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Sample records for abdominal muscle contraction

  1. Effects of different types of contraction in abdominal bracing on the asymmetry of left and right abdominal muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Song, Min-Young; Park, Hyeon-Ji; Park, Ji-Hyun; Bae, Hyun-Young; Lim, Da-Som

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective strength levels of abdominal muscle contraction using the bracing contraction method. [Subjects] The experiment was conducted with 31 healthy male (M=15) and female (F=16) adults attending D University in Busan; all participants had less than obesity level BMI (BMI<30). [Methods] Bracing contraction was performed by the subjects in the hook-lying position at maximum and minimum pressure levels, five times each, using a Pressure Biofeedback Unit (PBU), and the mean measurement value was calculated. The maximum pressure level was set at 100% and the half maximum pressure level was set at 50%. Each subject's left and right abdominal muscle thicknesses were then measured by ultrasound imaging in each state: at rest, 100% contraction, and 50% contraction. [Results] No significant differences were found between the left and right sides of the transversus abdominis (TrA) at rest, 50%, or 100% contraction. The external oblique abdominis (EO) and internal oblique abdominis (IO) showed no significant difference at rest or at the 50% contraction. However, a significant difference was noted at 100% contraction for the EO and IO. [Conclusion] Application of abdominal contraction using bracing can achieve symmetry in the left and right abdominal muscles at less than the maximum contractile strength. The occurrence of asymmetry in the left and right abdominal muscles at the maximum contractile strength suggests that the most suitable contractile strength in this exercise is less than the maximum contractile strength. PMID:25540478

  2. Contraction of Abdominal Wall Muscles Influences Incisional Hernia Occurrence and Size

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Samuel C.; Hu, Yaxi; Wollstein, Adi; Franz, Michael G.; Patel, Shaun P.; Kuzon, William M.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Incisional hernias are a complication in 10% of all open abdominal operations and can result in significant morbidity. The purpose of this study is to determine if inhibiting abdominal muscle contraction influences incisional hernia formation during laparotomy healing. We hypothesize that reducing abdominal musculature deformation reduces incisional hernia occurrence and size. Study Design Using an established rat model for incisional hernia, a laparotomy through the linea alba was closed with one mid-incision, fast-absorbing suture. Three groups were compared: a SHAM group (SHAM; n = 6) received no laparotomies while the Saline Hernia (SH; n = 6) and Botox Hernia (BH; n = 6) groups were treated once with equal volume saline or Botulinum Toxin (Botox®, Allergan) before the incomplete laparotomy closure. On post-operative day 14, the abdominal wall was examined for herniation and adhesions and contractile forces were measured for abdominal wall muscles. Results No hernias developed in SHAM rats. Rostral hernias developed in all SH and BH rats. Caudal hernias developed in all SH rats, but in only 50% of the BH rats. Rostral hernias in the BH group were 35% shorter and 43% narrower compared to those in the SH group (p < 0.05). The BH group had weaker abdominal muscles compared to the SHAM and SH groups (p < 0.05). Conclusions In our rat model, partial paralysis of abdominal muscles reduces the number and size of incisional hernias. These results confirm abdominal wall muscle contractions play a significant role in the pathophysiology of incisional hernia formation. PMID:25817097

  3. Comparison of changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle on during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Halim; Jung, Sangwoo; Joo, Sunghee; Song, Changho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare changes in the mobility of the pelvic floor muscle during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adults participated in this study (15 men and 15 women). [Methods] All participants performed a bridge exercise and abdominal curl-up during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver, maximal expiration, and pelvic floor muscle maximal contraction. Pelvic floor mobility was evaluated as the distance from the bladder base using ultrasound. [Results] According to exercise method, bridge exercise and abdominal curl-ups led to significantly different pelvic floor mobility. The pelvic floor muscle was elevated during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and descended during maximal expiration. Finally, pelvic floor muscle mobility was greater during abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. [Conclusion] According to these results, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver induced pelvic floor muscle contraction, and pelvic floor muscle contraction was greater during the abdominal curl-up than during the bridge exercise. PMID:27065532

  4. Comparison of changes in the contraction of the lateral abdominal muscles between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and breathe held at the maximum expiratory level.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryohei; Watanabe, Susumu

    2012-10-01

    The abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) is commonly used as a fundamental component of lumbar stabilization training programs. One potential limitation of lumbar stabilization programs is that it can be difficult and time consuming to train people to perform the ADIM. The transverse abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles are the most powerful muscles involved in expiration. However, little is known about the differences in the recruitment of the abdominal muscles between the ADIM and breathe held at maximum expiratory level (maximum expiration). The thickness of the TrA and IO muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging, and the activity of the EO muscle was measured by electromyography (EMG) in 33 healthy male performing the ADIM and maximum expiration. Maximum expiration produced a significant increase in the thickness of the TrA and IO muscles compared to the ADIM (p < 0.001). The EMG activity of the EO muscle was significantly higher during maximum expiration than during the ADIM (p < 0.001). The intensity of the EMG activity of the EO muscle was approximately 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction during maximum expiration. Thus, maximum expiration may be an effective method for training of co-activation of the lateral abdominal muscles.

  5. The functional coupling of the deep abdominal and paraspinal muscles: the effects of simulated paraspinal muscle contraction on force transfer to the middle and posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia.

    PubMed

    Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Willard, F H

    2014-10-01

    The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) consists of aponeurotic and fascial layers that interweave the paraspinal and abdominal muscles into a complex matrix stabilizing the lumbosacral spine. To better understand low back pain, it is essential to appreciate how these muscles cooperate to influence lumbopelvic stability. This study tested the following hypotheses: (i) pressure within the TLF's paraspinal muscular compartment (PMC) alters load transfer between the TLF's posterior and middle layers (PLF and MLF); and (ii) with increased tension of the common tendon of the transversus abdominis (CTrA) and internal oblique muscles and incremental PMC pressure, fascial tension is primarily transferred to the PLF. In cadaveric axial sections, paraspinal muscles were replaced with inflatable tubes to simulate paraspinal muscle contraction. At each inflation increment, tension was created in the CTrA to simulate contraction of the deep abdominal muscles. Fluoroscopic images and load cells captured changes in the size, shape and tension of the PMC due to inflation, with and without tension to the CTrA. In the absence of PMC pressure, increasing tension on the CTrA resulted in anterior and lateral movement of the PMC. PMC inflation in the absence of tension to the CTrA resulted in a small increase in the PMC perimeter and a larger posterior displacement. Combining PMC inflation and tension to the CTrA resulted in an incremental increase in PLF tension without significantly altering tension in the MLF. Paraspinal muscle contraction leads to posterior displacement of the PLF. When expansion is combined with abdominal muscle contraction, the CTrA and internal oblique transfers tension almost exclusively to the PLF, thereby girdling the paraspinal muscles. The lateral border of the PMC is restrained from displacement to maintain integrity. Posterior movement of the PMC represents an increase of the PLF extension moment arm. Dysfunctional paraspinal muscles would reduce the posterior

  6. The functional coupling of the deep abdominal and paraspinal muscles: the effects of simulated paraspinal muscle contraction on force transfer to the middle and posterior layer of the thoracolumbar fascia

    PubMed Central

    Vleeming, A; Schuenke, M D; Danneels, L; Willard, F H

    2014-01-01

    The thoracolumbar fascia (TLF) consists of aponeurotic and fascial layers that interweave the paraspinal and abdominal muscles into a complex matrix stabilizing the lumbosacral spine. To better understand low back pain, it is essential to appreciate how these muscles cooperate to influence lumbopelvic stability. This study tested the following hypotheses: (i) pressure within the TLF's paraspinal muscular compartment (PMC) alters load transfer between the TLF's posterior and middle layers (PLF and MLF); and (ii) with increased tension of the common tendon of the transversus abdominis (CTrA) and internal oblique muscles and incremental PMC pressure, fascial tension is primarily transferred to the PLF. In cadaveric axial sections, paraspinal muscles were replaced with inflatable tubes to simulate paraspinal muscle contraction. At each inflation increment, tension was created in the CTrA to simulate contraction of the deep abdominal muscles. Fluoroscopic images and load cells captured changes in the size, shape and tension of the PMC due to inflation, with and without tension to the CTrA. In the absence of PMC pressure, increasing tension on the CTrA resulted in anterior and lateral movement of the PMC. PMC inflation in the absence of tension to the CTrA resulted in a small increase in the PMC perimeter and a larger posterior displacement. Combining PMC inflation and tension to the CTrA resulted in an incremental increase in PLF tension without significantly altering tension in the MLF. Paraspinal muscle contraction leads to posterior displacement of the PLF. When expansion is combined with abdominal muscle contraction, the CTrA and internal oblique transfers tension almost exclusively to the PLF, thereby girdling the paraspinal muscles. The lateral border of the PMC is restrained from displacement to maintain integrity. Posterior movement of the PMC represents an increase of the PLF extension moment arm. Dysfunctional paraspinal muscles would reduce the posterior

  7. Signaling in muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ivana Y; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2015-02-02

    Signaling pathways regulate contraction of striated (skeletal and cardiac) and smooth muscle. Although these are similar, there are striking differences in the pathways that can be attributed to the distinct functional roles of the different muscle types. Muscles contract in response to depolarization, activation of G-protein-coupled receptors and other stimuli. The actomyosin fibers responsible for contraction require an increase in the cytosolic levels of calcium, which signaling pathways induce by promoting influx from extracellular sources or release from intracellular stores. Rises in cytosolic calcium stimulate numerous downstream calcium-dependent signaling pathways, which can also regulate contraction. Alterations to the signaling pathways that initiate and sustain contraction and relaxation occur as a consequence of exercise and pathophysiological conditions.

  8. Electromyography study of the portions of the abdominal rectus muscle.

    PubMed

    Negrao Filho, R de F; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da C

    1997-01-01

    This study objective was to verify the behavior of three portions of the abdominal rectus muscle through a quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal in different types of abdominal exercises. Ten young male between 16 and 27 years old were studied and they had no previous history of muscle and joint illness. They were well-trained and did seven abdominal exercises chosen considering the types of contraction (isotonic and isometric) as well as the muscle fixation points. The electric activity of the superior, medium (above umbilicus) and inferior (below umbilicus) portions at the left side of the abdominal rectus muscle was taken using Beckman type surface mini-electrodes. The registers were collected from computerized 8-channel Nicholet electromyography equipment, model Viking II. The signals were quantified using the MVA (Maximum Volunteer Activity) software, being considered for analysis the values of RMS (Root Mean Square). The obtained data were submitted to a parametric analysis using the variance analysis (F test) and also the Tukey test, besides a descriptive graphic analysis starting from the average RMS values of each muscle portion. This study results suggest that for the majority of the subjects, the functional activities of the abdominal rectus muscle are performed with electric activity differences among their portions, showing a tendency of producing more electric activity in the superior portion than in the medium and inferior portions. The experiment also demonstrated an absence of a common behavior pattern in the three portions of the ten tested subjects. PMID:9444489

  9. Relative Activity of Abdominal Muscles during Commonly Prescribed Strengthening Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Gilbert M.; Hyde, Jennifer E.; Uhrlaub, Michael B.; Wendel, Cara L.; Karst, Gregory M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relative electromyographic (EMG) activity of upper and lower rectus abdominis (LRA) and external oblique (EOA) muscles during five abdominal strengthening exercises. Isometric and dynamic EMG data indicated that abdominal strengthening exercises activated various abdominal muscle groups. For the LRA and EOA muscle groups, there were…

  10. Acting Out Muscle Contraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Describes a science activity that can be implemented into anatomy and physiology courses that demonstrates the interactions between action and myosin, the roles of sodium and calcium ions in the regulation of contraction, and the functions of the plasma membrane and the sarcoplasmic reticulum. (YDS)

  11. Comparison of abdominal muscle thickness according to feedback method used during abdominal hollowing exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangyong; Han, Seulki; Lee, Daehee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was intended to examine the most effective feedback method for contracting the musculus transversus abdominis muscle by using basic training, a pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging during abdominal hollowing exercise training. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects in this study were 30 healthy young students in their twenties. Thirty subjects were divided randomly and equally into the basic training, the pressure biofeedback unit, and real-time ultrasonographic imaging groups. All of the subjects received abdominal hollowing exercise training for 15 minutes. The subjects in the pressure biofeedback unit group were trained by using a pressure biofeedback unit. Those in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group received training with monitoring of possible contraction of their musculus transversus abdominis muscles on ultrasonography. [Results] In all the three groups, the musculus transversus abdominis became significantly thicker, but more significantly in the real-time ultrasonographic imaging group than in the basic training group. [Conclusion] The feedback method using real-time ultrasonographic imaging may be more effective in thickening the musculus transversus abdominis muscle during exercise than the traditional feedback method with manual contact only. However, it is insufficient in terms of overall qualitative improvement of exercise outcome. PMID:27799683

  12. Abdominal obesity, muscle composition, and insulin resistance in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert; Freeman, Jennifer; Hudson, Robert; Janssen, Ian

    2002-11-01

    The independent relationships between visceral and abdominal sc adipose tissue (AT) depots, muscle composition, and insulin sensitivity were examined in 40 abdominally obese, premenopausal women. Measurements included glucose disposal by euglycemic clamp, muscle composition by computed tomography, abdominal and nonabdominal (e.g. leg) AT by magnetic resonance imaging and cardiovascular fitness. Glucose disposal rates were negatively related to visceral AT mass (r = -0.42, P < 0.01). These observations remained significant (P < 0.01) after control for nonabdominal and abdominal sc AT, muscle attenuation, and peak oxygen uptake. Total, abdominal, or leg sc AT or muscle attenuation was not significantly (P > 0.10) related to glucose disposal. Subdivision of abdominal sc AT into anterior and posterior depots did not alter the observed relationships. Further analysis matched two groups of women for abdominal sc AT but with low and high visceral AT. Women with high visceral AT had lower glucose disposal rates compared with those with low visceral AT (P < 0.05). A similar analysis performed on two groups of women matched for visceral AT but high and low abdominal sc AT revealed no statistically different values for insulin sensitivity (P > 0.10). In conclusion, visceral AT alone is a strong correlate of insulin resistance independent of nonabdominal, abdominal sc AT, muscle composition, and cardiovascular fitness. Subdivision of abdominal sc AT did not provide additional insight into the relationship between abdominal obesity and metabolic risk.

  13. Comparison of Abdominal Muscle Thickness with Vaginal Pressure Changes in Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-In; Hwang-Bo, Gak; Kim, Ha-Roo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to verify the efficacy of a pelvic floor muscle exercise program by comparing subjects’ muscle thickness with changes in vaginal pressure. [Subjects] Two groups of female participants without a medical history of pelvic floor muscle dysfunction were evaluated. The mean age of Group I was 33.5 years and that of Group II was 49.69 years. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform a pelvic floor muscle contraction. While measuring the vaginal pressure of the pelvic floor muscle, biofeedback was given on five levels, and the thicknesses of the transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique muscles were measured with ultrasound. [Results] The thickness of the transversus abdominis muscle was significantly increased at 30 cmH2O in Group I, and at 20 cmH2O in Group II. The thickness of the internal oblique abdominal muscle significantly increased at maximum contraction in Group II. [Conclusion] Different abdominal muscles contracted depending on vaginal pressure. The result may be used to create and implement an exercise program that effectively strengthens the pelvic floor muscles. PMID:24707099

  14. Differences in abdominal muscle activation during coughing between smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Min-Hyung; Lee, Dong-Rour; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of the abdominal muscles during coughing between smokers and nonsmokers. [Subjects] A total of 30 healthy adults (15 smokers, 15 nonsmokers) participated. [Methods] The percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction values (%MVIC) of the rectus abdominis (RA), external abdominal oblique (EO), and internal abdominal oblique (IO) and transversus abdominis (TrA) were measured using surface electromyography. [Results] The %MVIC of the IO and TrA statistically significantly differed and the %MVIC of IO and TrA was found to be higher during coughing in nonsmokers compared with during coughing in smokers. [Conclusion] The activity of the deep abdominal muscles in nonsmokers was also higher than that of smokers during coughing. PMID:27190443

  15. Ballistic abdominal exercises: muscle activation patterns during three activities along the stability/mobility continuum.

    PubMed

    McGill, Stuart M; Karpowicz, Amy; Fenwick, Chad M J

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the muscle activity and spine motion during several tasks requiring rapid abdominal contraction. Eight healthy men from a university population were instrumented to obtain surface electromyography of selected trunk and hip muscles, together with video analysis to calculate joint moments and electromagnetic lumbar spine position sensor to track spine posture. Exercises included a punch, throw, and a ballistic torso-stiffening maneuver. This study found that no muscle turned on significantly before any other muscle during both the 1-in. punch and ballistic torso-stiffening maneuver. Conversely, there was a significant order or muscle onset during the baseball throw. Muscles reached peak activation significantly before any other muscle during the baseball throw and 1-in. punch, but there were no significant differences for the torso-stiffening maneuver. The exercises quantified in this study demonstrated how muscle contraction dynamics change to meet differing demands for stiffening, for force/moment production, and for rapid movements. Specifically, it seems that there is an order of contraction when movement is the goal but not when just spine stability is required. Thus, a different intensity of abdominal bracing is required to achieve the different objectives of sports tasks and exercises.

  16. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents.

  17. The effect of resistance exercise direction for hip joint stabilization on lateral abdominal muscle thickness

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of resistance direction in hip joint stabilization exercise on change in lateral abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults. Twenty-six healthy adults were randomly allocated to either a hip stabilization exercise by hip straight resistance group (n=12) or a hip diagonal resistance group (n=14). The outcome measures included contraction thickness ratio in transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique, and TrA lateral slide were assessed during the abdominal drawing-in maneuver by b-mode ultrasound. The researcher measured the abdominal muscle thickness of each participant before the therapist began the intervention and at the moment intervention was applied. There was a significant difference in lateral abdominal muscle thickness between the straight resistance exercise of hip joint group and the diagonal resistance exercise of hip joint group. Significant differences were found between the two groups in the percentage of change of muscle thickness of the TrA (P=0.018) and in the thickness ratio of the TrA (P=0.018). Stability exercise accompanied by diagonal resistance on the hip joint that was applied in this study can induce automatic contraction of the IO and TrA, which provides stability to the lumbar spine. PMID:27807520

  18. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Man, W; Hopkinson, N; Harraf, F; Nikoletou, D; Polkey, M; Moxham, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pressure is a recently described technique that assesses abdominal muscle (and hence expiratory muscle) strength more accurately than traditional techniques. A study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that more severe weakness exists in the quadriceps than in the abdominal muscles of patients with COPD compared with healthy elderly controls. Methods: Maximum cough gastric pressure and quadriceps isometric strength were measured in 43 patients with stable COPD and 25 healthy elderly volunteers matched for anthropometric variables. Results: Despite a significant reduction in mean quadriceps strength (29.9 kg v 41.2 kg; 95% CI –17.9 to –4.6; p = 0.001), cough gastric pressure was preserved in patients with COPD (227.3 cm H2O v 204.8 cm H2O; 95% CI –5.4 to 50.6; p = 0.11). Conclusions: Abdominal muscle strength is preserved in stable COPD outpatients in the presence of quadriceps weakness. This suggests that anatomical location and fibre type cannot explain quadriceps weakness in COPD. By inference, we conclude that disuse and consequent deconditioning are important factors in the development of quadriceps muscle weakness in COPD patients, or that activity protects the abdominal muscles from possible systemic myopathic processes. PMID:15923239

  19. A new paradigm for muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Walter; Powers, Krysta; Johnston, Kaleena; Duvall, Mike

    2015-01-01

    For the past 60 years, muscle contraction had been thought to be governed exclusively by the contractile filaments, actin, and myosin. This thinking explained most observations for concentric and isometric, but not for eccentric muscle contractions. Just over a decade ago, we discovered that eccentric contractions were associated with a force that could not be assigned to actin and myosin, but was at least in part associated with the filamentous protein titin. Titin was found to bind calcium upon activation, thereby increasing its structural stability, and thus its stiffness and force. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that the proximal part of titin binds to actin in an activation- and force-dependent manner, thereby shortening its free length, thus increasing its stiffness and force. Therefore, we propose that muscle contraction involves three filaments, actin, myosin and titin, and that titin regulates force by binding calcium and by shortening its spring length by binding to actin. PMID:26113821

  20. Lumbo-pelvic stability and electromyography of abdominal muscles in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Silva, L Alves; Monteiro, T Lombardi; Alves, N; de Carvalho, A Cesinando; de Azevedo, F Mícolis

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating the ability to rectify and maintain lumbar adjustment can contribute toward the understanding of the behavior of abdominal muscles and their participation in the stability of pelvic muscles in dancers during the posterior pelvic tilt and double straight leg lowering tests. Nine healthy volunteers (male and female ballet dancers; age mean: 25.9 +/- 7.37 years) underwent maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC), isometric voluntary contraction at 50% of MIVC, posterior pelvic tilt (PPT) and double straight leg lowering (DSLL) tests. The tests were carried out in a single day, with 3 repetitions each. During the tests, electromygraphic signals of the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus and obliquus externus were recorded. The signal acquisition system was made up of bipolar surface electrodes, electrogoniometer and an electromechanic device (pressure sensor), which were connected to a signal conditioner module. Root mean square values of each muscle during the DSLL and PPT were converted into percentage of activation of 50% MIVC. Lower back pressure was submitted to the same process. ANOVA with repeated measures was performed, with the level of significance set at p < 0.05. The results revealed that all dancers were able to maintain posterior pelvic tilt and there was trend toward greater activation of the bilateral obliquus internus muscle. In an attempt to keep the pelvic region stabilized during DSLL, there was a greater contribution from the obliquus externus muscle in relation to other abdominal muscles.

  1. Effect of craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jung Gil; Won, Shin Ji; Gak, Hwangbo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the craniocervical posture on abdominal muscle activities in hook-lying position. [Subjects] This study recruited 12 healthy young adults. [Methods] Each subject was asked to adopt a supine position with the hip and knee flexed at 60°. Surface electromyographic signals of transversus abdominis/internal oblique, rectus abdominis, and external oblique in different craniocervical postures (extension, neutral, and flexion) were compared. [Results] The transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis showed increased muscle activities in craniocervical flexion compared to craniocervical extension and neutral position. Greater muscle activities of the external oblique were seen in craniocervical flexion than in craniocervical extension. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion was found to be effective to increase the abdominal muscle activities. Consideration of craniocervical posture is recommended when performing trunk stabilization exercises. PMID:27065558

  2. Localization of motoneurons innervating individual abdominal muscles of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a systematic investigation of the innervation of the cat's individual abdominal muscles. The segmental distribution of the different motor pools was determined by using electrical microstimulation of the ventral horn to produce visible localized muscle twitches and by retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase injected into individual muscles. The segmental distribution of each motor pool was as follows: rectus abdominis, T4-L3; external oblique, T6-L3; transverse abdominis, T9-L3; and internal oblique, T13-L3.

  3. The effect of tonic contraction of the finger muscle on the motor cortical representation of the contracting adjacent muscle.

    PubMed

    Jono, Yasutomo; Chujo, Yuta; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Nikaido, Yasutaka; Hatanaka, Ryota; Hiraoka, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of tonic contraction of the finger muscle on the motor cortical representation of the contracting adjacent muscle. A representation map of the motor evoked potential (MEP) in the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles was obtained with the subject at rest or during tonic contraction of the ADM muscle while the FDI muscle was tonically contracted. The center of gravity (COG) of the MEP map in the FDI muscle shifted medially during contraction of the ADM muscle. Motor cortical excitability in the motor cortical representation of the FDI muscle that did not overlap with the motor cortical representation of the ADM muscle was suppressed, but motor cortical excitability in the motor cortical representation of the FDI muscle overlapping with the motor cortical representation of the ADM muscle was not suppressed during contraction of the ADM muscle. The motor cortical representation of the FDI muscle not overlapping with the motor cortical representation of the ADM muscle was located lateral to that of the FDI muscle that did overlap with the motor cortical representation of the ADM muscle. Medial shift of the COG of the motor cortical representation of the contracting finger muscle induced by tonic contraction of the adjacent finger muscle must be due to suppression of motor cortical excitability in the lateral part of the representation, which is not shared by the adjacent representation.

  4. On the thermodynamics of smooth muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålhand, Jonas; McMeeking, Robert M.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2016-09-01

    Cell function is based on many dynamically complex networks of interacting biochemical reactions. Enzymes may increase the rate of only those reactions that are thermodynamically consistent. In this paper we specifically treat the contraction of smooth muscle cells from the continuum thermodynamics point of view by considering them as an open system where matter passes through the cell membrane. We systematically set up a well-known four-state kinetic model for the cross-bridge interaction of actin and myosin in smooth muscle, where the transition between each state is driven by forward and reverse reactions. Chemical, mechanical and energy balance laws are provided in local forms, while energy balance is also formulated in the more convenient temperature form. We derive the local (non-negative) production of entropy from which we deduce the reduced entropy inequality and the constitutive equations for the first Piola-Kirchhoff stress tensor, the heat flux, the ion and molecular flux and the entropy. One example for smooth muscle contraction is analyzed in more detail in order to provide orientation within the established general thermodynamic framework. In particular the stress evolution, heat generation, muscle shorting rate and a condition for muscle cooling are derived.

  5. Efficiency of muscle contraction. The chemimechanic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E. W.

    1991-10-01

    Although muscle contraction is one of the principal themes of biological research, the exact mechanism whereby the chemical free energy of ATP hydrolysis is converted into mechanical work remains elusive. The high thermodynamic efficiency of the process, above all, is difficult to explain on the basis of present theories. A model of the elementary effect in muscle contraction is proposed which aims at high thermodynamic efficiency based on an approximate equilibrium between chemical and mechanical forces throughout the transfer of free energy. The experimental results described in the literature support the assumption that chemimechanic equilibrium is approximated by a free energy transfer system based on the binding of divalent metal ions to the myosin light chains. Muscle contraction demonstrated without light chains is expected to proceed with a considerably lower efficiency. Free energy transfer systems based on the binding of ions to proteins seem to be widespread in the cell. By establishing an approximate chemimechanic equilibrium, they could facilitate biological reactions considerably and save large amounts of free energy. The concept of chemimechanic equilibrium is seen as a supplementation to the concept of chemiosmotic equilibrium introduced for the membrane transport by P. Mitchell.

  6. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  7. The Pilates Method increases respiratory muscle strength and performance as well as abdominal muscle thickness.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Mateus Beltrame; da Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas; Weber, Laura Menezes; Monteiro, Mariane Borba

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p = 0.001), MEP (p = 0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p = 0.020) and the TrA (p < 0.001), IO (p = 0.002) and EO (p < 0.001) thickness after the PM program. No alterations in lung function were found. These findings suggest that the PM program promotes abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses. PMID:27210841

  8. The Pilates Method increases respiratory muscle strength and performance as well as abdominal muscle thickness.

    PubMed

    Giacomini, Mateus Beltrame; da Silva, Antônio Marcos Vargas; Weber, Laura Menezes; Monteiro, Mariane Borba

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the Pilates Method (PM) training program on the thickness of the abdominal wall muscles, respiratory muscle strength and performance, and lung function. This uncontrolled clinical trial involved 16 sedentary women who were assessed before and after eight weeks of PM training. The thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA), internal oblique (IO) and external oblique (EO) muscles was assessed. The respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximum inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) pressure. The lung function and respiratory muscle performance were assessed by spirometry. An increase was found in MIP (p = 0.001), MEP (p = 0.031), maximum voluntary ventilation (p = 0.020) and the TrA (p < 0.001), IO (p = 0.002) and EO (p < 0.001) thickness after the PM program. No alterations in lung function were found. These findings suggest that the PM program promotes abdominal wall muscle hypertrophy and an increase in respiratory muscle strength and performance, preventing weakness in abdominal muscles and dysfunction in ventilatory mechanics, which could favor the appearance of illnesses.

  9. Urethane and contraction of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Altura, B. M.; Weinberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    1 In vitro studies were undertaken on rat aortic strips and portal vein segments in order to determine whether or not the anaesthetic, urethane, can exert direct actions on vascular smooth muscle. 2 Urethane was found to inhibit development of spontaneous mechanical activity. This action took place with a urethane concentration as little as one tenth of that found in anaesthetic plasma concentratios, i.e., 10(-3) M. 3 Urethane (10(-3 to 10(-1) M) dose-dependently attenuated contractions induced by adrenaline, angiotensin and KCl. These inhibitory actions were observed with urethane added either before or after the induced contractions. 4 Ca2+-induced contractions of K+-depolarized aortae and portal veins were also attenuated, dose-dependently, by urethane. 5 All of these inhibitory effects were completely, and almost immediately, reversed upon washing out the anaesthetic from the organ baths. 6 A variety of pharmacological antagonists failed to mimic or affect the inhibitory effects induced by urethane. 7 These data suggest that plasma concentrations of urethane commonly associated with induction of surgical anaesthesia can induce, directly, relaxation of vascular muscle. PMID:497529

  10. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction. PMID:27111629

  11. Active behavior of abdominal wall muscles: Experimental results and numerical model formulation.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Sierra, M; Lauzeral, N; Muñoz, M J; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B

    2016-08-01

    In the present study a computational finite element technique is proposed to simulate the mechanical response of muscles in the abdominal wall. This technique considers the active behavior of the tissue taking into account both collagen and muscle fiber directions. In an attempt to obtain the computational response as close as possible to real muscles, the parameters needed to adjust the mathematical formulation were determined from in vitro experimental tests. Experiments were conducted on male New Zealand White rabbits (2047±34g) and the active properties of three different muscles: Rectus Abdominis, External Oblique and multi-layered samples formed by three muscles (External Oblique, Internal Oblique, and Transversus Abdominis) were characterized. The parameters obtained for each muscle were incorporated into a finite strain formulation to simulate active behavior of muscles incorporating the anisotropy of the tissue. The results show the potential of the model to predict the anisotropic behavior of the tissue associated to fibers and how this influences on the strain, stress and generated force during an isometric contraction.

  12. Flexing the abdominals: do bigger muscles make better fighters?

    PubMed

    Mowles, Sophie L; Cotton, Peter A; Briffa, Mark

    2011-06-23

    Animal contests often involve the use of repeated signals, which are assumed to advertise stamina, and hence fighting ability. While an individual may be predicted to give up once it has crossed an energetic threshold, costs inflicted by its opponent may also contribute to the giving-up decision. Therefore, physical strength should be of key importance in contests, allowing high signal magnitude as well as potentially inflicting costs. We investigated this using hermit crab shell fights, which employ a 'hybrid signal' of shell rapping, which advertises stamina but also imposes potentially deleterious consequences for the receiver. We examined the links between contest outcomes and two proxies for strength; the protein content and relative mass of hermit crab abdominal muscles, the main muscle group used in shell rapping. Our results indicate that there was no difference in muscle protein between winners and losers, whereas winners had significantly greater muscle mass : body mass ratios. Thus, while stamina has been assumed by theory to be an important determinant of agonistic success, the present results demonstrate the importance of muscle size and thereby strength. PMID:21247940

  13. Some effects of vagal blockade on abdominal muscle activation and shortening in awake dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Leevers, A M; Road, J D

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of abdominal muscle activation are thought to be different during expiratory threshold loading (ETL) compared with hypercapnia. Our objectives in the present study were to determine the effects of removing excitatory vagal feedback on abdominal muscle activation, shortening and pattern of recruitment during ETL and hypercapnia. Six tracheotomized dogs were chronically implanted with sonomicrometer transducers and fine wire EMG electrodes in each of the four abdominal muscles. Muscle length changes and EMG activity were studied in the awake dog during ETL (6 dogs) and CO2 rebreathing (3 dogs), before and after vagal blockade. 2. Following vagal blockade, the change in volume (increase in functional residual capacity, FRC) during ETL was greater and active phasic shortening of all the abdominal muscles was reduced, when shortening was compared with a similar change in lung volume. Similarly, at comparable minute ventilation, abdominal muscle active shortening was also reduced during hypercapnia. The internal muscle layer was recruited preferentially in both control and vagally blocked dogs during both ETL and hypercapnia. 3. The degree of recruitment of the abdominal muscles during ETL and hypercapnia in awake dogs is influenced by vagal feedback, but less so than in anaesthetized dogs. These results illustrate the importance of the vagi and abdominal muscle activation in load compensation. However, vagal reflexes are apparently not contributing to the preferential recruitment of the internal muscle layer. In awake dogs during vagal blockade abdominal muscle recruitment still occurs by extravagal mechanisms. PMID:8568685

  14. Effects of Abdominal Hollowing During Stair Climbing on the Activations of Local Trunk Stabilizing Muscles: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ah Young; Kim, Eun Hyuk; Cho, Yun Woo; Kwon, Sun Oh; Son, Su Min

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine using surface electromyography whether stair climbing with abdominal hollowing (AH) is better at facilitating local trunk muscle activity than stair climbing without AH. Methods Twenty healthy men with no history of low back pain participated in the study. Surface electrodes were attached to the multifidus (MF), lumbar erector spinae, thoracic erector spinae, transverse abdominus - internal oblique abdominals (TrA-IO), external oblique abdominals (EO), and the rectus abdominis. Amplitudes of electromyographic signals were measured during stair climbing. Study participants performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) for each muscle in various positions to normalize the surface electromyography data. Results AH during stair climbing resulted in significant increases in normalized MVCs in both MFs and TrA-IOs (p<0.05). Local trunk muscle/global trunk muscle ratios were higher during stair climbing with AH as compared with stair climbing without AH. Especially, right TrA-IO/EO and left TrA-IO/EO were significantly increased (p<0.05). Conclusion Stair climbing with AH activates local trunk stabilizing muscles better than stair climbing without AH. The findings suggest that AH during stair climbing contributes to trunk muscle activation and trunk stabilization. PMID:24466515

  15. Nox regulation of smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Ritsick, Darren R; Edens, William A; Finnerty, Victoria; Lambeth, J David

    2007-07-01

    The catalytic subunit gp91phox (Nox2) of the NADPH oxidase of mammalian phagocytes is activated by microbes and immune mediators to produce large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which participate in microbial killing. Homologs of gp91phox, the Nox and Duox enzymes, were recently described in a range of organisms, including plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates such as Drosophila melanogaster. While their enzymology and cell biology are being extensively studied in many laboratories, little is known about in vivo functions of Noxes. Here, we establish and use an inducible system for RNAi to discover functions of dNox, an ortholog of human Nox5 in Drosophila. We report here that depletion of dNox in musculature causes retention of mature eggs within ovaries, leading to female sterility. In dNox-depleted ovaries and ovaries treated with a Nox inhibitor, muscular contractions induced by the neuropeptide proctolin are markedly inhibited. This functional defect results from a requirement for dNox-for the proctolin-induced calcium flux in Drosophila ovaries. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel biological role for Nox-generated ROS in mediating agonist-induced calcium flux and smooth muscle contraction.

  16. Contraction stimulates muscle glucose uptake independent of atypical PKC.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Fujii, Nobuharu L; Toyoda, Taro; An, Ding; Farese, Robert V; Leitges, Michael; Hirshman, Michael F; Mul, Joram D; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-11-01

    Exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, but the underlying mechanisms are only partially understood. The atypical protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms λ and ζ (PKC-λ/ζ) have been shown to be necessary for insulin-, AICAR-, and metformin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, but not for treadmill exercise-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. To investigate if PKC-λ/ζ activity is required for contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake, we used mice with tibialis anterior muscle-specific overexpression of an empty vector (WT), wild-type PKC-ζ (PKC-ζ(WT)), or an enzymatically inactive T410A-PKC-ζ mutant (PKC-ζ(T410A)). We also studied skeletal muscle-specific PKC-λ knockout (MλKO) mice. Basal glucose uptake was similar between WT, PKC-ζ(WT), and PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles. In contrast, in situ contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in PKC-ζ(T410A) tibialis anterior muscles compared to WT or PKC-ζ(WT) tibialis anterior muscles. Furthermore, in vitro contraction-stimulated glucose uptake was greater in soleus muscles of MλKO mice than WT controls. Thus, loss of PKC-λ/ζ activity increases contraction-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. These data clearly demonstrate that PKC-λζ activity is not necessary for contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  17. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5–10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (−8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15–30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  18. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E; Macefield, Vaughan G; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5-10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (-8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15-30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  19. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL(uptake)) of l-[(3)H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL(uptake) of l-[(3)H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p<0.05). The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]IAP was much higher than that of l-[(3)H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p<0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly via the contraction-induced translocation of its specific transporter OCTN2 to the plasma membrane.

  20. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    SciTech Connect

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL{sub uptake}) of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL{sub uptake} of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p < 0.05). The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly

  1. The comparison of abdominal muscle activation on unstable surface according to the different trunk stability exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Da-yeon; Kim, Tae-ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effect of abdominal muscle activities and the activation ratio related to trunk stabilization to compare the effects between the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and lumbar stabilization exercises on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] Study subjects were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain, who were equally and randomly assigned to either the abdominal drawing-in maneuver group and the lumbar stabilization exercise group. Abdominal muscle activation and ratio was measured using a wireless TeleMyo DTS during right leg raise exercises while sitting on a Swiss ball. [Results] Differences in rectus abdominis, external oblique abdominis, and internal oblique abdominis muscle activation were observed before and after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the groups in the muscle activation of the external oblique abdominis and internal oblique abdominis, and the muscle activation ratio of external oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis and internal oblique abdominis/rectus abdominis. [Conclusion] Consequently trunk stability exercise enhances internal oblique abdominis activity and increases trunk stabilization. In addition, the abdominal drawing-in maneuver facilitates the deep muscle more than LSE in abdominal muscle. Therefore, abdominal drawing-in maneuver is more effective than lumbar stabilization exercises in facilitating trunk stabilization. PMID:27134401

  2. Effects of respiratory muscle training and electrical stimulation of abdominal muscles on respiratory capabilities in tetraplegic patients.

    PubMed

    Zupan, A; Savrin, R; Erjavec, T; Kralj, A; Karcnik, T; Skorjanc, T; Benko, H; Obreza, P

    1997-08-01

    Thirteen tetraplegic patients were included in the study of the effects of respiratory muscle training and of electrical stimulation of the abdominal muscles on their respiratory capabilities. Each patient was subjected for three 1 month lasting periods of the study: for inspiratory muscle training, expiratory muscle training and for a period without training. The sequence of these three periods was random for each patient. Respiratory tests (RT) measuring forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were conducted before and following each monthly period. Measurements were taken under four sets of conditions: the patients' unassisted efforts, their efforts combined with pressure manually applied by a therapist to the upper part of their abdomen, and their efforts accompanied by electrical stimulation (ES) of the abdominal muscles during the early phase of expirium, once triggered by the therapist and once by the patients themselves. RT values were increasing following respiratory muscle training and inspiratory training apparently had a slightly greater effect than its expiratory counterpart. The increments of values of RT were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after the inspiratory muscle training. RT measurements were greater when the patient's voluntary effort was combined with ES of abdominal muscles than when it was not. This study concludes that respiratory muscle training is a potentially effective approach and that ES of the abdominal muscles has potentials to improve coughing in tetraplegic patients.

  3. Work done by titin protein folding assists muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Fernández, Julio M.

    2016-01-01

    Current theories of muscle contraction propose that the power stroke of a myosin motor is the sole source of mechanical energy driving the sliding filaments of a contracting muscle. These models exclude titin, the largest protein in the human body, which determines the passive elasticity of muscles. Here, we show that stepwise unfolding/folding of titin Ig domains occurs in the elastic I band region of intact myofibrils at physiological sarcomere lengths and forces of 6-8 pN. We use single molecule techniques to demonstrate that unfolded titin Ig domains undergo a spontaneous stepwise folding contraction at forces below 10 pN, delivering up to 105 zJ of additional contractile energy, which is larger than the mechanical energy delivered by the power stroke of a myosin motor. Thus, it appears inescapable that folding of titin Ig domains is an important, but so far unrecognized contributor to the force generated by a contracting muscle. PMID:26854230

  4. Sepsis attenuates the anabolic response to skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Jennifer L.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically stimulated muscle contraction is a potential clinical therapy to treat sepsis-induced myopathy; however, whether sepsis alters contraction-induced anabolic signaling is unknown. Polymicrobial peritonitis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male C57BL/6 mice and time-matched, pair-fed controls (CON). At ~24 h post-CLP, the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve to evoke maximal muscle contractions and the gastrocnemius was collected 2 h later. Protein synthesis was increased by muscle contraction in CON mice. Sepsis suppressed the rate of synthesis in both the non-stimulated (31%) and stimulated (57%) muscle versus CON. Contraction of muscle in CON mice increased the phosphorylation of mTORC1 substrates S6K1 Thr389 (8-fold), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (7-fold) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (11-fold). Sepsis blunted the contraction-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr389 (67%), S6K1 Thr421/Ser424 (46%) and 4E-BP1 Ser65 (85%). Conversely, sepsis did not appear to modulate protein elongation as eEF2 Thr56 phosphorylation was decreased similarly by muscle contraction in both groups. MAPK signaling was discordant following muscle contraction in septic muscle; phosphorylation of ERK Thr202/Tyr204 and p38 Thr180/Tyr182 was increased similarly in both CON and CLP mice while sepsis prevented the contraction-induced phosphorylation of JNK Thr183/Tyr185 and c-JUN Ser63. The expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in muscle was increased by sepsis, and contraction increased TNF-α to a greater extent in muscle from septic than CON mice. Injection of the mTOR inhibitor Torin2 in separate mice confirmed that contraction-induced increases in S6K1 and 4E-BP1 were mTOR-mediated. These findings demonstrate that resistance to contraction-induced anabolic signaling occurs during sepsis and is predominantly mTORC1-dependent. PMID:25423127

  5. Mechanics of muscle injury induced by lengthening contraction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yingxin; Wineman, Alan S; Waas, Anthony M

    2008-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of two primary structural components, contractile myofibrils and extracellular matrix (ECM). The myofibrils adhere to the surrounding endomysium through the basal lamina, sarcolemma and dystrophin, and dystrophin associated glycoprotein (DAG). In this study, a novel shear lag type model is developed to investigate the mechanics of injury to the single muscle fiber due to lengthening contractions. A single muscle fiber is considered as a composite system with reinforced by the contractile myofibrils. The lateral linkages between myofibril and endomysium is modeled as a zero thickness coating layer, that could be injured under high interfacial shear stress. The results shows that the degree of the muscle injury is correlated to the magnitude of the passive stretch during the contraction. Dystrophic muscles are more susceptible to contraction induced injury due to lack of DAG complex in lateral linkage. PMID:18686034

  6. Physiological response to submaximal isometric contractions of the paravertebral muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, B. R.; Jorgensen, K.; Hargens, A. R.; Nielsen, P. K.; Nicolaisen, T.

