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Sample records for abdominal multidetector ct

  1. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Hong, Hye-Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Ha, Hong Il; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. Results The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Conclusion Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity. PMID:23901318

  2. Multidetector CT of emergent biliary pathologic conditions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel B; Oto, Aytekin; Thomas, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Various biliary pathologic conditions can lead to acute abdominal pain. Specific diagnosis is not always possible clinically because many biliary diseases have overlapping signs and symptoms. Imaging can help narrow the differential diagnosis and lead to a specific diagnosis. Although ultrasonography (US) is the most useful imaging modality for initial evaluation of the biliary system, multidetector computed tomography (CT) is helpful when US findings are equivocal or when biliary disease is suspected. Diagnostic accuracy can be increased by optimizing the CT protocol and using multiplanar reformations to localize biliary obstruction. CT can be used to diagnose and stage acute cholecystitis, including complications such as emphysematous, gangrenous, and hemorrhagic cholecystitis; gallbladder perforation; gallstone pancreatitis; gallstone ileus; and Mirizzi syndrome. CT also can be used to evaluate acute biliary diseases such as biliary stone disease, benign and malignant biliary obstruction, acute cholangitis, pyogenic hepatic abscess, hemobilia, and biliary necrosis and iatrogenic complications such as biliary leaks and malfunctioning biliary drains and stents. Treatment includes radiologic, endoscopic, or surgical intervention. Familiarity with CT imaging appearances of emergent biliary pathologic conditions is important for prompt diagnosis and appropriate clinical referral and treatment.

  3. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas--evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Horton, Karen H; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fishman, Elliot K

    2005-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is a rare cystic pancreatic tumor. In this case report we provide the imaging perspective of the lesion including the role of multidetector CT (MDCT) and CT angiography and 3D imaging.

  4. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  5. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms.

    PubMed

    Brisse, H J; Brenot, J; Pierrat, N; Gaboriaud, G; Savignoni, A; De Rycke, Y; Neuenschwander, S; Aubert, B; Rosenwald, J-C

    2009-04-07

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD(1%) assessed in a Catphan phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol(16) with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR(2.8%)), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1(%), adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy(-1). Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD(1%) for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol(16) values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  6. Effect of Low Tube Voltage on Image Quality, Radiation Dose, and Low-Contrast Detectability at Abdominal Multidetector CT: Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Wang, Ling; Li, Rui; Lin, Jie; Zheng, Xiangwu; Cao, Guoquan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the effect of low tube voltage (80 kV) on image quality, radiation dose, and low-contrast detectability (LCD) at abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods. A phantom containing low-contrast objects was scanned with a CT scanner at 80 and 120 kV, with tube current-time product settings at 150–650 mAs. The differences between image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scores of LCD obtained with 80 kV at 150–650 mAs and those obtained with 120 kV at 300 mAs were compared respectively. Results. The image noise substantially increased with low tube voltage. However, with identical dose, use of 80 kV resulted in higher CNR compared with CNR at 120 kV. There were no statistically significant difference in CNR and scores of LCD between 120 kV at 300 mAs and 80 kV at 550–650 mAs (P > 0.05). The relative dose delivered at 80 kV ranged from 58% at 550 mAs to 68% at 650 mAs. Conclusion. With a reduction of the tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV at abdominal CT, the radiation dose can be reduced by 32% to 42% without degradation of CNR and LCD. PMID:22619490

  7. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  8. Multidetector CT of Surgically Proven Blunt Bowel and Mesenteric Injury.

    PubMed

    Bates, David D B; Wasserman, Michael; Malek, Anita; Gorantla, Varun; Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina A

    2017-01-01

    Blunt traumatic injury is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Unintentional injury represents the leading cause of death in the United States for all persons between the ages of 1 and 44 years. In the setting of blunt abdominal trauma, the reported rate of occurrence of bowel and mesenteric injuries ranges from 1% to 5%. Despite the relatively low rate of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury in patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma, delays in diagnosis are associated with increased rates of sepsis, a prolonged course in the intensive care unit, and increased mortality. During the past 2 decades, as multidetector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as an essential tool in emergency radiology, several direct and indirect imaging features have been identified that are associated with blunt bowel and mesenteric injury. The imaging findings in cases of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury can be subtle and may be seen in the setting of multiple complex injuries, such as multiple solid-organ injuries and spinal fractures. Familiarity with the various imaging features of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, as well as an understanding of their clinical importance with regard to the care of the patient, is essential to making a timely diagnosis. Once radiologists are familiar with the spectrum of findings of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, they will be able to make timely diagnoses that will lead to improved patient outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  9. [Review of pre- and post-treatment multidetector computed tomography findings in abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Casula, E; Lonjedo, E; Cerverón, M J; Ruiz, A; Gómez, J

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the frequency of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) and the widely accepted use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a first-line treatment or as an alternative to conventional surgery make it necessary for radiologists to have thorough knowledge of the pre- and post-treatment findings. The high image quality provided by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) enables CT angiography to play a fundamental role in the study of AAA and in planning treatment. The objective of this article is to review the cases of AAA in which CT angiography was the main imaging technique, so that radiologists will be able to detect the signs related to this disease, to diagnose it, to plan treatment, and to detect complications in the postoperative period.

  10. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography scan - abdomen; CT scan - abdomen; CT abdomen and pelvis ... 2016:chap 133. Radiologyinfo.org. Computed tomography (CT) - abdomen and pelvis. Updated June 16, 2016. www.radiologyinfo. ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  12. [Gallstone ileus. Abdominal CT usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh, F; Brasseur, P; Bissen, L

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the case of a 93-year old woman referred to the emergency department and presenting with an intestinal obstruction. Abdominal CT reveals a biliary ileus caused by the migration and the impaction of a 3 cm gallstone in the small bowel. Surgical treatment by enterolithotomy was successful. In over 90% of cases, gallstone ileus is a complication of cholelithiasis and accounts for 25% of intestinal obstruction in patients over 65 years. To reduce morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential. Abdominal CT-scan is the gold standard technique.

  13. Multidetector CT of expected findings and complications after contemporary inguinal hernia repair surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tonolini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair (IHR) with prosthetic mesh implantation is the most common procedure in general surgery, and may be performed using either an open or laparoscopic approach. This paper provides an overview of contemporary tension-free IHR techniques and materials, and illustrates the expected postoperative imaging findings and iatrogenic injuries. Emphasis is placed on multidetector CT, which represents the ideal modality to comprehensively visualize the operated groin region and deeper intra-abdominal structures. CT consistently depicts seroma, mesh infections, hemorrhages, bowel complications and urinary bladder injuries, and thus generally provides a consistent basis for therapeutic choice. Since radiologists are increasingly requested to investigate suspected iatrogenic complications, this paper aims to provide an increased familiarity with early CT studies after IHR, including complications and normal postoperative appearances such as focal pseudolesions, in order to avoid misinterpretation and inappropriate management. PMID:27460285

  14. Dual-energy CT revisited with multidetector CT: review of principles and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltıncaba, Muşturay; Aktaş, Aykut

    2011-09-01

    Although dual-energy CT (DECT) was first conceived in the 1970s, it was not widely used for CT indications. Recently, the simultaneous acquisition of volumetric dual-energy data has been introduced using multidetector CT (MDCT) with two X-ray tubes and rapid kVp switching (gemstone spectral imaging). Two major advantages of DECT are material decomposition by acquiring two image series with different kVp and the elimination of misregistration artifacts. Hounsfield unit measurements by DECT are not absolute and can change depending on the kVp used for an acquisition. Typically, a combination of 80/140 kVp is used for DECT, but for some applications, 100/140 kVp is preferred. In this study, we summarized the clinical applications of DECT and included images that were acquired using the dual-source CT and rapid kVp switching. In general, unenhanced images can be avoided by using DECT for body and neurological applications; iodine can be removed from the image, and a virtual, non-contrast (water) image can be obtained. Neuroradiological applications allow for the removal of bone and calcium from the carotid and brain CT angiography. Thorax applications include perfusion imaging in patients with pulmonary thromboemboli and other chest diseases, xenon ventilation-perfusion imaging and solitary nodule characterization. Cardiac applications include dual-energy cardiac perfusion, viability and cardiac iron detection. The removal of calcific plaques from arteries, bone removal and aortic stent graft evaluation may be achieved in the vascular system. Abdominal applications include the detection and characterization of liver and pancreas masses, the diagnosis of steatosis and iron overload, DECT colonoscopy and CT cholangiography. Urinary system applications are urinary calculi characterization (uric acid vs. non-uric acid), renal cyst characterization and mass characterization. Musculoskeletal applications permit the differentiation of gout from pseudogout and a reduction of

  15. Scenes from the past: initial investigation of early jurassic vertebrate fossils with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Stephan A; Ross, Steffen; Thali, Michael J; Hostettler, Bernhard; Menkveld-Gfeller, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    The study of fossils permits the reconstruction of past life on our planet and enhances our understanding of evolutionary processes. However, many fossils are difficult to recognize, being encased in a lithified matrix whose tedious removal is required before examination is possible. The authors describe the use of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in locating, identifying, and examining fossil remains of crocodilians (Mesosuchia) embedded in hard shale, all without removing the matrix. In addition, they describe how three-dimensional (3D) reformatted CT images provided details that were helpful for extraction and preparation. Multidetector CT can help experienced paleontologists localize and characterize fossils in the matrix of a promising rock specimen in a nondestructive manner. Moreover, with its capacity to generate highly accurate 3D images, multidetector CT can help determine whether the fossils warrant extraction and can assist in planning the extraction process. Thus, multidetector CT may well become an invaluable tool in the field of paleoradiology.

  16. Cam-type deformities: Concepts, criteria, and multidetector CT features.

    PubMed

    Mellado, J M; Radi, N

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of a painful hip requires detailed knowledge of the regional anatomy. Some variants of the proximal femur, such as cam-type deformities, can course asymptomatically or cause femoroacetabular impingement. The principal numerical criterion for defining cam-type deformities, the alpha angle, has some limitations. In this article, we review the anatomic variants of the anterior aspect of the proximal femur, focusing on cam-type deformities. Using diagrams and multidetector CT images, we describe the parameters that are useful for characterizing these deformities in different imaging techniques. We also discuss the potential correspondence of imaging findings of cam-type deformities with the terms coined by anatomists and anthropologists to describe these phenomena.

  17. The validity of investigating occult hip fractures using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Huw L M; Carpenter, Eleanor C; Lyons, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 10% of all hip fractures are occult on plain radiography, requiring further investigation to ascertain the diagnosis. MRI is presently the gold standard investigation, but frequently has disadvantages of time delay, resulting in increased hospital stay and mortality. Our aim was to establish whether multidetector CT (MDCT) is an appropriate first-line investigation of occult femoral neck (NOF) fractures. Methods: From 2013, we elected to use MDCT as the first-line investigation in patients believed to have an NOF fracture with negative plain films. These were reported by consultant musculoskeletal radiologists. We retrospectively analysed the data of consecutive patients presenting to the University Hospital of Wales, over 30 months with a clinical suspicion of a hip fracture. Results: 1443 patients were admitted during the study period. 209 (14.5%) patients had negative plain films requiring further investigation to exclude an NOF fracture, of which 199 patients had a CT. 93 patients had no fracture and 20 patients had isolated greater trochanter fractures. None of these patients progressed to develop an intracapsular femoral neck fracture at 4-month follow-up, although one patient sustained an extracapsular fracture following a high-energy fall whilst admitted. 26 femoral neck fractures were diagnosed on CT, whilst the remaining 60 patients were diagnosed with other pelvic ring fractures. Conclusion: When interpreted by experienced radiologists, MDCT has both sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Advances in knowledge: We recommend the use of MDCT as a safe and appropriate first-line investigation for NOF fractures. PMID:26838948

  18. Trapping volumetric measurement by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Effect of CT threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaohua; Yuan, Huishu; Duan, Jianghui; Du, Yipeng; Shen, Ning; He, Bei

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various computed tomography (CT) thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements by multidetector CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: Twenty-three COPD patients were scanned with a 64-slice CT scanner in both the inspiratory and expiratory phase. CT thresholds of −950 Hu in inspiration and −950 to −890 Hu in expiration were used, after which trapping volumetric measurements were made using computer software. Trapping volume percentage (Vtrap%) under the different CT thresholds in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase was compared and correlated with lung function.Results: Mean Vtrap% was similar under −930 Hu in the expiratory phase and below −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase, being 13.18 ± 9.66 and 13.95 ± 6.72 (both lungs), respectively; this difference was not significant (P= 0.240). Vtrap% under −950 Hu in the inspiratory phase and below the −950 to −890 Hu threshold in the expiratory phase was moderately negatively correlated with the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity and the measured value of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage of the predicted value.Conclusions: Trapping volumetric measurement with multidetector CT is a promising method for the quantification of COPD. It is important to know the effect of various CT thresholds on trapping volumetric measurements.

  19. Classification of lung area using multidetector-row CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukaibo, Tsutomu; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2002-05-01

    Recently, we can get high quality images in the short time for the progress of X-ray CT scanner. And the three dimensional (3-D) analysis of pulmonary organs using multidetector-row CT (MDCT) images, is expected. This paper presents a method for classifying lung area into each lobe using pulmonary MDCT images of the whole lung area. It is possible to recognize the position of nodule by classifying lung area into these lobes. The structure of lungs differs on the right one and left one. The right lung is divided into three domains by major fissure and minor fissure. And, the left lung is divided into two domains by major fissure. Watching MDCT images carefully, we find that the surroundings of fissures have few blood vessels. Therefore, lung area is classified by extraction of the domain that the distance from pulmonary blood vessels is large and connective search of these extracted domains. These extraction and search are realized by 3-D weighted Hough transform.

  20. Recent technologic advances in multi-detector row cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra Simon

    2009-11-01

    Recent technical advances in multi-detector row CT have resulted in lower radiation dose, improved temporal and spatial resolution, decreased scan time, and improved tissue differentiation. Lower radiation doses have resulted from the use of pre-patient z collimators, the availability of thin-slice axial data acquisition, the increased efficiency of ECG-based tube current modulation, and the implementation of iterative reconstruction algorithms. Faster gantry rotation and the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources have led to improvements in temporal resolution, and gains in spatial resolution have been achieved through application of the flying x-ray focal-spot technique in the z-direction. Shorter scan times have resulted from the design of detector arrays with increasing numbers of detector rows and through the simultaneous use of two x-ray sources to allow higher helical pitch. Some improvement in tissue differentiation has been achieved with dual energy CT. This article discusses these recent technical advances in detail.

  1. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  2. Progress in Fully Automated Abdominal CT Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Automated analysis of abdominal CT has advanced markedly over just the last few years. Fully automated assessment of organs, lymph nodes, adipose tissue, muscle, bowel, spine, and tumors are some examples where tremendous progress has been made. Computer-aided detection of lesions has also improved dramatically. CONCLUSION This article reviews the progress and provides insights into what is in store in the near future for automated analysis for abdominal CT, ultimately leading to fully automated interpretation. PMID:27101207

  3. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  4. Penetrating wounds to the torso: evaluation with triple-contrast multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Lozano, J Diego; Munera, Felipe; Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; Menias, Christine O; Caban, Kim M

    2013-01-01

    Penetrating injuries account for a large percentage of visits to emergency departments and trauma centers worldwide. Emergency laparotomy is the accepted standard of care in patients with a penetrating torso injury who are not hemodynamically stable and have a clinical indication for exploratory laparotomy, such as evisceration or gastrointestinal bleeding. Continuous advances in technology have made computed tomography (CT) an indispensable tool in the evaluation of many patients who are hemodynamically stable, have no clinical indication for exploratory laparotomy, and are candidates for conservative treatment. Multidetector CT may depict the trajectory of a penetrating injury and help determine what type of intervention is necessary on the basis of findings such as active arterial extravasation and major vascular, hollow viscus, or diaphragmatic injuries. Because multidetector CT plays an increasing role in the evaluation of patients with penetrating wounds to the torso, the radiologists who interpret these studies should be familiar with the CT findings that mandate intervention.

  5. A new 3-D diagnosis strategy for duodenal malignant lesions using multidetector row CT, CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and 3-D multicholangiography.

    PubMed

    Sata, N; Endo, K; Shimura, K; Koizumi, M; Nagai, H

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) technology provide new opportunities for clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Here we assessed CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, and three-dimensional (3D) multicholangiography created by MD-CT for clinical diagnosis of duodenal malignant lesions. The study involved seven cases of periduodenal carcinoma (four ampullary carcinomas, two duodenal carcinomas, one pancreatic carcinoma). Biliary contrast medium was administered intravenously, followed by intravenous administration of an anticholinergic agent and oral administration of effervescent granules for expanding the upper gastrointestinal tract. Following intravenous administration of a nonionic contrast medium, an upper abdominal MD-CT scan was performed in the left lateral position. Scan data were processed on a workstation to create CT virtual duodenoscopy, duodenography, 3D multicholangiography, and various postprocessing images, which were then evaluated for their effectiveness as preoperative diagnostic tools. Carcinoma location and extent were clearly demonstrated as defects or colored low-density areas in 3-D multicholangiography images and as protruding lesions in virtual duodenography and duodenoscopy images. These findings were confirmed using multiplanar or curved planar reformation images. In conclusion, CT virtual duodenoscopy, doudenography, 3-D multicholangiography, and various images created by MD-CT alone provided necessary and adequate preoperative diagnostic information.

  6. Multidetector CT and postprocessing in planning and assisting in minimally invasive bronchoscopic airway interventions.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arjun; Godoy, Myrna C; Holden, Emma L; Madden, Brendan P; Chua, Felix; Ost, David E; Roos, Justus E; Naidich, David P; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    A widening spectrum of increasingly advanced bronchoscopic techniques is available for the diagnosis and treatment of various bronchopulmonary diseases. The evolution of computed tomography (CT)-multidetector CT in particular-has paralleled these advances. The resulting development of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing techniques has complemented axial CT interpretation in providing more anatomically familiar information to the pulmonologist. Two-dimensional techniques such as multiplanar recontructions and 3D techniques such as virtual bronchoscopy can provide accurate guidance for increasing yield in transbronchial needle aspiration and transbronchial biopsy of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. Sampling of lesions located deeper within the lung periphery via bronchoscopic pathways determined at virtual bronchoscopy are also increasingly feasible. CT fluoroscopy for real-time image-guided sampling is now widely available; electromagnetic navigation guidance is being used in select centers but is currently more costly. Minimally invasive bronchoscopic techniques for restoring airway patency in obstruction caused by both benign and malignant conditions include mechanical strategies such as airway stent insertion and ablative techniques such as electrocauterization and cryotherapy. Multidetector CT postprocessing techniques provide valuable information for planning and surveillance of these treatment methods. In particular, they optimize the evaluation of dynamic obstructive conditions such as tracheobronchomalacia, especially with the greater craniocaudal coverage now provided by wide-area detectors. Multidetector CT also provides planning information for bronchoscopic treatment of bronchopleural fistulas and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction for carefully selected patients with refractory emphysema.

  7. Relationship between noise, dose, and pitch in cardiac multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Zhang, Jie; Fletcher, Joel G

    2006-01-01

    In spiral computed tomography (CT), dose is always inversely proportional to pitch. However, the relationship between noise and pitch (and hence noise and dose) depends on the scanner type (single vs multi-detector row) and reconstruction mode (cardiac vs noncardiac). In single detector row spiral CT, noise is independent of pitch. Conversely, in noncardiac multi-detector row CT, noise depends on pitch because the spiral interpolation algorithm makes use of redundant data from different detector rows to decrease noise for pitch values less than 1 (and increase noise for pitch values > 1). However, in cardiac spiral CT, redundant data cannot be used because such data averaging would degrade the temporal resolution. Therefore, the behavior of noise versus pitch returns to the single detector row paradigm, with noise being independent of pitch. Consequently, since faster rotation times require lower pitch values in cardiac multi-detector row CT, dose is increased without a commensurate decrease in noise. Thus, the use of faster rotation times will improve temporal resolution, not alter noise, and increase dose. For a particular application, the higher dose resulting from faster rotation speeds should be justified by the clinical benefits of the improved temporal resolution.

  8. Multidetector CT of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis.

    PubMed

    Holly, Brian P; Steenburg, Scott D

    2011-01-01

    Venous injuries as a result of blunt trauma are rare. Even though current protocols for multidetector computed tomography (CT) of patients with trauma are designed to evaluate primarily the solid organs and arteries, blunt venous injuries may nevertheless be identified, or at least suspected, on the basis of the multidetector CT findings. Venous injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Diagnosis of a possible venous injury is crucial because the physical findings of a venous injury are nonspecific and may be absent. This article aims to make the radiologist aware of various venous injuries caused by blunt trauma and to provide helpful hints to aid in the identification of venous injuries. Multidetector CT technology, in combination with interactive manipulation of the raw dataset, can be useful in the creation of multiplanar reconstructed images and in the identification of a venous injury caused by blunt trauma. Familiarity with direct and indirect signs of venous injuries, as well as with examples of blunt traumatic venous injuries in the chest, abdomen, and pelvis, will help in the diagnosis of these injuries.

  9. Multi-detector CT in the paediatric urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Damasio, M B; Darge, K; Riccabona, M

    2013-07-01

    The use of paediatric multi-slice CT (MSCT) is rapidly increasing worldwide. As technology advances its application in paediatric care is constantly expanding with an increasing need for radiation dose control and appropriate utilization. Recommendations on how and when to use CT for assessment of the paediatric urinary tract appear to be an important issue. Therefore the European Society of Paediatric Radiology (ESPR) uroradiology task force and European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) paediatric working groups created a proposal for performing renal CT in children that has recently been published. The objective of this paper is to discuss paediatric urinary tract CT (uro-CT) in more detail and depth. The specific aim is not only to offer general recommendations on clinical indications and optimization processes of paediatric CT examination, but also to address various childhood characteristics and phenomena that facilitate understanding the different approach and use of uro-CT in children compared to adults. According to ALARA principles, paediatric uro-CT should only be considered for selected indications provided high-level comprehensive US is not conclusive and alternative non-ionizing techniques such as MR are not available or appropriate. Optimization of paediatric uro-CT protocols (considering lower age-adapted kV and mAs) is mandatory, and the number of phases and acquisition series should be kept as few as possible.

  10. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    PubMed

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  11. [Multidetector row CT in assessment of coronary artery calcification on hemodialisis].

    PubMed

    Caro, P; Delgado, R; Dapena, F; Núñez, A

    2007-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a strong predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Coronary artery calcification is more frequent, more extensive and progresses more rapidly in CKD than in general population. They are also considered a marker of coronary heart disease, with high prevalence and functional significance. It suggests that detection and surveillance may be worthwhile in general clinical practice. New non-invasive image techniques, like Multi-detector row CT, a type of spiral scanner, assess density and volume of calcification at multiple sites and allow quantitative scoring of vascular calcification using calcium scores analogous to those from electron-beam CT. We have assessed and quantified coronary artery calcification with 16 multidetector row CT in 44 patients on hemodialysis and their relationship with several cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary artery calcification prevalence was of 84 % with mean calcium score of 1580 +/- 2010 ( r 0-9844) with calcium score > 400 in 66% of patients. It was usually multiple, affecting more than two vessels in more than 50%. In all but one patient, left anterior descending artery was involved with higher calcium score level at right coronary artery. Advanced age, male, diabetes, smoking, more morbidity, cerebrovascular disease previous, and calcium-binders phosphate and analogous vitamin D treatment would seem to be associated with coronary artery calcification. Coronary artery calcification is very frequent and extensive, usually multiple and associated to modifiable risk factors in hemodialysis patients. Multi-detector-row CT seems an effective, suitable, readily applicable method to assess and quantify coronary artery calcification.

  12. Dedicated multi-detector CT of the esophagus: spectrum of diseases.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Zacherl, Johannes; Noebauer-Huhmann, Iris Melanie; Uffmann, Martin; Matzek, Wolfgang Karl; Pinker, Katja; Herold, Christian; Schima, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) offers new opportunities in the imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Its ability to cover a large volume in a very short scan time, and in a single breath hold with thin collimation and isotropic voxels, allows the imaging of the entire esophagus with high-quality multiplanar reformation and 3D reconstruction. Proper distention of the esophagus and stomach (by oral administration of effervescent granules and water) and optimally timed administration of intravenous contrast material are required to detect and characterize disease. In contrast to endoscopy and double-contrast studies of the upper GI tract, CT provides information about both the esophageal wall and the extramural extent of disease. Preoperative staging of esophageal carcinoma appears to be the main indication for MDCT. In addition, MDCT allows detection of other esophageal malignancies, such as lymphoma and benign esophageal tumors, such as leiomyma. A diagnosis of rupture or fistula of the esophagus can be firmly established using MDCT. Furthermore, miscellaneous esophageal conditions, such as achalasia, esophagitis, diverticula, and varices, are incidental findings and can also be visualized with hydro-multi-detector CT. Multi-detector CT is a valuable tool for the evaluation of esophageal wall disease and serves as an adjunct to endoscopy.

  13. Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (autoimmune pancreatitis): evaluation with multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Satomi; Siegelman, Stanley S; Hruban, Ralph H; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is a form of chronic pancreatitis characterized by a mixed inflammatory infiltrate that centers on the pancreatic ducts. It is a cause of benign pancreatic disease that can clinically mimic pancreatic cancer. Preoperative detection of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis is important because patients usually respond to steroid therapy. Patients with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis are often referred for computed tomography (CT) when they are suspected of having a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm; therefore, it is important to search for potential findings suggestive of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis when typical findings of a pancreatic or biliary neoplasm are not found. Typical CT findings include diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas without dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. Focal enlargement is most commonly seen in the head of the pancreas, and the involved pancreas on contrast material-enhanced CT images may be iso-attenuating relative to the rest of the pancreas, or hypo-attenuating, especially during the early postcontrast phase. Thickening and contrast enhancement of the wall of the common bile duct and gallbladder may reflect inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis associated with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis. There are several features seen at CT that may help to differentiate lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer, such as diffuse enlargement of the pancreas with minimal peripancreatic stranding in patients with obstructive jaundice, an absence of significant pancreatic atrophy, and an absence of significant main pancreatic duct dilatation. When these findings are encountered, clinical, other imaging, and serologic data should be evaluated.

  14. Noninvasive imaging of coronary arteries: current and future role of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Halliburton, Sandra S; Stillman, Arthur E; Kuzmiak, Stacie A; Nissen, Steven E; Tuzcu, E Murat; White, Richard D

    2004-07-01

    While invasive imaging techniques, especially selective conventional coronary angiography, will remain vital to planning and guiding catheter-based and surgical treatment of significantly stenotic coronary lesions, the comprehensive and serial assessment of asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic stages of coronary artery disease (CAD) for preventive purposes will eventually need to rely on noninvasive imaging techniques. Cardiovascular imaging with tomographic modalities, including computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, has great potential for providing valuable information. This review article will describe the current and future role of cardiac CT, and in particular that of multi-detector row CT, for imaging of atherosclerotic and other pathologic changes of the coronary arteries. It will describe how tomographic coronary imaging may eventually supplement traditional angiographic techniques in understanding the patterns of atherosclerotic CAD development.

  15. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-01-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers. PMID:24234584

  16. Virtual anthropology and forensic identification using multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, F; Savall, F; Mokrane, F-Z; Rousseau, H; Crubézy, E; Rougé, D; Telmon, N

    2014-04-01

    Virtual anthropology is made possible by modern cross-sectional imaging. Multislice CT (MSCT) can be used for comparative bone and dental identification, reconstructive identification and lesion identification. Comparative identification, the comparison of ante- and post-mortem imaging data, can be performed on both teeth and bones. Reconstructive identification, a considerable challenge for the radiologist, identifies the deceased by determining sex, geographical origin, stature and age at death. Lesion identification combines virtual autopsy and virtual anthropology. MSCT can be useful in palaeopathology, seeking arthropathy, infection, oral pathology, trauma, tumours, haematological disorders, stress indicators or occupational stress in bones and teeth. We examine some of the possibilities offered by this new radiological subspeciality that adds a new dimension to the work of the forensic radiologist. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial and involves communication and data exchange between radiologists, forensic pathologists, anthropologists and radiographers.

  17. Mandibular arteriovenous malformation: A rare life-threatening condition depicted on multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Amit Nandan Dhar; Pandey, Anubha; Kumar, Ishan; Agarwal, Arjit

    2014-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the mandible is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition which can lead to massive hemorrhage. The following is a description where a large mandibular AVM presented with torrential bleeding following tooth extraction for caries. An orthopantomogram (OPG) was performed which was suggestive of aneurysmal bone cyst or ameloblastoma. A computed tomography (CT) angiography revealed a large mandibular AVM with submandibular extension. It is important for both clinicians and radiologist to be aware of this type of lesion that can have life-threatening complications. It is important to define the anatomical location and the feeder vessels of the entity in detail preoperatively. This communication highlights the common differential and use of multidetector CT (MDCT) angiography along with other imaging modalities to prevent a fatal hemorrhage and arrive at a correct diagnosis. PMID:24959049

  18. High resolution multidetector CT aided tissue analysis and quantification of lung fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Robb, Richard A.

    2006-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, also known as Idiopathic Usual Interstitial Pneumontis, pathologically) is a progressive diffuse lung disease which has a median survival rate of less than four years with a prevalence of 15-20/100,000 in the United States. Global function changes are measured by pulmonary function tests and the diagnosis and extent of pulmonary structural changes are typically assessed by acquiring two-dimensional high resolution CT (HRCT) images. The acquisition and analysis of volumetric high resolution Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) images with nearly isotropic pixels offers the potential to measure both lung function and structure. This paper presents a new approach to three dimensional lung image analysis and classification of normal and abnormal structures in lungs with IPF.

  19. Normal or abnormal? Demystifying uterine and cervical contrast enhancement at multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is not generally advocated as the first-line imaging examination for disorders of the female pelvis. However, multidetector CT is often the modality of choice for evaluating nongynecologic pelvic abnormalities, particularly in emergent settings, in which all the pelvic organs are invariably assessed. Incidental findings of uterine and cervical contrast enhancement in such settings may easily be mistaken for abnormalities, given the broad spectrum of anatomic variants and enhancement patterns that may be seen in the normal uterus and cervix. The authors' review of CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging enhancement patterns, augmented by case examples from their clinical radiology practice, provides a solid foundation for understanding the spectrum of normal uterine and cervical appearances and avoiding potential pitfalls in the diagnosis of benign cervical lesions, adenomyosis, infection, malignancy, and postpartum effects. This information should help radiologists more confidently differentiate between normal and abnormal CT findings and, when CT findings are not definitive, offer appropriate recommendations for follow-up ultrasonography or MR imaging.

  20. Influence of z overscanning on normalized effective doses calculated for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Karantanas, Apostolos; Karabekios, Spiros; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of z overscanning on normalized effective dose for pediatric patients undergoing multidetector-computed tomography (CT) examinations. Five commercially available mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patients and the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code were employed in the current study to simulate pediatric CT exposures. For all phantoms, axial and helical examinations at 120 kV tube voltage were simulated. Scans performed at 80 kV were also simulated. Sex-specific normalized effective doses were estimated for four standard CT examinations i.e., head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk, for all pediatric phantoms. Data for both axial and helical mode acquisition were obtained. In the helical mode, z overscanning was taken into account. The validity of the Monte Carlo results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using thermoluminescence dosimetry and a physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 10-year-old child. In all cases normalized effective dose values were found to increase with increasing z overscanning. The percentage differences in normalized data between axial and helical scans may reach 43%, 70%, 36%, and 26% for head-neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and trunk studies, respectively. Normalized data for female pediatric patients was in general higher compared to male patients for all ages, examined regions, and z overscanning values. For both male and female children, the normalized effective dose values were reduced as the age was increased. For the same typical exposure conditions, dose values decreased when lower tube voltage was used; for a 1-year-old child, for example, the effective dose was 3.8 times lower when 80 kV instead of 120 kV was used. Normalized data for the estimation of effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing standard axial and helical CT examinations on an

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-11-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH.

  2. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: an imaging review comparing MR pulmonary angiography and perfusion with multidetector CT angiography

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, F P; Lima, C M A O; Coutinho, A C; Parente, D B; Bittencourt, L K; Bessa, L G P; Domingues, R C; Marchiori, E

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease that leads to substantial morbidity and eventual death. Pulmonary multidetector CT angiography (MDCTA), pulmonary MR angiography (MRA) and MR-derived pulmonary perfusion (MRPP) imaging are non-invasive imaging techniques for the differential diagnosis of PH. MDCTA is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, one of the most common causes of PH. MRA and MRPP are promising techniques that do not require the use of ionising radiation or iodinated contrast material, and can be useful for patients for whom such material cannot be used. This review compares the imaging aspects of pulmonary MRA and 64-row MDCTA in patients with chronic thromboembolic or idiopathic PH. PMID:22932061

  3. Bronchial anatomy of left lung: a study of multi-detector row CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinya; Ju, Yuanrong; Liu, Cheng; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Min; Sun, Jian; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    Familiarity with prevailing pattern and variations in the bronchial tree is not only essential for the anatomist to explain bronchial variation in bronchial specimens, but also useful for guiding bronchoscopy and instructing pulmonary segmental resection. The purpose of this study was designed to demonstrate various branching patterns of left lung with 3D images, with special attention given to identify the major types at transverse thin-section CT. Two hundred and sixteen patients with routine thorax scans were enrolled. The images of bronchial tree, virtual bronchoscopy were reconstructed using post-processing technique of multi-detector row CT. We attempted to classify the segmental bronchi by interpreting the post-processing images, and identified them in transverse thin-section CT. Our results showed that the segmental bronchial ramifications of the left superior lobe were classified into three types mainly, i.e., common stem of apical and posterior segmental bronchi (64%, 138/216); trifurcation (23%, 50/216); common stem of apical and anterior segmental bronchi (10%, 22/216), and they could be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. There were two major types in left basal segmental bronchi, i.e., bifurcation (75%, 163/216), trifurcation (18%, 39/216), and they could also be identified at two typical sections of transverse thin-section CT. In conclusion, our study have offered simplified branching patterns of bronchi and demonstrated various unusual bronchial branching patterns perfectly with 3D images, and have also revealed how to identify the main branching patterns in transverse thin-section CT.

  4. Multidetector CT appearance of the pelvis after cesarean delivery: normal and abnormal acute findings.

    PubMed

    Gui, Benedetta; Danza, Francesco Maria; Valentini, Anna Lia; Laino, Maria Elena; Caruso, Alessandro; Carducci, Brigida; Rodolfino, Elena; Devicienti, Ersilia; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean section (CS) may have several acute complications that can occur in the early postoperative period. The most common acute complications are hematomas and hemorrhage, infection, ovarian vein thrombosis, uterine dehiscence and rupture. Pelvic hematomas usually occur at specific sites and include bladder flap hematoma (between the lower uterine segment and the bladder) and subfascial or rectus sheath hematoma (rectus sheath or prevescical space). Puerperal hemorrhage can be associated with uterine dehiscence or rupture. Pelvic infections include endometritis, abscess, wound infection, and retained product of conception. Radiologists play an important role in the diagnosis and management of postoperative complications as a result of increasing use of multidetector CT in emergency room. The knowledge of normal and abnormal postsurgical anatomy and findings should facilitate the correct diagnosis so that the best management can be chosen for the patient, avoiding unnecessary surgical interventions and additional treatments. In this article we review the surgical cesarean technique and imaging CT technique followed by description of normal and abnormal post-CS CT findings.

  5. Multidetector CT appearance of the pelvis after cesarean delivery: normal and abnormal acute findings

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Benedetta; Danza, Francesco Maria; Valentini, Anna Lia; Laino, Maria Elena; Caruso, Alessandro; Carducci, Brigida; Rodolfino, Elena; Devicienti, Ersilia; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Cesarean section (CS) may have several acute complications that can occur in the early postoperative period. The most common acute complications are hematomas and hemorrhage, infection, ovarian vein thrombosis, uterine dehiscence and rupture. Pelvic hematomas usually occur at specific sites and include bladder flap hematoma (between the lower uterine segment and the bladder) and subfascial or rectus sheath hematoma (rectus sheath or prevescical space). Puerperal hemorrhage can be associated with uterine dehiscence or rupture. Pelvic infections include endometritis, abscess, wound infection, and retained product of conception. Radiologists play an important role in the diagnosis and management of postoperative complications as a result of increasing use of multidetector CT in emergency room. The knowledge of normal and abnormal postsurgical anatomy and findings should facilitate the correct diagnosis so that the best management can be chosen for the patient, avoiding unnecessary surgical interventions and additional treatments. In this article we review the surgical cesarean technique and imaging CT technique followed by description of normal and abnormal post-CS CT findings. PMID:27756714

  6. Relationship between indexed epicardial fat volume and coronary plaque volume assessed by cardiac multidetector CT

    PubMed Central

    You, Seulgi; Sun, Joo Sung; Park, Seon Young; Baek, Yoolim; Kang, Doo Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explored whether baseline indexed epicardial fat volume (EFVi) and serial changes in EFVi were associated with increase in coronary plaque volume as assessed by multidetector computed tomography. We retrospectively reviewed 87 patients with coronary artery plaque, identified during either baseline or follow-up cardiac computed tomography (CT) examinations. Each plaque volume was measured in volumetric units using a semiautomatic software tool. EFVi was quantified by calculating the total volume of epicardial tissue of CT density −190 to −30 HU, indexed to the body surface area. Clinical cardiovascular risk factors were extracted by medical record review at the time of the cardiac CT examinations. The relationship between EFVi and coronary plaque volume was explored by regression analysis. Although the EFVi did not change significantly from baseline to the time of the follow-up CT (65.7 ± 21.8 vs 66.0 ± 21.8 cm3/m3, P = 0.620), the plaque volumes were increased significantly on the follow-up CT scans. The annual change in EFVi was not accompanied by a parallel change in coronary plaque volume (P = 0.096–0.500). On univariate analysis, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, 10-year coronary heart disease risk, obesity, and baseline EFVi predicted rapid increases in lipid-rich and fibrous plaque volumes. On multivariate analysis, baseline EFVi (odds ratio = 1.029, P = 0.016) was an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume. EFVi was shown to be an independent predictor of a rapid increase in lipid-rich plaque volume. However, changes in EFVi were not associated with parallel changes in coronary plaque volume. PMID:27399137

  7. Evaluation of accuracy of 3D reconstruction images using multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mija; YI, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to determine the accuracy of linear measurements on three-dimensional (3D) images using multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods MDCT and CBCT were performed using 24 dry skulls. Twenty-one measurements were taken on the dry skulls using digital caliper. Both types of CT data were imported into OnDemand software and identification of landmarks on the 3D surface rendering images and calculation of linear measurements were performed. Reproducibility of the measurements was assessed using repeated measures ANOVA and ICC, and the measurements were statistically compared using a Student t-test. Results All assessments under the direct measurement and image-based measurements on the 3D CT surface rendering images using MDCT and CBCT showed no statistically difference under the ICC examination. The measurements showed no differences between the direct measurements of dry skull and the image-based measurements on the 3D CT surface rendering images (P>.05). Conclusion Three-dimensional reconstructed surface rendering images using MDCT and CBCT would be appropriate for 3D measurements. PMID:22474645

  8. Contrast enhanced multi-detector CT and MR findings of a well-differentiated pancreatic vipoma.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Severino, Rosa; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Masone, Stefania; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Maurea, Simone; Fonti, Rosa; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-10-28

    Pancreatic vipoma is an extremely rare tumor accounting for less than 2% of endocrine pancreatic neoplasms with a reported incidence of 0.1-0.6 per million. While cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific, exact localization of the tumor by means of either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) is pivotal for surgical planning. However, cross-sectional imaging findings are usually not specific and further characterization of the tumor may only be achieved by somatostatin-receptor scintigraphy (SRS). We report the case of a 70 years old female with a two years history of watery diarrhoea who was found to have a solid, inhomogeneously enhancing lesion at the level of the pancreatic tail at Gadolinium-enhanced MR (Somatom Trio 3T, Siemens, Germany). The tumor had been prospectively overlooked at a contrast-enhanced multi-detector CT (Aquilion 64, Toshiba, Japan) performed after i.v. bolus injection of only 100 cc of iodinated non ionic contrast media because of a chronic renal failure (3.4 mg/mL) but it was subsequently confirmed by SRS. The patient first underwent a successful symptomatic treatment with somatostatin analogues and was then submitted to a distal pancreasectomy with splenectomy to remove a capsulated whitish tumor which turned out to be a well-differentiated vipoma at histological and immuno-histochemical analysis.

  9. Abdominal CT findings in small bowel perforation.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Osadchy, A; Gayer, G

    2009-02-01

    Small bowel perforation is an emergent medical condition for which the diagnosis is usually not made clinically but by CT, a common imaging modality used for the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Direct CT features that suggest perforation include extraluminal air and oral contrast, which are often associated with secondary CT signs of bowel pathology. This pictorial review illustrates the CT findings of small bowel perforation caused by various clinical entities.

  10. Multi-detector row CT scanning in Paleoanthropology at various tube current settings and scanning mode.

    PubMed

    Badawi-Fayad, J; Yazbeck, C; Balzeau, A; Nguyen, T H; Istoc, A; Grimaud-Hervé, D; Cabanis, E- A

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal tube current setting and scanning mode for hominid fossil skull scanning, using multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Four fossil skulls (La Ferrassie 1, Abri Pataud 1, CroMagnon 2 and Cro-Magnon 3) were examined by using the CT scanner LightSpeed 16 (General Electric Medical Systems) with varying dose per section (160, 250, and 300 mAs) and scanning mode (helical and conventional). Image quality of two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstructions, three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and native images was assessed by four reviewers using a four-point grading scale. An ANOVA (analysis of variance) model was used to compare the mean score for each sequence and the overall mean score according to the levels of the scanning parameters. Compared with helical CT (mean score=12.03), the conventional technique showed sustained poor image quality (mean score=4.17). With the helical mode, we observed a better image quality at 300 mAs than at 160 in the 3D sequences (P=0.03). Whereas in native images, a reduction in the effective tube current induced no degradation in image quality (P=0.05). Our study suggests a standardized protocol for fossil scanning with a 16 x 0.625 detector configuration, a 10 mm beam collimation, a 0.562:1 acquisition mode, a 0.625/0.4 mm slice thickness/reconstruction interval, a pitch of 5.62, 120 kV and 300 mAs especially when a 3D study is required.

  11. Cirsoid Aneurysm of Coronary Arteries Associated with Arterioventricular Fistula Evaluated by 64-Multidetector CT Coronary Angiography: Depiction of a Case

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Gianluca Mamone, Giuseppe; Milazzo, Mariapina; Caruso, Settimo; Baravoglia, Cesar Hernandez; Vitulo, Patrizio; Gridelli, Bruno; Luca, Angelo

    2009-05-15

    A female patient with severe pulmonary hypertension was admitted for lung transplant evaluation. As an incidental finding, the chest CT showed diffuse and dilated coronaries, not detected at previous echocardiography. A coronary CT angiography was then performed using a 64-multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner to better evaluate the coronary tree. The images obtained after postprocessing demonstrated tremendously aneurysmatic and tortuous coronary arteries and the presence of a septal branch deepening into the myocardium and penetrating the right ventricle cavity, forming an abnormal arterioventricular fistula. A causal relation between the aneurysms and the fistula is suspected.

  12. Multidetector CT cystography for imaging colovesical fistulas and iatrogenic bladder leaks.

    PubMed

    Tonolini, Massimo; Bianco, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography currently represents the modality of choice to image the urinary bladder in traumatized patients. In this review we present our experience with MDCT cystography applications outside the trauma setting, particularly for diagnosing bladder fistulas and leaks. A detailed explanation is provided concerning exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. Colovesical fistulas most commonly occur as a complication of sigmoid diverticular disease, and often remain occult after extensive diagnostic work-up including cystoscopy and contrast-enhanced CT. We consistently achieved accurate preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas using MDCT cystography. Urinary leaks and injuries represent a non-negligible occurrence after pelvic surgery, particularly obstetric and gynaecological procedures: in our experience MDCT cystography is useful to investigate iatrogenic bladder leaks or fistulas. In our opinion, MDCT cystography should be recommended as the first line modality for direct visualization or otherwise confident exclusion of both spontaneous enterovesical fistulas and bladder injuries following instrumentation procedures, obstetric or surgical interventions. Main Messages • Explanation of exam preparation, acquisition technique, image reconstruction and interpretation. • Preoperative visualization of colovesical fistulas, usually secondary to sigmoid diverticulitis. • Visualization or exclusion of iatrogenic bladder injuries following instrumentation or surgery.

  13. Hypovolemic shock in children: abdominal CT manifestations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G A; Fallat, M E; Eichelberger, M R

    1987-08-01

    The authors describe a "hypoperfusion complex," seen on abdominal computed tomography, which consists of marked, diffuse dilatation of the intestine with fluid; abnormally intense contrast enhancement of the bowel wall, mesentery, kidneys, and/or pancreas; decreased caliber of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava; and moderate to large peritoneal fluid collections. This complex was present in three patients less than 2 years of age and was associated with severe injury and a poor outcome. Recognition of this constellation of findings may help direct attention to the patient's serious hemodynamic abnormality as much as to individual organ defects.

  14. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  15. Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT

    SciTech Connect

    Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H.

    2007-05-15

    We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

  16. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  17. An ancient Roman bowl embedded in a soil sample: surface shaded three dimensional display using data from a multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    De Maeseneer, M; Buls, N; Cleeren, N; Lenchik, L; De Mey, J

    2006-01-01

    We present an unusual application of multidetector CT and shaded surface rendering in the investigation of a soil sample, containing an ancient Roman bronze bowl. The CT findings were of fundamental importance in helping the archaeologists study the bronze bowl from the soil sample.

  18. Automatic vessel extraction and abdominal aortic stent planning in multislice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyan, Krishna; Smith, Dava; Varma, Jay; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-05-01

    The abdominal aorta is the most common site for an aneurysm, which may lead to hemorrhage and death, to develop. The aim of this study was to develop a semi-automated method to de-lineate the vessels and detect the center-line of these vessels to make measurements necessary for stent design from multi-detector computed tomograms. We developed a robust method of tracking the aortic vessel tree with branches from a user selected seed point along the vessel path using scale space approaches, central transformation measures, vessel direction findings, iterative corrections and a priori information in determining the vessel branches. Fifteen patients were scanned with contrast on Mx8000 CT scanner (Philips Medical Systems), with a 3.2 mm thickness, 1.5 mm slice spacing, and a stack of 512x512x320 volume data sets were reconstructed. The algorithm required an initial user input to locate the vessel seen in axial CT slice. Next, the automated image processing took approximately two minutes to compute the centerline and borders of the aortic vessel tree. The results between the manually and automatically generated vessel diameters were compared and statistics were computed. We observed our algorithm was consistent (less than 0.01 S.D) and similar (less than 0.1 S.D) to manual results.

