are implemented. For this repair construct, the findings suggest that although the medial row is not vulnerable during lateral-row tensioning of a TOE rotator cuff repair, lateral-row

  18. Airborne observed solar elevation and row direction effects on the near-IR/red ratio of cotton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Goettelman, R. C.; Leroy, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner was used to obtain data over two adjacent cotton fields having rows perpendicular to one another, at three times of day (different solar elevations), and on two dates (different plant size). The near IR/red ratios were displayed in image form, so that within-field variations and differences between fields could be easily assessed. The ratio varied with changing Sun elevation for north-south oriented rows, but no variation was detected for east-west oriented rows.

  19. Surface Electromyographic Activity of the Abdominal Muscles During Pelvic-Tilt and Abdominal-Hollowing Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Drysdale, Cheri L.; Earl, Jennifer E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus abdominus and external oblique abdominus muscles during pelvic-tilt and abdominal-hollowing exercises performed in different positions. Design and Setting: 2 × 3 (exercise by position) within-subjects design with repeated measures on both factors. All testing was performed in a university laboratory. Subjects: Twenty-six healthy, active young adult females. Measurements: Surface EMG activity was recorded from the left and right rectus abdominus and external oblique muscles while the 2 exercises (pelvic tilt and abdominal hollowing) were performed in different positions (standard, legs supported, and legs unsupported). The standard position was supine in the crook-lying position, the supported position was with hips and knees flexed to 90° and legs supported on a platform, and the unsupported position was with hips and knees flexed to 90° without external support. Peak EMG activity was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction for each muscle. Results: For the rectus abdominus, there was an interaction between position and activity. Abdominal hollowing produced significantly less activity than the pelvic tilt in all positions. The difference between the 2 exercises with the legs unsupported was of a greater magnitude than the other 2 positions. For the external obliques, there was significantly lower activity during the abdominal hollowing compared with the pelvic tilting. The greatest muscle activity occurred with the legs-unsupported position during both exercises. Conclusions: Abdominal-hollowing exercises produced less rectus abdominus and external oblique activity than pelvic-tilting exercises. Abdominal hollowing may be performed with minimal activation of the large global abdominal muscles. PMID:15085209

  20. Surface Electromyographic Activity of the Abdominal Muscles During Pelvic-Tilt and Abdominal-Hollowing Exercises.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Cheri L.; Earl, Jennifer E.; Hertel, Jay

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the rectus abdominus and external oblique abdominus muscles during pelvic-tilt and abdominal-hollowing exercises performed in different positions. DESIGN AND SETTING: 2 x 3 (exercise by position) within-subjects design with repeated measures on both factors. All testing was performed in a university laboratory. SUBJECTS: Twenty-six healthy, active young adult females. MEASUREMENTS: Surface EMG activity was recorded from the left and right rectus abdominus and external oblique muscles while the 2 exercises (pelvic tilt and abdominal hollowing) were performed in different positions (standard, legs supported, and legs unsupported). The standard position was supine in the crook-lying position, the supported position was with hips and knees flexed to 90 degrees and legs supported on a platform, and the unsupported position was with hips and knees flexed to 90 degrees without external support. Peak EMG activity was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction for each muscle. RESULTS: For the rectus abdominus, there was an interaction between position and activity. Abdominal hollowing produced significantly less activity than the pelvic tilt in all positions. The difference between the 2 exercises with the legs unsupported was of a greater magnitude than the other 2 positions. For the external obliques, there was significantly lower activity during the abdominal hollowing compared with the pelvic tilting. The greatest muscle activity occurred with the legs-unsupported position during both exercises. CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal-hollowing exercises produced less rectus abdominus and external oblique activity than pelvic-tilting exercises. Abdominal hollowing may be performed with minimal activation of the large global abdominal muscles.

  1. Acute abdomen in children due to extra-abdominal causes.

    PubMed

    Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Gardikis, Stefanos; Cassimos, Dimitrios; Kambouri, Katerina; Tsalkidou, Evanthia; Deftereos, Savas; Chatzimichael, Athanasios

    2008-06-01

    Acute abdominal pain in children is a common cause for referral to the emergency room and for subsequent hospitalization to pediatric medical or surgical departments. There are rare occasions when the abdominal pain is derived from extra-abdominal organs or systems. The aim of the present study was to establish the most common extra-abdominal causes of acute abdominal pain. The notes of all children (1 month-14 years of age) examined for acute abdominal pain in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) Department of Alexandroupolis District University Hospital in January 2001-December 2005 were analyzed retrospectively. Demographic data, clinical signs and symptoms, and laboratory findings were recorded, as well as the final diagnosis and outcome. Of a total number of 28 124 children who were brought to the A&E department, in 1731 the main complaint was acute abdominal pain. In 51 children their symptoms had an extra-abdominal cause, the most frequent being pneumonia (n = 15), tonsillitis (n = 10), otitis media (n = 9), and acute leukemia (n = 5). Both abdominal and extra-abdominal causes should be considered by a pediatrician who is confronted with a child with acute abdominal pain.

  2. Plasma osmotic changes during major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Malone, R A; McLeavey, C A; Arens, J F

    1977-12-01

    Fluid balance across the capillary membrane is maintained normally by a balance of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures (COP). In 12 patients having major intra-abdominal procedures, the COP was followed during the operative and immediate postoperative periods. The patients' intraoperative fluid management consisted of replacing shed blood with blood and following Shires' concept of crystalloid replacement. Significant decreases in COP to approximately two thirds of the initial value occurred in patients having intra-abdominal procedures versus only a 10 percent decrease in those having peripheral procedures (greater than .001). As a result of this decrease in COP, the balance between hydrostatic and colloid osmotic pressures is lost and risk of pulmonary intersitial edema is increased.