    1999-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Brief (30-second) isometric trunk extensions at 5%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and 3 minutes of prolonged trunk extension (20% MVC) in erect position were studied in nine healthy male subjects. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the intercorrelation between intramuscular pressure and tissue oxygenation of the paravertebral muscles during submaximal isometric contractions and further, to evaluate paravertebral electromyogram and intramuscular pressure as indicators of force development. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Local physiologic responses to muscle contraction are incompletely understood. METHODS: Relative oxygenation was monitored with noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy, intramuscular pressure was measured with a transducer-tipped catheter, and surface electromyogram was monitored at three recording sites. RESULTS: The root mean square amplitudes of the paravertebral electromyogram (L4, left and right; T12, right) and intramuscular pressure measured in the lumbar multifidus muscle at L4 increased with greater force development in a curvilinear manner. A significant decrease in the oxygenation of the lumbar paravertebral muscle in response to muscle contraction was found at an initial contraction level of 20% MVC. This corresponded to a paravertebral intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg. However, during prolonged trunk extension, no further decrease in tissue oxygenation was found compared with the tissue oxygenation level at the end of the brief contractions, indicating that homeostatic adjustments (mean blood pressure and heart rate) over time were sufficient to maintain paravertebral muscle oxygen levels. CONCLUSION: At a threshold intramuscular pressure of 30-40 mm Hg during muscle contraction, oxygenation in the paravertebral muscles is significantly reduced. The effect of further increase in intramuscular pressure on tissue oxygenation over time may be compensated for by an increase in blood pressure and heart

  7. The abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre for detecting activity in the deep abdominal muscles: is this clinical tool reliable and valid?

    PubMed Central

    Kaping, Karsten; Äng, Björn O; Rasmussen-Barr, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective The abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) is a common clinical tool for manually assessing whether a preferential activation of the deep abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain (LBP) is ‘correct’ or not. The validity and reliability of manual assessment of the ADIM are, however, as yet unknown. This study evaluated the concurrent and discriminative validity and reliability of the manually assessed ADIM. Design Single-blinded cross-sectional study. Settings General population in Stockholm County, Sweden. Participants The study sample comprised 38 participants seeking care for LBP, and 15 healthy subjects. Measures The manual ADIM was assessed as correct or not following a standard procedure. Ultrasound imaging (USI) was used as the concurrent reference (gold standard) for the manually assessed ADIM by calculating a ratio of the change in muscle thickness between the resting and the contracted states: the correlation between manual test and USI was calculated. Discriminative validity was analysed by calculating sensitivity and specificity. A sample of 24 participants was analysed with κ coefficients for interobserver reliability between two raters. Results The concurrent validity between the manual ADIM and the ADIM–USI ratios showed poor correlations (r=0.13–0.40). The discriminative validity of the manually assessed ADIM to predict LBP showed a sensitivity/specificity of 0.30/0.73, while the ADIM–USI ratio to predict LBP showed 0.19/0.87. The interobserver reliability for the manually assessed ADIM revealed substantial agreement: K=0.71, CI (95%) 0.41 to 1.00. Conclusions Although the interobserver reliability of the manually assessed ADIM was high, the concurrent and discriminative validity were both low for examining the preferential activity of the deep abdominal muscles. Neither the manually assessed ADIM nor the ultrasound testing discriminated between participants with LBP and healthy subjects regarding preferential activity of

  8. Imaging two-dimensional mechanical waves of skeletal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, Christer; Claesson, Kenji; Holtermann, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is related to rapid mechanical shortening and thickening. Recently, specialized ultrasound systems have been applied to demonstrate and quantify transient tissue velocities and one-dimensional (1-D) propagation of mechanical waves during muscle contraction. Such waves could potentially provide novel information on musculoskeletal characteristics, function and disorders. In this work, we demonstrate two-dimensional (2-D) mechanical wave imaging following the skeletal muscle contraction. B-mode image acquisition during multiple consecutive electrostimulations, speckle-tracking and a time-stamp sorting protocol were used to obtain 1.4 kHz frame rate 2-D tissue velocity imaging of the biceps brachii muscle contraction. The results present novel information on tissue velocity profiles and mechanical wave propagation. In particular, counter-propagating compressional and shear waves in the longitudinal direction were observed in the contracting tissue (speed 2.8-4.4 m/s) and a compressional wave in the transverse direction of the non-contracting muscle tissue (1.2-1.9 m/s). In conclusion, analysing transient 2-D tissue velocity allows simultaneous assessment of both active and passive muscle tissue properties.

  9. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-03-24

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle.

  10. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the mO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster O2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle. PMID:25801957

  11. Contraction induced muscle injury: towards personalized training and recovery programs.

    PubMed

    Givli, Sefi

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscles can be injured by their own contractions. Such contraction-induced injury, often accompanied by delayed onset of muscle soreness, is a leading cause of the loss of mobility in the rapidly increasing population of elderly people. Unlike other types of muscle injuries which hurt almost exclusively those who are subjected to intensive exercise such as professional athletes and soldiers in training, contraction induced injury is a phenomenon which may be experienced by people of all ages while performing a variety of daily-life activities. Subjects that experience contraction induced injury report on soreness that usually increases in intensity in the first 24 h after the activity, peaks from 24 to 72 h, and then subsides and disappears in a few days. Despite their clinical importance and wide influence, there are almost no studies, clinical, experimental or computational, that quantitatively relate between the extent of contraction induced injury and activity factors, such as number of repetitions, their frequency and magnitude. The lack of such quantitative information is even more emphasized by the fact that contraction induced injury can be used, if moderate and controlled, to improve muscle performance in the long term. Thus, if properly understood and carefully implemented, contraction induced injury can be used for the purpose of personalized training and recovery programs. In this paper, we review experimental, clinical, and theoretical works, attempting towards drawing a more quantitative description of contraction induced injury and related phenomena.

  12. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the baseline value. Our results indicate that tissue oxygenation significantly decreases during brief, low levels of static muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle

  13. The architecture and contraction time of intrinsic foot muscles.

    PubMed

    Tosovic, Danijel; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Glen, Christopher; Gorelick, Mark; Mark Brown, J

    2012-12-01

    Although critical for effective human locomotion and posture, little data exists regarding the segmentation, architecture and contraction time of the human intrinsic foot muscles. To address this issue, the Abductor Hallucis (AH), Abductor Digiti Minimi (ADM), Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) and Extensor Digitorum Brevis (EDB) were investigated utilizing a cadaveric dissection and a non-invasive whole muscle mechanomyographic (wMMG) technique. The segmental structure and architecture of formaldehyde-fixed foot specimens were determined in nine cadavers aged 60-80 years. The wMMG technique was used to determine the contraction time (Tc) of individual muscle segments, within each intrinsic foot muscle, in 12 volunteers of both genders aged between 19 and 24 years. While the pattern of segmentation and segmental -architecture (e.g. fibre length) and -Tc of individual muscle segments within the same muscle were similar, they varied between muscles. Also, the average whole muscle Tc of FDB was significantly (p < 0.05) shorter (faster) (Tc = 58 ms) than in all other foot muscles investigated (ADM Tc = 72 ms, EDB Tc = 72 ms and ABH Tc = 69 ms). The results suggest that the architecture and contraction time of the FDB reflect its unique direct contribution, through toe flexion, to postural stability and the rapid development of ground reaction forces during forceful activities such as running and jumping.

  14. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  15. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport.

    PubMed

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-08-15

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport.

  16. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport. PMID:26113296

  17. Activation of spinobulbar lamina I neurons by static muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L B; Andrew, D; Craig, A D

    2002-03-01

    Spinal lamina I neurons are selectively activated by small-diameter somatic afferents, and they project to brain stem sites that are critical for homeostatic control. Because small-diameter afferent activity evoked by contraction of skeletal muscle reflexly elicits exercise-related cardiorespiratory activation, we tested whether spinobulbar lamina I cells respond to muscle contraction. Spinobulbar lamina I neurons were identified in chloralose-anesthetized cats by antidromic activation from the ipsilateral caudal ventrolateral medulla. Static contractions of the ipsilateral triceps surae muscle were evoked by tibial nerve stimulation using parameters that avoid afferent activation, and arterial blood pressure responses were recorded. Recordings were maintained from 13 of 17 L(7) lamina I spinobulbar neurons during static muscle contraction, and 5 of these neurons were excited. Three were selectively activated only by muscle afferents and did not have a cutaneous receptive field. Spinobulbar lamina I neurons activated by muscle contraction provide an ascending link for the reflex cardiorespiratory adjustments that accompany muscular work. This study provides an important first step in elucidating an ascending afferent pathway for somato-autonomic reflexes.

  18. Cross-bridge model of muscle contraction. Quantitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, E; Hill, T L; Chen, Y

    1980-01-01

    We recently presented, in a qualitative manner, a cross-bridge model of muscle contraction which was based on a biochemical kinetic cycle for the actomyosin ATPase activity. This cross-bridge model consisted of two cross-bridge states detached from actin and two cross-bridge states attached to actin. In the present paper, we attempt to fit this model quantitatively to both biochemical and physiological data. We find that the resulting complete cross-bridge model is able to account reasonably well for both the isometric transient data observed when a muscle is subjected to a sudden change in length and for the relationship between the velocity of muscle contraction in vivo and the actomyosin ATPase activity in vitro. This model also illustrates the interrelationship between biochemical and physiological data necessary for the development of a complete cross-bridge model of muscle contraction. PMID:6455168

  19. Abdominal hollowing and lateral abdominal wall muscles' activity in both healthy men & women: An ultrasonic assessment in supine and standing positions.

    PubMed

    Manshadi, Farideh Dehghan; Parnianpour, Mohamad; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Azghani, Mahmood Reza; Kazemnejad, Anooshirvan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Abdominal Hollowing (AH) maneuver on External Oblique (EO), Internal Oblique (IO) and Transversus Abdominis (TrA) muscles in both healthy men and women during the two postures of supine and upright standing. The study was conducted on 43 asymptomatic volunteers (22 males and 21 females) aged 19-44 (27.8±6.4) years. Rehabilitative Ultrasonic Imaging (RUSI) was simultaneously performed to measure muscle thickness in both rest and during AH maneuvers while activation of the TrA during AH was controlled by Pressure Biofeedback (PBF) device. Mixed-model ANOVA with repeated measures design, and Pearson correlation tests were used to analyze the data. Muscle thickness of all muscles was significantly higher for male subjects (F>6.2, p<0.017). The interaction effect of gender and muscle status was significant only for IO (F=7.458, p=0.009) indicating that AH maneuver increased the thickness of IO in men. Interaction effect of posture and muscle status on muscular thickness indicated that changing position only affects the resting thickness of TrA (F=5.617, p=0.023). Standing posture significantly affected the TrA contraction ratio (t=3.122, p=0.003) and TrA preferential activation ratio (t=2.76, p=0.008). There was no relationship between age and muscle thickness (r=0.262, p=0.09). The PBF has been introduced as a clinical and available device for monitoring TrA activity, while RUSI showed that both TrA and IO muscles had activated after AH maneuver. We recommend performing further investigations using electromyography and RUSI simultaneously at more functional postures such as upright standing.

  20. Training through gametherapy promotes coactivation of the pelvic floor and abdominal muscles in young women, nulliparous and continents

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Valeria Regina; Riccetto, Cássio; Martinho, Natalia Miguel; Marques, Joseane; Carvalho, Leonardo Cesar; Botelho, Simone

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objectives: Several studies have been investigated co-activation can enhance the effectveness of PFM training protocols allowing preventive and therapeutic goals in pelvic floor dysfunctions. The objective of the present study was to investigate if an abdominal-pelvic protocol of training (APT) using gametherapy would allow co-activation of PFM and transversus abdominis/oblique internal (TrA/OI) muscles. Patients and methods: Twenty-five nulliparous, continent, young females, with median age 24.76 (±3.76) years were evaluated using digital palpation (DP) of PFM and surface electromyography of PFM and TrA/OI simultaneously, during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), alternating PFM and TrA/OI contraction requests. All women participated on a supervised program of APT using gametherapy, that included exercises of pelvic mobilization associated to contraction of TrA/OI muscles oriented by virtual games, for 30 minutes, three times a week, in a total of 10 sessions. Electromyographic data were processed and analyzed by ANOVA - analysis of variance. Results: When MVC of TrA/OI was solicited, it was observed simultaneous increase of electromyographic activity of PFM (p=0.001) following ATP. However, EMG activity did not change significantly during MVC of PFM. Conclusion: Training using gametherapy allowed better co-activation of pelvic floor muscles in response to contraction of TrA, in young nulliparous and continent women. PMID:27564290

  1. The effects of surface condition on abdominal muscle activity during single-legged hold exercise.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sung-min; Oh, Jae-seop; Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun

    2015-02-01

    To treat low-back pain, various spinal stability exercises are commonly used to improve trunk muscle function and strength. Because human movement for normal daily activity occurs in multi-dimensions, the importance of exercise in multi-dimensions or on unstable surfaces has been emphasized. Recently, a motorized rotating platform (MRP) for facilitating multi-dimensions dynamic movement was introduced for clinical use. However, the abdominal muscle activity with this device has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to compare the abdominal muscle activity (rectus abdominis, external and internal oblique muscles) during an active single-leg-hold (SLH) exercise on a floor (stable surface), foam roll, and motorized rotating platform (MRP). Thirteen healthy male subjects participated in this study. Using electromyography, the abdominal muscle activity was measured while the subjects performed SLH exercises on floor (stable surface), foam roll, and MRP. There were significant differences in the abdominal muscle activities among conditions (P<.05), except for left EO (P>.05) (Fig. 2). After the Bonferroni correction, however, no significant differences among conditions remained, except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor and foam roll conditions (padj<0.017). The findings suggest that performing the SLH exercises on a foam roll and MRP is more effective increased activities of both side of RA and IO, and Rt. EO compared to floor condition. However, there were no significant differences in abdominal muscles activity in the multiple comparison between conditions (mean difference were smaller than the standard deviation in the abdominal muscle activities) (padj>0.017), except for differences in both side IO muscle activity between the floor (stable surface) and foam roll (padj<0.017) (effect size: 0.79/0.62 (non-supporting/supporting leg) for foam-roll versus floor).

  2. LOCATION OF MYOFIBER DAMAGE IN SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER LENGTHENING CONTRACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    LOVERING, RICHARD M.; MCMILLAN, ALAN B.; GULLAPALLI, RAO P.

    2012-01-01

    High-force lengthening contractions are associated with muscle damage and pain, and the muscle–tendon junction is commonly cited as the primary area where myofiber damage occurs. We induced injury in the rat tibialis anterior muscle and acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images postinjury. We also assayed membrane damage and quantified the number of centrally nucleated myofibers throughout the injured muscles. Results suggest that myofiber injury occurs primarily in the middle portion of the muscle, with interstitial edema in the middle and distal portions. PMID:19760787

  3. The compliance of contracting skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bressler, B. H.; Clinch, N. F.

    1974-01-01

    1. The method of controlled releases was used to obtain tension—extension curves in toad (Bufo bufo) sartorii under a variety of conditions at 0° C. 2. The curves obtained were approximately linear over a considerable range of force (0·4P0 to P0) if the releases were given from the plateau of tetanic tension. The slope of this linear region was little affected by changes of release velocity in the range 10-120 mm/sec. 3. Such changes as did occur with alterations in release velocity could be quantitatively accounted for in terms of the internal shortening predicted by A. V. Hill's two-component model. 4. As the muscles were stretched above l0, we found that the maximum stiffness of the tetanized muscles fell in much the same way as the maximum developed force, P0. 5. In another series of experiments we found a rapid change in the overall shape of the tension—extension curve during the early phase of force development in an isometric tetanus. The stiffness of the muscle increased with increasing developed force during this period. 6. The force—velocity curve in these muscles was measured by two methods, both giving a similar result. Surprisingly, toad muscle appears to have about the same intrinsic speed as frog muscle at 0° C. The a.b product from our experiments is considerably greater than the reported values for the maintenance heat rate at 0° C in these muscles. 7. The probable site of the variable compliance in active muscle is discussed. It seems most likely that this is within the A-band, perhaps in the cross-bridges themselves. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4207658

  4. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    PubMed

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  5. Respiratory and abdominal muscle responses to expiratory threshold loading in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cerny, F; Armitage, L; Hirsch, J A; Bishop, B

    1992-03-01

    We hypothesized that the hyperinflation and pulmonary dysfunction of cystic fibrosis (CF) would distort feedback and therefore alter the abdominal muscle response to graded expiratory threshold loads (ETLs). We compared the respiratory and abdominal muscle responses with graded ETLs of seven CF patients with severe lung dysfunction with those of matched healthy control subjects in the supine and 60 degrees head-up positions. Breathing frequency, tidal volume, and ventilatory timing were determined from inspiratory flow recordings. Abdominal electromyograms (EMGs) were detected with surface electrodes placed unilaterally over the external and internal oblique and the rectus abdominis muscles. Thresholds, times of onset, and durations of phasic abdominal activity were determined from raw EMGs; peak amplitudes were determined from integrated EMGs. Graded ETLs were imposed by submerging a tube from the expiratory port of the breathing valve into a column of water at depths of 0-25 cmH2O. We found that breathing frequency, tidal volume, and expired minute ventilation were higher in CF patients than in control subjects during low ETLs; a change in body position did not alter these ventilatory responses in the CF patients but did in the control subjects. All CF patients, but none of the control subjects, had tonic abdominal activity while supine. CF patients recruited abdominal muscles at lower loads, earlier in the respiratory cycle, and to a higher recruitment level in both positions than the control subjects, but burst duration of phasic activity was not different between groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Increased cardiovascular response to static contraction of larger muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Seals, D R; Washburn, R A; Hanson, P G; Painter, P L; Nagle, F J

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the size of the active muscle mass on the cardiovascular response to static contraction. Twelve male subjects performed one-arm handgrip (HG), two-leg extension (LE), and a "dead-lift" maneuver (DL) in a randomly assigned order for 3 min at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction. O2 uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), and mean intra-arterial blood pressure (MABP) were measured at rest and, in addition to absolute tension exerted, throughout contraction. There was a direct relationship between the size of the active muscle mass and the magnitude of the increases in VO2, HR, and MABP, even though all contractions were performed at the same relative intensity. Tension, VO2, HR, and MABP increased progressively from HG to LE to DL. It was concluded that at the same percentage of maximal voluntary contraction, the magnitude of the cardiovascular response to isometric exercise is directly influenced by the size of the contracting muscle mass.

  7. Prior history of FDI muscle contraction: different effect on MEP amplitude and muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Talis, V L; Kazennikov, O V; Castellote, J M; Grishin, A A; Ioffe, M E

    2014-03-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation of left motor cortex were assessed in ten healthy subjects during maintenance of a fixed FDI contraction level. Subjects maintained an integrated EMG (IEMG) level with visual feedback and reproduced this level by memory afterwards in the following tasks: stationary FDI muscle contraction at the level of 40 ± 5 % of its maximum voluntary contraction (MVC; 40 % task), at the level of 20 ± 5 % MVC (20 % task), and also when 20 % MVC was preceded by either no contraction (0-20 task), by stronger muscle contraction (40-20 task) or by no contraction with a previous strong contraction (40-0-20 task). The results show that the IEMG level was within the prescribed limits when 20 and 40 % stationary tasks were executed with and without visual feedback. In 0-20, 40-20, and 40-0-20 tasks, 20 % IEMG level was precisely controlled in the presence of visual feedback, but without visual feedback the IEMG and force during 20 % IEMG maintenance were significantly higher in the 40-0-20 task than those in 0-20 and 40-20 tasks. That is, without visual feedback, there were significant variations in muscle activity due to different prehistory of contraction. In stationary tasks, MEP amplitudes in 40 % task were higher than in 20 % task. MEPs did not differ significantly during maintenance of the 20 % level in tasks with different prehistory of muscle contraction with and without visual feedback. Thus, in spite of variations in muscle background activity due to different prehistory of contraction MEPs did not vary significantly. This dissociation suggests that the voluntary maintenance of IEMG level is determined not only by cortical mechanisms, as reflected by corticospinal excitability, but also by lower levels of CNS, where afferent signals and influences from other brain structures and spinal cord are convergent.

  8. Abdominal muscle strength is related to the quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Suenimeire; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Ferreira, Vânia Tie Koga; Scheicher, Marcos Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association between abdominal muscle strength and quality of life among older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 40 older adults: 20 with lumbar osteoarthritis (12 women and 8 men, mean age of 65.90 ± 4.80 years) and 20 controls (14 women and 6 men, mean age of 67.90 ± 4.60 years). The volunteers were submitted to an abdominal muscle strength test. Quality of life was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire. Both abdominal muscle strength and quality of life scores were significantly lower in the group with lumbar osteoarthritis in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). Moreover, significant and positive associations were found between abdominal muscle strength and the subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire (p < 0.05, 0.421 ≥ rs ≤ 0.694). Based on the present findings, older adults with lumbar osteoarthritis with greater abdominal muscle strength have a better quality of life.

  9. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  10. Modeling the contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernanda Sofia Quintela da Silva; Parente, Marco Paulo Lages; Rocha, Paulo Alexandre Gomes Gonçalves; Saraiva, Maria Teresa da Quinta E Costa de Mascarenhas; Ramos, Isabel Maria Amorim Pereira; Natal Jorge, Renato Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We performed numerical simulation of voluntary contraction of the pelvic floor muscles to evaluate the resulting displacements of the organs and muscles. Structures were segmented in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. Different material properties and constitutive models were attributed. The Finite Element Method was applied, and displacements were compared with dynamic MRI findings. Numerical simulation showed muscle magnitude displacement ranging from 0 to 7.9 mm, more evident in the posterior area. Accordingly, the anorectum moved more than the uterus and bladder. Dynamic MRI showed less 0.2 mm and 4.1 mm muscle dislocation in the anterior and cranial directions, respectively. Applications of this model include evaluating muscle impairment, subject-specific mesh implant planning, or effectiveness of rehabilitation.

  11. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    PubMed

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  12. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F.

    2015-01-01

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies. PMID:26460719

  13. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  14. Influence of exercise training on the oxidative capacity of rat abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, J. M.; Stump, C. S.; Tipton, C. M.; Fregosi, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endurance exercise training would increase the oxidative capacity of the abdominal expiratory muscles of the rat. Accordingly, 9 male rats were subjected to an endurance training protocol (1 h/day, 6 days/week, 9 weeks) and 9 litter-mates served as controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was used as an index of oxidative capacity, and was determined in the following muscles: soleus, plantaris, costal diaphragm, crural diaphragm, and in all four abdominal muscles: rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique. Compared to their non-trained litter-mates, the trained rats had higher peak whole body oxygen consumption rates (+ 16%) and CS activities in plantaris (+34%) and soleus (+36%) muscles. Thus, the training program caused substantial systemic and locomotor muscle adaptations. The CS activity of costal diaphragm was 20% greater in the trained animals, but no difference was observed in crural diaphragm. The CS activity in the abdominal muscles was less than one-half of that in locomotor and diaphragm muscles, and there were no significant changes with training except in the rectus abdominis where a 26% increase was observed. The increase in rectus abdominis CS activity may reflect its role in postural support and/or locomotion, as none of the primary expiratory pumping muscles adapted to the training protocol. The relatively low levels of CS activity in the abdominal muscles suggests that they are not recruited frequently at rest, and the lack of an increase with training indicates that these muscles do not contribute significantly to the increased ventilatory activity accompanying exercise in the rat.

  15. Improved Cell Culture Method for Growing Contracting Skeletal Muscle Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquette, Michele L.; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2013-01-01

    An improved method for culturing immature muscle cells (myoblasts) into a mature skeletal muscle overcomes some of the notable limitations of prior culture methods. The development of the method is a major advance in tissue engineering in that, for the first time, a cell-based model spontaneously fuses and differentiates into masses of highly aligned, contracting myotubes. This method enables (1) the construction of improved two-dimensional (monolayer) skeletal muscle test beds; (2) development of contracting three-dimensional tissue models; and (3) improved transplantable tissues for biomedical and regenerative medicine applications. With adaptation, this method also offers potential application for production of other tissue types (i.e., bone and cardiac) from corresponding precursor cells.

  16. Heat production during contraction in skeletal muscle of hypothyroid mice

    SciTech Connect

    Leijendekker, W.J.; van Hardeveld, C.; Elzinga, G. )

    1987-08-01

    The effect of hypothyroidism on tension-independent and -dependent heat produced during a twitch and a tetanic contraction of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscle of mice was examined. The amount of heat produced during a twitch and the rate of heat development during a tetanus of EDL and soleus were measured at and above optimal length. The effect of hypothyroidism on force production was <30%. Straight lines were used to fit the relation between heat production and force. Hypothyroidism significantly decreases tension-independent heat during contraction of EDL and soleus muscle. Because the tension-independent heat is considered to be related to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling, these findings suggest that ATP splitting due to the Ca{sup 2+} cycling is reduced in hypothyroid mice. This conclusion was strengthened by the observation that the oxalate-supported {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-uptake activity and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}-loading capacity of muscle homogenates from hypothyroid mice were reduced, respectively, to 51 and to 65% in soleus and to 63 and 73% in EDL muscle as compared with euthyroid mice. The tension-dependent rate of heat development during a tetanus was also decreased in soleus muscle of hypothyroid mice. This suggests a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis related to cross-bridge cycling in this muscle due to the hypothyroid state.

  17. Abdominal Closure after TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction with Transversus Abdominis Muscle Release and Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Avendano-Peza, Héctor; Novitsky, Yuri W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Breast reconstruction with a pedicled transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM) flap can result in significant abdominal wall donor-site morbidity. Although the pedicled TRAM flap donor area reinforced with mesh results in decreased rates of postoperative abdominal bulging and hernias, the best technique to accomplish that is yet to be elucidated. We present our novel technique of posterior components separation with transversus abdominis muscle release and retromuscular mesh reinforcement for donor-area closure during pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. PMID:27757337

  18. Capsiate supplementation reduces oxidative cost of contraction in exercising mouse skeletal muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Kazuya; Tonson, Anne; Pecchi, Émilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Fur, Yann; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Chronic administration of capsiate is known to accelerate whole-body basal energy metabolism, but the consequences in exercising skeletal muscle remain very poorly documented. In order to clarify this issue, the effect of 2-week daily administration of either vehicle (control) or purified capsiate (at 10- or 100-mg/kg body weight) on skeletal muscle function and energetics were investigated throughout a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements in mice. Mechanical performance and energy metabolism were assessed strictly non-invasively in contracting gastrocnemius muscle using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 31-phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Regardless of the dose, capsiate treatments markedly disturbed basal bioenergetics in vivo including intracellular pH alkalosis and decreased phosphocreatine content. Besides, capsiate administration did affect neither mitochondrial uncoupling protein-3 gene expression nor both basal and maximal oxygen consumption in isolated saponin-permeabilized fibers, but decreased by about twofold the Km of mitochondrial respiration for ADP. During a standardized in vivo fatiguing protocol (6-min of repeated maximal isometric contractions electrically induced at a frequency of 1.7 Hz), both capsiate treatments reduced oxidative cost of contraction by 30-40%, whereas force-generating capacity and fatigability were not changed. Moreover, the rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis during the post-electrostimulation recovery period remained unaffected by capsiate. Both capsiate treatments further promoted muscle mass gain, and the higher dose also reduced body weight gain and abdominal fat content. These findings demonstrate that, in addition to its anti-obesity effect, capsiate supplementation improves oxidative metabolism in exercising muscle, which strengthen this compound as a natural compound for improving health.

  19. Capsiate Supplementation Reduces Oxidative Cost of Contraction in Exercising Mouse Skeletal Muscle In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Kazuya; Tonson, Anne; Pecchi, Émilie; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Fur, Yann; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Chronic administration of capsiate is known to accelerate whole-body basal energy metabolism, but the consequences in exercising skeletal muscle remain very poorly documented. In order to clarify this issue, the effect of 2-week daily administration of either vehicle (control) or purified capsiate (at 10- or 100-mg/kg body weight) on skeletal muscle function and energetics were investigated throughout a multidisciplinary approach combining in vivo and in vitro measurements in mice. Mechanical performance and energy metabolism were assessed strictly non-invasively in contracting gastrocnemius muscle using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and 31-phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Regardless of the dose, capsiate treatments markedly disturbed basal bioenergetics in vivo including intracellular pH alkalosis and decreased phosphocreatine content. Besides, capsiate administration did affect neither mitochondrial uncoupling protein-3 gene expression nor both basal and maximal oxygen consumption in isolated saponin-permeabilized fibers, but decreased by about twofold the Km of mitochondrial respiration for ADP. During a standardized in vivo fatiguing protocol (6-min of repeated maximal isometric contractions electrically induced at a frequency of 1.7 Hz), both capsiate treatments reduced oxidative cost of contraction by 30-40%, whereas force-generating capacity and fatigability were not changed. Moreover, the rate of phosphocreatine resynthesis during the post-electrostimulation recovery period remained unaffected by capsiate. Both capsiate treatments further promoted muscle mass gain, and the higher dose also reduced body weight gain and abdominal fat content. These findings demonstrate that, in addition to its anti-obesity effect, capsiate supplementation improves oxidative metabolism in exercising muscle, which strengthen this compound as a natural compound for improving health. PMID:26030806

  20. Abdominal muscle activity during breathing with and without inspiratory and expiratory loads in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Mesquita Montes, António; Baptista, João; Crasto, Carlos; de Melo, Cristina Argel; Santos, Rita; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2016-10-01

    Central Nervous System modulates the motor activities of all trunk muscles to concurrently regulate the intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic pressures. The study aims to evaluate the effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on abdominal muscle activity during breathing in healthy subjects. Twenty-three higher education students (21.09±1.56years; 8males) breathed at a same rhythm (inspiration: two seconds; expiration: four seconds) without load and with 10% of the maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures, in standing. Surface electromyography was performed to assess the activation intensity of rectus abdominis, external oblique and transversus abdominis/internal oblique muscles, during inspiration and expiration. During inspiration, transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly lower with inspiratory load when compared to without load (p=0.009) and expiratory load (p=0.002). During expiration, the activation intensity of all abdominal muscles was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to without load (p<0.05). The activation intensity of external oblique (p=0.036) and transversus abdominis/internal oblique (p=0.022) was significantly higher with inspiratory load when compared to without load. Transversus abdominis/internal oblique activation intensity was significantly higher with expiratory load when compared to inspiratory load (p<0.001). Transversus abdominis/internal oblique seems to be the most relevant muscle to modulate the intra-abdominal pressure for the breathing mechanics. PMID:27434376

  1. Conduction velocity of quiescent muscle fibers decreases during sustained contraction.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Camelia, Federico; Farina, Dario

    2005-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that conduction velocity of quiescent muscle fibers decreases during sustained contraction due to the activity of the active motor units in the muscle. Ten subjects trained for the identification of a target motor unit in the abductor pollicis brevis with feedback on surface EMG signals detected with a two-dimensional array of 61 electrodes. The subjects activated the target motor unit in two 10-s long contractions, before (contraction C1) and after (C3) a 3-min contraction (C2), all in ischemic condition. The target motor unit was not activated during C2. Eight of the 10 subjects (control group) performed a second experimental session identical to the first but with a resting period of 3 min instead of the contraction C2. Exerted force and target motor unit discharge rate were not different between the two subject groups and between C1 and C3 (mean +/- SD, over C1 and C3; C2 group: 15.8 +/- 10.4% maximal voluntary contractions and 13.1 +/- 1.9 pps; control group: 15.6 +/- 22.1% maximal voluntary contractions and 14.5 +/- 1.9 pps, respectively). Muscle fiber conduction velocity of the target motor unit decreased in C3 with respect to C1 in the C2 group (3.59 +/- 0.57 and 3.34 +/- 0.47 m/s for C1 and C3, respectively; P < 0.05) but not in the control group (3.47 +/- 0.68 and 3.46 +/- 0.73 m/s). In the C2 group, the percent decrease in conduction velocity of the target motor unit between C1 and C3 (6.4 +/- 7.1%) was not significantly different from the percent decrease in the average conduction velocity of the motor units active during C2 (9.6 +/- 5.4%). In conclusion, the contraction-induced modifications in electrophysiological membrane properties of muscle fibers are partly independent on fiber activation.

  2. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    PubMed

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP.

  3. Quantitative model for predicting lymph formation and muscle compressibility in skeletal muscle during contraction and stretch

    PubMed Central

    Causey, Laura; Cowin, Stephen C.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is widely perceived as nearly incompressible despite the fact that blood and lymphatic vessels within the endomysial and perimysial spaces undergo significant changes in diameter and length during stretch and contraction. These fluid shifts between fascicle and interstitial compartments have proved extremely difficult to measure. In this paper, we propose a theoretical framework based on a space-filling hexagonal fascicle array to provide predictions of the displacement of blood and lymph into and out of the muscle’s endomysium and perimysium during stretch and contraction. We also use this model to quantify the distribution of blood and initial lymphatic (IL) vessels within a fascicle and its perimysial space using data for the rat spinotrapezius muscle. On average, there are 11 muscle fibers, 0.4 arteriole/venule pairs, and 0.2 IL vessels per fascicle. The model predicts that the blood volume in the endomysial space increases 24% and decreases 22% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively. However, these significant changes in blood volume in the endomysium produce a change of only ∼2% in fascicle cross-sectional area. In contrast, the entire muscle deviates from isovolumetry by 7% and 6% for a 20% contraction and stretch, respectively, largely attributable to the significantly larger blood volume changes that occur in the perimysial space. This suggests that arcade blood vessels in the perimysial space provide the primary pumping action required for the filling and emptying of ILs during muscular contraction and stretch. PMID:22615376

  4. Control of respiration and bioenergetics during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Chung, Youngran; Molé, Paul A; Sailasuta, Napapon; Tran, Tuan Khanh; Hurd, Ralph; Jue, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    (1)H-NMR experiments have determined intracellular O(2) consumption (Vo(2)) with oxymyoglobin (MbO(2)) desaturation kinetics in human calf muscle during plantar flexion exercise at 0.75, 0.92, and 1.17 Hz with a constant load. At the onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) desaturates rapidly. The desaturation rate constant of approximately 30 s reflects the intracellular Vo(2). Although Mb desaturates quickly with a similar time constant at all workload levels, its final steady-state level differs. As work increases, the final steady-state cellular Po(2) decreases progressively. After Mb desaturation has reached a steady state, however, Vo(2) continues to rise. On the basis of current respiratory control models, the analysis in the present report reveals two distinct Vo(2) phases: an ADP-independent phase at the onset of contraction and an ADP-dependent phase after Mb has reached a steady state. In contrast to the accepted view, the initial intracellular Vo(2) shows that oxidative phosphorylation can support up to 36% of the energy cost, a significantly higher fraction than expected. Partitioning of the energy flux shows that a 31% nonoxidative component exists and responds to the dynamic energy utilization-restoration cycle (which lasts for only milliseconds) as postulated in the glycogen shunt theory. The present study offers perspectives on the regulation of respiration, bioenergetics, and Mb function during muscle contraction.

  5. Fluctuations in tension during contraction of single muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Morales, M F

    1977-01-01

    We have searched for fluctuations in the steady-state tension developed by stimulated single muscle fibers. Such tension "noise" is expected to be present as a result of the statistical fluctuations in the number and/or state of myosin cross-bridges interacting with thin filament sites at any time. A sensitive electro-optical tension transducer capable of resolving the expected fluctuations in magnitude and frequency was constructed to search for the fluctuations. The noise was analyzed by computing the power spectra and amplitude of stochastic fluctuations in the photomultiplier counting rate, which was made proportional to muscle force. The optical system and electronic instrumentation together with the minicomputer software are described. Tensions were measured in single skinned glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers in rigor and during contraction and relaxation. The results indicate the presence of fluctuations in contracting muscles and a complete absence of tension noise in eith rigor or relaxation. Also, a numerical method was developed to simulate the power spectra and amplitude of fluctuations, given the rate constants for association and dissociation of the cross-bridges and actin. The simulated power spectra and the frequency distributions observed experimentally are similar. PMID:922123

  6. From depolarization-dependent contractions in gastrointestinal smooth muscle to aortic pulse-synchronized contractions

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Sarah B; Mangel, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the diameter of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells is sufficiently narrow, and that the diffusion of calcium across the plasma membrane is sufficient, to support contractile activity. Thus, depolarization-triggered release of intracellular calcium was not believed to be operative in gastrointestinal smooth muscle. However, after the incubation of muscle segments in solutions devoid of calcium and containing the calcium chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, an alternative electrical event occurred that was distinct from normal slow waves and spikes. Subsequently, it was demonstrated in gastrointestinal smooth muscle segments that membrane depolarization associated with this alternative electrical event triggered rhythmic contractions by release of intracellular calcium. Although this concept of depolarization-triggered calcium release was iconoclastic, it has now been demonstrated in multiple gastrointestinal smooth muscle preparations. On the basis of these observations, we investigated whether a rhythmic electrical and mechanical event would occur in aortic smooth muscle under the same calcium-free conditions. The incubation of aortic segments in a solution with no added calcium plus ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid induced a fast electrical event without corresponding tension changes. On the basis of the frequency of these fast electrical events, we pursued, contrary to what has been established dogma for more than three centuries, the question of whether the smooth muscle wall of the aorta undergoes rhythmic activation during the cardiac cycle. As with depolarization-triggered contractile activity in gastrointestinal smooth muscle, it was “well known” that rhythmic activation of the aorta does not occur in synchrony with the heartbeat. In a series of experiments, however, it was demonstrated that rhythmic contractions occur in the aortic wall in synchrony with the heartbeat and share a common pacemaker with the heart

  7. Characterization of muscle contraction with second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prent, Nicole

    Muscle cells have the ability to change length and generate force due to orchestrated action of myosin nanomotors that cause sliding of actin filaments along myosin filaments in the sarcomeres, the fundamental contractile units, of myocytes. The correlated action of hundreds of sarcomeres is needed to produce the myocyte contractions. This study probes the molecular structure of the myofilaments and investigates the movement correlations between sarcomeres during contraction. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is employed for imaging striated myocytes. Myosin filaments in striated myocytes inherently have a nonzero second-order susceptibility, [special characters omitted] and therefore generate efficient SHG. Employing polarization-in polarization-out (PIPO) SHG microscopy allows for the accurate determination of the characteristic ratio, [special characters omitted] in birefringent myocytes, which describes the structure of the myosin filament. Analysis shows that the b value at the centre of the myosin filament, where the nonlinear dipoles are better aligned, is slightly lower than the value at the edges of the filament, where there is more disorder in orientation of the nonlinear dipoles from the myosin heads. Forced stretching of myocytes resulted in an SHG intensity increase with the elongation of the sarcomere. SHG microscopy captured individual sarcomeres during contraction, allowing for the measurement of sarcomere length (SL) and SHG intensity (SI) fluctuations. The fluctuations also revealed higher SHG intensity in elongated sarcomeres. The sarcomere synchronization model (SSM) for contracting and quiescent myocytes was developed, and experimentally verified for three cases (isolated cardiomyocyte, embryonic chicken cardiomyocyte, and larva myocyte). During contraction, the action of SLs and SIs between neighbouring sarcomeres partially correlated, whereas in quiescent myocytes the SLs show an anti-correlation and the SIs have no

  8. Transneuronal tracing of neural pathways controlling an abdominal muscle, rectus abdominis, in the ferret.

    PubMed

    Billig, I; Foris, J M; Card, J P; Yates, B J

    1999-02-27

    Abdominal muscles participate in generating a large number of behaviors and reflex responses, including expiration, coughing, sneezing, vomiting, postural control, production of speech, straining, facilitation of venous return to the heart, and reaction to vestibular stimulation. However, the only premotor neurons that have been conclusively shown to influence abdominal motoneurons are located in nucleus retroambiguus, the expiratory region of the caudal ventral respiratory group. In the present study, the neural circuitry controlling the activity of one abdominal muscle, rectus abdominis, was mapped using the transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) in the ferret. Injections of PRV into rectus abdominis labeled large presumed motoneurons in the ventral horn of T12-L4, and smaller presumed interneurons that were scattered in laminae VII, VIII, IX, and X of T4-L4. In addition, neurons in several areas of the medulla and caudal pons, including the retroambigual nucleus, medial and ventromedial reticular formation, nucleus prepositus hypoglossi, vestibular nuclei, and raphe nuclei, were infected by transynaptic passage of PRV from rectus abdominis motoneurons. Thus, the multifunctional roles of abdominal muscles appear to be coordinated by premotor neurons located in both the spinal cord and several regions of the brainstem. PMID:10023028

  9. Activation and intermuscular coherence of distal arm muscles during proximal muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Wook; Landers, Katlin; Harris-Love, Michelle L

    2014-03-01

    In the human upper extremity (UE), unintended effects of proximal muscle activation on muscles controlling the hand could be an important aspect of motor control due to the necessary coordination of distal and proximal segments during functional activities. This study aimed to elucidate the effects of concurrent activation of elbow muscles on the coordination between hand muscles performing a grip task. Eleven healthy subjects performed precision grip tasks while a constant extension or flexion moment was applied to their elbow joints, inducing a sustained submaximal contraction of elbow muscles to counter the applied torque. Activation of four hand muscles was measured during each task condition using surface electromyography (EMG). When concurrent activation of elbow muscles was induced, significant changes in the activation levels of the hand muscles were observed, with greater effects on the extrinsic finger extensor (23.2 % increase under 30 % elbow extensor activation; p = 0.003) than extrinsic finger flexor (14.2 % increase under 30 % elbow flexor activation; p = 0.130). Elbow muscle activation also induced involuntary changes in the intrinsic thumb flexor activation (44.6 % increase under 30 % elbow extensor activation; p = 0.005). EMG-EMG coherence analyses revealed that elbow muscle activation significantly reduced intermuscular coherence between distal muscle pairs, with its greatest effects on coherence in the β-band (13-25 Hz) (average of 17 % decrease under 30 % elbow flexor activation). The results of this study provide evidence for involuntary, muscle-specific interactions between distal and proximal UE muscles, which may contribute to UE motor performance in health and disease.

  10. Role of ROCK expression in gallbladder smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Ding, You-Ming; Wang, Chun-Tao; Wang, Wei-Xing

    2015-08-01

    Cholelithiasis is a common medical condition whose incidence rate is increasing yearly, while its pathogenesis has yet to be elucidated. The present study assessed the expression of Rho-kinase (ROCK) in gallbladder smooth muscles and its effect on the contractile function of gallbladder smooth muscles during gallstone formation. Thirty male guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups: The control group, the gallstone model group and the fasudil interference group. The fasting volume (FV) and bile capacity of the gallbladder (FB) as well as the total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents of the gallbladder bile were determined. In addition, the gallbladder was dissected to identify whether any gallstones had formed. Part of the gallbladder tissue specimens were used for immunohistochemical analysis of ROCK expression in gallbladder smooth muscles. The results showed that four guinea pigs in the model group and eight in the fasudil group displayed gallstone formation, while there was no gallstone formation in the control group. The FV and FB were significantly increased in the model and fasudil groups. Similarly, the TC and TG contents of gallbladder bile were increased in these groups. The positive expression rate of ROCK in gallbladder smooth muscles in the model and fasudil groups was significantly reduced compared with that in the control group (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that the reduction of ROCK expression in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscles weakened gallbladder contraction and thereby promoted gallstone formation.