  19. A method of estimating conceptus doses resulting from multidetector CT examinations during all stages of gestation

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Papadakis, Antonios E.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Current methods for the estimation of conceptus dose from multidetector CT (MDCT) examinations performed on the mother provide dose data for typical protocols with a fixed scan length. However, modified low-dose imaging protocols are frequently used during pregnancy. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for the estimation of conceptus dose from any MDCT examination of the trunk performed during all stages of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study to model the Siemens Sensation 16 and Sensation 64 MDCT scanners. Four mathematical phantoms were used, simulating women at 0, 3, 6, and 9 months of gestation. The contribution to the conceptus dose from single simulated scans was obtained at various positions across the phantoms. To investigate the effect of maternal body size and conceptus depth on conceptus dose, phantoms of different sizes were produced by adding layers of adipose tissue around the trunk of the mathematical phantoms. To verify MCNP results, conceptus dose measurements were carried out by means of three physical anthropomorphic phantoms, simulating pregnancy at 0, 3, and 6 months of gestation and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) crystals. Results: The results consist of Monte Carlo-generated normalized conceptus dose coefficients for single scans across the four mathematical phantoms. These coefficients were defined as the conceptus dose contribution from a single scan divided by the CTDI free-in-air measured with identical scanning parameters. Data have been produced to take into account the effect of maternal body size and conceptus position variations on conceptus dose. Conceptus doses measured with TLD crystals showed a difference of up to 19% compared to those estimated by mathematical simulations. Conclusions: Estimation of conceptus doses from MDCT examinations of the trunk performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be made

  20. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  1. Fully automated adipose tissue measurement on abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Sussman, Daniel L.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2011-03-01

    Obesity has become widespread in America and has been associated as a risk factor for many illnesses. Adipose tissue (AT) content, especially visceral AT (VAT), is an important indicator for risks of many disorders, including heart disease and diabetes. Measuring adipose tissue (AT) with traditional means is often unreliable and inaccurate. CT provides a means to measure AT accurately and consistently. We present a fully automated method to segment and measure abdominal AT in CT. Our method integrates image preprocessing which attempts to correct for image artifacts and inhomogeneities. We use fuzzy cmeans to cluster AT regions and active contour models to separate subcutaneous and visceral AT. We tested our method on 50 abdominal CT scans and evaluated the correlations between several measurements.

  2. CT evaluation of complications of abdominal aortic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, A.; Moss, A.A.; Lusby, R.; Kaiser, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of the CT findings in 29 consecutive patients being studied to detect complications of aortofemoral bypass surgery. Presenting symptoms included fever in 22 (76%), gastrointestinal bleeding in 2 (7%), a pulsating mass in 3 (10%), jaundice in 1 (3%), and back pain in 1 (3%). The complications observed most frequently were groin infection in 7 (24%), abdominal perigraft abscess in 11 (38%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (21%), aorto-enteric fistula in 3 (10%), and lymphocystic hematoma in 3 (10%). There were no false negatives, and overall accuracy and sensitivity of CT in detecting complications was 100%. The authors recommend that CT be performed prior to angiography or surgery whenever an abscess, pseudoaneurysm, or aorto-enteric fistula is suspected.

  3. Incidental discovery of radiopaque pills on abdominal CT in a patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Judge, Bryan S; Hoyle, John D

    2008-07-01

    We present a case in which a young female ingested several tablets of an over-the-counter cough and cold remedy over the course of a week. Pill fragments were identifiable and incidentally discovered when a CT scan of the abdomen was performed to evaluate the cause of her abdominal pain. Discovery of radiopaque pills on diagnostic imaging studies warrants further history and appropriate testing to rule out a life-threatening ingestion.

  4. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  5. Estimating radiation dose to organs of patients undergoing conventional and novel multidetector CT exams using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel, Erin

    Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology have led to an increase in the modality's diagnostic capabilities and therefore its utilization, which has in turn led to an increase in radiation exposure to the patient population. As a result, CT imaging currently constitutes approximately half of the collective exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures. In order to understand the radiation risk, it is necessary to estimate the radiation doses absorbed by patients undergoing CT imaging. The most widely accepted risk models are based on radiosensitive organ dose as opposed to whole body dose. In this research, radiosensitive organ dose was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations incorporating detailed multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner models, specific scan protocols, and using patient models based on accurate patient anatomy and representing a range of patient sizes. Organ dose estimates were estimated for clinical MDCT exam protocols which pose a specific concern for radiosensitive organs or regions. These dose estimates include estimation of fetal dose for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen pelvis CT exams or undergoing exams to diagnose pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism. Breast and lung dose were estimated for patients undergoing coronary CTA imaging, conventional fixed tube current chest CT, and conventional tube current modulated (TCM) chest CT exams. The correlation of organ dose with patient size was quantified for pregnant patients undergoing abdomen/pelvis exams and for all breast and lung dose estimates presented. Novel dose reduction techniques were developed that incorporate organ location and are specifically designed to reduce close to radiosensitive organs during CT acquisition. A generalizable model was created for simulating conventional and novel attenuation-based TCM algorithms which can be used in simulations estimating organ dose for any patient model. The generalizable model is a significant contribution of this

  6. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, W.; Santos, W. S.; Paschoal, C. M. M.; Souza, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current-time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  7. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation.

  8. Diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MRI for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with multi-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yuko; Hieda, Masashi; Akiyama, Naoko; Terada, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Noriaki; Nishiki, Masayo; Kono, Hirotaka; Kohno, Hiroshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Yoshikawa, Yukinobu; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Awai, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of gadoxetate disodium (Gd-EOB)-MRI for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared with multidetector CT (MDCT). Fifty patients with 57 surgically proven HCCs who underwent Gd-EOB-MRI and MDCT from March 2008 to June 2011 were evaluated. Two observers evaluated MR and CT on a lesion-by-lesion basis. We analyzed sensitivity by grading on a 5-point scale, the degree of arterial enhancement and the differences in histological grades in the diffusion-weighted images (DWI). The results showed that the sensitivity of Gd-EOB-MRI was higher than that of MDCT especially for HCCs that were 1 cm in diameter or smaller. The hepatobiliary phase was useful for the detecting of small HCC. We had few cases in which it was difficult to judge HCC in the arterial enhancement between MRI and MDCT. In the diffusion-weighted image, well differentiated HCC tended to show a low signal intensity, and poorly differentiated HCC tended to show a high signal intensity. In moderately differentiated HCC's, the mean diameter of the high signal intensity group was larger than that of the low signal intensity group (24.5 mm vs. 15.8 mm). In conclusion, Gd-EOB-MRI tended to show higher sensitivity compared to MDCT in the detection of HCC.

  9. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Arrivé, L; Corréas, J M; Lesèche, G; Ghebontni, L; Tubiana, J M

    1995-12-01

    Inflammatory aneurysm of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) is a variant of atherosclerotic aneurysm that is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum [1, 2]. These inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes are probably the result of a local autoallergic reaction to certain components of atherosclerotic plaques [2]. This distinct entity has important implications, as the periaortic fibrotic tissue adherent to ureters, the duodenum, and the inferior vena cava may complicate surgical repair [1, 2]. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the CT appearance of IAAA, with emphasis on the identification of IAAA and differentiation from conventional aortic aneurysms, evaluation of the involvement of adjacent structures by the periaortic fibrosis, and evaluation of the retroperitoneum after aneurysmal repair to analyze the resolution or the persistence of the periaortic fibrosis.

  10. The radiological diagnosis of fenestral otosclerosis: the utility of histogram analysis using multidetector row CT.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Togao, Osamu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Inoguchi, Takashi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Bone density measurements using high-resolution CT have been reported to be useful to diagnose fenestral otosclerosis. However, small region of interest (ROI) chosen by less-experienced radiologists may result in false-negative findings. Semi-automatic analysis such as CT histogram analysis may offer improved assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of CT histogram analysis in diagnosing fenestral otosclerosis. Temporal bone CT of consecutive patients with otosclerosis and normal controls was retrospectively analyzed. The control group consisted of the normal-hearing contralateral ears of patients with otitis media, cholesteatoma, trauma, facial nerve palsy, or tinnitus. All CT images were obtained using a 64-detector-row CT scanner with 0.5-mm collimation. AROI encompassing 10 × 10 pixels was placed in the bony labyrinth located anterior to the oval window. The mean CT value, variance and entropy were compared between otosclerosis patients and normal controls using Student's t test. The number of pixels below mean minus SD in the control (%Lowcont) and total subjects (%Lowtotal) were also compared. In addition, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) value for the discrimination between otosclerosis patients and normal controls was calculated. 51 temporal bones of 38 patients with otosclerosis and 30 temporal bones of 30 control subjects were included. The mean CT value was significantly lower in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01). In addition, variance, entropy, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were significantly higher in otosclerosis cases than in normal controls (p < 0.01, respectively). The AUC values for the mean CT value, %Lowcont and %Lowtotal were 0.751, 0.760 and 0.765, respectively. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that histogram analysis of CT image may be of clinical value in diagnosing otosclerosis.

  11. Variants of the popliteal artery terminal branches as detected by multidetector ct angiography

    PubMed Central

    Oztekin, Pelin Seher; Ergun, Elif; Cıvgın, Esra; Yigit, Hasan; Kosar, Pınar Nercis

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate variants of the popliteal artery (PA) terminal branches with 64-multidetector computed tomographic angiography (64-MD CTA). Materials and Methods A total of 495 extremities (251 right, 244 left) of 253 patients undergoing a 64-MD CTA examination were included in the study. Of these, 242 extremities were evaluated bilaterally, whereas 11 were evaluated unilaterally. The terminal branching pattern of the PA was classified according to the classification scheme proposed by Kim; the distance between the medial tibial plateau and the origin of the anterior tibial artery (A) and the length of the tibioperoneal trunk (B) have been measured and recorded. Results In 459 cases (92.7%) branching of PA occurred distal to the knee joint (Type I); in 18 cases (2.8%) PA branching was superior to the knee joint (Type II); and hypoplasia of the PA branches was found in 27 cases (5.5%) (Type III). Among these types the most frequent branching patterns were Type IA (87.5%), Type IIIA (3.9%), and Type IB (3.8%). The ranges of A and B mean distances were 47.6 mm and 29.6 mm, respectively Conclusion Variations in popliteal artery terminal branching pattern occurred in 7.4% to 17.6% of patients. Pre-surgical detection of these variations with MD CTA may help to reduce the risk of iatrogenic arterial injury by enabling a better surgical treatment plan. PMID:28352741

  12. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  13. Assessment of trabecular bone structure of the calcaneus using multi-detector CT: correlation with microCT and biomechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Gerd; Link, Thomas M; Kentenich, Marie; Schwieger, Karsten; Huber, Markus B; Burghardt, Andrew J; Majumdar, Sharmila; Rogalla, Patrik; Issever, Ahi S

    2009-05-01

    The prediction of bone strength can be improved when determining bone mineral density (BMD) in combination with measures of trabecular microarchitecture. The goal of this study was to assess parameters of trabecular bone structure and texture of the calcaneus by clinical multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in an experimental in situ setup and to correlate these parameters with microCT (microCT) and biomechanical testing. Thirty calcanei in 15 intact cadavers were scanned using three different protocols on a 64-slice MDCT scanner with an in-plane pixel size of 208 microm and 500 microm slice thickness. Bone cores were harvested from each specimen and microCT images with a voxel size of 16 microm were obtained. After image coregistration, trabecular bone structure and texture were evaluated in identical regions on the MDCT images. After data acquisition, uniaxial compression testing was performed. Significant correlations between MDCT- and microCT-derived measures of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) were found (range, R(2)=0.19-0.65, p<0.01 or 0.05). The MDCT-derived parameters of volumetric BMD, app. BV/TV, app. Tb.Th and app. Tb.Sp were capable of predicting 60%, 63%, 53% and 25% of the variation in bone strength (p<0.01). When combining those measures with one additional texture index (either GLCM, TOGLCM or MF.euler), prediction of mechanical competence was significantly improved to 86%, 85%, 71% and 63% (p<0.01). In conclusion, this study showed the feasibility of trabecular microarchitecture assessment using MDCT in an experimental setup simulating the clinical situation. Multivariate models of BMD or structural parameters combined with texture indices improved prediction of bone strength significantly and might provide more reliable estimates of fracture risk in patients.

  14. PET/CT detects abdominal wall and port site metastases of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goshen, E; Davidson, T; Aderka, D; Zwas, S T

    2006-07-01

    Abdominal wall metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC) may be resected with curative results. Such lesions, often indicators of additional intra-abdominal lesions, may appear in surgical scars, stomas and port site metastases after laparoscope-assisted surgery (LAS). Post-operative changes, primarily surgical scars, alter local physical findings making early detection of small lesions challenging. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the contribution of PET/CT to the diagnosis of recurrent colorectal cancer in the post-operative abdominal wall. 120 patients were referred for PET/CT with suspected recurrent CRC based on clinical, radiological or laboratory findings. All underwent whole body PET/CT imaging. 12 of these 120 (10%), were found to have abdominal wall lesions. A total of 16 abdominal wall lesions were detected, located to surgical scars, stomas, drain and laparoscope ports. Additional findings on PET/CT in this group included liver metastases, intra-abdominal lesions and retroperitoneal lymph node involvement. In general, the patients in this small group were young with high grade tumours presenting in advanced stages. In conclusion, PET/CT appears to be a sensitive tool for the diagnosis of abdominal wall recurrence of CRC. The accuracy of localization afforded by the fused functional and anatomic images makes PET/CT a likely tool for diagnosing abdominal wall lesions, including port site metastases of other aetiologies.

  15. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  16. Can multidetector CT detect the site of gastrointestinal tract injury in trauma? – A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Das, Ranjita; Paliwal, Swati; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the performance of computed tomography (CT) in localizing site of traumatic gastrointestinal tract (GIT) injury and determine the diagnostic value of CT signs in site localization. METHODS CT scans of 97 patients with surgically proven GIT or mesenteric injuries were retrospectively reviewed by radiologists blinded to surgical findings. Diagnosis of either GIT or mesenteric injuries was made. In patients with GIT injuries, site of injury and presence of CT signs such as focal bowel wall hyperenhancement, hypoenhancement, wall discontinuity, wall thickening, extramural air, intramural air, perivisceral infiltration, and active vascular contrast leak were evaluated. RESULTS Out of 97 patients, 90 had GIT injuries (70 single site injuries and 20 multiple site injuries) and seven had isolated mesenteric injury. The overall concordance between CT and operative findings for exact site localization was 67.8% (61/90), partial concordance rate was 11.1% (10/90), and discordance rate was 21.1% (19/90). For single site localization, concordance rate was 77.1% (54/70), discordance rate was 21.4% (15/70), and partial concordance rate was 1.4% (1/70). In multiple site injury, concordance rate for all sites of injury was 35% (7/20), partial concordance rate was 45% (9/20), and discordance rate was 20% (4/20). For upper GIT injuries, wall discontinuity was the most accurate sign for localization. For small bowel injury, intramural air and hyperenhancement were the most specific signs for site localization, while for large bowel injury, wall discontinuity and hypoenhancement were the most specific signs. CONCLUSION CT performs better in diagnosing small bowel injury compared with large bowel injury. CT can well predict the presence of multiple site injury but has limited performance in exact localization of all injury sites. PMID:27924777

  17. Update on multidetector coronary CT angiography of coronary stents: in vitro evaluation of 29 different stent types with dual-source CT.

    PubMed

    Maintz, David; Burg, Matthias C; Seifarth, Harald; Bunck, Alexander C; Ozgün, Murat; Fischbach, Roman; Jürgens, Kai Uwe; Heindel, Walter

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a large sample of the latest coronary artery stents using four image reconstruction approaches with respect to lumen visualization, lumen attenuation, and image noise in dual-source multidetector row CT (DSCT) in vitro and to provide a CT catalogue of currently used coronary artery stents. Twenty-nine different coronary artery stents (19 steel, 6 cobalt-chromium, 2 tantalum, 1 iron, 1 magnesium) were examined in a coronary artery phantom (vessel diameter 3 mm, intravascular attenuation 250 HU, extravascular density -70 HU). Stents were imaged in axial orientation with standard parameters: 32 x 0.6 collimation, pitch 0.24, 400 mAs, 120 kV, rotation time 0.33 s. Image reconstructions were obtained with four different convolution kernels (soft, medium-soft, standard high-resolution, stent-dedicated). To evaluate visualization characteristics of the stent, the lumen diameter, intraluminal density, and noise were measured. The stent-dedicated kernel offered best average lumen visualization (54 +/- 8.3%) and most realistic lumen attenuation (222 +/- 44 HU) at the expense of increased noise (23.9 +/- 1.9 HU) compared with standard CTA protocols (p < 0.001 for all). The magnesium stent showed the least artifacts with a lumen visibility of 90%. The majority of stents (79%) exhibited a lumen visibility of 50-59%. Less than half of the stent lumen was visible in only six stents. Stent lumen visibility largely varies depending on the stent type. Magnesium is by far more favorable a stent material with regard to CT imaging when compared with the more common materials steel, cobalt-chromium, or tantalum. The magnesium stent exhibits a lumen visibility of 90%, whereas the majority of the other stents exhibit a lumen visibility of 50-59%.

  18. A retrospective comparison of smart prep and test bolus multi-detector CT pulmonary angiography protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Suckling, Tara; Smith, Tony; Reed, Warren

    2013-06-15

    Optimal arterial opacification is crucial in imaging the pulmonary arteries using computed tomography (CT). This poses the challenge of precisely timing data acquisition to coincide with the transit of the contrast bolus through the pulmonary vasculature. The aim of this quality assurance exercise was to investigate if a change in CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) scanning protocol resulted in improved opacification of the pulmonary arteries. Comparison was made between the smart prep protocol (SPP) and the test bolus protocol (TBP) for opacification in the pulmonary trunk. A total of 160 CTPA examinations (80 using each protocol) performed between January 2010 and February 2011 were assessed retrospectively. CT attenuation coefficients were measured in Hounsfield Units (HU) using regions of interest at the level of the pulmonary trunk. The average pixel value, standard deviation (SD), maximum, and minimum were recorded. For each of these variables a mean value was then calculated and compared for these two CTPA protocols. Minimum opacification of 200 HU was achieved in 98% of the TBP sample but only 90% of the SPP sample. The average CT attenuation over the pulmonary trunk for the SPP was 329 (SD = ±21) HU, whereas for the TBP it was 396 (SD = ±22) HU (P = 0.0017). The TBP also recorded higher maximum (P = 0.0024) and minimum (P = 0.0039) levels of opacification. This study has found that a TBP resulted in significantly better opacification of the pulmonary trunk than the SPP.

  19. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  20. [Comparison of a dental cone beam CT with a multi-detector row CT on effective doses and physical image quality].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Tokumori, Kenji; Okamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshiura, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dental cone beam computed tomography (dental CBCT) and a multi-detector row CT (MDCT) using effective doses and physical image quality. A dental mode (D-mode) and an implant mode (I-mode) were employed for calculating effective doses. Field of view (FOV) size of the MDCT was 150 mm. Three types of images were obtained using 3 different reconstruction functions: FC1 (for abdomen images), FC30 (for internal ear and bone images) and FC81 (for high resolution images). Effective doses obtained with the D-mode and with the I-mode were about 20% and 50% of those obtained with the MDCT, respectively. Resolution properties obtained with the D-mode and I-mode were superior to that of the MDCT in a high frequency range. Noise properties of the D-mode and the I-mode were better than those with FC81. It was found that the dental CBCT has better potential as compared with MDCT in both dental and implant modes.

  1. Split-Bolus Single-Pass Multidetector-Row CT Protocol for Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Brunese, Luca; Piscioli, Irene; Pierotti, Luisa; Bellantonio, Lucio; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Rotondo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Currently computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become a widely accepted clinical tool in the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Objectives: To report split-bolus single-pass 64-multidetector-row CT (MDCT) protocol for diagnosis of PE. Patients and Methods: MDCT split-bolus results in 40 patients suspicious of PE were analyzed in terms of image quality of target pulmonary vessels (TPVs) and occurrence and severity of flow-related artifact, flow-related artifact, false filling defect of the pulmonary veins and beam hardening streak artifacts. Dose radiation to patients was calculated. Results: MDCT split-bolus protocol allowed diagnostic images of high quality in all cases. Diagnosis of PE was obtained in 22 of 40 patients. Mean attenuation for target vessels was higher than 250 HU all cases: 361 ± 98 HU in pulmonary artery trunk (PAT); 339 ± 93 HU in right pulmonary artery (RPA); 334 ± 100 HU in left pulmonary artery (LPA). Adequate enhancement was obtained in the right atrium (RA):292 ± 83 HU; right pulmonary vein (RPV): 302 ± 91 HU, and left pulmonary vein (LPV): 291 ± 83 HU. The flow related artifacts and the beam hardening streak artifacts have been detected respectively in 4 and 25 patients. No false filling defect of the pulmonary veins was revealed. Conclusion: MDCT split-bolus technique by simultaneous opacification of pulmonary arteries and veins represents an accurate technique for diagnosis of acute PE, removes the false filling defects of the pulmonary veins, and reduces flow related artifacts. PMID:27110334

  2. Voxel-Based Sensitivity of Flat-Panel CT for the Detection of Intracranial Hemorrhage: Comparison to Multi-Detector CT

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Andreas M.; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik; Fiehler, Jens; Kemmling, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Flat-panel CT (FPCT) allows cross-sectional parenchymal, vascular and perfusion imaging within the angiography suite, which could greatly facilitate acute stroke management. We hypothesized that FPCT offers equal diagnostic accuracy compared to multi-detector CT (MDCT) as a primary tool to exclude intracranial hemorrhage. Methods 22 patients with intracranial hematomas who had both MDCT and FPCT performed within 24 hours were retrospectively identified. Patients with visible change in hematoma size or configuration were excluded. Two raters independently segmented hemorrhagic lesions. Data sets and corresponding binary lesion maps were co-registered to compare hematoma volume. Diagnostic accuracy of FPCT to detect hemorrhage was calculated from voxel-wise analysis of lesion overlap compared to reference MDCT. Results Mean hematoma size was similar between MDCT (16.2±8.9 ml) and FPCT (16.1±8.6 ml), with near perfect correlation of hematoma sizes between modalities (ρ = 0.95, p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of FPCT to detect hemorrhagic voxels was 61.6% and 99.8% for intraventricular hematomas and 67.7% and 99.5% for all other intracranial hematomas. Conclusions In this small sample containing predominantly cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, FPCT based assessment of hemorrhagic volume in brain yields acceptable accuracy compared to reference MDCT, albeit with a limited sensitivity on a voxel level. Further assessment and improvement of FPCT is necessary before it can be applied as a primary imaging modality to exclude intracranial hemorrhage in acute stroke patients. PMID:27806106

  3. Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia: Presentations on 99mTc-MAG3 Scan, 99mTc-DMSA SPECT, and Multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Min-Woo; Kim, Young Jun; Sun, In O

    2015-10-01

    Crossed renal ectopia is an uncommon developmental anomaly in which both kidneys are located on the same side of the body. The present case describes a 20-year-old man who underwent the military entrance physical examination. The ultrasound showed the right kidney in normal site with slightly increased size, but the left kidney was not identified. Tc-MAG3 scan showed a single kidney with 2 ureters, and the orifices of the ureters were connected at both sides of bladder. Tc-DMSA SPECT and contrast-enhanced multidetector CT were performed and revealed crossed fused renal ectopia.

  4. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumors: CT and FDG-PET/CT findings with histopathological association.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Zengjie; Sun, Binbin; Li, Dacheng; Wang, Zhenguang; Liu, Fangjun; Hua, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) are rare and aggressive malignant tumors. The aim of the present study was to analyze computed tomography (CT) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of intra-abdominal desmoplastic DSRCT, and investigate the association of these features with histopathological results. The present study was a retrospective investigation of 4 patients with DSRCT. All patients underwent CT and dynamic CT, and 1 additionally underwent FDG-PET/CT scanning. Following a tumor resection, routine hematoxylin and eosin staining, and immunostaining, were performed and evaluated. Multiple large abdominopelvic masses were identified in all 4 patients; however, no indications of their site of origin were demonstrated. CT revealed soft-tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense lesions. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed slightly or moderately heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other observations from these patients included calcification (n=2), peritoneal seeding (n=3), hepatic metastasis (n=3), retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n=3) and ascites (n=2). FDG-PET/CT revealed multiple nodular increased FDG uptake in the abdominopelvic masses, and in the liver and peritoneum in 1 case. Intra-abdominal DSRCT demonstrated significant diagnostic characteristics on plain and contrast-enhanced CT. Multiple, bulky soft-tissue masses inside the peritoneal cavity, particularly in male adolescents and young adults, should be considered as potential cases of DSRCT. FDG-PET/CT techniques may be utilized to aid the staging of tumors.

  5. Multi-detector row CT as a "one-stop" examination in the preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen; Yan, Chaogui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Xuhui; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Mingjuan; Wang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2011-02-01

    We designed to investigate the feasibility of multi-detector row computerized tomography (CT) as a "one-stop" examination for the simultaneous preoperative evaluation of the morphology and function of living renal donors. 21 living renal donors were examined by 64-slice spiral CT with a three-phase enhancement CT scan and two inserted dynamic scans. The maximum intensity projection (MIP), multi-planar reformation (MPR), and volume reconstruction (VR) procedures were performed to compare the renal parenchyma, renal vessels, and collecting system with operational findings. The known Patlak equation was used to calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR); exact GFR information was acquired by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our results as following, there were 3 cases of artery variation and 3 cases of vein variation. CT findings all corresponded with the operation, and the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specialty, and negative predictive value of CT were all 100%. The r of the GFR values estimated from CT is 0.894 (left) (P < 0.001) and 0.881 (right) (P < 0.001). In conclusions, our findings demonstrate that 64-slice spiral CT may offer a "one-stop" examination to replace SPECT in the preoperative evaluation of living renal donors to simultaneously provide information regarding both anatomy and the GFR of living renal donors.

  6. Improving Image Quality of On-Board Cone-Beam CT in Radiation Therapy Using Image Information Provided by Planning Multi-Detector CT: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Chen, Fong-Lin; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to improve the image quality of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) mounted on the gantry of a linear accelerator used in radiation therapy based on the image information provided by planning multi-detector CT (MDCT). Methods MDCT-based shading correction for CBCT and virtual monochromatic CT (VMCT) synthesized using the dual-energy method were performed. In VMCT, the high-energy data were obtained from CBCT, while the low-energy data were obtained from MDCT. An electron density phantom was used to investigate the efficacy of shading correction and VMCT on improving the target detectability, Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy and variation, which were quantified by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the percent difference (%Diff) and the standard deviation of the CT numbers for tissue equivalent background material, respectively. Treatment plan studies for a chest phantom were conducted to investigate the effects of image quality improvement on dose planning. Results For the electron density phantom, the mean value of CNR was 17.84, 26.78 and 34.31 in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The mean value of %Diff was 152.67%, 11.93% and 7.66% in CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT, respectively. The standard deviation within a uniform background of CBCT, shading-corrected CBCT and VMCT was 85, 23 and 15 HU, respectively. With regards to the chest phantom, the monitor unit (MU) difference between the treatment plan calculated using MDCT and those based on CBCT, shading corrected CBCT and VMCT was 6.32%, 1.05% and 0.94%, respectively. Conclusions Enhancement of image quality in on-board CBCT can contribute to daily patient setup and adaptive dose delivery, thus enabling higher confidence in patient treatment accuracy in radiation therapy. Based on our results, VMCT has the highest image quality, followed by the shading corrected CBCT and the original CBCT. The research results presented in this study should be

  7. CT of benign cystic abdominal masses in children

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, P.J.; Whitley, N.O.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) correctly portrayed the gross anatomic features of six mesenteric, omental, and ovarian cysts and diagnosed two pancreatic pseudocysts in children. Large, well defined, low-density masses were found, often containing septa and filling most of the abdomen and pelvis. CT displayed the size and extent of the mass and showed extrinsic compression of displacement of surrounding structures. Different pathologic entities may have similar CT appearances, particularly with very large cystic masses.

  8. Construction of Abdominal Probabilistic Atlases and Their Value in Segmentation of Normal Organs in Abdominal CT Scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Hero, Alfred; Bland, Peyton; Kessler, Marc; Seo, Jongbum; Meyer, Charles

    A good abdominal probabilistic atlas can provide important information to guide segmentation and registration applications in the abdomen. Here we build and test probabilistic atlases using 24 abdominal CT scans with available expert manual segmentations. Atlases are built by picking a target and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. We improve our previous abdominal atlas by 1) choosing a least biased target as determined by a statistical tool, i.e. multidimensional scaling operating on bending energy, 2) using a better set of control points to model the deformation, and 3) using higher information content CT scans with visible internal liver structures. One atlas is built in the least biased target space and two atlases are built in other target spaces for performance comparisons. The value of an atlas is assessed based on the resulting segmentations; whichever atlas yields the best segmentation performance is considered the better atlas. We consider two segmentation methods of abdominal volumes after registration with the probabilistic atlas: 1) simple segmentation by atlas thresholding and 2) application of a Bayesian maximum a posteriori method. Using jackknifing we measure the atlas-augmented segmentation performance with respect to manual expert segmentation and show that the atlas built in the least biased target space yields better segmentation performance than atlases built in other target spaces.

  9. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses following abdominal surgery under real-time CT-fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Kashima, Masataka; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Takeda, Kan

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of transhepatic drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses retrospectively under real-time computed tomographic (CT) guidance. For abdominal abscesses, 12 consecutive patients received percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Abscesses were considered inaccessible using the usual access route because they were surrounded by the liver and other organs. The maximum diameters of abscesses were 4.6-9.5 cm (mean, 6.7 +/- 1.4 cm). An 8-Fr catheter was advanced into the abscess cavity through the liver parenchyma using real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance. Safety, feasibility, procedure time, and clinical utility were evaluated. Drainage catheters were placed with no complications in abscess cavities through the liver parenchyma in all patients. The mean procedure time was 18.8 +/- 9.2 min (range, 12-41 min). All abscesses were drained. They shrank immediately after catheter placement. In conclusions, this transhepatic approach under real-time CT fluoroscopic guidance is a safe, feasible, and useful technique for use of drainage of inaccessible abdominal abscesses.

  10. [Development of CT manifestations and anatomic studies on thoracic-abdominal junctional zone].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yilan; Deng, Wen; Yang, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Thoracic-abdominal junctional zone is an area from the inferior chest to superior belly. The inferior chest contains inferior pulmonary lobes, pulmonary ligament, inferior mediastinum and lower thoracic cavity,while the superior belly contains upper abdominal cavity, spatium retroperitonaeale, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, liver, stomach, adrenal glands, kidneys and spleen. This article is to review the CT manifestations and anatomy of diseases such as infection, trauma, hemorrhage, hernia and tumor involving this area. It could provides anatomic and pathological information for instituting clinical treatments.

  11. Pulmonary adenocarcinomas presenting as ground-glass opacities on multidetector CT: three-dimensional computer-assisted analysis of growth pattern and doubling time

    PubMed Central

    Borghesi, Andrea; Farina, Davide; Michelini, Silvia; Ferrari, Matteo; Benetti, Diego; Fisogni, Simona; Tironi, Andrea; Maroldi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the growth pattern and doubling time (DT) of pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting ground-glass opacities (GGOs) on multidetector computed tomography (CT). METHODS The growth pattern and DT of 22 pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting GGOs were retrospectively analyzed using three-dimensional semiautomatic software. Analysis of each lesion was based on calculations of volume and mass changes and their respective DTs throughout CT follow-up. Three-dimensional segmentation was performed by a single radiologist on each CT scan. The same observer and another radiologist independently repeated the segmentation at the baseline and the last CT scan to determine the variability of the measurements. The relationships among DTs, histopathology, and initial CT features of the lesions were also analyzed. RESULTS Pulmonary adenocarcinomas presenting as GGOs exhibited different growth patterns: some lesions grew rapidly and some grew slowly, whereas others alternated between periods of growth, stability, or shrinkage. A significant increase in volume and mass that exceeded the coefficient of repeatability of interobserver variability was observed in 72.7% and 84.2% of GGOs, respectively. The volume-DTs and mass-DTs were heterogeneous throughout the follow-up CT scan (range, −4293 to 21928 and −3113 to 17020 days, respectively), and their intra- and interobserver variabilities were moderately high. The volume-DTs and mass-DTs were not correlated with the initial CT features of GGOs; however, they were significantly shorter in invasive adenocarcinomas (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION Pulmonary adenocarcinomas exhibiting GGOs show heterogeneous growth patterns with a trend toward a progressive increase in size. DTs may be useful for predicting tumor aggressiveness. PMID:27682741

  12. Abdominal CT scanning in reproductive-age women with right lower quadrant abdominal pain: does its use reduce negative appendectomy rates and healthcare costs?

    PubMed

    Morse, Bryan C; Roettger, Richard H; Kalbaugh, Corey A; Blackhurst, Dawn W; Hines, William B

    2007-06-01

    Although acute appendicitis is the most frequent cause of the acute abdomen in the United States, its accurate diagnosis in reproductive-age women remains difficult. Problems in making the diagnosis are evidenced by negative appendectomy rates in this group of 20 per cent to 45 per cent. Abdominal CT scanning has been used in diagnosing acute appendicitis, but its reliability and usefulness remains controversial. There is concern that the use of CT scanning to make this diagnosis leads to increased and unwarranted healthcare charges and costs. The purpose of our study is to determine if abdominal CT scanning is an effective test in making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women (age, 16-49 years) with right lower quadrant abdominal pain and to determine if its use is cost-effective. From January 2003 to December 2006, 439 patients were identified from our academic surgical database and confirmed by chart review as undergoing an appendectomy with a pre- or postoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Data, including age, presence and results of preoperative abdominal CT scans, operative findings, and pathology reports were reviewed. Comparison of patients receiving a preoperative CT scan with those who did not was performed using chi-squared analysis. In the subgroup of reproductive-age women, there was a significant difference in negative appendectomy rates of 17 per cent in the group that received abdominal CT scans versus 42 per cent in the group that did not (P < 0.038). After accounting for the patient and insurance company costs, abdominal CT scan savings averaged $1412 per patient. Abdominal CT scanning is a reliable, useful, and cost-effective test for evaluating right lower quadrant abdominal pain and making the diagnosis of acute appendicitis in reproductive-age women.

  13. Distribution of abdominal and pelvic Hodgkin disease: implications for CT scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Aisen, A.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M.; Amendola, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis is frequently performed for the staging of abdominal and pelvic lymphoma. Certain limited CT protocols have been nearly as accurate as more complete examinations at defining the extent of lymphadenopathy and the response to therapy, with the advantages of decreased scanning time and patient radiation dose. The authors reviewed abdominal and pelvic CT scans and reports of 58 patients with Hodgkin disease to determine whether the entire abdomen and pelvis must always be scanned in such patients. Pelvic adenopathy without concurrent abdominal adenopathy was present in only one of 58 patients, and that patient presented clinically with inguinal adenopathy. These findings are supported by larger pathologic studies showing that Hodgkin disease always spreads contiguously. Patients with Hodgkin disease presenting above the diaphragm should undergo abdominal CT for staging; if the abdomen is normal, the pelvis need not be scanned. For Hodgkin patients with clinical or CT evidence of disease below the diaphragm, both abdomen and pelvis should be scanned.

  14. Colitis detection on abdominal CT scans by rich feature hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiamin; Lay, Nathan; Wei, Zhuoshi; Lu, Le; Kim, Lauren; Turkbey, Evrim; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Colitis is inflammation of the colon due to neutropenia, inflammatory bowel disease (such as Crohn disease), infection and immune compromise. Colitis is often associated with thickening of the colon wall. The wall of a colon afflicted with colitis is much thicker than normal. For example, the mean wall thickness in Crohn disease is 11-13 mm compared to the wall of the normal colon that should measure less than 3 mm. Colitis can be debilitating or life threatening, and early detection is essential to initiate proper treatment. In this work, we apply high-capacity convolutional neural networks (CNNs) to bottom-up region proposals to detect potential colitis on CT scans. Our method first generates around 3000 category-independent region proposals for each slice of the input CT scan using selective search. Then, a fixed-length feature vector is extracted from each region proposal using a CNN. Finally, each region proposal is classified and assigned a confidence score with linear SVMs. We applied the detection method to 260 images from 26 CT scans of patients with colitis for evaluation. The detection system can achieve 0.85 sensitivity at 1 false positive per image.

  15. Foreign objects encountered in the abdominal cavity at CT.

    PubMed

    Gayer, Gabriela; Petrovitch, Ivan; Jeffrey, R Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Foreign objects are not infrequently seen at computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis and may pose a diagnostic challenge to the radiologist, who must recognize the object, characterize its nature and location, and determine its clinical significance. Most foreign objects are incidentally detected at CT, but they may mimic a wide range of pathologic conditions. Some foreign objects (eg, an object that has been swallowed either intentionally or unintentionally) are the cause of the patient's signs and symptoms and require prompt medical attention. Other objects, such as a sponge or surgical instrument that has been retained postoperatively, may have medicolegal consequences. Furthermore, certain objects, such as intentionally concealed drug packets, may go undetected unless a high degree of suspicion exists and appropriate window settings are used to review the study. The radiologist should be familiar with the wide range of foreign objects that may be encountered at abdominopelvic CT, be able to recognize them promptly, and understand their implications for patient treatment.

  16. CT angiography in the abdomen: a pictorial review and update.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter S; Platt, Joel F

    2014-02-01

    The development of multidetector CT technology and helical scanning techniques has revolutionized the use of CT for primary diagnostic evaluation of the abdominal vasculature, particularly the arterial system. CT angiography has numerous benefits relative to conventional catheter angiography, and has largely replaced catheter-based techniques in many clinical algorithms. This pictorial review and update will cover important technical principles related to modern CT angiography (including contrast delivery and dose considerations), discuss relevant anatomy and variants, and illustrate numerous arterial conditions related to the abdominal aorta and branch vessels.

  17. Coronary artery calcium measurement with multi-detector row CT: in vitro assessment of effect of radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheng; Bae, Kyongtae T; Pilgram, Thomas K; Suh, Jongdae; Bradley, David

    2002-12-01

    The authors assessed in vitro the effect of radiation dose on coronary artery calcium quantification with multi-detector row computed tomography. A cardiac phantom with calcified cylinders was scanned at various milliampere second settings (20-160 mAs). A clear tendency was found for image noise to decrease as tube current increased (P <.001). No tendency was found for the Agatson score or calcium volume and mass errors to vary with tube current. Calcium measurements were not significantly affected by the choice of tube current. Calcium mass error was strongly correlated with calcium volume error (P <.001). The calcium mass measurement was more accurate and less variable than the calcium volume measurement.

  18. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  19. Evaluation of five image registration tools for abdominal CT: pitfalls and opportunities with soft anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  1. Validity of blood flow measurement using 320 multi-detectors CT and first-pass distribution theory: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Xuefang; Xu, Shaopeng; Zhou, Kenneth J.

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by first-pass technique. Heart was simulated with a container that was filled with pipeline of 3mm diameter; coronary artery was simulated with a pipeline of 2 cm diameter and connected with the simulated heart. The simulated coronary artery was connected with a big container with 1500 ml saline and 150ml contrast agent. One pump linking with simulated heart will withdraw with a speed of 10 ml/min, 15 ml/min, 20 ml/min, 25 ml/min and 30 ml/min. First CT scan starts after 30 s of pumpback with certain speed. The second CT scan starts 5 s after first CT scans. CT images processed as follows: The second CT scan images subtract first CT scan images, calculate the increase of CT value of simulated heart and the CT value of the unit volume of simulated coronary artery and then to calculate the total inflow of myocardial blood flow. CT myocardial blood flows were calculated as: 0.94 ml/s, 2.09 ml/s, 2.74 ml/s, 4.18 ml/s, 4.86 ml/s. The correlation coefficient is 0.994 and r2 = 0.97. The method of measuring the myocardial blood flow using 320 row detector CT by 2 scans is feasible. It is possible to develop a new method for quantitatively and functional assessment of myocardial perfusion blood flow with less radiation does.

  2. Automatic segmentation and co-registration of gated CT angiography datasets: measuring abdominal aortic pulsatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentz, Robert; Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, J. G.; Siddiki, Hassan; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri; Spencer, Garrett; Primak, Andrew N.; Zhang, Jie; Nielson, Theresa; McCollough, Cynthia; Yu, Lifeng

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To develop robust, novel segmentation and co-registration software to analyze temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets, with an aim to permit automated measurement of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Methods: We perform retrospective gated CT angiography in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Multiple, temporally overlapping, time-resolved CT angiography datasets are reconstructed over the cardiac cycle, with aortic segmentation performed using a priori anatomic assumptions for the aorta and heart. Visual quality assessment is performed following automatic segmentation with manual editing. Following subsequent centerline generation, centerlines are cross-registered across phases, with internal validation of co-registration performed by examining registration at the regions of greatest diameter change (i.e. when the second derivative is maximal). Results: We have performed gated CT angiography in 60 patients. Automatic seed placement is successful in 79% of datasets, requiring either no editing (70%) or minimal editing (less than 1 minute; 12%). Causes of error include segmentation into adjacent, high-attenuating, nonvascular tissues; small segmentation errors associated with calcified plaque; and segmentation of non-renal, small paralumbar arteries. Internal validation of cross-registration demonstrates appropriate registration in our patient population. In general, we observed that aortic pulsatility can vary along the course of the abdominal aorta. Pulsation can also vary within an aneurysm as well as between aneurysms, but the clinical significance of these findings remain unknown. Conclusions: Visualization of large vessel pulsatility is possible using ECG-gated CT angiography, partial scan reconstruction, automatic segmentation, centerline generation, and coregistration of temporally resolved datasets.

  3. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  4. The Role of Three-Dimensional Multidetector CT Gastrography in the Preoperative Imaging of Stomach Cancer: Emphasis on Detection and Localization of the Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lim, Nam Yeol; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2015-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin. PMID:25598676

  5. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  6. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Miano, Danielle I.; Silvis, Renee M.; Popp, Jill M.; Culbertson, Marvin C.; Campbell, Brendan; Smith, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED) and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4]) compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]). Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7]) and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]). The proportion of children with a

  7. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  8. Low-dose multiphase abdominal CT reconstruction with phase-induced swap prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, Mona; Rashed, Essam A.; Kudo, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Multiphase abdominal CT is an imaging protocol in which the patient is scanned at different phases before and after the injection of a contrast agent. Reconstructed images with different concentrations of contrast material provide useful information for effective detection of abnormalities. However, several scanning during a short period of time eventually increase the patient radiation dose to a remarkable value up to a risky level. Reducing the patient dose by modulating the x-ray tube current or acquiring the projection data through a small number of views are known to degrade the image quality and reduce the possibility to be useful for diagnosis purpose. In this work, we propose a novel multiphase abdominal CT imaging protocol with patient dose reduction and high image quality. The image reconstruction cost function consists of two terms, namely the data fidelity term and penalty term to enforce the anatomical similarity in successive contrast phase reconstruction. The prior information, named phase-induced swap prior (PISP) is computed using total variation minimization of image acquired from different contrast phases. The new method is evaluated through a simulation study using digital abdominal phantom and real data and results are promising.

  9. Adapted morphing model for 3D volume reconstruction applied to abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeev, Aleksey; Eltonsy, Nevine; Tourassi, Georgia; Martin, Robert; Elmaghraby, Adel

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D volume reconstruction model for volume rendering and apply this model to abdominal CT data. The model development includes two steps: (1) interpolation of given data for a complete 3D model, and (2) visualization. First, CT slices are interpolated using a special morphing algorithm. The main idea of this algorithm is to take a region from one CT slice and locate its most probable correspondence in the adjacent CT slice. The algorithm determines the transformation function of the region in between two adjacent CT slices and interpolates the data accordingly. The most probable correspondence of a region is obtained using correlation analysis between the given region and regions of the adjacent CT slice. By applying this technique recursively, taking progressively smaller subregions within a region, a high quality and accuracy interpolation is obtained. The main advantages of this morphing algorithm are 1) its applicability not only to parallel planes like CT slices but also to general configurations of planes in 3D space, and 2) its fully automated nature as it does not require control points to be specified by a user compared to most morphing techniques. Subsequently, to visualize data, a specialized volume rendering card (TeraRecon VolumePro 1000) was used. To represent data in 3D space, special software was developed to convert interpolated CT slices to 3D objects compatible with the VolumePro card. Visual comparison between the proposed model and linear interpolation clearly demonstrates the superiority of the proposed model.

  10. Estimating radiation doses from multidetector CT using Monte Carlo simulations: effects of different size voxelized patient models on magnitudes of organ and effective dose.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, J J; Cagnon, C H; Cody, D D; Stevens, D M; McCollough, C H; Zankl, M; Angel, E; McNitt-Gray, M F

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this work is to examine the effects of patient size on radiation dose from CT scans. To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of both patients and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. A family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models previously developed and validated by the GSF was implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. These patient models represent a range of patient sizes and ages (8 weeks to 48 years) and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented, allowing the estimation of dose to any individual organ and calculation of patient effective dose. To estimate radiation dose, every voxel in each patient model was assigned both a specific organ index number and an elemental composition and mass density. Simulated CT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a previously developed MDCT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, including bowtie filter, scanner geometry and helical source path. The scan simulations in this work include a whole-body scan protocol and a thoracic CT scan protocol, each performed with fixed tube current. The whole-body scan simulation yielded a predictable decrease in effective dose as a function of increasing patient weight. Results from analysis of individual organs demonstrated similar trends, but with some individual variations. A comparison with a conventional dose estimation method using the ImPACT spreadsheet yielded an effective dose of 0.14 mSv mAs(-1) for the whole-body scan. This result is lower than the simulations on the voxelized model designated 'Irene' (0.15 mSv mAs(-1)) and higher than the models 'Donna' and 'Golem' (0.12 mSv mAs(-1)). For the thoracic scan protocol, the ImPACT spreadsheet estimates an effective dose of 0.037 mSv mAs(-1), which falls between the calculated values for Irene (0.042 mSv mAs(-1)) and Donna (0.031 mSv mAs(-1)) and is higher relative

  11. 3D segmentation of abdominal aorta from CT-scan and MR images.

    PubMed

    Duquette, Anthony Adam; Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Bouchot, Olivier; Lalande, Alain

    2012-06-01

    We designed a generic method for segmenting the aneurismal sac of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) both from multi-slice MR and CT-scan examinations. It is a semi-automatic method requiring little human intervention and based on graph cut theory to segment the lumen interface and the aortic wall of AAAs. Our segmentation method works independently on MRI and CT-scan volumes and has been tested on a 44 patient dataset and 10 synthetic images. Segmentation and maximum diameter estimation were compared to manual tracing from 4 experts. An inter-observer study was performed in order to measure the variability range of a human observer. Based on three metrics (the maximum aortic diameter, the volume overlap and the Hausdorff distance) the variability of the results obtained by our method is shown to be similar to that of a human operator, both for the lumen interface and the aortic wall. As will be shown, the average distance obtained with our method is less than one standard deviation away from each expert, both for healthy subjects and for patients with AAA. Our semi-automatic method provides reliable contours of the abdominal aorta from CT-scan or MRI, allowing rapid and reproducible evaluations of AAA.