  3. Preincisional intraparietal Augmentin in abdominal operations.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, A. V.; Evans, M.; Smith, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 624 consecutive eligible patients undergoing abdominal operations received a single preoperative dose of amoxycillin/clavulanic acid (1.2 g Augmentin) for the prophylaxis of surgical wound infection. They were randomised to have the antibiotic injected intravenously at induction of anaesthesia (n = 328) or infiltrated subcutaneously along the line of the proposed incision (n = 296). The incidence of wound infections was considerably lower in the group given the antibiotic into the abdominal wall (8.4% compared with 15.9%--chi 2 = 7.90, P = 0.005). No significant differences were found in the incidence of other major or minor infective or non-infective postoperative complications between the groups. It is concluded that preincisional intraparietal injection is more effective than intravenous injection of Augmentin for the prophylaxis of surgical wound infection. PMID:2523210

  4. [Abdominal bloating: an up-to-date].

    PubMed

    Ducrotté, P

    2009-10-01

    Bloating is a common symptom, especially in women. In the clinical practice, it remains a therapeutic challenge. Since recently, its pathophysiology is better understood: an impaired transit of gas (particularly in the small bowel) or a visceral hypersensitivity leading to the induction of an abdominal discomfort despite a normal volume of gas are two of the main causes, far more frequent than an excessive production of gas. Moreover, bloating can be related to abnormal viscera-somatic reflexes promoting both an abdomino-phrenic dyssynergia and the relaxation of the muscles of the abdominal wall. From a therapeutic point of view, the efficacy of the gas absorbants remains to be more documented. Besides the treatment of a constipation and the avoidance of nutrients either highly fermentable or rich in fructose, other therapeutic options include prokinetics and drugs acting on visceral sensitivity. Probiotics are another promising option. In some centers, a non pharmacological therapeutic approach, mainly based on hypnosis, is discussed.

  5. Fluid-flow of a row of jets in crossflow - A numerical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Benson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed computer-visualized flow field of a row of jets in a confined crossflow is presented. The Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a finite volume method that incorporates a partial differential equation for incremental pressure to obtain a divergence-free flow field. The turbulence is described by a multiple-time-scale turbulence model. The computational domain includes the upstream region of the circular jet so that the interaction between the jet and the crossflow is simulated accurately. It is shown that the row of jets in the crossflow is characterized by a highly complex flow field that includes a horse-shoe vortex and two helical vortices whose secondary velocity components are co-rotating in space. It is also shown that the horse-shoe vortex is a ring of reversed flows located along the circumference of the jet exit.

  6. A low complexity reweighted proportionate affine projection algorithm with memory and row action projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianming; Grant, Steven L.; Benesty, Jacob

    2015-12-01

    A new reweighted proportionate affine projection algorithm (RPAPA) with memory and row action projection (MRAP) is proposed in this paper. The reweighted PAPA is derived from a family of sparseness measures, which demonstrate performance similar to mu-law and the l 0 norm PAPA but with lower computational complexity. The sparseness of the channel is taken into account to improve the performance for dispersive system identification. Meanwhile, the memory of the filter's coefficients is combined with row action projections (RAP) to significantly reduce computational complexity. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed RPAPA MRAP algorithm outperforms both the affine projection algorithm (APA) and PAPA, and has performance similar to l 0 PAPA and mu-law PAPA, in terms of convergence speed and tracking ability. Meanwhile, the proposed RPAPA MRAP has much lower computational complexity than PAPA, mu-law PAPA, and l 0 PAPA, etc., which makes it very appealing for real-time implementation.

  7. Revised model core potentials for third-row transition-metal atoms from Lu to Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Hirotoshi; Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Osanai, You; Noro, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Klobukowski, Mariusz; Miyoshi, Eisaku

    2009-07-01

    We have produced new relativistic model core potentials (spdsMCPs) for the third-row transition-metal atoms from Lu to Hg explicitly treating explicitly 5s and 5p electrons in addition to 5d and 6s electrons in the same manner for the first- and second-row transition-metal atoms given in the previous Letters [Y. Osanai, M.S. Mon, T. Noro, H. Mori, H. Nakashima, M. Klobukowski, E. Miyoshi, Chem. Phys. Lett. 452 (2008) 210; Y. Osanai, E. Soejima, T. Noro, H. Mori, M.S. Mon, M. Klobukowski, E. Miyoshi, Chem. Phys. Lett. 463 (2008) 230]. Using suitable correlating functions with the split-valence MCP functions, we demonstrate that the present MCP basis sets show reasonable performance in describing the electronic structures of atoms and molecules, bringing about accurate excitation energies for atoms and proper spectroscopic constants for Au 2, Hg 2, and AuH.

  8. Spreadsheet Calculation of Jets in Crossflow: Opposed Rows of Slots Slanted at 45 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, James D.; Clisset, James R.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend a baseline empirical model to the case of jets entering the mainstream flow from opposed rows of 45 degrees slanted slots. The results in this report were obtained using a spreadsheet modified from the one posted with NASA/TM--2010-216100. The primary conclusion in this report is that the best mixing configuration for opposed rows of 45 degrees slanted slots at any down stream distance is a parallel staggered configuration where the slots are angled in the same direction on top and bottom walls and one side is shifted by half the orifice spacing. Although distributions from perpendicular slanted slots are similar to those from parallel staggered configurations at some downstream locations, results for perpendicular slots are highly dependent on downstream distance and are no better than parallel staggered slots at locations where they are similar and are worse than parallel ones at other distances.