  11. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  12. β-Adrenergic modulation of skeletal muscle contraction: key role of excitation-contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Simeon P; Borrani, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Our aim is to describe the acute effects of catecholamines/β-adrenergic agonists on contraction of non-fatigued skeletal muscle in animals and humans, and explain the mechanisms involved. Adrenaline/β-agonists (0.1-30 μm) generally augment peak force across animal species (positive inotropic effect) and abbreviate relaxation of slow-twitch muscles (positive lusitropic effect). A peak force reduction also occurs in slow-twitch muscles in some conditions. β2 -Adrenoceptor stimulation activates distinct cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases to phosphorylate multiple target proteins. β-Agonists modulate sarcolemmal processes (increased resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude) via enhanced Na(+) -K(+) pump and Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter function, but this does not increase force. Myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity and maximum Ca(2+) -activated force are unchanged. All force potentiation involves amplified myoplasmic Ca(2+) transients consequent to increased Ca(2+) release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This unequivocally requires phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyR1) which sensitize the Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release mechanism. Enhanced trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx through phosphorylated voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels contributes to force potentiation in diaphragm and amphibian muscle, but not mammalian limb muscle. Phosphorylation of phospholamban increases SR Ca(2+) pump activity in slow-twitch fibres but does not augment force; this process accelerates relaxation and may depress force. Greater Ca(2+) loading of SR may assist force potentiation in fast-twitch muscle. Some human studies show no significant force potentiation which appears to be related to the β-agonist concentration used. Indeed high-dose β-agonists (∼0.1 μm) enhance SR Ca(2+) -release rates, maximum voluntary contraction strength and peak Wingate power in trained humans. The combined findings can explain how adrenaline

  13. Ultrasound evaluation of the symmetry of abdominal muscles in mild adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Linek, Paweł; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Gogola, Anna

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to evaluate the symmetry of the thickness of the abdominal muscles at rest and while standing in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. [Subjects and Methods] An ultrasound assessment was performed of the side-to-side differences of the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominalis (TrA) muscles in the supine and standing positions in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and control groups. [Results] In the AIS group, 64.3% of the patients had left scoliosis with a mean Cobb angle of 10.7°, and 35.7% of the patients had right scoliosis with a mean Cobb angle of 10°. In the supine position, the thickness asymmetry of the TrA was greater in the AIS compared with the control group by an average of 14% (95% CI 3.9–24.2). [Conclusion] Among the abdominal muscles examined, patients with AIS exhibited more asymmetry only for the TrA. In the standing position, the TrA was as symmetric in the patients as in the control group. Mild scoliosis has no impact on the symmetry of the thickness of the OE and OI in the supine and standing positions. The direction of curvature had no effect on the symmetry of the abdominal muscles studied. PMID:25729192

  14. Reliability of Abdominal Muscle Stiffness Measured Using Elastography during Trunk Rehabilitation Exercises.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, David; Wan, Alan; McPhee, Megan; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the intra-session and inter-rater reliability of shear modulus measured in abdominal muscles during two commonly used trunk stability exercises. Thirty healthy volunteers performed a series of abdominal hollow and abdominal brace tasks. Supersonic shear imaging was used to measure the shear modulus (considered an index of muscle tension) of the four anterior trunk muscles: obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis. Because of measurement artifacts, internus abdominis and transversus abdominis data were not analyzed for 36.7% and 26.7% of the participants, respectively. These participants exhibited thicker superficial fat layers than the others. For the remaining participants, fair to excellent intra-session and inter-rater reliability was observed with moderate to high intra-class coefficients (0.45-0.97) and low to moderate standard error of measurement values (0.38-3.53 kPa). Reliability values were consistently greater for superficial than for deeper muscles.

  15. Reliability of Abdominal Muscle Stiffness Measured Using Elastography during Trunk Rehabilitation Exercises.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, David; Wan, Alan; McPhee, Megan; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the intra-session and inter-rater reliability of shear modulus measured in abdominal muscles during two commonly used trunk stability exercises. Thirty healthy volunteers performed a series of abdominal hollow and abdominal brace tasks. Supersonic shear imaging was used to measure the shear modulus (considered an index of muscle tension) of the four anterior trunk muscles: obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, transversus abdominis and rectus abdominis. Because of measurement artifacts, internus abdominis and transversus abdominis data were not analyzed for 36.7% and 26.7% of the participants, respectively. These participants exhibited thicker superficial fat layers than the others. For the remaining participants, fair to excellent intra-session and inter-rater reliability was observed with moderate to high intra-class coefficients (0.45-0.97) and low to moderate standard error of measurement values (0.38-3.53 kPa). Reliability values were consistently greater for superficial than for deeper muscles. PMID:26746381

  16. Changes in Activation of Abdominal Muscles at Selected Angles During Trunk Exercise by Using Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Dong; Bae, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Jong-Gil; Han, Nami; Eom, Mi-Ja

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of activation of the abdominal muscles depending on exercise angles and whether the activation of rectus abdominis differs according to the location, during curl up and leg raise exercises, by measuring the thickness ratio of abdominal muscles using ultrasonography. Methods We examined 30 normal adults without musculoskeletal problems. Muscle thickness was measured in the upper rectus abdominis (URA), lower rectus abdominis (LRA), obliquus externus (EO), obliquus internus (IO), and transversus abdominis (TrA), at pre-determined angles (30°, 60°, 90°) and additionally at the resting angle (0°). Muscle thickness ratio was calculated by dividing the resting (0°) thickness for each angle, and was used as reflection of muscle activity. Results The muscle thickness ratio was significantly different depending on the angles in URA and LRA. For curl up-URA p=0 (30°<60°), p=0 (60°>90°), p=0.44 (30°<90°) and LRA p=0.01 (30°<60°), p=0 (60°>90°), p=0.44 (30°>90°), respectively, by one-way ANOVA test-and for leg raise-URA p=0 (30°<60°), p=0 (60°<90°), p=0 (30°<90°) and LRA p=0.01 (30°<60°), p=0 (60°<90°), p=0 (30°<90°), respectively, by one-way ANOVA test-exercises, but not in the lateral abdominal muscles (EO, IO, and TrA). Also, there was no significant difference in the muscle thickness ratio of URA and LRA during both exercises. In the aspect of muscle activity, there was significant difference in the activation of RA muscle by selected angles, but not according to location during both exercises. Conclusion According to this study, exercise angle is thought to be an important contributing factor for strengthening of RA muscle; however, both the exercises are thought to have no property of strengthening RA muscle selectively based on the location. PMID:26798609

  17. Subcutaneous abdominal fat and thigh muscle composition predict insulin sensitivity independently of visceral fat.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, B H; Thaete, F L; Simoneau, J A; Kelley, D E

    1997-10-01

    Whether visceral adipose tissue has a uniquely powerful association with insulin resistance or whether subcutaneous abdominal fat shares this link has generated controversy in the area of body composition and insulin sensitivity. An additional issue is the potential role of fat deposition within skeletal muscle and the relationship with insulin resistance. To address these matters, the current study was undertaken to measure body composition, aerobic fitness, and insulin sensitivity within a cohort of sedentary healthy men (n = 26) and women (n = 28). The subjects, who ranged from lean to obese (BMI 19.6-41.0 kg/m2), underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to measure fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM), computed tomography to measure cross-sectional abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue, and computed tomography (CT) of mid-thigh to measure muscle cross-sectional area, muscle attenuation, and subcutaneous fat. Insulin sensitivity was measured using the glucose clamp technique (40 mU.m-2.min-1), in conjunction with [3-3H]glucose isotope dilution. Maximal aerobic power (VO2max) was determined using an incremental cycling test. Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) ranged from 3.03 to 16.83 mg.min-1.kg-1 FFM. Rd was negatively correlated with FM (r = -0.58), visceral fat (r = -0.52), subcutaneous abdominal fat (r = -0.61), and thigh fat (r = -0.38) and positively correlated with muscle attenuation (r = 0.48) and VO2max (r = 0.26, P < 0.05). In addition to manifesting the strongest simple correlation with insulin sensitivity, in stepwise multiple regression, subcutaneous abdominal fat retained significance after adjusting for visceral fat, while the converse was not found. Muscle attenuation contributed independent significance to multiple regression models of body composition and insulin sensitivity, and in analysis of obese subjects, muscle attenuation was the strongest single correlate of insulin resistance. In summary, as a component of

  18. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  19. Compensatory strategies during walking in response to excessive muscle co-contraction at the ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoli; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2014-03-01

    Excessive co-contraction causes inefficient or abnormal movement in several neuromuscular pathologies. How synergistic muscles spanning the ankle, knee and hip adapt to co-contraction of ankle muscles is not well understood. This study aimed to identify the compensation strategies required to retain normal walking with excessive antagonistic ankle muscle co-contraction. Muscle-actuated simulations of normal walking were performed to quantify compensatory mechanisms of ankle and knee muscles during stance in the presence of normal, medium and high levels of co-contraction of antagonistic pairs gastrocnemius+tibialis anterior and soleus+tibialis anterior. The study showed that if co-contraction increases, the synergistic ankle muscles can compensate; with gastrocmemius+tibialis anterior co-contraction, the soleus will increase its contribution to ankle plantarflexion acceleration. At the knee, however, almost all muscles spanning the knee and hip are involved in compensation. We also found that ankle and knee muscles alone can provide sufficient compensation at the ankle joint, but hip muscles must be involved to generate sufficient knee moment. Our findings imply that subjects with a rather high level of dorsiflexor+plantarflexor co-contraction can still perform normal walking. This also suggests that capacity of other lower limb muscles to compensate is important to retain normal walking in co-contracted persons. The compensatory mechanisms can be useful in clinical interpretation of motion analyses, when secondary muscle co-contraction or other deficits may present simultaneously in subjects with motion disorders.

  20. Time to Maximal Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVC) for Five Different Muscle Groups in College Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, A. F.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    College men and women were studied to ascertain the force-time components of a rapid voluntary muscle contraction for five muscle groups. Researchers found that the time required for full contraction differs: (1) in men and women; and (2) among the five muscle groups. (Authors/PP)

  1. Grounding after moderate eccentric contractions reduces muscle damage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard; Chevalier, Gaétan; Hill, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Grounding a human to the earth has resulted in changes in the physiology of the body. A pilot study on grounding and eccentric contractions demonstrated shortened duration of pain, reduced creatine kinase (CK), and differences in blood parameters. This follow-up study was conducted to investigate the effects of grounding after moderate eccentric contractions on pain, CK, and complete blood counts. Thirty-two healthy young men were randomly divided into grounded (n=16) and sham-grounded (n=16) groups. On days 1 through 4, visual analog scale for pain evaluations and blood draws were accomplished. On day 1, the participants performed eccentric contractions of 200 half-knee bends. They were then grounded or sham-grounded to the earth for 4 hours on days 1 and 2. Both groups experienced pain on all posttest days. On day 2, the sham-grounded group experienced significant CK increase (P<0.01) while the CK of the grounded group did not increase significantly; the between-group difference was significant (P=0.04). There was also an increase in the neutrophils of the grounded group on day 3 (P=0.05) compared to the sham-grounded group. There was a significant increase in platelets in the grounded group on days 2 through 4. Grounding produced changes in CK and complete blood counts that were not shared by the sham-grounded group. Grounding significantly reduced the loss of CK from the injured muscles indicating reduced muscle damage. These results warrant further study on the effects of earthing on delayed onset muscle damage. PMID:26443876

  2. The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of a 6-month-old Crocodylus niloticus (Reptilia: Crocodylia).

    PubMed

    Fechner, R; Schwarz-Wings, D

    2013-06-01

    The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of crocodilians play an important role in their ventilatory mechanism. Yet the anatomy and homology of these muscles is poorly understood. To gain new insights into the anatomy of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall, we dissected a specimen of Crocodylus niloticus. Origin and insertion of the muscles, as well as their arrangement relative to each other was examined in great detail. The findings were compared with those of other crocodilian taxa to detect potential variability of the muscles of interest. The homology of the muscles was studied by comparing the muscles of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall with those of other diapsids. In Crocodylus niloticus, the infrapubic abdominal wall consists of four muscles: Musculus truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus, and Mm. rectus abdominis externus and internus. The arrangement of the muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of Crocodylus niloticus is consistent with that found in most other crocodilian taxa. In some crocodilian taxa, an additional muscle, M. ischiopubis, is found. In the remaining diapsids, only M. rectus abdominis is present. The crocodilian M. truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus and, if present, M. ischiopubis appear to be derivates of M. rectus abdominis; the development of those might be related to the evolution of the unique crocodilian ventilatory mechanism.

  3. Excitation—contraction coupling in amphioxus muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, S.; Henkart, Maryanna P.; Kidokoro, Y.

    1971-01-01

    1. Excitation-contraction coupling was studied in myotomal muscles of amphioxus, Branchiostoma californiense. 2. The action potential of a muscle cell produces a twitch with a rise time of 30-40 msec at 11° C and its Q10 is about 2·2. 3. The twitch increases in amplitude with increasing external Ca concentration and is abolished in Ca-free saline (1 mM-EGTA and 55·7 mM-MgCl2); the twitch amplitude is suppressed by Co or La ions. 4. Caffeine at concentrations above 1 mM in the external saline causes a prolongation of the action potential and a contracture which lasts several minutes. 5. After exposure to caffeine the responsiveness of the muscle to subsequent applications of caffeine recovers in normal saline in 20-30 minutes but not in Ca-free saline. 6. The amplitude of the caffeine contracture is independent of the external Ca concentration and is unaltered after the twitch is eliminated in Ca-free saline. 7. After exposure to caffeine a full-sized twitch can be obtained before the responsiveness to caffeine shows any significant recovery. 8. It is concluded that the twitch is produced by the Ca influx resulting from the increased permeability of the muscle cell membrane to Ca during the action potential and that the Ca mobilized by caffeine is not necessary to the initiation of the twitch. 9. Electronmicroscopy shows the existence of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Imagesabc and dabcd PMID:5158596

  4. Muscle contraction and the elasticity-mediated crosstalk effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharan, Nadiv; Farago, Oded

    2013-05-01

    Cooperative action of molecular motors is essential for many cellular processes. One possible regulator of motor coordination is the elasticity-mediated crosstalk (EMC) coupling between myosin II motors whose origin is the tensile stress that they collectively generate in actin filaments. Here, we use a statistical mechanical analysis to investigate the influence of the EMC effect on the sarcomere — the basic contractile unit of skeletal muscles. We demonstrate that the EMC effect leads to an increase in the attachment probability of motors located near the end of the sarcomere while simultaneously decreasing the attachment probability of the motors in the central part. Such a polarized attachment probability would impair the motors' ability to cooperate efficiently. Interestingly, this undesired phenomenon becomes significant only when the system size exceeds that of the sarcomere in skeletal muscles, which provides an explanation for the remarkable lack of sarcomere variability in vertebrates. Another phenomenon that we investigate is the recently observed increase in the duty ratio of the motors with the tension in muscle. We reveal that the celebrated Hill's equation for muscle contraction is very closely related to this observation.

  5. Effects of muscle relaxation on sustained contraction of ipsilateral remote muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kouki; Watanabe, Tasuku; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the temporal change of muscle activity during relaxation of ipsilateral remote muscles. While participants maintained a constant right wrist extensor isometric force, they dorsiflexed the ipsilateral ankle from resting position or relaxed from dorsiflexed position in response to an audio signal. The wrist extensor force magnitude increased in the 0–400 msec period after the onset of foot contraction compared to that of the resting condition (P < 0.05). On the other hand, wrist extensor force magnitude and electromyographic (EMG) activity decreased in the 0–400 msec period after the onset of ankle dorsiflexion compared to that of the resting condition (P < 0.05). Our findings suggest that foot muscle relaxation induces temporal reduction in hand muscle EMG activity and force magnitude. PMID:26611464

  6. A Low-Grade Fibromyxoid Sarcoma of the Internal Abdominal Oblique Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masakazu; Koide, Kei; Arita, Michinori; Kawaguchi, Koji; Mikuriya, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Jun; Iwamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    A low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare tumor, with a benign histologic appearance but malignant behavior. This report describes a 74-year-old man with an internal abdominal oblique muscle mass. The tumor appeared as a well-defined ovoid mass on computed tomography, with mild uptake on fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography images. Radical resection with wide safe margins was performed. Histologically, the tumor was composed of spindle-shaped cells in a whorled growth pattern, with alternating fibrous and myxoid stroma. MUC4 expression, a highly sensitive and specific immunohistochemical marker for LGFMS, was detected. Therefore, we diagnosed the tumor as LGFMS. At the 3-month follow-up, there was no sign of recurrence or metastasis. We report the first case of LGFMS arising from the internal abdominal oblique muscle. PMID:27247823

  7. Effects of Abdominal Stimulation during Inspiratory Muscle Training on Respiratory Function of Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-hyeon; Shim, Je-myung; Kwon, Hae-yeon; Kim, Ha-roo; Kim, Bo-in

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to verify a new method for improving respiratory functions by applying both abdominal stimulation and inspiratory muscle training (IMT) to train the inspiratory muscle and the expiratory muscle simultaneously, to improve the efficiency of IMT of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects] Eighteen stroke patients were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 9) and a control group (n = 9). [Methods] The experimental group was administered IMT with abdominal stimulation, and the control group was administered only IMT. During the intervention period, the experimental group and control group received training 20 min/day, 3 times/wk, for 4 weeks. To examine the lung functions of the subjects, FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75 were measured using an electronic spirometer. The diaphragm thickness ratio was calculated from measurements made with a 7.5-MHz linear probe ultrasonic imaging system. [Result] The experimental group and the control group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness ratio on the paretic side, but not on the non-paretic side. With regard to lung function, the experimental group showed significant increases in FEV1, PEF, and FEF25–75. The changes between before and after the intervention in the two groups were compared with each other, and the results showed significant differences in FEV1 and PEF. [Conclusion] The present study identified that IMT accompanied by abdominal stimulation improved the pulmonary function of chronic stroke patients. PMID:24567679

  8. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  9. Cooling-induced contraction in ovine airways smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S M; Pilcher, C W; Williams, K I

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of cold-induced bronchoconstriction is poorly understood. This prompted the present study whose aim was to determine the step-wise direct effect of cooling on smooth muscle of isolated ovine airways and analyse the role of calcium in the mechanisms involved. Isolated tracheal strips and bronchial segments were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses during stepwise cooling from 37 to 5 degrees C were examined. Cooling induced a rapid and reproducible contraction proportional to cooling temperature in ovine tracheal and bronchial preparations which was epithelium-independent. On readjustment to 37 degrees C the tone returned rapidly to basal level. Maximum contraction was achieved at a temperature of 5 degrees C for trachea and 15 degrees C for bronchiole. Cooling-induced contractions (CIC) was resistant to tetrodotoxin (1; 10 micrometer), and not affected by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1 micrometer) or the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (1 micrometer), or the histamine H1-antagonist mepyramine (1 micrometer) or indomethacin (1 micrometer). Ca2+ antagonists (nifedipine and verapamil) and Mn2+ raised tracheal but not bronchiolar tone and augmented CIC. Incubation in Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing Krebs' solution for 5 min had no effect on CIC, although it significantly reduced KCl-induced contraction by up to 75%. Cooling inhibited Ca2+ influx measured using 45Ca2+ uptake. Caffeine (100 micrometer) significantly inhibited CIC. The results show that cooling-induced contractions do not appear to involve activation of nerve endings, all surface reception systems or Ca2+ influx. However, CIC is mainly dependent on release of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:10072702

  10. Muscle-contraction properties in overarm throwing movements.

    PubMed

    Grezios, Apostolos K; Gissis, Ioannis Th; Sotiropoulos, Aristomenis A; Nikolaidis, Dimitrios V; Souglis, Athanasios G

    2006-02-01

    On the basis of dynamic and kinematic data, this study identifies the type of muscle contraction in unloaded overarm throwing movements. An unloaded throw or nearly unloaded throw is defined as the throw in which the external resistance is too small (e.g., the team handball, baseball, and water polo throws as well as the tennis and badminton smashes). A special arm-force-measuring apparatus was constructed to imitate an overarm throw. Forty-two subjects were placed into 3 groups: untrained subjects, weight-trained athletes, and team handball players. The measured parameters included the velocity of the initial movement, the release velocity, the velocity of the first 50 milliseconds of the concentric phase, the force value at the moment of deceleration of the initial movement, and the impulse values during the eccentric and concentric phases of the test movement. Statistically significant higher values of the above parameters (p < 0.05) were determined in that test at which the initial speed of movement was higher. Also, the correlation coefficients of the parameters of the initial phase of the throw movement were very high (p < 0.001), especially the parameters related with the movement's first 50 milliseconds. The results support the thesis that the stretch-shortening cycle is the type of muscle contraction in unloaded overarm throws. Furthermore, it is possible to increase the throw velocity by increasing the velocity of the initial movement (i.e., by provoking higher inertia forces).

  11. NIRS monitoring of muscle contraction to control a prosthetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Thomas; Zambarbieri, Daniela; Beltrami, Giorgio; Verni, Gennaro

    1999-01-01

    The fitting of upper-extremity amputees requires special efforts, and its significance has been increased by the development of the myoelectrically controlled prosthetic arm. This solution is not free of problems due to the nature of the amputation, to the electromagnetic noise affecting the myelectrical signal and to the perspiration due to the contact between socket and the residual limb. Starting from the fact that NIRS and electromyographic signals are similar during a muscle contraction, we have first studied the NIRS signal during forearm muscle contractions in normal and amputee subjects. Then a new system to interface the NIRS unit and the myoelectrical prosthetic hand has been developed. The NIRS unit has been used as optical sensor and all the operations (I/O and signal processing) are performed via software. This system has been tested on normal and amputee subjects performing hand grasping using a visual biofeedback control scheme. All the subjects have been able to perform these operations demonstrating the NIRS technique. This could represent an alternative solution for controlling a prosthetic device.

  12. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yohei; Akiho, Hirotada; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Eikichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT), pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents. PMID:25837933

  13. Terminology for contractions of muscles during shortening, while isometric, and during lengthening.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, John A

    2003-08-01

    Communication among scientists must be clear and concise to avoid ambiguity and misinterpretations. The selection of words must be based on accepted definitions. The fields of biomechanics, muscle physiology, and exercise science have had a particularly difficult time with terminology, arising from the complexity of muscle contractions and by the use of inappropriate terminology by scientists. The dictionary definition of the verb "contract," specifically for the case of muscle, is "to undergo an increase in tension, or force, and become shorter." Under all circumstances, an activated muscle generates force, but an activated muscle generating force does not invariably shorten! During the 1920s and 1930s, investigators recognized that the interaction between the force generated by the muscle and the load on the muscle results in either shortening, no length change (isometric), or lengthening of the muscle. The recognition that muscles perform three different types of "contractions" required that contraction be redefined as "to undergo activation and generate force." Modifiers of contraction are then needed to clarify the lack of movement or the directionality of movement. Despite the contradiction, for 75 years the lack of movement has been termed an "isometric contraction." The directionality of the movement is then best described by the adjectives "shortening" and "lengthening." The definitions of "concentric" as "having the same center" and of "eccentric" as "not having the same center" are consistent with hypertrophy, or remodeling of the heart muscle, but are inappropriate to describe the contractions of skeletal muscles.

  14. Postural- and respiratory-related activities of abdominal muscles during post-exercise hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    David, Pascal; Terrien, Jérémy; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The present study focuses on the role of superficial abdominal muscles revealed by electromyographic recordings during the maintenance of a bipedal stance perturbed by post-exercise hyperventilation. Twelve healthy subjects performed six 30-s postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing quietly, then one test every minute for the 5 min immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Displacement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored over time. Myoelectric activities of the obliquus externus (OE), obliquus internus (OI) and rectus abdominis (RA) muscles were recorded by surface electromyography (EMG). Metabolic parameters were measured with a portable telemetric device. The change in ventilatory drive induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in both postural sway parameters and EMG activities. For OE and OI, the increased EMG activities were prominent during expiration, whereas OI was silent during inspiration. OE and RA were activated during both expiration and inspiration. It is concluded that the compensation of respiratory disturbances of the erect posture appears to be less effective when minute ventilation increases. The patterns of muscle activity suggest that abdominal muscles are controlled differentially and that their functional coordination is dependent on the respiratory demand.

  15. Contractions

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel tightening of your uterus muscles at irregular intervals or a squeezing sensation in your lower abdomen ... beginning of childbirth. These contractions come at regular intervals, usually move from the back to the lower ...

  16. Effects of proctolin on contractions, membrane resistance, and non-voltage-dependent sarcolemmal ion channels in crustacean muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Erxleben, C F; deSantis, A; Rathmayer, W

    1995-06-01

    The neuropeptide proctolin in nanomolar concentrations enhances the contraction of crustacean muscle fibers manyfold. The cellular mechanisms underlying this potentiation were investigated in single, isolated, fast-contracting abdominal extensor muscle fibers of a small crustacean, the marine isopod Idotea baltica. Force measurements and current-clamp experiments revealed two actions of proctolin on the muscle fibers. In half of the preparations, proctolin (10(-9)-10(-6) M) increased the fiber's input resistance by up to 25%. In about one-fourth of the preparations, proctolin induced all-or-none action potentials in response to depolarizing current pulses in muscle fibers that showed graded electric responses under control conditions. In both cases, proctolin potentiated the peak force of muscle contractions (between 1.5- and 18-fold for 5 x 10(-9) M proctolin). Proctolin affected neither the membrane resting potential nor the threshold for excitation-contraction coupling. Using cell-attached patches on the sarcolemmal membrane, we identified non-voltage-dependent ion channels which contribute to the passive membrane properties of the muscle fibers. A 53 +/- 6 pS channel had its reversal potential near rest and carried outward current at depolarized potentials with physiological saline in the recording pipette. With isotonic K+ saline in the patch pipette, the reversal potential was +85 +/- 12 mV depolarized from the resting potential and single-channel conductances ranged from 36 to 166 pS. Proctolin modulated the activity of all these putative K+ channels by reducing the number of functionally active channels. The effects of proctolin on force of contraction, input resistance, and single-channel activity were mimicked by a membrane-permeating analog of cAMP. Conversely, a monothio analog of cAMP (Rp-cAMPS), a blocker of protein kinase A activity, substantially decreased the membrane input resistance of the muscle fibers. The results suggest that activation of the

  17. [Effect of the contraction of other muscle groups on muscle strength, latency period and endurance].

    PubMed

    Zimkin, N V; Hernandez, K A; Panov, V G

    1979-08-01

    The following investigation was undertaken in connection with Sechenov's idea on mutual influence of muscles performing different work. It deals with the influence on test muscle (TM) efficiency of other simultaneously working muscles (SWM). It was shown that tension of SWM or maintenance of complex postures exert a negative influence on the force and latency of the visual-motor reaction and the static effort endurance. The mechanism involved is external inhibition. After its extinction as a result of repeated combinations of both activities the degree of lowering of TM activity grows less and finally its improvement is observed as compared to data obtained in the absence of SWM contractions. It is suggested that when external inhibition is extinguished impulses arising in SWM reinforce and improve according to the law of dominant the functions of nervous centers regulating activities of the TM.

  18. Effects of bridge exercises with a sling and vibrations on abdominal muscle thickness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Gong, Won-tae

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to examine the changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (Io) muscles using ultrasonography in adults who performed bridge exercises with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver and a sling and received micro vibrations. In total, 32 subjects were divided into a therapy (n= 16) and control (n= 16) groups. The therapy group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and received vibrations. The control group completed nine sets, with four repetitions, of bridge exercises with the sling and did not receive vibrations. The thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles were measured in both groups using ultrasonography before and after therapy. According to the pressure applied to the biofeedback unit, both groups showed significant changes in the thicknesses of the TrA and Io muscles after therapy (P< 0.05). The change in the thickness of the TrA muscle after therapy was significantly different between the 2 groups when the pressures applied at 38, 42, and 46 mmHg (P< 0.05). Moreover, the change in the thickness of the Io muscle did not significantly different between the 2 groups at any of the pressures applied (P> 0.05). These findings indicate that approximately 15 minutes of vibrations during bridge exercises on unstable surfaces with a sling facilitates the activation of the deep trunk muscles and further enhances the activation of the TrA.

  19. Glucose uptake during contraction in isolated skeletal muscles from neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yet Hoi; Frugier, Tony; Zhang, Xinmei; Murphy, Robyn M; Lynch, Gordon S; Betik, Andrew C; Rattigan, Stephen; McConell, Glenn K

    2015-05-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) significantly attenuates the increase in skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction/exercise, and a greater attenuation is observed in individuals with Type 2 diabetes compared with healthy individuals. Therefore, NO appears to play an important role in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. In this study, we investigated the involvement of neuronal NOSμ (nNOSμ), the main NOS isoform activated during contraction, on skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction. Extensor digitorum longus muscles were isolated from nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. Muscles were contracted ex vivo in a temperature-controlled (30°C) organ bath with or without the presence of the NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) and the NOS substrate L-arginine. Glucose uptake was determined by radioactive tracers. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake increased approximately fourfold during contraction in muscles from both nNOSμ(-/-) and nNOSμ(+/+) mice. L-NMMA significantly attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction in both genotypes. This attenuation was reversed by L-arginine, suggesting that L-NMMA attenuated the increase in muscle glucose uptake during contraction by inhibiting NOS and not via a nonspecific effect of the inhibitor. Low levels of NOS activity (~4%) were detected in muscles from nNOSμ(-/-) mice, and there was no evidence of compensation from other NOS isoform or AMP-activated protein kinase which is also involved in mediating muscle glucose uptake during contraction. These results indicate that NO regulates skeletal muscle glucose uptake during ex vivo contraction independently of nNOSμ.

  20. Axial disposition of myosin heads in isometrically contracting muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Juanhuix, J; Bordas, J; Campmany, J; Svensson, A; Bassford, M L; Narayanan, T

    2001-01-01

    Meridional x-ray diffraction diagrams, recorded with high angular resolution, from muscles contracting at the plateau of isometric tension show that the myosin diffraction orders are clusters of peaks. These clusters are due to pronounced interference effects between the myosin diffracting units on either side of the M-line. A theoretical analysis based on the polarity of the myosin (and actin) filaments shows that it is possible to extract phase information from which the axial disposition of the myosin heads can be determined. The results show that each head in a crown pair has a distinct structural disposition. It appears that only one of the heads in the pair stereospecifically interacts with the thin filament at any one time. PMID:11222303

  1. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP]venous and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP]v (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP]v) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP]v increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144–161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP]v increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans. PMID:23429876

  2. Generation of Electrical Power from Stimulated Muscle Contractions Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Kilgore, Kevin; Ercegovic, David B.

    2004-01-01

    This project is a collaborative effort between NASA Glenn Research Center's Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Project, part of the NASA Aerospace Propulsion and Power Program of the Aerospace Technology Enterprise, and Case Western Reserve University's Cleveland Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) Center. The RAC Project foresees implantable power requirements for future applications such as organically based sensor platforms and robotics that can interface with the human senses. One of the goals of the FES Center is to develop a totally implantable neural prosthesis. This goal is based on feedback from patients who would prefer a system with an internal power source over the currently used system with an external power source. The conversion system under investigation would transform the energy produced from a stimulated muscle contraction into electrical energy. We hypothesize that the output power of the system will be greater than the input power necessary to initiate, sustain, and control the electrical conversion system because of the stored potential energy of the muscle. If the system can be made biocompatible, durable, and with the potential for sustained use, then the biological power source will be a viable solution.

  3. Relationships of Muscular Endurance Among Specific Muscle Groups for Continuous and Intermittent Static Contractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshizaki, Thomas B.; Massey, B. H.

    1986-01-01

    The static contraction endurance characteristics of five muscle groups were investigated in 38 normal, health, college-aged men. Four parameters of continuous and intermittent contractions were examined. Results support the hypothesis that endurance is unique to each muscle group and specific to the task performed. (Author/MT)

  4. Relation between muscle and brain activity during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseus muscle.

    PubMed

    van Duinen, Hiske; Renken, Remco; Maurits, Natasha M; Zijdewind, Inge

    2008-03-01

    We studied the relationship between muscle activity (electromyography, EMG), force, and brain activity during isometric contractions of the index finger, on a group and individual level. Ten subjects contracted their right or left index finger at 5, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal force. Subjects received visual feedback of the produced force. We focused our analysis on brain activation that correlated with EMG. Brain activity of specific anatomical areas (region-of-interest analysis, ROI) was quantified and correlated with EMG activity. Furthermore, we tried to distinguish between brain areas in which activity was modulated by the amount of EMG and areas that were active during the task but in which the activity was not modulated. Therefore, we used two regressors simultaneously: (1) the produced EMG and (2) the task (a categorical regressor). As expected, activity in the motor areas (contralateral sensorimotor cortex, premotor areas, and ipsilateral cerebellum) strongly correlated with the amount of EMG. In contrast, activity in frontal and parietal areas (inferior part of the right precentral sulcus, ipsilateral supramarginal gyrus, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral putamen, and insular cortex) correlated with activation per se, independently of the amount of EMG. Activity in these areas was equal during contractions of the right or left index finger. We suppose that these areas are more involved in higher order motor processes during the preparatory phase or monitoring feedback mechanisms. Furthermore, our ROI analysis showed that muscle and brain activity strongly correlate in traditional motor areas, both at group and at subject level.

  5. Deep abdominal muscle thickness measured under sitting conditions during different stability tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hideyuki; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Sawada, Yutaka; Okubo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate ultrasonically determined changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles during different sitting conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy men volunteered to participate in this study. Four different sitting conditions including (A) sitting, (B) sitting with left hip flexion, (C) sitting with an abdominal hollowing maneuver (AHM), and (D) sitting with an AHM and left hip flexion, were used. Subjective exercise difficulty was evaluated. [Results] Transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscle thicknesses significantly differed between conditions, with significantly greater thickness between positions from (A) to (D). Stability of the surface when sitting had no effect on the muscle thickness of the transversus abdominis. By contrast, sitting on an unstable surface caused an increase in muscle thickness of the internal oblique in each condition. The subjects reported progressively increasing difficulty in performing each exercise in a stable position from (A) to (D), while the difficulty in an unstable position was significantly different between (A) and (B), and between (C) and (D). [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that task (B) on a stable surface should be chosen for maximal activation of transversus abdominis without inducing overactivation of the internal oblique muscle. PMID:27134381

  6. Limb congestion enhances the synchronization of sympathetic outflow with muscle contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostoufi-Moab, S.; Herr, M. D.; Silber, D. H.; Gray, K. S.; Leuenberger, U. A.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we examined if the synchronization of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) with muscle contraction is enhanced by limb congestion. To explore this relationship, we applied signal-averaging techniques to the MSNA signal obtained during short bouts of forearm contraction (2-s contraction/3-s rest cycle) at 40% maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min. We performed this analysis before and after forearm venous congestion; an intervention that augments the autonomic response to sustained static muscle contractions via a local effect on muscle afferents. There was an increased percentage of the MSNA noted during second 2 of the 5-s contraction/rest cycles. The percentage of total MSNA seen during this particular second increased from minute 1 to 5 of contraction and was increased further by limb congestion (control minute 1 = 25.6 +/- 2.0%, minute 5 = 32.8 +/- 2.2%; limb congestion minute 1 = 29.3 +/- 2.1%, minute 5 = 37.8 +/- 3.9%; exercise main effect <0.005; limb congestion main effect P = 0.054). These changes in the distribution of signal-averaged MSNA were seen despite the fact that the mean number of sympathetic discharges did not increase over baseline. We conclude that synchronization of contraction and MSNA is seen during short repetitive bouts of handgrip. The sensitizing effect of contraction time and limb congestion are apparently due to feedback from muscle afferents within the exercising muscle.

  7. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  8. Muscle shortening velocity depends on tissue inertia and level of activation during submaximal contractions.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephanie A; Wakeling, James M

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform external work, muscles must do additional internal work to deform their tissue, and in particular, to overcome the inertia due to their internal mass. However, the contribution of the internal mass within a muscle to the mechanical output of that muscle has only rarely been studied. Here, we use a dynamic, multi-element Hill-type muscle model to examine the effects of the inertial mass within muscle on its contractile performance. We find that the maximum strain-rate of muscle is slower for lower activations and larger muscle sizes. As muscle size increases, the ability of the muscle to overcome its inertial load will decrease, as muscle tension is proportional to cross-sectional area and inertial load is proportional to mass. Thus, muscles that are larger in size will have a higher inertial cost to contraction. Similarly, when muscle size and inertial load are held constant, decreasing muscle activation will increase inertial cost to contraction by reducing muscle tension. These results show that inertial loads within muscle contribute to a slowing of muscle contractile velocities (strain-rates), particularly at the submaximal activations that are typical during animal locomotion.

  9. Automatic electrical stimulation of abdominal wall muscles increases tidal volume and cough peak flow in tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gollee, H; Hunt, K J; Allan, D B; Fraser, M H; McLean, A N

    2008-01-01

    Paralysis of the respiratory muscles in people with tetraplegia affects their ability to breathe and contributes to respiratory complications. Surface functional electrical stimulation (FES) of abdominal wall muscles can be used to increase tidal volume (V_{T}) and improve cough peak flow (CPF) in tetraplegic subjects who are able to breathe spontaneously. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel abdominal FES system which generates stimulation automatically, synchronised with the subjects' voluntary breathing activity. Four subjects with complete tetraplegia (C4-C6), breathing spontaneously, were recruited. The automatic stimulation system ensured that consistent stimulation was achieved. We compared spirometry during unassisted and FES-assisted quiet breathing and coughing, and measured the effect of stimulation on end-tidal CO_2 (EtCO_2) during quiet breathing. The system dependably recognised spontaneous respiratory effort, stimulating appropriately, and was well tolerated by patients. Significant increases in V_T during quiet breathing (range 0.05-0.23 L) and in CPF (range 0.04-0.49 L/s) were observed. Respiratory rate during quiet breathing decreased in all subjects when stimulated, whereas minute ventilation increased by 1.05-2.07 L/min. The changes in EtCO_2 were inconclusive. The automatic stimulation system augmented spontaneous breathing and coughing in tetraplegic patients and may provide a potential means of respiratory support for tetraplegic patients with reduced respiratory capacity.

  10. In-vivo measurement of muscle tension: dynamic properties of the MC sensor during isometric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Đorđević, Srđan; Tomažič, Sašo; Narici, Marco; Pišot, Rado; Meglič, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue structure in our body and plays an essential role for producing motion through integrated action with bones, tendons, ligaments and joints, for stabilizing body position, for generation of heat through cell respiration and for blood glucose disposal. A key function of skeletal muscle is force generation. Non-invasive and selective measurement of muscle contraction force in the field and in clinical settings has always been challenging. The aim of our work has been to develop a sensor that can overcome these difficulties and therefore enable measurement of muscle force during different contraction conditions. In this study, we tested the mechanical properties of a "Muscle Contraction" (MC) sensor during isometric muscle contraction in different length/tension conditions. The MC sensor is attached so that it indents the skin overlying a muscle group and detects varying degrees of tension during muscular contraction. We compared MC sensor readings over the biceps brachii (BB) muscle to dynamometric measurements of force of elbow flexion, together with recordings of surface EMG signal of BB during isometric contractions at 15° and 90° of elbow flexion. Statistical correlation between MC signal and force was very high at 15° (r = 0.976) and 90° (r = 0.966) across the complete time domain. Normalized SD or σN = σ/max(FMC) was used as a measure of linearity of MC signal and elbow flexion force in dynamic conditions. The average was 8.24% for an elbow angle of 90° and 10.01% for an elbow of angle 15°, which indicates high linearity and good dynamic properties of MC sensor signal when compared to elbow flexion force. The next step of testing MC sensor potential will be to measure tension of muscle-tendon complex in conditions when length and tension change simultaneously during human motion.