  12. Statistical 4D graphs for multi-organ abdominal segmentation from multiphase CT.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A; Pamulapati, Vivek; Summers, Ronald M

    2012-05-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D convolution using population training information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen and kidneys was applied to multiphase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient-specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance, enhancement, shape and location on organ segmentation. All four abdominal organs were segmented robustly and accurately with volume overlaps over 93.6% and average surface distances below 1.1mm.

  13. Basic study for automatic recognition of osteoporosis using abdominal x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Fujita, Hiroshi; Iida, Tadayuki; Takigawa, Atsushi; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong

    2004-05-01

    We have developed an algorithm that can be used to distinguish the central part of the vertebral body from an abdominal X-ray CT image and to automatically calculate three measures to diagnose the degree of osteoporosis in a patient. In addition, we examined whether it is possible to use these CT images as an aid in diagnosing osteoporosis. Three measures that were automatically extracted from the central part of a vertebral body in the CT images were compared with the bone mineral density (BMD) values that were obtained from the same vertebral body. We calculated the mean CT number, coefficient of variation, and the first moment of power spectrum in the recognized vertebral body. We judged whether a patient had osteoporosis using the diagnostic criteria for primary osteoporosis (Year 2000 revision, published by the Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research). We classified three measures for normal and abnormal groups using the principal component analysis, and the two groups were compared with the results obtained from the diagnostic criteria. As a result, it was found that the algorithm could be used to distinguish the central part of the vertebral body in the CT images and to calculate these measures automatically. When distinguishing whether a patient was osteoporotic or not with the three measures obtained from the CT images, the ratio (sensitivity) usable for diagnosing a patient as osteoporotic was 0.93 (14/15), and the ratio (specificity) usable for diagnosing a patient as normal was 0.64 (7/11). Based on these results, we believe that it is possible to utilize the measures obtained from these CT images to aid in diagnosing osteoporosis.

  14. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  15. Investigation of sinonasal anatomy via low-dose multidetector CT examination in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with higher risk for perioperative complications.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Marcin; Guzinski, Maciej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Krecicki, Tomasz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare visualisation of the surgically relevant anatomical structures via low- and standard-dose multidetector CT protocol in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and higher risk for perioperative complications (i.e. presence of bronchial asthma, history of sinus surgery and advanced nasal polyposis). 135 adult CRS patients were divided randomly into standard-dose (120 kVp, 100 mAs) or low-dose CT groups (120 kVp, 45 mAs). The detectability of the vital anatomical structures (anterior ethmoid artery, optic nerve, cribriform plate and lamina papyracea) was scored using a five-point scale (from excellent to unacceptable) by a radiologist and sinus surgeon. Polyp sizes were quantified endoscopically according to the Lildholdt's scale (LS). Olfactory function was tested with the "Sniffin' Sticks" test. On the low-dose CT images, detectability ranged from 2.42 (better than poor) for cribriform plate among anosmic cases to 4.11 (better than good) for lamina papyracea in cases without nasal polyps. Identification of lamina papyracea on low-dose scans was significantly worse in each group and the same was the case with cribriform plates in patients with advanced polyposis and anosmia. Cribriform plates were the most poorly identified (between poor and average) among all the structures on low-dose images. Identification of anterior ethmoid artery (AEA) with reduced dose was insignificantly worse than with standard-dose examination. The AEA was scored as an average-defined structure and was the second weakest visualised. In conclusion, preoperatively, low-dose protocols may not sufficiently visualise the surgically relevant anatomical structures in patients with CRS and bronchial asthma, advanced nasal polyps (LS > 2) and history of sinus surgery. Low mAs value enables comparable detectability of sinonasal landmarks with standard-dose protocols in patients without analysed risk factors. In the context of planned surgery, the current

  16. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  17. A reappraisal of adult thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy via CT scan in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xin-Hua; Su, Bai-Yan; Liu, Jing-Juan; Zhang, Gu-Muyang; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Mirjalili, S Ali; Ma, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Accurate surface anatomy is essential for safe clinical practice. There are numerous inconsistencies in clinically important surface markings among and within contemporary anatomical reference texts. The aim of this study was to investigate key thoracic and abdominal surface anatomy landmarks in living Chinese adults using computed tomography (CT). A total of 100 thoracic and 100 abdominal CT scans were examined. Our results indicated that the following key surface landmarks differed from current commonly-accepted descriptions: the positions of the tracheal bifurcation, azygos vein termination, and pulmonary trunk bifurcation (all below the plane of the sternal angle at vertebral level T5-T6 in most individuals); the superior vena cava formation and junction with the right atrium (most often behind the 1st and 4th intercostal spaces, respectively); and the level at which the inferior vena cava and esophagus traverse the diaphragm (T10 and T11, respectively). The renal arteries were most commonly at L1; the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2; the 11th rib was posterior to the left kidney in only 29% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs. A number of significant sex- and age-related differences were noted. The Chinese population was also compared with western populations on the basis of published reports. Reappraisal of surface anatomy using modern imaging tools in vivo will provide both quantitative and qualitative evidence to facilitate the clinical application of these key surface landmarks.

  18. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  19. Efficient Abdominal Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT with SIMPLE Context Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-20

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  20. Efficient multi-atlas abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-08-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  1. Efficient abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired CT with SIMPLE context learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal segmentation on clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) has been a challenging problem given the inter-subject variance of human abdomens and complex 3-D relationships among organs. Multi-atlas segmentation (MAS) provides a potentially robust solution by leveraging label atlases via image registration and statistical fusion. We posit that the efficiency of atlas selection requires further exploration in the context of substantial registration errors. The selective and iterative method for performance level estimation (SIMPLE) method is a MAS technique integrating atlas selection and label fusion that has proven effective for prostate radiotherapy planning. Herein, we revisit atlas selection and fusion techniques for segmenting 12 abdominal structures using clinically acquired CT. Using a re-derived SIMPLE algorithm, we show that performance on multi-organ classification can be improved by accounting for exogenous information through Bayesian priors (so called context learning). These innovations are integrated with the joint label fusion (JLF) approach to reduce the impact of correlated errors among selected atlases for each organ, and a graph cut technique is used to regularize the combined segmentation. In a study of 100 subjects, the proposed method outperformed other comparable MAS approaches, including majority vote, SIMPLE, JLF, and the Wolz locally weighted vote technique. The proposed technique provides consistent improvement over state-of-the-art approaches (median improvement of 7.0% and 16.2% in DSC over JLF and Wolz, respectively) and moves toward efficient segmentation of large-scale clinically acquired CT data for biomarker screening, surgical navigation, and data mining.

  2. Texture-learning-based system for three-dimensional segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cong-Qi; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Li-Jen; Wong, Yon-Choeng; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Jiang, Yan-Yau

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal CT images are commonly used for the diagnosis of kidney diseases. With the advances of CT technology, processing of CT images has become a challenging task mainly because of the large number of CT images being studied. This paper presents a texture-learning based system for the three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images. The system is designed to automatically delineate renal parenchyma and is based on the texturelearning and the region-homogeneity-based approaches. The first approach is achieved with the texture analysis using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features and an artificial neural network (ANN) to determine if a pixel in the CT image is likely to fall within the renal parenchyma. The second approach incorporates a two-dimensional (2D) region growing to segment renal parenchyma in single CT image slice and a 3D region growing to propagate the segmentation results to neighboring CT image slices. The criterion for the region growing is a test of region-homogeneity which is defined by examining the ANN outputs. In system evaluation, 10 abdominal CT image sets were used. Automatic segmentation results were compared with manually segmentation results using the Dice similarity coefficient. Among the 10 CT image sets, our system has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 that clearly shows a high correlation between the two segmentation results. Ultimately, our system could be incorporated in applications for the delineation of renal parenchyma or as a preprocessing in a CAD system of kidney diseases.

  3. [Significance of abdominal wall CT-angiography in planning DIEA perforator flaps, TRAM flaps and SIEA flaps].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schirmer, S; Frerichs, O; Gehl, H B

    2011-04-01

    Muscle sparing TRAM flaps and DIEA perforator flaps are standard procedures for breast reconstruction. Recently CT-angiography has been established to evaluate perforator vessels pre-operatively. CT-angiography was introduced to our department in July 2009. In a retrospective analysis data of the last 20 patients (altogether 22 flaps) before CT-angiography introduction and the following 20 (also 22 flaps) patients after introduction of CT-angiography were analysed with regard to the ratio of TRAM to DIEP flaps, and the time required to raise the flaps. The same surgeon raised all flaps. As different surgeons performed dissection of the recipient site, anastomoses, and insertion of flaps, and patients received primary (with sentinel or complete lymphadenctomy) or secondary reconstructions, only the time required harvesting the flap was compared. Thus other influences on raising the flap were eliminated. DIEP flaps were harvested with one single perforator. If perfusion or was considered not to be safe via one single perforator a muscle sparing TRAM flap (ms2) was raised. Angiography was performed using a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner. CT-angiography did not lead to an increased rate of DIEP flaps in relation to ms2-TRAM flaps. Harvesting time of all flap types with CT-angiography on average was 121 min, without CT-angiography 135 min. This was not significantly different. However, separate analysis of DIEP flaps and ms2-TRAM flaps revealed a significant advantage of CT-angiography based harvesting of DIEP flaps of 26 min: with CT-angiography 101 min vs. 127 min without CT-angiography (p<0.028). There were no significant differences for ms2-TRAM flaps. All scans showed course and branching, diameter and size of the inferior epigastric artery. If evident the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) was marked. Dosage was 292 mGy-606 mGy×cm dependent on body weight. CTDI was 6.8-14.7 mGy. CT-angiography is a reproducible and observer independent procedure

  4. Liver Segmentation Based on Snakes Model and Improved GrowCut Algorithm in Abdominal CT Image

    PubMed Central

    He, Baochun; Ma, Zhiyuan; Zong, Mao; Zhou, Xiangrong; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel method based on Snakes Model and GrowCut algorithm is proposed to segment liver region in abdominal CT images. First, according to the traditional GrowCut method, a pretreatment process using K-means algorithm is conducted to reduce the running time. Then, the segmentation result of our improved GrowCut approach is used as an initial contour for the future precise segmentation based on Snakes model. At last, several experiments are carried out to demonstrate the performance of our proposed approach and some comparisons are conducted between the traditional GrowCut algorithm. Experimental results show that the improved approach not only has a better robustness and precision but also is more efficient than the traditional GrowCut method. PMID:24066017

  5. Angular on-line tube current modulation in multidetector CT examinations of children and adults: The influence of different scanning parameters on dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of angular on-line tube current modulation on dose reduction in pediatric and adult patients undergoing multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) examinations. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, 10-year-old, and adult were employed in the current study. Phantoms were scanned with the use of on-line tube current modulation (TCM). Percent dose reduction (%DR) factors achieved by applying TCM, were determined for standard protocols used for head and neck, shoulder, thorax, thorax and abdomen, abdomen, abdomen and pelvis, pelvis, and whole body examinations. A preliminary study on the application of TCM in MDCT examinations of adult patients was performed to validate the results obtained in anthropomorphic phantoms. Dose reduction was estimated as the percentage difference of the modulated milliamperes for each scan and the preset milliamperes prescribed by the scan protocol. The dose reduction in children was found to be much lower than the corresponding reduction achieved for adults. For helical scans the %DR factors, ranged between 1.6% and 7.4% for the neonate, 2.9% and 8.7% for the 1-year old, 2% and 6% for the 5-year-old, 5% and 10.9% for the 10-year-old, and 10.4% and 20.7% for the adult individual. For sequential scans the corresponding %DR factors ranged between 1.3% and 6.7%, 4.5% and 11%, 4.2% and 6.6%, 6.4% and 12.3%, and 8.9% and 23.3%, respectively. Broader beam collimations are associated with decreased %DR factors, when other scanning parameters are held constant. TCM did not impair image noise. In adult patients, the %DR values were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained in the anthropomorphic adult phantom. In conclusion, on-line TCM may be considered as a valuable tool for reducing dose in routine CT examinations of pediatric and adult patients. However, the dose reduction achieved with TCM

  6. Comparison of CT and dual-energy DEXA using a modified trunk compartment in the measurement of abdominal fat.

    PubMed

    Lane, James T; Mack-Shipman, Lynn R; Anderson, Joseph C; Moore, Timothy E; Erickson, Judi M; Ford, Timothy C; Stoner, Julie A; Larsen, Jennifer L

    2005-08-01

    The quantification of abdominal fat is a marker of health risk. While dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is easily applied, it measures overall fat, although abdominal fat may be a better indicator of health risk from obesity. We have evaluated whether a subcomponent of DEXA measurements correlates better with computed tomography (CT) for body fat than those traditionally used. Forty-seven healthy adults (22 M/25 F), aged 54.5+/-15.8 yr (mean+/-SD), with BMI of 27.1+/-4.6 kg/m2 participated in a cross-sectional study. Body fat was measured using abdominal CT and DEXA for total fat, trunk fat, and a modified trunk measurement that excludes the chest, termed "lower trunk," and compared. The coefficient of variation for DEXA measurements for trunk, lower trunk, and total body were 1.98, 3.12, and 0.85%, respectively. Mean DEXA for percentage fat ranged from 31.7% to 34.1% for trunk, lower trunk, and total body, compared to 54.2% for abdominal CT (p<0.003 for each pairwise comparison). Lower trunk, whole trunk, and total body DEXA measurements were not different. Measurement of subcomponents of fat content by DEXA is not superior to whole body measurements and remains consistently lower than measurements by CT.

  7. Disproportionate fat stranding: a helpful CT sign in patients with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jose M; Sirlin, Claude B; Pinto, Pedro S; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Stella, Damien L; Casola, Giovanna

    2004-01-01

    Fat stranding adjacent to thickened bowel wall seen at computed tomography (CT) in patients with acute abdominal pain suggests an acute process of the gastrointestinal tract, but the differential diagnosis is wide. The authors observed "disproportionate" fat stranding (ie, stranding more severe than expected for the degree of bowel wall thickening present) and explored how this finding suggests a narrower differential diagnosis, one that is centered in the mesentery: diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and appendicitis. The characteristic CT findings (in addition to fat stranding) of each of these entities often lead to a final diagnosis. Diverticulitis manifests with mild, smooth bowel wall thickening and no lymphadenopathy. Epiploic appendagitis manifests with central areas of high attenuation and a hyperattenuated rim, in addition to its characteristic location adjacent to the colon. In contrast, omental infarction is always centered in the omentum. The most specific finding of appendicitis is a dilated, fluid-filled appendix. Correct noninvasive diagnosis is important because treatment approaches for these conditions range from monitoring to surgery.

  8. Computerized organ localization in abdominal CT volume with context-driven generalized Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Fast localization of organs is a key step in computer-aided detection of lesions and in image guided radiation therapy. We developed a context-driven Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for robust localization of organ-of-interests (OOIs) in a CT volume. Conventional GHT locates the center of an organ by looking-up center locations of pre-learned organs with "matching" edges. It often suffers from mislocalization because "similar" edges in vicinity may attract the prelearned organs towards wrong places. The proposed method not only uses information from organ's own shape but also takes advantage of nearby "similar" edge structures. First, multiple GHT co-existing look-up tables (cLUT) were constructed from a set of training shapes of different organs. Each cLUT represented the spatial relationship between the center of the OOI and the shape of a co-existing organ. Second, the OOI center in a test image was determined using GHT with each cLUT separately. Third, the final localization of OOI was based on weighted combination of the centers obtained in the second stage. The training set consisted of 10 CT volumes with manually segmented OOIs including liver, spleen and kidneys. The method was tested on a set of 25 abdominal CT scans. Context-driven GHT correctly located all OOIs in the test image and gave localization errors of 19.5±9.0, 12.8±7.3, 9.4±4.6 and 8.6±4.1 mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively. Conventional GHT mis-located 8 out of 100 organs and its localization errors were 26.0±32.6, 14.1±10.6, 30.1±42.6 and 23.6±39.7mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively.

  9. Comparing the diagnostic performance of MRI versus CT in the evaluation of acute nontraumatic abdominal pain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Baron, Keren Tuvia; Arleo, Elizabeth Kagan; Robinson, Christopher; Sanelli, Pina C

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to document the utilization of MRI compared with CT in pregnant patients presenting with acute nontraumatic abdominal pain at our institution and to compare the diagnostic performance of the two modalities. A retrospective review identified all pregnant patients at our institution who had MRI or CT exams of the abdomen and/or pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal pain over a 3-year period from January 2008 through December 2010. The imaging diagnoses were compared with pathologic data or operative findings as the primary reference standard or with clinical follow-up and laboratory data as the secondary reference standard. Patients without surgically proven diagnoses were followed clinically until delivery, when possible. Ninety-four pregnant patients were included in this study: 61 MRI exams were performed in 57 patients, 44 CT exams were performed in 43 patients (including six patients who had both), and 72 patients (77 %) had ultrasound prior to cross-sectional imaging, with the appendix specifically assessed in 25 patients but visualized in only two of them. Of 61 MRI exams, 24 were considered positive for imaging diagnoses, 33 were negative, and 4 were equivocal. Of 44 CT exams, 24 were positive and 20 were negative. The test characteristics for MRI and CT in the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain were as follows: sensitivity 91 and 88 %, specificity 85 and 90 %, positive predictive value 81 and 91 %, negative predictive value 94 and 8 5 %, and diagnostic accuracy 88 and 88 %, respectively. Differences were not statistically significant (p value = 1). The majority of MRIs (34/61 = 56 %) were read by emergency radiologists. MRI and CT performed equally well in the evaluation of acute nontraumatic abdominal pain during pregnancy. Given its lack of ionizing radiation, MRI may be preferable. Given that the majority of MRIs were read by radiologists specializing in emergency imaging, this is a technique that emergency

  10. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  11. [Evaluation of Intra-abdominal fat distribution using X-ray CT data for detection of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Takatsu, Kazuaki; Negishi, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Kouichi; Satou, Masanori; Yanai, Kazuya; Sasaki, Isamu; Fukuda, Kazuya; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Kouno, Atsushi; Shimomura, Younosuke

    2005-06-20

    To develop a novel method of detecting rectal cancer, we assessed relationships between intra-abdominal fat distribution and rectal cancer in Japanese patients. Subjects comprised 38 patients with rectal cancer apparent on CT-colonography and 110 other cases. The intra-abdominal fat area was determined by calculating pixel distribution with attenuation values from -140 HU to -40 HU. The area of intra-abdominal fat was measured on axial images using an interslice gap of 10 mm. Profile curves of intra-abdominal fat were in the plane direction from diaphragm to anus. Of note is the fact that Ogura's peak, a secondary small peak around the rectal cancer, was apparent on the profile of intra-abdominal fat, with 73.7% of rectal cancers displaying Ogura's peak. In comparison, only 19.1% of other cases displayed Ogura's peak on this profile. The relationship between fat and rectal cancer is difficult to explain. However, making good use of these results showing intra-abdominal fat distribution, a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for detecting rectal cancer according to the presence of Ogura's peak has potential as a method of mass screening. As only 148 cases were investigated in the present study, the accumulation of additional data is needed. More detailed studies with larger patient populations are warranted.

  12. A 64-slice multi-detector CT scan could evaluate the change of the left atrial appendage thrombi of the atrial fibrillation patient, which was reduced by warfarin therapy.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hidekazu

    2011-08-19

    Curable cause of stroke is the left atrial appendage (LAA) thrombi of atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Some AF patients have the LAA thrombi. It is very important to cure AF patients by warfarin. Transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) is the usual clinical tool to detect the LAA thrombi. Recently, a 64-slice multi-detector CT (64-MDCT) scan enables us to display the LAA thrombi more easily than TOE. I reported a case that a 64-MDCT scan had been used successfully in displaying the change of the LAA thrombi reduced by warfarin therapy. The size of the LAA thrombi was reduced from 25.2 mm × 19.3 mm (figure 1) to 22.1 mm × 14.8 mm (figure 2) after the 3-month warfarin therapy. It was useful to estimate the LAA thrombi by a 64-MDCT scan to estimate LAA thrombi itself and the change of LAA thrombi to evaluate the effectiveness of warfarin therapy.

  13. [Valvular heart disease: multidetector computed tomography evaluation].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Fernández-Pérez, G C; Tomás-Mallebrera, M; Badillo-Portugal, S; Orejas, M

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a clinical problem that has been studied with classical imaging techniques like echocardiography and MRI. Technological advances in CT make it possible to obtain static and dynamic images that enable not only a morphological but also a functional analysis in many cases. Although it is currently indicated only in patients with inconclusive findings at echocardiography and MRI or those in whom these techniques are contraindicated, multidetector CT makes it possible to diagnose stenosis or regurgitation through planimetry, to evaluate and quantify valvular calcium, and to show the functional repercussions of these phenomena on the rest of the structures of the heart. Given that multidetector CT is being increasingly used in the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, we think it is interesting for radiologists to know its potential for the study of valvular disease.

  14. A novel multiinstance learning approach for liver cancer recognition on abdominal CT images based on CPSO-SVM and IO.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiyan; Zheng, Ruiping; Yi, Dehui; Zhao, Di

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy.

  15. A Novel Multiinstance Learning Approach for Liver Cancer Recognition on Abdominal CT Images Based on CPSO-SVM and IO

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Dehui

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy. PMID:24368931

  16. The Value of Restaging With Chest and Abdominal CT/MRI Scan After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Chen; Zhang, Xu; Xie, E; An, Xin; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Zhu, Ying; Tang, Jing-Hua; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lin, Jun-Zhong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-11-01

    Little was known with regard to the value of preoperative systemic restaging for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This study was designed to evaluate the role of chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on preoperative restaging in LARC after neoadjuvant CRT and to assess the impact on treatment strategy.Between January 2007 and April 2013, 386 newly diagnosed consecutive patients with LARC who underwent neoadjuvant CRT and received restaging with chest and abdominal CT/MRI scan were included. Imaging results before and after CRT were analyzed.Twelve patients (3.1%) (6 liver lesions, 2 peritoneal lesions, 2 distant lymph node lesions, 1 lung lesions, 1 liver and lung lesions) were diagnosed as suspicious metastases on the restaging scan after radiotherapy. Seven patients (1.8%) were confirmed as metastases by pathology or long-term follow-up. The treatment strategy was changed in 5 of the 12 patients as a result of restaging CT/MRI findings. Another 10 patients (2.6%) who present with normal restaging imaging findings were diagnosed as metastases intra-operatively. The sensitivity, specificity accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive values of restaging CT/MRI was 41.4%, 98.6%, 58.3%, and 97.3%, respectively.The low incidence of metastases and minimal consequences for the treatment plan question the clinical value of routine restaging of chest and abdomen after neoadjuvant CRT. Based on this study, a routine restaging CT/MRI of chest and abdomen in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant CRT is not advocated, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) -guided CT/MRI restaging might be an alternative.

  17. Bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma: a review.

    PubMed

    Iaselli, Francesco; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Firetto, Cristina; D'Elia, Domenico; Squitieri, Nevada Cioffi; Biondetti, Pietro Raimondo; Danza, Francesco Maria; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The bowel and the mesentery represent the third most frequently involved structures in blunt abdominal trauma after the liver and the spleen. Clinical assessment alone in patients with suspected intestinal and/or mesenteric injury from blunt abdominal trauma is associated with unacceptable diagnostic delays. Multi-detector computed tomography, thanks to its high spatial, time and contrast resolutions, allows a prompt identification and proper classification of such conditions. The radiologist, in fact, is asked not only to identify the signs of trauma but also to provide an indication of their clinical significance, suggesting the chance of conservative treatment in the cases of mild and moderate, non-complicated or self-limiting injuries and focusing on life-threatening conditions which may benefit from immediate surgical or interventional procedures. Specific and non-specific CT signs of bowel and mesenteric injuries from blunt abdominal trauma are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Angiographic CT for Intra-abdominal Tumor Embolization: A New Tool for Vessel and Soft Tissue Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bernhard Christian Frericks, Bernd Benedikt; Albrecht, Thomas; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Wacker, Frank Klaus

    2007-07-15

    C-Arm cone-beam computed tomography (CACT), is a relatively new technique that uses data acquired with a flat-panel detector C-arm angiography system during an interventional procedure to reconstruct CT-like images. The purpose of this Technical Note is to present the technique, feasibility, and added value of CACT in five patients who underwent abdominal transarterial chemoembolization procedures. Target organs for the chemoembolizations were kidney, liver, and pancreas and a liposarcoma infiltrating the duodenum. The time for patient positioning, C-arm and system preparation, CACT raw data acquisition, and data reconstruction for a single CACT study ranged from 6 to 12 min. The volume data set produced by the workstation was interactively reformatted using maximum intensity projections and multiplanar reconstructions. As part of an angiography system CACT provided essential information on vascular anatomy, therapy endpoints, and immediate follow-up during and immediately after the abdominal interventions without patient transfer. The quality of CACT images was sufficient to influence the course of treatment. This technology has the potential to expedite any interventional procedure that requires three-dimensional information and navigation.

  19. Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after neck dissection: colour Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Flor, N; Sardanelli, F; Ghilardi, G; Tentori, A; Franceschelli, G; Felisati, G; Cornalba, G P

    2007-05-01

    Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare disease, which has been previously unreported in association with neck dissection. We describe the Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography (CT) findings of a case of carotid pseudoaneurysm, one month after pharyngolaryngectomy with bilateral neck dissection. Multidetector CT confirmed the diagnosis made on the basis of Doppler ultrasound; the high image quality of axial and three-dimensional reconstructions avoided the need for pre-operative conventional angiography. In the presence of a pulsatile cervical mass after neck surgery, pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery should be included in the differential diagnosis, and multidetector CT can be the sole pre-operative diagnostic imaging modality.

  20. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  1. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo Nakao, Norio; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Maeda, Hiroaki; Ishikura, Reiichi; Miura, Koui; Sakamoto, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Ken; Baba, Rika

    2006-12-15

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200{sup o} rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients.

  2. Development of automated extraction method of biliary tract from abdominal CT volumes based on local intensity structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Kusuto; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Hirose, Tomoaki; Oda, Masahiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Nagino, Masato; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated biliary tract extraction method from abdominal CT volumes. The biliary tract is the path by which bile is transported from liver to the duodenum. No extraction method have been reported for the automated extraction of the biliary tract from common contrast CT volumes. Our method consists of three steps including: (1) extraction of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) candidate regions, (2) extraction of intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) candidate regions, and (3) combination of these candidate regions. The IHBD has linear structures and intensities of the IHBD are low in CT volumes. We use a dark linear structure enhancement (DLSE) filter based on a local intensity structure analysis method using the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix for the IHBD candidate region extraction. The EHBD region is extracted using a thresholding process and a connected component analysis. In the combination process, we connect the IHBD candidate regions to each EHBD candidate region and select a bile duct region from the connected candidate regions. We applied the proposed method to 22 cases of CT volumes. An average Dice coefficient of extraction result was 66.7%.

  3. Automated segmentation of upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT data using hierarchical statistical modeling of organ interrelations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, S.; Otake, Y.; Okada, T.; Hori, M.; Tomiyama, N.; Sato, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have been studying the automatic segmentation of multi-organ region from abdominal CT images. In previous work, we proposed an approach using a hierarchical statistical modeling using a relationship between organs. In this paper, we have proposed automatic segmentation of the upper digestive tract from abdominal contrast-enhanced CT using previously segmented multiple organs. We compared segmentation accuracy of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum between our proposed method using hierarchical statistical modeling and a conventional statistical atlas method. Additionally, preliminary experiment was performed which added the region representing gas to the candidate region at the segmentation step. The segmentation results were evaluated quantitatively by Dice coefficient, Jaccard index and the average symmetric surface distance of the segmented region and correct region data. Percentage of the average of Dice coefficient of esophagus, stomach and duodenum were 58.7, 68.3, and 38.6 with prediction-based method and 23.7, 51.1, and 24.4 with conventional atlas method.

  4. An Abdominal CT may be Safe in Selected Hypotensive Trauma Patients with Positive FAST Exam

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mackenzie R.; Holcomb, John B.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) and hypotension often indicates urgent surgery. An abdomen/pelvis CT (apCT) may allow less invasive management but the delay may be associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Patients in the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study with hypotension and a positive FAST (HF+) who underwent a CT (apCT+) were compared to those who did not. Results Of the 92 HF+ identified, 32(35%) underwent apCT during initial evaluation and apCT was associated with decreased odds of an emergency operation, OR 0.11 95% CI (0.001–0.116) and increased odds of angiographic intervention, OR 14.3 95% CI (1.5–135). There was no significant difference in 30 day mortality or need for dialysis. Conclusion An apCt in HF+ patients is associated with reduced odds of emergency surgery, but not mortality. Select HF+ patients can safely undergo apCT to obtain clinically useful information. PMID:25805456

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row CT for detection of in-stent restenosis vs detection of stenosis in nonstented coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Kefer, Joelle M; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of 16-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for detecting in-stent restenosis. Fifty patients with 69 previously implanted coronary stents underwent 16-slice MDCT before quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Diagnostic accuracy of MDCT for detection of in-stent restenosis defined as >50% lumen diameter stenosis (DS) in stented and nonstented coronary segments >1.5-mm diameter was computed using QCA as reference. According to QCA, 18/69 (25%) stented segments had restenosis. In addition, 33/518 (6.4%) nonstented segments had >50% DS. In-stent restenosis was correctly identified on MDCT images in 12/18 stents, and absence of restenosis was correctly identified in 50/51 stents. Stenosis in native coronary arteries was correctly identified in 22/33 segments and correctly excluded in 482/485 segments. Thus, sensitivity (67% vs 67% p=1.0), specificity (98% vs 99%, p=0.96) and overall diagnostic accuracy (90% vs 97%, p=0.68) was similarly high for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting stenosis in nonstented coronary segments. MDCT has similarly high diagnostic accuracy for detecting in-stent restenosis as for detecting coronary artery disease in nonstented segments. This suggests that MDCT could be clinically useful for identification of restenosis in patients after coronary stenting.

  6. Three-dimensional volume-rendered multidetector CT imaging of the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery: its anatomy and role in diagnosing extrapancreatic perineural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Craig; Brooke Jeffrey, R.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Olcott, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Extrapancreatic perineural spread in pancreatic adenocarcinoma contributes to poor outcomes, as it is known to be a major contributor to positive surgical margins and disease recurrence. However, current staging classifications have not yet taken extrapancreatic perineural spread into account. Four pathways of extrapancreatic perineural spread have been described that conveniently follow small defined arterial pathways. Small field of view three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images allow visualization of small peripancreatic vessels and thus perineural invasion that may be associated with them. One such vessel, the posterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery (PIPDA), serves as a surrogate for extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising in the uncinate process. This pictorial review presents the normal and variant anatomy of the PIPDA with 3D volume-rendered MDCT imaging, and emphasizes its role as a vascular landmark for the diagnosis of extrapancreatic perineural invasion from uncinate adenocarcinomas. Familiarity with the anatomy of PIPDA will allow accurate detection of extrapancreatic perineural spread by pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the uncinate process, and may potentially have important staging implications as neoadjuvant therapy improves. PMID:24434918

  7. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  8. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-05-07

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  9. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  10. Automated pediatric abdominal effective diameter measurements versus age-predicted body size for normalization of CT dose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Phillip M; Vachon, Linda A; Duddalwar, Vinay A

    2013-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in adjusting CT radiation dose data for patient body size. A method for automated computation of the abdominal effective diameter of a patient from a CT image has previously only been tested in adult patients. In this work, we tested the method on a set of 128 pediatric patients aged 0.8 to 12.9 years (average 8.0 years, SD = 3.7 years) who had CT abdomen/pelvis exams performed on a Toshiba Aquilion 64 scanner. For this set of patients, age-predicted abdominal effective diameter extrapolated based on data from the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements was a relatively poor predictor of measured effective diameter. The mean absolute percentage error between the CTDI normalization coefficient calculated from a manually measured effective diameter and the coefficient determined by age-predicted effective diameter was 12.3 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-52.8 %, SD 8.7 %) and 12.9 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-56.4 %, SD 9.2 %). In contrast, there is a close correspondence between the automated and manually measured patient effective diameters, with a mean absolute error of 0.6 cm (error range 0.2-1.3 cm). This correspondence translates into a high degree of correspondence between normalization coefficients determined by automated and manual measurements; the mean absolute percentage error was 2.1 % with respect to a 32 cm phantom (range 0.0-8.1 %, SD = 1.4 %) and 2.3 % with respect to a 16 cm phantom (range 0.0-9.3 %, SD = 1.6 %).

  11. Utility of the CT Scan in Diagnosing Midgut Volvulus in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Morshedi, Mehdi; Baradaran Jamili, Mohammad; Shafizadeh Barmi, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic intestinal malrotation first presenting in the adults is rare. Midgut volvulus is the most common complication of malrotation in the adults. Because of more differential diagnosis, Computed Tomography (CT) scan can play an important role in the evaluation of patients with this abnormality. The whirl pattern around the superior mesenteric artery found on CT scan in patients with midgut volvulus is pathognomonic and diagnostic. We describe a case of intestinal malrotation complicated by midgut volvulus in an adult patient. The preoperative CT findings were pathognomonic. PMID:28182093

  12. Multi-organ segmentation from multi-phase abdominal CT via 4D graphs using enhancement, shape and location optimization.

    PubMed

    Linguraru, Marius George; Pura, John A; Chowdhury, Ananda S; Summers, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    The interpretation of medical images benefits from anatomical and physiological priors to optimize computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) applications. Diagnosis also relies on the comprehensive analysis of multiple organs and quantitative measures of soft tissue. An automated method optimized for medical image data is presented for the simultaneous segmentation of four abdominal organs from 4D CT data using graph cuts. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were obtained at two phases: non-contrast and portal venous. Intra-patient data were spatially normalized by non-linear registration. Then 4D erosion using population historic information of contrast-enhanced liver, spleen, and kidneys was applied to multi-phase data to initialize the 4D graph and adapt to patient specific data. CT enhancement information and constraints on shape, from Parzen windows, and location, from a probabilistic atlas, were input into a new formulation of a 4D graph. Comparative results demonstrate the effects of appearance and enhancement, and shape and location on organ segmentation.

  13. Segmentation of Costal Cartilage in Abdominal CT Data using Watershed Markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Andrew B.; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2007-05-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is a promising non-invasive technique that heats a specific tumor region to fatal levels, while minimizing cell death in nearby healthy areas. For liver applications, the rib cage limits the transducer placement. A treatment plan based on CT images would segment the ribs and provide visualization of them and the tumor. A HIFU simulation of deposited heat would also require rib segmentation. Unfortunately, the ribs are difficult to segment on CT as they transition to cartilage, with CT units similar to that of the liver. The purpose of this work was to develop a rib segmentation algorithm based on CT images for HIFU treatment planning. After an initial threshold of the CT data, rib regions were characterized based on their size, and if a region were greater than a predetermined area parameter (i.e. it consisted of rib and liver), a marker based watershed transformation separated the two regions and continued to the next inferior slice. After false positives were removed by a predetermined volume parameter, the remaining objects were reassigned high CT values. Preliminary results from six human CT datasets indicated this segmentation method works well, successfully distinguishing the ribs from nearby organs. Of the fifty-five ribs counted in these datasets, only five contained small errors due to reconstruction shading irregularities, with four of these in one dataset. Once all cartilage was assigned high CT numbers, any commercially available 3D rendering software (e.g. OsiriX) can be used to visualize the ribs and tumor.

  14. Consideration of the Pathological Features of Pediatric Congenital Heart Diseases Which Are Ideally Suitable for Diagnosing With Multidetector-row CT

    PubMed Central

    Hayabuchi, Yasunobu; Inoue, Miki; Watanabe, Noriko; Sakata, Miho; Ohnishi, Tatsuya; Kagami, Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Background A lots of articles published regarding the usefulness of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) mostly describe that it can be an alternative to the invasive catheterization and angiography. The unique diagnostic features of this imaging modality have been largely ignored or disregarded. We described the pathological conditions that cannot be diagnosed by conventional angiography with cardiac catheterization but can be accurately diagnosed by MDCT. Methods We retrospectively reviewed non-ECG-gated MDCT images acquired from 452 children and young adults with CHD between 2005 and 2010 in our institute. In this article, we focused on the diagnostic advantages of MDCT, and indicated five pathological conditions. (1) When Blalock-Taussig shunt total occlusion prevents catheter insertion into the artificial vessel and angiography is ruled out, the peripheral pulmonary artery during the peripheral pulmonary artery can be imaged and diagnosed using MDCT based on blood flow supplied from many small collateral vessels originating from the aorta. (2) The location and protrusion of the device in the vessel after coil embolization to treat patent ductus arteriosus can be accurately visualized by virtual endoscopy using MDCT. (3) Calcification of patches, synthetic blood vessels, and other prostheses that is indistinct on conventional angiograms is clear on MDCT. (4) Simultaneous MDCT observations of the anatomical relationships between arterial and venous systems on the same image can clarify the detail diagnosis for surgical treatment. (5) Compression of the airways by the great vessels and pulmonary segmental emphysematous change can be diagnosed by MDCT. Results and Conclusions Among patients with CHD, MDCT is useful not only as a non-invasive alternative to conventional angiography, but also as a tool for specific morphological diagnoses. In the future, it will be necessary to accumulate experience in the

  15. Point Organ Radiation Dose in Abdominal CT: Effect of Patient Off-Centering in an Experimental Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Ali Khawaja, Ranish Deedar; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Lira, Diego; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Primak, Andrew; Xu, George; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2017-01-10

    To determine the effect of patient off-centering on point organ radiation dose measurements in a human cadaver scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol. A human cadaver (88 years, body-mass-index 20 kg/m(2)) was scanned with routine abdominal CT protocol on 128-slice dual source MDCT (Definition Flash, Siemens). A total of 18 scans were performed using two scan protocols (a) 120 kV-200 mAs fixed-mA (CTDIvol 14 mGy) (b) 120 kV-125 ref mAs (7 mGy) with automatic exposure control (AEC, CareDose 4D) at three different positions (a) gantry isocenter, (b) upward off-centering and (c) downward off-centering. Scanning was repeated three times at each position. Six thimble (in liver, stomach, kidney, pancreas, colon and urinary bladder) and four MOSFET dosimeters (on cornea, thyroid, testicle and breast) were placed for calculation of measured point organ doses. Organ dose estimations were retrieved from dose-tracking software (eXposure, Radimetrics). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance. There was a significant difference between the trends of point organ doses with AEC and fixed-mA at all three positions (p < 0.01). Variation in point doses between fixed-mA and AEC protocols were statistically significant across all organs at all Table positions (p < 0.001). There was up to 5-6% decrease in point doses with upward off-centering and in downward off-centering. There were statistical significant differences in point doses from dosimeters and dose-tracking software (mean difference for internal organs, 5-36% for fixed-mA & 7-48% for AEC protocols; p < 0.001; mean difference for surface organs, >92% for both protocols; p < 0.0001). For both protocols, the highest mean difference in point doses was found for stomach and lowest for colon. Measured absorbed point doses in abdominal CT vary with patient-centering in the gantry isocenter. Due to lack of consideration of patient positioning in the dose estimation on automatic software-over estimation of

  16. A Method for the Automatic Exposure Control in Pediatric Abdominal CT: Application to the Standard Deviation Value and Tube Current Methods by Using Patient's Age and Body Size.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Ken; Akiyama, Shinji; Nambu, Atushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hasebe, Yuusuke

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to apply the pediatric abdominal CT protocol of Donnelly et al. in the United States to the pediatric abdominal CT-AEC. Examining CT images of 100 children, we found that the sectional area of the hepatic portal region (y) was strongly correlated with the body weight (x) as follows: y=7.14x + 84.39 (correlation coefficient=0.9574). We scanned an elliptical cone phantom that simulates the human body using a pediatric abdominal CT scanning method of Donnelly et al. in, and measured SD values. We further scanned the same phantom under the settings for adult CT-AEC scan and obtained the relationship between the sectional areas (y) and the SD values. Using these results, we obtained the following preset noise factors for CT-AEC at each body weight range: 6.90 at 4.5-8.9 kg, 8.40 at 9.0-17.9 kg, 8.68 at 18.0-26.9 kg, 9.89 at 27.0-35.9 kg, 12.22 at 36.0-45.0 kg, 13.52 at 45.1-70.0 kg, 15.29 at more than 70 kg. From the relation between age, weight and the distance of liver and tuber ischiadicum of 500 children, we obtained the CTDIvol values and DLP values under the scanning protocol of Donnelly et al. Almost all of DRL from these values turned out to be smaller than the DRL data of IAEA and various countries. Thus, by setting the maximum current values of CT-AEC to be the Donnelly et al.'s age-wise current values, and using our weight-wise noise factors, we think we can perform pediatric abdominal CT-AEC scans that are consistent with the same radiation safety and the image quality as those proposed by Donnelly et al.

  17. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Calder, Alistair Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects ("rib gaps"). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia.

  18. Usefulness of a metal artifact reduction algorithm for orthopedic implants in abdominal CT: phantom and clinical study results.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seonji; Kim, Se Hyung; Hwang, Eui Jin; Shin, Cheong-Il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm for orthopedic prostheses in phantom and clinical CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An agar phantom with two sets of spinal screws was scanned at various tube voltage (80-140 kVp) and tube current-time (34-1032 mAs) settings. The orthopedic MAR algorithm was combined with filtered back projection (FBP) or iterative reconstruction. The mean SDs in three ROIs were compared among four datasets (FBP, iterative reconstruction, FBP with orthopedic MAR, and iterative reconstruction with orthopedic MAR). For the clinical study, the mean SDs of three ROIs and 4-point scaled image quality in 52 patients with metallic orthopedic prostheses were compared between CT images acquired with and without orthopedic MAR. The presence and type of image quality improvement with orthopedic MAR and the presence of orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were also analyzed. RESULTS. In the phantom study, the mean SD with orthopedic MAR was significantly lower than that without orthopedic MAR regardless of dose settings and reconstruction algorithms (FBP versus iterative reconstruction). The mean SD near the metallic prosthesis in 52 patients was significantly lower on CT images with orthopedic MAR (28.04 HU) than those without it (49.21 HU). Image quality regarding metallic artifact was significantly improved with orthopedic MAR (rating of 2.60 versus 1.04). Notable reduction of metallic artifacts and better depiction of abdominal organs were observed in 45 patients. Diagnostic benefit was achieved in six patients, but orthopedic MAR-related new artifacts were seen in 30 patients. CONCLUSION. Use of the orthopedic MAR algorithm significantly reduces metal artifacts in CT of both phantoms and patients and has potential for improving diagnostic performance in patients with severe metallic artifacts.

  19. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aneurysm: a retrospective analysis of CT follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hechelhammer, Lukas; Wildermuth, Simon; Lachat, Mario L; Pfammatter, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Retrospective radiologic and clinical midterm follow-up is reported for 10 patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). At a mean follow-up of 33 months, regression of the thickness of the perianeurysmal fibrosis (PAF) and decrease of aneurysmal sac diameter was observed in nine patients. Four EVAR-associated complications were observed: periinterventional dissection of femoral artery (n = 1), blue toe syndrome (n = 1), and stent-graft disconnection (n = 2). EVAR is the less invasive method of aneurysm exclusion in patients with IAAA with a comparable evolution of the PAF as reported after open repair.

  20. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® pulsatile abdominal mass, suspected abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Benoit; Dill, Karin E; Flamm, Scott D; Francois, Christopher J; Gerhard-Herman, Marie D; Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Mansour, M Ashraf; Mohler, Emile R; Oliva, Isabel B; Schenker, Matthew P; Weiss, Clifford; Rybicki, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    Clinical palpation of a pulsating abdominal mass alerts the clinician to the presence of a possible abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Generally an arterial aneurysm is defined as a localized arterial dilatation ≥50% greater than the normal diameter. Imaging studies are important in diagnosing the cause of a pulsatile abdominal mass and, if an AAA is found, in determining its size and involvement of abdominal branches. Ultrasound (US) is the initial imaging modality of choice when a pulsatile abdominal mass is present. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) may be substituted in patients for whom US is not suitable. When aneurysms have reached the size threshold for intervention or are clinically symptomatic, contrast-enhanced multidetector CT angiography (CTA) is the best diagnostic and preintervention planning study, accurately delineating the location, size, and extent of aneurysm and the involvement of branch vessels. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) may be substituted if CT cannot be performed. Catheter arteriography has some utility in patients with significant contraindications to both CTA and MRA. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria(®) are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  1. Patient-specific models of wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm: a comparison between MR and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Putter, Sander; Breeuwer, Marcel; van de Vosse, Frans N.; Kose, Ursula; Gerritsen, Frans A.

    2006-03-01

    Finite element method based patient-specific wall stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) may provide a more accurate rupture risk predictor than the currently used maximum transverse diameter. In this study, we have investigated the sensitivity of the wall stress in AAA with respect to geometrical variations. We have acquired MR and CT images for four patients with AAA. Three individual users have delineated the AAA vessel wall contours on the image slices. These contours were used to generate synthetic feature images for a deformable model based segmentation method. We investigated the reproducibility and the influence of the user variability on the wall stress. For sufficiently smooth models of the AAA wall, the peak wall stress is reproducible for three out of the four AAA geometries. The 0.99 percentiles of the wall stress show excellent reproducibility for all four AAAs. The variations induced by user variability are larger than the errors caused by the segmentation variability. The influence of the user variability appears to be similar for MR and CT. We conclude that the peak wall stress in AAA is sensitive to small geometrical variations. To increase reproducibility it appears to be best not to allow too much geometrical detail in the simulations. This could be achieved either by using a sufficiently smooth geometry representation or by using a more robust statistical parameter derived from the wall stress distribution.

  2. Longitudinal tube modulation for chest and abdominal CT examinations: impact on effective patient doses calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Depuydt, M.; Jacobs, J.; Nens, J.; Lemmens, K.; Oyen, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: In multi-slice CT, manufacturers have implemented automatic tube current modulation (TCM) algorithms. These adjust tube current in the x-y plane (angular modulation) and/or along the z-axis (z-axis modulation) according to the size and attenuation of the scanned body part. Current methods for estimating effective dose (ED) values in CT do not account for such new developments. This study investigated the need to take TCM into account when calculating ED values, using clinical data. Methods: The effect of TCM algorithms as implemented on a GE BrightSpeed 16, a Philips Brilliance 64 and a Siemens Sensation 64 CT scanners was investigated. Here, only z-axis modulation was addressed, considering thorax and abdomen CT examinations collected from 534 adult patients. Commercially available CT dosimetry software (CT expo v.1.7) was used to compute EDTCM (ED accounting for TCM) as the sum of ED of successive slices. A two-step approach was chosen: first we estimated the relative contribution of each slice assuming a constant tube current. Next a weighted average was taken based upon the slice specific tube current value. EDTCM was than compared to patient ED estimated using average mA of all slices. Results and Conclusions: The proposed method is relatively simple and uses as input: the parameters of each protocol, a fitted polynomial function of weighting factors for each slice along the scan length and mA values of the individual patient examination. Results show that z-axis modulation does not have a strong impact on ED for the Siemens and the GE scanner (difference ranges from -4.1 to 3.3 percent); for the Philips scanner the effect was more important, (difference ranges from -8.5 to 6.9 percent), but still all median values approached zero (except for one case, where the median reached -5.6%), suggesting that ED calculation using average mA is in general a good approximation for EDTCM. Higher difference values for the Philips scanner are due to a stronger

  3. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Güven, Koray; Acunaş, Bülent

    2004-10-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography has provided excellent opportunities for advancement of computed tomography (CT) technology and clinical applications. It has a wide range of applications in the abdomen including vascular pathologies either occlusive or aneurysmal; enables the radiologist to produce vascular mapping that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to mass lesions. MDCTA can be used in preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation. MDCTA can also provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of ischemic bowel disease, active Crohn disease, the extent and location of collateral vessels in cirrhosis.