  9. Airborne ROWS data report for the high resolution experiment, June 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandemark, D.; Hines, D.; Bailey, S.; Stewart, K.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne radar ocean wave spectrometer (ROWS) data collected during the Office of Naval Research's High Resolution Remote Sensing Experiment of June 1993 are presented. This data summary covers six flights made using NASA's T-39 aircraft over a region of the North Atlantic off the coast of North Carolina and includes multiple crossings of the gulf stream. The Ku-band ROWS was operated in a configuration which continuously switched between an altimeter and a spectrometer channel. Data derived from the two channels include altimeter radar cross section, altimeter-derived sea surface mean square slope and wind speed, and directional and nondirectional longwave spectra. Discussion is provided for several events of particular interest.

  10. Recurrent abdominal pain in childhood urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Polito, Cesare; La Manna, Angela; Signoriello, Giuseppe; Marte, Antonio

    2009-12-01

    Our goal was to establish the clinical presentation and features of pain attacks in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and urolithiasis. We compared the rate of previous appendectomy among 100 consecutive patients with that of 270 control subjects. We also compared the frequency of pain attacks with that reported by children with functional or organic gastrointestinal RAP. Fifty-three patients had no history of dysuria or gross hematuria, and only 35 had hematuria at the first visit; 41 patients were evaluated for urolithiasis only because of a family history of kidney stones associated with RAP. Twenty-nine patients had been previously hospitalized for abdominal symptoms. Sixteen patients and 4 control subjects (1.5%) had undergone a previous appendectomy (P < .0001). Two to 28 months before the diagnosis of urolithiasis, 37 patients underwent abdominal ultrasonography, which did not show urinary stones. Sixty-nine percent of subjects younger than 8 years of age had central/diffuse abdominal pain. The mean frequency of pain attacks was 4 to 9 times lower than in patients with functional or organic gastrointestinal RAP. Because of the inconstant occurrence of dysuria and hematuria, the location of pain in areas other than the flank, and the lack of calculi shown on imaging studies performed after pain attacks, the urologic origin of pain may be overlooked and ineffective procedures performed. The possibility of urolithiasis should be considered in children with RAP who have a family history of urolithiasis and/or infrequent pain attacks, even when dysuria and hematuria are lacking, and in younger children even when pain is not lateral.

  11. Intravenous leiomyomatosis of the uterus with extension to the right heart

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman admitted with debilitation and engorgement both lower extremities. Transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography, abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography revealed a lobulated pelvic mass, a mass within right internal iliac vein, both common iliac vein, as well as the inferior vena cava, extending into the right atrium. In addition, echocardiography and abdominal ultrasound showed the tumor of right atrium and inferior vena cave has no stalk and has well-demarcated borders with the wall of right atrium and inferior vena cave. Hence, the presumptive diagnosis of IVL was made by echocardiography and abdominal ultrasound and the presumptive diagnosis of sarcoma with invasion in right internal iliac vein, both common iliac vein, the inferior vena cava, as well as the right atrium was made by multi-detector-row computerized tomography. The patient underwent a one-stage combined multidisciplinary thoraco-abdominal operation under general anaesthetic. Subsequently the pathologic report confirmed IVL. PMID:21943238

  12. Impacts of tree rows on grassland birds & potential nest predators: A removal experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Kevin S.; Ribic, Christine; Sample, David W.; Fawcett, Megan J.; Dadisman, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, grasslands and the wildlife that inhabit them are widely imperiled. Encroachment by shrubs and trees has widely impacted grasslands in the past 150 years. In North America, most grassland birds avoid nesting near woody vegetation. Because woody vegetation fragments grasslands and potential nest predator diversity and abundance is often greater along wooded edge and grassland transitions, we measured the impacts of removing rows of trees and shrubs that intersected grasslands on potential nest predators and the three most abundant grassland bird species (Henslow’s sparrow [Ammodramus henslowii], Eastern meadowlark [Sturnella magna], and bobolink [Dolichonyx oryzivorus]) at sites in Wisconsin, U.S.A. We monitored 3 control and 3 treatment sites, for 1 yr prior to and 3 yr after tree row removal at the treatment sites. Grassland bird densities increased (2–4 times for bobolink and Henslow’s sparrow) and nesting densities increased (all 3 species) in the removal areas compared to control areas. After removals, Henslow’s sparrows nested within ≤50 m of the treatment area, where they did not occur when tree rows were present. Most dramatically, activity by woodland-associated predators nearly ceased (nine-fold decrease for raccoon [Procyon lotor]) at the removals and grassland predators increased (up to 27 times activity for thirteen-lined ground squirrel [Ictidomys tridecemlineatus]). Nest success did not increase, likely reflecting the increase in grassland predators. However, more nests were attempted by all 3 species (175 versus 116) and the number of successful nests for bobolinks and Henslow’s sparrows increased. Because of gains in habitat, increased use by birds, greater production of young, and the effective removal of woodland-associated predators, tree row removal, where appropriate based on the predator community, can be a beneficial management action for conserving grassland birds and improving fragmented and degraded grassland

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Condensation on a Horizontal Tube Row with Vapour Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoune, Azzeddine