  11. Force depression following muscle shortening in sub-maximal voluntary contractions of human adductor pollicis.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skeletal muscles are often studied for controlled, electrically induced, maximal, or supra-maximal contractions. However, many mechanical properties, such as the force-length relationship and force enhancement following active muscle stretching, are quite different for maximal and sub-maximal, or electrically induced and voluntary contractions. Force depression, the loss of force observed following active muscle shortening, has been observed and is well documented for electrically induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Since sub-maximal voluntary contractions are arguably the most important for everyday movement analysis and for biomechanical models of skeletal muscle function, it is important to study force depression properties under these conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine force depression following sub-maximal, voluntary contractions. Sets of isometric reference and isometric-shortening-isometric test contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary effort were performed with the adductor pollicis muscle. All reference and test contractions were executed by controlling force or activation using a feedback system. Test contractions included adductor pollicis shortening over 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees of thumb adduction. Force depression was assessed by comparing the steady-state isometric forces (activation control) or average electromyograms (EMGs) (force control) following active muscle shortening with those obtained in the corresponding isometric reference contractions. Force was decreased by 20% and average EMG was increased by 18% in the shortening test contractions compared to the isometric reference contractions. Furthermore, force depression was increased with increasing shortening amplitudes, and the relative magnitudes of force depression were similar to those found in electrically stimulated and maximal contractions. We conclude from these results that force depression occurs in sub

  12. Contraction and AICAR Stimulate IL-6 Vesicle Depletion From Skeletal Muscle Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lauritzen, Hans P.M.M.; Brandauer, Josef; Schjerling, Peter; Koh, Ho-Jin; Treebak, Jonas T.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Galbo, Henrik; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that interleukin 6 (IL-6) is released from contracting skeletal muscles; however, the cellular origin, secretion kinetics, and signaling mechanisms regulating IL-6 secretion are unknown. To address these questions, we developed imaging methodology to study IL-6 in fixed mouse muscle fibers and in live animals in vivo. Using confocal imaging to visualize endogenous IL-6 protein in fixed muscle fibers, we found IL-6 in small vesicle structures distributed throughout the fibers under basal (resting) conditions. To determine the kinetics of IL-6 secretion, intact quadriceps muscles were transfected with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged IL-6 (IL-6-EGFP), and 5 days later anesthetized mice were imaged before and after muscle contractions in situ. Contractions decreased IL-6-EGFP–containing vesicles and protein by 62% (P < 0.05), occurring rapidly and progressively over 25 min of contraction. However, contraction-mediated IL-6-EGFP reduction was normal in muscle-specific AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2-inactive transgenic mice. In contrast, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased IL-6-EGFP vesicles, an effect that was inhibited in the transgenic mice. In conclusion, resting skeletal muscles contain IL-6–positive vesicles that are expressed throughout myofibers. Contractions stimulate the rapid reduction of IL-6 in myofibers, occurring through an AMPKα2-independent mechanism. This novel imaging methodology clearly establishes IL-6 as a contraction-stimulated myokine and can be used to characterize the secretion kinetics of other putative myokines. PMID:23761105

  13. Involuntary painful muscle contractions in Satoyoshi syndrome: a surface electromyographic study.

    PubMed

    Drost, Gea; Verrips, Aad; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Stegeman, Dick F; Zwarts, Machiel J

    2006-11-01

    We report a child with Satoyoshi syndrome manifested by involuntary painful muscle contractions and alopecia. Although an autoimmune origin of Satoyoshi syndrome seems likely, its exact etiology remains as yet unknown, as is the origin of the involuntary contractions. To gain a better understanding of the electrophysiological characteristics of the involuntary contractions, we performed a surface electromyographic (EMG) study. We investigated muscle contractions in the legs using two noninvasive techniques: high-density surface EMG (HD-sEMG) recordings on one muscle, and polymyographic surface EMG (sEMG) recordings on various muscles. During the involuntary contractions, HD-sEMG showed a fourfold increase in amplitude compared to maximal voluntary contractions. These high potentials were widely distributed across the whole muscle and showed a pronounced oscillatory behavior with a frequency around 45 Hz. Polymyographic sEMG revealed that the involuntary contractions often occur simultaneously in various muscles or showed a switch of activity from one muscle to another. These findings point to hyperactivity or a disinhibition at the alpha motor neuron level, originating probably at that level, although a central origin cannot be excluded. (c) 2006 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:16972238

  14. The difference between standing and sitting in 3 different seat inclinations on abdominal muscle activity and chest and abdominal expansion in woodwind and brass musicians

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Bronwen J.; O'Dwyer, Nicholas; Halaki, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Wind instrumentalists require a sophisticated functioning of their respiratory system to control their air stream, which provides the power for optimal musical performance. The air supply must be delivered into the instrument in a steady and controlled manner and with enough power by the action of the expiratory musculature to produce the desired level of sound at the correct pitch. It is suggested that playing posture may have an impact on the abdominal muscle activity controlling this expired air, but there is no research on musicians to support this theory. This study evaluated chest and abdominal expansion, via respiratory inductive plethysmography, as well as activation patterns of lower and upper abdominal musculature, using surface electromyography, during performance of a range of typical orchestral repertoire by 113 woodwind and brass players. Each of the five orchestral excerpts was played in one of four randomly allocated postures: standing; sitting flat; sitting inclined forwards; and sitting inclined backwards. Musicians showed a clear preference for playing in standing rather than sitting. In standing, the chest expansion range and maximum values were greater (p < 0.01), while the abdominal expansion was less than in all sitting postures (p < 0.01). Chest expansion patterns did not vary between the three sitting postures, while abdominal expansion was reduced in the forward inclined posture compared to the other sitting postures (p < 0.05). There was no significant variation in abdominal muscle activation between the sitting postures, but the level of activation in sitting was only 2/3 of the significantly higher level observed in standing (p < 0.01). This study has demonstrated significant differences in respiratory mechanics between sitting and standing postures in wind musicians during playing of typical orchestral repertoire. Further research is needed to clarify the complex respiratory mechanisms supporting musical performance. PMID:25202290

  15. The difference between standing and sitting in 3 different seat inclinations on abdominal muscle activity and chest and abdominal expansion in woodwind and brass musicians.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Bronwen J; O'Dwyer, Nicholas; Halaki, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Wind instrumentalists require a sophisticated functioning of their respiratory system to control their air stream, which provides the power for optimal musical performance. The air supply must be delivered into the instrument in a steady and controlled manner and with enough power by the action of the expiratory musculature to produce the desired level of sound at the correct pitch. It is suggested that playing posture may have an impact on the abdominal muscle activity controlling this expired air, but there is no research on musicians to support this theory. This study evaluated chest and abdominal expansion, via respiratory inductive plethysmography, as well as activation patterns of lower and upper abdominal musculature, using surface electromyography, during performance of a range of typical orchestral repertoire by 113 woodwind and brass players. Each of the five orchestral excerpts was played in one of four randomly allocated postures: standing; sitting flat; sitting inclined forwards; and sitting inclined backwards. Musicians showed a clear preference for playing in standing rather than sitting. In standing, the chest expansion range and maximum values were greater (p < 0.01), while the abdominal expansion was less than in all sitting postures (p < 0.01). Chest expansion patterns did not vary between the three sitting postures, while abdominal expansion was reduced in the forward inclined posture compared to the other sitting postures (p < 0.05). There was no significant variation in abdominal muscle activation between the sitting postures, but the level of activation in sitting was only 2/3 of the significantly higher level observed in standing (p < 0.01). This study has demonstrated significant differences in respiratory mechanics between sitting and standing postures in wind musicians during playing of typical orchestral repertoire. Further research is needed to clarify the complex respiratory mechanisms supporting musical performance.

  16. Pre-operative inspiratory muscle training preserves postoperative inspiratory muscle strength following major abdominal surgery – a randomised pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, SR; Fletcher, E; McConnell, AK; Poskitt, KR; Whyman, MR

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this pilot study was to assess the effect of pre-operative inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on respiratory variables in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS Respiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory [MIP] and expiratory [MEP] mouth pressure) and pulmonary functions were measured at least 2 weeks before surgery in 80 patients awaiting major abdominal surgery. Patients were then allocated randomly to one of four groups (Group A, control; Group B, deep breathing exercises; Group C, incentive spirometry; Group D, specific IMT). Patients in groups B, C and D were asked to train twice daily, each session lasting 15 min, for at least 2 weeks up to the day before surgery. Outcome measurements were made immediately pre-operatively and postop-eratively. RESULTS In groups A, B and C, MIP did not increase from baseline to pre-operative assessments. In group D, MIP increased from 51.5 cmH2O (median) pre-training to 68.5 cmH2O (median) post-training pre-operatively (P < 0.01). Postoperatively, groups A, B and C showed a fall in MIP from baseline (P < 0.01, P < 0.01) and P = 0.06, respectively). No such significant reduction in postoperative MIP was seen in group D (P = 0.36). CONCLUSIONS Pre-operative specific IMT improves MIP pre-operatively and preserves it postoperatively. Further studies are required to establish if this is associated with reduced pulmonary complications. PMID:20663275

  17. Analysis of Muscle Contraction on Pottery Manufacturing Process Using Electromyography (EMG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soewardi, Hartomo; Azka Rahmayani, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common problems in pottery manufacturing process is musculoskeletal disorders on workers. This disorder was caused by uncomfortable posture where the workers sit on the floor with one leg was folded and another was twisted for long duration. Back, waist, buttock, and right knee frequently experience the disorders. The objective of this research is to investigate the muscle contraction at such body part of workers in manufacturing process of pottery. Electromyography is used to investigate the muscle contraction based on the median frequency signal. Focus measurements is conducted on four muscles types. They are lower interscapular muscle on the right and left side, dorsal lumbar muscle, and lateral hamstring muscle. Statistical analysis is conducted to test differences of muscle contraction between female and male. The result of this research showed that the muscle which reached the highest contraction is dorsal lumbar muscle with the average of median frequency is 51,84 Hz. Then followed by lower interscapular muscle on the left side with the average of median frequency is 31,30 hz, lower interscapular muscle on the right side average of median frequency is 31,24 Hz, and lateral hamstring muscle average of median frequency is 21,77 Hz. Based on the statistic analysis result, there were no differences between male and female on left and right lower interscapular muscle and dorsal lumbar muscle but there were differences on lateral hamstring muscle with the significance level is 5%. Besides that, there were differences for all combination muscle types with the level of significance is 5%.

  18. Modulation of muscle contraction by a cell-permeable peptide

    PubMed Central

    Tünnemann, Gisela; Karczewski, Peter; Haase, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to immortal cell lines, primary cells are hardly susceptible to intracellular delivery methods such as transfection. In this study, we evaluated the direct delivery of several cell-permeable peptides under noninvasive conditions into living primary adult rat cardiomyocytes. We specifically monitored the functional effects of a cell-permeable peptide containing the 15 amino acid N-terminal peptide from human ventricular light chain-1 (VLC-1) on contraction and intracellular Ca2+ signals after electrical stimulation in primary adult cardiomyocytes. The transducible VLC-1 variant was taken up by cardiomyocytes within 5 min with more than 95% efficiency and localized to sarcomeric structures. Analysis of the functional effects of the cell-permeable VLC-1 revealed an enhancement of the intrinsic contractility of cardiomyocytes without affecting the intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, peptide transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides represents not only a unique strategy to enhance heart muscle function with no secondary effect on intracellular Ca2+ but also an invaluable tool for the modulation and manipulation of protein interactions in general and in primary cells. PMID:17717642

  19. Development of new muscle contraction sensor to replace sEMG for using in muscles analysis fields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Matsuoka, Y; Kong, W; Imtiaz, U; Bartolomeo, L; Cosentino, S; Zecca, M; Sessa, S; Ishii, H; Takanishi, A

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the technologies for detecting, processing and interpreting bioelectrical signals have improved tremendously. In particular, surface electromyography (sEMG) has gained momentum in a wide range of applications in various fields. However, sEMG sensing has several shortcomings, the most important being: measurements are heavily sensible to individual differences, sensors are difficult to position and very expensive. In this paper, the authors will present an innovative muscle contraction sensing device (MC sensor), aiming to replace sEMG sensing in the field of muscle movement analysis. Compared with sEMG, this sensor is easier to position, setup and use, less dependent from individual differences, and less expensive. Preliminary experiments, described in this paper, confirm that MC sensing is suitable for muscle contraction analysis, and compare the results of sEMG and MC sensor for the measurement of forearm muscle contraction.

  20. The effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on cervical multifidus muscle dimensions in healthy office workers.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Leila; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Khalkhali Zavieh, Minoo; Noori Kochi, Farhang; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    It is argued that cervical multifidus muscles (CMM) are responsible for providing neck stability. However, whether they are actually activated during the tasks performed by the upper extremities to the neck is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of isometric contraction of shoulder muscles on the dimensions of CMM. Twenty three healthy males voluntarily participated in this study. Ultrasonography imaging of CMM was conducted at rest and at 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction of shoulder muscles in 6 directions of shoulder movements. Anterior-posterior dimension (APD), lateral dimension (LD), shape ratio and multiplied linear dimension (MLD) of cervical multifidus were measured. The APD of CMM was increased while LD and shape ratio were decreased by shoulder muscles contraction (P < 0.01).

  1. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in contracting leg muscles of seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Bent, L R; Sander, M; Bolton, P S; Macefield, V G

    2013-06-01

    We previously showed that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) does not modulate the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in relaxed human leg muscles. However, given that there is little, if any, fusimotor drive to relaxed human muscles, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of muscle spindles becomes apparent during volitional contractions at levels that engage the fusimotor system. Unitary recordings were made from 28 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of seated awake human subjects. Twenty-one of the spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction; seven were silent at rest and were recruited during the contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock" but no entrainment of EMG. Despite these robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven muscle spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular input was not sufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurones recruited during a voluntary steady-state contraction, arguing against a significant role of the vestibular system in adjusting the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurones. PMID:23552997

  2. Forearm Muscle Oxygenation Decreases During Low Levels of Brief, Isometric Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy Gita; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, Alan R.; Rempel, D. M.; Hargens, Murthy G. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Regional muscle pain syndromes can be caused by repeated and sustained exertion of a specific muscle. Such exertion may elevate local tissue fluid pressure, reduce blood flow and tissue oxygenation (TO2), and cause fatigue, pain and functional deficits of the Involved muscle. Low levels (less than 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of prolonged static contraction of the upper extremity are common In many occupational settings and May cause fatigue. The purpose of our Investigation was to determine whether TO2 decreases significantly at low levels of static contraction of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB).

  3. The effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise on abdominal muscle thickness and Oswestry disability index in subjects with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Doo; Yu, Seong-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise with 4 weeks using the musculoskeletal ultrasonography on muscle thickness and disability in subjects with low back pain. Twenty patients with nonspecific back pain (abdominal draw-in maneuver group: n= 10, core exercise group: n= 10) were recruited in the study. Both group received exercise intervention 3 times a week for 4weeks. The test were based on muscle thickness (transversus abdominis; Tra, internal oblique; IO and external oblique; EO), disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured immediately before and after intervention. The data was measured by SPSS program 12.0 version and analyzed by Paired t-test and Independent t-test. The following results were obtained. The thickness of IO, EO for both group significantly improved except for muscle thickness of Tra. The ODI were significant difference for both groups. As the results of this study, we suggest that it may be effective method to apply to increase for the thickness of Tra, EO using abdominal draw-in maneuver and thickness of IO using core exercise. PMID:24278873

  4. Muscle co-contraction modulates damping and joint stability in a three-link biomechanical limb.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Stewart; Ferns, Norm; Breakspear, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Computational models of neuromotor control require forward models of limb movement that can replicate the natural relationships between muscle activation and joint dynamics without the burdens of excessive anatomical detail. We present a model of a three-link biomechanical limb that emphasizes the dynamics of limb movement within a simplified two-dimensional framework. Muscle co-contraction effects were incorporated into the model by flanking each joint with a pair of antagonist muscles that may be activated independently. Muscle co-contraction is known to alter the damping and stiffness of limb joints without altering net joint torque. Idealized muscle actuators were implemented using the Voigt muscle model which incorporates the parallel elasticity of muscle and tendon but omits series elasticity. The natural force-length-velocity relationships of contractile muscle tissue were incorporated into the actuators using ideal mathematical forms. Numerical stability analysis confirmed that co-contraction of these simplified actuators increased damping in the biomechanical limb consistent with observations of human motor control. Dynamic changes in joint stiffness were excluded by the omission of series elasticity. The analysis also revealed the unexpected finding that distinct stable (bistable) equilibrium positions can co-exist under identical levels of muscle co-contraction. We map the conditions under which bistability arises and prove analytically that monostability (equifinality) is guaranteed when the antagonist muscles are identical. Lastly we verify these analytic findings in the full biomechanical limb model.

  5. Comparison of contraction times of a muscle and its motor units.

    PubMed

    Eldred, E; Smith, L; Edgerton, V R

    1992-11-01

    The twitch contraction time (CT) for each of 13 soleus (SOL) and 13 medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles was compared with the mean CT from a sample of its motor units (MUs; 356 total) to see if the CT of a whole muscle when tested at its optimal length (Lo) differed systematically from that of its MUs tested at their individual Lo's. The CTs of the whole muscle were significantly longer in the ratio of 1.13. This is consistent with a hypothesis that electrical-field effects result in a more protracted contraction of the individual muscle fiber. PMID:1491789

  6. Motor nerve terminals on abdominal muscles in larval flesh flies, Sarcophaga bullata: comparisons with Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Feeney, C J; Karunanithi, S; Pearce, J; Govind, C K; Atwood, H L

    1998-12-14

    Motor nerve terminals on abdominal body-wall muscles 6A and 7A in larval flesh flies were investigated to establish their general structural features with confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and freeze-fracture procedures. As in Drosophila and other dipterans, two motor axons supply these muscles, and two morphologically different terminals were discerned with confocal microscopy: thin terminals with relatively small varicosities (Type Is), and thicker terminals with larger varicosities (Type Ib). In serial electron micrographs, Type Ib terminals were distinguished from Type Is terminals by their larger cross-sectional area, more extensive subsynaptic reticulum, more mitochondrial profiles, and more clear synaptic vesicles. Type Ib terminals possessed larger synapses and more synaptic contact area per unit terminal length. Although presynaptic dense bars of active zones were similar in mean length for the two terminal types, there were almost twice as many dense bars per synapse for Type Ib terminals. Freeze-fractures through the presynaptic membrane showed particle-free areas indicative of synapses on the P-face, within which were localized aggregations of large intramembranous particles indicative of active zones. These particles were similar in number to those found at active zones of several other arthropod neuromuscular junctions. In general, synaptic structural parameters strongly paralleled those of the anatomically homologous muscles in Drosophila melanogaster. In live preparations, simultaneous focal recording from identified varicosities and intracellular recording indicated that the two terminals produced excitatory junction potentials of similar amplitude in a physiological solution similar to that used for Drosophila.

  7. Passive mechanical properties of rat abdominal wall muscles suggest an important role of the extracellular connective tissue matrix.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; Carr, John Austin; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal wall muscles have a unique morphology suggesting a complex role in generating and transferring force to the spinal column. Studying passive mechanical properties of these muscles may provide insights into their ability to transfer force among structures. Biopsies from rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were harvested from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and single muscle fibers and fiber bundles (4-8 fibers ensheathed in their connective tissue matrix) were isolated and mechanically stretched in a passive state. Slack sarcomere lengths were measured and elastic moduli were calculated from stress-strain data. Titin molecular mass was also measured from single muscle fibers. No significant differences were found among the four abdominal wall muscles in terms of slack sarcomere length or elastic modulus. Interestingly, across all four muscles, slack sarcomere lengths were quite long in individual muscle fibers (>2.4 µm), and demonstrated a significantly longer slack length in comparison to fiber bundles (p < 0.0001). Also, the extracellular connective tissue matrix provided a stiffening effect and enhanced the resistance to lengthening at long muscle lengths. Titin molecular mass was significantly less in TrA compared to each of the other three muscles (p < 0.0009), but this difference did not correspond to hypothesized differences in stiffness.

  8. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J.; Richardson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement (“slide”) of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP. PMID:19015895

  9. An ionic-chemical-mechanical model for muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Manning, Gerald S

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic process underlying muscle contraction is the parallel sliding of thin actin filaments along an immobile thick myosin fiber powered by oar-like movements of protruding myosin cross bridges (myosin heads). The free energy for functioning of the myosin nanomotor comes from the hydrolysis of ATP bound to the myosin heads. The unit step of translational movement is based on a mechanical-chemical cycle involving ATP binding to myosin, hydrolysis of the bound ATP with ultimate release of the hydrolysis products, stress-generating conformational changes in the myosin cross bridge, and relief of built-up stress in the myosin power stroke. The cycle is regulated by a transition between weak and strong actin-myosin binding affinities. The dissociation of the weakly bound complex by addition of salt indicates the electrostatic basis for the weak affinity, while structural studies demonstrate that electrostatic interactions among negatively charged amino acid residues of actin and positively charged residues of myosin are involved in the strong binding interface. We therefore conjecture that intermediate states of increasing actin-myosin engagement during the weak-to-strong binding transition also involve electrostatic interactions. Methods of polymer solution physics have shown that the thin actin filament can be regarded in some of its aspects as a net negatively charged polyelectrolyte. Here we employ polyelectrolyte theory to suggest how actin-myosin electrostatic interactions might be of significance in the intermediate stages of binding, ensuring an engaged power stroke of the myosin motor that transmits force to the actin filament, and preventing the motor from getting stuck in a metastable pre-power stroke state. We provide electrostatic force estimates that are in the pN range known to operate in the cycle.

  10. An ionic-chemical-mechanical model for muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Manning, Gerald S

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic process underlying muscle contraction is the parallel sliding of thin actin filaments along an immobile thick myosin fiber powered by oar-like movements of protruding myosin cross bridges (myosin heads). The free energy for functioning of the myosin nanomotor comes from the hydrolysis of ATP bound to the myosin heads. The unit step of translational movement is based on a mechanical-chemical cycle involving ATP binding to myosin, hydrolysis of the bound ATP with ultimate release of the hydrolysis products, stress-generating conformational changes in the myosin cross bridge, and relief of built-up stress in the myosin power stroke. The cycle is regulated by a transition between weak and strong actin-myosin binding affinities. The dissociation of the weakly bound complex by addition of salt indicates the electrostatic basis for the weak affinity, while structural studies demonstrate that electrostatic interactions among negatively charged amino acid residues of actin and positively charged residues of myosin are involved in the strong binding interface. We therefore conjecture that intermediate states of increasing actin-myosin engagement during the weak-to-strong binding transition also involve electrostatic interactions. Methods of polymer solution physics have shown that the thin actin filament can be regarded in some of its aspects as a net negatively charged polyelectrolyte. Here we employ polyelectrolyte theory to suggest how actin-myosin electrostatic interactions might be of significance in the intermediate stages of binding, ensuring an engaged power stroke of the myosin motor that transmits force to the actin filament, and preventing the motor from getting stuck in a metastable pre-power stroke state. We provide electrostatic force estimates that are in the pN range known to operate in the cycle. PMID:27603027

  11. Skeletal muscle contraction in protecting joints and bones by absorbing mechanical impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S.; Sarvazyan, A.

    2016-09-01

    We have previously hypothesized that the dissipation of mechanical energy of external impact is a fundamental function of skeletal muscle in addition to its primary function to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy. In this paper, a mathematical justification of this hypothesis is presented. First, a simple mechanical model, in which the muscle is considered as a simple Hookean spring, is considered. This analysis serves as an introduction to the consideration of a biomechanical model taking into account the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction, kinetics of myosin bridges, sarcomere dynamics, and tension of muscle fibers. It is shown that a muscle behaves like a nonlinear and adaptive spring tempering the force of impact and increasing the duration of the collision. The temporal profiles of muscle reaction to the impact as functions of the levels of muscle contraction, durations of the impact front, and the time constants of myosin bridges closing, are obtained. The absorption of mechanical shock energy is achieved due to the increased viscoelasticity of the contracting skeletal muscle. Controlling the contraction level allows for the optimization of the stiffness and viscosity of the muscle necessary for the protection of the joints and bones.

  12. A Case of Pulmonary Paragonimiasis with Involvement of the Abdominal Muscle in a 9-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ah-Rum; Lee, Hae-Ran; Lee, Kwan-Sub; Lee, Sang-Eun

    2011-01-01

    In Korea, many people enjoy eating raw or underkooked freshwater crayfish and crabs which unfortunately may cause paragonimiasis. Here, we describe a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a 9-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-month history of abdominal pain, especially in the right flank and the right inguinal area, with anorexia. A chest radiograph revealed pleural effusion in both lungs, and her abdominal sonography indicated an inflammatory lesion in the right psoas muscle. Peripheral blood analysis of the patient showed hypereosinophilia (66.0%) and an elevated total serum IgE level (>2,500 IU/ml). The pleural effusion tested by ELISA were also positive for antibodies against paragonimiasis. Her dietary history stated that she had ingested raw freshwater crab, 4 months previously. The diagnosis was pulmonary paragonimiasis accompanied by abdominal muscle involvement. She was improved after 5 cycles of praziquantel treatment and 2 times of pleural effusion drainage. In conclusion, herein, we report a case of pulmonary and abdominal paragonimiasis in a girl who presented with abdominal pain and tenderness in the inguinal area. PMID:22355209

  13. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation. PMID:27168073

  14. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation.

  15. Respiratory responses to stimulation of abdominal and upper-thorax intercostal muscles using multiple Permaloc electrodes.

    PubMed

    Walter, James S; Thomas, Donald; Sayers, Scott; Perez-Tamayo, R Anthony; Crish, Timothy; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of abdominal and upper-thoracic muscles was studied with the long-term goal of improved respiratory care for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. A 12-channel stimulator and multiple surface and implanted Permaloc electrodes were evaluated in five anesthetized canines. Abdominal stimulation with 100 mA using four bilateral sets of surface electrodes placed on the midaxillary line at the 7th through 13th intercostal spaces and with a closed airway at a large lung volume produced an expiratory tracheal pressure of 109 +/- 29 cm H2O (n = 2, mean +/- standard error of the mean). Similar high pressures were induced with implanted electrodes at the same locations. Upper-thoracic stimulation with 40 mA and four sets of implanted electrodes ventral to the axilla induced inspiratory pressures of -12 +/- 2 cm H2O (n = 5). Combined extradiaphragmatic pacing with an open airway produced a tidal volume of 440 +/- 45 mL (n = 4). The robust respiratory volumes and pressures suggest applications in SCI respiratory care. PMID:26230516

  16. Contraction-free, fume-fixed longitudinal sections of fresh frozen muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Slocum, Glenn R.

    1988-01-01

    Contraction damage occurring when longitudinal frozen sections of fresh unfixed muscles are thawed on microscope slides has limited histological examination of this tissue mainly to cross sections. Longitudinally oriented sections are advantageous for investigating properties that vary along the length of the muscle fibers. A fume fixation technique has been developed for preventing contraction of thick longitudinal frozen sections. The technique is compatible with histochemical staining of enzymes.

  17. Inhibition of skeletal muscle protein synthesis in septic intra-abdominal abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, T.C.; Siegel, J.H.; Tall, B.D.; Morris, J.G.; Smith, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Chronic sepsis is always associated with profound wasting leading to increased release of amino acids from skeletal muscle. Net protein catabolism may be due to decreased rate of synthesis, increased rate of degradation, or both. To determine whether protein synthesis is altered in chronic sepsis, the rate of protein synthesis in vivo was estimated by measuring the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-phenylalanine in skeletal muscle protein in a chronic (5-day) septic rat model induced by creation of a stable intra-abdominal abscess using an E. coli + B. fragilis-infected sterile fecal-agar pellet as foreign body nidus. Septic rats failed to gain weight at rates similar to control animals, therefore control animals were weight matched to the septic animals. The skeletal muscle protein content in septic animals was significantly reduced relative to control animals (0.18 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.21 +/- 0.01 mg protein/gm wet wt; p less than 0.02). The rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein from control animals was 39 +/- 4 nmole/gm wet wt/hr or a fractional synthetic rate of 5.2 +/- 0.5%/day. In contrast to control animals, the fractional synthetic rate in septic animals (2.6 +/- 0.2%/day) was reduced by 50% compared to control animals (p less than 0.005). The decreased rate of protein synthesis in sepsis was not due to an energy deficit, as high-energy phosphates and ATP/ADP ratio were not altered. This decrease in protein synthesis occurred even though septic animals consumed as much food as control animals.

  18. Changes in muscle strength and pain in response to surgical repair of posterior abdominal wall disruption followed by rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, A; Herrington, L; Blower, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Posterior abdominal wall deficiency (PAWD) is a tear in the external oblique aponeurosis or the conjoint tendon causing a posterior wall defect at the medial end of the inguinal canal. It is often known as sportsman's hernia and is believed to be caused by repetitive stress. Objective: To assess lower limb and abdominal muscle strength of patients with PAWD before intervention compared with matched controls; to evaluate any changes following surgical repair and rehabilitation. Methods: Sixteen subjects were assessed using a questionnaire, isokinetic testing of the lower limb strength, and pressure biofeedback testing of the abdominals. After surgery and a six week rehabilitation programme, the subjects were re-evaluated. A control group were assessed using the same procedure. Results: Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was not affected by this condition. A deficit hip muscle strength was found on the affected limb before surgery, which was significant for the hip flexors (p = 0.05). Before surgery, 87% of the patients compared with 20% of the controls failed the abdominal obliques test. Both the injured and non-injured sides had improved significantly in strength after surgery and rehabilitation. The strength of the abdominal obliques showed the most significant improvement over the course of the rehabilitation programme. Conclusions: Lower limb muscle strength may have been reduced as the result of disuse atrophy or pain inhibition. Abdominal oblique strength was deficient in the injured patients and this compromises rotational control of the pelvis. More sensitive investigations (such as electromyography) are needed to assess the link between abdominal oblique function and groin injury. PMID:12547744

  19. PPARdelta agonism inhibits skeletal muscle PDC activity, mitochondrial ATP production and force generation during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Baker, David J; Constantin, Despina; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2009-01-15

    We have recently shown that PPARdelta agonism, used clinically to treat insulin resistance, increases fat oxidation and up-regulates mitochondrial PDK4 mRNA and protein expression in resting skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that PDK4 up-regulation, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-dependent carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, would negatively affect muscle function during sustained contraction where the demand on CHO is markedly increased. Three groups of eight male Wistar rats each received either vehicle or a PPARdelta agonist (GW610742X) at two doses (5 and 100 mg (kg body mass (bm))(-1) orally for 6 days. On the seventh day, the gastrocnemius-soleus-plantaris muscle group was isolated and snap frozen, or underwent 30 min of electrically evoked submaximal intensity isometric contraction using a perfused hindlimb model. During contraction, the rate of muscle PDC activation was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the rates of muscle PCr hydrolysis and lactate accumulation were significantly increased at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control, reflecting lower mitochondrial ATP generation. Muscle tension development during contraction was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (25%; P < 0.05). The present data demonstrate that PPARdelta agonism inhibits muscle CHO oxidation at the level of PDC during prolonged contraction, and is paralleled by the activation of anaerobic metabolism, which collectively impair contractile function.

  20. Effects of divergent resistance exercise contraction mode and dietary supplementation type on anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis and muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rahbek, Stine Klejs; Farup, Jean; Møller, Andreas Buch; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Holm, Lars; Jessen, Niels; Vissing, Kristian

    2014-10-01

    Greater force produced with eccentric (ECC) compared to concentric (CONC) contractions, may comprise a stronger driver of muscle growth, which may be further augmented by protein supplementation. We investigated the effect of differentiated contraction mode with either whey protein hydrolysate and carbohydrate (WPH + CHO) or isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO) supplementation on regulation of anabolic signalling, muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and muscle hypertrophy. Twenty-four human participants performed unilateral isolated maximal ECC versus CONC contractions during exercise habituation, single-bout exercise and 12 weeks of training combined with WPH + CHO or CHO supplements. In the exercise-habituated state, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K, p-rpS6 increased by approximately 42, 206 and 213 %, respectively, at 1 h post-exercise, with resistance exercise per se; whereas, the phosphorylation was exclusively maintained with ECC at 3 and 5 h post-exercise. This acute anabolic signalling response did not differ between the isocaloric supplement types, neither did protein fractional synthesis rate differ between interventions. Twelve weeks of ECC as well as CONC resistance training augmented hypertrophy with WPH + CHO group compared to the CHO group (7.3 ± 1.0 versus 3.4 ± 0.8 %), independently of exercise contraction type. Training did not produce major changes in basal levels of Akt-mTOR pathway components. In conclusion, maximal ECC contraction mode may constitute a superior driver of acute anabolic signalling that may not be mirrored in the muscle protein synthesis rate. Furthermore, with prolonged high-volume resistance training, contraction mode seems less influential on the magnitude of muscle hypertrophy, whereas protein and carbohydrate supplementation augments muscle hypertrophy as compared to isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation .

  1. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  2. Reliability of ultrasound measurement of automatic activity of the abdominal muscle in participants with and without chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) imaging has been considered as a non-invasive technique to measure thickness and estimate relative abdominal muscle activity. Although some studies have assessed the reliability of US imaging, no study has assessed the reliability of US measurement of automatic activity of abdominal muscles in positions with different levels of stability in participants with chronic low back pain (cLBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate within-day and between-days reliability of US thickness measurements of automatic activity of the abdominal muscles in asymptomatic participants and within-day reliability in those with cLBP. Methods A total of 20 participants (10 with cLBP, 10 healthy) participated in the study. The reliability of US thickness measurements at supine lying and sitting positions (sitting on a chair, sitting on a gym ball with both feet on the ground or lifting one foot off the floor) were assessed. We evaluated within-day reliability in all participants and between-days reliability in asymptomatic participants. Results We found high ICC scores (0.85-0.95) and also small SEM and MDC scores in both groups. The reliability of the measurements was comparable between participants with and without LBP in each position but the SEMs and MDCs was slightly higher in patient group compared with healthy group. It indicates high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all positions. Conclusion US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of automatic activity of abdominal muscles in positions with low levels of stability in participants with and without LBP. PMID:24479859

  3. Individuals with chronic low back pain do not modulate the level of transversus abdominis muscle contraction across different postures.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takuya; Yamanaka, Masanori; Ukishiro, Kengo; Tohyama, Harukazu; Saito, Hiroshi; Samukawa, Mina; Kobayashi, Takumi; Ino, Takumi; Takeda, Naoki

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of the transversus abdominis (TrA) muscle in three basic postures in subjects with and without chronic low back pain. Subjects were classified into a chronic low back pain group (n = 27) and a healthy control group (n = 23). The thickness of the TrA muscle was measured at rest and during the abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) in supine, sitting and standing postures using B-mode ultrasound imaging. Contraction ratio (TrA thickness during the ADIM/TrA thickness at rest) was calculated for each posture. At rest, the TrA thickness in the sitting and standing postures was significantly greater than in the supine posture (p < 0.017) in the control group, but similar in all three postures in the low back pain group. TrA thickness was similar in the low back pain and control group in all three postures. During the ADIM, TrA thickness was significantly greater in the control group than in the chronic low back pain group in all three postures. The contraction ratio was also significantly higher in the control group than in the chronic low back pain group in all three postures. These results indicate that the automatic postural contraction of the TrA observed in the control subjects in the sitting and standing postures was not demonstrated in subjects with chronic low back pain. The present study revealed the one aspect of different response of the TrA muscle to changing posture between two groups.

  4. Excitation failure in eccentric contraction-induced injury of mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G L; Lowe, D A; Hayes, D A; Karwoski, C J; Prior, B M; Armstrong, R B

    1993-01-01

    1. Histological evidence suggests that the force deficit associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury is due to structural damage to contractile elements within the muscle fibre. Alternatively, the force deficit could be explained by an inability to activate the contractile proteins. It was the objective of this study to investigate the latter possibility. 2. Mouse soleus muscles were isolated, placed in an oxygenated Krebs-Ringer buffer at 37 degrees C, and baseline measurements were made. The muscle then performed one of three contraction protocols: (1) twenty eccentric (n = 10 muscles); (2) ten eccentric (n = 12); or (3) twenty isometric (n = 10) contractions. At the end of the injury protocol, measurements were made during performance of a passive stretch, twitch and tetanus. Next, force was recorded during exposure of the muscle to buffer containing 50 mM caffeine. 3. Decrements in maximal isometric tetanic force (P0) observed for muscles in the twenty eccentric, ten eccentric, and twenty isometric contraction protocols were 42.6 +/- 4.2, 20.0 +/- 2.3 and 3.9 +/- 2.4%, respectively. However, the caffeine-elicited forces in muscles from the three protocols were not different when corrected for initial differences in P0 (64.9 +/- 1.3, 64.2 +/- 2.1 and 68.9 +/- 2.5% of pre-injury P0). The peak caffeine-elicited force was 118.4 +/- 8.6% of post-injury P0 for the muscles in the twenty eccentric contraction protocol, which was significantly different from that observed for the other protocols (71.8-80.2% post-injury P0). These findings indicate that the force deficit in this muscle injury model results from a failure of the excitation process at some step prior to calcium (Ca2+) release by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 4. In an attempt to locate the site of failure, intracellular measurements were made in injured muscles to test whether injury to the sarcolemma might have resulted in a shift of the resting membrane potential of the muscle fibre. However

  5. Quantification of muscle co-contraction using supersonic shear wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Hug, François; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-02-01

    Muscle stiffness estimated using shear wave elastography can provide an index of individual muscle force during isometric contraction and may therefore be a promising method for quantifying co-contraction. We estimated the shear modulus of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle using supersonic shear wave imaging and measured its myoelectrical activity using surface electromyography (sEMG) during graded isometric contractions of plantar flexion and dorsiflexion (n=7). During dorsiflexion, the average shear modulus was 26 ± 6 kPa at peak sEMG amplitude, which was significantly less (P=0.02) than that measured at the same sEMG level during plantar flexion (42 ± 10 kPa). The passive tension during contraction was estimated using the passive LG muscle shear modulus during a passive ankle rotation measured at an equivalent ankle angle to that measured during contraction. The passive shear modulus increased significantly (P<0.01) from the plantar flexed position (16 ± 5 kPa) to the dorsiflexed position (26 ± 9 kPa). Once this change in passive tension from joint rotation was accounted for, the average LG muscle shear modulus due to active contraction was significantly greater (P<0.01) during plantar flexion (26 ± 8 kPa) than at sEMG-matched levels of dorsiflexion (0 ± 4 kPa). The negligible shear modulus estimated during isometric dorsiflexion indicates negligible active force contribution by the LG muscle, despite measured sEMG activity of 19% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion contraction. This strongly suggests that the sEMG activity recorded from the LG muscle during isometric dorsiflexion was primarily due to cross-talk. However, it is clear that passive muscle tension changes can contribute to joint torque during isometric dorsiflexion.

  6. AICAR stimulation metabolome widely mimics electrical contraction in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Licht; Egawa, Tatsuro; Oshima, Rieko; Kurogi, Eriko; Tomida, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2013-12-15

    Physical exercise has potent therapeutic and preventive effects against metabolic disorders. A number of studies have suggested that 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a pivotal role in regulating carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in contracting skeletal muscles, while several genetically manipulated animal models revealed the significance of AMPK-independent pathways. To elucidate significance of AMPK and AMPK-independent signals in contracting skeletal muscles, we conducted a metabolomic analysis that compared the metabolic effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribonucleoside (AICAR) stimulation with the electrical contraction ex vivo in isolated rat epitrochlearis muscles, in which both α1- and α2-isoforms of AMPK and glucose uptake were equally activated. The metabolomic analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry detected 184 peaks and successfully annotated 132 small molecules. AICAR stimulation exhibited high similarity to the electrical contraction in overall metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that the major principal component characterized common effects whereas the minor principal component distinguished the difference. PCA and a factor analysis suggested a substantial change in redox status as a result of AMPK activation. We also found a decrease in reduced glutathione levels in both AICAR-stimulated and contracting muscles. The muscle contraction-evoked influences related to the metabolism of amino acids, in particular, aspartate, alanine, or lysine, are supposed to be independent of AMPK activation. Our results substantiate the significance of AMPK activation in contracting skeletal muscles and provide novel evidence that AICAR stimulation closely mimics the metabolomic changes in the contracting skeletal muscles.

  7. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  8. Muscle co-contraction during gait in individuals with articular cartilage defects in the knee.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Louise M; McNally, Michael P; Chaudhari, Ajit M; Flanigan, David C; Best, Thomas M; Siston, Robert A; Schmitt, Laura C

    2016-07-01

    Increased muscle co-contraction during gait is common in individuals with knee pathology, and worrisome as it is known to amplify tibiofemoral compressive forces. While knees with articular cartilage defects (ACD) are more vulnerable to compressive forces, muscle co-contraction has never been reported in this population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which individuals with ACDs in the knee demonstrate elevated quadriceps to hamstrings muscle co-contraction on the involved limb during gait compared to the uninvolved limb and to healthy controls. We also explored the impact of participant characteristics and knee impairments on co-contraction. Twenty-nine individuals with full-thickness knee ACDs (ACD group) and 19 healthy adults (control group) participated in this study. Participants performed five gait trials at self-selected speed, during which activity of the quadriceps and hamstrings muscles were collected with surface electromyography. Three-dimensional motion capture was used to define phases of gait. Quadriceps strength and self-reported outcomes were also assessed in the same session. There were no differences in quadriceps: hamstrings co-contraction between the ACD and control groups, or between the involved and uninvolved limb for the ACD group. For both ACD and control groups, co-contraction was highest in early stance and lowest in late stance. Quadriceps strength was consistently the strongest predictor of muscle co-contraction in both the ACD and the control groups, with individuals with lower strength demonstrating greater co-contraction. Further study is needed to understand the effect of increased muscle co-contraction on joint compressive forces in the presence of varied quadriceps strength.

  9. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction do not blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction in humans.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brett S; Markwald, Rachel R; Smith, Erica G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2005-10-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses are blunted in the vascular beds of contracting muscle (functional sympatholysis), but the mechanism(s) have been difficult to elucidate. We tested the hypothesis that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction in human muscle. We measured forearm blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the reductions in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) in response to reflex increases in sympathetic activity evoked via lower body negative pressure (LBNP). In protocol 1, eight young adults were studied under control resting conditions and during simulated muscle contractions using rhythmic forearm cuff inflations (20 inflations/min) with cuff pressures of 50 and 100 mmHg with the arm below heart level (BH), as well as 100 mmHg with the arm at heart level (HL). Forearm vasoconstrictor responses (%DeltaFVC) during LBNP were -26 +/- 2% during control conditions and were not blunted by simulated contractions (range = -31 +/- 3% to -43 +/- 6%). In protocol 2, eight subjects were studied under control conditions and during rhythmic handgrip exercise (20 contractions/min) using workloads of 15% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) at HL and BH (similar metabolic demand, greater mechanical muscle pump effect for the latter) and 5% MVC BH alone and in combination with superimposed forearm compressions of 100 mmHg (similar metabolic demand, greater mechanical component of contractions for the latter). The forearm vasoconstrictor responses during LBNP were blunted during 15% MVC exercise with the arm at HL (-1 +/- 3%) and BH (-2 +/- 3%) compared with control (-25 +/- 3%; both P < 0.005) but were intact during both 5% MVC alone (-24 +/- 4%) and with superimposed compressions (-23 +/- 4%). We conclude that mechanical effects of contraction per se do not cause functional sympatholysis in the human forearm and that this phenomenon appears to be coupled with the metabolic demand of contracting skeletal muscle.

  10. Comparison of deep and superficial abdominal muscle activity between experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors and controls during stabilization exercise.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Hyun; Hong, Sang-Min; Kim, Chang-Won; Shin, Yun-A

    2015-06-01

    Pilates and resistance exercises are used for lumbar stabilization training. However, it is unclear which exercise is more effective for lumbar stabilization. In our study, we aimed to compare surface muscle activity and deep muscle thickness during relaxation and spinal stabilization exercise in experienced Pilates and resistance exercise instructors. This study is a retrospective case control study set in the Exercise Prescription Laboratory and Sports Medicine Center. The participants included Pilates instructors (mean years of experience, 3.20±1.76; n=10), resistance exercise instructors (mean years of experience, 2.53±0.63; n=10), and controls (n=10). The participants performed 4 different stabilization exercises: abdominal drawing-in maneuver, bridging, roll-up, and one-leg raise. During the stabilization exercises, surface muscle activity was measured with electromyography, whereas deep muscle thickness was measured by ultrasound imaging. During the 4 stabilization exercises, the thickness of the transverse abdominis (TrA) was significantly greater in the Pilates-trained group than the other 2 other groups. The internal oblique (IO) thickness was significantly greater in the Pilates- and resistance-trained group than the control group, during the 4 exercises. However, the surface muscle activities were similar between the groups. Both Pilates and resistance exercise instructors had greater activation of deep muscles, such as the TrA and IO, than the control subjects. Pilates and resistance exercise are both effective for increasing abdominal deep muscle thickness. PMID:26171383

  11. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p < 0.05). AminoL40 administration significantly mitigated the EC-induced impairment of the FSR (0.172 ± 0.018 %/h). EC decreased the paw withdrawal threshold at 1 and 2 days after EC, which indicated that EC induced muscle soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise. PMID:25772815

  12. Different motor learning effects on excitability changes of motor cortex in muscle contraction state.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Higashi, Toshio

    2013-09-01

    We aimed to investigate whether motor learning induces different excitability changes in the human motor cortex (M1) between two different muscle contraction states (before voluntary contraction [static] or during voluntary contraction [dynamic]). For the same, using motor evoked potentials (MEPs) obtained by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we compared excitability changes during these two states after pinch-grip motor skill learning. The participants performed a force output tracking task by pinch grip on a computer screen. TMS was applied prior to the pinch grip (static) and after initiation of voluntary contraction (dynamic). MEPs of the following muscles were recorded: first dorsal interosseous (FDI), thenar muscle (Thenar), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles. During both the states, motor skill training led to significant improvement of motor performance. During the static state, MEPs of the FDI muscle were significantly facilitated after motor learning; however, during the dynamic state, MEPs of the FDI, Thenar, and FCR muscles were significantly decreased. Based on the results of this study, we concluded that excitability changes in the human M1 are differentially influenced during different voluntary contraction states (static and dynamic) after motor learning.