  4. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  5. Dual-energy multidetector CT: how does it work, what can it tell us, and when can we use it in abdominopelvic imaging?

    PubMed

    Coursey, Courtney A; Nelson, Rendon C; Boll, Daniel T; Paulson, Erik K; Ho, Lisa M; Neville, Amy M; Marin, Daniele; Gupta, Rajan T; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2010-01-01

    Dual-energy CT provides information about how substances behave at different energies, the ability to generate virtual unenhanced datasets, and improved detection of iodine-containing substances on low-energy images. Knowing how a substance behaves at two different energies can provide information about tissue composition beyond that obtainable with single-energy techniques. The term K edge refers to the spike in attenuation that occurs at energy levels just greater than that of the K-shell binding because of the increased photoelectric absorption at these energy levels. K-edge values vary for each element, and they increase as the atomic number increases. The energy dependence of the photoelectric effect and the variability of K edges form the basis of dual-energy techniques, which may be used to detect substances such as iodine, calcium, and uric acid crystals. The closer the energy level used in imaging is to the K edge of a substance such as iodine, the more the substance attenuates. In the abdomen and pelvis, dual-energy CT may be used in the liver to increase conspicuity of hypervascular lesions; in the kidneys, to distinguish hyperattenuating cysts from enhancing renal masses and to characterize renal stone composition; in the adrenal glands, to characterize adrenal nodules; and in the pancreas, to differentiate between normal and abnormal parenchyma.

  6. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  7. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  8. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  9. Optimization of abdominal fat quantification on CT imaging through use of standardized anatomic space: A novel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The quantification of body fat plays an important role in the study of numerous diseases. It is common current practice to use the fat area at a single abdominal computed tomography (CT) slice as a marker of the body fat content in studying various disease processes. This paper sets out to answer three questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. At what single anatomic slice location do the areas of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) estimated from the slice correlate maximally with the corresponding fat volume measures? How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? Are there combinations of multiple slices (not necessarily contiguous) whose area sum correlates better with volume than does single slice area with volume? Methods: The authors propose a novel strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. The authors then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. To address the third issue, the authors carry out similar correlation studies by utilizing two and three slices for calculating area sum. Results: Based on 50 abdominal CT data sets, the proposed mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized currently for single slice area estimation as a marker. Conclusions: The maximum area-to-volume correlation achieved is quite high, suggesting that it may be reasonable to estimate body fat by measuring the area of fat from a single anatomic slice at the site of maximum correlation and use this as a marker. The site of maximum correlation is not at L4-L5 as commonly assumed

  10. Helical CT Angiography of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Treated with Suprarenal Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhonghua

    2003-06-15

    The endovascular repair of abdominal aorticaneurysm (AAA) with stent grafts is rapidly becoming an important alternative to open repair. Suprarenal stent grafting, recently modified from conventional infrarenal stent grafting, is a technique for the purpose of treating patients with inappropriate aneurysm necks.Unlike open repair, the success of endoluminal repair cannot be ascertained by means of direct examination and thus relies on imaging results. The use of conventional angiography for arterial imaging has become less dominant, while helical computed tomography angiography(CTA) has become the imaging modality of choice for both preoperative assessment and postoperative followup after treatment with stent graft implants. There is an increasing likelihood that radiologists will become more and more involved in the procedure of aortic stent grafting and in giving the radiological report on these patients treated with stent grafts. It is necessary for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging findings, including common and uncommon appearances following aortic stent grafting. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe and present normal and abnormal imaging appearances following aortic stent grafting based on helical CTA.

  11. The effect of z overscanning on radiation burden of pediatric patients undergoing head CT with multidetector scanners: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Tzedakis, Antonis; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of z overscanning on eye lens dose and effective dose received by pediatric patients undergoing head CT examinations. A pediatric patient study was carried out to obtain the exposure parameters and data regarding the eye lens position with respect to imaged volume boundaries. This information was used to simulate CT exposures by Monte Carlo code. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP, version 4C2) radiation transport code and five mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old patient, were employed in the current study. To estimate effective dose, the weighted computed tomography dose index was calculated by cylindrical polymethyl-methacrylate phantoms of 9.7, 13.1, 15.4, 16.1, and 16.9 cm in diameter representing the pediatric head of newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year-old individuals, respectively. The validity of the Monte Carlo calculated approach was verified by comparison with dose data obtained using physical pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. For all patients studied, the eye lenses were located in the region -1 to 3 cm from the first slice of the imaged volume. Doses from axial scans were always lower than those from corresponding helical examinations. The percentage differences in normalized eye lens absorbed dose between contiguous axial and helical examinations with pitch=1 were found to be up to 10.9%, when the eye lenses were located inside the region to be imaged. When the eye lenses were positioned 0-3 cm far from the first slice of region to be imaged, the normalized dose to the lens from contiguous axial examinations was up to 11 times lower than the corresponding values from helical mode with pitch=1. The effective dose from axial examinations was up to 24% lower than corresponding values from helical examinations with pitch=1. In conclusion, it is more dose efficient to use axial mode acquisition rather than helical scan

  12. Classification of visual signs in abdominal CT image figures in biomedical literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    "Imaging signs" are a critical part of radiology's language. They not only are important for conveying diagnosis, but may also aid in indexing radiology literature and retrieving relevant cases and images. Here we report our work towards representing and categorizing imaging signs of abdominal abnormalities in figures in the radiology literature. Given a region-of-interest (ROI) from a figure, our goal was to assign a correct imaging sign label to that ROI from the following seven: accordion, comb, ring, sandwich, small bowel feces, target, or whirl. As training and test data, we created our own "gold standard" dataset of regions containing imaging signs. We computed 2997 feature attributes to represent imaging sign characteristics for each ROI in training and test sets. Following feature selection they were reduced to 70 attributes and were input to a Support Vector Machine classifier. We applied image-enhancement methods to compensate for variable quality of the images in radiology articles. In particular we developed a method for automatic detection and removal of pointers/markers (arrows, arrowheads, and asterisk symbols) on the images. These pointers/markers are valuable for approximately locating ROIs; however, they degrade the classification because they are often (partially) included in the training ROIs. On a test set of 283 ROIs, our method achieved an overall accuracy of 70% in labeling the seven signs, which we believe is a promising result for using imaging signs to search/retrieve radiology literature. This work is also potentially valuable for the creation of a visual ontology of biomedical imaging entities.

  13. CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution vs CT enteroclysis in small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Minordi, L M; Vecchioli, A; Mirk, P; Bonomo, L

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to compare CT enterography with polyethylene glycol solution (PEG-CT) with CT enteroclysis (CT-E) in patients with suspected small bowel disease. Methods 145 patients underwent abdominal contrast-enhanced 16-row multidetector CT after administration of 2000 ml of PEG by mouth (n = 75) or after administration of 2000 ml of methylcellulose by nasojejunal tube (n = 70). Small bowel distension, luminal and extraluminal findings were evaluated and compared with small bowel follow-through examination in 60 patients, double contrast enema in 50, surgery in 25 and endoscopy in 35. Statistical evaluation was carried out by χ2 testing. For both techniques we have also calculated the effective dose and the equivalent dose in a standard patient. Results Crohn's disease was diagnosed in 64 patients, neoplasms in 16, adhesions in 6. Distension of the jejunum was better with CT-E than PEG-CT (p<0.05: statistically significant difference). No significant difference was present for others sites (p>0.05). Evaluation of pathological ileal loops was good with both techniques. The values of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were respectively 94%, 100% and 96% with CT-E, and 93%, 94% and 93% with PEG-CT. The effective dose for PEG-CT was less than the dose for the CT-E (34.7 mSv vs 39.91 mSv). Conclusion PEG-CT shows findings of Crohn's disease as well as CT-E does, although CT-E gives better bowel distension, especially in the jejunum, and has higher specificity than PEG-CT. PMID:20959377

  14. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  15. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  16. SU-F-207-14: Low Contrast Detectability (LCD) at Different Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Abdominal CT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Using diagnostic reference levels (DRL) to optimize CT protocols has potential to reduce radiation dose and meet regulatory requirements. However, DRL’s tend to be misconstrued as dose limits, are typically designed for specific patient populations, and are assumed to have acceptable image quality (AIQ) associated with them. To determine the image quality that is associated with established DRL’s for adult abdominal CT studies, a LCD phantom study was employed. Methods: A CT phantom (CIRS) containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background (HUBB) matrix was scanned with a GE HD750 64 slice scanner. The phantom was scanned at the NEXT 2006 25th CTDIvol of 12 mGy, the NCRP 172 achievable dose (AD) CTDIvol of 17 mGy and 75th CTDIvol of 25 mGy and at the ACR recommended CTDIvol of 25 mGy. It was also scanned at a CTDIvol 20% greater than the AD at 20 mGy and the ACR maximum threshold of 30 mGy. Results: At the NEXT 2006 25th percentile CTDIvol of 12 mGy, a 6.3 mm low contrast lesion was detectable in the 20 HUBB; 6.3 mm in the 10 HUBB and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column. Increasing the CTDIvol to the NCRP 172 AD of 17 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was visualized in the 20 HUBB column. At 20 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was detectable in the 10 HUBB column. No further lesions were visible between 20 and 30 mGy. However, conspicuity of all lesions increased with each additional step up in CTDI. Conclusion: Optimizing radiation dose to achieve AIQ is a critical aspect of any dose optimization committee. Hence, judicious monitoring of radiation exposure to patients has to be balanced with diagnostic image quality.

  17. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization Therapy for a Hypoplastic Pelvic Kidney with a Single Vaginal Ectopic Ureter to Control Incontinence: The Usefulness of Three-Dimensional CT Angiography Using Multidetector-Row Helical CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kudoh, Kouichi Kadota, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Imuta, Masanori; Yasuda, Tsuyoshi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Inadome, Akito; Yoshida, Masaki; Ueda, Shouichi

    2003-09-15

    A girl with continuous urinary incontinence was successfully treated by angiographic embolization of a hypoplastic pelvic kidney with a single unilateral vaginal ectopic opening of the ureter. For this intervention, CT angiography was useful for detecting the corresponding renal artery of the hypoplastic kidney.

  19. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  20. Multidetector CT of hepatic artery pathologies.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, D; Erol, B; Karcaaltincaba, M

    2012-01-01

    The hepatic artery can be involved by a variety of pathology and diseases.Today MDCT enables high quality imaging of the hepatic artery using axial, MIP and volume rendered images. We illustrate MDCT findings of anatomical variations, aneurysm, dilatation, dissection, arteriovenous fistula, thrombosis and stenosis. Aneurysms can be saccular, fusiform and multiple and may develop due to atherosclerosis, vasculitis, trauma and biopsy. Dilatation of hepatic artery can be seen in portal hypertension, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease and hemangiomatosis. Hepatic artery can be occluded after trauma and transplantation. Dissection develops due to atherosclerosis, Marfan and Ehler Danlos syndromes and during pregnancy. Arteriovenous fistula can be congenital and acquired. We conclude that various hepatic artery pathologies can be confidently diagnosed by MDCT.

  1. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Graft (CABG) Surgery Atherosclerosis Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks • Warning Signs of a ... Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support Network Heart Attack Tools & Resources What Is a Heart Attack? How ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... ray beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ...

  3. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  4. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  5. Staging of Primary Abdominal Lymphomas: Comparison of Whole-Body MRI with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 18F-FDG-PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Stecco, Alessandro; Buemi, Francesco; Quagliozzi, Martina; Lombardi, Mariangela; Santagostino, Alberto; Sacchetti, Gian Mauro; Carriero, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequences (WB-DW-MRI) with that of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the staging of patients with primary gastrointestinal lymphoma. Methods. This retrospective study involved 17 untreated patients with primary abdominal gastrointestinal lymphoma. All patients underwent 18F-FDG-PET/CT and WB-DW-MRI. Histopathology findings or at least 6 months of clinical and radiological follow-up was the gold standard. The Musshoff-modified Ann Arbor system was used for staging, and diagnostic accuracy was evaluated on a per-node basis. Results. WB-DW-MRI exhibited 100% sensitivity, 96.3% specificity, and 96.1% and 100% positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and PPV and NPV of PET/CT were 95.9%, 100%, and 100% and 96.4%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two techniques (p = 0.05). The weighted kappa agreement statistics with a 95% confidence interval were 0.97 (0.95–0.99) between the two MRI readers and 0.87 (0.82–0.92) between the two methods. Conclusions. WB-DW-MRI appears to have a comparable diagnostic value to 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging patients with gastrointestinal lymphoma. PMID:26798331

  6. Comparison of the Diagnostic Image Quality of the Canine Maxillary Dentoalveolar Structures Obtained by Cone Beam Computed Tomography and 64-Multidetector Row Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Drees, Randi; Koenig, Lisa J; Snyder, Christopher J; Hetzel, Scott; Miles, Chanda R; Schwarz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this blinded study was to validate the use of cone beam computed tomography (C) for imaging of the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures by comparing its diagnostic image quality with that of 64-multidetector row CT Sagittal slices of a tooth-bearing segment of the maxilla of a commercially purchased dog skull embedded in methylmethacrylate were obtained along a line parallel with the dental arch using a commercial histology diamond saw. The slice of tooth-bearing bone that best depicted the dentoalveolar structures was chosen and photographed. The maxillary segment was imaged with cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT. Four blinded evaluators compared the cone beam CT and 64-multidetector row CT images and image quality was scored as it related to the anatomy of dentoalveolar structures. Trabecular bone, enamel, dentin, pulp cavity, periodontal ligament space, and lamina dura were scored In addition, a score depicting the evaluators overall impression of the image was recorded. Images acquired with cone beam CT were found to be significantly superior in image quality to images acquired with 64-multidetector row CT overall, and in all scored categories. In our study setting cone beam CT was found to be a valid and clinically superior imaging modality for the canine maxillary dentoalveolar structures when compared to 64-multidetector row CT.

  7. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Mench, A; Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Lamoureux, R; Smajdor, L; Cormack, B; Mohammed, T; Rill, L; Arreola, M; Sinclair, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5, 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality

  8. [Why should an abdominal CT scan be performed for suspected appendicitis in the adult patient? Lessons from ten clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Pautrat, K; Soyer, P; Pocard, M

    2009-10-01

    Ten years after its introduction, the contribution and indications for computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of appendicitis remain the subject of controversy among surgeons. Many argue that CT is frequently superfluous and costly, results in excessive radiation exposure, and delays surgical treatment. On our service, we perform 150 to 180 adult appendectomies annually. We feel that CT helps us to avoid unnecessary appendectomy, to clear up diagnostic uncertainty, and, most importantly, to guide the choice of surgical approach. We illustrate our experience through ten clinical cases in which the use of preoperative imaging has resulted in improved care.

  9. Thoraco-Abdominal Duplication Cyst- Role Tc-99m Pertechnetate SPECT-CT Scintigraphy in Localising Ectopic Gastric Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ravina, Mudalsha; Datta, Deepanksha; Rangan, Kasturi; Suraj, Ajay Singh; Gambhir, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Thoraco-abdominal duplication cyst, a congenital malformation of the posterior primitive foregut rarely presents with anaemia. Ectopic gastric mucosa is seen in around 20%-30% of the enteric duplication cysts. We report the scintigraphic findings of one such case which helped in final diagnosis and management of the patient. PMID:28242991

  10. Can a revised paediatric radiation dose reduction CT protocol be applied and still maintain anatomical delineation, diagnostic confidence and overall imaging quality?

    PubMed Central

    Siriwanarangsun, P; Tanaanantarak, P; Krisanachinda, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare multidetector CT (MDCT) radiation doses between default settings and a revised dose reduction protocol and to determine whether the diagnostic confidence can be maintained with imaging quality made under the revised protocol in paediatric head, chest and abdominal CT studies. Methods: The study retrospectively reviewed head, chest, abdominal and thoracoabdominal MDCT studies, comparing 231 CT studies taken before (Phase 1) and 195 CT studies taken after (Phase 2) the implemented revised protocol. Image quality was assessed using a five-point grading scale based on anatomical criteria, diagnostic confidence and overall quality. Image noise and dose–length product (DLP) were collected and compared. Results: The relative dose reductions between Phase 1 and Phase 2 were statistically significant in 35%, 51% and 54% (p < 0.001) of head, chest and abdominal CT studies, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in overall image quality score comparisons in the head (p = 0.3), chest (p = 0.7), abdominal (p = 0.7) and contiguous thoracic (p = 0.1) and abdominal (p = 0.2) CT studies, with the exception of anatomical quality in definition of bronchial walls and delineation of intrahepatic portal branches in thoracoabdominal CTs, and diagnostic confidence in mass lesion in head CTs, liver lesion (>1 cm), splanchnic venous thrombosis, pancreatitis in abdominal CTs, and emphysema and aortic dissection in thoracoabdominal CTs. Conclusion: Paediatric CT radiation doses can be significantly reduced from manufacturer's default protocol while still maintaining anatomical delineation, diagnostic confidence and overall imaging quality. Advances in knowledge: Revised paediatric CT protocol can provide a half DLP reduction while preserving overall imaging quality. PMID:24959737

  11. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  12. Case report highlighting how wound path identification on CT can help identify organ damage in abdominal blast injuries.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tatjana V; Folio, Les R; Backus, Christopher E; Bunger, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Penetrating trauma is frequently encountered in forward deployed military combat hospitals. Abdominal blast injuries represent nearly 11% of combat injuries, and multiplanar computed tomography imaging is optimal for injury assessment and surgical planning. We describe a multiplanar approach to assessment of blast and ballistic injuries, which allows for more expeditious detection of missile tracts and damage caused along the path. Precise delineation of the trajectory path and localization of retained fragments enables time-saving and detailed evaluation of associated tissue and vascular injury. For consistent and reproducible documentation of fragment locations in the body, we propose a localization scheme based on Cartesian coordinates to report 3-dimensional locations of fragments and demonstrating the application in three cases of abdominal blast injury.

  13. Assessment of sub-milli-sievert abdominal computed tomography with iterative reconstruction techniques of different vendors

    PubMed Central

    Padole, Atul; Sainani, Nisha; Lira, Diego; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Lo Gullo, Roberto; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess diagnostic image quality of reduced dose (RD) abdominal computed tomography (CT) with 9 iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) from 4 different vendors to the standard of care (SD) CT. METHODS: In an Institutional Review Board approved study, 66 patients (mean age 60 ± 13 years, 44 men, and 22 women) undergoing routine abdomen CT on multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners from vendors A, B, and C (≥ 64 row CT scanners) (22 patients each) gave written informed consent for acquisition of an additional RD CT series. Sinogram data of RD CT was reconstructed with two vendor-specific and a vendor-neutral IRTs (A-1, A-2, A-3; B-1, B-2, B-3; and C-1, C-2, C-3) and SD CT series with filtered back projection. Subjective image evaluation was performed by two radiologists for each SD and RD CT series blinded and independently. All RD CT series (198) were assessed first followed by SD CT series (66). Objective image noise was measured for SD and RD CT series. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon signed rank, kappa, and analysis of variance tests. RESULTS: There were 13/50, 18/57 and 9/40 missed lesions (size 2-7 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Missed lesions includes liver cysts, kidney cysts and stone, gall stone, fatty liver, and pancreatitis. There were also 5, 4, and 4 pseudo lesions (size 2-3 mm) on RD CT for vendor A, B, and C, respectively. Lesions conspicuity was sufficient for clinical diagnostic performance for 6/24 (RD-A-1), 10/24 (RD-A-2), and 7/24 (RD-A-3) lesions for vendor A; 5/26 (RD-B-1), 6/26 (RD-B-2), and 7/26 (RD-B-3) lesions for vendor B; and 4/20 (RD-C-1) 6/20 (RD-C-2), and 10/20 (RD-C-3) lesions for vendor C (P = 0.9). Mean objective image noise in liver was significantly lower for RD A-1 compared to both RD A-2 and RD A-3 images (P < 0.001). Similarly, mean objective image noise lower for RD B-2 (compared to RD B-1, RD B-3) and RD C-3 (compared to RD C-1 and C-2) (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Regardless of IRTs and MDCT vendors

  14. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  15. Indirect CT venography of the abdominal cavity and lower limbs in patients with the suspicion of pulmonary embolism--indications, technique, diagnostic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Czekajska-Chehab, Elzbieta; Drop, Andrzej; Terlecka, Barbara; Trzeciak, Jadwiga; Trojanowska, Agnieszka; Odój, Magdalena

    2004-01-01

    Multi-slice computed tomography has become the main method to diagnose and evaluate the intensity of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). The most common cause of PE is thrombosis of veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The paper presents various aspects of the use of combined pulmonary artery arteriography and indirect venography performed using multi-slice tomography in relation to other methods imaging the venous system used so far. The authors presented the techniques of CT examination of venous vessels of the lower limbs, abdominal cavity and pelvis in patients with the suspicion of PE, typical images of lesions, results of studies concerning these issues conducted to date and their own experience based on clinical practice.

  16. Automatic segmentation of the liver using multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yujin; Hong, Helen; Chung, Jin Wook; Yoon, Young Ho

    2012-02-01

    We propose an effective technique for the extraction of liver boundary based on multi-planar anatomy and deformable surface model in abdominal contrast-enhanced CT images. Our method is composed of four main steps. First, for extracting an optimal volume circumscribing a liver, lower and side boundaries are defined by positional information of pelvis and rib. An upper boundary is defined by separating the lungs and heart from CT images. Second, for extracting an initial liver volume, optimal liver volume is smoothed by anisotropic diffusion filtering and is segmented using adaptively selected threshold value. Third, for removing neighbor organs from initial liver volume, morphological opening and connected component labeling are applied to multiple planes. Finally, for refining the liver boundaries, deformable surface model is applied to a posterior liver surface and missing left robe in previous step. Then, probability summation map is generated by calculating regional information of the segmented liver in coronal plane, which is used for restoring the inaccurate liver boundaries. Experimental results show that our segmentation method can accurately extract liver boundaries without leakage to neighbor organs in spite of various liver shape and ambiguous boundary.

  17. Comparison of in vivo cone-beam and multidetector computed tomographic scans by three-dimensional merging software.

    PubMed

    Rostetter, Claudio; Metzler, Philipp; Schenkel, Jan S; Seifert, Burkhardt; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo

    2015-12-01

    In dentomaxillofacial radiology, cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is used to give fast and high-resolution 3-dimensional images of bone with a low dose of radiation. However, its use for quantitative measurement of bone density based on absolute values (Hounsfield units, HU) as in multidetector CT is still controversial. We know of no in vivo study of 3-dimensional merging software that will reliably match identical bone areas of cone-beam and multidetector CT datasets. We studied 19 multidetector, and 19 cone-beam, CT scans of the skull. The two datasets were fused, corresponding points were identified for measurement, and we compared mean density. We used linear regression to analyse the relation between the two different scanning methods, and studied a total of 4180 measurements. The mean time interval between scans was 5.2 (4.7) months. Mean R(2) over all measurements was 0.63 (range 0.22 - 0.79) with a mean internal consistency (Cronbach's α) of 0.86 (range 0.61 - 0.93). The strongest linearity, seen at the left mastoid, was R(2)=0.79 with high internal consistency (Cronbach's α 0.89), and the weakest was at the left zygomatic bone with R(2)=0.22 and Cronbach's α=0.61. Measurements of bone density based on cone-beam and multidetector CT scans generated in vivo showed high and reproducible internal consistency but poor linearity.

  18. [Gene-environment interaction for the HIF1-A 1772C>T polymorphisms and cigarette smoking increase susceptibility to abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Staniszewski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Pathological changes in the vascular vessels, such as the presence of atherosclerotic plaques or aneurysmal dilatations, are associated with the local conditions of ischemial/hypoxia. Polymorphisms in the HIF1A gene, encoding an oxygen-regulated HIF-1 subunit (HIF-1a), determine inter-individual variability in vascular response to hypoxia. Stimulation of selected pathways, related to this response (i.e. angiogenesis) is impaired by cigarette smoke exposure. In this work, we examined the associations between 1772C>T polymorphism (rs11549465) located in the coding region of HIF1A gene (Pro582-Ser), smoking and the occurrence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Moreover, the relations of these factors with the presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with AAA were studied. The case-control study was designed, in which a group of 1060 Caucasian subjects: 535 AAA patients and 525 controls, was analyzed. Data regarding smoking status were collected using questionnaire. Past and current smokers were analyzed together. In the group of 220 AAA subjects the coexistence of PAD was characterized. HIF-1A genotypes were assessed by PCR-RFLP method. Genetic-environmental interactions were examined by a two-by-four tables. In these analyzes, logistic regression models were used to adjusting for the relevant covariates. The frequency of HIF1A 1772T allele in AAA group (0,067) was similar to that observed in the control group (0,070). In the analyses of genetic-environmental interactions was observed that the co-occurrence of HIF1A 1772CT and TT genotypes and exposure to tobacco smoke has a strong multiplicative effect on the susceptibility to the AAA development. The age and gender adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were: 7,6 for smoking alone (p<0,0001); 0,65 for 1772CT and TT genotypes alone (p=0,3) and 14,4for smoking plus 1772CT and TT genotypes (p<0,0001). The proportion of smokers carrying 1772T allele was higher among patients with advanced form of PAD (femoro

  19. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  20. Detection and visualization of endoleaks in CT data for monitoring of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Egger, J.; Wimmer, A.; Großkopf, S.; Freisleben, B.

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present an efficient algorithm for the segmentation of the inner and outer boundary of thoratic and abdominal aortic aneurysms (TAA & AAA) in computed tomography angiography (CTA) acquisitions. The aneurysm segmentation includes two steps: first, the inner boundary is segmented based on a grey level model with two thresholds; then, an adapted active contour model approach is applied to the more complicated outer boundary segmentation, with its initialization based on the available inner boundary segmentation. An opacity image, which aims at enhancing important features while reducing spurious structures, is calculated from the CTA images and employed to guide the deformation of the model. In addition, the active contour model is extended by a constraint force that prevents intersections of the inner and outer boundary and keeps the outer boundary at a distance, given by the thrombus thickness, to the inner boundary. Based upon the segmentation results, we can measure the aneurysm size at each centerline point on the centerline orthogonal multiplanar reformatting (MPR) plane. Furthermore, a 3D TAA or AAA model is reconstructed from the set of segmented contours, and the presence of endoleaks is detected and highlighted. The implemented method has been evaluated on nine clinical CTA data sets with variations in anatomy and location of the pathology and has shown promising results.

  1. Analysis of the topological properties of the proximal femur on a regional scale: evaluation of multi-detector CT-scans for the assessment of biomechanical strength using local Minkowski functionals in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Link, T. M.; Monetti, R. A.; Kuhn, V.; Eckstein, F.; Raeth, C. W.; Reiser, M.

    2006-03-01

    In our recent studies on the analysis of bone texture in the context of Osteoporosis, we could already demonstrate the great potential of the topological evaluation of bone architecture based on the Minkowski Functionals (MF) in 2D and 3D for the prediction of the mechanical strength of cubic bone specimens depicted by high resolution MRI. Other than before, we now assess the mechanical characteristics of whole hip bone specimens imaged by multi-detector computed tomography. Due to the specific properties of the imaging modality and the bone tissue in the proximal femur, this requires to introduce a new analysis method. The internal architecture of the hip is functionally highly specialized to withstand the complex pattern of external and internal forces associated with human gait. Since the direction, connectivity and distribution of the trabeculae changes considerably within narrow spatial limits it seems most reasonable to evaluate the femoral bone structure on a local scale. The Minkowski functionals are a set of morphological descriptors for the topological characterization of binarized, multi-dimensional, convex objects with respect to shape, structure, and the connectivity of their components. The MF are usually used as global descriptors and may react very sensitively to minor structural variations which presents a major limitation in a number of applications. The objective of this work is to assess the mechanical competence of whole hip bone specimens using parameters based on the MF. We introduce an algorithm that considers the local topological aspects of the bone architecture of the proximal femur allowing to identify regions within the bone that contribute more to the overall mechanical strength than others.

  2. Advances and perspectives in lung cancer imaging using multidetector row computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (CT) into clinical practice has revolutionized many aspects of the clinical work-up. Lung cancer imaging has benefited from various breakthroughs in computing technology, with advances in the field of lung cancer detection, tissue characterization, lung cancer staging and response to therapy. Our paper discusses the problems of radiation, image visualization and CT examination comparison. It also reviews the most significant advances in lung cancer imaging and highlights the emerging clinical applications that use state of the art CT technology in the field of lung cancer diagnosis and follow-up.

  3. An hybrid CPU-GPU framework for quantitative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysm volume by CT angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An; Therasse, Eric; Soulez, Gilles

    2010-03-01

    We developed a hybrid CPU-GPU framework enabling semi-automated segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) on Computed Tomography Angiography (CTA) examinations. AAA maximal diameter (D-max) and volume measurements and their progression between 2 examinations can be generated by this software improving patient followup. In order to improve the workflow efficiency some segmentation tasks were implemented and executed on the graphics processing unit (GPU). A GPU based algorithm is used to automatically segment the lumen of the aneurysm within short computing time. In a second step, the user interacted with the software to validate the boundaries of the intra-luminal thrombus (ILT) on GPU-based curved image reformation. Automatic computation of D-max and volume were performed on the 3D AAA model. Clinical validation was conducted on 34 patients having 2 consecutive MDCT examinations within a minimum interval of 6 months. The AAA segmentation was performed twice by a experienced radiologist (reference standard) and once by 3 unsupervised technologists on all 68 MDCT. The ICC for intra-observer reproducibility was 0.992 (>=0.987) for D-max and 0.998 (>=0.994) for volume measurement. The ICC for inter-observer reproducibility was 0.985 (0.977-0.90) for D-max and 0.998 (0.996- 0.999) for volume measurement. Semi-automated AAA segmentation for volume follow-up was more than twice as sensitive than D-max follow-up, while providing an equivalent reproducibility.

  4. Studies on the application of a low-voltage peak to the postsurgical follow-up CT scan in abdominal cancer patients in order to reduce the exposure of patients to radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J. H.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, H. J.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.

    2012-10-01

    This study examined the radiation dose, computed tomography (CT) number, contrast and image quality of patients requiring periodic follow-up abdominal CT examinations at various tube voltages. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of patients who underwent a clinical analysis and the other group was a phantom one. Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Twenty patients who underwent a periodic follow-up examination by CT were selected randomly. The tube current was fixed to 150 mA, and the tube voltage was adjusted according to the appropriate value of each examination. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) values were measured. The CT number of each organ was measured by setting up a 1 cm diameter return on investment (ROI) in the abdominal organs at the same height of the first lumbar vertebra using images of the arterial phase. Two radiologists in consensus graded the quality of the abdominal images into three groups. An abdomen-shaped acrylic phantom was used in the phantom study. An ion chamber was inserted into the holes located at the center and periphery of the phantom, where the radiation dose was automatically displayed on the reader. Tube voltages of 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were applied to the phantom (diluted contrast medium with water at 1:10 ratio) and the phantom was scanned. The CT number was measured from a 1 cm diameter ROI at the center of the image. The CTDI value decreased by 36% at 100 kVp (7.50 mGy) compared with that at 120 kVp (11.70 mGy). According to the radiologists' evaluation, there were 17 equivalent, 3 acceptable and 0 unacceptable levels in the group of 20 subjects. The radiation dose in the phantom study decreased with increasing tube voltages from 80 to 140 kVp. The peripheral and central doses decreased by 38% and 41%, respectively. The CT numbers at 80, 100, 120 and 140 kVp were 1365.9±4.4, 1046.1±3.7, 862.8±3.2 and 737.5±3.0 HU, respectively. In conclusion, in a follow

  5. Effect of Radiation Dose Reduction and Reconstruction Algorithm on Image Noise, Contrast, Resolution, and Detectability of Subtle Hypoattenuating Liver Lesions at Multidetector CT: Filtered Back Projection versus a Commercial Model-based Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Marin, Daniele; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Patel, Bhavik; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-02-07

    Purpose To determine the effect of radiation dose and iterative reconstruction (IR) on noise, contrast, resolution, and observer-based detectability of subtle hypoattenuating liver lesions and to estimate the dose reduction potential of the IR algorithm in question. Materials and Methods This prospective, single-center, HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. A dual-source computed tomography (CT) system was used to reconstruct CT projection data from 21 patients into six radiation dose levels (12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) on the basis of two CT acquisitions. A series of virtual liver lesions (five per patient, 105 total, lesion-to-liver prereconstruction contrast of -15 HU, 12-mm diameter) were inserted into the raw CT projection data and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) (B31f kernel) and sinogram-affirmed IR (SAFIRE) (I31f-5 kernel). Image noise (pixel standard deviation), lesion contrast (after reconstruction), lesion boundary sharpness (average normalized gradient at lesion boundary), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were compared. Next, a two-alternative forced choice perception experiment was performed (16 readers [six radiologists, 10 medical physicists]). A linear mixed-effects statistical model was used to compare detection accuracy between FBP and SAFIRE and to estimate the radiation dose reduction potential of SAFIRE. Results Compared with FBP, SAFIRE reduced noise by a mean of 53% ± 5, lesion contrast by 12% ± 4, and lesion sharpness by 13% ± 10 but increased CNR by 89% ± 19. Detection accuracy was 2% higher on average with SAFIRE than with FBP (P = .03), which translated into an estimated radiation dose reduction potential (±95% confidence interval) of 16% ± 13. Conclusion SAFIRE increases detectability at a given radiation dose (approximately 2% increase in detection accuracy) and allows for imaging at reduced radiation dose (16% ± 13), while maintaining low

  6. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  7. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  8. Extensive Erosion of Vertebral Bodies Due to a Chronic Contained Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Alecio Fernando; Cardoso, Fabiano Nassar; da Rocha Fernandes, Artur

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a case of chronically ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm contained within the lumbar vertebral bodies that presented with dull abdominal pain. Sudden, massive hemorrhage is an uncommon, yet well-known complication of an untreated abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, misleading clinical and radiological findings present difficult diagnostic challenges in such cases. This report emphasizes the findings obtained with multidetector computed tomography and delineates the differentiation of this condition from similar pathologies. PMID:27200153

  9. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Prospective study evaluating the relative sensitivity of 18F-NaF PET/CT for detecting skeletal metastases from renal cell carcinoma in comparison to multidetector CT and 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy, using an adaptive trial design

    PubMed Central

    Gerety, E. L.; Lawrence, E. M.; Wason, J.; Yan, H.; Hilborne, S.; Buscombe, J.; Cheow, H. K.; Shaw, A. S.; Bird, N.; Fife, K.; Heard, S.; Lomas, D. J.; Matakidou, A.; Soloviev, D.; Eisen, T.; Gallagher, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The detection of occult bone metastases is a key factor in determining the management of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), especially when curative surgery is considered. This prospective study assessed the sensitivity of 18F-labelled sodium fluoride in conjunction with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-NaF PET/CT) for detecting RCC bone metastases, compared with conventional imaging by bone scintigraphy or CT. Patients and methods An adaptive two-stage trial design was utilized, which was stopped after the first stage due to statistical efficacy. Ten patients with stage IV RCC and bone metastases were imaged with 18F-NaF PET/CT and 99mTc-labelled methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) bone scintigraphy including pelvic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Images were reported independently by experienced radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians using a 5-point scoring system. Results Seventy-seven lesions were diagnosed as malignant: 100% were identified by 18F-NaF PET/CT, 46% by CT and 29% by bone scintigraphy/SPECT. Standard-of-care imaging with CT and bone scintigraphy identified 65% of the metastases reported by 18F-NaF PET/CT. On an individual patient basis, 18F-NaF PET/CT detected more RCC metastases than 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy/SPECT or CT alone (P = 0.007). The metabolic volumes, mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmean and SUVmax) of the malignant lesions were significantly greater than those of the benign lesions (P < 0.001). Conclusions 18F-NaF PET/CT is significantly more sensitive at detecting RCC skeletal metastases than conventional bone scintigraphy or CT. The detection of occult bone metastases could greatly alter patient management, particularly in the context when standard-of-care imaging is negative for skeletal metastases. PMID:26202597

  12. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  13. CHIMERA Multidetector at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Baldo, M.; Barna, R.; Campisi, M.g.; Cardella, G.; Cavallaro, Sl., Amico, V.D.; De Filippo, E.; DePasquale, D.; Femino, S.; Geraci, E.; Giustolisi, F.; Guazzoni, P.; Iacono-Manno, C.M.; Italiano, A.; Lanzalone, G.; Lanzano, G.; LoNigro, S.; Lombardo, U.; Manfredi, G.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Porto, F.; Sambataro, S.; Sperduto, M.L.; Sutera, C.M.; Zetta, L.

    2000-12-31

    The installation of CHIMERA multidetector, designed in order to study central collisions in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energy, is going on at LNS and the first experiment with the forward part (688 telescopes) is running since May 1999. The aim of this contribution is to present the status of the project.

  14. SU-F-207-01: Comparison of Beam Characteristics and Organ Dose From Four Commercial Multidetector Computed Tomography Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, T; Araki, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric properties and patient organ doses from four commercial multidetector CT (MDCT) using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation based on the absorbed dose measured using a Farmer chamber and cylindrical water phantoms according to AAPM TG-111. Methods: Four commercial MDCT were modeled using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The incident photon spectrum and bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined so that calculated values of aluminum half-value layer (Al-HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air agreed with measured values. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and cylindrical water phantoms. The dose distributions of head, chest, and abdominal scan were calculated using patient CT images and mean organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs at 120 kVp of Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 9.1, 7.5, 7.2, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated Al-HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 5%. For adult head scans, mean doses for eye lens from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 21.7, 38.5, 47.2 and 28.4 mGy, respectively. For chest scans, mean doses for lung from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 21.1, 26.1, 35.3 and 24.0 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans, the mean doses for liver from Brilliance, LightSpeed, Aquilion, and SOMATOM were 16.5, 21.3, 22.7, and 18.0 mGy, respectively. The absorbed doses increased with decreasing Al-HVL. The organ doses from Aquilion were two greater than those from Brilliance in head scan. Conclusion: MC dose distributions based on absorbed dose measurement in cylindrical water phantom are useful to evaluate individual patient organ doses.

  15. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  16. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  17. Pelvic ultrasound immediately following MDCT in female patients with abdominal/pelvic pain: is it always necessary?

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Kim, Alice; Kim, Danny; Babb, James S; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-10-01

    To determine the added value of reimaging the female pelvis with ultrasound (US) immediately following multidetector CT (MDCT) in the emergent setting. CT and US exams of 70 patients who underwent MDCT for evaluation of abdominal/pelvic pain followed by pelvic ultrasound within 48 h were retrospectively reviewed by three readers. Initially, only the CT images were reviewed followed by evaluation of CT images in conjunction with US images. Diagnostic confidence was recorded for each reading and an exact Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed to compare the two. Changes in diagnosis based on combined CT and US readings versus CT readings alone were identified. Confidence intervals (95%) were derived for the percentage of times US reimaging can be expected to lead to a change in diagnosis relative to the diagnosis based on CT interpretation alone. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the ovaries/adnexa 8.1% of the time (three reader average); the majority being cases of a suspected CT abnormality found to be normal on US. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the uterus 11.9% of the time (three reader average); the majority related to the endometrial canal. The 95% confidence intervals for the ovaries/adnexa and uterus were 5-12.5% and 8-17%, respectively. Ten cases of a normal CT were followed by a normal US with 100% agreement across all three readers. Experienced readers correctly diagnosed ruptured ovarian cysts and tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) based on CT alone with 100% agreement. US reimaging after MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis is not helpful: (1) following a normal CT of the pelvic organs or (2) when CT findings are diagnostic and/or characteristic of certain entities such as ruptured cysts and TOA. Reimaging with ultrasound is warranted for (1) less-experienced readers to improve diagnostic confidence or when CT findings are not definitive, (2) further evaluation of suspected endometrial abnormalities. A distinction should be made between the need for

  18. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  19. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  20. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  1. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  2. Four- and Eight-Channel Aortoiliac CT Angiography: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Karcaaltincaba, Musturay Foley, Dennis

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To compare performance parameters, contrast material load and radiation dose in a patient cohort having aortoiliac CT angiography using 4- and 8-channel multidetector CT (MDCT) systems. Methods. Eighteen patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms underwent initial 4-channel and follow-up 8-channel MDCT angiography. Both the 4- and 8-channel MDCT systems utilized a matrix detector of 16 x 1.25 mm rows. Scan coverage included the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries to the level of the proximal femoral arteries. For 4-channel MDCT, nominal slice thickness and beam pitch were 1.25 mm and 1.5, respectively, and for 8-channel MDCT they were 1.25 mm and 1.35 or 1.65 respectively. Scan duration, iodinated contrast material load and mean aortoiliac attenuation were compared retrospectively. Comparative radiation dose measurements for 4- and 8-channel MDCT were obtained using a multiple scan average dose technique on an abdominal phantom. Results. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, 8-channel MDCT aortoiliac angiography was performed with equivalent collimation, decreased contrast load (mean 45% decrease: 144 ml versus 83 ml of 300 mg iodine/ml contrast material) and decreased acquisition time (mean 51% shorter: 34.4 sec versus 16.9 sec) without a significant change in mean aortic enhancement (299 HU versus 300 HU, p > 0.05). Radiation dose was 2 rad for the 4-channel system and 2/1.5 rad for the 8-channel system at 1.35/1.65 pitch respectively. Conclusion. Compared with 4-channel MDCT, aortoiliac CT angiography with 8-channel MDCT produces equivalent z-axis resolution with decreased contrast load and acquisition time without increased radiation exposure.

  3. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT

    PubMed Central

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J.; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T.; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm. Guy

    2013-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and the coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology (BEST) Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging. PMID:22551595

  4. State-of-the-art in CT hardware and scan modes for cardiovascular CT.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, Sandra; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Dey, Damini; Einstein, Andrew J; Gentry, Ralph; George, Richard T; Gerber, Thomas; Mahesh, Mahadevappa; Weigold, Wm Guy

    2012-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (CT) allows noninvasive anatomic and functional imaging of the heart, great vessels, and coronary arteries. In recent years, there have been several advances in CT hardware, which have expanded the clinical utility of CT for cardiovascular imaging; such advances are ongoing. This review article from the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography Basic and Emerging Sciences and Technology Working Group summarizes the technical aspects of current state-of-the-art CT hardware and describes the scan modes this hardware supports for cardiovascular CT imaging.

  5. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  6. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  7. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  8. Imaging for chronic abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Diagnostic imaging is often not indicated in chronic abdominal pain. In particular, undifferentiated abdominal pain is rarely an indication for a CT scan. CT scanning is overused even when imaging is required. Other modalities may be preferable. A normal CT scan does not rule out cancer. Alarm symptoms, including anaemia, blood in the stool, waking at night with gastrointestinal symptoms, and weight loss, should be investigated. The most appropriate modality depends on the symptoms. Clinical information on request forms for CT scans should be specific and include the suspected condition as this helps the radiologist to determine an appropriate imaging protocol.

  9. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  10. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  11. Diagnostic Yield of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Patients with Acute Spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Bannas, Peter; Schoen, Gerhard; Froelich, Andreas; Well, Lennart; Regier, Marc; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with acute spondylodiscitis. Methods and Materials For data acquisition, we searched our radiological database for all patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for suspected spondylodiscitis between 2007 and 2015 (n = 325). For further analyses, we included all patients (n = 67) who initially underwent MDCT prior to MRI. Overall accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for MDCT and, separately, for contrast-enhanced CT (CECT, n = 36) and for non-enhanced CT (NECT, n = 31). MRI together with clinical evaluation served as the standard of reference.

  12. [The different genotypes of MTHFR 1298A>C and PON1 -108C>T polymorphisms confer the increased risk of the abdominal aortic aneurysm in the smoking and nonsmoking persons].

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ewa; Waliszewski, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Andrzej L

    2005-01-01

    In abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) both the etiology and the pathogenesis are of the multifactorial character. The genetic component in the determination of this disease is proven by its familial occurrence. Smoking represents the best recognized risk factor of the AAA development. Increased concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy) in plasma are the common finding in these patients. It is assumed that the Hcy thiolactone, the most reactive metabolite of Hcy, may participate in the aortic wall destruction in AAA. The polymorphic variants of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C>T and 1298A>C) influence tissue concentrations of the Hcy. Paraoxonase (PON1), the enzyme associated in plasma with the HDL fraction, as lactonase detoxicates the Hcy thiolactone. The promotor polymorphism of PON1 - 108C>T gene may determine the lower activity of this enzyme. In the case-control study of 106 patients with AAA and 97 healthy persons, the effects of selected genetic and nongenetic risk factors on development of AAA were assessed, considering the possibilities of interaction between them. It was found, that the arterial hypertension, cigarette smoking and the lower HDL fraction are independent risk factors of AAA. The arterial hypertension was a risk factor both in the smoking and the nonsmoking males, whereas the lower HDL fraction has been the risk factor only for the smoking men. By the multivariate analysis in the nonsmoking males the MTHFR 1298 AC and CC genotypes increased the risk of AAA development 4,8-fold in relation to the MTHFR 1298 AA nonsmoking males. In reference to the genotypes of the expected high impact on the metabolism of Hcy and of Hcy thiolactone, the genotypes of MTHFR 677TT and PON1 -108CT and TT were more frequent in smoking ones, but the difference was not significant. This observation fits with the assumption that the influence of smoking on the occurrence of AAA prevails over that of genetic variability. When the patients age was considered

  13. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  14. Abdominal Mass Secondary to Human Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ghoroobi, Javad; Khoddami, Maliheh; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Naser; Mahdavi, Alireza; Hatefi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is an extensive helminthic infection that leads to visceral larva migrans in humans. A 2.5-year-old girl referred for abdominal mass. She had history of pharyngitis for two weeks. There were no other symptoms. Abdominal examination revealed an irregular solid mass in right lower quadrant (RLQ). Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an echohetrogenic large mass in RLQ, liver, and retroperitoneal area. Abdominal CT scan showed a huge mass. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal mass that involved right liver lobe, bladder, ileocecal valve, small and large intestines was found. At histopathology diagnosis of toxocariasis was made. PMID:28164001

  15. [CT - diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory acute intestinal conditions].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, W

    2011-08-24

    Multidetector-row CT has shown over the past years that it is able to provide reliable diagnoses in various acute intestinal conditions. The presented article provides an overview of primary and secondary inflammatory acute intestinal pathologies and their differential diagnoses.

  16. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  17. Abdominal exploration

    MedlinePlus

    ... and CT scans , have not provided an accurate diagnosis. Exploratory laparotomy may be used to help diagnose and treat many health conditions, including: Cancer of the ovary, colon, pancreas, liver Endometriosis Gallstones Hole in the intestine (intestinal ...