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis presents an experimental and theoretical investigation into the effect of vapour shear on the condensation of steam flowing vertically downwards over a single horizontal tube and a horizontal tube in a row. Honda and Fujii's conjugate heat transfer analysis has been adapted and modified to take account of property variation with temperature and release of sensible heat to the condensing film. In industrial condensers, even in the first row, the vapour velocity profile around a tube is affected by the presence of its neighbours. This work extends Honda and Fujii's analysis to investigate the effect of tube spacing on the heat transfer. The finite element method was used to obtain the velocity field around the tube in a row and subsequently the boundary layer equations for the condensate and vapour film along with the heat flow in the tube wall were solved simultaneously. Data have been obtained at absolute pressures of 0.8 and 0.9 bar and for steam superheat up to 40 degC. Approach steam velocities up to 25 m/s were covered. Cooling water velocities and temperatures were in the range 0.68-1.16 m/s and 18-43^circ C, respectively. Honda et al (67), Roshko's flow, theory was found to fit the data for the steam flowing over the isolated tube. The theoretical data for the latter agreed well with the Shekriladze and Gomelauri (2) and Rose (40) correlations and Honda et al (67), potential flow, theory. On | Nu| Re^{-1/2} versus F basis, an average enhancement of 50% in condensate film heat transfer was observed in the case of steam flowing over the tube in a row compared to the isolated tube. This compared with the predicted value of 23% enhancement.

  14. Age and sex differences in paranormal beliefs: a response to Vitulli, Tipton, and Rowe (1999)

    PubMed

    Irwin, H J

    2000-04-01

    Vitulli, Tipton, and Rowe (1999) report evidence of age and sex differences in the strength of paranormal beliefs. An alternative interpretation of their data is offered in terms of differential item functioning. It is suggested that respondents' interpretation of paranormal belief test items may vary with age and sex, and that such differences in the strength with which such beliefs are endorsed has not been conclusively established by Vitulli, et al.

  15. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve Bone Health in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    may FES rowing improves tibial stress distribution. This image demonstrates the change in stress distribution in response to the same axial force...kN/mm). This indicates improved bone strength and better stress distribution. improve fracture risk prediction and detection of response to...osteoporosis-related bone fracture . This study aims to learn if the severe osteoporosis in lower extremities caused by spinal cord injuries can be slowed or

  16. CFD Simulations of Supersonic Highly Swirling Flow Exiting a Turbine Vane Row Compared with Experimental Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff S.; Richardson, Brian R.; Schmauch, Preston; Kenny, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been heavily involved in developing the J2-X engine. The Center has been testing a Work Horse Gas Generator (WHGG) to supply gas products to J2-X turbine components at realistic flight-like operating conditions. Three-dimensional time accurate CFD simulations and analytical fluid analysis have been performed to support WHGG tests at MSFC. The general purpose CFD program LOCI/Chem was utilized to simulate flow of products from the WHGG through a turbine manifold, a stationary row of turbine vanes, into a Can and orifice assembly used to control the back pressure at the turbine vane row and finally through an aspirator plate and flame bucket. Simulations showed that supersonic swirling flow downstream of the turbine imparted a much higher pressure on the Can wall than expected for a non-swirling flow. This result was verified by developing an analytical model that predicts wall pressure due to swirling flow. The CFD simulations predicted that the higher downstream pressure would cause the pressure drop across the nozzle row to be approximately half the value of the test objective. With CFD support, a redesign of the Can orifice and aspirator plate was performed. WHGG experimental results and observations compared well with pre-test and post-test CFD simulations. CFD simulations for both quasi-static and transient test conditions correctly predicted the pressure environment downstream of the turbine row and the behavior of the gas generator product plume as it exited the WHGG test article, impacted the flame bucket and interacted with the external environment.

  17. Leaf primordium size specifies leaf width and vein number among row-type classes in barley.

    PubMed

    Thirulogachandar, Venkatasubbu; Alqudah, Ahmad M; Koppolu, Ravi; Rutten, Twan; Graner, Andreas; Hensel, Goetz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Schnurbusch, Thorsten; Kuhlmann, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Exploring genes with impact on yield-related phenotypes is the preceding step to accomplishing crop improvements while facing a growing world population. A genome-wide association scan on leaf blade area (LA) in a worldwide spring barley collection (Hordeum vulgare L.), including 125 two- and 93 six-rowed accessions, identified a gene encoding the homeobox transcription factor, Six-rowed spike 1 (VRS1). VRS1 was previously described as a key domestication gene affecting spike development. Its mutation converts two-rowed (wild-type VRS1, only central fertile spikelets) into six-rowed spikes (mutant vrs1, fully developed fertile central and lateral spikelets). Phenotypic analyses of mutant and wild-type leaves revealed that mutants had an increased leaf width with more longitudinal veins. The observed significant increase of LA and leaf nitrogen (%) during pre-anthesis development in vrs1 mutants also implies a link between wider leaf and grain number, which was validated from the association of vrs1 locus with wider leaf and grain number. Histological and gene expression analyses indicated that VRS1 might influence the size of leaf primordia by affecting cell proliferation of leaf primordial cells. This finding was supported by the transcriptome analysis of mutant and wild-type leaf primordia where in the mutant transcriptional activation of genes related to cell proliferation was detectable. Here we show that VRS1 has an independent role on barley leaf development which might influence the grain number. © 2017 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Near Hartree-Fock quality GTO basis sets for the first- and third-row atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry

    1989-01-01

    Energy-optimized Gaussian-type-orbital (GTO) basis sets of accuracy approaching that of numerical Hartree-Fock computations are compiled for the elements of the first and third rows of the periodic table. The methods employed in calculating the sets are explained; the applicability of the sets to electronic-structure calculations is discussed; and the results are presented in tables and briefly characterized.

  19. Terpyridine complexes of first row transition metals and electrochemical reduction of CO₂ to CO.

    PubMed

    Elgrishi, Noémie; Chambers, Matthew B; Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2014-07-21

    Homoleptic terpyridine complexes of first row transition metals are evaluated as catalysts for the electrocatalytic reduction of CO2. Ni and Co-based catalytic systems are shown to reduce CO2 to CO under the conditions tested. The Ni complex was found to exhibit selectivity for CO2 over proton reduction while the Co-based system generates mixtures of CO and H2 with CO : H2 ratios being tuneable through variation of the applied potential.