  13. Effect of eccentric contraction on satellite cell activation in human vastus lateralis muscle.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Yoko; Kawai, Minako; Mori, Futoshi; Miyata, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    We compared the time-course of satellite cell (SC) activation between eccentric and concentric contractions in the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle after step exercise. Young adults participated in a 30-min step up/down exercise which mainly involved concentric contractions with the right VL muscle and eccentric contractions with the left VL muscle. The concentric and eccentric contraction phases of the VL muscles were identified by changes in the electromyogram (EMG) and knee joint angle. Biopsy samples were taken from both VL muscles at three time periods: before the exercise and 2 and 5 days after the exercise. We found that the numbers of SCs were significantly increased in the type IIa fibers of the left VL at 2 and 5 days after the exercise. The expression of both hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and myogenic differentiation 1 (MyoD) mRNA had significantly increased in the left VL at 2 and 5 days after the exercise and in the right VL at 5 days after the exercise. The expression of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 1 mRNA also increased in the left VL at 2 days after exercise. These results indicate that eccentric contraction can effectively activate SC proliferation for up to 5 days after exercise. Similar changes in HGF, MyoD and TRPC1 mRNA expression suggest that HGF/c-Met signal activation through cation influx has a major impact on skeletal muscle SC activation in response to eccentric exercise.

  14. Obtaining maximum muscle excitation for normalizing shoulder electromyography in dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Joanne N; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle specific maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) are commonly used to elicit reference amplitudes to normalize electromyographic signals (EMG). It has been questioned whether this is appropriate for normalizing EMG from dynamic contractions. This study compares EMG amplitude when shoulder muscle activity from dynamic contractions is normalized to isometric and isokinetic maximal excitation as well as a hybrid approach currently used in our laboratory. Anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper and lower trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi and infraspinatus were monitored during (1) manually resisted MVICs, and (2) maximum voluntary dynamic concentric contractions (MVDC) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Dynamic contractions were performed (a) at 30°/s about the longitudinal, frontal and sagittal axes of the shoulder, and (b) during manual bi-rotation of a tilted wheel at 120°/s. EMG from the wheel task was normalized to the maximum excitation from (i) the muscle specific MVIC, (ii) from any MVIC (MVICALL), (iii) for any MVDC, (iv) from any exertion (maximum experimental excitation, MEE). Mean EMG from the wheel task was up to 45% greater when normalized to muscle specific isometric contractions (method i) than when normalized to MEE (method iv). Seventy-five percent of MEE's occurred during MVDCs. This study presents an 20 useful and effective process for obtaining the greatest excitation from the shoulder muscles when normalizing dynamic efforts.

  15. Captopril augments acetylcholine-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions in vitro via kinin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Naman; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors therapy is aassociated with bothersome dry cough as an adverse effect. The mechanisms underlying this adverse effect are not clear. Therefore, influence of captopril (an ACE inhibitor) on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced bronchial smooth muscle contractions was investigated. Further, the mechanisms underlying the captopril-induced changes were also explored. In vitro contractions of rat bronchial smooth muscle to cumulative concentrations of ACh were recorded before and after exposure to captopril. Further, the involvement of kinin and inositol triphosphate (IP₃) pathways for captopril-induced alterations were explored. ACh produced concentration-dependent (5-500 µM) increase in bronchial smooth muscle contractions. Pre-treatment with captopril augmented the ACh-induced contractions at each concentration significantly. Pre-treatment with aprotinin (kinin synthesis inhibitor) or heparin (inositol triphosphate, IP₃-inhibitor), blocked the captopril-induced augmentation of bronchial smooth muscle contractions evoked by ACh. Further, captopril-induced augmentation was absent in calcium-free medium. These results suggest that captopril sensitizes bronchial smooth muscles to ACh-induced contractions. This sensitization may be responsible for dry cough associated with captopril therapy. PMID:27468462

  16. Effects of performing an abdominal hollowing exercise on trunk muscle activity during curl-up exercise on an unstable surface

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Hwan; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the abdominal hollowing exercise on trunk muscle activity during the curl-up exercise on an unstable surface by measuring electromyography (EMG) activity. [Subjects] Fourteen young healthy adults (nine male, five female) voluntarily participated in this study. [Methods] Each subject was asked to perform a curl-up exercise on two supporting surfaces (stable and unstable surfaces) combined with the abdominal hollowing exercise on an unstable surface. The muscle activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transverse abdominis (TrA) were measured using surface EMG during performance of the curl-up exercise. [Results] The EMG activity of the RA and EO was significantly higher on an unstable surface than on a stable surface during the curl-up exercise. The EMG activities of the TrA and IO were greater in combination with the abdominal hollowing exercise on an unstable surface than during the curl-up exercise on both a stable and unstable surface. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the local trunk muscle activity during the curl-up exercise is more strongly affected by combination with the abdominal hollowing exercise than by performance on an unstable supporting surface. PMID:25729202

  17. Histone deacetylase 8 regulates cortactin deacetylation and contraction in smooth muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Shu; Cleary, Rachel A; Wang, Ruping; Gannon, Olivia J; Seto, Edward; Tang, Dale D

    2014-08-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that mediate nucleosomal histone deacetylation and gene expression. Some members of the HDAC family have also been implicated in nonhistone protein deacetylation, which modulates cell-cycle control, differentiation, and cell migration. However, the role of HDACs in smooth muscle contraction is largely unknown. Here, HDAC8 was localized both in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of mouse and human smooth muscle cells. Knockdown of HDAC8 by lentivirus-encoding HDAC8 shRNA inhibited force development in response to acetylcholine. Treatment of smooth muscle tissues with HDAC8 inhibitor XXIV (OSU-HDAC-44) induced relaxation of precontracted smooth muscle tissues. In addition, cortactin is an actin-regulatory protein that undergoes deacetylation during migration of NIH 3T3 cells. In this study, acetylcholine stimulation induced cortactin deacetylation in mouse and human smooth muscle tissues, as evidenced by immunoblot analysis using antibody against acetylated lysine. Knockdown of HDAC8 by RNAi or treatment with the inhibitor attenuated cortactin deacetylation and actin polymerization without affecting myosin activation. Furthermore, expression of a charge-neutralizing cortactin mutant inhibited contraction and actin dynamics during contractile activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of smooth muscle contraction. In response to contractile stimulation, HDAC8 may mediate cortactin deacetylation, which subsequently promotes actin filament polymerization and smooth muscle contraction.

  18. Pathways of Ca2+ entry and cytoskeletal damage following eccentric contractions in mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao-Ting; Whitehead, Nicholas P.; Gervasio, Othon L.; Reardon, Trent F.; Vale, Molly; Fatkin, Diane; Dietrich, Alexander; Yeung, Ella W.

    2012-01-01

    Muscles that are stretched during contraction (eccentric contractions) show deficits in force production and a variety of structural changes, including loss of antibody staining of cytoskeletal proteins. Extracellular Ca2+ entry and activation of calpains have been proposed as mechanisms involved in these changes. The present study used isolated mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles subjected to 10 eccentric contractions and monitored force production, immunostaining of cytoskeletal proteins, and resting stiffness. Possible pathways for Ca2+ entry were tested with streptomycin (200 μM), a blocker of stretch-activated channels, and with muscles from mice deficient in the transient receptor potential canonical 1 gene (TRPC1 KO), a candidate gene for stretch-activated channels. At 30 min after the eccentric contractions, the isometric force was decreased to 75 ± 3% of initial control and this force loss was reduced by streptomycin but not in the TRPC1 KO. Desmin, titin, and dystrophin all showed patchy loss of immunostaining 30 min after the eccentric contractions, which was substantially reduced by streptomycin and in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Muscles showed a reduction of resting stiffness following eccentric contractions, and this reduction was eliminated by streptomycin and absent in the TRPC1 KO muscles. Calpain activation was determined by the appearance of a lower molecular weight autolysis product and μ-calpain was activated at 30 min, whereas the muscle-specific calpain-3 was not. To test whether the loss of stiffness was caused by titin cleavage, protein gels were used but no significant titin cleavage was detected. These results suggest that Ca2+ entry following eccentric contractions is through a stretch-activated channel that is blocked by streptomycin and encoded or modulated by TRPC1. PMID:22461447

  19. Effects of contraction path and velocity on the coordination of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task.

    PubMed

    Jiayuan He; Xinjun Sheng; Dingguo Zhang; Xiangyang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Though many studies indicated that the behavior of single muscle was different between contraction and relaxation, the effect of contraction history profile on multiple muscles has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the influence of contraction history on the coordination patterns of hand muscles during a three-digit force production task. The effects of the contraction and relaxation paths with two contraction velocities (5% and 10% maximum voluntary contraction per second) were investigated. The results showed that the force-independent characteristic of muscle coordination patterns still held regardless of the contraction history profiles. In addition, the effect of contraction path was more significant than that of velocity. The study provides a potential way to overcome the impact of contraction disturbance for improving the robustness of the human-machine interface (HMI) based on electromyographic (EMG) pattern recognition.

  20. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  1. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT. PMID:27445844

  2. Effects of hypoxia and glucose-removal condition on muscle contraction of the smooth muscles of porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuta; Kaneda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Nuruki, Takaomi; Kanda, Hidenori; Urakawa, Norimoto; Shimizu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the dependence of aerobic energy metabolism and utilization of glucose in contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle, we investigated the changes in the reduced pyridine nucleotide (PNred) fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity, and determined the phosphocreatine (PCr) and ATP contents of the porcine urinary bladder during contractions induced by high K(+) or carbachol (CCh) and with and without hypoxia (achieved by bubbling N2 instead of O2) or in a glucose-free condition. Hyperosmotic addition of 65 mM KCl (H-65K(+)) and 1 µM CCh induced a phasic contraction followed by a tonic contraction. A glucose-free physiological salt solution (PSS) did not change the subsequent contractile responses to H-65K(+) and CCh. However, hypoxia significantly attenuated H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced contraction. H-65K(+) and CCh induced a sustained increase in PNred fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity. Hypoxia enhanced H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced increases in PNred fluorescence, whereas glucose-free PSS decreased these increases, significantly. In the presence of H-65K(+), hypoxia decreased the PCr and ATP contents; however, the glucose-free PSS did not change the PCr contents. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high K(+)- and CCh-induced contractions depend on aerobic metabolism and that an endogenous substrate may be utilized to maintain muscle contraction in a glucose-free PSS in the porcine urinary bladder.

  3. The influence of strength-endurance training on the oxygenation of isometrically contracted forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Usaj, Anton; Jereb, Blaz; Robi, Pritrznik; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-08-01

    Ice-climbers frequently use the squeezing of rubber rings for increasing their isometric strength-endurance in the forearm muscles. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether such training influences oxygenation and endurance of forearm muscles at higher as well as lower testing intensities. Fourteen healthy young ice-climbers were divided and randomized into two groups. Group A performed a specific ice-climbing test, an ice-axe-grasping (axe weight 750 g) until fatigue. Group B performed 150 N isometric hand-squeezing of dynamometer until fatigue. Both groups performed similar training of squeezing a rubber ring at 30% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) for 6 weeks. The forearm oxygenation was assessed by relative saturation of oxygen (RSO(2)), total hemoglobin concentration (RTOTHb), the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (ROXYHb) and concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin (RDEOXYHb). The results revealed that muscle strength-endurance training increased performance of forearm muscles during 150 N contraction with an accompanied increase in oxygenation of the exercising muscles. In contrast, the same training did not influence the performance of forearm muscles during ice-axe-grasping in spite of increased oxygenation. Muscle oxygenation during intense isometric contraction is low in spite of an increase observed in training. This may be due to oxygenation levels that were below the limit where oxygenation may influence the duration of the contraction. Increased oxygenation may have occurred due to an increased blood flow and perfusion through superficial muscles or layers may not have contributed to the generation of the force of the contraction, as would be the case in deeper muscle layers.

  4. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  5. Muscle contraction is required to maintain the pool of muscle progenitors via YAP and NOTCH during fetal myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Esteves de Lima, Joana; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Birchmeier, Carmen; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    The importance of mechanical activity in the regulation of muscle progenitors during chick development has not been investigated. We show that immobilization decreases NOTCH activity and mimics a NOTCH loss-of-function phenotype, a reduction in the number of muscle progenitors and increased differentiation. Ligand-induced NOTCH activation prevents the reduction of muscle progenitors and the increase of differentiation upon immobilization. Inhibition of NOTCH ligand activity in muscle fibers suffices to reduce the progenitor pool. Furthermore, immobilization reduces the activity of the transcriptional co-activator YAP and the expression of the NOTCH ligand JAG2 in muscle fibers. YAP forced-activity in muscle fibers prevents the decrease of JAG2 expression and the number of PAX7+ cells in immobilization conditions. Our results identify a novel mechanism acting downstream of muscle contraction, where YAP activates JAG2 expression in muscle fibers, which in turn regulates the pool of fetal muscle progenitors via NOTCH in a non-cell-autonomous manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15593.001 PMID:27554485

  6. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans. PMID:25539935

  7. Characterizing rapid-onset vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the human leg.

    PubMed

    Credeur, Daniel P; Holwerda, Seth W; Restaino, Robert M; King, Phillip M; Crutcher, Kiera L; Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Fadel, Paul J

    2015-02-15

    Rapid-onset vasodilation (ROV) following single muscle contractions has been examined in the forearm of humans, but has not yet been characterized in the leg. Given known vascular differences between the arm and leg, we sought to characterize ROV following single muscle contractions in the leg. Sixteen healthy men performed random ordered single contractions at 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) using isometric knee extension made with the leg above and below heart level, and these were compared with single isometric contractions of the forearm (handgrip). Single thigh cuff compressions (300 mmHg) were utilized to estimate the mechanical contribution to leg ROV. Continuous blood flow was determined by duplex-Doppler ultrasound and blood pressure via finger photoplethysmography (Finometer). Single isometric knee extensor contractions produced intensity-dependent increases in peak leg vascular conductance that were significantly greater than the forearm in both the above- and below-heart level positions (e.g., above heart level: leg 20% MVC, +138 ± 28% vs. arm 20% MVC, +89 ± 17%; P < 0.05). Thigh cuff compressions also produced a significant hyperemic response, but these were brief and smaller in magnitude compared with single isometric contractions in the leg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the presence of a rapid and robust vasodilation to single muscle contractions in the leg that is largely independent of mechanical factors, thus establishing the leg as a viable model to study ROV in humans.

  8. Control of respiration by the hypothalamus and by feedback from contracting muscles in cats.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, T G; Mullins, D C; Millhorn, D E

    1986-06-01

    Central command and feedback from contracting muscles are two mechanisms which are thought to control the respiratory and cardiovascular systems during exercise. In this study, we compared the individual and combined responses to activation of central command and to muscular contraction in anesthetized cats. Continuous electrical stimulation of the subthalamic locomotor region (STLR) was used to simulate central command (Eldridge et al., 1985). Static (tetanic) contraction of hindlimb muscles was produced by stimulating the cut peripheral ends of the L7-S1 ventral roots. Despite similar increases in arterial pressure, STLR stimulation caused larger increases in cardiac frequency and respiration than that evoked by muscular contraction. When performed during muscular contraction, STLR still caused large increases in respiration, arterial pressure and cardiac frequency. In contrast, muscular contraction when induced during STLR stimulation caused only small increases in respiration and modest changes in arterial pressure and cardiac frequency. These results suggest that central command and feedback from contracting muscles exert different respiratory and cardiovascular effects when activated simultaneously than when activated individually. In addition, central command, as activated by STLR stimulation, predominates over the responses caused by muscular contraction. PMID:3738257

  9. Contribution of abdominal muscle strength to various activities of daily living of stroke patients with mild paralysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takaaki; Sato, Atsushi; Togashi, Yui; Kasahara, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Takuro; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The trunk muscles frequently become weak after stroke, thus impacting overall activities of daily living. However, activities of daily living items closely related with trunk strength remain unclear. This study aimed to clarify the influence of trunk muscle weakness on activities of daily living items. [Subjects] The subjects were 24 stroke patients who fulfilled the following inclusion criteria: first stroke and the absence of severe paralysis, marked cognitive function deterioration, unilateral spatial neglect or apathy. [Methods] According to abdominal strength, the 24 patients were divided into a nonweakness group and a weakness group. For the assessment, we used the stroke impairment assessment set, the Berg balance scale, a simple test for evaluating hand function, grip strength, and functional independence measure scale scores and the results were compared between the groups. [Results] The Berg balance scale score and scores for dressing, toilet use, transfer to bed, and walk items of the functional independence measure were significantly lower in the weakness group than in the nonweakness group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that weakness of the abdominal muscles adversely impacts the balance of patients with mild stroke as well as their ability to dress, use a toilet, transfer, and walk. Trunk training, including abdominal muscle exercises, can effectively improve the performance of these activities of daily living items.

  10. The Effects of Horse Riding Simulation Training on Stroke Patients’ Balance Ability and Abdominal Muscle Thickness Changes

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Il-Hun; Kim, Byeong Jo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of horse riding simulation training on changes in balance ability and abdominal muscle thicknesses of stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty stroke patients with hemiplegia were recruited, and they were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group. [Methods] The experimental group performed horse riding simulation training, whereas the control group performed trunk exercises for 8 weeks. Balance ability was measured using a BioRescue system. The thicknesses of subjects’ external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles were measured by ultrasonic imaging. [Results] In the experimental group, balance ability was significantly improved after training. Similarly, the thickness of the abdominal muscles on the affected side changed after training in the experimental group, whereas the control group showed no statistically significant changes. [Conclusion] We suggest that horse riding simulation training is more effective than trunk exercises at reducing the center of pressure path length and travel speed and improving the asymmetry of the abdominal muscles of stroke patients. PMID:25202200

  11. Synthesis of Facial Image with Expression Based on Muscular Contraction Parameters Using Linear Muscle and Sphincter Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seonju; Ozawa, Shinji

    We aim to synthesize individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. We have proposed a method of calculating the muscular contraction parameters from arbitrary face image without using learning for each individual. As a result, we could generate not only individual facial expression, but also the facial expressions of various persons. In this paper, we propose the muscle-based facial model; the facial muscles define both the linear and the novel sphincter. Additionally, we propose a method of synthesizing individual facial image with expression based on muscular contraction parameters. First, the individual facial model with expression is generated by fitting using the arbitrary face image. Next, the muscular contraction parameters are calculated that correspond to the expression displacement of the input face image. Finally, the facial expression is synthesized by the vertex displacements of a neutral facial model based on calculated muscular contraction parameters. Experimental results reveal that the novel sphincter muscle can synthesize facial expressions of the facial image, which corresponds to the actual face image with arbitrary and mouth or eyes expression.

  12. Prostaglandins induce vasodilatation of the microvasculature during muscle contraction and induce vasodilatation independent of adenosine.

    PubMed

    Murrant, Coral L; Dodd, Jason D; Foster, Andrew J; Inch, Kristin A; Muckle, Fiona R; Ruiz, Della A; Simpson, Jeremy A; Scholl, Jordan H P

    2014-03-15

    Blood flow data from contracting muscle in humans indicates that adenosine (ADO) stimulates the production of nitric oxide (NO) and vasodilating prostaglandins (PG) to produce arteriolar vasodilatation in a redundant fashion such that when one is inhibited the other can compensate. We sought to determine whether these redundant mechanisms are employed at the microvascular level. First, we determined whether PGs were involved in active hyperaemia at the microvascular level. We stimulated four to five skeletal muscle fibres in the anaesthetized hamster cremaster preparation in situ and measured the change in diameter of 2A arterioles (maximum diameter 40 μm, third arteriolar level up from the capillaries) at a site of overlap with the stimulated muscle fibres before and after 2 min of contraction [stimulus frequencies: 4, 20 and 60 Hz at 15 contractions per minute (CPM) or contraction frequencies of 6, 15 or 60 CPM at 20 Hz; 250 ms train duration]. Muscle fibres were stimulated in the absence and presence of the phospholipase A2 inhibitor quinacrine. Further, we applied a range of concentrations of ADO (10(-7)-10(-5) M) extraluminally, (to mimic muscle contraction) in the absence and presence of L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor), indomethacin (INDO, cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and L-NAME + INDO and observed the response of 2A arterioles. We repeated the latter experiment on a different level of the cremaster microvasculature (1A arterioles) and on the microvasculature of a different skeletal muscle (gluteus maximus, 2A arterioles). We observed that quinacrine inhibited vasodilatation during muscle contraction at intermediate and high contraction frequencies (15 and 60 CPM). L-NAME, INDO and L-NAME + INDO were not effective at inhibiting vasodilatation induced by any concentration of ADO tested in 2A and 1A arterioles in the cremaster muscle or 2A arterioles in the gluteus maximus muscle. Our data show that PGs are involved in the vasodilatation of the microvasculature in

  13. Decrease in Muscle Contraction Time Complements Neural Maturation in the Development of Dynamic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Dayanidhi, Sudarshan; Kutch, Jason J.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental improvements in dynamic manipulation abilities are typically attributed to neural maturation, such as myelination of corticospinal pathways, neuronal pruning, and synaptogenesis. However the contributions from changes in the peripheral motor system are less well understood. Here we investigated whether there are developmental changes in muscle activation-contraction dynamics and whether these changes contribute to improvements in dynamic manipulation in humans. We compared pinch strength, dynamic manipulation ability, and contraction time of the first dorsal interosseous muscle in typically developing preadolescent, adolescent, and young adults. Both strength and dynamic manipulation ability increased with age (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.00001, respectively). Surprisingly, adults had a 33% lower muscle contraction time compared with preadolescents (p < 0.01), and contraction time showed a significant (p < 0.005) association with dynamic manipulation abilities. Whereas decreases in muscle contraction time during development have been reported in the animal literature, our finding, to our knowledge, is the first report of this phenomenon in humans and the first finding of its association with manipulation. Consequently, the changes in the muscle contractile properties could be an important complement to neural maturation in the development of dynamic manipulation. These findings have important implications for understanding central and peripheral contributors to deficits in manipulation in atypical development, such as in children with cerebral palsy. PMID:24048835

  14. Electromechanical delay components during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabio; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Limonta, Eloisa; Venturelli, Massimo; Monti, Elena; Bet, Luciano; Fossati, Barbara; Meola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation can be partitioned into mainly electrochemical and mainly mechanical components by an EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach. Component duration and measurement reliability were investigated during contraction and relaxation in a group of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n = 13) and in healthy controls (n = 13). EMG, mechanomyogram, and force were recorded in DM1 and in age- and body-matched controls from tibialis anterior (distal muscle) and vastus lateralis (proximal muscle) muscles during maximum voluntary and electrically-evoked isometric contractions. The electrochemical and mechanical components of the electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation were calculated off-line. Maximum strength was significantly lower in DM1 than in controls under both experimental conditions. All electrochemical and mechanical components were significantly longer in DM1 in both muscles. Measurement reliability was very high in both DM1 and controls. The high reliability of the measurements and the differences between DM1 patients and controls suggest that the EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach could be utilized as a valid tool to assess the level of neuromuscular dysfunction in this pathology, and to follow the efficacy of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions.

  15. Muscle fatigue and contraction intensity modulates the complexity of surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Cashaback, Joshua G A; Cluff, Tyler; Potvin, Jim R

    2013-02-01

    Nonlinear dynamical techniques offer a powerful approach for the investigation of physiological time series. Multiscale entropy analyses have shown that pathological and aging systems are less complex than healthy systems and this finding has been attributed to degraded physiological control processes. A similar phenomenon may arise during fatiguing muscle contractions where surface electromyography signals undergo temporal and spectral changes that arise from the impaired regulation of muscle force production. Here we examine the affect of fatigue and contraction intensity on the short and long-term complexity of biceps brachii surface electromyography. To investigate, we used an isometric muscle fatigue protocol (parsed into three windows) and three contraction intensities (% of maximal elbow joint moment: 40%, 70% and 100%). We found that fatigue reduced the short-term complexity of biceps brachii activity during the last third of the fatiguing contraction. We also found that the complexity of surface electromyography is dependent on contraction intensity. Our results show that multiscale entropy is sensitive to muscle fatigue and contraction intensity and we argue it is imperative that both factors be considered when evaluating the complexity of surface electromyography signals. Our data contribute to a converging body of evidence showing that multiscale entropy can quantify subtle information content in physiological time series.

  16. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  17. Comparison of the isolated contraction ratios of the hip extensors and erector spinae muscles of the lumbar region and thoracic muscles during different back extension exercises

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the isolated contraction ratios of the hip extensors, erector spinae muscles of the lumbar region, and thoracic muscles during different back extension exercises. [Subjects] Twelve males participated in this study. [Methods] The subjects performed various back extension exercises. The activities of the T7 erector spinae muscles, L3 erector spinae muscles, and the gluteus maximus were measured, and the isolation contraction ratios were calculated. [Results] The isolated contraction ratio of the T7 erector spinae muscles significantly increased during exercise 2. The isolated contraction ratio of the gluteus maximus increased by a significant degree during exercise 1 compared with the other exercises. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that the back extension exercises 1 and 2 can be applied to selectively exercise the hip extensors, thoracic muscles, and muscles of the lumbar region. PMID:25729158

  18. The myokine decorin is regulated by contraction and involved in muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Kanzleiter, Timo; Rath, Michaela; Görgens, Sven W; Jensen, Jørgen; Tangen, Daniel S; Kolnes, Anders J; Kolnes, Kristoffer J; Lee, Sindre; Eckel, Jürgen; Schürmann, Annette; Eckardt, Kristin

    2014-07-25

    The health-promoting effects of regular exercise are well known, and myokines may mediate some of these effects. The small leucine-rich proteoglycan decorin has been described as a myokine for some time. However, its regulation and impact on skeletal muscle has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we report decorin to be differentially expressed and released in response to muscle contraction using different approaches. Decorin is released from contracting human myotubes, and circulating decorin levels are increased in response to acute resistance exercise in humans. Moreover, decorin expression in skeletal muscle is increased in humans and mice after chronic training. Because decorin directly binds myostatin, a potent inhibitor of muscle growth, we investigated a potential function of decorin in the regulation of skeletal muscle growth. In vivo overexpression of decorin in murine skeletal muscle promoted expression of the pro-myogenic factor Mighty, which is negatively regulated by myostatin. We also found Myod1 and follistatin to be increased in response to decorin overexpression. Moreover, muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases atrogin1 and MuRF1, which are involved in atrophic pathways, were reduced by decorin overexpression. In summary, our findings suggest that decorin secreted from myotubes in response to exercise is involved in the regulation of muscle hypertrophy and hence could play a role in exercise-related restructuring processes of skeletal muscle. PMID:24996176

  19. The interaction between peripheral and central fatigue at different muscle temperatures during sustained isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Alex; Hodder, Simon; Havenith, George

    2015-08-15

    Changes in central fatigue have been linked to active and passive changes in core temperature, as well as integration of sensory feedback from thermoreceptors in the skin. However, the effects of muscle temperature (Tm), and thereby metaboreceptor and local afferent nerve temperature, on central fatigue (measured using voluntary activation percentage) during sustained, high muscle fatigue exercise remain unexamined. In this study, we investigated Tm across the range of cold to hot, and its effect on voluntary activation percentage during sustained isometric contractions of the knee extensors. The results suggest that contrary to brief contractions, during a sustained fatiguing contraction Tm significantly (P < 0.001) influences force output (-0.7%/°C increase) and central fatigue (-0.5%/°C increase), showing a negative relationship across the Tm continuum in moderately trained individuals. The negative relationship between voluntary activation percentage and Tm indicates muscle temperature may influence central fatigue during sustained and high muscle fatigue exercise. On the basis of on an integrative analysis between the present data and previous literature, the impact of core and muscle temperature on voluntary muscle activation is estimated to show a ratio of 5.5 to 1, respectively. Accordingly, Tm could assume a secondary or tertiary role in the reduction of voluntary muscle activation when body temperature leaves a thermoneutral range.

  20. Optical induction of muscle contraction at the tissue scale through intrinsic cellular amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jonghee; Choi, Myunghwan; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Won Jong; Choi, Chulhee

    2014-08-01

    The smooth muscle cell is the principal component responsible for involuntary control of visceral organs, including vascular tonicity, secretion, and sphincter regulation. It is known that the neurotransmitters released from nerve endings increase the intracellular Ca(2+) level in smooth muscle cells followed by muscle contraction. We herein report that femtosecond laser pulses focused on the diffraction-limited volume can induce intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the irradiated smooth muscle cell without neurotransmitters, and locally increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels are amplified by calcium-induced calcium-releasing mechanisms through the ryanodine receptor, a Ca(2+) channel of the endoplasmic reticulum. The laser-induced Ca(2+) increases propagate to adjacent cells through gap junctions. Thus, ultrashort-pulsed lasers can induce smooth muscle contraction by controlling Ca(2+), even with optical stimulation of the diffraction-limited volume. This optical method, which leads to reversible and reproducible muscle contraction, can be used in research into muscle dynamics, neuromuscular disease treatment, and nanorobot control. PMID:23650149

  1. Abdominal muscle activation changes if the purpose is to control pelvis motion or thorax motion.

    PubMed

    Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moreside, Janice M; McGill, Stuart M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare trunk muscular recruitment and lumbar spine kinematics when motion was constrained to either the thorax or the pelvis. Nine healthy women performed four upright standing planar movements (rotations, anterior-posterior translations, medial-lateral translations, and horizontal circles) while constraining pelvis motion and moving the thorax or moving the pelvis while minimizing thorax motion, and four isometric trunk exercises (conventional curl-up, reverse curl-up, cross curl-up, and reverse cross curl-up). Surface EMG (upper and lower rectus abdominis, lateral and medial aspects of external oblique, internal oblique, and latissimus dorsi) and 3D lumbar displacements were recorded. Pelvis movements produced higher EMG amplitudes of the oblique abdominals than thorax motions in most trials, and larger lumbar displacements in the medial-lateral translations and horizontal circles. Conversely, thorax movements produced larger rotational lumbar displacement than pelvis motions during rotations and higher EMG amplitudes for latissimus dorsi during rotations and anterior-posterior translations and for lower rectus abdominis during the crossed curl-ups. Thus, different neuromuscular compartments appear when the objective changes from pelvis to thorax motion. This would suggest that both movement patterns should be considered when planning spine stabilization programs, to optimize exercises for the movement and muscle activations desired.

  2. The interrelation between aPKC and glucose uptake in the skeletal muscle during contraction and insulin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Santos, J M; Benite-Ribeiro, S A; Queiroz, G; Duarte, J A

    2014-12-01

    Contraction and insulin increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. While the insulin pathway, better characterized, requires activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and atypical protein kinase (aPKC), muscle contraction seems to share insulin-activated components to increase glucose uptake. This study aimed to investigate the interrelation between the pathway involved in glucose uptake evoked by insulin and muscle contraction. Isolated muscle of rats was treated with solvent (control), insulin, wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor) and the combination of insulin plus wortmannin. After treatment, muscles were electrically stimulated (contracted) or remained at rest. Glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) localization, glucose uptake and phospho-aPKC (aPKC activated form) were assessed. Muscle contraction and insulin increased glucose uptake in all conditions when compared with controls not stimulating an effect that was accompanied by an increase in GLUT4 and of phospho-aPKC at the muscle membrane. Contracted muscles treated with insulin did not show additive effects on glucose uptake or aPKC activity compared with the response when these stimuli were applied alone. Inhibition of PI3K blocked insulin effect on glucose uptake and aPKC but not in the contractile response. Thus, muscle contraction seems to stimulate aPKC and glucose uptake independently of PI3K. Therefore, aPKC may be a convergence point and a rate limit step in the pathway by which, insulin and contraction, increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

  3. Effect of electrically induced muscle contractions on posttraumatic edema formation in frog hind limbs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; Fish, D R; Mendel, F C; Burton, H W

    1992-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that repeated muscle contractions induced by high voltage pulsed current (HVPC) would limit volume increases in traumatized frog hind limbs. Twelve frogs were anesthetized, and both hind limbs of each frog were traumatized by impact. Limb volumes were measured via water displacement over a 24-hour period. Four 30-minute treatments of continuous 1-pulse per second HVPC were applied to one limb selected randomly. Stimulation produced muscle contractions that resulted in minimal joint movements. Volume changes from pretrauma limb volumes (in milliliters per kilogram) were analyzed by an analysis of variance for repeated measures. Our hypothesis was rejected (ie, repeated muscle contractions, as induced in this study, did not limit posttraumatic edema formation in frogs). Further investigation of the relative influences of limb position and varying pulse rates, pulse durations, and intensities of HVPC on edema formation may provide valuable insights on effective treatment of edema in humans.

  4. The relationship between cough-specific quality of life and abdominal muscle endurance, fatigue, and depression in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Hulya; Savci, Sema; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Saglam, Melda; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Coplu, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cough is a prevalent symptom that impacts quality of life in COPD. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between cough-specific quality of life, abdominal muscle endurance, fatigue, and depression in stable patients with COPD. Methods Twenty-eight patients with COPD (mean age 60.6±8.7 years) referred for pulmonary rehabilitation participated in this cross-sectional study. Sit-ups test was used for assessing abdominal muscle endurance. Leicester Cough Questionnare (LCQ) was used to evaluate symptom-specific quality of life. Fatigue perception was evaluated with Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS). Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used for assessing depression level. Results The LCQ total score was significantly associated with number of sit-ups; BDI score; FIS total; physical, cognitive, and psychosocial scores (P<0.05). Scores of the LCQ physical, social, and psychological domains were also significantly related with number of sit-ups, FIS total score, and BDI score (P<0.05). FIS total score and number of sit-ups explained 58% of the variance in LCQ total score (r=0.76, r2=0.577, F(2–20)=12.296, P<0.001). Conclusion Chronic cough may adversely affect performance in daily life due to its negative effect on fatigue and decrease abdominal muscle endurance in patients with COPD. Decreased cough-related quality of life is related with increased level of depression in COPD patients. Effects of increased abdominal muscle endurance and decreased fatigue in COPD patients with chronic cough need further investigation. PMID:26379433

  5. Maximum isometric knee flexor and extensor muscle contractions: normal patterns of torque versus time.

    PubMed

    Murray, M P; Baldwin, J M; Gardner, G M; Sepic, S B; Downs, W J

    1977-06-01

    Isometric torque of the knee flexor and extensor muscles were recorded for 5 seconds at three knee joint positions. The subjects included healthy men in age groups from 20 to 35 and 45 to 65 years of age. The amplitudes and duration of peak torque and the time to peak torque were measured for each contraction. Peak torque was usually maintaned less than 0.1 second and never longer than 0.9 second. At each of the three angles, the mean extensor muscle torque was higher than the mean flexor muscle torque in both age groups, and the mean torque for both muscle group was higher among the younger than among the older man. The highest average torque was recorded at the knee angle of 60 degrees for the extensor muscles and 45 degrees for the flexor muscles, but this was not always a stereotyped response either for a given individual or among individuals.

  6. Behavior of human gastrocnemius muscle fascicles during ramped submaximal isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin E; Stubbs, Peter W; Herbert, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    Precise estimates of muscle architecture are necessary to understand and model muscle mechanics. The primary aim of this study was to estimate continuous changes in fascicle length and pennation angle in human gastrocnemius muscles during ramped plantar flexor contractions at two ankle angles. The secondary aim was to determine whether these changes differ between proximal and distal fascicles. Fifteen healthy subjects performed ramped contractions (0-25% MVC) as ultrasound images were recorded from the medial (MG, eight sites) and lateral (LG, six sites) gastrocnemius muscle with the ankle at 90° and 120° (larger angles correspond to shorter muscle lengths). In all subjects, fascicles progressively shortened with increasing torque. MG fascicles shortened 5.8 mm (11.1%) at 90° and 4.5 mm (12.1%) at 120°, whereas LG muscle fascicles shortened 5.1 mm (8.8%) at both ankle angles. MG pennation angle increased 1.4° at 90° and 4.9° at 120°, and LG pennation angle decreased 0.3° at 90° and increased 2.6° at 120°. Muscle architecture changes were similar in proximal and distal fascicles at both ankle angles. This is the first study to describe continuous changes in fascicle length and pennation angle in the human gastrocnemius muscle during ramped isometric contractions. Very similar changes occurred in proximal and distal muscle regions. These findings are relevant to studies modeling active muscle mechanics. PMID:27604399

  7. Effect of topical cheek surface anesthesia on isometric contractions of the human masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L V; Robbins, D M

    1988-02-01

    To study the possibility of interactions between buccal cutaneous sensory receptors and voluntary maximum isometric contractions of the masseter muscles, six adult subjects exercised maximum teeth clenching before and after spraying the right cheek surface with aerosol containing 20% benzocaine. The right cheek and masseter muscle served as the experimental side, the left cheek and masseter muscle as the control side. Isometric motor outputs, on the right and left sides, were monitored by integrated surface electromyography over periods of 10 seconds. Topical surface anesthesia provided no evidence of motor modulation by cutaneous tactile receptors. Before and after anesthesia, the two muscles showed nearly identical and well-coordinated motor innervation patterns. It is suggested that the cortical motor commands of maximum isometric contractions, with recruitment of practically all available motor units, overrule all modulatory inputs except those of fatigue.

  8. Decrease in intramuscular lipid droplets and translocation of HSL in response to muscle contraction and epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Prats, Clara; Donsmark, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Londos, Constantine; Sztalryd, Carole; Holm, Cecilia; Galbo, Henrik; Ploug, Thorkil

    2006-11-01

    A better understanding of skeletal muscle lipid metabolism is needed to identify the molecular mechanisms relating intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) to muscle metabolism and insulin sensitivity. An increasing number of proteins have been reported to be associated with intracellular triglyceride (TG), among them the PAT family members: perilipin, ADRP (for adipocyte differentiation-related protein), and TIP47 (for tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa). Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is thought to be the major enzyme responsible for IMTG hydrolysis in skeletal muscle. In adipocytes, regulation of HSL by intracellular redistribution has been demonstrated. The existence of such regulatory mechanisms in skeletal muscle has long been hypothesized but has never been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to characterize the PAT family proteins associated with IMTG and to investigate the effect of epinephrine stimulation or muscle contraction on skeletal muscle TG content and HSL intracellular distribution. Rat soleus muscles were either incubated with epinephrine or electrically stimulated for 15 min. Single muscle fibers were used for morphological analysis by confocal and transmission electron microscopy. We show a decrease in IMTG in response to both lipolytic stimuli. Furthermore, we identify two PAT family proteins, ADRP and TIP47, associated with IMTG. Finally, we demonstrate HSL translocation to IMTG and ADRP after stimulation with epinephrine or contraction.

  9. Effects of a Bridging Exercise with Hip Adduction on the EMG Activities of the Abdominal and Hip Extensor Muscles in Females

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun-Mi; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activities of the abdominal and hip extensor muscles between the bridging exercise (BE) and bridging exercise with hip adduction (BEHA) positions in women using electromyography (EMG). [Subjects] We recruited 14 healthy adult females with no history of low back pain. [Methods] The subjects performed bridging exercises with and without hip adduction. The EMG activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and gluteus maximus (GM) muscles were recorded. [Result] The EMG activities of all muscles were significantly increased during the BEHA compared to the BE. [Conclusion] The bridging exercise with hip adduction produced greater activation of the abdominal and hip extensor muscles. PMID:24259933

  10. Muscle contraction phenotypic analysis enabled by optogenetics reveals functional relationships of sarcomere components in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Barnes, Dawn E.; Matsunaga, Yohei; Benian, Guy M.; Ono, Shoichiro; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    The sarcomere, the fundamental unit of muscle contraction, is a highly-ordered complex of hundreds of proteins. Despite decades of genetics work, the functional relationships and the roles of those sarcomeric proteins in animal behaviors remain unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that optogenetic activation of the motor neurons that induce muscle contraction can facilitate quantitative studies of muscle kinetics in C. elegans. To increase the throughput of the study, we trapped multiple worms in parallel in a microfluidic device and illuminated for photoactivation of channelrhodopsin-2 to induce contractions in body wall muscles. Using image processing, the change in body size was quantified over time. A total of five parameters including rate constants for contraction and relaxation were extracted from the optogenetic assay as descriptors of sarcomere functions. To potentially relate the genes encoding the sarcomeric proteins functionally, a hierarchical clustering analysis was conducted on the basis of those parameters. Because it assesses physiological output different from conventional assays, this method provides a complement to the phenotypic analysis of C. elegans muscle mutants currently performed in many labs; the clusters may provide new insights and drive new hypotheses for functional relationships among the many sarcomere components.