  18. Liver echinococcus - CT scan (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This upper abdominal CT scan shows multiple cysts in the liver, caused by dog tapeworm (echinococcus). Note the large circular cyst (seen on the left side of the screen) and multiple smaller cysts throughout ...

  19. Dynamic multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma of hepatitis B virus-positive and -negative patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to retrospectively investigate and compare multidetector computed tomography findings of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive and -negative patients. Methods Triphasic (arterial, portal venous, and delayed phases) dynamic multidetector computed tomography (CT) was performed in 83 patients with HCC, 48 of whom were HBV-positive. The diagnosis of HCC was established with typical CT imaging findings (68 patients) or histopathological evaluation (15 patients). Distribution of solitary, multiple, and diffuse HCC, portal/hepatic vein thrombosis, metastasis, and patients with high alpha-fetoprotein levels in the HBV-positive and -negative groups were compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Lesion size, alpha-fetoprotein levels, arterial, portal, delayed enhancement, and washout of lesions were compared using the Student’s t-test. Results Hypervascular tumors were observed in 72 (87%) patients, and hypovascular tumors were found in 11 (13%) patients. The mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-positive patients with HCC was significantly higher than the mean alpha-fetoprotein value of HBV-negative patients (P < 0.05). Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis were more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients (P < 0.05). The frequencies of solitary, multiple, and diffuse lesions in HBV-positive and -negative patients were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The mean diameters, arterial, portal, and delayed phase attenuations, and washout of HCC were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Conclusions Multidetector CT imaging findings of HCC in HBV-positive and -negative patients are alike. Portal/hepatic vein thrombosis and metastasis are more frequently observed in HBV-positive patients. Alpha-fetoprotein levels are higher in HBV-positive patients. PMID:25608603

  20. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  1. Morphometric analysis of sex differences in contemporary Japanese pelves using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Torimitsu, Suguru; Makino, Yohsuke; Saitoh, Hisako; Sakuma, Ayaka; Ishii, Namiko; Yajima, Daisuke; Inokuchi, Go; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Yamaguchi, Rutsuko; Hashimoto, Mari; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2015-12-01

    Sex estimation of decomposed or skeletal remains is clearly important in forensic contexts. Recently, contemporary population-specific data has been obtained using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanning. The main purpose of this study was to investigate skeletal pelvic dimorphism in a contemporary Japanese forensic sample and to quantify the accuracy of sex estimation using various pelvic measurements obtained from three-dimensional (3D) CT images. This study used a total of 208 cadavers (104 males, 104 females) of which postmortem CT scanning and subsequent forensic autopsy were conducted between December 2011 and August 2014. Eleven measurements of each pelvis were obtained from 3D CT reconstructed images that extracted only bone data. The measurements were analyzed using descriptive statistics and discriminant function analyses. All except one measurement were dimorphic in terms of sex differences. Univariate discriminant function analyses using these measurements provided sex classification accuracy rates of 62.0-98.1%. The subpubic angle was found to contribute most significantly to accurate sex estimation. Multivariate discriminant functions yielded sex prediction accuracy rates of 63.9-98.1%. In conclusion, the pelvic measurements obtained from 3D CT images of a contemporary Japanese population successfully demonstrated sexual dimorphism and may be useful for the estimation of skeletal sex in the field of forensic anthropology.

  2. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  3. Ultrasonography and computed tomography of inflammatory abdominal wall lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Rabinowitz, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with inflammatory lesions of the abdominal wall were examined by ultrasonography. Nine of these patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) scanning as well. Both ultrasonography and CT clearly delineated the exact location and extent of abdominal wall abscesses. Abscesses were easily differentiated from cellulitis or phlegmon with ultrasound. The peritoneal line was more clearly delineated on ultrasonograms than on CT scans; abscesses were also more distinct on the ultrasonograms because of their low echogenicity compared with the surrounding structures. Gas bubbles, fat density with specific low attenuation values, and underlying inflamed bowel loops in obese patients with Crohn's disease were better delineated by CT.

  4. Spontaneous abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, K; Vanpaemel, G; Verheyen, L

    2008-01-01

    We report the first case, to our knowledge, of spontaneous abscess of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity caused by group G streptococci. A 52-year-old diabetic woman presented with abdominal tenderness and weight loss that had persisted for a few weeks. CT scan showed several abscesses of the abdominal wall, omentum and abdominal cavity. The abscesses were drained laparoscopically and antibiotics were given postoperatively. Biopsies and cultures showed group G streptococci. The patient recovered without any complication and left our hospital on the 17th postoperative day.

  5. Is multidetector computed tomography comparable to magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of lumbar foraminal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Kang, Woo Young; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Bae, Yun Jung; Seo, Jiwoon; Kim, Junghoon; Kang, Heung Sik

    2017-02-01

    Background Both multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used for assessment of lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS). Therefore, it is relevant to assess agreement between these imaging modalities. Purpose To determine intermodality, inter-, and intra-observer agreement for assessment of LFS on MDCT and MRI. Material and Methods A total of 120 foramina in 20 patients who visited our institution in January and February 2014 were evaluated by six radiologists with different levels of experience. Radiologists evaluated presence and severity of LFS on sagittal CT and MR images according to a previously published LFS grading system. Intermodality agreement was analyzed by using weighted kappa statistics, while inter- and intra-observer agreement were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and kappa statistics. Results Overall intermodality agreement was moderate to good (kappa, 0.478-0.765). In particular, two professors and one fellow tended to overestimate the degree of LFS on CT compared with MRI. For inter-observer agreement of all six observers, ICCs indicated excellent agreement for both CT (0.774) and MRI (0.771), while Fleiss' kappa values showed moderate agreement for CT (0.482) and MRI (0.575). There was better agreement between professors and fellows compared with residents. For intra-observer agreement, ICCs indicated excellent agreement, while kappa values showed good to excellent agreement for both CT and MRI. Conclusion MDCT was comparable to MRI for diagnosis and assessment of LFS, especially for experienced observers. However, there was a tendency to overestimate the degree of LFS on MDCT compared with MRI.

  6. Managing patient dose in multi-detector computed tomography(MDCT). ICRP Publication 102.

    PubMed

    Valentin, J

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) technology has changed considerably in recent years with the introduction of increasing numbers of multiple detector arrays. There are several parameters specific to multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners that increase or decrease patient dose systematically compared to older single detector computed tomography (SDCT) scanners. This document briefly reviews the MDCT technology, radiation dose in MDCT, including differences from SDCT and factors that affect dose, radiation risks, and the responsibilities for patient dose management. The document recommends that users need to understand the relationship between patient dose and image quality and be aware that image quality in CT is often higher than that necessary for diagnostic confidence. Automatic exposure control (AEC) does not totally free the operator from selection of scan parameters, and awareness of individual systems is important. Scanning protocols cannot simply be transferred between scanners from different manufacturers and should be determined for each MDCT. If the image quality is appropriately specified by the user, and suited to the clinical task, there will be a reduction in patient dose for most patients. Understanding of some parameters is not intuitive and the selection of image quality parameter values in AEC systems is not straightforward. Examples of some clinical situation shave been included to demonstrate dose management, e.g. CT examinations of the chest, the heart for coronary calcium quantification and non-invasive coronary angiography, colonography, the urinary tract, children, pregnant patients, trauma cases, and CT guided interventions. CT is increasingly being used to replace conventional x-ray studies and it is important that patient dose is given careful consideration, particularly with repeated or multiple examinations.

  7. Intra-Abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Abdominal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oguejiofor, Njideka; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Njoku, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infectious disease, caused by gram positive anaerobic bacteria, that may appear as an abdominal mass and/or abscess (Wagenlehner et al. 2003). This paper presents an unusual case of a hemodynamically stable 80-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with 4 weeks of worsening abdominal pain and swelling. He also complains of a 20-bound weight loss in 2 months. A large tender palpable mass in the right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Laboratory studies showed a normal white blood cell count, slightly decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, and mildly elevated total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. A CT with contrast was done and showed a liver mass. Radiology and general surgery suspected malignancy and recommended CT guided biopsy. The sample revealed abundant neutrophils and gram positive rods. Cytology was negative for malignancy and cultures eventually grew actinomyces. High dose IV penicillin therapy was given for 4 weeks and with appropriate response transitioned to oral antibiotic for 9 months with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:28299215

  8. A Modular and Compact Multidetector System Based on Monolithic Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Figuera, P.; Cardella, G.; Di Pietro, A.; Papa, M.; Tian, W.; Amorini, F.; Musumarra, A.; Pappalardo, G.; Rizzo, F.; Tudisco, S.; Fallica, G.; Valvo, G.

    2004-02-27

    The characteristics of a new multidetector based on the use of Monolithic Silicon Telescopes are presented. Using suitable ion implantation techniques, the {delta}E and residual energy stages of the telescopes have been integrated on a single Si chip, obtaining a typical thickness for the {delta}E stage of the order of 2{mu}m.

  9. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ayşe; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  10. Advances of multidetector computed tomography in the characterization and staging of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsili, Athina C; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 90%-95% of kidney tumors. With the widespread use of cross-sectional imaging modalities, more than half of RCCs are detected incidentally, often diagnosed at an early stage. This may allow the planning of more conservative treatment strategies. Computed tomography (CT) is considered the examination of choice for the detection and staging of RCC. Multidetector CT (MDCT) with the improvement of spatial resolution and the ability to obtain multiphase imaging, multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions in any desired plane brought about further improvement in the evaluation of RCC. Differentiation of RCC from benign renal tumors based on MDCT features is improved. Tumor enhancement characteristics on MDCT have been found closely to correlate with the histologic subtype of RCC, the nuclear grade and the cytogenetic characteristics of clear cell RCC. Important information, including tumor size, localization, and organ involvement, presence and extent of venous thrombus, possible invasion of adjacent organs or lymph nodes, and presence of distant metastases are provided by MDCT examination. The preoperative evaluation of patients with RCC was improved by depicting the presence or absence of renal pseudocapsule and by assessing the possible neoplastic infiltration of the perirenal fat tissue and/or renal sinus fat compartment. PMID:26120380

  11. Multidetector row computed tomography evaluation of potential living laparoscopic renal donors: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Saravanan; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Small, William C; Torres, William E; Mittal, Pardeep K

    2006-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Living related kidney donation is the major source of renal grafts due to limited availability of cadaveric kidneys. Open nephrectomy was used to harvest donor kidneys. However, the laparoscopic approach is associated with less postoperative pain and quick recovery. So, most centers now prefer a laparoscopic approach to explant donor kidneys. Laparoscopic approach is technically challenging due to limited operative visibility. Hence, accurate preoperative detection of renal arterial and venous anomalies is imperative to avoid inadvertent vascular injury and bleeding. The preoperative workup of renal donors includes clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, and imaging. Traditionally, the renal donors were evaluated with conventional imaging techniques, which included renal catheter angiography and intravenous urography. However, conventional imaging is invasive, expensive, and less accurate for evaluation of complex renal venous anomalies, small calculi, and diffuse or focal renal parenchymal lesions. The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) revolutionized the CT technology by enabling isotropic resolution with faster scan coverage in a single, short breath-hold. Consequently, MDCT has now replaced conventional imaging for comprehensive imaging of potential living renal donors. MDCT is a minimally invasive technique that can accurately detect urolithiasis, renal arterial and venous anomalies, renal parenchymal lesions, and urinary tract anomalies. Renal vascular anomalies detected by MDCT can help the surgeon in planning donor nephrectomy. MDCT with three-dimensional CT angiography enables accurate preoperative renal vascular mapping. This article reviews the role of MDCT in preoperative evaluation of potential laparoscopic renal donors.

  12. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Otomaru, Konosuke; Fujikawa, Takuro; Saito, Yasuo; Ando, Takaaki; Obi, Takeshi; Miura, Naoki; Kubota, Chikara

    2015-09-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery.

  13. CT Enterography

    MedlinePlus

    ... obstructions and Crohn’s disease. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. CT enterography is better able ... the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT ...

  14. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  15. Colonic perforation by a transmural and transvalvular migrated retained sponge: multi-detector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Sagnelli, Marco; Guadagno, Paolo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Marra, Teresa; Scotto di Santolo, Maria; Fei, Landino; Salvatore, Marco

    2014-04-21

    Transmural migrated retained sponges usually impact at the level of the ileo-cecal valve leading to a small bowel obstruction. Once passed through the ileo-cecal valve, a retained sponge can be propelled forward by peristaltic activity and eliminated with feces. We report the case of a 52-year-old female with a past surgical history and recurrent episodes of abdominal pain and constipation. On physical examination, a generalized resistance was observed with tenderness in the right flank. Contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography findings were consistent with a perforated right colonic diverticulitis with several out-pouchings at the level of the ascending colon and evidence of free air in the right parieto-colic gutter along with an air-fluid collection within the mesentery. In addition, a ring-shaped hyperdense intraluminal material was also noted. At surgery, the ascending colon appeared irregularly thickened and folded with a focal wall interruption and a peri-visceral abscess at the level of the hepatic flexure, but no diverticula were found. A right hemi-colectomy was performed and on dissection of the surgical specimen a retained laparotomy sponge was found in the bowel lumen.

  16. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  17. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI{sub 100,air}); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub w}) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI{sub 100,air} values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI{sub 100,air} ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI{sub w} for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well

  18. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  20. Primary epiploic appendagitis: CT diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Maglinte, Dean D; Rajesh, Arumugam; Akisik, Fatih M

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the CT signs of primary epiploic appendagitis. A retrospective search of the CT database over 12 months for this diagnosis revealed 11 cases. The clinical findings were recorded. Softcopy CT images were reviewed by two experienced abdominal radiologists (KS, DM) for location of lesion, size, shape, presence of central hyperdense focus, degree of bowel wall thickening, mass effect, and ancillary signs. Abdominal pain was the primary symptom in all patients. Preliminary diagnoses were appendicitis (n=2), diverticulitis (n=5), pancreatitis (n=1), ovarian lesion (n=1), or unknown (n=2). Abdominal examination and white blood cell count were uninformative. CT examination revealed a solitary (n=11), ovoid (n=9) fatty lesion with some soft tissue stranding adjacent to the left colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=3), or right colon (n=2). Central hyperdensity (n=5), mild bowel wall thickening (n=2), and parietal peritoneal thickening (n=4) were also seen. In 4 patients the lesions were not visible on follow-up CT examination performed 23-184 days later. Primary epiploic appendagitis can clinically mimic other, more serious inflammatory conditions. Knowledge of its findings on CT would help the radiologist make the diagnosis and allow a more conservative approach to patient care.

  1. CT of schistosomal calcification of the intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Fataar, S.; Bassiony, H.; Satyanath, S.; Rudwan, M.; Hebbar, G.; Khalifa, A.; Cherian, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of schistosomal colonic calcification on abdominal radiographs has been described. The appearance on computed tomography (CT) is equally distinctive and occurs with varying degrees of genitourinary calcification. The authors have experience in three cases with the appearance on CT of intestinal calcification due to schistosomiasis.

  2. Multidetector computed tomography analysis of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caisong; Liu, Wei; Yang, Jun; Yang, Jing; Shao, Kangwei; Yuan, Lixin; Chen, Hairong; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) features of benign and malignant nodules in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). MDCT findings, including the size, solid percentage, calcification, margin, capsule, anteroposterior-transverse diameter ratio as well as the mode and the degree of enhancement of 137 thyroid nodules in 127 CLT cases were retrospectively analyzed. Furthermore, the correlation between MDCT findings and pathological results combined with the CT perfusion imaging was analyzed for the differences between benign and malignant nodules. A total of 77.5% (31/40) of malignant nodules were completely solid, and 33% (32/97) of benign nodules were predominantly cystic. Compared with the benign nodules, micro-calcification and internal calcification were more frequently observed in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). MDCT features such as ill-defined margin, absence of capsule or incomplete capsule or homogeneous enhancement were more likely to be present in the malignant nodules (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in the enhancement degree at arterial or venous phase between benign and malignant nodules (P>0.05). MDCT features are useful in differentiating the benign and malignant nodules in CLT patients, and it may be essential for a radiologist to review the MDCT characteristics of nodules in the clinical practice.

  3. MDCT Imaging Findings of Liver Cirrhosis: Spectrum of Hepatic and Extrahepatic Abdominal Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, Guillermo P.; Previgliano, Carlos H.; Nader, Mathieu; Chwoschtschinsky, Elisa; Heldmann, Maureen G.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic cirrhosis is the clinical and pathologic result of a multifactorial chronic liver injury. It is well known that cirrhosis is the origin of multiple extrahepatic abdominal complications and a markedly increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This tumor is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide and the third most common cause of cancer related death. With the rising incidence of HCC worldwide, awareness of the evolution of cirrhotic nodules into malignancy is critical for an early detection and treatment. Adequate imaging protocol selection with dynamic multiphase Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and reformatted images is crucial to differentiate and categorize the hepatic nodular dysplasia. Knowledge of the typical and less common extrahepatic abdominal manifestations is essential for accurately assessing patients with known or suspected hepatic disease. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the imaging spectrum of intra- and extrahepatic abdominal manifestations of hepatic cirrhosis seen on MDCT. PMID:23986608

  4. New insights on COPD imaging via CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sverzellati, N; Molinari, F; Pirronti, T; Bonomo, L; Spagnolo, P; Zompatori, M

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to quantify morphological features and investigate structure/function relationship in COPD. This approach allows a phenotypical definition of COPD patients, and might improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and suggest new therapeutical options. In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has also become potentially suitable for the assessment of ventilation, perfusion and respiratory mechanics. This review focuses on the established clinical applications of CT, and novel CT and MRI techniques, which may prove valuable in evaluating the structural and functional damage in COPD. PMID:18229568

  5. [Duodenal perforation after blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Schneider, R; Moebius, C; Thelen, A; Jonas, S

    2009-12-01

    Duodenal perforation after a blunt abdominal trauma is a rare emergency situation that can result in life-threatening complications. We report on a woman who had a perforation of the duodenum after a supposed mild blunt abdominal trauma. Unremarkable at the initial presentation, the patient presented with acute abdominal pain and a retroperitoneal abscess five days after the initial trauma. The duodenal repair was performed with a Roux-Y anastomosis. Difficulties in diagnosis are very common, but the early recognition of the rupture is essential. The contrast-enhanced CT scan is the gold standard for diagnosis. Surgical management depends on the severity of the trauma and must be chosen on an individual basis.

  6. A Study of Internal Thoracic Arteriovenous Principal Perforators by Using Multi-detector Row Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Shunsuke; Onishi, Hiroyuki; Terashi, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are numerous reports of perforating branches from the intercostal spaces of the internal thoracic vessels. These branches have varying diameters, and a main perforating branch, the principal perforator, most often found in the second or third intercostal space. We report different results based on multi-detector row computed tomography. Methods: We evaluated 121 sides from 70 women scheduled for breast reconstruction with free lower abdominal skin flaps who underwent preoperative multi-detector row computed tomographic scan between June 2008 and June 2015. For primary reconstruction, we analyzed both sides, and for 1-sided secondary reconstruction, we analyzed only the unaffected side. We evaluated both early arterial phase and late venous phase 5-mm horizontal, cross-sectional, and volume-rendering images for perforation sites and internal thoracic arteriovenous perforating branches’ intercostal space thickness. We analyzed differences in thickness between the internal thoracic arteries and veins and symmetry in cases involving both sides. Results: Venous principal perforators nearly always perforated the same intercostal spaces as accompanying veins of arterial principal perforators (99.2%), forming arteriovenous principal perforators. We found 49 principal perforators in the first intercostal space (37.4%), 52 in the second intercostal space (39.7%), 23 in the third intercostal space (17.6%), 6 in the fourth intercostal space (4.6%), and 1 in the fifth intercostal space (0.7%). Of the 51 cases in which we studied both sides, 25 cases (49%) had principal perforators with bilateral symmetry. Conclusions: In contrast to findings from past reports, we found that internal thoracic arteriovenous principal perforators were often present in almost the same numbers in the first and second intercostal spaces. PMID:26958104

  7. [The different manifestations of pulmonary aspergillosis: multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Koren Fernández, L; Alonso Charterina, S; Alcalá-Galiano Rubio, A; Sánchez Nistal, M A

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a fungal infection usually caused by inhaling Aspergillus fumigatus spores. However, when we talk about aspergillosis, we normally refer to the spectrum of clinical and radiological findings that depend directly on the patient's immune status, on the prior existence of lung disease, and on the virulence of the infective organism. There are four types of pulmonary aspergillosis (aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive aspergillosis), and each type has its own distinct radiologic findings. We review the signs of pulmonary aspergillosis on multidetector computed tomography and we correlate them with patients' symptoms and immune responses. Likewise, we discuss the differential diagnoses.

  8. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matos, António P.; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall. PMID:25295188

  9. Multidetector computer tomography: evaluation of blunt chest trauma in adults.

    PubMed

    Palas, João; Matos, António P; Mascarenhas, Vasco; Herédia, Vasco; Ramalho, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  10. Helical CT in emergency radiology.

    PubMed

    Novelline, R A; Rhea, J T; Rao, P M; Stuk, J L

    1999-11-01

    Today, a wide range of traumatic and nontraumatic emergency conditions are quickly and accurately diagnosed with helical computed tomography (CT). Many traditional emergency imaging procedures have been replaced with newer helical CT techniques that can be performed in less time and with greater accuracy, less patient discomfort, and decreased cost. The speed of helical technology permits CT examination of seriously ill patients in the emergency department, as well as patients who might not have been taken to CT previously because of the length of the examinations of the past. Also, helical technology permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, a great advance for the multiple-trauma patient. Higher quality CT examinations result from decreased respiratory misregistration, enhanced intravenous contrast material opacification of vascular structures and parenchymal organs, greater flexibility in image reconstruction, and improved multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations. This report summarizes the role and recommended protocols for the helical CT diagnosis of thoracic aortic trauma; aortic dissection; pulmonary embolism; acute conditions of the neck soft tissues; abdominal trauma; urinary tract stones; appendicitis; diverticulitis; abdominal aortic aneurysm; fractures of the face, spine, and extremities; and acute stroke.

  11. From the RSNA refresher courses: CT angiography: clinical applications in the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Fishman, E K

    2001-10-01

    The development of spiral computed tomography (CT) and subsequently multidetector CT has provided unparalleled opportunities for advancement of CT technology and clinical applications. One of the most influential developments has been CT angiography, which is the use of thin-section CT combined with postprocessing of imaging data by using a variety of three-dimensional reconstruction techniques to produce vascular maps that equal or exceed those provided by classic angiography in many applications. In the evaluation of pancreatic disease, the use of multidetector CT angiography enables the radiologist to produce vascular maps that clearly show tumor invasion of vasculature and the relationship of vessels to pancreatic masses. Anatomic areas for which the three-dimensional display is especially helpful include the confluence of the portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein and the more distal portions of the portal vein. Preliminary studies indicate that CT angiography may prove beneficial in the evaluation of ischemic bowel and active Crohn disease. CT angiography has proved extremely valuable for applications such as preoperative planning for hepatic resection, preoperative evaluation and planning for liver transplantation, pretreatment planning for patients considered for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and pretreatment evaluation of portal vein patency for a variety of reasons. CT angiography can also provide supplemental information in patients with cirrhosis, upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to varices, or primary extrahepatic neoplasms.

  12. Sudden onset abdominal pain and distension: an imaging sparkler.

    PubMed

    Klair, Jagpal Singh; Girotra, M; Medarametla, S; Shah, H R

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged patient presenting with acute onset abdominal pain and distension who had signs of bowel obstruction on physical exam. He was afebrile, hemodynamically stable with no peritoneal signs. Abdominal radiograph and CT scan were pathognomic for sigmoid volvulus. Through this case report we want to discuss the presentation, diagnosis, management options for sigmoid volvulus and importance of features suggestive of ischemic bowel that necessitates different management options.

  13. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  14. Diagnostic imaging of acute abdominal pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Sarah L; Knudson, Mark P

    2015-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presentation in the outpatient setting and can represent conditions ranging from benign to life-threatening. If the patient history, physical examination, and laboratory testing do not identify an underlying cause of pain and if serious pathology remains a clinical concern, diagnostic imaging is indicated. The American College of Radiology has developed clinical guidelines, the Appropriateness Criteria, based on the location of abdominal pain to help physicians choose the most appropriate imaging study. Ultrasonography is the initial imaging test of choice for patients presenting with right upper quadrant pain. Computed tomography (CT) is recommended for evaluating right or left lower quadrant pain. Conventional radiography has limited diagnostic value in the assessment of most patients with abdominal pain. The widespread use of CT raises concerns about patient exposure to ionizing radiation. Strategies to reduce exposure are currently being studied, such as using ultrasonography as an initial study for suspected appendicitis before obtaining CT and using low-dose CT rather than standard-dose CT. Magnetic resonance imaging is another emerging technique for the evaluation of abdominal pain that avoids ionizing radiation.

  15. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  16. Multidetector computed tomography findings in deaths with severe burns.

    PubMed

    Levy, Angela D; Harcke, Howard T; Getz, John M; Mallak, Craig T

    2009-06-01

    This study compared autopsy with postmortem multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings in charred remains. Seventeen consecutive male subjects (mean age, 29.4 years) who perished in a fire-related event resulting in charred remains underwent total body MDCT immediately prior to routine autopsy that included serum carboxyhemoglobin measurement. MDCT showed all thermal tissue changes (skin and subcutaneous fat loss, skeletal muscle retraction, pugilistic attitude, cortical fractures, bone and organ destruction, thermal epidural hematoma, and thermal amputation) and established all fracture patterns that were lethal, but autopsy added the fire as a contributory cause of death when there was carboxyhemoglobin elevation. MDCT had limited value in determination of lethal vascular and visceral injuries. MDCT is an effective complement to autopsy in the setting of charred remains and may serve to augment a limited autopsy. This may be particularly useful in mass casualty scenarios.

  17. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  18. Enhanced security for multi-detector quantum random number generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangon, Davide G.; Vallone, Giuseppe; Zanforlin, Ugo; Villoresi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Quantum random number generators (QRNG) represent an advanced solution for randomness generation, which is essential in every cryptographic application. In this context, integrated arrays of single-photon detectors have promising applications as QRNGs based on the spatial detection of photons. For the employment of QRNGs in cryptography, it is necessary to have efficient methods to evaluate the so-called quantum min-entropy that corresponds to the amount of the true extractable quantum randomness from the QRNG. Here, we present an efficient method that allows the estimation of the quantum min-entropy for a multi-detector QRNG. In particular, we consider a scenario in which an attacker can control the efficiency of the detectors and knows the emitted number of photons. Eventually, we apply the method to a QRNG with 103 detectors.

  19. CT Scans

    MedlinePlus

    ... cross-sectional pictures of your body. Doctors use CT scans to look for Broken bones Cancers Blood clots Signs of heart disease Internal bleeding During a CT scan, you lie still on a table. The table ...

  20. Probable atypical cat scratch disease presenting as isolated posterior pancreatic duodenal lymphadenitis and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Dzelalija, B; Petrovec, M; Avsic-Zupanc, T

    2001-09-15

    We report a case involving a 15-year-old girl with atypical, clinically unsuspected cat scratch disease (CSD) presenting as isolated posterior pancreatic duodenal lymphadenitis, fever, and abdominal pain. The serological, abdominal ultrasonographic, and CT findings, as well as clinical and epidemiological data, indicate that B. henselae was likely an etiologic agent of CSD in our patient.

  1. Clinical significance of multidetector-row computed tomography in breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hiroyoshi; Fujita, Takeo; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ogasawara, Yutaka; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Several reports support the association of higher ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence rates with positive or intermediate margins compared with negative pathologic margins. Precise evaluation of tumor extension and adequate surgical margin are important factors affecting tumor recurrence after breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Many studies have reported the utility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing the tumor extension of breast cancer, but few have evaluated the utility of multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). The results of this study show the clinical significance of MDCT for detecting cancer extension and demonstrate the clinical role of MDCT in BCS. Subjects comprised 136 patients grouped into two categories based on whether or not tumor extension was evaluated with MDCT preoperatively. The positive surgical margin rate and breast conservation rate were analyzed in each group and the clinical role of MDCT in BCS was evaluated. Moreover, evaluation of intraductal extension was done both with MDCT and histologically, and computed tomography (CT)-pathologic correlations were examined retrospectively. Finally, the margin-positive cases were analyzed in relation to their clinical characteristics. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of the intraductal component were 71.8%, 85.7%, 82.1%, and 76.9%, respectively. The positive surgical margin rate and conservation rate are 7.46% and 81.9%, respectively, for those who were diagnosed with MDCT preoperatively; their corresponding rates without MDCT were 16.67% and 67.9%. Most margin-positive patients have remarkable lymphatic space invasion. Positive surgical margins were often recognized toward the nipple. For diagnosing the intraductal extension, MDCT shows sufficient diagnosability. Moreover, MDCT can provide appropriate information for the determination of adequate surgical margins and contribute to increases in breast conservation

  2. CT of Normal Developmental and Variant Anatomy of the Pediatric Skull: Distinguishing Trauma from Normality.

    PubMed

    Idriz, Sanjin; Patel, Jaymin H; Ameli Renani, Seyed; Allan, Rosemary; Vlahos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice has been increasing rapidly, with the number of CT examinations performed in adults and children rising by 10% per year in England. Because the radiology community strives to reduce the radiation dose associated with pediatric examinations, external factors, including guidelines for pediatric head injury, are raising expectations for use of cranial CT in the pediatric population. Thus, radiologists are increasingly likely to encounter pediatric head CT examinations in daily practice. The variable appearance of cranial sutures at different ages can be confusing for inexperienced readers of radiologic images. The evolution of multidetector CT with thin-section acquisition increases the clarity of some of these sutures, which may be misinterpreted as fractures. Familiarity with the normal anatomy of the pediatric skull, how it changes with age, and normal variants can assist in translating the increased resolution of multidetector CT into more accurate detection of fractures and confident determination of normality, thereby reducing prolonged hospitalization of children with normal developmental structures that have been misinterpreted as fractures. More important, the potential morbidity and mortality related to false-negative interpretation of fractures as normal sutures may be avoided. The authors describe the normal anatomy of all standard pediatric sutures, common variants, and sutural mimics, thereby providing an accurate and safe framework for CT evaluation of skull trauma in pediatric patients.

  3. Evaluating an Ultrasound Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...Algorithm for Patients with Blunt Abdominal Trauma RTO-MP-HFM-109 P6 - 7 Table 1: Patients undergoing laparotomy U S US results C T CT result...11] Henneman PL, Marx JA, Moore EE. 1990. Diagnostic

  4. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancer Infection of the tubes (salpingitis) Ectopic pregnancy Fibroid tumors of the uterus (womb) Malignant tumors of the uterus or cervix Endometriosis Adhesions (scars) Screening and Diagnosis How is the cause of abdominal pain determined? ...

  5. [The abdominal catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian A

    2011-08-01

    Patients with an abdominal catastrophe are in urgent need of early, interdisciplinary medical help. The treatment plan should be based on medical priorities and clear leadership. First priority should be given to achieve optimal oxygenation of blood and stabilization of circulation during all treatment-phases. The sicker the patient, the less invasive the (surgical) treatment should to be, which means "damage control only". This short article describes 7 important, pragmatic rules that will help to increase the survival of a patient with an abdominal catastrophe. Preexisting morbidity and risk factors must be included in the overall risk-evaluation for every therapeutic intervention. The challenge in patients with an abdominal catastrophe is to carefully balance the therapeutic stress and the existing resistance of the individual patient. The best way to avoid abdominal disaster, however, is its prevention.

  6. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  7. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  8. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  9. Low-dose CT for quantitative analysis in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    few studies on pulmonary emphysema [22-24], that showed that quantification of hyperinflated tissue is not affected by a reduction of tube current...Pulmonary emphysema : radiation dose and section thickness at multidetector CT quantification--comparison with macroscopic and microscopic...pulmonary emphysema using a low-dose technique. Radiol Med 2002, 104:13-24. 24. Nishio M, Matsumoto S, Ohno Y, Sugihara N, Inokawa H, Yoshikawa T

  10. Multi-detector CT assessment in pulmonary hypertension: techniques, systematic approach to interpretation and key findings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Hoey, Edward T D; Reynolds, John H; Ganeshan, Arul; Ment, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be suspected based on the clinical history, physical examination and electrocardiogram findings but imaging is usually central to confirming the diagnosis, establishing a cause and guiding therapy. The diagnostic pathway of PAH involves a variety of complimentary investigations of which computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has established a central role both in helping identify an underlying cause for PAH and assessing resulting functional compromise. In particular CTPA is considered as the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of thromboembolic disease. This article reviews the CTPA evaluation in PAH, describing CTPA techniques, a systematic approach to interpretation and spectrum of key imaging findings.

  11. Multidetector CT and histological features of benign mesenchymoma of the infratemporal space: a rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Kelkar, CA; Desai, RS; Kambadakone, A; Shetty, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Benign mesenchymoma is a soft tissue neoplasm composed of an admixture of two or more benign mesenchymal components in addition to fibrous tissue. A rare case of benign mesenchymoma of the infratemporal space in a 14-year-old boy is presented. In this case report we discuss the salient imaging and histopathological features of this rare entity. PMID:22282510

  12. Neurologic applications of whole-brain volumetric multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kenneth V; Mokin, Maxim; Bates, Vernice E

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of computed tomography (CT) scanning in the 1970s revolutionized the way clinicians could diagnose and treat stroke. Subsequent advances in CT technology significantly reduced radiation dose, reduced metallic artifact, and achieved speeds that enable dynamic functional studies. The recent addition of whole-brain volumetric CT perfusion technology has given clinicians a powerful tool to assess parenchymal perfusion parameters as well as visualize dynamic changes in blood vessel flow throughout the brain during a single cardiac cycle. This article reviews clinical applications of volumetric multimodal CT that helped to guide and manage care.

  13. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  14. Refractory Abdominal Pain in a Hemodialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ying; Chen, Xiao-nong; Shi, Hao; Xie, Jingyuan; Chen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) is a rare disorder. Failure of an early diagnosis may cause progressive intestinal ischemia, leading to abdominal pain, sepsis, and death. Patients with end-stage renal disease are among the highest risk populations for developing this lethal complication. The key to a correct diagnosis at an early stage is a high index of suspicion in predisposed patients. In our case, we present a 62-year-old female undergoing maintenance hemodialysis for 8 years; she complained of abdominal pain after hemodialysis in the last 3 months; NOMI was suspected after a CT angiography. She partially recovered after multiple clinical interventions such as decreased ultrafiltration, an increased dose of low molecular-weight heparin and the use of vasoactive drugs. In conclusion, NOMI can be reversible if it is diagnosed as early as possible and after the necessary diagnostic measurements are initiated. PMID:26266246

  15. Abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Biller, J A; Grand, R J; Harris, B H

    1987-09-01

    Little information is available about the development of abdominal abscesses in adolescents with Crohn's disease. We report the clinical presentation of five adolescents with Crohn's disease who developed this complication. The mean time from diagnosis until development of an abdominal abscess was 1.7 years. The admitting diagnosis was an acute abdomen in two patients and recurrent Crohn's disease in the other three. No features of the clinical presentation or laboratory data distinguished this group from other adolescents with Crohn's disease. The use of ultrasound and CT scanning was helpful in making this diagnosis preoperatively. Those patients with active Crohn's disease who do not respond promptly to medical therapy should be evaluated for the development of this complication.

  16. Anatomical variation of celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, and hepatic artery: Evaluation with multidetector computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Farghadani, Maryam; Momeni, Mohammad; Hekmatnia, Ali; Momeni, Fateme; Baradaran Mahdavi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and hepatic artery are the most important branches of abdominal aorta due to their vascularization field. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of different anatomical variation of celiac axis, SMA, hepatic artery, and its branches with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography of upper abdomen arteries. Materials and Methods: MDCT of 607 kidney donor and traumatic patients that referred to MDCT unit at Al Zahra Hospital in Isfahan from 2012 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. We excluded patients with history of abdominal vascular surgery and hepatic or pancreatic surgery. Computed tomography images of the patient were obtained with 64-row MDCT scanner and anatomical variations were analyzed. Results: Three hundred and eighty-eight (63.9%) of the 607 patients had classic arterial anatomy and 219 (36.1%) patients had variant types. The most common type of variation was the origin of the right hepatic artery (RHA) from SMA (9.6%), and the next common variation was the origin of the left hepatic artery (LHA) from the left gastric artery (6.9%). Variations in the origin of the common hepatic artery (CHA) were seen in 16 (2.6%) patients. Buhler arc was identified in two patients. The RHA originated from the celiac axis in 11 (1.8%) patients and from the aorta in 8 (1.3%) patients. Trifurcation of CHA into gastroduodenal artery, RHA, and LHA was detected in 11 (1.8%) patients. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that anatomical variation occurs in a high percentage of patients. Detection of these variations can guide surgical and radiological interventional planning.

  17. Doses metrics and patient age in CT.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Tipnis, Sameer V

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how effective dose and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) change with patient age (size) for routine head and abdominal/pelvic CT examinations. Heads and abdomens of patients were modelled as a mass-equivalent cylinder of water corresponding to the patient 'effective diameter'. Head CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(S) of 40 mGy, and abdominal CT scans were performed at CTDIvol(L) of 10 mGy. Values of SSDE were obtained using conversion factors in AAPM Task Group Report 204. Age-specific scan lengths for head and abdominal CT scans obtained from the authors' clinical practice were used to estimate the dose-length product for each CT examination. Effective doses were calculated from previously published age- and sex-specific E/DLP conversion factors, based on ICRP 103 organ-weighting factors. For head CT examinations, the scan length increased from 15 cm in a newborn to 20 cm in adults, and for an abdominal/pelvic CT, the scan length increased from 20 cm in a newborn to 45 cm in adults. For head CT scans, SSDE ranged from 37.2 mGy in adults to 48.8 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 31 %. The corresponding head CT effective doses range from 1.4 mSv in adults to 5.2 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 270 %. For abdomen CT scans, SSDE ranged from 13.7 mGy in adults to 23.0 mGy in a newborn, an increase of 68 %. The corresponding abdominal CT effective doses ranged from 6.3 mSv in adults to 15.4 mSv in a newborn, an increase of 140 %. SSDE increases much less than effective dose in paediatric patients compared with adults because it does not account for scan length or scattered radiation. Size- and age-specific effective doses better quantify the total radiation received by patients in CT by explicitly accounting for all organ doses, as well as their relative radio sensitivity.

  18. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed. PMID:24038286

  19. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: a persistent painful hip.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Dinnish; Ashraf, Nadeem; Ahmad, Adil; Menon, Jay

    2013-09-13

    The presentation of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with isolated hip pain is a rare phenomenon. We present an atypical case of a 58-year-old previously fit man who presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening left hip pain associated with unintentional weight loss, tender bilateral testicular swellings and a large non-tender palpable mass on abdominal examination. Urgent abdominal CT scan findings revealed a 15 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm extending to the aortic bifurcation associated with an extensive left hydronephrosis. In theatre, the diagnosis of inflammatory AAA (IAAA) was confirmed following the presence of pyuria and a successful repair with an open approach using a bifurcated dacron graft was performed.

  20. [The computed tomographic diagnosis of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Grützner, G; Jungblut, R M; Kniemeyer, H W; Mödder, U

    1994-07-01

    Amongst 1599 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, there were 89 patients (5.6%) who showed typical features of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA). 37 of the 89 patients had been examined preoperatively by CT. In 73% of the cases (27/37) a correct diagnosis had been made. Localisation, width and extent of the IAAA was correctly diagnosed in all patients. Involvement of the renal arteries by the inflammatory process, the extent of thrombus and of mural calcification were accurately shown. The inflammatory tissues were typically ventral and lateral to the aorta. Frequently, there were adhesions to neighbouring structures. Aortic rupture, aortic dissection and retroperitoneal lymphoma may produce similar CT appearances; nevertheless, CT remains at present the method of choice for the diagnosis of IAAA because of its high sensitivity.

  1. Virtual modeling of robot-assisted manipulations in abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Berelavichus, Stanislav V; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Shirokov, Vadim S; Kubyshkin, Valeriy A; Kriger, Andrey G; Kondratyev, Evgeny V; Zakharova, Olga P

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effectiveness of using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data in preoperative planning of robot-assisted surgery. METHODS: Fourteen patients indicated for surgery underwent MDCT using 64 and 256-slice MDCT. Before the examination, a specially constructed navigation net was placed on the patient’s anterior abdominal wall. Processing of MDCT data was performed on a Brilliance Workspace 4 (Philips). Virtual vectors that imitate robotic and assistant ports were placed on the anterior abdominal wall of the 3D model of the patient, considering the individual anatomy of the patient and the technical capabilities of robotic arms. Sites for location of the ports were directed by projection on the roentgen-positive tags of the navigation net. RESULTS: There were no complications observed during surgery or in the post-operative period. We were able to reduce robotic arm interference during surgery. The surgical area was optimal for robotic and assistant manipulators without any need for reinstallation of the trocars. CONCLUSION: This method allows modeling of the main steps in robot-assisted intervention, optimizing operation of the manipulator and lowering the risk of injuries to internal organs. PMID:22816028

  2. Advances in abdominal MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, J T

    1998-01-01

    Major technical advances in MR imaging have led to its wider use in the evaluation of abdominal disease. The principle new pulse sequence is the RARE sequence for T2-weighted imaging. Multishot and breath-hold single-shot RARE techniques are now widely used, and both have performed as well as conventional spin-echo imaging with far shorter acquisition times. The most notable improvements have been in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Two liver-specific contrast agents received FDA approval during 1997: SPIO particles or ferumoxide and mangafodipir trisodium, a hepatocyte-specific agent. Both of these agents provide considerable benefit in the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. Manganese enhancement has also proved useful in MR imaging of the pancreas, although fat-suppressed T1-weighted imaging with dynamic gadolinium enhancement has also yielded results comparable with those of contrast-enhanced CT. MR hydrography, a generic term for static fluid imaging, is another derivative of RARE fast T2-weighted imaging. MRCP, the best known example of MR hydrography, has been rapidly and widely employed as a primary method for imaging the biliary and pancreatic ducts and has become competitive with ERCP. MR vascular imaging, especially portal venography, has been used for noninvasive imaging of portal venous disease in Budd Chiari disease, before placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, and for pancreatic cancer staging. Finally, the development of conventional phased-array body coils and endorectal coils has enabled high-quality MR imaging of perirectal disease (including Crohn disease, fistula in ano, and postpartum sphincter dysfunction). Future abdominal applications of MR imaging will involve second-generation MR interventional techniques, including use of open systems, functional or diffusion-weighted imaging exploiting the molecular activity of tissues, and virtual MR endoscopy. Although CT continues to evolve

  3. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  4. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction. PMID:23997589

  5. Jejunal perforation after abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Coronado-Malagón, Martin; Tauffer-Carrion, Luis Tomas

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented to the emergency department 24 h after undergoing abdominal liposuction, bilateral breast augmentation and facial fat grafting at a private plastic surgery clinic. She presented with the classic evolution of a bowel perforation secondary to abdominal liposuction. A computed tomography (CT) scan found free air in her abdominal cavity. Based on the CT scan and the persistent pain experienced by the patient, an abdominal laparatomy was urgently performed. A jejunum perforation was found and was treated with a resection of the affected segment followed by intestinal anastomosis. The patient had a successful recovery and was discharged seven days later. The present article also reviews the classical presentation of a bowel perforation following abdominal liposuction.

  6. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  7. 64-MULTIDETECTOR COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC ANGIOGRAPHY OF THE CANINE CORONARY ARTERIES

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Randi; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Reeder, Scott B.; Pinkerton, Marie E.; Johnson, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Canine coronary artery angiography (CTA) was performed in four anesthetized healthy dogs using 64-multi-detector computed tomography. Esmolol, a β-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, and sodium nitroprusside, an arteriolar and venous dilator, were administered to enhance visualization of the coronary arteries by reducing heart rate and creating vasodilation. The left main coronary artery with its three main branches and the right coronary artery were visualized and subdivided in 13 segments for evaluation. Optimal reconstruction interval, expressed as percentage of the R-to-R interval, was determined at 5% in 2.9%, 35% in 1%, 75% in 21.2%, 85% in 43.3%, and 95% in 31.7% of the segments. Overall image quality was good in 41.3% of the segments and excellent in 14.4%. There was blur in 98.1%, motion in 17.3%, and stair step in 6.7% of the evaluated segments, but these artifacts did not interfere with anatomic depiction of the arteries. Cross-sectional anatomy of the coronary arteries as evaluated from the coronary CTA agreed well with gross anatomic evaluation and published information. The use of esmolol did not lead to the target heart rate of 60–65 beats/min. Nitroprusside had no significant effect on visualized length or diameter of the coronary artery branches. Coronary CTA is useful for the anatomic depiction of coronary artery branches in the dog. PMID:21521398

  8. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  9. Quantitative anatomical labeling of the anterior abdominal wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wade M.; Xu, Zhoubing; Asman, Andrew J.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-03-01

    Ventral hernias (VHs) are abnormal openings in the anterior abdominal wall that are common side effects of surgical intervention. Repair of VHs is the most commonly performed procedure by general surgeons worldwide, but VH repair outcomes are not particularly encouraging (with recurrence rates up to 43%). A variety of open and laparoscopic techniques are available for hernia repair, and the specific technique used is ultimately driven by surgeon preference and experience. Despite routine acquisition of computed tomography (CT) for VH patients, little quantitative information is available on which to guide selection of a particular approach and/or optimize patient-specific treatment. From anecdotal interviews, the success of VH repair procedures correlates with hernia size, location, and involvement of secondary structures. Herein, we propose an image labeling protocol to segment the anterior abdominal area to provide a geometric basis with which to derive biomarkers and evaluate treatment efficacy. Based on routine clinical CT data, we are able to identify inner and outer surfaces of the abdominal walls and the herniated volume. This is the first formal presentation of a protocol to quantify these structures on abdominal CT. The intra- and inter rater reproducibilities of this protocol are evaluated on 4 patients with suspected VH (3 patients were ultimately diagnosed with VH while 1 was not). Mean surfaces distances of less than 2mm were achieved for all structures.