  20. Theoretical Studies of Three Dimensional Transonic Flow through a Compressor Blade Row.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    Row", Calspan Report No. AB-5487-A-l, AFOSR-TR-76- 1082 , AD-A031234, (August 1976). 2 Rae, W.J., "Relaxation Solutions for Three-Dimensional Transonic...S487-A-1, AFOSR-TR-76- 1082 , AD-A031234, (August 1976). 2. Rae, W.J., "Relaxation Solutions for Three-Dimensional Transonic Flow Through a Compressor

  1. Impacts of Tree Rows on Grassland Birds and Potential Nest Predators: A Removal Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Kevin S.; Ribic, Christine A.; Sample, David W.; Fawcett, Megan J.; Dadisman, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, grasslands and the wildlife that inhabit them are widely imperiled. Encroachment by shrubs and trees has widely impacted grasslands in the past 150 years. In North America, most grassland birds avoid nesting near woody vegetation. Because woody vegetation fragments grasslands and potential nest predator diversity and abundance is often greater along wooded edge and grassland transitions, we measured the impacts of removing rows of trees and shrubs that intersected grasslands on potential nest predators and the three most abundant grassland bird species (Henslow’s sparrow [Ammodramus henslowii], Eastern meadowlark [Sturnella magna], and bobolink [Dolichonyx oryzivorus]) at sites in Wisconsin, U.S.A. We monitored 3 control and 3 treatment sites, for 1 yr prior to and 3 yr after tree row removal at the treatment sites. Grassland bird densities increased (2–4 times for bobolink and Henslow’s sparrow) and nesting densities increased (all 3 species) in the removal areas compared to control areas. After removals, Henslow’s sparrows nested within ≤50 m of the treatment area, where they did not occur when tree rows were present. Most dramatically, activity by woodland-associated predators nearly ceased (nine-fold decrease for raccoon [Procyon lotor]) at the removals and grassland predators increased (up to 27 times activity for thirteen-lined ground squirrel [Ictidomys tridecemlineatus]). Nest success did not increase, likely reflecting the increase in grassland predators. However, more nests were attempted by all 3 species (175 versus 116) and the number of successful nests for bobolinks and Henslow’s sparrows increased. Because of gains in habitat, increased use by birds, greater production of young, and the effective removal of woodland-associated predators, tree row removal, where appropriate based on the predator community, can be a beneficial management action for conserving grassland birds and improving fragmented and degraded grassland

  2. FES-Rowing versus Zoledronic Acid to Improve BoneHealth in SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT There is no established treatment to prevent bone loss or to induce new bone formation following SCI, although the... no established treatment to prevent bone loss or to induce new bone formation following SCI. The goal of this clinical trial -- FES-Rowing versus...Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No . 0704-0188 Public

  3. Ten-year effects from row thinnings in loblolly pine plantations of eastern Maryland

    Treesearch

    Silas Little; John J. Mohr; Paul V. Mook

    1967-01-01

    Four degrees of row thinning were tested in 17-year-old loblolly pine plantations of eastern Maryland. In the following 10 years diameter and basal-area growth of tagged trees increased in relation to intensity of thinning. The heavier thinnings also had the most effect in increasing live-crown lengths and ratios and in favoring crown-class position. Volume growth was...

  4. Risk factors of postoperative pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy using a triple-row stapler.

    PubMed

    Kawaida, Hiromichi; Kono, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Hosomura, Naohiro; Amemiya, Hidetake; Fujii, Hideki

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is one of the major complications in patients who undergo distal pancreatectomy (DP). Recently, dividing the pancreas by stapler is a commonly performed technique, however, POPF still occurs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the risk factors for POPF after DP using a triple-row stapler. A total of 75 patients underwent DP using a triple-row stapler (Endo GIA™ Reloads with Tri-Staple™ Technology 60 mm; COVIDIEN, North Haven, CT, USA) at Yamanashi University from December 2012 to December 2016. The clinical risk factors for POPF after DP using a triple-row stapler were identified based on univariate and multivariate analyses. Clinical POPF (ISGPF Grade B and C) was seen in 7 of 75 patients (9.3%). The body mass index (BMI) was significantly higher in the patients with POPF (26.8 ± 0.5 kg/m 2 ) compared with the patients without POPF (21.4 ± 0.4 kg/m 2 ; a cut-off value; 25.7 kg/m 2 ). In addition, the patients with POPF were significantly younger than the patients without POPF (56.4 ± 5.6 vs 67.0 ± 1.5; a cut-off value was 57.0 years old). BMI and age were found to be significant risk factors for POPF after DP using a triple-row stapler.

  5. KSC technician installs rows of experiment racks in IML-1 spacelab module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) technician installs rows of experiment racks in the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) in the KSC Operations and Checkout (O and C) Bldg. The IML-1 is scheduled to fly on STS-42 in early 1992, and will turn the shuttle into a laboratory dedicated to investigating the effects of microgravity on materials and life processes. View provided by KSC with alternate number KSC-91P-169.