  11. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  12. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Comparison in muscle damage between maximal voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contractions of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Jubeau, Marc; Muthalib, Makii; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2012-02-01

    This study compared between maximal voluntary (VOL) and electrically stimulated (ES) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage to investigate whether ES would induce greater muscle damage than VOL. Twelve non-resistance-trained men (23-39 years) performed VOL with one arm and ES with the contralateral arm separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counterbalanced order. Both VOL and ES (frequency 75 Hz, pulse duration 250 μs, maximally tolerated intensity) exercises consisted of 50 maximal isometric contractions (4-s on, 15-s off) of the elbow flexors at a long muscle length (160°). Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque (MVC), range of motion, muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and serum creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following exercise. The average peak torque over the 50 isometric contractions was greater (P < 0.05) for VOL (32.9 ± 9.8 N m) than ES (16.9 ± 6.3 N m). MVC decreased greater and recovered slower (P < 0.05) after ES (15% lower than baseline at 96 h) than VOL (full recovery). Serum CK activity increased (P < 0.05) only after ES, and the muscles became more sore and tender after ES than VOL (P < 0.05). These results showed that ES induced greater muscle damage than VOL despite the lower torque output during ES. It seems likely that higher mechanical stress imposed on the activated muscle fibres, due to the specificity of motor unit recruitment in ES, resulted in greater muscle damage. PMID:21573775

  14. Adaptations of upper trapezius muscle activity during sustained contractions in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Andersen, Helle; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Farina, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The study compared the distribution of electromyographic (EMG) signal amplitude in the upper trapezius muscle in 10 women with fibromyalgia and in 10 healthy women before and after experimentally-induced muscle pain. Surface EMG signals were recorded over the right upper trapezius muscle with a 10 x 5 grid of electrodes during 90 degrees shoulder abduction sustained for 60s. The control subjects repeated the abduction task following injections of isotonic and hypertonic (painful) saline into the upper trapezius muscle. The EMG amplitude was computed for each electrode pair and provided a topographical map of the distribution of muscle activity. The pain level rated by the patients at the beginning of the sustained contraction was 5.9+/-1.5. The peak pain intensity for the control group following the injection of hypertonic saline was 6.0+/-1.6. During the sustained contractions, the EMG amplitude increased relatively more in the cranial than caudal region of the upper trapezius muscle for the control subjects (shift in the distribution of EMG amplitude: 2.3+/-1.3mm; P<0.01). The patient group showed lower average EMG amplitude than the controls during the contraction (P<0.05) and did not show different changes in EMG amplitude between different regions of the upper trapezius. A similar behavior was observed for the control group following injection of hypertonic saline. The results indicate that muscle pain prevents the adaptation of upper trapezius activity during sustained contractions as observed in non-painful conditions, which may induce overuse of similar muscle compartments with fatigue.

  15. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits.

  16. Proprioceptive acuity predicts muscle co-contraction of the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis in older adults' dynamic postural control.

    PubMed

    Craig, C E; Goble, D J; Doumas, M

    2016-05-13

    Older adults use a different muscle strategy to cope with postural instability, in which they 'co-contract' the muscles around the ankle joint. It has been suggested that this is a compensatory response to age-related proprioceptive decline however this view has never been assessed directly. The current study investigated the association between proprioceptive acuity and muscle co-contraction in older adults. We compared muscle activity, by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from the bilateral tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscles, in young (aged 18-34) and older adults (aged 65-82) during postural assessment on a fixed and sway-referenced surface at age-equivalent levels of sway. We performed correlations between muscle activity and proprioceptive acuity, which was assessed using an active contralateral matching task. Despite successfully inducing similar levels of sway in the two age groups, older adults still showed higher muscle co-contraction. A stepwise regression analysis showed that proprioceptive acuity measured using variable error was the best predictor of muscle co-contraction in older adults. However, despite suggestions from previous research, proprioceptive error and muscle co-contraction were negatively correlated in older adults, suggesting that better proprioceptive acuity predicts more co-contraction. Overall, these results suggest that although muscle co-contraction may be an age-specific strategy used by older adults, it is not to compensate for age-related proprioceptive deficits. PMID:26905952

  17. Muscle-fiber conduction velocity estimated from surface EMG signals during explosive dynamic contractions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, M; Merlo, E; Farina, D; Antonutto, G; Merletti, R; Di Prampero, P E

    2004-06-01

    Muscle-fiber conduction velocity (CV) was estimated from surface electromyographic (EMG) signals during isometric contractions and during short (150-200 ms), explosive, dynamic exercises. Surface EMG signals were recorded with four linear adhesive arrays from the vastus lateralis and medialis muscles of 12 healthy subjects. Isometric contractions were at linearly increasing force from 0% to 100% of the maximum. The dynamic contractions consisted of explosive efforts of the lower limb on a sledge ergometer. For the explosive contractions, muscle-fiber CV was estimated in seven time-windows located along the ascending time interval of the force. There was a significant correlation between CV values during the isometric ramp and explosive contractions (R = 0.75). Moreover, CV estimates increased significantly from (mean +/- SD) 4.32 +/- 0.46 m/s to 4.97 +/- 0.45 m/s during the increasing-force explosive task. It was concluded that CV can be estimated reliably during dynamic tasks involving fast limb movements and that, in these contractions, it may provide important information on motor-unit control properties.

  18. A DIC Based Technique to Measure the Contraction of a Skeletal Muscle Engineered Tissue.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Emanuele; Carosio, Silvia; Faraldi, Martina; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary science based on the application of engineering approaches to biologic tissue formation. Engineered tissue internal organization represents a key aspect to increase biofunctionality before transplant and, as regarding skeletal muscles, the potential of generating contractile forces is dependent on the internal fiber organization and is reflected by some macroscopic parameters, such as the spontaneous contraction. Here we propose the application of digital image correlation (DIC) as an independent tool for an accurate and noninvasive measurement of engineered muscle tissue spontaneous contraction. To validate the proposed technique we referred to the X-MET, a promising 3-dimensional model of skeletal muscle. The images acquired through a high speed camera were correlated with a custom-made algorithm and the longitudinal strain predictions were employed for measuring the spontaneous contraction. The spontaneous contraction reference values were obtained by studying the force response. The relative error between the spontaneous contraction frequencies computed in both ways was always lower than 0.15%. In conclusion, the use of a DIC based system allows for an accurate and noninvasive measurement of biological tissues' spontaneous contraction, in addition to the measurement of tissue strain field on any desired region of interest during electrical stimulation. PMID:27034612

  19. The Effects of Knee Joint and Hip Abduction Angles on the Activation of Cervical and Abdominal Muscles during Bridging Exercises.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Park, Du-Jin

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the flexion angle of the knee joint and the abduction angle of the hip joint on the activation of the cervical region and abdominal muscles. [Subjects] A total of 42 subjects were enrolled 9 males and 33 females. [Methods] The bridging exercise in this study was one form of exercise with a knee joint flexion angle of 90°. Based on this, a bridging exercise was conducted at the postures of abduction of the lower extremities at 0, 5, 10, and 15°. [Result] The changes in the knee joint angle and the hip abduction angle exhibited statistically significant effects on the cervical erector spinae, adductor magnus, and gluteus medius muscles. The abduction angles did not result in statistically significant effects on the upper trapezium, erector spinae, external oblique, and rectus abdominis muscles. However, in relation to the knee joint angles, during the bridging exercise, statistically significant results were exhibited. [Conclusion] When patients with both cervical and back pain do a bridging exercise, widening the knee joint angle would reduce cervical and shoulder muscle activity through minimal levels of abduction, permitting trunk muscle strengthening with reduced cervical muscle activity. This method would be helpful for strengthening trunk muscles in a selective manner. PMID:24259870

  20. Contraction-induced lipolysis is not impaired by inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Alsted, Thomas J; Ploug, Thorkil; Prats, Clara; Serup, Annette K; Høeg, Louise; Schjerling, Peter; Holm, Cecilia; Zimmermann, Robert; Fledelius, Christian; Galbo, Henrik; Kiens, Bente

    2013-10-15

    In skeletal muscle hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) has long been accepted to be the principal enzyme responsible for lipolysis of intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) during contractions. However, this notion is based on in vitro lipase activity data, which may not reflect the in vivo lipolytic activity. We investigated lipolysis of IMTG in soleus muscles electrically stimulated to contract ex vivo during acute pharmacological inhibition of HSL in rat muscles and in muscles from HSL knockout (HSL-KO) mice. Measurements of IMTG are complicated by the presence of adipocytes located between the muscle fibres. To circumvent the problem with this contamination we analysed intramyocellular lipid droplet content histochemically. At maximal inhibition of HSL in rat muscles, contraction-induced breakdown of IMTG was identical to that seen in control muscles (P < 0.001). In response to contractions IMTG staining decreased significantly in both HSL-KO and WT muscles (P < 0.05). In vitro TG hydrolase activity data revealed that adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and HSL collectively account for ∼98% of the TG hydrolase activity in mouse skeletal muscle, other TG lipases accordingly being of negligible importance for lipolysis of IMTG. The present study is the first to demonstrate that contraction-induced lipolysis of IMTG occurs in the absence of HSL activity in rat and mouse skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results suggest that ATGL is activated and plays a major role in lipolysis of IMTG during muscle contractions.

  1. Changes in corticomotor excitability after fatiguing muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Sacco, P; Thickbroom, G W; Byrnes, M L; Mastaglia, F L

    2000-12-01

    To investigate whether the type and duration of activity influences corticomotor excitability following fatiguing exercise, we compared motor evoked potential (MEP) responses of the biceps brachii to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during recovery from two different exercise regimens. Responses were recorded in both the resting state and during a weak contraction. Ten subjects performed a 60-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and, on a subsequent occasion, a sustained 20% MVC to the point of exhaustion. Resting MEP amplitude declined following maximal and submaximal protocols, reaching 34% and 31% of pre-exercise means, respectively (P < 0.001 for both). In contrast, mean facilitated MEP amplitude showed a smaller and more transient decrement following the sustained submaximal effort (64%; P < 0.05), but not the 60-s MVC. Abolition of the postexercise depression in resting MEP amplitude by a weak tonic contraction indicates that decreases in excitability at the spinal level contribute to the reduced corticomotor excitability observed after fatiguing exercise. PMID:11102907

  2. Repeated bouts of fast velocity eccentric contractions induce atrophy of gastrocnemius muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Eisuke; Nosaka, Kazunori; Tsutaki, Arata; Kouzaki, Karina; Nakazato, Koichi

    2015-10-01

    One bout of exercise consisting of fast velocity eccentric contractions has been shown to increase muscle protein degradation in rats. The present study tested the hypothesis that muscle atrophy would be induced after four bouts of fast velocity eccentric contractions, but not after four bouts of slow velocity eccentric contractions. Male Wistar rats were randomly placed into 3 groups; fast (180°/s) velocity (180EC, n = 7), slow (30°/s) velocity eccentric exercise (30EC, n = 7), or sham-treatment group (control, n = 7). The 180EC and 30EC groups received 4 sessions of 4 sets of 5 eccentric contractions of triceps surae muscles by extending the ankle joint during evoked electrical stimulation of the muscles, and the control group had torque measures, every 2 days, and all rats were sacrificed 1 day after the fourth session. Medial and lateral gastrocnemius wet mass were 4-6 % smaller, cross-sectional area of medial gastrocnemius was 6-7% smaller, and isometric tetanic torque of triceps surae muscles was 36 % smaller (p < 0.05) for 180EC than control at 1 day after the fourth session, but no such differences were evident between 30EC and control. The expressions of atrophy-related molecules such as FoxO1, FoxO3 and myostatin were upregulated (78-229 %) only for 180EC, but an increase in phosphorylated p70s6k (227%) was found only for 30EC at 1 day after the fourth session (p < 0.05). The level of Bax, a pro-apoptotic protein, was greater (p < 0.05) for 180EC than control. These results support the hypothesis that muscles are atrophied by repeated bouts of fast but not slow velocity eccentric contractions.

  3. Contraction mode itself does not determine the level of mTORC1 activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ato, Satoru; Makanae, Yuhei; Kido, Kohei; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Resistance training with eccentric contraction has been shown to augment muscle hypertrophy more than other contraction modes do (i.e., concentric and isometric contraction). However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle contraction mode on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling using a standardized force-time integral (load (weight) × contraction time). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: eccentric contraction, concentric contraction, and isometric contraction. The right gastrocnemius muscle was exercised via percutaneous electrical stimulation-induced maximal contraction. In experiment 1, different modes of muscle contraction were exerted using the same number of reps in all groups, while in experiment 2, muscle contractions were exerted using a standardized force-time integral. Muscle samples were obtained immediately and 3 h after exercise. Phosphorylation of molecules associated with mTORC1 activity was assessed using western blot analysis. In experiment 1, the force-time integral was significantly different among contraction modes with a higher force-time integral for eccentric contraction compared to that for other contraction modes (P < 0.05). In addition, the force-time integral was higher for concentric contraction compared to that for isometric contraction (P < 0.05). Similarly, p70S6K phosphorylation level was higher for eccentric contraction than for other modes of contraction (P < 0.05), and concentric contraction was higher than isometric contraction (P < 0.05) 3 h after exercise. In experiment 2, under the same force-time integral, p70S6K (Thr389) and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation levels were similar among contraction modes 3 h after exercise. Our results suggest that mTORC1 activity is not determined by differences in muscle contraction mode itself. Instead, mTORC1 activity is determined by differences in the force

  4. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  5. Localized Electrical Impedance Myography of the Biceps Brachii Muscle during Different Levels of Isometric Contraction and Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le; Shin, Henry; Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed changes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) at different levels of isometric muscle contraction as well as during exhaustive exercise at 60% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) until task failure. The EIM was performed on the biceps brachii muscle of 19 healthy subjects. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the muscle resistance (R) measured during the isometric contraction and when the muscle was completely relaxed. Post hoc analysis shows that the resistance increased at higher contractions (both 60% MVC and MVC), however, there were no significant changes in muscle reactance (X) during the isometric contractions. The resistance also changed during different stages of the fatigue task and there were significant decreases from the beginning of the contraction to task failure as well as between task failure and post fatigue rest. Although our results demonstrated an increase in resistance during isometric contraction, the changes were within 10% of the baseline value. These changes might be related to the modest alterations in muscle architecture during a contraction. The decrease in resistance seen with muscle fatigue may be explained by an accumulation of metabolites in the muscle tissue. PMID:27110795

  6. Gated /sup 31/P NMR study of tetanic contraction in rat muscle depleted of phosphocreatine

    SciTech Connect

    Shoubridge, E.A.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    Rats were fed a diet containing 1% ..beta..-guanidino-propionic acid (GPA) for 6-12 wk to deplete their muscles of phosphocreatine (PCr). Gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained from the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle at various time points during either a 1- or 3-s isometric tetanic contraction using a surface coil. The energy cost of a 1-s tetanus in unfatigued control rat muscle was 48.4 ..mu..mol ATP x g dry wt/sup -1/ x s/sup -1/ and was largely supplied by PCr; anaerobic glycogenolysis was negligible. In GPA-fed rats PCr was undetectable after 400 ms. This had no effect on initial force generated per gram, which was not significantly different from controls. Developed tension in a 3-s tetanus in GPA-fed rats could be divided into a peak phase (duration 0.8-0.9 s) and a plateau phase (65% peak tension) in which PCr was undetectable and the (ATP) was < 20% of that in control muscle. Energy from glycogenolysis was sufficient to maintain force generation at this submaximal level. Mean net glycogen utilization per 3-s tetanus was 78% greater than in control muscle. However, the observed decrease in intracellular pH was less than that expected from energy budget calculations, suggesting either increased buffering capacity or modulation of ATP hydrolysis in the muscles of GPA-fed rats. The results demonstrate that the transport role of PCr is not essential in contracting muscle in GPA-fed rats. PCr is probably important in this regard in the larger fibers of control muscle. Although fast-twitch muscles depleted of PCr have nearly twice the glycogen reserves of control muscle, glycogenolysis is limited in its capacity to fill the role of PCr as an energy buffer under conditions of maximum ATP turnover.

  7. Non-invasive muscle contraction assay to study rodent models of sarcopenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Age-related sarcopenia is a disease state of loss of muscle mass and strength that affects physical function and mobility leading to falls, fractures, and disability. The need for therapies to treat age-related sarcopenia has attracted intensive preclinical research. To facilitate the discovery of these therapies, we have developed a non-invasive rat muscle functional assay system to efficiently measure muscle force and evaluate the efficacy of drug candidates. Methods The lower leg muscles of anesthetized rats are artificially stimulated with surface electrodes on the knee holders and the heel support, causing the lower leg muscles to push isometric pedals that are attached to force transducers. We developed a stimulation protocol to perform a fatigability test that reveals functional muscle parameters like maximal force, the rate of fatigue, fatigue-resistant force, as well as a fatigable muscle force index. The system is evaluated in a rat aging model and a rat glucocorticoid-induced muscle loss model Results The aged rats were generally weaker than adult rats and showed a greater reduction in their fatigable force when compared to their fatigue-resistant force. Glucocorticoid treated rats mostly lost fatigable force and fatigued at a higher rate, indicating reduced force from glycolytic fibers with reduced energy reserves. Conclusions The involuntary contraction assay is a reliable system to assess muscle function in rodents and can be applied in preclinical research, including age-related sarcopenia and other myopathy. PMID:22035016

  8. Smooth Muscle Cell Contraction Increases the Critical Buckling Pressure of Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Danika M.; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg versus 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability. PMID:23261241

  9. Smooth muscle cell contraction increases the critical buckling pressure of arteries.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Danika M; Zhang, Jinzhou; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Yangming; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-02-22

    Recent in vitro experiments demonstrated that arteries under increased internal pressure or decreased axial stretch may buckle into the tortuous pattern that is commonly observed in aging or diseased arteries in vivo. It suggests that buckling is a possible mechanism for the development of artery tortuosity. Vascular tone has significant effects on arterial mechanical properties but its effect on artery buckling is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of smooth muscle cell contraction on the critical buckling pressure of arteries. Porcine common carotid arteries were perfused in an ex vivo organ culture system overnight under physiological flow and pressure. The perfusion pressure was adjusted to determine the critical buckling pressure of these arteries at in vivo and reduced axial stretch ratios (1.5 and 1.3) at baseline and after smooth muscle contraction and relaxation stimulated by norepinephrine and sodium nitroprusside, respectively. Our results demonstrated that the critical buckling pressure was significantly higher when the smooth muscle was contracted compared with relaxed condition (97.3mmHg vs 72.9mmHg at axial stretch ratio of 1.3 and 93.7mmHg vs 58.6mmHg at 1.5, p<0.05). These results indicate that arterial smooth muscle cell contraction increased artery stability.

  10. Ultrasound-Derived Abdominal Muscle Thickness Better Detects Metabolic Syndrome Risk in Obese Patients than Skeletal Muscle Index Measured by Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Ido, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yuki; Ishii, Kojiro; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Sato, Koji; Fujimoto, Masahiro; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Sanada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia has never been diagnosed based on site-specific muscle loss, and little is known about the relationship between site-specific muscle loss and metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors. To this end, this cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the relationship between site-specific muscle size and MetS risk factors. Subjects were 38 obese men and women aged 40-82 years. Total body fat and lean body mass were assessed by whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Muscle thickness (MTH) was measured using B-mode ultrasound scanning in six body regions. Subjects were classified into general obesity (GO) and sarcopenic obesity (SO) groups using the threshold values of one standard deviation below the sex-specific means of either MTH or skeletal muscle index (SMI) measured by DXA. MetS risk score was acquired by standardizing and summing the following continuously distributed variables: visceral fat area, mean blood pressure, HbA1c, and serum triglyceride / high density lipoprotein cholesterol, to obtain the Z-score. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the MetS risk score was independently associated with abdominal MTH in all subjects, but not with MTH in other muscle regions, including the thigh. Although HbA1c and the number of MetS risk factors in the SO group were significantly higher than those in the GO group, there were no significant differences between GO and SO groups as defined by SMI. Ultrasound-derived abdominal MTH would allow a better assessment of sarcopenia in obese patients and can be used as an alternative to the conventionally-used SMI measured by DXA. PMID:26700167

  11. [Does maximum short-term electric stimulation cause contraction of the pelvic floor muscles?].

    PubMed

    Martan, A; Halaska, M; Masata, M; Voigt, R; Vering, A

    1997-04-01

    Electric stimulation is successfully used in the treatment of the stress and urgent type of incontinence. Electric stimulation of the muscles of the pelvic floor causes reflex contraction of the striated peri- and paraurethral muscles and is associated with concurrent reflex inhibition of the detrusor muscle. The therapeutic results depends greatly on the total or at least partially preserved innervation of the muscles of the pelvic floor by the pudendal nerve. One of the possible stimuli of the pelvic floor muscles is maximal electric stimulation (MES) and the objective of our study was to evaluate the effect of MES on the muscles of the pelvic floor or to detect possible changes by US and urodynamic examination. The study comprised women with the stress type of incontinence (GSI). The group was formed by 40 women with GSI, 20 were subjected to US examination and urodynamic examination (n = 20). The group of subjects subjected to urodynamic examination was extended to 40 (n = 40). For electrostimulation a Conmax apparatus was used. The applied frequency was 20 Hz, the amplitude from 0 to 90 mA (grades 0.6), pulse duration 0.75 ms. During the cystometric examination the authors recorded a significant increase of the maximal urethral closure pressure (MUCP), prolongation of the functional (FUL) and anatomical length (AUL) of the urethra during MES. During US examination the authors recorded a significant diminution of the gamma angle, a reduction of the mobility of the UV junction and prolongation of the anatomical length of the urethra during MES. From the investigation ensues that the pelvic floor muscles are contracted during MES and those changes contribute to an increase of the muscular tonus and contracting capacity of the muscles of the pelvic floor and thus cause among other things elevation of the neck of the urinary bladder. The elevation contributes to the normalization of the intraabdominal transmission of pressure to the proximal urethra and thus to

  12. Acetylcholine and calcium on membrane permeability and contraction of intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, L; Von Hagen, S; Joiner, P D

    1967-05-01

    Acetylcholine elicited a sustained contraction and an increase in potassium efflux in longitudinal muscle isolated from the guinea pig ileum. Stepwise increases in the calcium concentration of the bathing medium, from 0.06 to 36 mM generally reduced the increase in potassium efflux, but had a complex effect on the mechanical response. Contractions produced by high levels of acetylcholine became progressively larger or remained at a high magnitude as the calcium concentration was increased. Contractions produced by low levels of acetylcholine also improved initially, but were depressed again by the highest concentration of calcium introduced. Ethanol, in the appropriate concentration, inhibited completely the acetylcholine-induced contraction without reducing the increase in potassium efflux. Calcium reversed this effect. Both extracellular calcium and ethanol depressed the large, transient increase in muscle tone developed by fibers that were preincubated in a high calcium medium and then exposed to a calcium-free medium. These findings suggested that extracellular calcium ions react with two different sites in the membrane, a stabilizing site and a storage site. A muscle contraction is activated by calcium ions which diffuse from the storage site to the myoplasm. Calcium ions reacting with the stabilizing site impede this diffusion process. Part of the stimulatory effect of acetylcholine is derived from its capacity to counteract the action of calcium at the stabilizing site.

  13. Defective excitation-contraction coupling is partially responsible for impaired contractility in hindlimb muscles of Stac3 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Xiaofei; Doering, Jonathan; Grange, Robert W.; Jiang, Honglin

    2016-01-01

    The Stac3 gene is exclusively expressed in skeletal muscle, and Stac3 knockout is perinatal lethal in mice. Previous data from Stac3-deleted diaphragms indicated that Stac3-deleted skeletal muscle could not contract because of defective excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. In this study, we determined the contractility of Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle. In response to frequent electrostimulation, Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contracted but the maximal tension generated was only 20% of that in control (wild type or heterozygous) muscle (P < 0.05). In response to high [K+], caffeine, and 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CMC), the maximal tensions generated in Stac3-deleted muscle were 29% (P < 0.05), 58% (P = 0.08), and 55% (P < 0.05) of those in control muscle, respectively. In response to 4-CMC or caffeine, over 90% of myotubes formed from control myoblasts contracted, but only 60% of myotubes formed from Stac3-deleted myoblasts contracted (P = 0.05). However, in response to 4-CMC or caffeine, similar increases in intracellular calcium concentration were observed in Stac3-deleted and control myotubes. Gene expression and histological analyses revealed that Stac3-deleted hindlimb muscle contained more slow type-like fibers than control muscle. These data together confirm a critical role of STAC3 in EC coupling but also suggest that STAC3 may have additional functions in skeletal muscle, at least in the hindlimb muscle. PMID:27184118

  14. Regulation of phosphorylase kinase by low concentrations of Ca ions upon muscle contraction: the connection between metabolism and muscle contraction and the connection between muscle physiology and Ca-dependent signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    OZAWA, Eijiro

    2011-01-01

    It had long been one of the crucial questions in muscle physiology how glycogenolysis is regulated in connection with muscle contraction, when we found the answer to this question in the last half of the 1960s. By that time, the two principal currents of muscle physiology, namely, the metabolic flow starting from glycogen and the mechanisms of muscle contraction, had already been clarified at the molecular level thanks to our senior researchers. Thus, the final question we had to answer was how to connect these two currents. We found that low concentrations of Ca ions (10−7–10−4 M) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum for the regulation of muscle contraction simultaneously reversibly activate phosphorylase kinase, the enzyme regulating glycogenolysis. Moreover, we found that adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), which is already known to activate muscle phosphorylase kinase, is not effective in the absence of such concentrations of Ca ions. Thus, cyclic AMP is not effective by itself alone and only modifies the activation process in the presence of Ca ions (at that time, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase had not yet been identified). After a while, it turned out that our works have not only provided the solution to the above problem on muscle physiology, but have also been considered as the first report of Ca-dependent protein phosphorylation, which is one of the central problems in current cell biology. Phosphorylase kinase is the first protein kinase to phosphorylate a protein resulting in the change in the function of the phosphorylated protein, as shown by Krebs and Fischer. Our works further showed that this protein kinase is regulated in a Ca-dependent manner. Accordingly, our works introduced the concept of low concentrations of Ca ions, which were first identified as the regulatory substance of muscle contraction, to the vast field of Ca biology including signal transduction. PMID:21986313

  15. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  16. Human skeletal muscle metabolic economy in vivo: effects of contraction intensity, age, and mobility impairment

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Anita D.; Tonson, Anne; Larsen, Ryan G.; DeBlois, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that older muscle has greater metabolic economy (ME) in vivo than young, in a manner dependent, in part, on contraction intensity. Twenty young (Y; 24 ± 1 yr, 10 women), 18 older healthy (O; 73 ± 2, 9 women) and 9 older individuals with mild-to-moderate mobility impairment (OI; 74 ± 1, 7 women) received stimulated twitches (2 Hz, 3 min) and performed nonfatiguing voluntary (20, 50, and 100% maximal; 12 s each) isometric dorsiflexion contractions. Torque-time integrals (TTI; Nm·s) were calculated and expressed relative to maximal fat-free muscle cross-sectional area (cm2), and torque variability during voluntary contractions was calculated as the coefficient of variation. Total ATP cost of contraction (mM) was determined from flux through the creatine kinase reaction, nonoxidative glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, and used to calculate ME (Nm·s·cm−2·mM ATP−1). While twitch torque relaxation was slower in O and OI compared with Y (P ≤ 0.001), twitch TTI, ATP cost, and economy were similar across groups (P ≥ 0.15), indicating comparable intrinsic muscle economy during electrically induced isometric contractions in vivo. During voluntary contractions, normalized TTI and total ATP cost did not differ significantly across groups (P ≥ 0.20). However, ME was lower in OI than Y or O at 20% and 50% MVC (P ≤ 0.02), and torque variability was greater in OI than Y or O at 20% MVC (P ≤ 0.05). These results refute the hypothesis of greater muscle ME in old age, and provide support for lower ME in impaired older adults as a potential mechanism or consequence of age-related reductions in functional mobility. PMID:25163917

  17. Restoration of excitation-contraction coupling and slow calcium current in dysgenic muscle by dihydropyridine receptor complementary DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Tsutomu; Beam, Kurt G.; Powell, Jeanne A.; Numa, Shosaku

    1988-11-01

    Microinjection of an expression plasmid that carries complementary DNA encoding the receptor for dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers of skeletal muscle restores both excitation-contraction coupling and slow calcium current in cultured skeletal muscle cells from mice with muscular dysgenesis. This suggests that the dihydropyridine receptor in the transverse tubule membrane of skeletal muscle functions both as the voltage sensor for excitation-contraction coupling and as the slow calcium channel.

  18. Regulation of muscle contraction by Drebrin-like protein 1 probed by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Butkevich, Eugenia; Platen, Mitja; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Biophysics Team

    Sarcomeres are the fundamental contractile units of striated muscle cells. They are composed of a variety of structural and regulatory proteins functioning in a precisely orchestrated fashion to enable coordinated force generation in striated muscles. Recently, we have identified a C. elegans drebrin-like protein 1 (DBN-1) as a novel sarcomere component, which stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction. To further characterize the function of DBN-1 in muscle cells, we generated a new dbn-1 loss-of-function allele. Absence of DBN-1 resulted in a unique worm movement phenotype, characterized by hyper-bending. It is not clear yet if DBN-1 acts to enhance or reduce the capacity for contraction. We present here an experimental mechanical study on C. elegans muscle mechanics. We measured the stiffness of the worm by indenting living C. eleganswith a micron-sized sphere adhered to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Modeling the worm as a pressurized elastic shell allows us to monitor the axial tension in the muscle through the measured stiffness. We compared responses of wild-type and mutant C. elegans in which DBN-1 is not expressed..

  19. Action of the calcium antagonists cocaine and ethanol on contraction and potassium efflux of smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    HURWITZ, L; BATTLE, F; WEISS, G B

    1962-11-01

    Isolated longitudinal smooth muscle from guinea pig ileum exposed to a high potassium depolarizing medium exhibited a sustained increase in muscle tone and an increase in potassium efflux. When the concentration of calcium ion in the medium was elevated the increase in muscle tone was enhanced, but the change in potassium efflux was reduced slightly. Lowering the calcium concentration diminished the increase in muscle tone. Both cocaine and ethanol completely inhibited the sustained contraction of potassium-depolarized fibers. Addition of excess calcium ion reversed these inhibitions. Cocaine acted primarily like a competitive antagonist; and ethanol, like an indirect antagonist of calcium, ion. Under certain conditions acetylcholine potentiated the reversal by calcium ion of the drug-induced inhibitions. The two inhibitory drugs had dissimilar effects on potassium efflux from smooth muscle fibers immersed in Tyrode solution. Cocaine depressed and ethanol enhanced this membrane process. However, the increase in potassium efflux induced by acetylcholine was inhibited by ethanol. This inhibition also was reversed by increasing the concentration of calcium ion in the medium. The data suggested that calcium activates and cocaine and ethanol inhibit a cellular reaction which occurs beyond the point of membrane depolarization and is essential for smooth muscle contraction. Furthermore, calcium serves to depress membrane excitability, but appears to have a specific stimulatory role in the acetylcholine-induced increase in potassium efflux from longitudinal fibers.

  20. Recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin is necessary for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ruping; Cleary, Rachel A; Gannon, Olivia J; Tang, Dale D

    2015-04-01

    β-Catenin is a key component that connects transmembrane cadherin with the actin cytoskeleton at the cell-cell interface. However, the role of the β-catenin/cadherin interaction in smooth muscle has not been well characterized. Here stimulation with acetylcholine promoted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin in smooth muscle cells/tissues. Knockdown of β-catenin by lentivirus-mediated shRNA attenuated smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, myosin light chain phosphorylation at Ser-19 and actin polymerization in response to contractile activation were not reduced by β-catenin knockdown. In addition, the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain disrupted the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin. Force development, but not myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin polymerization, was reduced by the expression of the β-catenin armadillo domain. Furthermore, actin polymerization and microtubules have been implicated in intracellular trafficking. In this study, the treatment with the inhibitor latrunculin A diminished the interaction of β-catenin with N-cadherin in smooth muscle. In contrast, the exposure of smooth muscle to the microtubule depolymerizer nocodazole did not affect the protein-protein interaction. Together, these findings suggest that smooth muscle contraction is mediated by the recruitment of β-catenin to N-cadherin, which may facilitate intercellular mechanotransduction. The association of β-catenin with N-cadherin is regulated by actin polymerization during contractile activation.

  1. The effect of deuterium oxide (D sub 2 O) on in vitro vascular smooth muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliam, T.M.; Liepins, A.; Rankin, A.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O), a stable nonradioactive isotope of water, has been demonstrated to reduce L-type calcium channel conductance in isolated myocytes. Since the concentration of intracellular free calcium has been implicated in the mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction, the authors investigated whether it inhibits contraction of vascular smooth muscle. Phenylephrine concentration-contraction curves were carried out in the rat aortic ring preparation to determine whether D{sub 2}O inhibits contraction of rat aorta induced through activation of receptor-operated calcium channels. D{sub 2}O depressed these response curves in a concentration dependent manner with 50% inhibition of maximum contraction observed with 60% D{sub 2}O; this effect proved to be reversible and non-toxic. D{sub 2}O also depressed potassium chloride curves, demonstrating an effect on voltage-operated calcium channels. Since vascular endothelium releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) when stimulated by a range of pharmacological agents, it was examined whether the endothelium has a role in these actions of D{sub 2}O on vascular contraction. Mechanical disruption of the endothelium had no effect.

  2. Comparative studies on troponin, a Ca²⁺-dependent regulator of muscle contraction, in striated and smooth muscles of protochordates.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Takashi; Sato, Naruki

    2012-01-01

    Troponin is well known as a Ca(2+)-dependent regulator of striated muscle contraction and it has been generally accepted that troponin functions as an inhibitor of muscle contraction or actin-myosin interaction at low Ca(2+) concentrations, and Ca(2+) at higher concentrations removes the inhibitory action of troponin. Recently, however, troponin became detectable in non-striated muscles of several invertebrates and in addition, unique troponin that functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent activator of muscle contraction has been detected in protochordate animals, although troponin in vertebrate striated muscle is known as an inhibitor of the contraction in the absence of a Ca(2+). Further studies on troponin in invertebrate muscle, especially in non-striated muscle, would provide new insight into the evolution of regulatory systems for muscle contraction and diverse function of troponin and related proteins. The methodology used for preparation and characterization of functional properties of protochordate striated and smooth muscles will be helpful for further studies of troponin in other invertebrate animals.

  3. Contraction-induced injury to single permeabilized muscle fibers from normal and congenitally-clefted goat palates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A goat model in which cleft palate is induced by the plant alkaloid, anabasine was used to determine muscle fiber integrity of the levator veli palatine (LVP) muscle. It was determined that muscle fiber type, size, and sensitivity to contraction-induced injury was different between cleft palate ind...

  4. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly. PMID:25714438

  5. Antioxidant effect of muscle relaxants (vecuronium, rocuronium) on the rabbit abdominal aortic endothelial damage induced by reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Seon; Cho, Eun Sun; Kim, Dong Won; Jeong, Mi Ae

    2013-01-01

    Background Muscle relaxants induce vascular smooth muscle relaxation by inducing synthesis of the prostaglandins that influence vasomotor tone. However, the effects of muscle relaxants on endothelial cells and tissues following injury by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are unclear. We tested the effects of the muscle relaxants vecuronium and rocuronium on impaired acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation following induction of ROS in rabbit aorta in vitro. Methods Isolated rabbit abdominal aortic ring segments were pretreated with vecuronium or rocuronium at 10-4, 3 × 10-4, 10-3 or 3 × 10-3 M, with or without inhibitors of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (diethyldithiocarbamate; DETCA, 0.8 mM) or catalase (3-amino-1,2,4-triazole; 3AT, 50 mM). All groups of aortic rings were then exposed to ROS generated by electrolysis in the organ bath medium (Krebs-Henseleit solution). The effects of vecuronium and rocuronium on ROS-induced impairment of relaxation induced by ACh (10-6 M) were assessed. Results Aortic rings treated with vecuronium or rocuronium at 10-4, 3 × 10-4, 10-3 or 3 × 10-3 M preserved the capacity for ACh-induced endothelial relaxation following ROS exposure in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with DETCA partially inhibited the protective effects of vecuronium and rocuronium on ACh-induced relaxation (P < 0.001), but pretreatment with 3AT had no effect. Conclusions Muscle relaxants protected the endothelium in isolated rabbit abdominal aorta from free-radical injury in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that vecuronium and rocuronium may act as superoxide anion scavengers. PMID:24427462

  6. Ultrasound evaluation of muscle thickness changes in the external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis muscles considering the influence of posture and muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Tomoaki; Abe, Yota; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate muscle thickness changes in the external oblique (EO), internal oblique (IO), and transversus abdominis (TrA) muscles between the neutral position and trunk rotation, under a state of rest without voluntary contractions, and isometric contractions to both sides with resistance of 50% of the maximum trunk rotation strength. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 21 healthy young men. [Methods] Muscle thickness changes in the EO, IO, and TrA in each position and state were evaluated by ultrasound. The range of motion at maximum trunk rotation and the maximum strength of trunk rotation were measured using a hand-held dynamometer. [Results] In the neutral position and at 50% trunk rotation to the right side, the thicknesses of the IO and TrA significantly increased with resistance. In both states, the thicknesses of the IO and TrA significantly increased at 50% trunk rotation to the right side. [Conclusion] The muscular contractions of the IO and TrA were stronger during ipsilateral rotation than in the neutral position and with resistance than at rest. Moreover, the muscular contraction was strongest in the resistive state during ipsilateral rotation.

  7. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  8. Participation of bivalent ions in the acetylcholine-provoked gastric smooth-muscle phasis contractions.

    PubMed

    Boev, K; Papasova, M

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on muscle strips from cat antrum. Acetylcholine added to Ca++ -free medium containing EDTA (10-5M) exerted no effect on the phasic contractions of the gastric smooth muscle. Ba++at low concentrations (0,1 to 0,5mM) replaced Ca++with respect to the acetylcholine effect. On the background of blocked cholinergic (atropine 10-5M) and adrenergic (phentolamine 10-5 M and propranolol 10-5M) structures Ba++ provoked slow potentials and cotractions with a frequency of 9 to 10 cpm. delta600 (10-5M) blocked the Ba++-induced myogenic electrical and contractile activities of the smooth muscle. The role of the cholinergic structures for synchronizing the electrical and contractile activities of the smooth muscle is considered.

  9. Gravitational effects on human cardiovascular responses to isometric muscle contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde-Petersen, Flemmig; Suzuki, Yoji; Sadamoto, Tomoko

    Isometric exercise induces profound cardiovascular adaptations increasing mean arterial pressure and heart rate. We investigated effects of simulated +Gz and -Gz respectively on the central and peripheral cardiovascular system. Sustained handgrip exercise was performed at 40% of maximum for 2 minutes in five subjects. This maneuver increased mean arterial pressure by 40-45 mm Hg both during head out water immersion which simulates weightlessness, as well as bedrest during -25, 0, and +25 degrees tilt from the horizontal. Lower body negative pressure (-60 mm Hg for 10 min) attenuated the response to handgrip exercise to 30 mm Hg. It also increased the heart rate minimally by about 20 beats per minute while the water immersion, as well as head up, head down and horizontal bedrest showed increments of about 50 beats per min. It was concluded that the response to isometric contraction is mediated through the high pressure baroreceptors, because similar responses were seen during stresses producing a wide variation in central venous pressure. During lower body negative pressure the increased sympathetic nervous activity itself increased resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure. The responses to static exercise were, therefore, weaker.

  10. Sustained maximal voluntary contraction produces independent changes in human motor axons and the muscle they innervate.

    PubMed

    Milder, David A; Sutherland, Emily J; Gandevia, Simon C; McNulty, Penelope A

    2014-01-01

    The repetitive discharges required to produce a sustained muscle contraction results in activity-dependent hyperpolarization of the motor axons and a reduction in the force-generating capacity of the muscle. We investigated the relationship between these changes in the adductor pollicis muscle and the motor axons of its ulnar nerve supply, and the reproducibility of these changes. Ten subjects performed a 1-min maximal voluntary contraction. Activity-dependent changes in axonal excitability were measured using threshold tracking with electrical stimulation at the wrist; changes in the muscle were assessed as evoked and voluntary electromyography (EMG) and isometric force. Separate components of axonal excitability and muscle properties were tested at 5 min intervals after the sustained contraction in 5 separate sessions. The current threshold required to produce the target muscle action potential increased immediately after the contraction by 14.8% (p<0.05), reflecting decreased axonal excitability secondary to hyperpolarization. This was not correlated with the decline in amplitude of muscle force or evoked EMG. A late reversal in threshold current after the initial recovery from hyperpolarization peaked at -5.9% at ∼35 min (p<0.05). This pattern was mirrored by other indices of axonal excitability revealing a previously unreported depolarization of motor axons in the late recovery period. Measures of axonal excitability were relatively stable at rest but less so after sustained activity. The coefficient of variation (CoV) for threshold current increase was higher after activity (CoV 0.54, p<0.05) whereas changes in voluntary (CoV 0.12) and evoked twitch (CoV 0.15) force were relatively stable. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent changes in motor axon excitability are unlikely to contribute to concomitant changes in the muscle after sustained activity in healthy people. The variability in axonal excitability after sustained activity suggests that

  11. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices.

  12. A threshold-based approach for muscle contraction detection from surface EMG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morantes, Gaudi; Fernández, Gerardo; Altuve, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals are commonly used as control signals in prosthetic and orthotic devices. Super cial electrodes are placed on the skin of the subject to acquire its muscular activity through this signal. The muscle contraction episode is then in charge of activating and deactivating these devices. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard" to detect muscle contraction, leading to delayed responses and false and missed detections. This fact motivated us to propose a new approach that compares a smoothed version of the SEMG signal with a xed threshold, in order to detect muscle contraction episodes. After preprocessing the SEMG signal, the smoothed version is obtained using a moving average lter, where three di erent window lengths has been evaluated. The detector was tuned by maximizing sensitivity and speci city and evaluated using SEMG signals obtained from the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles, taken during the walking of ve subjects. Compared with traditional detection methods, we obtain a reduction of 3 ms in the detection delay, an increase of 8% in sensitivity but a decrease of 15% in speci city. Future work is directed to the inclusion of a temporal threshold (a double-threshold approach) to minimize false detections and reduce detection delays.

  13. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices. PMID:27006422

  14. A Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Loading Device for Dynamically Imaging Shortening and Lengthening Muscle Contraction Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Silder, Amy; Westphal, Christopher J.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and test a magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible device to induce either shortening or lengthening muscle contractions for use during dynamic MR imaging. The proposed device guides the knee through cyclic flexion-extension, while either elastic or inertial loads are imposed on the hamstrings. Ten subjects were tested in a motion capture laboratory to evaluate the repeatability of limb motion and imposed loads. Image data were subsequently obtained for all ten subjects using cine phase contrast imaging. Subjects achieved ~30 deg of knee joint motion, with individual subjects remaining within ~1 deg of their average motion across 56 repeated cycles. The maximum hamstring activity and loading occurred when the knee was flexed for the elastic loading condition (shortening contraction), and extended for the inertial loading condition (lengthening contraction). Repeat MR image acquisitions of the same loading condition resulted in similar tissue velocities, while spatial variations in velocity data were clearly different between loading conditions. The proposed device can enable dynamic imaging of the muscle under different types of loads, which has the potential to improve our understanding of basic muscle mechanics, identify potential causes of muscle injury, and provide a basis for quantitatively assessing injury effects at the tissue level. Slight modifications to the device design and/or subject positioning could allow for imaging of the quadriceps or the knee. PMID:24353749

  15. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  16. The generalized Hill model: A kinematic approach towards active muscle contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion.