  10. A rare case of abdominal infection: Emphysematous pyelonephritis without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Oyar, Orhan; Tan, Gözde Canan; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Turan, Celaleddı̇n

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare form of necrotizing pyelonephritis. It is a life-threatening condition that usually affects patients with diabetes, and a small percentage may be due to urinary tract obstruction. Here, we present the case of an EP caused by urinary tract obstruction without diabetes. A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, chills, and abdominal pain. There was no significant past history. Physical examination depicted bilateral lower abdominal and right flank knocking tenderness. Laboratory exams revealed leukocytosis, neutrophilia, a high C-reactive protein level, and pyuria. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) showed diffuse gas in the right renal collecting system and dilatation of the right renal pelvis compared to the right side, in addition to multiple millimetric stones located in the right kidney and right ureter. After emergent placement of a percutaneous nephrostomy, she was admitted. Control abdominal CT without contrast revealed the absence of gas, hydronephrosis of the right renal pelvis, and the presence of nephrolithiasis. The patient was discharged 10 days of post-procedure with instructions for follow-up. Emergency physicians need to remain alert about this life-threatening disease and the typical CT findings of this disease to make a timely diagnosis and navigate management. PMID:28250980

  11. Coronary artery imaging with multidetector computed tomography: a call for an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Stillman, Arthur E; Garcia, Mario J; Halliburton, Sandra S; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nissen, Steven E; Modic, Michael T; Lytle, Bruce W; Topol, Eric J; White, Richard D

    2006-05-01

    Modern multidetector computed tomography systems are capable of a comprehensive assessment of the cardiovascular system, including noninvasive assessment of coronary anatomy. Multidetector computed tomography is expected to advance the role of noninvasive imaging for coronary artery disease, but clinical experience is still limited. Clinical guidelines are necessary to standardize scanner technology and appropriate clinical applications for coronary computed tomographic angiography. Further evaluation of this evolving technology will benefit from cooperation between different medical specialties, imaging scientists, and manufacturers of multidetector computed tomography systems, supporting multidisciplinary teams focused on the diagnosis and treatment of early and advanced stages of coronary artery disease. This cooperation will provide the necessary education, training, and guidelines for physicians and technologists assuring standard of care for their patients.

  12. Usefulness of 40-slice multidetector row computed tomography to detect coronary disease in patients prior to cardiac valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Pouleur, Anne-Catherine; le Polain de Waroux, Jean-Benoît; Kefer, Joëlle; Pasquet, Agnès; Coche, Emmanuel; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2007-12-01

    Preoperative identification of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients prior to valve surgery requires systematic invasive coronary angiography. The purpose of this current prospective study was to evaluate whether exclusion of CAD by multi-detector CT (MDCT) might potentially avoid systematic cardiac catheterization in these patients. Eighty-two patients (53 males, 62 +/- 13 years) scheduled to undergo valve surgery underwent 40-slice MDCT before invasive quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). According to QCA, 15 patients had CAD (5 one-vessel, 6 two-vessel and 4 three-vessel disease). The remaining 67 patients had no CAD. On a per-vessel basis, MDCT correctly identified 27/29 (sensitivity 93%) vessels with and excluded 277/299 vessels (specificity 93%) without CAD. On a per-patient basis, MDCT correctly identified 14/15 patients with (sensitivity 93%) and 60/67 patients without CAD (specificity 90%). Positive and negative predictive values of MDCT were 67% and 98%. Performing invasive angiography only in patients with abnormal MDCT might have avoided QCA in 60/82 (73%). MDCT could be potentially useful in the preoperative evaluation of patients with valve disease. By selecting only those patients with coronary lesions to undergo invasive coronary angiography, it could avoid cardiac catheterization in a large number of patients without CAD.

  13. MULTIDETECTOR-ROW COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY PATTERNS OF BRONCHOESPHAGEAL ARTERY HYPERTROPHY AND SYSTEMIC-TO-PULMONARY FISTULA IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Gianluca; Caldin, Marco; Mezzalira, Giorgia; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies involving arterial branches in the lungs are one of the causes of hemoptysis in humans and dogs. Congenital and acquired patterns of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy have been reported in humans based on CT characteristics. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe clinical, echocardiographic, and multidetector computed tomography features of bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy and systemic-to-pulmonary arterial communications in a sample of 14 dogs. Two main vascular patterns were identified in dogs that resembled congenital and acquired conditions reported in humans. Pattern 1 appeared as an aberrant origin of the right bronchoesophageal artery, normal origin of the left one, and enlargement of both the bronchial and esophageal branches that formed a dense network terminating in a pulmonary artery through an orifice. Pattern 2 appeared as a normal origin of both right and left bronchoesophageal arteries, with an enlarged and tortuous course along the bronchi to the periphery of the lung, where they communicated with subsegmental pulmonary arteries. Dogs having Pattern 1 also had paraesophageal and esophageal varices, with the latter being confirmed by videoendoscopy examination. Authors conclude that dogs with Pattern 1 should be differentiated from dogs with other congenital vascular systemic-to-pulmonary connections. Dogs having Pattern 2 should be evaluated for underlying pleural or pulmonary diseases. Bronchoesophageal artery hypertrophy can be accompanied by esophageal venous engorgement and should be included in the differential diagnosis for esophageal and paraesophageal varices in dogs.

  14. FDG PET/CT findings of common bile duct tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jing; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) tuberculosis is rare. A 39-year-old woman was referred because of a 5-month history of abdominal pain. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed dilatation of the distal CBD with irregularly thickened wall. Enhanced CT revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake of the CBD lesion and several retroperitoneal lymph nodes with slight FDG uptake. CBD cholangiocarcinoma with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was suspected. CBD tuberculosis was confirmed by endoluminal biopsy. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal biliary FDG accumulation, particularly in tuberculosis endemic areas.

  15. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  16. Predominance of Abdominal Visceral Adipose Tissue Reflects the Presence of Aortic Valve Calcification.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masayoshi; Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Misaka, Tomofumi; Machii, Hirofumi; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-Ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background. Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is a common feature of aging and is related to coronary artery disease. Although abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plays fundamental roles in coronary artery disease, the relationship between abdominal VAT and AVC is not fully understood. Methods. We investigated 259 patients who underwent cardiac and abdominal computed tomography (CT). AVC was defined as calcified lesion on the aortic valve by CT. %abdominal VAT was calculated as abdominal VAT area/total adipose tissue area. Results. AVC was detected in 75 patients, and these patients showed higher %abdominal VAT (44% versus 38%, p < 0.05) compared to those without AVC. When the cutoff value of %abdominal VAT was set at 40.9%, the area under the curve to diagnose AVC was 0.626. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that age (OR 1.120, 95% CI 1.078-1.168, p < 0.01), diabetes (OR 2.587, 95% CI 1.323-5.130, p < 0.01), and %abdominal VAT (OR 1.032, 95% CI 1.003-1.065, p < 0.05) were independent risk factors for AVC. The net reclassification improvement value for detecting AVC was increased when %abdominal VAT was added to the model: 0.5093 (95% CI 0.2489-0.7697, p < 0.01). Conclusion. We determined that predominance of VAT is associated with AVC.

  17. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  18. Current CT/MRI examination of the upper intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taourel, P; Pradel, J; Bruel, J M

    1994-12-01

    When properly performed, CT of the abdomen can provide valuable information about mural diseases of the alimentary tract. It can demonstrate the digestive origin of an abdominal mass, categorize a given lesion on the basis of its specific CT appearance and any associated CT findings, assess the extramural spread of gastrointestinal lesion, guide various interventional procedures (biopsy, drainage) and follow a patient's response to therapy.

  19. Incision for abdominal laparoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal laparoscopy is a useful aid in diagnosing disease or trauma in the abdominal cavity with less scarring than ... as liver and pancreatic resections may begin with laparoscopy to exclude the presence of additional tumors (metastatic ...

  20. A reappraisal of adult abdominal surface anatomy.

    PubMed

    Mirjalili, S Ali; McFadden, Sara L; Buckenham, Tim; Stringer, Mark D

    2012-10-01

    Descriptions of clinically important surface landmarks often vary between and within contemporary anatomical texts. The aim of this study was to investigate the surface anatomy of major abdominal vessels, kidneys, spleen, gastroesophageal junction, and duodenojejunal flexure in living adults using computed tomography (CT). After excluding patients with distorting space-occupying lesions, scoliosis, abnormal lordosis, and obvious visceromegaly, 108 abdominal CT scans of supine adults (mean age 60 years, range 18-97 years; 64 female) at end tidal inspiration were available for analysis by dual consensus reporting. Intra-observer agreement was assessed by repeat blind assessment of a random sample of scans. The vertebral level of the aortic bifurcation and almost all of its major branches, and the origin of the inferior vena cava were consistent with current descriptions. Important differences from contemporary descriptions of surface anatomy were as follows: the renal arteries were most commonly at the L1 vertebral level (left 55%, right 43%); the midpoint of the renal hila was most frequently at L2 (left 68%, right 40%); the 11th rib was a posterior relation of the left kidney in only 28% of scans; and the spleen was most frequently located between the 10th and 12th ribs (48%) with its long axis in line with the 11th rib (55%). Although the majority of vascular surface landmarks are consistent with standard descriptions, the surface anatomy of the kidneys, renal arteries, and spleen needs to be revised in accordance with observations using modern imaging techniques in vivo.

  1. Validation of multi-detector computed tomography as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeryl C; Appt, Susan E; Werre, Stephen R; Tan, Joshua C; Kaplan, Jay R

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate low radiation dose, contrast-enhanced, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as a non-invasive method for measuring ovarian volume in macaques. Computed tomography scans of four known-volume phantoms and nine mature female cynomolgus macaques were acquired using a previously described, low radiation dose scanning protocol, intravenous contrast enhancement, and a 32-slice MDCT scanner. Immediately following MDCT, ovaries were surgically removed and the ovarian weights were measured. The ovarian volumes were determined using water displacement. A veterinary radiologist who was unaware of actual volumes measured ovarian CT volumes three times, using a laptop computer, pen display tablet, hand-traced regions of interest, and free image analysis software. A statistician selected and performed all tests comparing the actual and CT data. Ovaries were successfully located in all MDCT scans. The iliac arteries and veins, uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix, ureters, urinary bladder, rectum, and colon were also consistently visualized. Large antral follicles were detected in six ovaries. Phantom mean CT volume was 0.702+/-SD 0.504 cc and the mean actual volume was 0.743+/-SD 0.526 cc. Ovary mean CT volume was 0.258+/-SD 0.159 cc and mean water displacement volume was 0.257+/-SD 0.145 cc. For phantoms, the mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 2.5%. For ovaries, the least squares mean coefficient of variation for CT volumes was 5.4%. The ovarian CT volume was significantly associated with actual ovarian volume (ICC coefficient 0.79, regression coefficient 0.5, P=0.0006) and the actual ovarian weight (ICC coefficient 0.62, regression coefficient 0.6, P=0.015). There was no association between the CT volume accuracy and mean ovarian CT density (degree of intravenous contrast enhancement), and there was no proportional or fixed bias in the CT volume measurements. Findings from this study indicate that MDCT is a valid non

  2. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  3. Modern CT applications in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Garland, Melissa R; Lawler, Leo P; Whitaker, Brent R; Walker, Ian D F; Corl, Frank M; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-01-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) is used primarily for diagnosis in humans, it can also be used to diagnose disease in veterinary patients. CT and associated three-dimensional reconstruction have a role in diagnosis of a range of illnesses in a variety of animals. In a sea turtle with failure to thrive, CT showed a nodal mass in the chest, granulomas in the lungs, and a ball in the stomach. CT of a sea dragon with balance and movement problems showed absence of the swim bladder. In a sloth with failure to thrive, CT allowed diagnosis of a coin in the intestine. CT of a puffin with failure to thrive showed a mass in the chest, which was found to be a hematoma. In a smooth-sided toad whose head was tilted to one side and who was circling in that direction, CT showed partial destruction of the temporal bone. CT of a domestic cat with listlessness showed a mass with focal calcification, which proved to be a leiomyosarcoma. CT of a sea otter showed pectus excavatum, which is caused by the animal smashing oysters against its chest. In a Japanese koi with abdominal swelling, CT allowed diagnosis of a hepatoma.

  4. Prediction of Small Bowel Obstruction Caused by Bezoars Using Risk Factor Categories on Multidetector Computed Tomographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Lian-qin; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with small bowel obstruction (SBO) caused by bezoars on multidetector computed tomographic findings. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 61 patients who had bezoars in the small bowels on MDCT. The patients were divided into SBO patients group and non-SBO patients group. The mean values of the diameter, volume, and CT attenuation as well as location and characteristics of the bezoars were compared between the two groups. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine factors associated with SBO. Results. There were 32 patients (52.5%) in the SBO group and 29 patients (47.5%) in the non-SBO group. The bezoars in the SBO group had greater values of each mean diameter and mean volume than those in the non-SBO group (3.2 ± 0.5 cm versus 1.6 ± 0.7 cm, P < 0.0001, 14.9 ± 6.4 cm3 versus 2.5 ± 2.7 cm3, P < 0.0001, resp.) and had a lower CT attenuation than the non-SBO group (55.5 ± 23.4 versus 173.0 ± 68.0, P < 0.0001). The SBO group had higher prevalence of phytobezoar appearance (75.0% versus 10.3%, P < 0.0001). Major diameters of bezoar and phytobezoar were significant independent risk factors associated with SBO (odds ratio = 36.09, 8.26, resp., and P = 0.0004, 0.044, resp.). Conclusions. Major diameter of bezoar or phytobezoar is a potential risk factor associated with SBO. PMID:27403434

  5. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    2016-01-01

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  6. Evaluation of posterior clinoid process pneumatization by multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burulday, Veysel; Akgül, Mehmet Hüseyin; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Ozveren, Mehmet Faik; Kaya, Ahmet

    2016-10-21

    In the present study, we investigated the types and ratio of posterior clinoid process (PCP) pneumatization in paranasal sinus multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Paranasal MDCT images of 541 subjects (227 males, 314 females), between 15 and 65 years old, were included into the study. Pneumatization of anterior clinoid process and pneumatization types (I, II, or III) were evaluated in the males and females. PCP pneumatization was detected in 20.7 % of the males and 11.5 % of the females. Right, left, and bilateral PCP pneumatizations were detected in 7.9, 5.7, and 7.0 % of the males and 2.9, 3.2, and 4.5 % of the females, respectively. PCP pneumatization of the males is significantly higher than the females. The most detected type of pneumatization was type I (61.2 %) for all groups. In right, left, and bilateral pneumatizations separately, type I pneumatization was the most detected pneumatization type with the ratio of the 70.4, 65.2, and 50.0 %, respectively. In males, type I (61.7 %), and similarly in females, type I (60.6 %) pneumatization were detected more. Type II and type III pneumatizations were detected in decreasing order in both groups. In younger subjects, pneumatization of posterior clinoid process was found as higher, and in older subjects, PCP pneumatization was found as lower. Sclerosis process related to the aging may be responsible for the lower pneumatization ratios in older subjects. Structure of the surrounding regions of PCP is important for surgical procedures related to cavernous sinus, basilar apex aneurysms, and mass lesions. Preoperative radiological examinations are useful for operative planning. Any anomalies to PCP can cause unnecessary injury to the neurovascular complex structure around the cavernous sinus or postclinoidectomy CSF fistulas. Posterior clinoidectomies should be avoided in patients with type III PCP pneumatization to prevent CSF fistulas.

  7. Multi-atlas segmentation for abdominal organs with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid / gray matter / white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  8. Multi-Atlas Segmentation for Abdominal Organs with Gaussian Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan P; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-17

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter/white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  9. Patient doses using multidetector computed tomography scanners in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Korir, G K; Wambani, J S; Korir, I K

    2012-08-01

    Assessment of patient dose attributed to multislice computed tomography (CT) examination. A questionnaire method was developed and used in recording the patient dose and scanning parameters for the head, chest, abdomen and lumbar spine examinations. The patient doses due to brain, chest and abdomen examination were above the international diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by factors of between one and four. The study demonstrated that the use of multislice CT elevates patient radiation dose, justifying the need for local optimised scanning protocols and the use of institutional DRL for dose management without affecting diagnostic image quality.

  10. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  11. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  12. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  13. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  14. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  15. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  16. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  17. Study of statistical properties of hybrid statistic in coherent multidetector compact binary coalescences search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Pai, Archana

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we revisit the coherent gravitational wave search problem of compact binary coalescences with multidetector network consisting of advanced interferometers like LIGO-Virgo. Based on the loss of the optimal multidetector signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we construct a hybrid statistic as a best of maximum-likelihood-ratio (MLR) statistic tuned for face-on and face-off binaries. The statistical properties of the hybrid statistic is studied. The performance of this hybrid statistic is compared with that of the coherent MLR statistic for generic inclination angles. Owing to the single synthetic data stream, the hybrid statistic gives few false alarms compared to the multidetector MLR statistic and small fractional loss in the optimum SNR for a large range of binary inclinations. We demonstrate that, for a LIGO-Virgo network and binary inclination ɛ <7 0 ° and ɛ >11 0 ° , the hybrid statistic captures more than 98% of the network optimum matched filter SNR with a low false alarm rate. The Monte Carlo exercise with two distributions of incoming inclination angles—namely, U [cos ɛ ] and a more realistic distribution proposed by B. F. Schutz [Classical Quantum Gravity 28, 125023 (2011)]—are performed with the hybrid statistic and give approximately 5% and 7% higher detection probabilities, respectively, compared to the two stream multidetector MLR statistic for a fixed false alarm probability of 1 0-5.

  18. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  19. Musculoskeletal applications of flat-panel volume CT.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Benjamin; Sarwar, Ammar; Bartling, Soenke H; Cheung, Arnold; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Bredella, Miriam A; Brady, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajiv

    2008-12-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a recent development in imaging. We discuss some of the musculoskeletal applications of a high-resolution flat-panel CT scanner. FpVCT has four main advantages over conventional multidetector computed tomography (MDCT): high-resolution imaging; volumetric coverage; dynamic imaging; omni-scanning. The overall effective dose of fpVCT is comparable to that of MDCT scanning. Although current fpVCT technology has higher spatial resolution, its contrast resolution is slightly lower than that of MDCT (5-10HU vs. 1-3HU respectively). We discuss the efficacy and potential utility of fpVCT in various applications related to musculoskeletal radiology and review some novel applications for pediatric bones, soft tissues, tumor perfusion, and imaging of tissue-engineered bone growth. We further discuss high-resolution CT and omni-scanning (combines fluoroscopic and tomographic imaging).

  20. Use of abdominal computed tomography in blunt trauma: Do we scan too much?

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Bryan G.; Bigelow, Eric; Yelle, Jean-Denis; Pagliarello, Guiseppe

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine what proportion of abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans ordered after blunt trauma are positive and the applicability and accuracy of existing clinical prediction rules for obtaining a CT scan of the abdomen in this setting. Setting A leading trauma hospital, affiliated with the University of Ottawa. Design A retrospective cohort study. Patients and methods All patients with blunt trauma admitted to hospital over a 1-year period having an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 12 who underwent CT of the abdomen during the initial assessment. Recorded data included age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, ISS, type of injuries, number of abdominal CT scans ordered, and scan results. Two clinical prediction rules were found in the literature that identify patients likely to have intra-abdominal injuries. These rules were applied retrospectively to the cohort. The predicted proportion of positive CT scans was compared with the observed proportion, and the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were estimated. Results Of the 297 patients entered in the study, 109 underwent abdominal CT. The median age was 32 years, 71% were male and the median ISS was 24. In only 36.7% (40 of 109) of scans were findings suggestive of intra-abdominal injuries. Application of one of the clinical prediction rules gave a sensitivity of 93.8% and specificity of 25.5% but excluded 23% of patients because of a GCS score less than 11. The second prediction rule tested could be applied to all patients and was highly sensitive (92.5%) and specific (100.0%). Conclusions The assessment of the abdomen in blunt trauma remains a challenge. Accuracy in predicting positive scans in equivocal cases is poor. Retrospective application of an existing clinical prediction rule was found to be highly accurate in identifying patients with positive CT findings. Prospective use of such a rule could reduce the number of CT scans ordered without missing significant injuries. PMID

  1. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as bilateral hydroureteronephrosis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Grilli Cicilioni, Carlo; Sbrollini, Giulia; Angelini, Andrea; Maselli, Guevar; Carbonari, Luciano

    2014-12-30

    We report a case of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (IAAA) producing bilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis. A 74-year-old patient presented to urologist office for bilateral hydronephrosis detected by kidney and bladder ultrasound (US). Patient reported lower urinary tract symptoms and inconstant and slight low back pain irradiated to inguinal region dating 3 weeks. Renal function, urine analysis and abdominal examination were normal. However the repeated ultrasound in the urologist office revealed abdominal aortic aneurism extended to iliac vessels. The patient was sent directly to vascular surgery unit where contrast computerized tomography (CT) and successful surgical repair were done. Final diagnosis was IAAA. The post-operative course was uneventful. Renal function was regular and the hydronephrosis reduced spontaneously under monitoring by CT and US. We review diagnosis and management of hydronephrosis that is sometimes linked to IAAA rather than standard AAA. Abdominal ultrasound is mandatory in any bilateral hydronephrosis and it could save lives.

  2. Abdominal wall abscess: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Gandhi, Natasha

    2010-01-01

    An 83-year-old, mildly demented rest home resident presented to the emergency department with a 2 day history of a right sided abdominal wall mass. He had a mechanical fall 2 days previously and landed on his right side and had attributed the mass to this. He had no symptoms apart from feeling bloated and not being able to pass wind for a day. He had passed a normal bowel motion the day before presentation. On abdominal examination there was an 11 × 4 cm mass in the right lower quadrant. It was firm in consistency, non-fluctuant and non-tender to touch. There was mild erythema over the area but no skin breaks. Chest radiograph was unremarkable. The abdominal film showed dilated small bowel and no large bowel could be seen. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed a thick walled gallbladder with multiple calculi and air present. There was also an extensive air and fluid collection in the layers of the abdominal wall and subcutaneous fat which arose from a perforation of the gallbladder. The patient was not a surgical candidate due to multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with antibiotics and underwent a CT guided percutaneous cholecystostomy. Despite the radiological intervention and antibiotics the patient progressively deteriorated and died peacefully 5 days after admission.

  3. An uncommon cause of abdominal pain: Mesenteric cyst

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Ünlüer, Seran; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Kamer, Kemal Erdı̇nç; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Tan, Gözde Canan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst. A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure. Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients. PMID:28250978

  4. Attenuation-based size metric for estimating organ dose to patients undergoing tube current modulated CT exams

    SciTech Connect

    Bostani, Maryam McMillan, Kyle; Lu, Peiyun; Kim, Hyun J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Task Group 204 introduced effective diameter (ED) as the patient size metric used to correlate size-specific-dose-estimates. However, this size metric fails to account for patient attenuation properties and has been suggested to be replaced by an attenuation-based size metric, water equivalent diameter (D{sub W}). The purpose of this study is to investigate different size metrics, effective diameter, and water equivalent diameter, in combination with regional descriptions of scanner output to establish the most appropriate size metric to be used as a predictor for organ dose in tube current modulated CT exams. Methods: 101 thoracic and 82 abdomen/pelvis scans from clinically indicated CT exams were collected retrospectively from a multidetector row CT (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare) with Institutional Review Board approval to generate voxelized patient models. Fully irradiated organs (lung and breasts in thoracic scans and liver, kidneys, and spleen in abdominal scans) were segmented and used as tally regions in Monte Carlo simulations for reporting organ dose. Along with image data, raw projection data were collected to obtain tube current information for simulating tube current modulation scans using Monte Carlo methods. Additionally, previously described patient size metrics [ED, D{sub W}, and approximated water equivalent diameter (D{sub Wa})] were calculated for each patient and reported in three different ways: a single value averaged over the entire scan, a single value averaged over the region of interest, and a single value from a location in the middle of the scan volume. Organ doses were normalized by an appropriate mAs weighted CTDI{sub vol} to reflect regional variation of tube current. Linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between normalized organ doses and each size metric. Results: For the abdominal organs, the correlations between normalized organ dose and size metric were overall slightly higher for all three

  5. Determination of dosimetric quantities in pediatric abdominal computed tomography scans*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; da Silva, Teógenes Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aiming at contributing to the knowledge on doses in computed tomography (CT), this study has the objective of determining dosimetric quantities associated with pediatric abdominal CT scans, comparing the data with diagnostic reference levels (DRL). Materials and methods The study was developed with a Toshiba Asteion single-slice CT scanner and a GE BrightSpeed multi-slice CT unit in two hospitals. Measurements were performed with a pencil-type ionization chamber and a 16 cm-diameter polymethylmethacrylate trunk phantom. Results No significant difference was observed in the values for weighted air kerma index (CW), but the differences were relevant in values for volumetric air kerma index (CVOL), air kerma-length product (PKL,CT) and effective dose. Conclusion Only the CW values were lower than the DRL, suggesting that dose optimization might not be necessary. However, PKL,CT and effective dose values stressed that there still is room for reducing pediatric radiation doses. The present study emphasizes the importance of determining all dosimetric quantities associated with CT scans. PMID:25741103

  6. An improved analytical model for CT dose simulation with a new look at the theory of CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Robert L.; Munley, Michael T.; Bayram, Ersin

    2005-12-15

    Gagne [Med. Phys. 16, 29-37 (1989)] has previously described a model for predicting the sensitivity and dose profiles in the slice-width (z) direction for CT scanners. The model, developed prior to the advent of multidetector CT scanners, is still widely used; however, it does not account for the effect of anode tilt on the penumbra or include the heel effect, both of which are increasingly important for the wider beams (up to 40 mm) of contemporary, multidetector scanners. Additionally, it applied only on (or near) the axis of rotation, and did not incorporate the photon energy spectrum. The improved model described herein transcends all of the aforementioned limitations of the Gagne model, including extension to the peripheral phantom axes. Comparison of simulated and measured dose data provides experimental validation of the model, including verification of the superior match to the penumbra provided by the tilted-anode model, as well as the observable effects on the cumulative dose distribution. The initial motivation for the model was to simulate the quasiperiodic dose distribution on the peripheral, phantom axes resulting from a helical scan series in order to facilitate the implementation of an improved method of CT dose measurement utilizing a short ion chamber, as proposed by Dixon [Med. Phys. 30, 1272-1280 (2003)]. A more detailed set of guidelines for implementing such measurements is also presented in this paper. In addition, some fundamental principles governing CT dose which have not previously been clearly enunciated follow from the model, and a fundamental (energy-based) quantity dubbed 'CTDI-aperture' is introduced.

  7. Three-dimensional image reconstruction of an anorectal malformation with multidetector-row helical computed tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshio; Ando, Hisami; Seo, Takahiko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Katsuno, Shinsuke; Shinohara, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Kensaku; Toriwaki, Junichiro

    2003-05-01

    The presentation of the surgical anatomy of anorectal malformation by standard anatomical figures is not suitable for individual anorectoplasty. It is essential to understand the anatomy of the pelvic muscle (striated muscle complex: SMC) including the external anal sphincter and their three-dimensional (3D) configuration in each patient. Thus, we studied the SMC three-dimensionally with multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MRH-CT) preoperatively, and evaluated its usefulness. Fourteen patients with anorectal malformations before anorectoplasty (types: high n=6, intermediate n=2, low n=6) and two patients without anorectal malformations as controls (total: male n=8, female n=8) were investigated. An image of pelvic region was prepared with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm and a reconstruction pitch of 0.5 mm. A 3D reconstruction on a conventional personal computer (PC) was made with a volume rendering method, and assisted by our own software. The SMC was analyzed with three modified modes of 3D reconstruction corresponding to the surrounding tissues. A length of the parasagittal muscle, and both the sagittal and transverse width of the vertical fibers in the SMC at the connection to the parasagittal muscle were measured on a 3D image and then compared among three different types and controls. To eliminate variations in age, a length index was used to allow comparison. The 3D configuration of the SMC was different in every case. The arranged image mode, which displayed the SMC and the pelvic bones simultaneously, enabled to use conventional knowledge in cysto-urethrography. The length of the parasagittal muscle was longest in the high type but the width of the vertical fibers was smallest. Anatomical figures of the SMC including the external anal sphincter were clearly demonstrated on a PC in every anorectal malformation by our program. A 3D reconstruction image provides positional information on the SMC for the body surface and pelvic bone at the same time

  8. Recurrent pneumothorax following abdominal paracentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    A 62 year old man presented with abdominal ascites, without pleural effusion, due to peritoneal mesothelioma. He had chronic obstructive airways disease and a past history of right upper lobectomy for tuberculosis. On two occasions abdominal paracentesis was followed within 72 hours by pneumothorax. This previously unreported complication of abdominal paracentesis may be due to increased diaphragmatic excursion following the procedure and should be considered in patients with preexisting lung disease. PMID:2385561

  9. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  10. Abdominal pregnancy- a case report.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ii; Ude, Ac; Aderibigbe, Aso; Amu, Oc; Udeh, Pe; Obianyo, Nen; Ani, Coc

    2011-01-01

    A case of abdominal pregnancy in a 39 year old female gravida 4, para 0(+3) is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a viable abdominal pregnancy at 15 weeks gestational age. She was initially managed conservatively. Surgical intervention became necessary at 20 weeks gestational age following Ultrasound detection of foetal demise. The maternal outcome was favourable. This case is presented to highlight the dilemma associated with diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy with a review of literature.

  11. Synchronous infection of the aorta and the testis: emphysematous epididymo-orchitis, abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm, and testicular artery pseudoaneurysm diagnosed by use of MDCT.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Rahul G; Balani, Ankit; Merchant, Suleman A; Joshi, Anagha R

    2014-07-01

    We report clinical details and imaging findings for a case of emphysematous epididymo-orchitis with co-existing mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm and a testicular artery pseudoaneurysm in a diabetic 65-year-old male. We report imaging findings from ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Use of MDCT to identify, confirm, and define the extent of the disease, and its utility in understanding the pathogenesis of this rare condition are highlighted. For such lethal infections, early diagnosis and intervention can be lifesaving; imaging can be of crucial importance in this.

  12. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  13. Fertility after abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, G; Doyle, M; Barrett, T; Byrne, P; De Mello, M; Harrison, R F

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the morbidity and pregnancy outcome of myomectomy in infertile women with uterine fibroids. This was a cross-sectional study. Records were reviewed for 100 consecutive women in the Rotunda Hospital who underwent myomectomy in the years 1995-1996. A questionnaire regarding subsequent fertility was sent. The study was carried out in the infertility unit at the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Seventy-five women responded. Multiple myomectomy was performed in 52 (70%). Mean fibroid size was 6.8 cm (range 2-14.5 cm). Nine women (12%) developed complications; five had menstrual problems, two had wound discomfort and two had abdominal discomfort. Twenty-five women (33%) became pregnant. Seven (28%) were IVF pregnancies. Overall six (24%) miscarried. In 19 of 25, pregnancy occurred where fibroids were the only identifiable cause of infertility. We conclude that abdominal myomectomy is associated with a favourable outcome in infertile women particularly if no other confounding variable is present.

  14. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  15. CT demonstration of peripelvic and periureteral non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    McMillin, K.I.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-05-01

    Abdominal CT is often performed for the staging of lymphoma. Retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy is the most common abnormality identified, but various extranodal sites of lymphomatous involvement have been reported, especially in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Renal involvement is not rare, but peripelvic or periureteral involvement in the absence of renal parenchymal involvement or contiguous abdominal adenopathy is extremely unusual. Two recent patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who did show these findings are presented.

  16. Retroperitoneal abscess: an extra-abdominal manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Mallia, Alvin James; Ashwood, Neil; Arealis, George; Galanopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneal abscesses are unusual occurrences with occult and insidious presentations. There is often a lack of abdominal signs, leading to delays in drainage and high mortality rates. We report a case of thigh emphysema in an 88-year-old patient with diabetes. Prior to admission the patient reported a vague 4-week history of left thigh pain and an inability to fully weight bear. She presented to our emergency department with sepsis and acute kidney impairment. An X-ray of her left femur revealed widespread gas between muscular planes. A retroperitoneal abscess involving the left renal fossa, psoas, iliacus and upper thigh muscles was revealed on an urgent CT scan. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) and underwent an emergency drainage. Despite ICU the patient died 2 days after admission. PMID:25576509

  17. Retroperitoneal abscess: an extra-abdominal manifestation.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Alvin James; Ashwood, Neil; Arealis, George; Galanopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-09

    Retroperitoneal abscesses are unusual occurrences with occult and insidious presentations. There is often a lack of abdominal signs, leading to delays in drainage and high mortality rates. We report a case of thigh emphysema in an 88-year-old patient with diabetes. Prior to admission the patient reported a vague 4-week history of left thigh pain and an inability to fully weight bear. She presented to our emergency department with sepsis and acute kidney impairment. An X-ray of her left femur revealed widespread gas between muscular planes. A retroperitoneal abscess involving the left renal fossa, psoas, iliacus and upper thigh muscles was revealed on an urgent CT scan. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) and underwent an emergency drainage. Despite ICU the patient died 2 days after admission.

  18. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  19. CT Colonography (Virtual Colonoscopy)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z CT Colonography Computed tomography (CT) colonography or virtual colonoscopy uses special x-ray equipment to examine ... and blood vessels. CT colonography, also known as virtual colonoscopy, uses low dose radiation CT scanning to ...

  20. Hypercortisolism Is Associated With Increased Coronary Arterial Atherosclerosis: Analysis of Noninvasive Coronary Angiography Using Multidetector Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Neary, Nicola M.; Booker, O. Julian; Abel, Brent S.; Matta, Jatin R.; Muldoon, Nancy; Sinaii, Ninet; Pettigrew, Roderic I.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Observational studies show that glucocorticoid therapy and the endogenous hypercortisolism of Cushing's syndrome (CS) are associated with increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the causes of these findings remain largely unknown. Objective: To determine whether CS patients have increased coronary atherosclerosis. Design: A prospective case-control study was performed. Setting: Subjects were evaulated in a clinical research center. Subjects: Fifteen consecutive patients with ACTH-dependent CS, 14 due to an ectopic source and 1 due to pituitary Cushing's disease were recruited. Eleven patients were studied when hypercortisolemic; 4 patients were eucortisolemic due to medication (3) or cyclic hypercortisolism (1). Fifteen control subjects with at least one risk factor for cardiac disease were matched 1:1 for age, sex, and body mass index. Primary outcome variables: Agatston score a measure of calcified plaque and non-calcified coronary plaque volume were quantified using a multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiogram scan. Additional variables included fasting lipids, blood pressure, history of hypertension or diabetes, and 24-hour urine free cortisol excretion. Results: CS patients had significantly greater noncalcified plaque volume and Agatston score (noncalcified plaque volume [mm3] median [interquartile ranges]: CS 49.5 [31.4, 102.5], controls 17.9 [2.6, 25.3], P < .001; Agatston score: CS 70.6 [0, 253.1], controls 0 [0, 7.6]; P < .05). CS patients had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures than controls (systolic: CS 143 mm Hg [135, 173]; controls, 134 [123, 136], P < .02; diastolic CS: 86 [80, 99], controls, 76 [72, 84], P < .05). Conclusions: Increased coronary calcifications and noncalcified coronary plaque volumes are present in patients with active or previous hypercortisolism. Increased atherosclerosis may contribute to the increased rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with

  1. Standardized anatomic space for abdominal fat quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately measure subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) from images is important for improved assessment and management of patients with various conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and degenerative disease. Although imaging and analysis methods to measure the volume of these tissue components have been developed [1, 2], in clinical practice, an estimate of the amount of fat is obtained from just one transverse abdominal CT slice typically acquired at the level of the L4-L5 vertebrae for various reasons including decreased radiation exposure and cost [3-5]. It is generally assumed that such an estimate reliably depicts the burden of fat in the body. This paper sets out to answer two questions related to this issue which have not been addressed in the literature. How does one ensure that the slices used for correlation calculation from different subjects are at the same anatomic location? At what anatomic location do the volumes of SAT and VAT correlate maximally with the corresponding single-slice area measures? To answer these questions, we propose two approaches for slice localization: linear mapping and non-linear mapping which is a novel learning based strategy for mapping slice locations to a standardized anatomic space so that same anatomic slice locations are identified in different subjects. We then study the volume-to-area correlations and determine where they become maximal. We demonstrate on 50 abdominal CT data sets that this mapping achieves significantly improved consistency of anatomic localization compared to current practice. Our results also indicate that maximum correlations are achieved at different anatomic locations for SAT and VAT which are both different from the L4-L5 junction commonly utilized.

  2. Patient doses from CT examinations in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ataç, Gökçe Kaan; Parmaksız, Aydın; İnal, Tolga; Bulur, Emine; Bulgurlu, Figen; Öncü, Tolga; Gündoğdu, Sadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to establish the first diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for computed tomography (CT) examinations in adult and pediatric patients in Turkey and compare these with international DRLs. METHODS CT performance information and examination parameters (for head, chest, high-resolution CT of the chest [HRCT-chest], abdominal, and pelvic protocols) from 1607 hospitals were collected via a survey. Dose length products and effective doses for standard patient sizes were calculated from the reported volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). RESULTS The median number of protocols reported from the 167 responding hospitals (10% response rate) was 102 across five different age groups. Third quartile CTDIvol values for adult pelvic and all pediatric body protocols were higher than the European Commission standards but were comparable to studies conducted in other countries. CONCLUSION The radiation dose indicators for adult patients were similar to those reported in the literature, except for those associated with head protocols. CT protocol optimization is necessary for adult head and pediatric chest, HRCT-chest, abdominal, and pelvic protocols. The findings from this study are recommended for use as national DRLs in Turkey. PMID:26133189

  3. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Background: In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. Objectives: To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Results: Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Conclusions: Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid. PMID:25763079

  5. Value and Accuracy of Multidetector Computed Tomography in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Rishi Philip; Moorkath, Abdunnisar; Basti, Ram Shenoy; Suresh, Hadihally B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Objective; To find out the role of MDCT in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with respect to the cause and level of the obstruction, and its accuracy. To identify the advantages of MDCT with respect to other imaging modalities. To correlate MDCT findings with histopathology/surgical findings/Endoscopic Retrograde CholangioPancreatography (ERCP) findings as applicable. Material/Methods This was a prospective study conducted over a period of one year from August 2014 to August 2015. Data were collected from 50 patients with clinically suspected obstructive jaundice. CT findings were correlated with histopathology/surgical findings/ERCP findings as applicable. Results Among the 50 people studied, males and females were equal in number, and the majority belonged to the 41–60 year age group. The major cause for obstructive jaundice was choledocholithiasis. MDCT with reformatting techniques was very accurate in picking a mass as the cause for biliary obstruction and was able to differentiate a benign mass from a malignant one with high accuracy. There was 100% correlation between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis regarding the level and type of obstruction. MDCT was able to determine the cause of obstruction with an accuracy of 96%. Conclusions MDCT with good reformatting techniques has excellent accuracy in the evaluation of obstructive jaundice with regards to the level and cause of obstruction. PMID:27429673

  6. Differentiation of Lymphoma Presenting as Retroperitoneal Mass and Retroperitoneal Fibrosis: Evaluation with Multidetector-row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Min; Li, Chun-Mei; Song, Guo-Dong; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) and lymphoma presenting as retroperitoneal mass may closely resemble each other and misdiagnosis may occur. This study investigated the differential imaging features of RPF and lymphoma which presented as a retroperitoneal soft tissue using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Methods: The 42 consecutive patients were included in this retrospective review, including 19 RPF patients (45.2%; including 13 males and 6 females; mean age: 56.7 ± 6.2 years) and 23 patients with lymphoma (54.8%; including 14 males and 9 females; mean age: 57.4 ± 12.3 years). An array of qualitative computed tomography (CT) features of lesions in 42 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and lymphoma were retrospectively analyzed. The quantitative size of the lesion at the para-aortic region and attenuation in the precontrast, arterial, and portal phases were calculated in regions of interest and compared between the patients with newly diagnosed untreated RPF and with lymphoma. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess the potential diagnostic value of each quantitative parameter. Inter-reader concordance was also calculated. Results: Mean ages between patients with RPF and lymphoma were not significantly different (56.7 ± 6.2 years vs. 57.4 ± 12.3 years P = 0.595). Compared to those in patients with lymphoma, homogeneous enhancement (65.2% vs. 94.7%, P = 0.027) and pelvic extension (52.2% vs. 89.5%, P = 0.017) were significantly more common while the involvement of additional nodes (78.3% vs. 5.3%, P < 0.001), suprarenal extension (60.9% vs. 15.8%, P = 0.004), and aortic displacement (43.5% vs. 5.3%, P = 0.006) were significantly less common in patients with RPF. Lesion size at the para-aorta was significantly greater in patients with lymphoma, compared with RPF patients (3.9 ± 1.2 cm vs. 1.8 ± 0.6 cm; P < 0.001). The attenuation values in three phases were not significantly different

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aortocaval Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzardi, Giuseppe Fossaceca, Rita; Divenuto, Ignazio; Musiani, Antonello; Brustia, Piero; Carriero, Alessandro

    2010-08-15

    Aortocaval fistula (ACF) is a rare complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). We report the endovascular repair of an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for acute hypotension. She presented with a pulsatile abdominal mass and became rapidly anuric. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed an AAA rupture into the inferior vena cava. The features of the AAA made it suitable for endovascular repair. To prevent pulmonary embolism caused by the presence of sac thrombosis near the vena cava lumen, a temporary vena cava filter was deployed before the procedure. A bifurcated stent-graft was placed with the patient under local anaesthesia, and the AAA was successfully treated. A transient type II endoleak was detected on CT 3 days after endograft placement. At routine follow-up 6 and 12 months after the procedure, the patient was in good clinical condition, and the type II endoleak had sealed completely. Endovascular treatment offers an attractive therapeutic alternative to open repair in case of ACF; however, only small numbers of patients have been treated, and long-term follow-up interval is lacking.

  8. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  9. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  10. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  11. Investigation of temporal resolution required for CT coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Kawai, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2012-03-01

    Sub-second multi-detector computed tomography systems (MDCTs) offer great potentials for improving cardiac imaging. However, since the temporal resolution of such CT systems is not sufficient, blurring and artifacts produced by fast cardiac motion are still problematic. The purposes of this study were to investigate the accurate method for measurement of temporal resolution (TR) of the cardiac CT and required TR for obtaining better CT coronary angiography (CTCA). We employed a dual source CT system (Somatom Definition, Siemens), which has various temporal resolution modes (83, 125, and 165 msec) for electro-cardiogram (ECG)-gated scanning. The temporal sensitivity profiles (TSPs) were measured by a new method using temporal impulse generated by metal ball (impulse method). The CTCA images of 200 patients with heart rates (HRs) ranging from 36 to 117 beat per minute (bpm) were visually evaluated using a 4-point scale. The 165-msec TR mode, which is mostly available on recent MDCTs, showed a sufficient image quality only at low HR (<= 60 bpm) for all 3 arteries. The image quality of 125-msec TR mode was acceptable at low to intermediate HRs (< 80 bpm) for LADs and LCXs, and insufficient for the RCAs in cases with HR more than 71 bpm. The 83-msec TR mode demonstrated excellent image quality except for cases with very quick motion of the RCAs at a high HR (>80 bpm).

  12. [Penetrating abdominal injuries].

    PubMed

    Nesbakken, A; Pillgram-Larsen, J; Naess, F; Gerner, T; Solheim, K; Stadaas, J O; Gjøra, O

    1990-02-28

    We have reviewed the medical records of 111 patients treated for abdominal stab wounds during the period 1980-87. Our two hospitals serve a catchment area of about 450,000 people. Exploratory laparotomy was performed in 89 patients with suspected peritoneal penetration. In 16 patients the laparotomy was negative, and in 15 patients only minor injuries were noted. There were no serious complications in these 31 patients. Twenty-seven patients had thoracic wounds below the fourth intercostal space, 15 with intraabdominal injuries. The most common injuries were lacerations of the liver, the small bowel and the diaphragm. The mortality in the series was 2%. Stab wounds are infrequent in Norway, and most surgeons have limited experience of such injuries. We discuss whether to employ immediate exploratory laparotomy or selective management when the peritoneum has been penetrated. When there is no evidence of evisceration or omental protrusion, local exploration of the wound should be performed in order to confirm or exclude peritoneal penetration. Injury to the diaphragm and intraabdominal viscera should always be suspected in thoracic stab wounds below the fourth intercostal space.

  13. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  14. Outcome of Blunt Abdominal Traumas with Stable Hemodynamic and Positive FAST Findings

    PubMed Central

    Behboodi, Firooz; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Masjedi, Navid; Shojaie, Reza; Sadri, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) is a highly effective first screening tool for initial classification of abdominal trauma patients. The present study was designed to evaluate the outcome of patients with blunt abdominal trauma and positive FAST findings. Methods: The present prospective cross-sectional study was done on patients over 7 years old with normal abdominal examination, positive FAST findings, and available abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan findings. The frequency of need for laparotomy as well as its probable risk factors were calculated. Results: 180 patients were enrolled (mean age: 28.0 ± 11.5 years; 76.7% male). FAST findings were confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan in only 124 (68.9%) cases. Finally, 12 (6.6%) patients needed laparotomy. Mean age of those in need of laparotomy was significantly higher than others (36.75 ± 11.37 versus 27.34 ± 11.37, p = 0.006). Higher grading of spleen (p = 0.001) and hepatic (p = 0.038) ruptures increased the probability of need for laparotomy. Conclusion: 68.9% of the positive FAST findings in patients with blunt abdominal trauma and stable hemodynamics was confirmed by abdominopelvic CT scan and only 6.6% needed laparotomy. Simultaneous presence of free fluid and air in the abdominal area, old age, and higher grading o solid organ injuries were factors that had a significant correlation with need for laparotomy. PMID:27299142

  15. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    PubMed

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  16. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  18. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  19. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...70%); 13 for other compli- ations, such as biliary or perineal conditions (26%); and 4 or feeding access (8%). For the civilians, 2 had trauma

  20. Abdominal actinomycosis masquerading as an omental tumor in a 12-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Yutaka; Iinuma, Yasushi; Hashizume, Naoki; Yoshida, Motomu; Iida, Hisataka; Shibuya, Hiroyuki; Naito, Shinichi; Nitta, Koju

    2013-02-01

    We herein report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 12-year-old girl in whom an omental primary tumor was suspected before surgery. The patient began to experience intermittent lower left abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans were inconclusive at this time, but 6 months later, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations showed a 7-cm, tumor-like lesion in the left abdominal cavity; malignancy could not be ruled out. The tumor, which originated in the omentum and adhered strongly to the left abdominal wall, was resected along with approximately 90 % of the omentum, the peritoneum in contact with the mass, and the posterior layer of the rectus abdominal sheath, under suspicion of a malignant tumor. However, omental actinomycosis was the final pathological diagnosis. The patient's antibiotic treatment was changed to a penicillin-series oral antibiotic to prevent recurrence of the actinomycosis. The patient was discharged from our hospital 16 days after the first surgery, but she developed three episodes of ileus; the first two required surgery. The patient has had no further recurrences of actinomycosis or postoperative ileus 20 months after discharge.