  6. Impacts of tree rows on grassland birds and potential nest predators: a removal experiment.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Kevin S; Ribic, Christine A; Sample, David W; Fawcett, Megan J; Dadisman, John D

    2013-01-01

    Globally, grasslands and the wildlife that inhabit them are widely imperiled. Encroachment by shrubs and trees has widely impacted grasslands in the past 150 years. In North America, most grassland birds avoid nesting near woody vegetation. Because woody vegetation fragments grasslands and potential nest predator diversity and abundance is often greater along wooded edge and grassland transitions, we measured the impacts of removing rows of trees and shrubs that intersected grasslands on potential nest predators and the three most abundant grassland bird species (Henslow's sparrow [Ammodramus henslowii], Eastern meadowlark [Sturnella magna], and bobolink [Dolichonyx oryzivorus]) at sites in Wisconsin, U.S.A. We monitored 3 control and 3 treatment sites, for 1 yr prior to and 3 yr after tree row removal at the treatment sites. Grassland bird densities increased (2-4 times for bobolink and Henslow's sparrow) and nesting densities increased (all 3 species) in the removal areas compared to control areas. After removals, Henslow's sparrows nested within ≤50 m of the treatment area, where they did not occur when tree rows were present. Most dramatically, activity by woodland-associated predators nearly ceased (nine-fold decrease for raccoon [Procyon lotor]) at the removals and grassland predators increased (up to 27 times activity for thirteen-lined ground squirrel [Ictidomys tridecemlineatus]). Nest success did not increase, likely reflecting the increase in grassland predators. However, more nests were attempted by all 3 species (175 versus 116) and the number of successful nests for bobolinks and Henslow's sparrows increased. Because of gains in habitat, increased use by birds, greater production of young, and the effective removal of woodland-associated predators, tree row removal, where appropriate based on the predator community, can be a beneficial management action for conserving grassland birds and improving fragmented and degraded grassland ecosystems.

  7. Disenfranchised grief and nonfinite loss as experienced by the families of death row inmates.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sandra J; Beck, Elizabeth

    The families of death row inmates experience grief and loss issues that have been neglected by scholars and clinicians alike. The issues found in this population are unique and require our understanding. The present study uses the concepts of disenfranchised grief and nonfinite loss to uncover the pain experienced by the children and other family members who have a loved one on death row. Kenneth Doka's (1989) concept of disenfranchised grief is utilized to bring attention to the ways in which the circumstances surrounding an execution leave the family members of those condemned to death outside of the "grieving rules" that exist in the United States. Family members are disenfranchised from their grief, as society does not socially validate their pain. The loss that they feel is also nonfinite (Bruce & Schultz, 2001) in that it is continuous and denies the families all of the hopes, dreams, and expectations that they had for their loved one who now sits on death row. The qualitative interview method was utilized by the authors of this study to gather data from 26 family members of death row inmates who are incarcerated along the East Coast of the United States. The reactions of this group of family members are varied and complex, yet they include the following common responses: social isolation due to stigma and their own feelings of criminalization, intensified family conflict between family members who grieve differently from one another, diminished self-esteem, shame, diffused and specific feelings of guilt, and a chronic state of despair. This study explores virtually untapped terrain. An examination of the microlevel effects of the death penalty on families provides insight in to the area of death and dying, especially as it is related to disenfranchised loss and nonfinite grief. In addition, this study provides insight into the death penalty and its effects.

  8. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Role of 64-row computed tomographic angiography in diagnosis and therapeutic planning

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Zhang, Meng-Fan; Rong, Ai-Mei; Fang, Xiang-Jie; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Guo-Hao; Chen, Peng-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Yang; Duan, Xu-Hua; Han, Xin-Wei; Liu, Yan-Jie

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the value of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for diagnosis and therapeutic planning in lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. METHODS: Sixty-three consecutive patients with acute lower GI bleeding underwent CTA before endovascular or surgical treatment. CTA was used to determine whether the lower GI bleeding was suitable for endovascular treatment, surgical resection, or conservative treatment in each patient. Treatment planning with CTA was compared with actual treatment decisions or endovascular or surgical treatment that had been carried out in each patient based on CTA findings. RESULTS: 64-row CTA detected active extravasation of contrast material in 57 patients and six patients had no demonstrable active bleeding, resulting in an accuracy of 90.5% in the detection of acute GI bleeding (57 of 63). In three of the six patients with no demonstrable active bleeding, active lower GI bleeding recurred within one week after CTA, and angiography revealed acute bleeding. The overall location-based accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of GI bleeding by 64-row CTA were 98.8% (249 of 252), 95.0% (57 of 60), 100% (192 of 192), 100% (57 of 57), and 98.5% (192 of 195), respectively. Treatment planning was correctly established on the basis of 64-row CTA with an accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 98.4% (248 of 252), 93.3% (56 of 60), 100% (192 of 192), 100% (56 of 56), and 97.5% (192 of 196), respectively, in a location-based evaluation. CONCLUSION: 64-row CTA is safe and effective in making decisions regarding treatment, without performing digital subtraction angiography or surgery, in the majority of patients with lower GI bleeding. PMID:25852291

  9. A reevaluation of the unusual abdominal musculature of squamate reptiles (Reptilia: Squamata).

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S

    2009-08-01

    The abdominal muscles of lizards and snakes (Squamata) have been the subject of periodic attention from anatomists, embryologists, and systematists. Until now, the presence of a superficial portion of the m. rectus abdominis, named the m. rectus abdominis lateralis, has been considered a key synapomorphy of the clade Autarchoglossa, which includes all extant squamates save Gekkota and Iguania. However, the precise anatomical relations of the m. rectus abdominis lateralis have never been fully investigated. Here, I show that the m. rectus abdominis lateralis is present in Iguania. Its absence in Gekkota represents rare gross anatomical support for recent molecular-structure-based hypotheses of squamate relationships placing geckoes as sister to the remaining squamates. Where present, it is the most superficial trunk muscle, exterior to the m. obliquus externus. The separation of the m. rectus abdominis lateralis from the m. rectus abdominis occurs as the m. obliquus externus aponeurosis and part of the m. obliquus internus aponeurosis emerge superficially to form the outer portion of the rectus sheath. In Autarchoglossa, the contralateral mm. recti abdomines laterales meet at the midline and are attached to the imbricae of the transverse scale rows characteristic of the clade, suggesting developmental, functional, and evolutionary association. Because the m. rectus abdominis lateralis is sometimes continuous with the pectoralis, its exclusive association with the m. rectus abdominis is questionable. It may be a neomorphic layer that is part of the abaxial developmental system, comprising those muscles whose connective tissue is largely derived from lateral plate as opposed to somatic mesoderm. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Abdominal wall desmoid tumors: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MA, JIN-HUI; MA, ZHEN-HAI; DONG, XUE-FENG; YIN, HANG; ZHAO, YONG-FU