  17. Muscle co-contraction around the knee when walking with unstable shoes.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario; Baca, Arnold

    2015-02-01

    Walking with unstable shoes has been discussed to decrease joint loading. Typical estimates of joint loading using an inverse dynamic approach only account for net joint moments, not considering the potential role of muscular co-contraction. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare muscular co-contraction levels when walking with two different unstable shoe constructions (rocker-bottom and toning shoes) compared to walking with regular shoes. For each shoe condition, 12 healthy subjects walked with both, a regular shoe and with an unstable shoe at self-selected walking speed at a 10-m walkway. Surface EMG data of selected muscles were recorded and time normalized for calculating co-contraction indices (CCI) for opposing muscle groups. Results showed an increase of co-contraction primarily for vastii and gastrocnemius muscles for the first and second half of stance when walking with an unstable shoe construction. Therefore, when using an inverse dynamic approach to analyze joint loading differences between regular shoes and unstable shoes, one should be cautious in interpreting the data, as these methods base their estimates of joint moments upon the net joint torque.

  18. The Generalized Hill Model: A Kinematic Approach Towards Active Muscle Contraction.

    PubMed

    Göktepe, Serdar; Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling is the physiological process of converting an electrical stimulus into a mechanical response. In muscle, the electrical stimulus is an action potential and the mechanical response is active contraction. The classical Hill model characterizes muscle contraction though one contractile element, activated by electrical excitation, and two non-linear springs, one in series and one in parallel. This rheology translates into an additive decomposition of the total stress into a passive and an active part. Here we supplement this additive decomposition of the stress by a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a passive and an active part. We generalize the one-dimensional Hill model to the three-dimensional setting and constitutively define the passive stress as a function of the total deformation gradient and the active stress as a function of both the total deformation gradient and its active part. We show that this novel approach combines the features of both the classical stress-based Hill model and the recent active-strain models. While the notion of active stress is rather phenomenological in nature, active strain is micro-structurally motivated, physically measurable, and straightforward to calibrate. We demonstrate that our model is capable of simulating excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle with its characteristic features of wall thickening, apical lift, and ventricular torsion. PMID:25221354

  19. Muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction during stair ambulation following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle; Stevermer, Catherine A; Gillette, Jason C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare muscle activity amplitudes and co-contraction in those with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to healthy controls during stair negotiation. Eighteen participants with unilateral ACL reconstruction and 17 healthy controls performed stair ascent and descent while surface electromyography was recorded from knee and hip musculature. During stair ascent, the ACL group displayed higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.02), higher vastus lateralis:biceps femoris co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus lateralis:vastus medialis co-contraction (51-100% stance, p = 0.05). During stair descent, the ACL group demonstrated higher gluteus maximus activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.01; 51-100% stance, p < 0.01), lower rectus femoris activity (1-50% stance, p = 0.04), higher semimembranosus activity (1-50% stance, p=0.01), higher gluteus medius activity (51-100% stance, p = 0.01), and higher vastus medialis:semimembranosus co-contraction (1-50% stance, p = 0.02). While the altered muscle activity strategies observed in the ACL group may act to increase joint stability, these strategies may alter joint loading and contribute to post-traumatic knee osteoarthritis often observed in this population. Our results warrant further investigation to determine the longterm effects of altered muscle activity on the knee joint following ACL reconstruction.

  20. Contraction level-related modulation of corticomuscular coherence differs between the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles in humans.

    PubMed

    Ushiyama, Junichi; Masakado, Yoshihisa; Fujiwara, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Tetsuya; Hase, Kimitaka; Kimura, Akio; Liu, Meigen; Ushiba, Junichi

    2012-04-01

    The sensorimotor cortex activity measured by scalp EEG shows coherence with electromyogram (EMG) activity within the 15- to 35-Hz frequency band (β-band) during weak to moderate intensity of isometric voluntary contraction. This coupling is known to change its frequency band to the 35- to 60-Hz band (γ-band) during strong contraction. This study aimed to examine whether such contraction level-related modulation of corticomuscular coupling differs between muscles with different muscle compositions and functions. In 11 healthy young adults, we quantified the coherence between EEG over the sensorimotor cortex and rectified EMG during tonic isometric voluntary contraction at 10-70% of maximal voluntary contraction of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles, respectively. In the TA, the EEG-EMG coherence shifted from the β-band to the γ-band with increasing contraction level. Indeed, the magnitude of β-band EEG-EMG coherence was significantly decreased, whereas that of γ-band coherence was significantly increased, when the contraction level was above 60% of maximal voluntary contraction. In contrast to the TA, the SOL showed no such frequency changes of EEG-EMG coherence with alterations in the contraction levels. In other words, the maximal peak of EEG-EMG coherence in the SOL existed within the β-band, irrespective of the contraction levels. These findings suggest that the central nervous system regulates the frequency of corticomuscular coupling to exert the desired levels of muscle force and, notably, that the applicable rhythmicity of the coupling for performing strong contractions differs between muscles, depending on the physiological muscle compositions and functions of the contracting muscle.

  1. Smooth muscle NOS, colocalized with caveolin-1, modulates contraction in mouse small intestine

    PubMed Central

    El-Yazbi, Ahmed F; Cho, Woo Jung; Cena, Jonathan; Schulz, Richard; Daniel, Edwin E

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in myenteric neurons is activated during peristalsis to produce nitric oxide which relaxes intestinal smooth muscle. A putative nNOS is also found in the membrane of intestinal smooth muscle cells in mouse and dog. In this study we studied the possible functions of this nNOS expressed in mouse small intestinal smooth muscle colocalized with caveolin-1(Cav-1). Cav-1 knockout mice lacked nNOS in smooth muscle and provided control tissues. 60 mM KCl was used to increase intracellular [Ca2+] through L-type Ca2+ channel opening and stimulate smooth muscle NOS activity in intestinal tissue segments. An additional contractile response to LNNA (100 μM, NOS inhibitor) was observed in KCl-contracted tissues from control mice and was almost absent in tissues from Cav-1 knockout mice. Disruption of caveolae with 40 mM methyl-β cyclodextrin in tissues from control mice led to the loss of Cav-1 and nNOS immunoreactivity from smooth muscle as shown by immunohistochemistry and a reduction in the response of these tissues to N-ω-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA). Reconstitution of membrane cholesterol using water soluble cholesterol in the depleted segments restored the immunoreactivity and the response to LNNA added after KCl. Nicardipine (1 μM) blocked the responses to KCl and LNNA confirming the role of L-type Ca2+ channels. ODQ (1 μM, soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor) had the same effect as inhibition of NOS following KCl. We conclude that the activation of nNOS, localized in smooth muscle caveolae, by calcium entering through L-type calcium channels triggers nitric oxide production which modulates muscle contraction by a cGMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:18400048

  2. Ca2+-induced contraction of cat esophageal circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, W; Chen, Q; Sohn, U D; Kim, N; Kirber, M T; Harnett, K M; Behar, J; Biancani, P

    2001-04-01

    ACh-induced contraction of esophageal circular muscle (ESO) depends on Ca2+ influx and activation of protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon). PKCepsilon, however, is known to be Ca2+ independent. To determine where Ca2+ is needed in this PKCepsilon-mediated contractile pathway, we examined successive steps in Ca2+-induced contraction of ESO muscle cells permeabilized by saponin. Ca2+ (0.2-1.0 microM) produced a concentration-dependent contraction that was antagonized by antibodies against PKCepsilon (but not by PKCbetaII or PKCgamma antibodies), by a calmodulin inhibitor, by MLCK inhibitors, or by GDPbetas. Addition of 1 microM Ca2+ to permeable cells caused myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine, by D609 [phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor], and by propranolol (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase inhibitor). Ca2+-induced contraction and diacylglycerol (DAG) production were reduced by D609 and by propranolol, alone or in combination. In addition, contraction was reduced by AACOCF(3) (cytosolic phospholipase A(2) inhibitor). These data suggest that Ca2+ may directly activate phospholipases, producing DAG and arachidonic acid (AA), and PKCepsilon, which may indirectly cause phosphorylation of MLC. In addition, direct G protein activation by GTPgammaS augmented Ca2+-induced contraction and caused dose-dependent production of DAG, which was antagonized by D609 and propranolol. We conclude that agonist (ACh)-induced contraction may be mediated by activation of phospholipase through two distinct mechanisms (increased intracellular Ca2+ and G protein activation), producing DAG and AA, and activating PKCepsilon-dependent mechanisms to cause contraction.

  3. Decreasing effects of glycerol-fractions extracted from ox diaphragm muscles on acetylcholine-induced contractions of smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Kimura, I

    1979-04-01

    Extracts of 5% glycerol obtained from ox diaphragm muscles were fractionated into four (A, B, C and D) with (NH4)2SO4. The activity as acetylcholine (ACh) receptor-like substance containing fraction was evidenced as follows; the ACh-induced contraction of tracheal muscles decreased with addition of the fraction, and such could not be attributed to the reaction with ACh receptors of tracheal smooth muscles. Fraction D had the most potent activity in the presence of neostigmine. This reaction induced by fraction D was reversed by addition of d-tubocurarine (d-TC). Fraction D was fractionated into three (I, II and III) by gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). The purified fraction III was identified by electrophoresis, UV and visible absorption spectrum, and ion-exchange chromatography to be myoglobin. Pure myoglobin also proved to have a decreasing effect on ACh-induced contraction. PMID:537248

  4. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance on Trunk and Upper Limb Muscle Activation during Maximum Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Chull; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the muscle activities of the trunk muscles and upper limb muscles during maximum isometric contraction when temporomandibular joint alignment was achieved with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance in order provide basic data on the effects of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on the entire body. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with healthy Korean adults in their 20s (males=10, females=10). [Methods] An 8 channel surface electromyography system was used to measure the muscle activities of the upper limb muscles and neck muscles of the subjects during maximum isometric contraction with and without use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Results] The maximum isometric contractions of the trunk and upper limb muscles when mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance were used were compared with those when no mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance was used. The results showed that the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical and lumbar erector spinae, upper trapezius, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis and internal oblique and external oblique muscles all showed significant increases in maximum isometric contractions with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Conclusion] The use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance is considered to be a method for normal adults to improve the stability of the entire body with the improvement of the stability of the TMJ. The proximal improvement in stability improves of the proximal thereby improving not only muscle strength with increased muscle activation but also stability during exercises. PMID:24396194

  5. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  6. High-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE) for non-thermal ablation without muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an emerging technology for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. The technique involves delivering a series of unipolar electric pulses to permanently destabilize the plasma membrane of cancer cells through an increase in transmembrane potential, which leads to the development of a tissue lesion. Clinically, IRE requires the administration of paralytic agents to prevent muscle contractions during treatment that are associated with the delivery of electric pulses. This study shows that by applying high-frequency, bipolar bursts, muscle contractions can be eliminated during IRE without compromising the non-thermal mechanism of cell death. Methods A combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental techniques were performed to investigate high-frequency irreversible electroporation (H-FIRE). A theoretical model for determining transmembrane potential in response to arbitrary electric fields was used to identify optimal burst frequencies and amplitudes for in vivo treatments. A finite element model for predicting thermal damage based on the electric field distribution was used to design non-thermal protocols for in vivo experiments. H-FIRE was applied to the brain of rats, and muscle contractions were quantified via accelerometers placed at the cervicothoracic junction. MRI and histological evaluation was performed post-operatively to assess ablation. Results No visual or tactile evidence of muscle contraction was seen during H-FIRE at 250 kHz or 500 kHz, while all IRE protocols resulted in detectable muscle contractions at the cervicothoracic junction. H-FIRE produced ablative lesions in brain tissue that were characteristic in cellular morphology of non-thermal IRE treatments. Specifically, there was complete uniformity of tissue death within targeted areas, and a sharp transition zone was present between lesioned and normal brain. Conclusions H-FIRE is a feasible technique for non-thermal tissue

  7. The effect of tendon on muscle force in dynamic isometric contractions: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    van Soest, A J; Huijing, P A; Solomonow, M

    1995-07-01

    Recently, Baratta and Solomonow J. Biomechanics 24, 109-116 (1991) studied the effect of tendon on muscle-tendon complex behavior in cat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. This was done by determining the relation between neural stimulation and muscle force in a dynamic isometric experiment, both before and after the removal of the distal tendon. From their results, Baratta and Solomonow concluded that in isometric and concentric contractions at mid-range force levels, tendon behaves as a rigid force conductor. This conclusion is in conflict with literature in which several functions are attributed to the elastic behavior of the series elastic element (SEE), of which tendon is the major part. The present study investigates the expected generalizability of their findings, by simulating the experiments using a straightforward Hill-type muscle model. First, model predictions are shown to be in line with the experimental results on cat TA: in dynamic isometric experiments at mid-range force levels, the effect of SEE removal is indeed negligible. Second, the effect of SEE removal is predicted to vary largely among muscles. Third, the most important determinants of the effect of SEE removal in dynamic isometric contractions are shown to be maximum fiber shortening velocity and the ratio of SEE slack length to fibre optimum length. PMID:7657678

  8. Effectiveness of daily eccentric contractions induced via kilohertz frequency transcutaneous electrical stimulation on muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Nakanishi, Ryosuke; Murakami, Shinichiro; Fujita, Naoto; Kondo, Hiroyo; Ishihara, Akihiko; Roy, Roland R; Fujino, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of daily repeated bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric contractions induced by high frequency (kilohertz) transcutaneous electrical stimulation in ameliorating atrophy of the soleus muscle in hindlimb unloaded rats were determined. Five groups of male rats were studied: control, hindlimb unloaded for 2 weeks (HU), or HU plus two daily bouts of concentric, isometric, or eccentric high-frequency electrical stimulation-induced contractions of the calf musculature. Soleus mass and fiber size were smaller, the levels of phosphorylated Akt1 and FoxO3a lower, and atrogin-1 and ubiquitinated proteins higher in the HU, and the HU plus concentric or isometric contraction groups than in the control group. In contrast, daily bouts of eccentric contractions maintained these values at near control levels and all measures were significantly different from all other HU groups. These results indicate that daily bouts of eccentric contractions induced by high-frequency stimulation inhibited the ubiquitin-proteasome catabolic pathway and enhanced the Akt1/FoxO3a anabolic pathway that resulted in a prevention of the atrophic response of the soleus muscle to chronic unloading.

  9. Energy liberation and chemical change in frog skeletal muscle during single isometric tetanic contractions

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Recent data obtained from Rana temporaria sartorius muscles during an isometric tetanus indicate that the time-course of phosphocreatine (PC) splitting cannot account for the total energy (heat + work) liberation (Gilbert et al. 1971. J. Physiol. (Lond.) 218:)63). As this conclusion is important to an understanding of the chemical energetics of contraction, similar experments were performed on unpoisoned, oxygenated Rana pipiens sartorius muscles. The muscles were tetanized (isometrically) at 0 degrees C for 0.6, 1, or 5 s; metabolism was rapidly arrested by freezing the muscles with a specially designed hammer apparatus, and the frozen muscles were chemically analyzed. Comparable myothermal measurments were made on frogs from the same batch. Results of these experiments indicate: (a) The energy liberation parallels the PC and ATP breakdown with a proportionality constant of 10.7 kcal/mol; (b) comparably designed experiments with sartorius muscles of R. temporaria revealed that the ratio of energy liberation to PC splitting was significantly greater than that observed in R. pipiens sartorius muscles; (c) there is no systematic difference between experiments in which metabolism was arrested by the hammer apparatus and others using a conventional immersion technique. PMID:1078574

  10. Middle ear muscle contractions and their relation to pulse and echo evoked potentials in the bat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, O. W., Jr.; Henson, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is made of pulse and echo orientation cries of the Mustache Bat. That bat's cries are characterized by a long, 60 to 30 msec, pure tone component and brief beginning and terminal FM sweeps. In addition to obvious echo overlap and middle ear muscle contractions, the following are examined: (1) characteristics of pulse- and echo-evoked potential under various conditions, (2) evidence of changes in hearing sensitivity during and after pulse emission, and (3) the role of the middle ear muscles in bringing about these changes.

  11. Evaluation of an in vitro muscle contraction model in mouse primary cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Ogino, Shinya; Ito, Miyuki; Furuichi, Yasuro; Takagi, Mayumi; Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ono, Yusuke; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2016-03-15

    To construct an in vitro contraction model with the primary cultured myotubes, we isolated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus. Differentiated myotubes possessed a greater number of sarcomere assemblies and higher expression levels of myosin heavy chain, cytochrome c oxidase IV, and myoglobin than in C2C12 myotubes. In agreement with these results regarding the sarcomere assemblies and protein expressions, the primary myotubes showed higher contractile activity stimulated by the electric pulses than that in the C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that mouse primary myotubes will be a valuable research tool as an in vitro muscle contraction model. PMID:26548957

  12. Perchlorate enhances transmission in skeletal muscle excitation- contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the anion perchlorate (present extracellularly at 8 mM) were studied on functional skeletal muscle fibers from Rana pipiens, voltage-clamped in a Vaseline gap chamber. Established methods were used to monitor intramembranous charge movement and flux of Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during pulse depolarization. Saponin permeabilization of the end portions of the fiber segment (Irving, M., J. Maylie, N. L. Sizto, and W. K. Chandler. 1987. Journal of General Physiology. 89:1-41) substantially reduced the amount of charge moving during conventional control pulses, thus minimizing a technical error that plagued our previous studies. Perchlorate prolonged the ON time course of charge movement, especially at low and intermediate voltages. The OFFs were also made slower, the time constant increasing twofold. The hump kinetic component was exaggerated by ClO4- or was made to appear in fibers that did not have it in reference conditions. ClO4- had essentially no kinetic ON effects at high voltages (> or = 10 mV). ClO4- changed the voltage distribution of mobile charge. In single Boltzmann fits, the midpoint potential V was shifted -20 mV and the steepness parameter K was reduced by 4.7 mV (or 1.78-fold), but the maximum charge was unchanged (n = 9). Total Ca content in the SR, estimated using the method of Schneider et al. (Schneider, M. F., B. J. Simon, and G. Szucs. 1987. Journal of Physiology. 392:167-192) for correcting for depletion, stayed constant over tens of minutes in reference conditions but decayed in ClO4- at an average rate of 0.3 mumol/liter myoplasmic water per s. ClO4- changed the kinetics of release flux, reducing the fractional inactivation of release after the peak. ClO4- shifted the voltage dependence of Ca release flux. In particular, the threshold voltage for Ca release was shifted by about -20 mV, and the activation of the steady component of release flux was shifted by > 20 mV in the negative direction. The shift of

  13. On Using Model Populations to Determine Mechanical Properties of Skeletal Muscle. Application to Concentric Contraction Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Miana-Mena, F J; Calvo, B; Muñoz, M J; Rodríguez, J F; Grasa, J

    2015-10-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, the experimental evaluation of the material properties is crucial for the development of computational models that closely reproduce real organ systems. When simulations of muscle tissue are concerned, stress/strain relations for both passive and active behavior are required. These experimental relations usually exhibit certain variability. In this study, a set of material parameters involved in a 3D skeletal muscle model are determined by using a system biology approach in which the parameters are randomly varied leading to a population of models. Using a set of experimental results from an animal model, a subset of the entire population of models was selected. This reduced population predicted the mechanical response within the window of experimental observations. Hence, a range of model parameters, instead of a single set of them, was determined. Rat Tibialis Anterior muscle was selected for this study. Muscles ([Formula: see text]) were activated through the sciatic nerve and during contraction the tissue pulled a weight fixed to the distal tendon (concentric contraction). Three different weights 1, 2 and 3 N were used and the time course of muscle stretch was analyzed obtaining values of (mean [Formula: see text] standard deviation): [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] respectively. A paired two-sided sign rank test showed significant differences between the muscle response for the three weights ([Formula: see text]). This study shows that the Monte Carlo method could be used for determine muscle characteristic parameters considering the variability of the experimental population.

  14. Sarcoplasmic reticulum and excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Devine, C E; Somlyo, A V; Somlyo, A P

    1972-03-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in the smooth muscles of rabbit main pulmonary artery, mesenteric vein, aorta, mesenteric artery, taenia coli, guinea pig mesenteric artery, and human uterus, and correlated with contractions of the smooth muscles in Ca-free media. SR volumes were determined in main pulmonary artery (5.1%), aorta (5%), portal-anterior mesenteric vein (2.2%), taenia coli (2%), and mesenteric artery (1.8%): because of tangentially sectioned membranes these estimates are subject to a correction factor of up to +50% of the values measured. Smooth muscles that contained a relatively large volume of SR maintained significant contractile responses to drugs in the virtual absence of extracellular calcium at room temperatures, while smooth muscles that had less SR did not. The unequal maximal contractions of main pulmonary artery elicited by different drugs were also observed in Ca-free, high potassium-depolarizing solution, indicating that they were secondary to some mechanism independent of changes in membrane potential or calcium influx. Longitudinal tubules of SR run between and are fenestrated about groups of surface vesicles separated from each other by intervening dense bodies. Extracellular markers (ferritin and lanthanum) entered the surface vesicles, but not the SR. The peripheral SR formed couplings with the surface membrane: the two membranes were separated by gaps of approximately 10 nm traversed by electron-opaque connections suggestive of a periodicity of approximately 20-25 nm. These couplings are considered to be the probable sites of electromechanical coupling in twitch smooth muscles. Close contacts between the SR and the surface vesicles may have a similar function, or represent sites of calcium extrusion. The presence of both thick and thin myofilaments and of rough SR in smooth muscles supports the dual, contractile and morphogenetic, function of smooth muscle.

  15. Motor unit activation order during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed muscles.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christine K; Nelson, Gary; Than, Lara; Zijdewind, Inge

    2002-06-01

    The activation order of motor units during electrically evoked contractions of paralyzed or partially paralyzed thenar muscles was determined in seven subjects with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. The median nerve was stimulated percutaneously with pulses of graded intensity to produce increments in the compound electromyogram (EMG) and force. Each increment corresponded to the activation of another unit. The evoked unit EMG and force was obtained by digital subtraction. The thenar muscles had between 15 and 83 units (26 +/- 19) that produced 114.3 +/- 127.1 mN force (n = 290). In six subjects, a significant positive correlation was found between activation order and unit force indicating that weaker units were excited before stronger units. These data are contrary to the notion that a reversal of unit activation order occurs during evoked versus voluntary contractions. PMID:12115967

  16. The Development of Muscle Fatigue Suppresses Auditory Sensory Gating (P50) during Sustained Contraction.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Aleksander A; Dmitrieva, Elena S; Stankevich, Ludmila N; Knyazeva, Veronika M; Shestakova, Anna N

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the influence of fatigue development on sensory gating during a muscle load. The fatiguing task was sustained contraction of a handgrip dynamometer with 7 and 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The suppression of P50, an auditory event-related potential, was used as the sensory gating index in the paired-click paradigm with a 500 ms interstimulus interval; the difference between the P50 amplitudes of the first and the second stimuli of the pair was used as the sensory gating index. We found that the 30% MVC fatigue development strongly decreased sensory gating, sometimes totally suppressing it. We concluded that central fatigue impaired motor performance and strongly suppressed inhibitory processes, as shown by the decreased P50 amplitude to the second stimulus. Therefore, muscle central fatigue influences sensory gating, similar to schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:27458348

  17. Experimental basis of the hypotheses on the mechanism of skeletal muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Summary With time clever hypotheses may be accepted as “facts” without being supported by solid experimental evidence. In our opinion this happened with muscle contraction where pure suggestions still occupy the scene and delay the progress of the research. Among these suggestions are: 1. the believe that viscosity is irrelevant in the economy of muscle contraction, 2. the concept of the drag stroke, 3. some interpretations of the significance of the Huxley-Simmons manoeuvre, 4. the definition of the load as a force/cross-section without taking into consideration the possible, divergent effects of the infinite mass x acceleration couples. Technical questions are also raised since it is apparent that measuring equipments interfere with the measure itself. PMID:23738252

  18. The Development of Muscle Fatigue Suppresses Auditory Sensory Gating (P50) during Sustained Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Aleksander A.; Dmitrieva, Elena S.; Stankevich, Ludmila N.; Knyazeva, Veronika M.; Shestakova, Anna N.

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the influence of fatigue development on sensory gating during a muscle load. The fatiguing task was sustained contraction of a handgrip dynamometer with 7 and 30% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The suppression of P50, an auditory event-related potential, was used as the sensory gating index in the paired-click paradigm with a 500 ms interstimulus interval; the difference between the P50 amplitudes of the first and the second stimuli of the pair was used as the sensory gating index. We found that the 30% MVC fatigue development strongly decreased sensory gating, sometimes totally suppressing it. We concluded that central fatigue impaired motor performance and strongly suppressed inhibitory processes, as shown by the decreased P50 amplitude to the second stimulus. Therefore, muscle central fatigue influences sensory gating, similar to schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:27458348

  19. In a dynamic lifting task, the relationship between cross-sectional abdominal muscle thickness and the corresponding muscle activity is affected by the combined use of a weightlifting belt and the Valsalva maneuver.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Trevor W; Smith, Camille; Grenier, Sylvain G

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown that under isometric conditions, as the activity of the abdominal muscles increases, the thicknesses of the muscles also increase. The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether change in muscle thickness could be used as a measure of muscle activity during a deadlift as well as determining the effect of a weightlifting belt and/or the Valsalva maneuver on the muscle thicknesses. The Transversus Abdominis (TrA) and Internal Obliques (IO) muscles were analyzed at rest and during a deadlift. Muscle thickness was measured using ultrasound imaging and muscle activity was simultaneously recorded using electromyography. Each subject performed deadlift under normal conditions, while performing the Valsalva maneuver, while wearing a weightlifting belt and while both utilizing the belt and the Valsalva maneuver. There was no relationship between change in muscle thickness and muscle activity for both the TrA and IO (R(2)<0.13 for all conditions). However it was found that the Valsalva maneuver increased abdominal muscle thickness whereas the belt limited muscle expansion; each with an increase in activity. These results indicate that ultrasound cannot be used to measure muscle activity for a deadlift and that the belt affects how the IO and TrA function together. PMID:27093137

  20. Impact of Retropubic vs. Transobturator Slings for Urinary Incontinence on Myofascial Structures of the Pelvic Floor, Adductor and Abdominal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Beilecke, K; Soeder, S; Hufenbach, E; Tunn, R

    2014-01-01

    Suburethral tension-free slings (tapes or bands) are an essential component in the operative treatment of urinary incontinence. In the present contribution the influence of the type of suburethral sling (retropubic vs. transobturator) on the myofascial structures of the abdominal, adductor and pelvic floor muscles is examined. For this purpose, 70 patients were prospectively observed clinically and physiotherapeutically. Significant differences were seen in the improvement of the pelvic floor musculature (strength, endurance, speed) after placement of a suburethral sling, irrespective of whether it was of the retropubic or the transobturator type. Thus, after surgical treatment patients should be encouraged to undertake further pelvic floor exercising or this should be prescribed for them. There were no significant changes in the abdominal and adductor muscles but there were slight increases with regard to pain level, pain on palpation, and trigger points after placement of both types of sling; thus this is not a criterion in the decision as to which type of sling to use. PMID:24741121

  1. A muscle contracting substance from a plant's closing Fly-Trap.

    PubMed

    Lea, H W

    1976-01-01

    A muscle contracting substance (MCS) occurs in crushed, incubated traps of the insectivorous plant, the Venus Fly-Trap (Dionaea muscipula Ellis). This MCS is provisionally identified as lysophosphatidic acid. More MCS is produced from traps which have been touched than from untouched traps, which may be due to activation of phospholipase D. This enzyme hydrolyses phospholipids of membranes, and could alter the physiological properties of membranes.

  2. Stiffness changes in frog skeletal muscle during contraction recorded using ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, I; Sugi, H; Tamura, Y

    1988-01-01

    1. A technique has been developed with which the stiffness changes in frog skeletal muscle can be continuously recorded by measuring the propagation velocity of ultrasonic waves (3-7 MHz) with negligibly small perturbations to the contractile system. 2. The resting muscle stiffness was 2.256 +/- 0.002 x 10(9) N/m2 (S.D.) at 1-2 degrees C (n = 10) and 2.480 +/- 0.007 x 10(9) N/m2 at 19-20 degrees C (n = 12) in the longitudinal direction, and 2.223 +/- 0.008 x 10(9) N/m2 at 1-2 degrees C (n = 8) and 2.437 +/- 0.007 x 10(9) N/m2 at 19-20 degrees C (n = 9) in the transverse direction. 3. The resting muscle stiffness measured with ultrasonic waves was virtually insensitive to the resting force development, i.e. the extension of the parallel elastic component. 4. The longitudinal muscle stiffness increased during isometric contraction at a rate faster than the force development. The amount of increase of the longitudinal stiffness in an isometric tetanus at 2.2 microns sarcomere length was 2.4 +/- 0.1 x 10(7) N/m2 at 1-2 degrees C (n = 10) and 6.5 +/- 1.3 x 10(7) N/m2 at 19-20 degrees C (n = 12). 5. On the other hand, the transverse muscle stiffness decreased during isometric contraction at a rate faster than the force development. The amount of decrease of the transverse stiffness in an isometric tetanus at 2.2 microns sarcomere length was 5.6 +/- 0.1 x 10(7) N/m2 at 1-2 degrees C (n = 8) and 6.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(7) N/m2 at 19-20 degrees C (n = 9). 6. The amount of both the longitudinal and the transverse stiffness changes during an isometric tetanus decreased linearly with increasing sarcomere length, indicating that the stiffness changes during contraction reflect the formation of cross-links between the myofilaments. 7. Both the longitudinal and the transverse stiffness increased when resting muscle was put into rigor state. The rigor muscle stiffness was insensitive to small stretches, i.e. the strain of the rigor cross-links. 8. These results are discussed in

  3. Loss of abdominal muscle in Pitx2 mutants associated with altered axial specification of lateral plate mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Eng, Diana; Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Xu, Jun; Shih, Hung-Ping; Gross, Michael K; Kioussi, Chrissa; Kiouss, Chrissa

    2012-01-01

    Sequence specific transcription factors (SSTFs) combinatorially define cell types during development by forming recursively linked network kernels. Pitx2 expression begins during gastrulation, together with Hox genes, and becomes localized to the abdominal lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) before the onset of myogenesis in somites. The somatopleure of Pitx2 null embryos begins to grow abnormally outward before muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) or Pitx2 begin expression in the dermomyotome/myotome. Abdominal somites become deformed and stunted as they elongate into the mutant body wall, but maintain normal MRF expression domains. Subsequent loss of abdominal muscles is therefore not due to defects in specification, determination, or commitment of the myogenic lineage. Microarray analysis was used to identify SSTF families whose expression levels change in E10.5 interlimb body wall biopsies. All Hox9-11 paralogs had lower RNA levels in mutants, whereas genes expressed selectively in the hypaxial dermomyotome/myotome and sclerotome had higher RNA levels in mutants. In situ hybridization analyses indicate that Hox gene expression was reduced in parts of the LPM and intermediate mesoderm of mutants. Chromatin occupancy studies conducted on E10.5 interlimb body wall biopsies showed that Pitx2 protein occupied chromatin sites containing conserved bicoid core motifs in the vicinity of Hox 9-11 and MRF genes. Taken together, the data indicate that Pitx2 protein in LPM cells acts, presumably in combination with other SSTFs, to repress gene expression, that are normally expressed in physically adjoining cell types. Pitx2 thereby prevents cells in the interlimb LPM from adopting the stable network kernels that define sclerotomal, dermomyotomal, or myotomal mesenchymal cell types. This mechanism may be viewed either as lineage restriction or specification. PMID:22860089

  4. Increasing temperature speeds intracellular PO2 kinetics during contractions in single Xenopus skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Koga, S; Wüst, R C I; Walsh, B; Kindig, C A; Rossiter, H B; Hogan, M C

    2013-01-01

    Precise determination of the effect of muscle temperature (T(m)) on mitochondrial oxygen consumption kinetics has proven difficult in humans, in part due to the complexities in controlling for T(m)-related variations in blood flow, fiber recruitment, muscle metabolism, and contractile properties. To address this issue, intracellular Po(2) (P(i)(O(2))) was measured continuously by phosphorescence quenching following the onset of contractions in single Xenopus myofibers (n = 24) while controlling extracellular temperature. Fibers were subjected to two identical contraction bouts, in random order, at 15°C (cold, C) and 20°C (normal, N; n = 12), or at N and 25°C (hot, H; n = 12). Contractile properties were determined for every contraction. The time delay of the P(i)(O(2)) response was significantly greater in C (59 ± 35 s) compared with N (35 ± 26 s, P = 0.01) and H (27 ± 14 s, P = 0.01). The time constant for the decline in P(i)(O(2)) was significantly greater in C (89 ± 34 s) compared with N (52 ± 15 s; P < 0.01) and H (37 ± 10 s; P < 0.01). There was a linear relationship between the rate constant for P(i)(O(2)) kinetics and T(m) (r = 0.322, P = 0.03). Estimated ATP turnover was significantly greater in H than in C (P < 0.01), but this increased energy requirement alone with increased T(m) could not account for the differences observed in P(i)(O(2)) kinetics among conditions. These results demonstrate that P(i)(O(2)) kinetics in single contracting myofibers are dependent on T(m), likely caused by temperature-induced differences in metabolic demand and by temperature-dependent processes underlying mitochondrial activation at the start of muscle contractions.

  5. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  6. Comparison of gel contraction mediated by airway smooth muscle cells from patients with and without asthma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hisako; Moir, Lyn M; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent E

    2007-01-01

    Backgrounds Exaggerated bronchial constriction is the most significant and life threatening response of patients with asthma to inhaled stimuli. However, few studies have investigated the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from these patients. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to measure contraction of ASM cells by embedding them into a collagen gel, and to compare the contraction between subjects with and without asthma. Methods Gel contraction to histamine was examined in floating gels containing cultured ASM cells from subjects with and without asthma following overnight incubation while unattached (method 1) or attached (method 2) to casting plates. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase protein levels were also examined. Results Collagen gels containing ASM cells reduced in size when stimulated with histamine in a concentration‐dependent manner and reached a maximum at a mean (SE) of 15.7 (1.2) min. This gel contraction was decreased by inhibitors for phospholipase C (U73122), myosin light chain kinase (ML‐7) and Rho kinase (Y27632). When comparing the two patient groups, the maximal decreased area of gels containing ASM cells from patients with asthma was 19 (2)% (n = 8) using method 1 and 22 (3)% (n = 6) using method 2, both of which were greater than that of cells from patients without asthma: 13 (2)% (n = 9, p = 0.05) and 10 (4)% (n = 5, p = 0.024), respectively. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase levels were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The increased contraction of asthmatic ASM cells may be responsible for exaggerated bronchial constriction in asthma. PMID:17412779

  7. Sarcoplasmic-reticulum biogenesis in contraction-inhibited skeletal-muscle cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Charuk, J H; Guerin, C; Holland, P C

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that inhibition of the spontaneous contractile activity of cultured embryonic-chick skeletal-muscle fibres with tetrodotoxin (TTX) leads to decreased sarcoplasmic-reticulum Ca(2+)-transport rates and steady-state concentrations of the high-energy Ca(2+)-ATPase phosphoenzyme intermediate [Charuk & Holland (1983) Exp. Cell Res. 144, 143-157]. In the present study we used a monoclonal antibody to the Ca(2+)-ATPase to show that there is a decreased amount of enzyme accumulated by contraction-inhibited myotubes. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using the monoclonal antibody to the Ca(2+)-ATPase also revealed a disordered subcellular organization of the sarcotubular system in contraction-inhibited myotubes. The biogenesis of sarcoplasmic-reticulum proteins in TTX-paralysed myofibres was studied by labelling cells with [35S]methionine before isolation of the active Ca(2+)-pump membrane fraction. Protein turnover was selectively increased in that fraction from TTX-treated muscle cultures. Electrophoretic analysis and quantitative fluorography confirmed that decreased accumulation of the Ca(2+)-ATPase enzyme in contraction-inhibited myotubes was associated with increased turnover of this protein. The present results demonstrate that biogenesis of the sarcoplasmic-reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase is regulated by the contractile activity of skeletal-muscle fibres. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:1312329

  8. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  9. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Raiteri, Brent J; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  10. Regulation of contraction and thick filament assembly-disassembly in glycerinated vertebrate smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Isolated smooth muscle cells and cell fragments prepared by glycerination and subsequent homogenization will contract to one-third their normal length, provided Ca++ and ATP are present. Ca++- independent contraction was obtained by preincubation in Ca++ and ATP gamma S, or by addition of trypsin-treated myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) that no longer requires Ca++ for activation. In the absence of Ca++, myosin was rapidly lost from the cells upon addition of ATP. Glycerol-urea-PAGE gels showed that none of this myosin is phosphorylated. The extent of myosin loss was ATP- and pH-dependent and occurred under conditions similar to those previously reported for the in vitro disassembly of gizzard myosin filaments. Ca++-dependent contraction was restored to extracted cells by addition of gizzard myosin under rigor conditions (i.e., no ATP), followed by addition of MLCK, calmodulin, Ca++, and ATP. Function could also be restored by adding all these proteins in relaxing conditions (i.e., in EGTA and ATP) and then initiating contraction by Ca++ addition. Incubation with skeletal myosin will restore contraction, but this was not Ca++- dependent unless the cells were first incubated in troponin and tropomyosin. These results strengthen the idea that contraction in glycerinated cells and presumably also in intact cells is primarily thick filament regulated via MLCK, that the myosin filaments are unstable in relaxing conditions, and that the spatial information required for cell length change is present in the thin filament- intermediate filament organization. PMID:6688623

  11. Minor sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane components that modulate excitation–contraction coupling in striated muscles

    PubMed Central

    Treves, Susan; Vukcevic, Mirko; Maj, Marcin; Thurnheer, Raphael; Mosca, Barbara; Zorzato, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In striated muscle, activation of contraction is initiated by membrane depolarisation caused by an action potential, which triggers the release of Ca2+ stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum by a process called excitation–contraction coupling. Excitation–contraction coupling occurs via a highly sophisticated supramolecular signalling complex at the junction between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules. It is generally accepted that the core components of the excitation–contraction coupling machinery are the dihydropyridine receptors, ryanodine receptors and calsequestrin, which serve as voltage sensor, Ca2+ release channel, and Ca2+ storage protein, respectively. Nevertheless, a number of additional proteins have been shown to be essential both for the structural formation of the machinery involved in excitation–contraction coupling and for its fine tuning. In this review we discuss the functional role of minor sarcoplasmic reticulum protein components. The definition of their roles in excitation–contraction coupling is important in order to understand how mutations in genes involved in Ca2+ signalling cause neuromuscular disorders. PMID:19403606

  12. Lower muscle co-contraction in flutter kicking for competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yuji; Hirano, Masami; Yamada, Yosuke; Ikuta, Yasushi; Nomura, Teruo; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Oda, Shingo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in muscle activation pattern and co-contraction of the rectus and biceps femoris in flutter-kick swimming between competitive and recreational swimmers, to better understand the mechanism of repetitive kicking movements during swimming. Ten competitive and 10 recreational swimmers swam using flutter kicks at three different velocities (100%, 90%, and 80% of their maximal velocity) in a swimming flume. Surface electromyographic signals (EMG) were obtained from the rectus (RF) and biceps femoris (BF), and lower limb kinematic data were obtained at the same time. The beginning and ending of one kick cycle was defined as when the right lateral malleolus reached its highest position in the vertical axis. The offset timing of muscle activation of RF in the recreational swimmers was significantly later at all velocities than in the competitive swimmers (47-48% and 26-33% of kick time of one cycle for recreational and competitive swimmers, respectively), although the kinematic data and other activation timing of RF and BF did not differ between groups. A higher integrated EMG of RF during hip extension and knee extension induced a higher level of muscle co-contraction between RF and BF in the recreational swimmers. These results suggest that long-term competitive swimming training can induce an effective muscle activation pattern in the upper legs.

  13. Factors affecting the equatorial X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting frog skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Hashizume, H; Sugi, H

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the equatorial X-ray diffraction pattern from tetanized frog sartorius muscles (Rana catesbiana ) were studied by use of time-resolved data collection technique (time resolution, 0.5 sec) to give information about the dynamic properties of the cross-bridges. No significant changes in the intensity ratio of two equatorial reflections (I1,0/I1,1) were observed when isometrically contracting muscles were slowly stretched by 5-6%, in spite of marked force changes. The intensity ratio also showed no significant changes when the load on isometrically contracting muscles was suddenly increased from Po to 1.2-1.5 Po to produce isotonic muscle lengthening. Closer examination of the data indicated that a small decrease in the value of I1,1 was caused by both slow stretch and isotonic lengthening. Because of the scatter of experimental plots in I1,0, the effect of small change in I1,1 on the intensity ratio fell within the range of accuracy of measurement. It is suggested that no marked changes in myosin head orientation or in the number of the cross-bridges in the vicinity of the thin filaments take place in response to slow stretches or isotonic lengthening, and that the decreased regularity of the filament lattice may produce the change in I1,1. PMID:6611027

  14. Repeated static contractions increase mitochondrial vulnerability toward oxidative stress in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Kent; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Mogensen, Martin; Tonkonogi, Michail

    2006-09-01

    Repeated static contractions (RSC) induce large fluctuations in tissue oxygen tension and increase the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study investigated the effect of RSC on muscle contractility, mitochondrial respiratory function, and in vitro sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) kinetics in human muscle. Ten male subjects performed five bouts of static knee extension with 10-min rest in between. Each bout of RSC (target torque 66% of maximal voluntary contraction torque) was maintained to fatigue. Muscle biopsies were taken preexercise and 0.3 and 24 h postexercise from vastus lateralis. Mitochondria were isolated and respiratory function measured after incubation with H(2)O(2) (HPX) or control medium (Con). Mitochondrial function was not affected by RSC during Con. However, RSC exacerbated mitochondrial dysfunction during HPX, resulting in decreased respiratory control index, decreased mitochondrial efficiency (phosphorylated ADP-to-oxygen consumed ratio), and increased noncoupled respiration (HPX/Con post- vs. preexercise). SR Ca(2+) uptake rate was lower 0.3 vs. 24 h postexercise, whereas SR Ca(2+) release rate was unchanged. RSC resulted in long-lasting changes in muscle contractility, including reduced maximal torque, low-frequency fatigue, and faster torque relaxation. It is concluded that RSC increases mitochondrial vulnerability toward ROS, reduces SR Ca(2+) uptake rate, and causes low-frequency fatigue. Although conclusive evidence is lacking, we suggest that these changes are related to increased formation of ROS during RSC. PMID:16728514

  15. Influence of ovarian muscle contraction and oocyte growth on egg chamber elongation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Darcy; Horne-Badovinac, Sally

    2016-04-15

    Organs are formed from multiple cell types that make distinct contributions to their shape. The Drosophila egg chamber provides a tractable model to dissect such contributions during morphogenesis. Egg chambers consist of 16 germ cells (GCs) surrounded by a somatic epithelium. Initially spherical, these structures elongate as they mature. This morphogenesis is thought to occur through a 'molecular corset' mechanism, whereby structural elements within the epithelium become circumferentially organized perpendicular to the elongation axis and resist the expansive growth of the GCs to promote elongation. Whether this epithelial organization provides the hypothesized constraining force has been difficult to discern, however, and a role for GC growth has not been demonstrated. Here, we provide evidence for this mechanism by altering the contractile activity of the tubular muscle sheath that surrounds developing egg chambers. Muscle hypo-contraction indirectly reduces GC growth and shortens the egg, which demonstrates the necessity of GC growth for elongation. Conversely, muscle hyper-contraction enhances the elongation program. Although this is an abnormal function for this muscle, this observation suggests that a corset-like force from the egg chamber's exterior could promote its lengthening. These findings highlight how physical contributions from several cell types are integrated to shape an organ.