  1. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography in the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Hoddick, W K; Hricak, H; Sollitto, R; Justich, E; Filly, R A; Higgins, C B

    1985-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate abdominal aortic aneurysms in 27 patients. The findings were compared retrospectively with CT, ultrasound (US), and angiography in 17 cases and prospectively with US in 10 cases. MRI identified the renal arteries in all cases, demonstrated involvement at or above the origin of the renal arteries in eight patients, and showed extension of the aneurysm into the iliac arteries in 12 cases. The outer dimension of the aneurysm, the diameter of the residual lumen, and the length of the aneurysm were measured easily from the MR images. The measurements of transverse dimension of the abdominal aortic aneurysm were similar for MRI, CT, and US. MRI more accurately defined extension above the renal arteries and below the aortic bifurcation. It is concluded that MRI provides the necessary information for the surveillance and preoperative evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  2. Common abdominal emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, James

    2002-02-01

    Because young children often present to EDs with abdominal complaints, emergency physicians must have a high index of suspicion for the common abdominal emergencies that have serious sequelae. At the same time, they must realize that less serious causes of abdominal symptoms (e.g., constipation or gastroenteritis) are also seen. A gentle yet thorough and complete history and physical examination are the most important diagnostic tools for the emergency physician. Repeated examinations and observation are useful tools. Physicians should listen carefully to parents and their children, respect their concerns, and honor their complaints. Ancillary tests are inconsistent in their value in assessing these complaints. Abdominal radiographs can be normal in children with intussusception and even malrotation and early volvulus. Unlike the classic symptoms seen in adults, young children can display only lethargy or poor feeding in cases of appendicitis or can appear happy and playful between paroxysmal bouts of intussusception. The emergency physician therefore, must maintain a high index of suspicion for serious pathology in pediatric patients with abdominal complaints. Eventually, all significant abdominal emergencies reveal their true nature, and if one can be patient with the child and repeat the examinations when the child is quiet, one will be rewarded with the correct diagnosis.

  3. Performance benchmarking of liver CT image segmentation and volume estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Jiayin; Tian, Qi; Liu, Jimmy J.; Qi, Yingyi; Leow, Wee Kheng; Han, Thazin; Wang, Shih-chang

    2008-03-01

    In recent years more and more computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems are being used routinely in hospitals. Image-based knowledge discovery plays important roles in many CAD applications, which have great potential to be integrated into the next-generation picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Robust medical image segmentation tools are essentials for such discovery in many CAD applications. In this paper we present a platform with necessary tools for performance benchmarking for algorithms of liver segmentation and volume estimation used for liver transplantation planning. It includes an abdominal computer tomography (CT) image database (DB), annotation tools, a ground truth DB, and performance measure protocols. The proposed architecture is generic and can be used for other organs and imaging modalities. In the current study, approximately 70 sets of abdominal CT images with normal livers have been collected and a user-friendly annotation tool is developed to generate ground truth data for a variety of organs, including 2D contours of liver, two kidneys, spleen, aorta and spinal canal. Abdominal organ segmentation algorithms using 2D atlases and 3D probabilistic atlases can be evaluated on the platform. Preliminary benchmark results from the liver segmentation algorithms which make use of statistical knowledge extracted from the abdominal CT image DB are also reported. We target to increase the CT scans to about 300 sets in the near future and plan to make the DBs built available to medical imaging research community for performance benchmarking of liver segmentation algorithms.

  4. Gastric Intramural and Portal Venous Gas Following Blunt Abdominal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Indrani; Samarasam, Inian; Chandran, Sudhakar; Mathew, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gastric emphysema or pneumatosis is a rare finding. Early endoscopy and urgent laparotomy is advised in post-trauma patients. Case Presentation A 29 year old man presented with blunt abdominal injury following a high-speed motorbike crash He complained of abdominal pain and abdomen was distended. CT abdomen revealed air in the gastric wall with disruption of gastric mucosa. He had normal white cell counts, bleeding parameters and blood gases. He was treated conservatively with nasogastric decompression, intravenous analgesics and antibiotics with which he recovered well. Conclusions Early surgical management is indicated in post-trauma patients in whom bowel infarction is suspected. In a stable patient, a negative laparotomy is a major additional stress post trauma - conservative management with close clinical observation is a suitable management alternative. PMID:24396802

  5. Hereditary angioedema (HAE): a cause for recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Soni, Parita; Kumar, Vivek; Alliu, Samson; Shetty, Vijay

    2016-11-14

    A 44-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency room with a 2-day history of sudden onset of severe cramping left lower quadrant abdominal pain associated with ∼20 episodes diarrhoea. Abdominal CT scan exhibited bowel wall oedema and acute extensive colitis. On the basis of the preliminary diagnosis of acute abdomen, the patient was admitted under the surgical team and treated for acute colitis. Since her family history was significant for hereditary angioedema (HAE), complement studies were performed which revealed low complement C4 levels and abnormally low values of C1q esterase inhibitor. Thus, the diagnosis of HAE type I was established. This case report summarises that the symptoms of HAE are often non-specific, hence making the underlying cause difficult to diagnose.

  6. Clinical significance of mesenteric panniculitis-like abnormalities on abdominal computerized tomography in patients with malignant neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenpreis, Eli D; Roginsky, Grigory; Gore, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the association of malignancy with mesenteric panniculitis-like changes on computed tomography (CT). METHODS All abdominal CT scans performed at NorthShore University HealthSystem showing mesenteric panniculitis from January 2005 to August 2010 were identified in the Radnet (RadNet Corporation, Los Angeles, CA) database. Patients with a new or known diagnosis of a malignancy were included for this analysis. Longitudinal clinical histories were obtained from electronic medical records. RESULTS In total, 147794 abdominal CT scans were performed during the study period. Three hundred and fifty-nine patients had mesenteric panniculitis (MP)-like abnormalities on their abdominal CT. Of these patients, 81 patients (22.6%) had a known history of cancer at the time of their CT scan. Nineteen (5.3%) had a new diagnosis of cancer in concurrence with their CT, but the majority of these (14/19, 74%) were undergoing CT as part of a malignancy evaluation. Lymphomas were the most common cancers associated with MP-like findings on CT (36 cases, 36%), with follicular lymphoma being the most frequent subtype (17/36). A variety of solid tumors, most commonly prostate (7) and renal cell cancers (6) also were seen. CT follow up was obtained in 56 patients. Findings in the mesentery were unchanged in 45 (80%), worsened in 6 (11%), and improved in 5 patients (9%). Positron emission tomography (PET) scans performed in 44 patients only showed a positive uptake in the mesenteric mass in 2 patients (5%). CONCLUSION A new diagnosis of cancer is uncommon in patients with CT findings suggestive of MP. MP-like mesenteric abnormalities on CT generally remain stable in patients with associated malignancies. PET scanning is not recommended in the evaluation of patients with mesenteric panniculitis-like findings on CT. PMID:28082812

  7. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention. Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall. Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture. Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  8. Texture analysis improves level set segmentation of the anterior abdominal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhoubing; Allen, Wade M.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The treatment of ventral hernias (VH) has been a challenging problem for medical care. Repair of these hernias is fraught with failure; recurrence rates ranging from 24% to 43% have been reported, even with the use of biocompatible mesh. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to guide intervention through expert, but qualitative, clinical judgments, notably, quantitative metrics based on image-processing are not used. The authors propose that image segmentation methods to capture the three-dimensional structure of the abdominal wall and its abnormalities will provide a foundation on which to measure geometric properties of hernias and surrounding tissues and, therefore, to optimize intervention.Methods: In this study with 20 clinically acquired CT scans on postoperative patients, the authors demonstrated a novel approach to geometric classification of the abdominal. The authors’ approach uses a texture analysis based on Gabor filters to extract feature vectors and follows a fuzzy c-means clustering method to estimate voxelwise probability memberships for eight clusters. The memberships estimated from the texture analysis are helpful to identify anatomical structures with inhomogeneous intensities. The membership was used to guide the level set evolution, as well as to derive an initial start close to the abdominal wall.Results: Segmentation results on abdominal walls were both quantitatively and qualitatively validated with surface errors based on manually labeled ground truth. Using texture, mean surface errors for the outer surface of the abdominal wall were less than 2 mm, with 91% of the outer surface less than 5 mm away from the manual tracings; errors were significantly greater (2–5 mm) for methods that did not use the texture.Conclusions: The authors’ approach establishes a baseline for characterizing the abdominal wall for improving VH care. Inherent texture patterns in CT scans are helpful to the tissue classification, and texture

  9. A simple method for labeling CT images with respiratory states

    SciTech Connect

    Berlinger, Kajetan; Sauer, Otto; Vences, Lucia; Roth, Michael

    2006-09-15

    A method is described for labeling CT images with their respiratory state by a needle, connected to the patient's chest/abdomen. By means of a leverage the needle follows the abdominal respiratory motion. The needle is visible as a blurred spot in every CT slice. The method was tested with nine patients. A series of volume scans during free breathing was performed. The detected positions of the moving needle in every single slice were compared to each other thus enabling respiratory state assignment. The tool is an inexpensive alternative to complex respiratory measuring tools for four dimensional (4D) CT and was greatly accepted in the clinic due to its simplicity.

  10. MR Evaluation of the Nontraumatic Acute Abdomen with CT Correlation.

    PubMed

    Bannas, Peter; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sectional imaging plays a crucial role in the triage of patients with acute abdominal pain. Ionizing radiation exposure is a recognized drawback of computed tomography (CT), the primary imaging technique. MR imaging is a promising alternative to CT; it provides excellent image quality with high-contrast resolution without the disadvantages of ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast. This article provides a basic overview of the typical MR findings of the most frequent disease entities encountered in the setting of the nontraumatic acute abdomen, including direct comparison with CT findings to familiarize the readers with these same findings on MR.

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... test used to help diagnose—or rule out—spinal column damage in injured patients. CT scanning is fast, ... CT is to detect—or to rule out—spinal column damage in patients who have been injured. CT ...

  12. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  13. Optic Strut and Para-clinoid Region – Assessment by Multi-detector Computed Tomography with Multiplanar and 3 Dimensional Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Ravikiran, S.R.; Kumar, Ashvini; Chavadi, Channabasappa; Pulastya, Sanyal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate thickness, location and orientation of optic strut and anterior clinoid process and variations in paraclinoid region, solely based on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images with multiplanar (MPR) and 3 dimensional (3D) reconstructions, among Indian population. Materials and Methods Ninety five CT scans of head and paranasal sinuses patients were retrospectively evaluated with MPR and 3D reconstructions to assess optic strut thickness, angle and location, variations like pneumatisation, carotico-clinoid foramen and inter-clinoid osseous ridge. Results Mean optic strut thickness was 3.64mm (±0.64), optic strut angle was 42.67 (±6.16) degrees. Mean width and length of anterior clinoid process were 10.65mm (±0.79) and 11.20mm (±0.95) respectively. Optic strut attachment to sphenoid body was predominantly sulcal as in 52 cases (54.74%) and was most frequently attached to anterior 2/5th of anterior clinoid process, seen in 93 sides (48.95%). Pneumatisation of optic strut occurred in 23 sides. Carotico-clinoid foramen was observed in 42 cases (22.11%), complete foramen in 10 cases (5.26%), incomplete foramen in 24 cases (12.63%) and contact type in 8 cases (4.21%). Inter-clinoid osseous bridge was seen unilaterally in 4 cases. Conclusion The study assesses morphometric features and anatomical variations of paraclinoid region using MDCT 3D and multiplanar reconstructions in Indian population. PMID:26557589

  14. Right upper quadrant abdominal pain as the initial presentation of polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Gago, Ricardo; Shum, Lee Ming; Vilá, Luis M

    2017-02-22

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotising vasculitis that involves medium and small vessels. PAN generally presents with constitutional, cutaneous, neurological, renal and gastrointestinal manifestations. However, PAN initially involving a single organ/system is uncommon. Here, we present a 42-year-old man who was hospitalised because of severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain that started 2 months before. Physical examination was remarkable for right upper quadrant abdominal tenderness. Abdominopelvic CT showed lymphadenopathy but no hepatic, gallbladder, pancreatic, intestinal or renal abnormalities. Abdominal angiography showed multiple small aneurysms located in the jejunal and hepatic arteries characteristic of PAN. He had a prompt and remarkable response to high-dose corticosteroids and oral cyclophosphamide. Our case, together with other reports, suggests that PAN should be considered in patients presenting with right upper abdominal pain. Timely diagnosis and treatment reduce the overall morbidity and mortality of the disease.

  15. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  16. The relationship of abdominal fat mass assessed by helical or conventional computed tomography to serum leptin concentration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junji; Sasaki, Takeyoshi; Watanabe, Mitsuyo

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we focused on the relationship of intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) or subcutaneous fat (SF) mass to serum leptin levels, and also on the relationship of leptin to serum lipid and lipoprotein concentration. Subjects with obesity (26 men, 26 women) were recruited for this study. We obtained helical CT scans with a tube current of 150 mA, voltage of 120 kV and 2:1 pitch (table speed in relation to slice thickness), starting at the upper edge of the liver and continuing to the pelvis. The intra-abdominal visceral fat (VF) volume was measured by drawing a line within the muscle wall surrounding the abdominal cavity. The abdominal SF volume was calculated by subtracting the VF volume from the total abdominal fat volume. By comparison, the abdominal VF and SF areas were determined at the umbilical level by the established slice-by-slice CT scanning technique. We found: 1) abdominal SF mass, either as volume or area, was a more important determinant of serum leptin than was VF mass; 2) among TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C, only TG had a positive correlation to serum leptin levels in men, whereas in women no lipid parameters had any relationship with leptin; and 3) VF mass had a positive correlation to serum TC and TG in men, whereas SF did not. The present study provides considerable evidence on the relationship between abdominal fat mass and serum leptin, and shows that the relationships between serum leptin and serum lipids and lipoproteins are not straightforward. We also suggest that fat area measured by conventional CT is a better indicator than its corresponding volume assessed by helical CT, based on the present results showing its closer association to serum lipids.

  17. [A case of fulminant amoebic colitis with an abscess in the abdominal cavity rescued by conservative management].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Akira; Nomura, Kousuke; Odagiri, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Akihiro; Domon, Kaoru; Yamashita, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tsukasa; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Masanori; Mitani, Toshifumi; Ogawa, Osamu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Hoteya, Shu; Kaise, Mitsuru; Matoba, Shuichirou; Fujii, Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    A 75-year-old man was admitted because of watery diarrhea, hematochezia and right lower abdominal pain. Many deep undermining colonic ulcers were found by colonoscopy, and we detected trophozoite amoeba pathologically. Metronidazole was administered orally from 3 days after admission. However, since CT demonstrated a huge abscess in the abdominal cavity, we performed percutaneous drainage from 17 days after admission. On day 157, the patient was discharged, because the colonic ulcers had almost healed, and trophozoite amoebas were not recognized pathologically.

  18. Rectus sheath haematoma: a rare masquerader for abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Changal, Khalid Hamid; Saleem, Saad; Ghous, Ghulam

    2017-04-13

    Rectus sheath haematoma is a rare cause of abdominal pain. It can be easily confused for other causes of acute abdomen and may even lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Our patient has the rectus sheath haematoma because of violent coughing and on presentation had no obvious clinical sign pointing to the same. Diagnosis was made by a CT scan of the abdomen, and patient was treated conservatively. Rectus sheath haematomas are usually present on the posterior aspect of the rectus muscles and thus may not be clinically appreciable.

  19. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kunihide; Matsuyama, Masakazu; Endou, Jouji; Nishimura, Masanori; Ishii, Hirohito; Yokota, Atsuko; Ikenoue, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA.

  20. Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Report of Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA. PMID:24386030

  1. Primary diagnosis of abdominal arteriovenous fistula by MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Amparo, E G; Higgins, C B; Hricak, H

    1984-12-01

    Two cases of abdominal arteriovenous (AV) fistula were imaged by magnetic resonance (MR). Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormally increased flow with resultant dilatation of the veins draining the site of the fistula. Findings were correlated with CT, digital subtraction angiography, and arteriography. This report suggests the usefulness of MR imaging as the initial imaging technique of choice in clinically suspected cases of AV fistula. The diagnosis can be made within 30 to 45 min of imaging time and does not require administration of contrast material.

  2. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  3. [Abdominal pregnancy care. Case report].

    PubMed

    Morales Hernández, Sara; Díaz Velázquez, Mary Flor; Puello Tamara, Edgardo; Morales Hernández, Jorge; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, Maria Antonia; Cruz Cruz, Polita del Rocío; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2008-10-01

    Abdominal pregnancies are the implantation of gestation in some of the abdominal structures. This kind of pregnancies represents sevenfold maternal death risk than tubarian ectopic pregnancies, and 90-fold death risk than normal ones. Previous cases have erroneously reported as abscess in Douglas punch, and frequently result in obitus or postnatal deaths. We report a case of a patient with 27 years old, and diagnosis of 25.2 weeks of pregnancy, prior placenta and anhidramnios, referred due to difficult in uterine contour delimitation, easy palpation of fetal parts, cephalic pole in left hypochondrious and presence of mass in hypogastria, no delimitations, pain with mobilization, no transvaginal bleed and fetal movements. Interruption of pregnancy is decided by virtue of severe oligohidramnios, retardation in fetal intrabdominal growth, and recurrent maternal abdominal pain. Surgical intervention was carried out for resolution of the obstetrical event, in which was found ectopic abdominal pregnancy with bed placental in right uterine horn that corresponded to a pregnancy of 30 weeks of gestation. Abdominal pregnancy is still a challenge for obstetrics due to its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis is oriented to prevent an intrabdominal hemorrhage that is the main maternal cause of mortality.

  4. Multidetector computed tomography of pediatric large airway diseases: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward Y; Greenberg, S Bruce; Boiselle, Phillip M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology have given rise to improvements in the noninvasive and comprehensive assessment of the large airways in pediatric patients. Superb two-dimensional and three-dimensional reconstruction MDCT images have revolutionized the display of large airways and enhanced the ability to diagnose large airway diseases in children. The 320-MDCT scanner, which provides combined detailed anatomic and dynamic functional information assessment of the large airways, is promising for the assessment of dynamic large airway disease such as tracheobronchomalacia. This article discusses imaging techniques and clinical applications of MDCT for assessing large airway diseases in pediatric patients.

  5. ISEE-C HKH high energy cosmic rays. [multidetector particle telescope experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, D. E.; Bieser, F. S.; Heckman, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the ISEE-C multidetector cosmic ray telescope experiment. The HKH particle identifier sensor array is designed to identify the charge and mass of incident cosmic ray nuclei from H-1 to Ni-64 over the energy range of approximately 20 to 500 MeV/nucleon. Particle identification is based on the multiple energy loss technique. The scientific aspects of the experiment are briefly reviewed and consideration is given to the flight hardware, including sensors, event encoding, buffer memory, redundancy and commandability, and packaging.

  6. Absence of a sphenoid wing in neurofibromatosis type 1 disease: imaging with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Onbas, Omer; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Kantarci, Mecit; Atasoy, Mustafa; Alper, Fatih

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 disease is characterized by pigmented cutaneous lesions and generalized tumors of a neural crest origin and it may affect all the systems of the human body. Sphenoid dysplasia is one of the characteristics of this syndrome and it occurs in 5-10% of the cases; further, abnormalities of the sphenoid wings are often considered pathognomonic. However, complete agenesis of a sphenoid wing is very rare. We report here on an unusual case of neurofibromatosis type 1 disease with the associated absence of a sphenoid wing that was diagnosed by using multidetector computed tomography.

  7. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture.

  8. Identification of Cardiac and Aortic Injuries in Trauma with Multi-detector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Shergill, Arvind K; Maraj, Tishan; Barszczyk, Mark S; Cheung, Helen; Singh, Navneet; Zavodni, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    Blunt and penetrating cardiovascular (CV) injuries are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid detection of these injuries in trauma is critical for patient survival. The advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has led to increased detection of CV injuries during rapid comprehensive scanning of stabilized major trauma patients. MDCT has the ability to acquire images with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, as well as the capability to create multiplanar reformats. This pictorial review illustrates several common and life-threatening traumatic CV injuries from a regional trauma center.

  9. Identification of Cardiac and Aortic Injuries in Trauma with Multi-detector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shergill, Arvind K; Maraj, Tishan; Barszczyk, Mark S; Cheung, Helen; Singh, Navneet; Zavodni, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    Blunt and penetrating cardiovascular (CV) injuries are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid detection of these injuries in trauma is critical for patient survival. The advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has led to increased detection of CV injuries during rapid comprehensive scanning of stabilized major trauma patients. MDCT has the ability to acquire images with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, as well as the capability to create multiplanar reformats. This pictorial review illustrates several common and life-threatening traumatic CV injuries from a regional trauma center. PMID:26430541

  10. Tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography: association with N categories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Xiao-li; Li, Jun-ru; Li, Zhen-lin; Chen, Tian-wu; Pu, Hong; Yin, Long-lin; Xu, Guo-hui; Li, Zhen-wen; Reng, Jing; Zhou, Peng; Cheng, Zhu-zhong; Cao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict the presence of regional lymph node metastasis and could determine N categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive patients with gastric adenocarcinoma who had undergone gastrectomy 1 week after contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography were retrospectively identified. The gross tumor volume was evaluated on multidetector computed tomography images. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine whether the gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis, and the Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare the gross tumor volume among N categories. Additionally, a receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to identify the accuracy of the gross tumor volume in differentiating N categories. RESULTS: The gross tumor volume could predict regional lymph node metastasis (p<0.0001) in the univariate analysis, and the multivariate analyses indicated that the gross tumor volume was an independent risk factor for regional lymph node metastasis (p=0.005, odds ratio=1.364). The Mann-Whitney U test showed that the gross tumor volume could distinguish N0 from the N1-N3 categories, N0-N1 from N2-N3, and N0-N2 from N3 (all p<0.0001). In the T1-T4a categories, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 12.3 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 16.6 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24.6 cm3). In the T4a category, the gross tumor volume could differentiate N0 from the N1-N3 categories (cutoff, 15.8 cm3), N0-N1 from N2-N3 (cutoff, 17.8 cm3), and N0-N2 from N3 (cutoff, 24 cm3). CONCLUSION: The gross tumor volume of resectable gastric adenocarcinoma on multidetector computed tomography could predict regional lymph node metastasis and N categories. PMID:27166769

  11. Atypical abdominal pain: post-traumatic transverse colon stricture.

    PubMed

    Rotar, Raluca; Uwechue, Raphael; Sasapu, Kishore Kumar

    2013-08-23

    A driver presented to the emergency department 1 day after an accident driving his excavator with abdominal pain and vomiting. He was admitted to the surgical ward 2 days later, after reattending. A CT scan revealed wall thickening and oedema in the transverse colon. This was supported by a subsequent CT virtual colonoscopy which raised the suspicion of neoplasia. A follow-up colonoscopy was not carried further than the transverse colon due to an indurated, tight stricture. Biopsies from that area showed ulceration and inflammatory changes non-specific for ischaemia, drug-induced changes or inflammatory bowel disease. As a consequence of the subocclusive symptoms and the possibility of a neoplastic diagnosis, a laparoscopic-assisted transverse colectomy was performed. The histology of the resected segment revealed post-traumatic inflammation and fibrosis with no evidence of neoplasia.

  12. Diagnostic imaging of abdominal fluid collections and abscesses.

    PubMed

    Baker, M E; Blinder, R A; Rice, R P

    1986-01-01

    With today's advanced technology, the clinician and radiologist have a number of techniques with which to evaluate the abdomen for fluid collections and/or abscesses. Three points are clear from the plethora of literature concerning this subject: the need to individualize the clinical and imaging approach to each patient suspected of an abnormal fluid collection or abscess, the need to individualize the imaging procedure based upon what is done best at the institution, and the need for percutaneous aspiration of all fluid collections for diagnosis. No single imaging test is totally sensitive or specific for the detection of an infected fluid collection. Overall, CT probably does provide the most accurate means to detect an intra-abdominal abscess. Because of this, and because it is less operator dependent than ultrasound, CT is used most often as the procedure of choice at our institution.

  13. Contribution of diffusion weighted MRI to diagnosis and staging in gastric tumors and comparison with multi-detector computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fatih Özbay, Mehmet; Çallı, İskan; Doğan, Erkan; Çelik, Sebahattin; Batur, Abdussamet; Bora, Aydın; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Özgökçe, Mesut; Çetin Kotan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Diagnostic performance of Diffusion-Weighted magnetic resonance Imaging (DWI) and Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) for TNM (Tumor, Lymph node, Metastasis) staging of gastric cancer was compared. Patients and methods We used axial T2-weighted images and DWI (b-0,400 and b-800 s/mm2) protocol on 51 pre-operative patients who had been diagnosed with gastric cancer. We also conducted MDCT examinations on them. We looked for a signal increase in the series of DWI images. The depth of tumor invasion in the stomach wall (tumor (T) staging), the involvement of lymph nodes (nodal (N) staging), and the presence or absence of metastases (metastatic staging) in DWI and CT images according to the TNM staging system were evaluated. In each diagnosis of the tumors, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative accuracy rates of DWI and MDCT examinations were found through a comparison with the results of the surgical pathology, which is the gold standard method. In addition to the compatibilities of each examination with surgical pathology, kappa statistics were used. Results Sensitivity and specificity of DWI and MDCT in lymph node staging were as follows: N1: DWI: 75.0%, 84.6%; MDCT: 66.7%, 82%;N2: DWI: 79.3%, 77.3%; MDCT: 69.0%, 68.2%; N3: DWI: 60.0%, 97.6%; MDCT: 50.0%, 90.2%. The diagnostic tool DWI seemed more compatible with the gold standard method (surgical pathology), especially in the staging of lymph node, when compared to MDCT. On the other hand, in T staging, the results of DWI and MDCT were better than the gold standard when the T stage increased. However, DWI did not demonstrate superiority to MDCT. The sensitivity and specificity of both imaging techniques for detecting distant metastasis were 100%. Conclusions The diagnostic accuracy of DWI for TNM staging in gastric cancer before surgery is at a comparable level with MDCT and adding DWI to routine protocol of evaluating lymph nodes metastasis might increase diagnostic accuracy

  14. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  15. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  16. Advances in post-mortem CT-angiography

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, J; Dominguez, A; Vanhaebost, J; Mangin, P

    2014-01-01

    Performing a post-mortem multidetector CT (MDCT) scan has already become routine in some institutes of forensic medicine. To better visualize the vascular system, different techniques of post-mortem CT-angiography have been explored, which can essentially be divided into partial- and whole-body angiography techniques. Probably the most frequently applied technique today is the so-called multiphase post-mortem CT-angiography (MPMCTA) a standardized method for investigating the vessels of the head, thorax and abdomen. Different studies exist, describing its use for medicolegal investigations, and its advantages as well as its artefacts and pitfalls. With the aim to investigate the performance of PMCTA and to develop and validate techniques, an international working group was created in 2012 called the “Technical Working Group Post-mortem Angiography Methods” (TWGPAM). Beyond its primary perspective, the goals of this group include creating recommendations for the indication of the investigation and for the interpretation of the images and to distribute knowledge about PMCTA. This article provides an overview about the different approaches that have been developed and tested in recent years and an update about ongoing research in this field. It will explain the technique of MPMCTA in detail and give an outline of its indications, application, advantages and limitations. PMID:24234582

  17. Abdominal Bloating: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, A Young; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  18. Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Lemieux, Isabelle

    2006-12-14

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with abdominal obesity, blood lipid disorders, inflammation, insulin resistance or full-blown diabetes, and increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Proposed criteria for identifying patients with metabolic syndrome have contributed greatly to preventive medicine, but the value of metabolic syndrome as a scientific concept remains controversial. The presence of metabolic syndrome alone cannot predict global cardiovascular disease risk. But abdominal obesity - the most prevalent manifestation of metabolic syndrome - is a marker of 'dysfunctional adipose tissue', and is of central importance in clinical diagnosis. Better risk assessment algorithms are needed to quantify diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk on a global scale.

  19. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  20. [PET/CT for diagnostics and therapy stratification of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, C; Haberkorn, U; Giesel, F L

    2010-08-01

    With the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently the hybrid systems PET/CT, the management of cancer patients in the treatment strategy has changed tremendously. The combination of PET with multidetector CT scanning enables the integration of metabolic and high resolution morphological image information. PET/CT is nowadays an established modality for tumor detection, characterization, staging and response monitoring. The increased installation of PET/CT systems worldwide and also the increased scientific publications underline the importance of this imaging modality. PET/CT is particular the imaging modality of choice in lung cancer staging and re-staging (T, N and M staging). The possible increased success of surgery in lung cancer patients and also the expected reduction in additional invasive diagnostics lead to benefits for both the individual patient and the healthcare system. In this review article PET and PET/CT is presented for diagnostic and therapeutic stratification in lung cancer. The fundamentals of glucose metabolism, staging, tumor recurrence and therapeutic monitoring are presented.

  1. Experimental benchmarking of a Monte Carlo dose simulation code for pediatric CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Yoshizumi, Terry; Colsher, James G.; Jones, Robert P.; Frush, Donald P.

    2007-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a desire to reduce CT radiation dose to children because of their susceptibility and prolonged risk for cancer induction. Concerns arise, however, as to the impact of dose reduction on image quality and thus potentially on diagnostic accuracy. To study the dose and image quality relationship, we are developing a simulation code to calculate organ dose in pediatric CT patients. To benchmark this code, a cylindrical phantom was built to represent a pediatric torso, which allows measurements of dose distributions from its center to its periphery. Dose distributions for axial CT scans were measured on a 64-slice multidetector CT (MDCT) scanner (GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK). The same measurements were simulated using a Monte Carlo code (PENELOPE, Universitat de Barcelona) with the applicable CT geometry including bowtie filter. The deviations between simulated and measured dose values were generally within 5%. To our knowledge, this work is one of the first attempts to compare measured radial dose distributions on a cylindrical phantom with Monte Carlo simulated results. It provides a simple and effective method for benchmarking organ dose simulation codes and demonstrates the potential of Monte Carlo simulation for investigating the relationship between dose and image quality for pediatric CT patients.

  2. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Metric of the multidetector F-statistic

    SciTech Connect

    Prix, Reinhard

    2007-01-15

    We develop a general formalism for the parameter-space metric of the multidetector F-statistic, which is a matched-filtering detection statistic for continuous gravitational waves. We find that there exists a whole family of F-statistic metrics, parametrized by the (unknown) amplitude parameters of the gravitational wave. The multidetector metric is shown to be expressible in terms of noise-weighted averages of single-detector contributions, which implies that the number of templates required to cover the parameter space does not scale with the number of detectors. Contrary to using a longer observation time, combining detectors of similar sensitivity is therefore the computationally cheapest way to improve the sensitivity of coherent wide-parameter searches for continuous gravitational waves. We explicitly compute the F-statistic metric family for signals from isolated spinning neutron stars, and we numerically evaluate the quality of different metric approximations in a Monte Carlo study. The metric predictions are tested against the measured mismatches and we identify regimes in which the local metric is no longer a good description of the parameter-space structure.

  3. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations*

    PubMed Central

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations. PMID:27403020

  4. Multidetector computed tomography angiography of the renal arteries: normal anatomy and its variations.

    PubMed

    de Mello Júnior, Carlos Fernando; Araujo Neto, Severino Aires; de Carvalho Junior, Arlindo Monteiro; Rebouças, Rafael Batista; Negromonte, Gustavo Ramalho Pessoa; de Oliveira, Carollyne Dantas

    2016-01-01

    Conventional angiography is still considered the gold standard for the study of the anatomy and of vascular diseases of the abdomen. However, the advent of multidetector computed tomography and techniques of digital image reconstruction has provided an alternative means of performing angiography, without the risks inherent to invasive angiographic examinations. Therefore, within the field of radiology, there is an ever-increasing demand for deeper knowledge of the anatomy of the regional vasculature and its variations. Variations in the renal vascular system are relatively prevalent in the venous and arterial vessels. For various conditions in which surgical planning is crucial to the success of the procedure, knowledge of this topic is important. The aim of this study was to familiarize the general radiologist with variations in the renal vascular system. To that end, we prepared a pictorial essay comprising multidetector computed tomography images obtained in a series of cases. We show patterns representative of the most common anatomical variations in the arterial blood supply to the kidneys, calling attention to the nomenclature, as well as to the clinical and surgical implications of such variations.

  5. [Right atrial thrombosis with acute abdominal onset].

    PubMed

    Petcu, D P; Petcu, C; Roşu, M

    2009-01-01

    Intracardiac masses are detected more frequently due to the availability of echocardiography. Right atrial thrombosis is rare comparatively with that of the left atrium. The clinical presentation of the patient with right atrial thrombosis is linked with a misleading association between cardiovascular signs and digestive signs (acute abdominal pain, vomiting and marmorated skin of flanks). Initial clinical suspicions of acute pancreatitis, entero-mesenteric infarction and complicated gastro-duodenal ulcer were invalidated by imagistic investigations -- echocardiography and CT. The massive thrombus located in the right atrium, prolapsing during diastole through the tricuspid valve, was associated with the increase in plasmatic D-dimers and new ECG modifications type right bundle block (hemodynamic straining of the right ventricle). The evolution was favorable, after heparin-therapy by infusing pump, with relief of cardiovascular and digestive symptoms after the first 6 hours; after 36 h from the beginning of the treatment the thrombus was lysed. Sudden death likelihood through complete obstruction of the tricuspid ostium was prevented due to the early diagnosis offered by imagistic methods.

  6. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT, include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems.

  7. Projection space denoising with bilateral filtering and CT noise modeling for dose reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manduca, Armando; Yu Lifeng; Trzasko, Joshua D.; Khaylova, Natalia; Kofler, James M.; McCollough, Cynthia M.; Fletcher, Joel G.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel locally adaptive projection space denoising algorithm for low-dose CT data. Methods: The denoising algorithm is based on bilateral filtering, which smooths values using a weighted average in a local neighborhood, with weights determined according to both spatial proximity and intensity similarity between the center pixel and the neighboring pixels. This filtering is locally adaptive and can preserve important edge information in the sinogram, thus maintaining high spatial resolution. A CT noise model that takes into account the bowtie filter and patient-specific automatic exposure control effects is also incorporated into the denoising process. The authors evaluated the noise-resolution properties of bilateral filtering incorporating such a CT noise model in phantom studies and preliminary patient studies with contrast-enhanced abdominal CT exams. Results: On a thin wire phantom, the noise-resolution properties were significantly improved with the denoising algorithm compared to commercial reconstruction kernels. The noise-resolution properties on low-dose (40 mA s) data after denoising approximated those of conventional reconstructions at twice the dose level. A separate contrast plate phantom showed improved depiction of low-contrast plates with the denoising algorithm over conventional reconstructions when noise levels were matched. Similar improvement in noise-resolution properties was found on CT colonography data and on five abdominal low-energy (80 kV) CT exams. In each abdominal case, a board-certified subspecialized radiologist rated the denoised 80 kV images markedly superior in image quality compared to the commercially available reconstructions, and denoising improved the image quality to the point where the 80 kV images alone were considered to be of diagnostic quality. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that bilateral filtering incorporating a CT noise model can achieve a significantly better noise-resolution trade

  8. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the child’s mood and emotions, and in turn cause depression and anxiety. Screening/Diagnosis Detailed information regarding the location of abdominal pain, the frequency (number of times per week) and ... about the cause, and will guide further testing. Other important pieces ...

  9. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  10. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  11. [Performance evaluation for CT-AEC(CT automatic exposure control)systems].

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Ikeda, Shu; Osawa, Kazuaki; Sekine, Ryo; Niwa, Nobuyuki; Terada, Masami; Keat, Nicholas; Miyazaki, Shigeru

    2007-05-20

    Although many current CT scanners incorporate CT-AEC, performance evaluation is not standardized. This study evaluates the performance of the latest CT-AEC of each manufacturer with the aim of establishing a standard CT-AEC performance evaluation method. The design of the phantoms was based upon the operation characteristics of different CT-AECs. A cone, an ellipse, a variable-shaped ellipse, stepped phantoms, and their analysis software were devised and carried out the field test. The targets were LightSpeed VCT 64 with 2D and 3D Auto mA(GE), Aquilion 64M with Real-EC and Volume-EC(Toshiba), Sensation 64 with CARE Dose and CARE Dose 4D(Siemens), and Bulliance 16P with Dose Right(Philips). Data was acquired while varying the typical abdominal CT(with CT-AEC)scanning conditions (120 kV, 5 mm slice, standard function for abdomen, scanning range 200 mm). The acquired images were converted to the DICOM format and image noise(SD) was calculated using dedicated software. All 4 CT-AECs reduced exposure dose. For GE and Toshiba, image noise was constant and met the target. For Siemens, noise was independent of phantom shape but varied uniformly with phantom size. For Philips, noise varied with phantom size and shape, and variation degree depended on phantom thickness in scanogram direction. The results reflect the basic concept and performance characteristics of the methods. Standardization of CT-AEC performance evaluation is possible using these phantoms.

  12. Listeriosis Infection of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Papadoulas, Spyros I; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kraniotis, Pantelis A; Manousi, Maria E; Marangos, Markos N; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) infected by Listeria monocytogenes in a 72-year-old male diabetic farmer, is reported. Our patient had a history of a recent pneumonia that could have been caused by Listeria too. Aneurysm infection was manifested by fever and abdominal and back pain, which prompted investigation with CT scanning that revealed a 4.9 cm AAA with typical signs of infection. He underwent urgent AAA repair with aortobifemoral bypass grafting and had an uneventful course. Aneurysm content microbiology revealed Listeria monocytogenes and following a 9-week course of antibiotics our patient remains asymptomatic 11 months later. PMID:23599616

  13. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  14. An unusual cause of acute abdominal pain in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Tariq; Latif, Hina; Shabbir, Bilquis

    2014-07-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile viral disease caused by the bite of Aedes aegypti mosquito. It is a major health problem especially in tropical and subtropical areas including South East Asia and Pakistan. In the past few years, dengue fever has been endemic in Northern Punjab. Physicians managing dengue fever come across varied and uncommon complications of dengue fever. We report a case of dengue fever that developed severe right upper quadrant abdominal pain and induration after extreme retching and vomiting for 2 days. A rectus sheath hematoma was confirmed on noncontrast computed tomography (CT). Rectus sheath hematoma as a complication of dengue fever has rarely been reported before and never from this part of the world. Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon and often clinically misdiagnosed cause of abdominal pain. It is the result of bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the superior or inferior epigastric artery or their branches or from a direct tear of the rectus muscle. It can mimic almost any abdominal condition (See Fig.) (See Table).

  15. Pathologic aerophagia: a rare cause of chronic abdominal distension

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Cestari, Ana Beatriz C.S.S.; da Silva, Orli Carvalho; Fernandes, Marcia Antunes; Firme, Livia Honorato

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe an adolescent with pathologic aerophagia, a rare condition caused by excessive and inappropriate swallowing of air and to review its treatment and differential diagnoses. Case description: An 11-year-old mentally impaired blind girl presenting serious behavior problems and severe developmental delay with abdominal distension from the last 8 months. Her past history included a Nissen fundoplication. Abdominal CT and abdominal radiographs showed diffuse gas distension of the small bowel and colon. Hirschsprung's disease was excluded. The distention was minimal at the moment the child awoke and maximal at evening, and persisted after control of constipation. Audible repetitive and frequent movements of air swallowing were observed. The diagnosis of pathologic aerophagia associated to obsessive-compulsive disorder and developmental delay was made, but pharmacological treatment was unsuccessful. The patient was submitted to an endoscopic gastrostomy, permanently opened and elevated relative to the stomach. The distention was resolved, while maintaining oral nutrition. Comments: Pathologic aerophagia is a rare self-limiting condition in normal children exposed to high levels of stress and may be a persisting problem in children with psychiatric or neurologic disease. In this last group, the disease may cause serious complications. Pharmacological and behavioral treatments are ill-defined. Severe cases may demand surgical strategies, mainly decompressive gastrostomy. PMID:26100594

  16. Complications in CT-guided Procedures: Do We Really Need Postinterventional CT Control Scans?

    SciTech Connect

    Nattenmüller, Johanna Filsinger, Matthias Bryant, Mark Stiller, Wolfram Radeleff, Boris Grenacher, Lars Kauczor, Hans-Ullrich Hosch, Waldemar

    2013-06-19

    PurposeThe aim of this study is twofold: to determine the complication rate in computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsies and drainages, and to evaluate the value of postinterventional CT control scans.MethodsRetrospective analysis of 1,067 CT-guided diagnostic biopsies (n = 476) and therapeutic drainages (n = 591) in thoracic (n = 37), abdominal (n = 866), and musculoskeletal (ms) (n = 164) locations. Severity of any complication was categorized as minor or major. To assess the need for postinterventional CT control scans, it was determined whether complications were detected clinically, on peri-procedural scans or on postinterventional scans only.ResultsThe complication rate was 2.5 % in all procedures (n = 27), 4.4 % in diagnostic punctures, and 1.0 % in drainages; 13.5 % in thoracic, 2.0 % in abdominal, and 3.0 % in musculoskeletal procedures. There was only 1 major complication (0.1 %). Pneumothorax (n = 14) was most frequent, followed by bleeding (n = 9), paresthesia (n = 2), material damage (n = 1), and bone fissure (n = 1). Postinterventional control acquisitions were performed in 65.7 % (701 of 1,067). Six complications were solely detectable in postinterventional control acquisitions (3 retroperitoneal bleeds, 3 pneumothoraces); all other complications were clinically detectable (n = 4) and/or visible in peri-interventional controls (n = 21).ConclusionComplications in CT-guided interventions are rare. Of these, thoracic interventions had the highest rate, while pneumothoraces and bleeding were most frequent. Most complications can be detected clinically or peri-interventionally. To reduce the radiation dose, postinterventional CT controls should not be performed routinely and should be restricted to complicated or retroperitoneal interventions only.

  17. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  18. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  19. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-M, E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Dies, P.

    2010-12-07

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at ''Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez'' in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}), the volumetric dose index (C{sub vol}) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the C{sub w}(31.1 mGy) and C{sub vol}(11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for C{sub w} and 5.5 mGy for C{sub vol}. However, this protocol presented the highest value for P{sub KL,CT}(282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  20. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-M, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at "Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez" in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (Cw), the volumetric dose index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the Cw (31.1 mGy) and Cvol (11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for Cw and 5.5 mGy for Cvol. However, this protocol presented the highest value for PKL,CT (282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  1. Gallbladder opacification on gadoxetate disodium-enhanced CT scan.

    PubMed

    Karam, Adib R; Scortegagna, Eduardo; Chen, Byron Y; Dupuis, Carolyn S; Coughlin, Dennis D

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the radiologist's ability to identify excreted gadoxetate disodium within the gallbladder on CT scan. Thirty three healthy adults underwent imaging of the liver during work-up for potential liver donation. Three patients had undergone prior cholecystectomy and therefore were excluded. Imaging consisted of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) and multiphase contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Two fellowship-trained abdominal imaging radiologists, who were blinded to the MRC images and the contrast agent used during MRC, independently reviewed the CT scans of the 30 patients that were included. The scans were evaluated for the presence or absence of abnormal hyperdensity within the gallbladder. Three patients did not receive intravenous gadoxetate disodium, 4 patients had their MRC after the CT scan, and 1 patient had the CT scans 5 days following the MRC. Twenty two patients had the CT scan within 24 h following the gadoxetate disodium-enhanced MRC. Of the 22 patients expected to have gadolinium in the gallbladder, both reviewers identified hyperdensity in the same 20 patients (90%). Both reviewers reported no abnormal hyperdensity within the gallbladder in the remaining 10 patients. CT scan can reveal excreted gadoxetate disodium within the gallbladder lumen and therefore gadoxetate disodium-enhanced CT scan can potentially play a role in the evaluation of cystic duct patency and work-up of acute cholecystitis.

  2. NETL CT Imaging Facility

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's CT Scanner laboratory is equipped with three CT scanners and a mobile core logging unit that work together to provide characteristic geologic and geophysical information at different scales, non-destructively.

  3. Body CT (CAT Scan)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  4. Virtual monochromatic spectral imaging with fast kilovoltage switching: reduction of metal artifacts at CT.

    PubMed

    Pessis, Eric; Campagna, Raphaël; Sverzut, Jean-Michel; Bach, Fabienne; Rodallec, Mathieu; Guerini, Henri; Feydy, Antoine; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    With arthroplasty being increasingly used to relieve joint pain, imaging of patients with metal implants can represent a significant part of the clinical work load in the radiologist's daily practice. Computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of patients who are suspected of having metal prosthesis-related problems such as aseptic loosening, bone resorption or osteolysis, infection, dislocation, metal hardware failure, or periprosthetic bone fracture. Despite advances in detector technology and computer software, artifacts from metal implants can seriously degrade the quality of CT images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. Several factors may help reduce the number and severity of artifacts at multidetector CT, including decreasing the detector collimation and pitch, increasing the kilovolt peak and tube charge, and using appropriate reconstruction algorithms and section thickness. More recently, dual-energy CT has been proposed as a means of reducing beam-hardening artifacts. The use of dual-energy CT scanners allows the synthesis of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images. Monochromatic images depict how the imaged object would look if the x-ray source produced x-ray photons at only a single energy level. For this reason, VMS imaging is expected to provide improved image quality by reducing beam-hardening artifacts.

  5. Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography in hemodynamically stable emergency patients.

    PubMed

    Fornell Pérez, R

    2017-02-10

    This critically appraised topic (CAT) study aims to evaluate the quality and extent of the scientific evidence that supports the use of focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) versus multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in hemodynamically stable trauma patients in the emergency room. An efficient search of the literature yielded several recent articles with a high level of evidence. The CAT study concludes that FAST is an acceptable initial imaging test in hemodynamically stable patients, although its performance is limited in certain circumstances. The decision whether to use MDCT should be determined by evaluating the patient's degree of instability and the distance to the MDCT scanner. Nevertheless, few articles address the question of the distance to MDCT scanners in emergency departments.

  6. Computed tomography angiography: state-of-the-art imaging using multidetector-row technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Fleischmann, Dominik; Chan, Frandics P; Catalano, Carlo; Hellinger, Jeffrey C; Passariello, Roberto; Rubin, Geoffrey D

    2004-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is an essential diagnostic modality for many clinical algorithms. This is particularly true with regard to the evaluation of cardiovascular disease. As a result of increased image acquisition speed, improved spatial resolution, and greater scan volume, MDCT angiography (computed tomography angiography [CTA]) has become an excellent noninvasive imaging technique, replacing intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography for most vascular territories. The clinical success of CTA depends on precise synchronization of image acquisition with optimal vascular enhancement. As technology continuously evolves, however, this task can be challenging. It remains important to have a fundamental knowledge of the principles behind technical parameters and contrast medium administration. This article reviews these essential principles, followed by an overview of current clinical applications.

  7. Collimated prompt gamma TOF measurements with multi-slit multi-detector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Chevallier, M.; Constanzo, J.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Henriquet, P.; La Tessa, C.; Létang, J. M.; Pleskač, R.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Richard, M. H.; Rinaldi, I.; Roellinghoff, F.; Schuy, C.; Testa, E.; Testa, M.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal prompt-gamma ray profiles have been measured with a multi-slit multi-detector configuration at a 75 MeV/u 13C beam and with a PMMA target. Selections in time-of-flight and energy have been applied in order to discriminate prompt-gamma rays produced in the target from background events. The ion ranges which have been extracted from each individual detector module agree amongst each other and are consistent with theoretical expectations. In a separate dedicated experiment with 200 MeV/u 12C ions the fraction of inter-detector scattering has been determined to be on the 10%-level via a combination of experimental results and simulations. At the same experiment different collimator configurations have been tested and the shielding properties of tungsten and lead for prompt-gamma rays have been measured.