    2013-01-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare lesions that do not possess any metastatic potential. However, they have a strong tendency to invade locally and recur. They constitute 3% of all soft tissue tumors and 0.03% of all neoplasms. Abdominal DTs occur sporadically or are associated with certain familial syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). The single form of this neoplasm most frequently occurs in females of reproductive age and during pregnancy. A female patient with a DT of the abdominal wall who had no relevant family history was admitted to hospital. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had no history of trauma, surgery or childbearing. According to the medical history, physical examination and CT report, the patient was diagnosed with DT. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was replaced with a polypropylene mesh. The histological diagnosis was of DT. The patient remains in good health and complete remission without any other treatment following surgery. DTs exhibit aggressive growth and have a high rate of recurrence. Surgery is the optimal treatment, and subsequent radiotherapy may decrease the local recurrence rate. Further research into their aetiology is required combined with multicentre clinical trials of new treatments in order to improve management of this disease. This case report provides general knowledge of DT, and may be used as a guidance for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23833679

  11. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  12. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Evolving Controversies and Uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Carino, Davide; Sarac, Timur P; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2018-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as a permanent dilatation of the abdominal aorta that exceeds 3 cm. Most AAAs arise in the portion of abdominal aorta distal to the renal arteries and are defined as infrarenal. Most AAAs are totally asymptomatic until catastrophic rupture. The strongest predictor of AAA rupture is the diameter. Surgery is indicated to prevent rupture when the risk of rupture exceeds the risk of surgery. In this review, we aim to analyze this disease comprehensively, starting from an epidemiological perspective, exploring etiology and pathophysiology, and concluding with surgical controversies. We will pursue these goals by addressing eight specific questions regarding AAA: (1) Is the incidence of AAA increasing? (2) Are ultrasound screening programs for AAA effective? (3) What causes AAA: Genes versus environment? (4) Animal models: Are they really relevant? (5) What pathophysiology leads to AAA? (6) Indications for AAA surgery: Are surgeons over-eager to operate? (7) Elective AAA repair: Open or endovascular? (8) Emergency AAA repair: Open or endovascular?

  13. Nonspecific abdominal pain is a safe diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pennel, David John Laurie; Goergen, Nina; Driver, Chris P

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess if a clinical diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is safe and if patients with this initial diagnosis are likely to require further investigation or surgical intervention. 3323 patients admitted with NSAP from July 1990 to September 2012 utilizing a prospective database of all surgical admissions were included. Readmission over the period of the study and specifically within 30 days of their initial presentation was identified together with any invasive investigation or surgical intervention. 319 children (9.6%) were subsequently readmitted with abdominal pain at some point during the study period. Of these, 78 (2.3%) were readmitted within 30 days. 118 (3.5%) children subsequently had an operation or invasive investigation some point following their initial admission. Of these 33 (0.6%) had the procedure within 3 months of the initial admission. 13 patients had an appendicectomy within 3 months of the initial presentation. Of these histology confirmed appendicitis in 8 patients. This gives an overall incidence of "missed" appendicitis of 0.2 % (8/3323). This study confirms that a clinical diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) is safe in a pediatric population and the risk of "missing" appendicitis is only 0.2%. Patients and/or parents can be confidently reassured that the risk of missing organic pathology is very low. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lung-protective ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, Emmanuel; Jaber, Samir

    2014-08-01

    To provide the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of prophylactic lung-protective mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery. Evidence is accumulating, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Nonprotective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (>10-12 ml/kg), very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, <5 cm H2O), or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by the previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung-protective mechanical ventilation. Recent data provide compelling evidence that prophylactic lung-protective mechanical ventilation using lower tidal volume (6-8 ml/kg of predicted body weight), moderate PEEP (6-8 cm H2O), and recruitment maneuvers is associated with improved functional or physiological and clinical postoperative outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. The use of prophylactic lung-protective ventilation can help in improving the postoperative outcome.

  15. A Spreadsheet for the Mixing of a Row of Jets with a Confined Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, J. D.; Smith, T. D.; Clisset, J. R.; Lear, W. E.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive computer code, written with a readily available software program, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) is presented which displays 3 D oblique plots of a conserved scalar distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow, for a single row, double rows, or opposed rows of jets with or without flow area convergence and/or a non-uniform crossflow scalar distribution. This project used a previously developed empirical model of jets mixing in a confined crossflow to create an Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that can output the profiles of a conserved scalar for jets injected into a confined crossflow given several input variables. The program uses multiple spreadsheets in a single Microsoft Excel notebook to carry out the modeling. The first sheet contains the main program, controls for the type of problem to be solved, and convergence criteria. The first sheet also provides for input of the specific geometry and flow conditions. The second sheet presents the results calculated with this routine to show the effects on the mixing of varying flow and geometric parameters. Comparisons are also made between results from the version of the empirical correlations implemented in the spreadsheet and the versions originally written in Applesoft BASIC (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) in the 1980's.