  8. [Evaluation of cardiac tumors by multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Mercado-Guzman, Marcela P; Meléndez-Ramírez, Gabriela; Castillo-Castellon, Francisco; Kimura-Hayama, Eric

    Cardiac tumors, are a rare pathology (0.002-0.3%) in all age groups, however, they have a clinic importance, due the affected organ. They are classified in primary (benign or malignant) and secondary (metastasis) types. Among primary type, mixoma, is the most common benign tumor, and sarcoma represents most of the malignant injuries. Cardiac metastasis are more frequent than primary tumors. Clinic effects of cardiac tumors are unspecific and vary according their location, size and agresivity. The use of Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) assist on the location, sizing, anatomical relationships and the compromise of adyacents structures, besides, MRI is useful for tissue characterization of the tumor. Due to the previous reasons, studies based on noninvasive cardiovascular imaging, have an important role on the characterization of these lesions and the differential diagnosis among them.

  9. An Unusual Left Ventricular Outflow Pseudoaneurysm: Usefulness of Echocardiography and Multidetector Computed Tomography for Surgical Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Da Col, Uberto; Ramoni, Enrico Di Bella, Isidoro; Ragni, Temistocle

    2009-01-15

    Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) pseudoaneurysm is a rare but potentially lethal complication, mainly after aortic root endocarditis or surgery. Usually it originates from a dehiscence in the mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa and it arises posteriorly to the aortic root. Due to these anatomical features, its imaging assessment is challenging and surgical repair requires complex procedures. An unusual case of LVOT pseudoaneurysm is described. It was detected by transthoracic ecocardiography 7 months after aortic root replacement for acute endocarditis. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) confirmed the presence of a pouch located between the aortic root and the right atrium. Computed tomography also detected the origin of the pseudoaneurysm from the muscular interventricular septum of the LVOT, rather below the aortic valve plane. It was repaired with an extracardiac surgical approach, sparing the aortic root bioprosthesis previously implanted. The high-resolution three-dimensional details provided by the preoperative MDCT allowed us to plan a simple and effective surgical strategy.

  10. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  11. Renal Artery Injury Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma – Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zahoor; Nabir, Syed; Ahmed, Mohamed Nadeem; Al Hilli, Shatha; Ravikumar, Vajjala; Momin, Umais Zaid

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Blunt abdominal trauma is routinely encountered in the Emergency Department. It is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality amongst the population below the age of 35 years worldwide. Renal artery injury secondary to blunt abdominal trauma however, is a rare occurrence. Here, we present two such cases, encountered in the emergency department sustaining polytrauma following motor vehicle accidents. Case Report We hereby report two interesting cases of renal artery injury sustained in polytrauma patients. In these two cases we revealed almost the entire spectrum of findings that one would expect in renal arterial injuries. Conclusions Traumatic renal artery occlusion is a rare occurrence with devastating consequences if missed on imaging. Emergency radiologists need to be aware of the CT findings so as to accurately identify renal artery injury. This case report stresses the need for immediate CT assessment of polytrauma patients with suspected renal injury, leading to timely diagnosis and urgent surgical or endovascular intervention. PMID:28058071

  12. Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine: Impact of a Simple Educational Intervention on Appropriate Abdominal Imaging at a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Matthew F.; Agan, Donna L.; Liu, Yang; Johnson, John O.; Shaw, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising costs pose a major threat to US health care. Residency programs are being asked to teach residents how to provide cost-conscious medical care. Methods An educational intervention incorporating the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria with lectures on cost-consciousness and on the actual hospital charges for abdominal imaging was implemented for residents at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, CA. We hypothesized that residents would order fewer abdominal imaging examinations for patients with complaints of abdominal pain after the intervention. We analyzed the type and number of abdominal imaging studies completed for patients admitted to the inpatient teaching service with primary abdominal complaints for 18 months before (738 patients) and 12 months following the intervention (632 patients). Results There was a significant reduction in mean abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans per patient (1.7–1.4 studies per patient, P < .001) and total abdominal radiology studies per patient (3.1–2.7 studies per patient, P  =  .02) following the intervention. The avoidance of charges solely due to the reduction in abdominal CT scans following the intervention was $129 per patient or $81,528 in total. Conclusions A simple educational intervention appeared to change the radiologic test-ordering behavior of internal medicine residents. Widespread adoption of similar interventions by residency programs could result in significant savings for the health care system. PMID:24404274

  13. Estimating cancer risks to adults undergoing body CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; He, Wenjun

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to estimate cancer risks from the amount of radiation used to perform body computed tomography (CT) examination. The ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator was used to compute values of organ doses for adult body CT examinations. The radiation used to perform each examination was quantified by the dose-length product (DLP). Patient organ doses were converted into corresponding age and sex dependent cancer risks using data from BEIR VII. Results are presented for cancer risks per unit DLP and unit effective dose for 11 sensitive organs, as well as estimates of the contribution from 'other organs'. For patients who differ from a standard sized adult, correction factors based on the patient weight and antero-posterior dimension are provided to adjust organ doses and the corresponding risks. At constant incident radiation intensity, for CT examinations that include the chest, risks for females are markedly higher than those for males, whereas for examinations that include the pelvis, risks in males were slightly higher than those in females. In abdominal CT scans, risks for males and female patients are very similar. For abdominal CT scans, increasing the patient age from 20 to 80 resulted in a reduction in patient risks of nearly a factor of 5. The average cancer risk for chest/abdomen/pelvis CT examinations was ∼26 % higher than the cancer risk caused by 'sensitive organs'. Doses and radiation risks in 80 kg adults were ∼10 % lower than those in 70 kg patients. Cancer risks in body CT can be estimated from the examination DLP by accounting for sex, age, as well as patient physical characteristics.

  14. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  15. Accurate estimation of global and regional cardiac function by retrospectively gated multidetector row computed tomography: comparison with cine magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Belge, Bénédicte; Coche, Emmanuel; Pasquet, Agnès; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis J; Gerber, Bernhard L

    2006-07-01

    Retrospective reconstruction of ECG-gated images at different parts of the cardiac cycle allows the assessment of cardiac function by multi-detector row CT (MDCT) at the time of non-invasive coronary imaging. We compared the accuracy of such measurements by MDCT to cine magnetic resonance (MR). Forty patients underwent the assessment of global and regional cardiac function by 16-slice MDCT and cine MR. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes estimated by MDCT (134+/-51 and 67+/-56 ml) were similar to those by MR (137+/-57 and 70+/-60 ml, respectively; both P=NS) and strongly correlated (r=0.92 and r=0.95, respectively; both P<0.001). Consequently, LV ejection fractions by MDCT and MR were also similar (55+/-21 vs. 56+/-21%; P=NS) and highly correlated (r=0.95; P<0.001). Regional end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses by MDCT were highly correlated (r=0.84 and r=0.92, respectively; both P<0.001), but significantly lower than by MR (8.3+/-1.8 vs. 8.8+/-1.9 mm and 12.7+/-3.4 vs. 13.3+/-3.5 mm, respectively; both P<0.001). Values of regional wall thickening by MDCT and MR were similar (54+/-30 vs. 51+/-31%; P=NS) and also correlated well (r=0.91; P<0.001). Retrospectively gated MDCT can accurately estimate LV volumes, EF and regional LV wall thickening compared to cine MR.

  16. [Abdominal CSF pseudocyst recurrence in a 14-year-old patient with ventricular-peritoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Laurent, P; Hennecker, J-L; Schillaci, A; Scordidis, V

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst is a rare complication of ventricular-peritoneal shunt (VPS) but needs to be considered in every patient with abdominal complaints or signs of intracranial hypertension (IH). The pathogenesis of pseudocysts remains unclear. Diverse predisposing factors have been proposed such as previous abdominal surgeries, multiple VPS revisions, infections, history of necrotizing enterocolitis, and nonspecific inflammatory processes. We report the case of a 14-year-old patient, known to have a VPS as intraventricular hemorrhage treatment, presenting cephalalgia, vomiting, apathy, and an indurate abdominal mass without fever. The first abdominal CSF pseudocyst diagnosis had been established 3 months earlier. Abdominal ultrasounds confirmed a large homogeneous cyst with the shunt tip within the pseudocyst. Cerebral CT revealed an increased ventricular size. An exploratory laparotomy with cyst aspiration, lysis of adhesions, excision of cystic walls, and repositioning of the peritoneal catheter was performed. No antibiotics were initiated given that the cultures were negative. Ultrasonography proved to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of VPS abdominal complications, especially CSF pseudocyst. CT can also reliably confirm the pseudocyst. In case of IH signs, a cerebral CT scan can be performed to evaluate the ventricular distension and to check the shunt position. Various methods to process the cyst have been described in the medical literature, but the recurrence rate remains elevated (25-100%). Then the probability of an infection without any clinical sign has to be considered. In case of suspected infection, the VPS is removed and replaced by an external ventricular drain. Antibiotics are started and adjusted to the results of the CSF culture. If there is no direct sign of infection, only the distal catheter is externalized and antibiotics are introduced until infection is treated. Depending on the peritoneal absorption state

  17. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications.

  18. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  19. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  20. Technical aspects of abdominal stomas.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian A; Kropp, Bradley; Frimberger, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Continent urinary diversion has gained increasing popularity in the pediatric population during the last few decades. In adults, continent diversions are usually needed to replace a bladder after cystectomy for invasive carcinoma. Subsequently, the creation of functional and cosmetically hidden urinary and cecal abdominal stomas has become an integral part of many urinary reconstructive procedures. These techniques, originally developed for pediatric urinary reconstruction have gained increasing popularity for adult patients in need of a continence procedure. In the current manuscript, we review the technical aspects of site selection, mucocutaneous anastomosis, cosmetic appearance, and management of associated complications.

  1. Quadricuspid pulmonary valve in an adult patient identified by transthoracic echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soo-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Quadricuspid pulmonary valve is a rare congenital heart disease. It is infrequently associated with significant clinical complications and tends to be clinically silent. Because of its benign nature, it has been diagnosed mainly post mortem. Its diagnosis by transthoracic echocardiography is very difficult because of the anatomical features. We describe a case of quadricuspid pulmonary valve diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and electrocardiography-gated multi-detector row computed tomography.

  2. Interfraction variation in lung tumor position with abdominal compression during stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yano, Shinsuke

    2013-09-15

    of tumor motion. However, in most of the authors’ patients, the use of abdominal compression seemed to increase the interfraction variation in tumor position, despite reducing lung tumor motion. The daily tumor position deviated more systematically from the tumor position in the planning CT scan in the lateral and longitudinal directions in patients treated with abdominal compression compared to those treated without compression. Therefore, target matching is required to correct or minimize the interfraction variation.

  3. Association of Colony Forming Units with Coronary Artery and Abdominal Aortic Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Susan; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Larson, Martin G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; McCabe, Elizabeth L.; Martin, Roderick P.; Klein, Rachael J.; Hashmi, Basma; Hoffmann, Udo; Fox, Caroline S.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Certain bone marrow-derived cell populations, termed endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have been reported to possess angiogenic activity. Experimental data suggest that depletion of these angiogenic cell populations may promote atherogenesis, but limited data are available regarding their relation to subclinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans. Methods and Results We studied 889 participants of the Framingham Heart Study who were free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease (mean age, 65 years; 55% women). Participants underwent EPC phenotyping using an early outgrowth colony forming unit (CFU) assay and cell surface markers. Participants also underwent non-contrast multidetector computed tomography to assess the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis, as reflected by burden of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). In this study sample, we examined the association of EPC-related phenotypes with both CAC and AAC. Across decreasing tertiles of CFU, there was a progressive increase in median CAC and AAC scores. In multivariable analyses adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, each standard deviation increase in CFU was associated with an approximately 16% decrease in CAC (P=0.02) and 17% decrease in AAC (P=0.03). In contrast, neither CD34+/KDR+ nor CD34+ variation were associated with significant differences in coronary or aortic calcification. Conclusion In this large, community-based sample of men and women, lower CFU number was associated with a higher burden of subclinical atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries and aorta. Decreased angiogenic potential could contribute to the development of atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:20823386

  4. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  5. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    K. Intra- abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of ruptured abdomi- nal aortic aneurysm repair. Am Surg 1989;55:396-402. 6. Sugrue M...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Author’s personal copy Case Report Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After

  6. Comparison of Intraoperative Portable CT Scanners in Skull Base and Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Single Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Conley, David B.; Tan, Bruce; Bendok, Bernard R.; Batjer, H. Hunt; Chandra, Rakesh; Sidle, Douglas; Rahme, Rudy J.; Adel, Joseph G.; Fishman, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Precise and safe management of complex skull base lesions can be enhanced by intraoperative computed tomography (CT) scanning. Surgery in these areas requires real-time feedback of anatomic landmarks. Several portable CT scanners are currently available. We present a comparison of our clinical experience with three portable scanners in skull base and craniofacial surgery. We present clinical case series and the participants were from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital. Three scanners are studied: one conventional multidetector CT (MDCT), two digital flat panel cone-beam CT (CBCT) devices. Technical considerations, ease of use, image characteristics, and integration with image guidance are presented for each device. All three scanners provide good quality images. Intraoperative scanning can be used to update the image guidance system in real time. The conventional MDCT is unique in its ability to resolve soft tissue. The flat panel CBCT scanners generally emit lower levels of radiation and have less metal artifact effect. In this series, intraoperative CT scanning was technically feasible and deemed useful in surgical decision-making in 75% of patients. Intraoperative portable CT scanning has significant utility in complex skull base surgery. This technology informs the surgeon of the precise extent of dissection and updates intraoperative stereotactic navigation. PMID:22470270

  7. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  8. Spectrum of Abdominal Aortic Disease in a Tertiary Health Care Setup: MDCT Based Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, DG Santosh; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal aortic disease is an important cause of clinical disability that requires early detection by imaging methods for prompt and effective management. Understanding regional disease pattern and prevalence has a bearing on healthcare management and resource planning. Non-invasive, conclusive imaging strategy plays an important role in the detection of disease. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography (MDCT) with its technological developments provides affordable, accurate and comprehensive imaging solution. Aim To evaluate regional demography of abdominal aortic disease spectrum detected using MDCT imaging data in a tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods A descriptive study was conducted based on MDCT imaging data of patients who were investigated with clinical diagnosis of abdominal aortic disease, from March 2008-2010, over a period of 24 months. Patients were examined with the contrast-enhanced MDCT examination. Morphological diagnosis of the aortic disease was based on changes in relative aortic caliber, luminal irregularity, presence of wall calcification, dissection or thrombus and evidence of major branch occlusion. Patients were categorized into four groups based on imaging findings. MDCT information and associated clinical parameters were examined and correlated to management of patient. Descriptive statistical data, namely mean, standard deviation and frequency of disease were evaluated. Results A total of 90 out of 210 patients (43%) were detected with the abdominal aortic abnormality defined by imaging criteria. Group I, comprising of patients with atherosclerosis –including those with complications, constituted 65.5% of the patients. Group II represented patients with aneurysms (45.5%). Group III, consisting of 32.2% of the patients, contained those with dissections. The rest of the patients, including patients with aorto-arteritis, were classified as group IV. Eight patients with aneurysm and one patient with aorto-arteritis were

  9. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption Is Associated with Abdominal Fat Partitioning in Healthy Adults123

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jiantao; Sloan, Matthew; Fox, Caroline S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Smith, Caren E.; Saltzman, Edward; Rogers, Gail T.; Jacques, Paul F.; McKeown, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal adiposity, particularly visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is independently linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that greater intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) may be associated with abnormal fat accumulation in VAT. We examined whether habitual SSB consumption and diet soda intakes are differentially associated with deposition of body fat. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using previously collected data in 2596 middle-aged adults (1306 men and 1290 women) from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. VAT and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were measured using multidetector computed tomography. Habitual intake of SSBs and diet soda was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. We observed that SSB consumption was positively associated with VAT after adjustment for SAT and other potential confounders (P-trend < 0.001). We observed an inverse association between SSB consumption and SAT (P-trend = 0.04) that persisted after additional adjustment for VAT (P-trend < 0.001). Higher SSB consumption was positively associated with the VAT-to-SAT ratio (P-trend < 0.001). No significant association was found between diet soda consumption and either VAT or the VAT-to-SAT ratio, but diet soda was positively associated with SAT (P-trend < 0.001). Daily consumers of SSBs had a 10% higher absolute VAT volume and a 15% greater VAT-to-SAT ratio compared with nonconsumers, whereas consumption of diet soda was not associated with either volume or distribution of VAT. PMID:24944282

  10. Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with abdominal fat partitioning in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiantao; Sloan, Matthew; Fox, Caroline S; Hoffmann, Udo; Smith, Caren E; Saltzman, Edward; Rogers, Gail T; Jacques, Paul F; McKeown, Nicola M

    2014-08-01

    Abdominal adiposity, particularly visceral adipose tissue (VAT), is independently linked to the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that greater intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) may be associated with abnormal fat accumulation in VAT. We examined whether habitual SSB consumption and diet soda intakes are differentially associated with deposition of body fat. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using previously collected data in 2596 middle-aged adults (1306 men and 1290 women) from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts. VAT and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were measured using multidetector computed tomography. Habitual intake of SSBs and diet soda was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. We observed that SSB consumption was positively associated with VAT after adjustment for SAT and other potential confounders (P-trend < 0.001). We observed an inverse association between SSB consumption and SAT (P-trend = 0.04) that persisted after additional adjustment for VAT (P-trend < 0.001). Higher SSB consumption was positively associated with the VAT-to-SAT ratio (P-trend < 0.001). No significant association was found between diet soda consumption and either VAT or the VAT-to-SAT ratio, but diet soda was positively associated with SAT (P-trend < 0.001). Daily consumers of SSBs had a 10% higher absolute VAT volume and a 15% greater VAT-to-SAT ratio compared with nonconsumers, whereas consumption of diet soda was not associated with either volume or distribution of VAT.

  11. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  12. A Kinect™ camera based navigation system for percutaneous abdominal puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Deqiang; Luo, Huoling; Jia, Fucang; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Yong; Guo, Xuejun; Cai, Wei; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Zheng, Huimin; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-08-01

    Percutaneous abdominal puncture is a popular interventional method for the management of abdominal tumors. Image-guided puncture can help interventional radiologists improve targeting accuracy. The second generation of Kinect™ was released recently, we developed an optical navigation system to investigate its feasibility for guiding percutaneous abdominal puncture, and compare its performance on needle insertion guidance with that of the first-generation Kinect™. For physical-to-image registration in this system, two surfaces extracted from preoperative CT and intraoperative Kinect™ depth images were matched using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. A 2D shape image-based correspondence searching algorithm was proposed for generating a close initial position before ICP matching. Evaluation experiments were conducted on an abdominal phantom and six beagles in vivo. For phantom study, a two-factor experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of the operator’s skill and trajectory on target positioning error (TPE). A total of 36 needle punctures were tested on a Kinect™ for Windows version 2 (Kinect™ V2). The target registration error (TRE), user error, and TPE are 4.26  ±  1.94 mm, 2.92  ±  1.67 mm, and 5.23  ±  2.29 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences in TPE regarding operator’s skill and trajectory are observed. Additionally, a Kinect™ for Windows version 1 (Kinect™ V1) was tested with 12 insertions, and the TRE evaluated with the Kinect™ V1 is statistically significantly larger than that with the Kinect™ V2. For the animal experiment, fifteen artificial liver tumors were inserted guided by the navigation system. The TPE was evaluated as 6.40  ±  2.72 mm, and its lateral and longitudinal component were 4.30  ±  2.51 mm and 3.80  ±  3.11 mm, respectively. This study demonstrates that the navigation accuracy of the proposed system is acceptable

  13. Mechanical ventilation in abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Futier, E; Godet, T; Millot, A; Constantin, J-M; Jaber, S

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges in perioperative care is to reduce postoperative morbidity and mortality. Patients who develop postoperative morbidity but survive to leave hospital have often reduced functional independence and long-term survival. Mechanical ventilation provides a specific example that may help us to shift thinking from treatment to prevention of postoperative complications. Mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing surgery has long been considered only as a modality to ensure gas exchange while allowing maintenance of anesthesia with delivery of inhaled anesthetics. Evidence is accumulating, however, suggesting an association between intraoperative mechanical ventilation strategy and postoperative pulmonary function and clinical outcome in patients undergoing abdominal surgery. Non-protective ventilator settings, especially high tidal volume (VT) (>10-12mL/kg) and the use of very low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (PEEP<5cmH2O) or no PEEP, may cause alveolar overdistension and repetitive tidal recruitment leading to ventilator-associated lung injury in patients with healthy lungs. Stimulated by previous findings in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the use of lower tidal volume ventilation is becoming increasingly more common in the operating room. However, lowering tidal volume, though important, is only part of the overall multifaceted approach of lung protective mechanical ventilation. In this review, we aimed at providing the most recent and relevant clinical evidence regarding the use of mechanical ventilation in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) Findings of a Diagnostic Dilemma: Atypically Located Acute Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Evrimler, Sehnaz; Okumuser, Irfan; Unal, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Acute appendicitis is an emergent surgically treated disease generally represented by right lower abdominal pain. The most common location of the appendix is descending intraperitoneal. However, it can also show atypical locations such as inguinal canal, femoral canal, subhepatic, retrocecal, intraperitoneal abdominal midline and left side in situs inversus or intestinal malrotation patients. Atypical location can lead to atypical clinical presentations. Ultrasonography is the first choice modality for imaging. However, it can be insufficient for demonstration of the appendix. Therefore, computed tomography (CT) is needed for further examination. We aim to review the CT findings of atypically located acute appendicitis with cases and remind the clinicians and radiologists the importance of the prompt diagnosis. Case Report We presented five atypically-located appendix cases, including four with acute appendicitis that presented to our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. Two of the acute appendicitis cases had normal, the other two had elevated white blood cell count, but all of them had elevated CRP. Ultrasonography imaging was performed as a first-line imaging modality. Because of the inconclusive results of both clinical-laboratory findings and ultrasonography, CT imaging was performed. Abdominal CT demonstrated all of the atypically localised appendices successfully, which were left-sided in a malrotated patient, retrocecal, subhepatic, retrocecal ascending, intraperitoneal abdominal midline localised. Conclusıons Atypically located acute appendicitis can show atypical presentation and result in misdiagnosis. If ultrasonograpgy is inconclusive, we suggest abdominal CT in such confusing, complicated cases, because misdiagnosis or delay in the right diagnosis can result in complications and increased morbidity and mortality rates. PMID:28058072

  15. Coronary artery calcium score: influence of reconstruction interval at 16-detector row CT with retrospective electrocardiographic gating.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Thomas; Hunold, Peter; Schmermund, Axel; Kühl, Hilmar; Waltering, Kai-Uwe; Debatin, Jörg F; Barkhausen, Jörg

    2004-11-01

    In 30 patients, Agatston and volumetric scores were assessed by using retrospectively gated multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). For each patient, 10 data sets were created at different times and were evenly spaced throughout the cardiac cycle. For each reconstruction, patients were assigned a percentile that described the level of cardiovascular risk. Nineteen (63%) of 30 patients could be assigned to more than one risk group depending on the reconstruction interval used. Agatston and volumetric scores both proved highly dependent on the reconstruction interval used (coefficient of variation, < or =63.1%) even with the most advanced CT scanners. Accurate and reproducible quantification of coronary calcium seems to require analysis of multiple reconstructions.

  16. CT imaging signs of surgically proven bowel trauma.

    PubMed

    LeBedis, Christina A; Anderson, Stephan W; Bates, David D B; Khalil, Ramy; Matherly, David; Wing, Heidi; Burke, Peter A; Soto, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and interobserver agreement of individual CT findings as well as the bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) in surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was IRB approved and consent was waived. All patients 14 years or older who sustained surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma between 1/1/2004 and 6/30/2015 were included. Admission trauma MDCT scans were independently interpreted by two abdominal fellowship-trained radiologists who recorded the following CT findings: intraperitoneal fluid, mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding, bowel wall thickening/hematoma, active intravenous contrast extravasation, free intraperitoneal air, bowel wall discontinuity, and focal bowel hypoenhancement. Subsequently, the electronic medical records of the included patients, admission abdominal physical exam results, admission white blood cell count, and findings at exploratory laparotomy of the included patients were recorded. Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The incidence and interobserver agreement of the CT findings were as follows: intraperitoneal fluid 93.9 %, kappa = 0.784 (good); mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding 84.8 %, kappa = 0.718 (good); bowel wall thickening/hematoma 42.4 %, kappa = 0.491 (moderate); active IV contrast extravasation 36.3 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); free intraperitoneal air 21.2 %, kappa = 0.904 (very good), bowel wall discontinuity 6.1 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); and focal bowel hypoenhancement 6.1 %, kappa = 0.468 (moderate). An absence of the specified CT findings was encountered in 9.1 % with surgically proven bowel injuries (kappa = 1.00, perfect). In our study, 9/16 patients or 56.3 % had a bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) of 2 or more as defined by McNutt et al. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg 78(1):105-111, 2014). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid and

  17. [Two-dimensional and three-dimensional CT diagnosis of alimentary tract].

    PubMed

    Shiraga, N

    2001-10-01

    The recent development of multidetector-row CT(MDCT) has made it possible to obtain three-dimensional images of the alimentary tract that offer new diagnostic potential. In its two-dimensional diagnosis of the alimentary tract, MDCT has also changed the concept of the oral contrast agent. Before MDCT, we routinely used a positive contrast agent to distinguish the stomach and intestine from other organs and masses. The excellent slice profile acquired by MDCT can distinguish the alimentary tract and depict abnormal findings without the use of a positive contrast agent. With the use of an intravenous contrast medium, the alimentary tract itself, alimentary tumors, and inflammatory disease are well demarcated with water and air. Moreover, the combination of two-dimensional and three-dimensional diagnostic images makes it possible to detect and assess early gastric and colonic cancers as conventional gastroscopy and colonoscopy. Although the lack of texture information is one of the disadvantages of three-dimensional CT, three-dimensional CT diagnosis of the alimentary tract is less invasive and more objective than conventional studies. Advances in three-dimensional imaging with isotropic data sets will lead to the use of two-dimensional and three-dimensional CT diagnosis as one of the standard examinations of the alimentary tract.

  18. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Belinato, Walmir; Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N.; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the {sup 18}F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  19. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  20. Hybrid SPECT/CT Imaging in the Evaluation of Coronary Stenosis: Role in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Andrea; Schillaci, Orazio; Arganini, Chiara; Gaspari, Eleonora; Ricci, Aurora; Morosetti, Daniele; Coco, Irene; Crusco, Sonia; Calabria, Ferdinando; Sperandio, Massimiliano; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Our purpose was to combine the results of the MDCT (multidetector computed tomography) morphological data and the SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography) data using hybrid imaging to overcome the limits of the MDCT in the evaluation of coronary stenosis in diabetic patients with large amount of calcium in the coronary arteries. Method and Materials. 120 diabetic patients underwent MDCT examination and SPECT examination. We evaluated 324 coronary arteries. After the examinations, we merged CT and SPECT images. Results. CT evaluation: 52 (32.8%) coronaries with stenosis ≥ 50%, 228 (70.4%) with stenosis < 50%, and 44 (13.6%) with a doubtful evaluation. SPECT evaluation: 80 (24.7%) areas with hypoperfusion, 232 (71.6%) with normal perfusion, and 12 (3.7%) with a doubtful evaluation. Of 324 coronary arteries and corresponding areas, the hybrid SPECT/CT evaluation showed 92 (28.4%) areas with hypoperfusion, and 232 (71.6%) with normal perfusion. Conclusion. Hybrid CT/SPECT imaging could be useful in the detection of significant coronary stenosis in patients with large amount of coronary calcifications. PMID:24959556

  1. [Inflammatory aneurysm of the abdominal aorta: TC assessment of the postoperative course].

    PubMed

    Gigoni, R; Boraschi, P; Cartei, F; Braccini, G; Perri, G

    1996-09-01

    This study was aimed at investigating CT reliability in the postoperative follow-up of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) previously treated with prosthesis positioning. During the last 5 years, 13 male patients operated on for subrenal IAAA with intraluminal prosthesis positioning, were followed-up with CT. All CT images were reviewed by three radiologists to assess prosthesis integrity; the possible presence of intraluminal thrombosis was investigated, together with pre/postprosthetic dilatation and the involvement of inferior vena cava, ureters and third duodenal segment. The prostheses were intact and no signs of intraluminal thrombosis were depicted in all patients; a periprosthetic dilation of abdominal aorta associated with parietal thrombosis was observed in one patient. Nine patients exhibited mild-moderate thickening of the original aortic or iliac walls; the inferior vena cava was involved in 6 of them and the left ureter in one. Contact with the III duodenal segment was found in 3 patients. In conclusion, CT proves to be a reliable technique in the postoperative follow-up of IAAA, yielding accurate information about the prosthesis, the aortoiliac walls and retroperitoneal structures. Moreover, in our experience late postoperative complications were not of major clinical importance.

  2. Surgical interventions with fatal outcome: utility of multi-phase postmortem CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Zerlauth, J-B; Doenz, F; Dominguez, A; Palmiere, C; Uské, A; Meuli, R; Grabherr, S

    2013-02-10

    Cases of fatal outcome after surgical intervention are autopsied to determine the cause of death and to investigate whether medical error caused or contributed to the death. For medico-legal purposes, it is imperative that autopsy findings are documented clearly. Modern imaging techniques such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and postmortem CT angiography, which is used for vascular system imaging, are useful tools for determining cause of death. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of postmortem CT angiography for the medico-legal death investigation. This study investigated 10 medico-legal cases with a fatal outcome after surgical intervention using multi-phase postmortem whole body CT angiography. A native CT scan was performed as well as three angiographic phases (arterial, venous, and dynamic) using a Virtangio(®) perfusion device and the oily contrast agent, Angiofil(®). The results of conventional autopsy were compared to those from the radiological investigations. We also investigated whether the radiological findings affected the final interpretation of cause-of-death. Causes of death were hemorrhagic shock, intracerebral hemorrhage, septic shock, and a combination of hemorrhage and blood aspiration. The diagnoses were made by conventional autopsy as well as by postmortem CT angiography. Hemorrhage played an important role in eight of ten cases. The radiological exam revealed the exact source of bleeding in seven of the eight cases, whereas conventional autopsy localized the source of bleeding only generally in five of the seven cases. In one case, neither conventional autopsy nor CT angiography identified the source of hemorrhage. We conclude that postmortem CT angiography is extremely useful for investigating deaths following surgical interventions. This technique helps document autopsy findings and allows a second examination if it is needed; specifically, it detects and visualizes the sources of hemorrhages in detail, which

  3. Multiple ectopic hepatocellular carcinomas arising in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Toru; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Yoshida, Yoichiro; Aisu, Naoya; Tanimura, Syu; Hisano, Satoshi; Kuno, Nobuaki; Sohda, Tetsuro; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2012-09-01

    Ectopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a very rare clinical entity that is defined as HCC arising from extrahepatic liver tissue. This report presents a case of ectopic multiple HCC arising in the abdominal cavity. A 42-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with liver dysfunction at a general health checkup. Both HCV antibody and hepatitis B surface antigen were negative. Laboratory examination showed elevations in serum alpha-fetoprotein and PIVKA-II. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed multiple nodular lesions in the abdominal cavity with ascites without a possible primary tumor. Exploratory laparoscopy was performed, which revealed bloody ascites and multiple brown nodular tumors measuring approximately 10 mm in size that were disseminated on the perineum and mesentery. A postoperative PET-CT scan was performed but it did not reveal any evidence of a tumor in the liver. The tumors resected from the peritoneum were diagnosed as HCC. The present case of HCC was thought to have possibly developed from ectopic liver on the peritoneum or mesentery.

  4. Percutaneous catheter drainage of abdominal abscesses associated with perforated viscus.

    PubMed

    Flancbaum, L; Nosher, J L; Brolin, R E

    1990-01-01

    Improvements in radiologic localization have made percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) the initial procedure of choice for many intra-abdominal abscesses (IAA). During the past seven years 154 patients underwent PCD for treatment of abdominal abscesses. Fourteen of these patients had PCD as the initial treatment for IAA secondary to a perforated viscus and subsequently underwent an elective one-stage operation to treat the underlying disease. Etiologies of the abscesses included perforated appendicitis in six patients, sigmoid diverticulitis in three patients, Crohn's ileitis in two patients, and one case each of perforated gastric ulcer, perforated sigmoid carcinoma, and perforated gallbladder. Initial localization of the abscess was achieved by either CT or ultrasound. Seven abscesses were localized in the right lower quadrant, four were localized in the liver, and one was localized each in the left flank, right flank, subhepatic space, and pelvis. All patients subsequently underwent a definitive elective operation for their primary disease including six interval appendectomies, four sigmoid colectomies, two small-bowel resections, one subtotal gastrectomy and one cholecystectomy. There were no complications due to PCD and no deaths occurred. We conclude that PCD can be successfully performed as the initial treatment for IAA associated with a perforated viscus, obviating the first stage of the traditional two-stage surgical approach.

  5. Anatomic considerations for abdominally placed permanent left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Parnis, S M; McGee, M G; Igo, S R; Dasse, K; Frazier, O H

    1989-01-01

    To determine anatomic parameters for a permanent, electrically actuated left ventricular assist device (LVAD), the effects of abdominal placement of pneumatic LVADs used as temporary support for patients awaiting heart transplantation was studied. Understanding the anatomic constraints imposed by the abdominal viscera in LVAD placement is crucial, because improper placement can result in compression or obstruction of adjacent structures. Anatomic compatibility was assessed in four men (age 22-48 years) who were supported by the LVAD for over 1 month (range 35-132 days). The pump was intraperitoneally placed in the left upper quadrant. Radiographic techniques were employed, including CT scanning (with patients supine) and contrast imaging (patients in anatomical position), and the pump and conduits appeared to be properly positioned, with minimal compression of the body of the stomach, and no obstruction of adjacent organs. Three patients returned to a solid food diet and exercised daily by stationary cycling and walking. No signs of migration or erosion of the pump were present at the time of LVAD removal and cardiac transplantation. Successful clinical experience with short-term use of the LVAD suggests that the electrically actuated device can be well tolerated in patients requiring permanent left ventricular assistance.

  6. Delay in diagnosis and lessons learnt from a case of abdominal wall abscess caused by fishbone perforation.

    PubMed

    Hakeem, A; Shanmugam, V; Badrinath, K; Dube, M; Panto, P

    2015-04-01

    Complications following foreign body (FB) ingestion are an uncommon clinical problem. A 59-year-old man presented with a 4-week history of left iliac fossa pain and 1 episode of dark red blood mixed with stools. Inflammatory markers were elevated, and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis showed an ill defined abdominal wall inflammatory collection in close contact with the small bowel loops. He was treated with antibiotics, and follow-up CT, colonoscopy and small bowel enema were mostly unremarkable. The patient presented again ten months later with left iliac fossa cellulitis and fever. Multiplanar CT (the patient's fourth scan) demonstrated a 10cm abdominal wall collection with a linear hyperdense structure in the collection. The radiologists suspected a FB and on close scrutiny of the previous scans, they noted it to have been present on all of them. A targeted incision led to the removal of a 3cm fishbone from the collection. This case highlights the need to consider the possibility of a FB being the underlying cause in any unexplained intra-abdominal or abdominal wall inflammatory process so that the diagnosis is made in a timely manner.

  7. Effectiveness of thigh-to-thigh current path for the measurement of abdominal fat in bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ki Hwan; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-12-01

    We present a new method measuring body impedance using a thigh-to-thigh current path, which can reflect the abdominal fat portion more sensitively and can be conveniently applied during the daily use on a toilet seat. Two pairs of electrodes were installed on a toilet seat to provide current and to permit voltage measurement through a thigh-to-thigh current path. The effectiveness of the method was compared with conventional foot-to-foot and hand-to-foot current paths by simulation and by experiments referenced to computed tomography (CT) image analysis. Body impedance using three different current paths was measured, and abdominal CT images were acquired for eight subjects. Measured body impedances were compared with the visceral to subcutaneous fat ratio (VF/SF) calculated from the CT-determined abdominal fat volume. The thigh-to-thigh current path was about 75% more sensitive in abdominal fat measurement than the conventional current paths in simulation experiments and displayed a higher VF/SF correlation (r = 0.768) than the foot-to-foot (r = 0.425) and hand-to-foot (r = 0.497) current paths.

  8. CT angiography - chest

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - thorax; CTA - lungs; Pulmonary embolism - CTA chest; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - CTA chest; Venous thromboembolism - CTA lung; Blood clot - CTA lung; Embolus - CTA lung; CT ...

  9. Traumatic hypovolemic shock revisited: the spectrum of contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomography findings and clinical implications for its management.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Hiroki; Kanki, Akihiko; Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Akira; Noda, Yasufumi; Yasokawa, Kazuya; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-10-01

    Hypovolemic shock is often seen in patients with severe blunt trauma who have suffered from blood circulation inadequate to maintain oxygen delivery to multiple organs. The early recognition and prompt management of hypovolemic shock in patients with multiple injuries are mandatory to improving prognosis and patient conditions. The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) as a primary diagnostic tool is well established. The abdominal organs show several common and classic appearances on contrast-enhanced CT in patients with trauma. The hypovolemic shock complex is reported in the previous literature as decreased enhancement of the viscera, increased mucosal enhancement and luminal dilation of the small bowel, mural thickening and fluid-filled loops of the small bowel, the halo sign and flattening of the inferior vena cava, reduced aortic diameter, and peripancreatic edema. However, there have been controversial CT reports with contradictory appearances. Physicians understanding these findings could prompt alternative approaches to the early assessment and management of hypovolemic shock. The aim of this article is to illustrate common and well-known abdominal CT features in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock, to discuss controversial CT signs in the pancreas and adrenal gland, and to describe CT findings' clinical implications when managing hypovolemic shock.

  10. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  11. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  13. Pulmonary complications of abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Panitch, Howard B

    2015-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an integral component of the chest wall. Defects in the ventral abdominal wall alter respiratory mechanics and can impair diaphragm function. Congenital abdominal wall defects also are associated with abnormalities in lung growth and development that lead to pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and alterations in thoracic cage formation. Although infants with ventral abdominal wall defects can experience life-threatening pulmonary complications, older children typically experience a more benign respiratory course. Studies of lung and chest wall function in older children and adolescents with congenital abdominal wall defects are few; such investigations could provide strategies for improved respiratory performance, avoidance of respiratory morbidity, and enhanced exercise ability for these children.

  14. Long-term effect of cinacalcet hydrochloride on abdominal aortic calcification in patients on hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Nakao, Kazushi; Takatori, Yuji; Inoue, Junko; Kojo, Shoichirou; Akagi, Shigeru; Fukushima, Masaki; Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is one of the common complications in dialysis patients, and is associated with increased risk of vascular calcification. The effects of cinacalcet hydrochloride treatment on bone and mineral metabolism have been previously reported, but the benefit of cinacalcet on vascular calcification remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cinacalcet on abdominal aortic calcification in dialysis patients. Subjects and methods Patients were on maintenance hemodialysis with insufficiently controlled SHPT (intact parathyroid hormone [PTH] >180 pg/mL) by conventional therapies. All subjects were initially administered 25 mg cinacalcet daily, with concomitant use of calcitriol analogs. Abdominal aortic calcification was annually evaluated by calculating aortic calcification area index (ACAI) using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), from 12 months before to 36 months after the initiation of cinacalcet therapy. Results Twenty-three patients were analyzed in this study. The mean age was 59.0±8.7 years, 34.8% were women, and the mean dialysis duration was 163.0±76.0 months. After administration of cinacalcet, serum levels of intact PTH, phosphorus, and calcium significantly decreased, and mean Ca × P values significantly decreased from 67.4±7.9 mg2/dL2 to 52±7.7 mg2/dL2. Although the ACAI value did not decrease during the observation period, the increase in ACAI between 24 months and 36 months after cinacalcet administration was significantly suppressed. Conclusion Long-term administration of cinacalcet was associated with reduced progression of abdominal aortic calcification, and achieving appropriate calcium and phosphorus levels may reduce the rates of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients on hemodialysis. PMID:24379691

  15. WE-B-207-02: CT Lung Cancer Screening and the Medical Physicist: A Dosimetry Summary of CT Participants in the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.

    2015-06-15

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) was a multi-center randomized, controlled trial comparing a low-dose CT (LDCT) to posterior-anterior (PA) chest x-ray (CXR) in screening older, current and former heavy smokers for early detection of lung cancer. Recruitment was launched in September 2002 and ended in April 2004 when 53,454 participants had been randomized at 33 screening sites in equal proportions. Funded by the National Cancer Institute this trial demonstrated that LDCT screening reduced lung cancer mortality. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cited NLST findings and conclusions in its deliberations and analysis of lung cancer screening. Under the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the USPSTF favorable recommendation regarding lung cancer CT screening assisted in obtaining third-party payers coverage for screening. The objective of this session is to provide an introduction to the NLST and the trial findings, in addition to a comprehensive review of the dosimetry investigations and assessments completed using individual NLST participant CT and CXR examinations. Session presentations will review and discuss the findings of two independent assessments, a CXR assessment and the findings of a CT investigation calculating individual organ dosimetry values. The CXR assessment reviewed a total of 73,733 chest x-ray exams that were performed on 92 chest imaging systems of which 66,157 participant examinations were used. The CT organ dosimetry investigation collected scan parameters from 23,773 CT examinations; a subset of the 75,133 CT examinations performed using 97 multi-detector CT scanners. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. An experimentally-validated CT scanner simulation was coupled with 193 adult hybrid computational phantoms representing the height and weight of the current U.S. population. The dose to selected organs was calculated using the organ dose library and the abstracted scan

  16. Evaluation of cardiovascular anomalies in patients with asymptomatic turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Hee; Jung, Ji Mi; Song, Min Seob; Choi, Seok jin; Chung, Woo Yeong

    2013-08-01

    Turner syndrome is well known to be associated with significant cardiovascular abnormalities. This paper studied the incidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in asymptomatic adolescent patients with Turner syndrome using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) instead of echocardiography. Twenty subjects diagnosed with Turner syndrome who had no cardiac symptoms were included. Blood pressure and electrocardiography (ECG) was checked. Cardiovascular abnormalities were checked by MDCT. According to the ECG results, 11 had a prolonged QTc interval, 5 had a posterior fascicular block, 3 had a ventricular conduction disorder. MDCT revealed vascular abnormalities in 13 patients (65%). Three patients had an aberrant right subclavian artery, 2 had dilatation of left subclavian artery, and others had an aortic root dilatation, aortic diverticulum, and abnormal left vertebral artery. As for venous abnormalities, 3 patients had partial anomalous pulmonary venous return and 2 had a persistent left superior vena cava. This study found cardiovascular abnormalities in 65% of asymptomatic Turner syndrome patients using MDCT. Even though, there are no cardiac symptoms in Turner syndrome patients, a complete evaluation of the heart with echocardiography or MDCT at transition period to adults must be performed.

  17. Associations Between Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index and Aortic Structure and Sclerosis Using Multidetector Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Hiromichi; Shibata, Yoshimasa; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Ishimitsu, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been accepted as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement. However, PWV depends on blood pressure (BP). To eliminate the BP dependency of PWV, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was developed. This study aimed to define the relationship between CAVI and aortic atherosclerosis or structure on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Patients with (n = 49) or without (n = 49) coronary artery disease were studied. The lumen and vessel diameters and wall thickness were calculated from the cross-sectional area at the pulmonary bifurcation level by 64-slice MDCT. The CAVI was measured within 3 days before MDCT. Multivariate analysis showed that the vessel diameter of the ascending and descending aorta on MDCT depends on age, body surface area, and diastolic BP. The CAVI significantly correlated with the vessel diameter ( r = .453) and wall thickness ( r = .387) of the thoracic descending aorta ( P < .001, respectively). The CAVI was an independent predictor of the descending aortic wall thickness on multiple stepwise regression analysis. These data suggest that CAVI, a simple index, is useful for evaluating thoracic aortic atherosclerosis.

  18. A case of bilateral tracheal bronchus: report of a rare association in multidetector computed tomography bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Candace; Doros, Caius; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral tracheal bronchus is a rare variation of the tracheobronchial tree. We present a 1-year 7-month-old male patient who presented with sepsis following endotracheal intubation. Upon review of multidetector computed tomography images, the patient was diagnosed with displaced bilateral tracheal bronchus. Imaging showed a right-sided anomalous bronchus arising 0.9 cm proximal to the carina. The left-sided anomalous bronchus arose 0.7 cm proximal to the carina, mimicking a tracheal trifurcation. When viewed together, the close proximity of both the right and left tracheal bronchi to the carina created a distinct tracheal quadrifurcation. This rare anatomic variation was additionally associated with an anorectal malformation (anal atresia). Unrecognized tracheal bronchus in patients undergoing endotracheal intubation can lead to serious complications. While bilateral tracheal bronchus is described in the literature, we are unaware of any case similar to this patient presentation. We present and analyze this unusual case of bilateral tracheal bronchus. The anatomy and clinical significance of this variation is then discussed.

  19. A Structural and Functional Assessment of the Lung via Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric A.; Simon, Brett A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    With advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), it is now possible to image the lung in 10 s or less and accurately extract the lungs, lobes, and airway tree to the fifth- through seventh-generation bronchi and to regionally characterize lung density, texture, ventilation, and perfusion. These methods are now being used to phenotype the lung in health and disease and to gain insights into the etiology of pathologic processes. This article outlines the application of these methodologies with specific emphasis on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We demonstrate the use of our methods for assessing regional ventilation and perfusion and demonstrate early data that show, in a sheep model, a regionally intact hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstrictor (HPV) response with an apparent inhibition of HPV regionally in the presence of inflammation. We present the hypothesis that, in subjects with pulmonary emphysema, one major contributing factor leading to parenchymal destruction is the lack of a regional blunting of HPV when the regional hypoxia is related to regional inflammatory events (bronchiolitis or alveolar flooding). If maintaining adequate blood flow to inflamed lung regions is critical to the nondestructive resolution of inflammatory events, the pathologic condition whereby HPV is sustained in regions of inflammation would likely have its greatest effect in the lung apices where blood flow is already reduced in the upright body posture. PMID:16921136

  20. Structural Comparison between the Right and Left Atrial Appendages Using Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Koichi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Torii, Ryo; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of the right atrial appendage (RAA) and left atrial appendage (LAA) were compared to clarify why thrombus formation less frequently occurs in RAA than in LAA. Morphological differences between RAA and LAA of 34 formalin-preserved cadaver hearts were investigated. Molds of RAA and LAA specimens were made and the neck areas, volumes of the atrial appendages (AA), and amount of pectinate muscles (PMs) were analyzed using multidetector computed tomography. In RAA, most PMs were connected to one another and formed a “dendritic” appearance and the inner surface area was smaller than in LAA. RAA had smaller volumes and larger neck areas than LAA. The ratios of the neck area/volume were larger and the amounts of PMs were smaller in RAA than in LAA. The volumes, neck areas, and amount of PMs of RAA were significantly correlated with those of LAA. According to the 3D structure, RAA appears to be suited for a more favorable blood flow, which may explain why the thrombus formation is less common in RAA than in LAA. Examining not only LAA but also RAA by transesophageal echocardiography may be useful in high-risk patients of thrombus formation in LAA because the volume, neck area, and amount of PMs of LAA reflect the shape of RAA. PMID:27900330