  16. A Spreadsheet for the Mixing of a Row of Jets with a Confined Crossflow. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holderman, J. D.; Smith, T. D.; Clisset, J. R.; Lear, W. E.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive computer code, written with a readily available software program, Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) is presented which displays 3 D oblique plots of a conserved scalar distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow, for a single row, double rows, or opposed rows of jets with or without flow area convergence and/or a non-uniform crossflow scalar distribution. This project used a previously developed empirical model of jets mixing in a confined crossflow to create an Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that can output the profiles of a conserved scalar for jets injected into a confined crossflow given several input variables. The program uses multiple spreadsheets in a single Microsoft Excel notebook to carry out the modeling. The first sheet contains the main program, controls for the type of problem to be solved, and convergence criteria. The first sheet also provides for input of the specific geometry and flow conditions. The second sheet presents the results calculated with this routine to show the effects on the mixing of varying flow and geometric parameters. Comparisons are also made between results from the version of the empirical correlations implemented in the spreadsheet and the versions originally written in Applesoft BASIC (Apple Computer, Cupertino, CA) in the 1980's.

  17. Crop Row Detection in Maize Fields Inspired on the Human Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, J.; Pajares, G.; Montalvo, M.; Guerrero, J. M.; Guijarro, M.; Ribeiro, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method, oriented to image real-time processing, for identifying crop rows in maize fields in the images. The vision system is designed to be installed onboard a mobile agricultural vehicle, that is, submitted to gyros, vibrations, and undesired movements. The images are captured under image perspective, being affected by the above undesired effects. The image processing consists of two main processes: image segmentation and crop row detection. The first one applies a threshold to separate green plants or pixels (crops and weeds) from the rest (soil, stones, and others). It is based on a fuzzy clustering process, which allows obtaining the threshold to be applied during the normal operation process. The crop row detection applies a method based on image perspective projection that searches for maximum accumulation of segmented green pixels along straight alignments. They determine the expected crop lines in the images. The method is robust enough to work under the above-mentioned undesired effects. It is favorably compared against the well-tested Hough transformation for line detection. PMID:22623899

  18. Development of a Linearized Unsteady Euler Analysis with Application to Wake/Blade-Row Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdon, Joseph M.; Montgomery, Matthew D.; Chuang, H. Andrew

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional, linearized, Euler analysis is being developed to provide a comprehensive and efficient unsteady aerodynamic analysis for predicting the aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses of axial-flow turbomachinery blading. The mathematical models needed to describe nonlinear and linearized, inviscid, unsteady flows through a blade row operating within a cylindrical annular duct are presented in this report. A numerical model for linearized inviscid unsteady flows, which couples a near-field, implicit, wave-split, finite volume analysis to far-field eigen analyses, is also described. The linearized aerodynamic and numerical models have been implemented into the three-dimensional unsteady flow code, LINFLUX. This code is applied herein to predict unsteady subsonic flows driven by wake or vortical excitations. The intent is to validate the LINFLUX analysis via numerical results for simple benchmark unsteady flows and to demonstrate this analysis via application to a realistic wake/blade-row interaction. Detailed numerical results for a three-dimensional version of the 10th Standard Cascade and a fan exit guide vane indicate that LINFLUX is becoming a reliable and useful unsteady aerodynamic prediction capability that can be applied, in the future, to assess the three-dimensional flow physics important to blade-row, aeroacoustic and aeroelastic responses.

  19. Building generalized inverses of matrices using only row and column operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    Most students complete their first and only course in linear algebra with the understanding that a real, square matrix A has an inverse if and only if rref(A), the reduced row echelon form of A, is the identity matrix I n . That is, if they apply elementary row operations via the Gauss-Jordan algorithm to the partitioned matrix [A | I n ] to obtain [rref(A) | P], then the matrix A is invertible exactly when rref(A) = I n , in which case, P = A -1. Many students must wonder what happens when A is not invertible, and what information P conveys in that case. That question is, however, seldom answered in a first course. We show that investigating that question emphasizes the close relationships between matrix multiplication, elementary row operations, linear systems, and the four fundamental spaces associated with a matrix. More important, answering that question provides an opportunity to show students how mathematicians extend results by relaxing hypotheses and then exploring the strengths and limitations of the resulting generalization, and how the first relaxation found is often not the best relaxation to be found. Along the way, we introduce students to the basic properties of generalized inverses. Finally, our approach should fit within the time and topic constraints of a first course in linear algebra.

  20. A CFD analysis of blade row interactions within a high-speed axial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Michael Scott

    Aircraft engine design provides many technical and financial hurdles. In an effort to streamline the design process, save money, and improve reliability and performance, many manufacturers are relying on computational fluid dynamic simulations. An overarching goal of the design process for military aircraft engines is to reduce size and weight while maintaining (or improving) reliability. Designers often turn to the compression system to accomplish this goal. As pressure ratios increase and the number of compression stages decrease, many problems arise, for example stability and high cycle fatigue (HCF) become significant as individual stage loading is increased. CFD simulations have recently been employed to assist in the understanding of the aeroelastic problems. For accurate multistage blade row HCF prediction, it is imperative that advanced three-dimensional blade row unsteady aerodynamic interaction codes be validated with appropriate benchmark data. This research addresses this required validation process for TURBO, an advanced three-dimensional multi-blade row turbomachinery CFD code. The solution/prediction accuracy is characterized, identifying key flow field parameters driving the inlet guide vane (IGV) and stator response to the rotor generated forcing functions. The result is a quantified evaluation of the ability of TURBO to predict not only the fundamental flow field characteristics but the three dimensional blade loading.