  16. Differences in time to peak carbachol-induced contractions between circular and longitudinal smooth muscles of mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Samezawa, Nanako; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The muscular layer in the GI tract consists of an inner circular muscular layer and an outer longitudinal muscular layer. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the representative neurotransmitter that causes contractions in the gastrointestinal tracts of most animal species. There are many reports of muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscles, but few studies discuss circular muscles. The present study detailed the contractile response in the circular smooth muscles of the mouse ileum. We used small muscle strips (0.2 mm × 1 mm) and large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the mouse ileum to compare contraction responses in circular and longitudinal smooth muscles. The time to peak contractile responses to carbamylcholine (CCh) were later in the small muscle strips (0.2 × 1 mm) of circular muscle (5.7 min) than longitudinal muscles (0.4 min). The time to peak contractile responses to CCh in the large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) were also later in the circular muscle (3.1 min) than the longitudinal muscle (1.4 min). Furthermore, a muscarinic M2 receptor antagonist and gap junction inhibitor significantly delayed the time to peak contraction of the large muscle strips (4 × 4 mm) from the circular muscular layer. Our findings indicate that muscarinic M2 receptors in the circular muscular layer of mouse ileum exert a previously undocumented function in gut motility via the regulation of gap junctions.

  17. Slow inward barium current and contraction on frog single muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Potreau, D; Raymond, G

    1980-01-01

    1. Excitation-contraction coupling process in isolated frog muscle fibres, under conditions which allow the development of a Ba permeability, has been investigated by the simultaneous recording of electrical and mechanical activity. 2. The sustained contraction elicited by a long lasting Ba action potential depends on two mechanisms. The first is potential dependent, the second which is inhibited by MnCl2 (10 mM), depends on the inward flux of Ba ions. 3. The relationship observed between the inward IBa and the peak tension resembles that which has been observed between ICa and the contraction on other muscular structures. 4. The relative tension progressively declines as the intracellular Ba concentration increases and the contractility ends after a series of depolarizing pulses (or Ba action potentials). This indicates that the Ba ions which enter the cell release Ca ions and replace them in the intracellular storage sites. 5. Following a pretreatment with caffeine, the inward IBa fails to induce a contraction. Moreover a muscle which has been loaded with barium until the contraction ceases, does not develop a contracture in presence of caffeine. These results show that the Ba induced Ca release is located at the level of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 6. Calculations show that the amount of Ba ions necessary to abolish the contractility corresponds to the maximum ability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum for Ca binding. 7. Almost all the inward flux of Ba ions and the contraction are abolished by glycerol-treatment which suggests that the coupling occurs at the T-system level. The results are discussed in regard to the technical limitations of the voltage-clamp method. PMID:7431249

  18. Three-dimensional geometrical changes of the human tibialis anterior muscle and its central aponeurosis measured with three-dimensional ultrasound during isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Andrew G.; Lichtwark, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscles not only shorten during contraction to perform mechanical work, but they also bulge radially because of the isovolumetric constraint on muscle fibres. Muscle bulging may have important implications for muscle performance, however quantifying three-dimensional (3D) muscle shape changes in human muscle is problematic because of difficulties with sustaining contractions for the duration of an in vivo scan. Although two-dimensional ultrasound imaging is useful for measuring local muscle deformations, assumptions must be made about global muscle shape changes, which could lead to errors in fully understanding the mechanical behaviour of muscle and its surrounding connective tissues, such as aponeurosis. Therefore, the aims of this investigation were (a) to determine the intra-session reliability of a novel 3D ultrasound (3DUS) imaging method for measuring in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis deformations and (b) to examine how contraction intensity influences in vivo human muscle and aponeurosis strains during isometric contractions. Methods. Participants (n = 12) were seated in a reclined position with their left knee extended and ankle at 90° and performed isometric dorsiflexion contractions up to 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. 3DUS scans of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle belly were performed during the contractions and at rest to assess muscle volume, muscle length, muscle cross-sectional area, muscle thickness and width, fascicle length and pennation angle, and central aponeurosis width and length. The 3DUS scan involved synchronous B-mode ultrasound imaging and 3D motion capture of the position and orientation of the ultrasound transducer, while successive cross-sectional slices were captured by sweeping the transducer along the muscle. Results. 3DUS was shown to be highly reliable across measures of muscle volume, muscle length, fascicle length and central aponeurosis length (ICC ≥ 0.98, CV < 1%). The TA remained isovolumetric

  19. The Signaling Mechanism of Contraction Induced by ATP and UTP in Feline Esophageal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Jung, Hyunwoo; Cho, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    P2 receptors are membrane-bound receptors for extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and UTP. P2 receptors have been classified as ligand-gated ion channels or P2X receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Recently, purinergic signaling has begun to attract attention as a potential therapeutic target for a variety of diseases especially associated with gastroenterology. This study determined the ATP and UTP-induced receptor signaling mechanism in feline esophageal contraction. Contraction of dispersed feline esophageal smooth muscle cells was measured by scanning micrometry. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was determined by western blot analysis. ATP and UTP elicited maximum esophageal contraction at 30 s and 10 μM concentration. Contraction of dispersed cells treated with 10 μM ATP was inhibited by nifedipine. However, contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP, 0.1 μM UTP and 10 μM UTP was decreased by U73122, chelerythrine, ML-9, PTX and GDPβS. Contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP and UTP was inhibited by Gαi3 or Gαq antibodies and by PLCβ1 or PLCβ3 antibodies. Phosphorylated MLC20 was increased by ATP and UTP treatment. In conclusion, esophageal contraction induced by ATP and UTP was preferentially mediated by P2Y receptors coupled to Gαi3 and G q proteins, which activate PLCβ1 and PLCβ3. Subsequently, increased intracellular Ca2+ and activated PKC triggered stimulation of MLC kinase and inhibition of MLC phosphatase. Finally, increased pMLC20 generated esophageal contraction. PMID:26013385

  20. The force of contraction of the human ciliary muscle during accommodation

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, R. F.

    1977-01-01

    1. Apparatus has been designed to alter the shape of the human lens by tensile forces applied to the zonular fibres indirectly through the ciliary body. The changes in dioptric power of the lens for monochromatic sodium light were measured at the same time. Simultaneous serial photography, and direct measurement enabled one to relate a change in shape of the lens to the change in dioptric power. Subsequently, the same lens was isolated and spun around its antero-posterior polar axis and high speed photography recorded its changing profile. 2. By comparing the changes in lens profile due to zonular tension and centrifugal force respectively, the force developed in the zonule for a given change in the shape of the lens could be calculated. Changes in dioptric power associated with those of shape can thus be related directly to the force of contraction of the ciliary muscle necessary to reduce the initial tension of the zonule in the unaccommodated state. 3. The force of contraction of the ciliary muscle as measured by radial force exerted through the zonule and the change in dioptric power of the lens were not linearly related. The relationship is more exactly expressed by the equation [Formula: see text] where D = amplitude of accommodation in dioptres (m-1), FCB = force of contraction of the ciliary muscle as measured by changes in tension of the zonule (N), Kdf = dioptric force coefficient and is constant for a given age (m-1N-½ × 102·5). This coefficient is 0·41 at 15 yr and 0·07 at 45 yr of age. 4. In youth for maximum accommodation (10-12 D) the force is approximately 1·0 × 10-2 N while to produce sufficient accommodation for near vision (3·5 D) the force is less than 0·05 × 10-2 N. 5. After the age of 30 yr the force of contraction of the ciliary muscle necessary to produce maximum accommodation rises steadily to about 50 yr of age and thereafter probably falls slightly. At about 50 yr of age the ciliary muscle is some 50% more powerful than in youth

  1. The role of computed tomography in evaluating body composition and the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal malignancy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gibson, D J; Burden, S T; Strauss, B J; Todd, C; Lal, S

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that there were 3.45 million new cases and 1.75 million deaths from cancer in Europe in 2012. Colorectal cancer was one of the most common cancers, accounting for 13% of new cases and 12.2% of all deaths. Conditions causing reduced muscle mass, such as sarcopenia, can increase the morbidity and mortality of people with cancer. Computed tomography (CT) scans can provide accurate, high-quality information on body composition, including muscle mass. To date, there has been no systematic review on the role of CT scans in identifying sarcopenia in abdominal cancer. This review aimed to examine the role of CT scans in determining the influence of reduced muscle mass on clinical outcome in abdominal cancer. A systematic review of English-language articles published in 2000 or later was conducted. Articles included cohort, randomised controlled trials and validation studies. Participants were people diagnosed with abdominal cancer who had undergone a CT scan. Data extraction and critical appraisal were undertaken. Ten cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies demonstrated that low muscle mass was significantly associated with poor clinical outcome, with six specifically demonstrating reduced survival rates. Eight studies demonstrated that a greater number of patients (27.3-66.7%) were identified as sarcopenic using CT scans compared with numbers identified as malnourished using body mass index. CT scans can identify reduced muscle mass and predict negative cancer outcomes in people with abdominal malignancies, where traditional methods of assessment are less effective.

  2. Detection of the electromechanical delay and its components during voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps femoris muscle

    PubMed Central

    Begovic, Haris; Zhou, Guang-Quan; Li, Tianjie; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical delay (EMD) was described as a time elapsed between first trigger and force output. Various results have been reported based on the measurement method with observed inconsistent results when the trigger is elicited by voluntary contraction. However, mechanomyographic (MMG) sensor placed far away on the skin from the contracting muscle was used to detect muscle fiber motion and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling which may give unreliable results. On this basis, the purpose of this study was to detect EMD during active muscle contraction whilst introducing an ultrafast ultrasound (US) method to detect muscle fiber motion from a certain depth of the muscle. Time delays between onsets of EMG-MMG, EMG-US, MMG-FORCE, US-FORCE, and EMG-FORCE were calculated as 20.5 ± 4.73, 28.63 ± 6.31, 19.21 ± 6.79, 30.52 ± 8.85, and 49.73 ± 6.99 ms, respectively. Intrarater correlation coefficient (ICC) was higher than MMG when ultrafast US was used for detecton of the Δt EMG-US and Δt US-FORCE, ICC values of 0.75 and 0.70, respectively. Synchronization of the ultrafast ultrasound with EMG and FORCE sensors can reveal reliable and clinically useful results related to the EMD and its components when muscle is voluntarily contracted. With ultrafast US, we detect onset from the certain depth of the muscle excluding the tissues above the muscle acting as a low-pass filter which can lead to inaccurate time detection about the onset of the contracting muscle fibers. With this non-invasive technique, understanding of the muscle dynamics can be facilitated. PMID:25566091

  3. The experimental type 2 diabetes therapy glycogen phosphorylase inhibition can impair aerobic muscle function during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Baker, David J; Greenhaff, Paul L; MacInnes, Alan; Timmons, James A

    2006-06-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase inhibition represents a promising strategy to suppress inappropriate hepatic glucose output, while muscle glycogen is a major source of fuel during contraction. Glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors (GPi) currently being investigated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes do not demonstrate hepatic versus muscle glycogen phosphorylase isoform selectivity and may therefore impair patient aerobic exercise capabilities. Skeletal muscle energy metabolism and function are not impaired by GPi during high-intensity contraction in rat skeletal muscle; however, it is unknown whether glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors would impair function during prolonged lower-intensity contraction. Utilizing a novel red cell-perfused rodent gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus system, muscle was pretreated for 60 min with either 3 micromol/l free drug GPi (n=8) or vehicle control (n=7). During 60 min of aerobic contraction, GPi treatment resulted in approximately 35% greater fatigue. Muscle glycogen phosphorylase a form (P<0.01) and maximal activity (P<0.01) were reduced in the GPi group, and postcontraction glycogen (121.8 +/- 16.1 vs. 168.3 +/- 8.5 mmol/kg dry muscle, P<0.05) was greater. Furthermore, lower muscle lactate efflux and glucose uptake (P<0.01), yet higher muscle Vo(2), support the conclusion that carbohydrate utilization was impaired during contraction. Our data provide new confirmation that muscle glycogen plays an essential role during submaximal contraction. Given the critical role of exercise prescription in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it will be important to monitor endurance capacity during the clinical evaluation of nonselective GPi. Alternatively, greater effort should be devoted toward the discovery of hepatic-selective GPi, hepatic-specific drug delivery strategies, and/or alternative strategies for controlling excess hepatic glucose production in type 2 diabetes.

  4. Memories of early work on muscle contraction and regulation in the 1950's and 1960's

    SciTech Connect

    Huxley, Hugh E.

    2008-04-25

    Professor Ebashi's epic work on the biochemistry of the regulation of muscle contraction began in the early 1950's, during the same period that work on the molecular basis of force production in muscle was also beginning. The latter work started in two MRC Research Units in the UK, and was continued jointly by the two workers from those Units who had, independently, gone to MIT to learn the new techniques of electron microscopy and to apply them to muscle. In a somewhat similar fashion, Professor Ebashi also spent one or two years in the USA, continuing his work on the role of calcium in muscle regulation in Lippman's laboratory, before returning to Japan to achieve the great breakthroughs in this work during the 1960's. Hanson and Huxley, after putting forward the overlapping actin and myosin filament arrays model for the striated muscle sarcomere, and subsequently the sliding filament model of muscle contraction (simultaneously with A.F Huxley and R. Niedergerke), returned to the UK to pursue detailed structural studies in separate Research Units, in a mixture of consultation, collaboration, and competition, during the later 1950's and throughout the 1960's. However, the path to enlightenment described here in some detail was somewhat more tortuous than the standard literature perhaps reveals. Nevertheless, by the time of the Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Muscle Contraction in 1972, the two lines of enquiry on regulation itself, and on the tilting cross-bridge model of force production, had arrived at a good deal of common ground, and indeed the identification of troponin and its periodic distribution along the actin filaments had helped resolve a long-standing puzzle in the interpretation of the low angle X-ray diagram. Since then, an enormous amount of remarkable new work has been necessary to establish troponin regulation and the tilting cross-bridge mechanism in molecular detail, but the work in the 1950's and 1960's has provided a firm and accurate basis

  5. Memories of early work on muscle contraction and regulation in the 1950's and 1960's.

    PubMed

    Huxley, Hugh E

    2008-04-25

    Professor Ebashi's epic work on the biochemistry of the regulation of muscle contraction began in the early 1950's, during the same period that work on the molecular basis of force production in muscle was also beginning. The latter work started in two MRC Research Units in the UK, and was continued jointly by the two workers from those Units who had, independently, gone to MIT to learn the new techniques of electron microscopy and to apply them to muscle. In a somewhat similar fashion, Professor Ebashi also spent one or two years in the USA, continuing his work on the role of calcium in muscle regulation in Lippman's laboratory, before returning to Japan to achieve the great breakthroughs in this work during the 1960's. Hanson and Huxley, after putting forward the overlapping actin and myosin filament arrays model for the striated muscle sarcomere, and subsequently the sliding filament model of muscle contraction (simultaneously with A.F Huxley and R. Niedergerke), returned to the UK to pursue detailed structural studies in separate Research Units, in a mixture of consultation, collaboration, and competition, during the later 1950's and throughout the 1960's. However, the path to enlightenment described here in some detail was somewhat more tortuous than the standard literature perhaps reveals. Nevertheless, by the time of the Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Muscle Contraction in 1972, the two lines of enquiry on regulation itself, and on the tilting cross-bridge model of force production, had arrived at a good deal of common ground, and indeed the identification of troponin and its periodic distribution along the actin filaments had helped resolve a long-standing puzzle in the interpretation of the low angle X-ray diagram. Since then, an enormous amount of remarkable new work has been necessary to establish troponin regulation and the tilting cross-bridge mechanism in molecular detail, but the work in the 1950's and 1960's has provided a firm and accurate basis

  6. Dynamics of Muscle Microcirculatory and Blood-myocyte O2 Flux During Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Poole, David C.; Copp, Steven W.; Hirai, Daniel M.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2011-01-01

    The O2 requirements of contracting skeletal muscle may increase 100-fold above rest. In 1919 August Krogh’s brilliant insights recognized the capillary as the principal site for this increased blood-myocyte O2 flux. Based on the premise that most capillaries did not sustain RBC flux at rest Krogh proposed that capillary recruitment (i.e., initiation of red blood cell (RBC) flux in previously non-flowing capillaries) increased the capillary surface area available for O2 flux and reduced mean capillary-to-mitochondrial diffusion distances. More modern experimental approaches reveal that most muscle capillaries may support RBC flux at rest. Thus, rather than contraction-induced capillary recruitment per se, increased RBC flux and hematocrit within already-flowing capillaries likely elevate perfusive and diffusive O2 conductances and hence blood-myocyte O2 flux. Additional surface area for O2 exchange is recruited but, crucially, this may occur along the length of already-flowing capillaries (i.e. longitudinal recruitment). Today, the capillary is still considered the principal site for O2 and substrate delivery to contracting skeletal muscle. Indeed, the presence of very low intramyocyte O2 partial pressures (PO2’s) and the absence of PO2 gradients, whilst refuting the relevance of diffusion distances, place an even greater importance on capillary hemodynamics. This emergent picture calls for a paradigm-shift in our understanding of the function of capillaries by de-emphasizing de novo ‘capillary recruitment.’ Diseases such as heart failure impair blood-myocyte O2 flux, in part, by decreasing the proportion of RBC-flowing capillaries. Knowledge of capillary function in healthy muscle is requisite for identification of pathology and efficient design of therapeutic treatments. PMID:21199399

  7. Trigeminal and carotid body inputs controlling vascular resistance in muscle during post-contraction hyperaemia in cats.

    PubMed

    de Burgh Daly, M; Cook, M N

    1999-03-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats, the effects of stimulation of the receptors in the nasal mucosa and carotid body chemoreceptors on vascular resistance in hindlimb skeletal muscle were studied to see whether the responses were the same in active as in resting muscle. The measurements of vascular resistance were taken, first, in resting muscle, and second, in the immediate post-contraction hyperaemic phase that followed a 30 s period of isometric contractions. 2. Stimulation of the receptors in the nasal mucosa caused reflex apnoea and vasoconstriction in muscle. The latter response was attenuated when the test was repeated during post-contraction hyperaemia. 3. Stimulations of the carotid bodies were made during a period of apnoea evoked reflexly by electrical stimulation of both superior laryngeal nerves. This apnoea prevented any effects of changes in respiration on the carotid body reflex vascular responses. Stimulation of the carotid bodies evoked hindlimb muscle vasoconstriction. In the post-contraction hyperaemic period, the response was reduced or abolished. A similar attenuation of the reflex vasoconstrictor responses occurred in decentralized muscles stimulated through their motor roots in the cauda equina. 4. Evidence is presented that the attenuation of the vasoconstrictor responses evoked by the two reflexes is a phenomenon localized to the contracting muscles themselves resulting from an interaction between sympathetic neuronal activity and the local production of metabolites. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the metabolic needs of tissues in relation to asphyxial defence mechanisms such as occur in the diving response. PMID:10050020

  8. Mechanical Anisotropy of Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Decreases with Their Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Takeo

    Tensile properties of smooth muscle cells freshly isolated from rat thoracic aortas (FSMCs) in their major and minor axes were measured using a laboratory-made micro tensile tester. The relationship between the tension applied to a cell and its elongation was obtained in untreated cells and those treated with 10-5M serotonin to induce contraction. An initial stiffness of untreated FSMCs, normalized by their initial cross-sectional area perpendicular to the stretch direction, was significantly higher in the major axis (14.8±4.3kPa, mean±SEM, n=5) than the minor axis (2.8±1.0kPa, n=5). The stiffness increased significantly in response to the contraction, but the increase was much higher in the minor axis (59.0±9.4kPa, n=4) than in the major (88.1±13.3kPa, n=4). The difference between the two directions was insignificant in the contracted state. Observations of the morphology of actin filaments with a confocal laser scanning microscope in untreated FSMCs revealed that they were long fibers running almost parallel to the major axis, while those in contracted cells showed an aggregated structure without a preferential direction. These results may indicate that anisotropy in untreated FSMCs is caused by the anisotropic alignment of their actin filaments, and that such anisotropy disappears in response to actin filament reorganization caused by the contraction.

  9. Heat production and chemical change during isometric contraction of rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gower, D; Kretzschmar, K M

    1976-01-01

    1. Methods are described whereby the soleus muscle of the rat may be used for the investigation of initial processes in the absence of oxidative recovery. 2. The anaerobic conditions employed had no effect on the concentration of phosphocreatine in resting muscle or the mechanical response during contraction. 3. Muscles were stimulated tetanically for 10 s at 17-18 degrees C. Measurements were made of the heat production and metabolic changes that occurred during a 13 s period following the first stimulus. 4. There was no detectable change in the concentration of ATP. Neither was there detectable activity of adenylate kinase or adenylate deaminase. The changes in the concentration of glycolytic intermediaries were undetectable or very small. 5. The change in the concentration of phosphocreatine was large and amounted to -127 +/- 11-4 mumol/mmol Ct (mean and S.E. of the mean, negative sign indicates break-down, Ct = free creatine + phosphocreatine) which is equivalent to about -2-13 mumol/g wet weight of muscle. The heat production was 6549 +/- 408 mJ/mmol Ct (mean and S.E. of mean) which is equivalent to about 110 mJ/g. 6. About 30% of the observed energy output is unaccounted for by measured metabolic changes. 7. The ratio of heat production (corrected for small amounts of glycolytic activity) to phosphocreatine hydrolysis was -49-7 +/- 5-6 kJ/mol (mean and S.E. of mean), in agreement with previous results using comparable contractions of frog muscle, but different from the enthalpy change associated with phosphocreatine hydrolysis under in vivo conditions (-34 kJ/mol). 8. The results support the notion that the discrepancy between energy output and metabolism is an indication of an unidentified process of substantial energetic significance that is common to a number of species. PMID:978498

  10. Phosphocreatine kinetics at the onset of contractions in skeletal muscle of MM creatine kinase knockout mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Brian B.; Meyer, Ronald A.; Wiseman, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Phosphocreatine (PCr) depletion during isometric twitch stimulation at 5 Hz was measured by (31)P-NMR spectroscopy in gastrocnemius muscles of pentobarbital-anesthetized MM creatine kinase knockout (MMKO) vs. wild-type C57B (WT) mice. PCr depletion after 2 s of stimulation, estimated from the difference between spectra gated to times 200 ms and 140 s after 2-s bursts of contractions, was 2.2 +/- 0.6% of initial PCr in MMKO muscle vs. 9.7 +/- 1.6% in WT muscles (mean +/- SE, n = 7, P < 0.001). Initial PCr/ATP ratio and intracellular pH were not significantly different between groups, and there was no detectable change in intracellular pH or ATP in either group after 2 s. The initial difference in net PCr depletion was maintained during the first minute of continuous 5-Hz stimulation. However, there was no significant difference in the quasi-steady-state PCr level approached after 80 s (MMKO 36.1 +/- 3.5 vs. WT 35.5 +/- 4.4% of initial PCr; n = 5-6). A kinetic model of ATPase, creatine kinase, and adenylate kinase fluxes during stimulation was consistent with the observed PCr depletion in MMKO muscle after 2 s only if ADP-stimulated oxidative phosphorylation was included in the model. Taken together, the results suggest that cytoplasmic ADP more rapidly increases and oxidative phosphorylation is more rapidly activated at the onset of contractions in MMKO compared with WT muscles.

  11. Muscle-Type Specific Autophosphorylation of CaMKII Isoforms after Paced Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Eilers, Wouter; Gevers, Wouter; van Overbeek, Daniëlle; de Haan, Arnold; Jaspers, Richard T.; Hilbers, Peter A.; van Riel, Natal; Flück, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We explored to what extent isoforms of the regulator of excitation-contraction and excitation-transcription coupling, calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) contribute to the specificity of myocellular calcium sensing between muscle types and whether concentration transients in its autophosphorylation can be simulated. CaMKII autophosphorylation at Thr287 was assessed in three muscle compartments of the rat after slow or fast motor unit-type stimulation and was compared against a computational model (CaMuZclE) coupling myocellular calcium dynamics with CaMKII Thr287 phosphorylation. Qualitative differences existed between fast- (gastrocnemius medialis) and slow-type muscle (soleus) for the expression pattern of CaMKII isoforms. Phospho-Thr287 content of δA CaMKII, associated with nuclear functions, demonstrated a transient and compartment-specific increase after excitation, which contrasted to the delayed autophosphorylation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated βM CaMKII. In soleus muscle, excitation-induced δA CaMKII autophosphorylation demonstrated frequency dependence (P = 0.02). In the glycolytic compartment of gastrocnemius medialis, CaMKII autophosphorylation after excitation was blunted. In silico assessment emphasized the importance of mitochondrial calcium buffer capacity for excitation-induced CaMKII autophosphorylation but did not predict its isoform specificity. The findings expose that CaMKII autophosphorylation with paced contractions is regulated in an isoform and muscle type-specific fashion and highlight properties emerging for phenotype-specific regulation of CaMKII. PMID:25054156

  12. Triclosan impairs excitation-contraction coupling and Ca2+ dynamics in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, Gennady; Zhang, Rui; Bannister, Roger A; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Li, Ning; Fritsch, Erika B; Feng, Wei; Barrientos, Genaro C; Schebb, Nils H; Hammock, Bruce D; Beam, Kurt G; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Pessah, Isaac N

    2012-08-28

    Triclosan (TCS), a high-production-volume chemical used as a bactericide in personal care products, is a priority pollutant of growing concern to human and environmental health. TCS is capable of altering the activity of type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), but its potential to influence physiological excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) and muscle function has not been investigated. Here, we report that TCS impairs ECC of both cardiac and skeletal muscle in vitro and in vivo. TCS acutely depresses hemodynamics and grip strength in mice at doses ≥12.5 mg/kg i.p., and a concentration ≥0.52 μM in water compromises swimming performance in larval fathead minnow. In isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes, skeletal myotubes, and adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers TCS depresses electrically evoked ECC within ∼10-20 min. In myotubes, nanomolar to low micromolar TCS initially potentiates electrically evoked Ca(2+) transients followed by complete failure of ECC, independent of Ca(2+) store depletion or block of RyR1 channels. TCS also completely blocks excitation-coupled Ca(2+) entry. Voltage clamp experiments showed that TCS partially inhibits L-type Ca(2+) currents of cardiac and skeletal muscle, and [(3)H]PN200 binding to skeletal membranes is noncompetitively inhibited by TCS in the same concentration range that enhances [(3)H]ryanodine binding. TCS potently impairs orthograde and retrograde signaling between L-type Ca(2+) and RyR channels in skeletal muscle, and L-type Ca(2+) entry in cardiac muscle, revealing a mechanism by which TCS weakens cardiac and skeletal muscle contractility in a manner that may negatively impact muscle health, especially in susceptible populations.

  13. Skeletal Muscle Inflammation Following Repeated Bouts of Lengthening Contractions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Deyhle, Michael R.; Gier, Amanda M.; Evans, Kaitlyn C.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Parcell, Allen C.; Hyldahl, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating an adaptive process that protects the muscle from damage by subsequent bouts of exercise, a phenomenon called the repeated bout effect (RBE). The mechanisms underlying the RBE are not understood. We hypothesized that an attenuated inflammation response following a repeated bout of lengthening contractions (LC) would be coincidental with a RBE, suggesting a potential relationship. Fourteen men (n = 7) and women (n = 7) completed two bouts of lengthening contractions (LC) separated by 28 days. Muscle biopsies were taken before the first bout (B1) from the non-exercised leg, and from the exercised leg 2- and 27-d post-B1 and 2-d following the second bout (B2). A 29-plex cytokine array identified alterations in inflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry quantified inflammatory cell infiltration and major histocompatibility complex class 1 (MHC-1). Muscle soreness was attenuated in the days following B2 relative to B1, indicating a RBE. Intramuscular monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP1) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP10) increased following B2 relative to the pre-exercise sample (7–52 and 11–36 pg/ml, respectively p < 0.05). Interleukin 4 (IL4) decreased (26–13 pg/ml, p < 0.05) following B2 relative to the pre-exercise sample. Infiltration of CD68+ macrophages and CD8+ T-cells were evident following B2, but not B1. Moreover, CD8+ T-cells were observed infiltrating apparently necrotic muscle fibers. No changes in MHC-1 were found. We conclude that inflammation is not attenuated following a repeated bout of LC and that CD8+ T-cells may play a role in muscle adaptation following LC. Moreover, it appears that the muscle or the immune system becomes sensitized to an initial bout of damaging exercise such that inflammatory cell infiltration into the muscle is enhanced upon a repeated bout of damaging exercise. PMID:26793125

  14. History dependence of human muscle-fiber conduction velocity during voluntary isometric contractions

    PubMed Central

    Lateva, Zoia C.

    2011-01-01

    The conduction velocity (CV) of a muscle fiber is affected by the fiber's discharge history going back ∼1 s. We investigated this dependence by measuring CV fluctuations during voluntary isometric contractions of the human brachioradialis muscle. We recorded electromyogram (EMG) signals simultaneously from multiple intramuscular electrodes, identified potentials belonging to the same motor unit using EMG decomposition, and estimated the CV of each discharge from the interpotential interval. In 12 of 14 subjects, CV increased by ∼10% during the first second after recruitment and then fluctuated by about ±2% in a way that mirrored the fluctuations in the instantaneous firing rate. The CV profile could be precisely described in terms of the discharge history by a simple mathematical model. In the other two subjects, and one subject retested after cooling the arm, the CV fluctuations were inversely correlated with instantaneous firing rate. In all subjects, CV was additionally affected by very short interdischarge intervals (<25 ms): it was increased in doublets at recruitment, but decreased in doublets during continuous firing and after short interdischarge intervals in doubly innervated fibers. CV also exhibited a slow trend of about −0.05%/s that did not depend on the immediate discharge history. We suggest that measurements of CV fluctuations during voluntary contractions, or during stimulation protocols that involve longer and more complex stimulation patterns than are currently being used, may provide a sensitive approach for estimating the dynamic characteristics of ion channels in the human muscle-fiber membrane. PMID:21565985

  15. Role of muscle mass and mode of contraction in circulatory responses to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. F.; Snell, P. G.; Pettinger, W. A.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Taylor, W. F.; Hamra, M.; Graham, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The roles of the mode of contraction (dynamic or static) and active muscle mass in determining the cardiovascular response to exercise has been investigated experimentally in six normal men. Exercise consisted of static handgrip and dynamic handgrip exercise, and static and dynamic knee extension for a period of six minutes. Observed increases in mean arterial pressure after exercise were similar for each mode of contraction, but larger for knee extension than handgrip exercise. Cardiac output increased more for dynamic than for static exercise and for each mode more for knee exercise than for handgrip exercise. Systemic resistance was found to be lower for dynamic than for static exercise, and to decrease from resisting levels by about one third during dynamic knee extension. It is shown that the magnitude of cardiovascular response is related to active muscle mass, but is independent of the contraction mode. Equalization of cardiovascular response was achieved by proportionately larger increases in cardiac output during dynamic exercise. The complete experimental results are given in a table.

  16. Effects of stapedius-muscle contractions on the masking of auditory-nerve responses.

    PubMed

    Pang, X D; Guinan, J J

    1997-12-01

    There has been little exploration of the mechanisms by which stapedius muscle contractions reduce the masking of responses to high-frequency sounds by low-frequency sounds. To fill this gap in knowledge, controlled stapedius contractions were elicited with direct shocks in anesthetized cats, and measurements were made of the effects of these contractions on the masking of single auditory-nerve fibers and on the attenuation of middle-ear transmission. The results show that the stapedius-induced reductions of masking can be much larger than the attenuations of low-frequency sound. With a 300-Hz band of masking noise centered at 500 Hz, and signal tones at 6 or 8 kHz, unmasking effects over 40 dB were observed for sounds 100 dB SPL or less. The data suggest that much larger unmasking might occur. The observed unmasking can be explained completely by a linear stapedius-induced attenuation of sound transmission through the middle ear and a nonlinear growth rate of masking for auditory-nerve fibers. No central effects are required. It is argued that the reduction of the upward spread of masking is probably one of the most important functions of the stapedius muscle.

  17. Thin-film dielectric elastomer sensors to measure the contraction force of smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araromi, O.; Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Favre, M.; Giazzon, M.; Martin-Olmos, C.; Liley, M.; Shea, H.

    2015-04-01

    The development of thin-film dielectric elastomer strain sensors for the characterization of smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction is presented here. Smooth muscle disorders are an integral part of diseases such as asthma and emphysema. Analytical tools enabling the characterization of SMC function i.e. contractile force and strain, in a low-cost and highly parallelized manner are necessary for toxicology screening and for the development of new and more effective drugs. The main challenge with the design of such tools is the accurate measurement of the extremely low contractile cell forces expected as a result of SMC monolayer contraction (as low as ~ 100 μN). Our approach utilizes ultrathin (~5 μm) and soft elastomer membranes patterned with elastomer-carbon composite electrodes, onto which the SMCs are cultured. The cell contraction induces an in-plane strain in the elastomer membrane, predicted to be in the order 1 %, which can be measured via the change in the membrane capacitance. The cell force can subsequently be deduced knowing the mechanical properties of the elastomer membrane. We discuss the materials and fabrication methods selected for our system and present preliminary results indicating their biocompatibility. We fabricate functional capacitive senor prototypes with good signal stability over the several hours (~ 0.5% variation). We succeed in measuring in-plane strains of 1 % with our fabricated devices with good repeatability and signal to noise ratio.

  18. PPADS does not block contraction-induced prostaglandin E2 synthesis in cat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Jennifer L.; Hayes, Shawn G.; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2008-01-01

    Pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′-4-disulfonate (PPADS), a purinergic 2 (P2) receptor antagonist, has been shown to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in cats. In vitro, however, PPADS has been shown to block the production of prostaglandins, some of which play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex. Thus the possibility exists that PPADS blocks the exercise pressor reflex through a reduction in prostaglandin synthesis rather than through the blockade of P2 receptors. Using microdialysis, we collected interstitial fluid from skeletal muscle to determine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations during the intermittent contraction of the triceps surae muscle before and after a popliteal arterial injection of PPADS (10 mg/kg). We found that the PGE2 concentration increased in response to the intermittent contraction before and after the injection of PPADS (both, P < 0.05). PPADS reduced the pressor response to exercise (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the magnitude of PGE2 production during contraction (P = 0.48). These experiments demonstrate that PPADS does not block the exercise pressor reflex through a reduction in PGE2 synthesis. We suggest that PGE2 and P2 receptors play independent roles in stimulating the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:18790832

  19. Tianeptine's effects on spontaneous and Ca2+-induced uterine smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Oreščanin-Dušić, Zorana; Miljević, C D; Slavić, M; Nikolić-Kokić, A; Paskulin, R; Blagojević, D; Lečić-Toševski, D; Spasić, M B

    2012-06-01

    Tianeptine is a novel anti-depressant with an efficacy equivalent to that of classical anti-depressants. Additional beneficial effects include neuroprotection, anti-stress and anti-ulcer properties whose molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood but may involve changes in the anti-oxidant defence system. Herein, we have studied the effects of tianeptine on both contractile activity of isolated rat uteri and components of the endogenous anti-oxidative defence system. Tianeptine-induced dose-dependent inhibition of both spontaneous and Ca2+-induced contraction of uterine smooth muscle. The effect was more pronounced in the latter. Tianeptine treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities in spontaneous and Ca2+-stimulated uteri. A significant decrease in glutathione-reductase (GR) activity in both spontaneous and Ca2+-induced uterine contractions after tianeptine treatment indicated a reduction in reduced glutathione and consequently a shift toward a more oxidised state in the treated uteri. In spontaneously contracting uteri, tianeptine caused a decrease in copper-zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) activity. Tianeptine's anti-depressant effects may be accomplished by triggering a cascade of cellular adaptations including inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and an adequate anti-oxidative protection response. PMID:22849838

  20. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  1. Strength Training to Contraction Failure Increases Voluntary Activation of the Quadriceps Muscle Shortly After Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Elin Karin; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Andersen, Lars Louis; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The objective of this study was to investigate voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during one set of knee extensions performed until contraction failure in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. Design This was a cross-sectional study of 24 patients with total knee arthroplasty. One set of knee extensions was performed until contraction failure, using a predetermined 10 repetition maximum loading. In the operated leg, electromyographic (EMG) activity of the lateral and medial vastus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris muscles was recorded during the set. Muscle activity (%EMGmax) and median power frequency of the EMG power spectrum were calculated for each repetition decile (10%–100% contraction failure). Results Muscle activity increased significantly over contractions from a mean of 90.0 and 93.6 %EMGmax (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 99.3 and 105.5 %EMGmax at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.009 and 0.004). Median power frequency decreased significantly over contractions from a mean of 66.8 and 64.2 Hz (lateral vastus and medial vastus, respectively) at 10% contraction failure to 59.9 and 60.1 Hz at 100% contraction failure (P = 0.0006 and 0.0187). Conclusion In patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty, 10 repetition maximum–loaded knee extensions performed in one set until contraction failure increases voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle during the set. Clinical Trials Gov-identifier: NCT01713140 to the abstract to increase trial transparency. PMID:26339729

  2. A Comparison of Vaginal Pressures and Abdominal Muscle Thickness According to Childbirth Delivery Method during the Valsalva Maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haroo; Kak, Hwang-Bo; Kim, Boin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of childbirth delivery method on vaginal pressure and abdominal thickness during the Valsalva maneuver (VAL). [Subjects] Thirty healthy female volunteers (26–39 years of age) were selected for this research. Their delivery histories were: nulliparous 10, vaginal delivery 10, and Cesarean delivery 10. None of the participants had a history of incontinence. [Methods] In the crook-lying position, a perineometer probe was inserted into the vagina and the transducer was placed transversely on the right side of the body during the Valsalva maneuver. [Results] There were significant differences in the thickness of the transverses abdominis (TrA) between in all the groups rest and the Valsalva maneuver, and there were significant differences in the internus oblique (IO) in the nulliparous group. During the Valsalva maneuver, there were significant differences in the TrA between the nulliparous group and the vaginal delivery group, and there were significant differences in the IO between the nulliparous delivery group and the vaginal delivery group, and between the nulliparous group and the Cesarean section group. Delivery history changed vaginal pressure, and there were significant differences between the nulliparous group and the vaginal delivery group, and between the nulliparous group and the Cesarean delivery group. [Conclusion] Pregnancy and delivery method may affect pelvic floor and abdominal muscles during the Valsalva maneuver. PMID:24707104

  3. Role of dystroglycan in limiting contraction-induced injury to the sarcomeric cytoskeleton of mature skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Erik P.; Turk, Rolf; Willer, Tobias; Beltrán, Daniel; Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Peterson, Taylor A.; Engle, Jeffrey; Prouty, Sally; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Saito, Fumiaki; Anderson, Mary E.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a highly expressed extracellular matrix receptor that is linked to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. DG is critical for the function of skeletal muscle, and muscle with primary defects in the expression and/or function of DG throughout development has many pathological features and a severe muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, reduction in DG at the sarcolemma is a common feature in muscle biopsies from patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. However, the consequence of disrupting DG in mature muscle is not known. Here, we investigated muscles of transgenic mice several months after genetic knockdown of DG at maturity. In our study, an increase in susceptibility to contraction-induced injury was the first pathological feature observed after the levels of DG at the sarcolemma were reduced. The contraction-induced injury was not accompanied by increased necrosis, excitation–contraction uncoupling, or fragility of the sarcolemma. Rather, disruption of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton was evident as reduced passive tension and decreased titin immunostaining. These results reveal a role for DG in maintaining the stability of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton during contraction and provide mechanistic insight into the cause of the reduction in strength that occurs in muscular dystrophy after lengthening contractions. PMID:27625424

  4. Role of dystroglycan in limiting contraction-induced injury to the sarcomeric cytoskeleton of mature skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Turk, Rolf; Willer, Tobias; Beltrán, Daniel; Inamori, Kei-Ichiro; Peterson, Taylor A; Engle, Jeffrey; Prouty, Sally; Matsumura, Kiichiro; Saito, Fumiaki; Anderson, Mary E; Campbell, Kevin P

    2016-09-27

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a highly expressed extracellular matrix receptor that is linked to the cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. DG is critical for the function of skeletal muscle, and muscle with primary defects in the expression and/or function of DG throughout development has many pathological features and a severe muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, reduction in DG at the sarcolemma is a common feature in muscle biopsies from patients with various types of muscular dystrophy. However, the consequence of disrupting DG in mature muscle is not known. Here, we investigated muscles of transgenic mice several months after genetic knockdown of DG at maturity. In our study, an increase in susceptibility to contraction-induced injury was the first pathological feature observed after the levels of DG at the sarcolemma were reduced. The contraction-induced injury was not accompanied by increased necrosis, excitation-contraction uncoupling, or fragility of the sarcolemma. Rather, disruption of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton was evident as reduced passive tension and decreased titin immunostaining. These results reveal a role for DG in maintaining the stability of the sarcomeric cytoskeleton during contraction and provide mechanistic insight into the cause of the reduction in strength that occurs in muscular dystrophy after lengthening contractions.

  5. Ovine tracheal muscle contraction in vitro: inhibition by calcium channel blockers gallopamil and verapamil.

    PubMed

    Jackowski, J; Chapman, G A; Abraham, W M; Ahmed, T

    1993-01-01

    We compared the inhibitory effects of calcium channel blockers, gallopamil and verapamil on acetylcholine (Ach)-induced contractions of ovine tracheal muscle in vitro. Adult sheep were sacrificed and tracheal strips were obtained by cutting the single tracheal rings from the mid-trachea. Tracheal strips were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit solution and isometric tension measured upon stimulation with cumulative doses of Ach (10(-7) to 10(-4) M) without and after pretreatment with gallopamil (10(-7) to 10(-6) M) or verapamil (10(-6) to 10(-5) M). In untreated tissues, the mean concentration of Ach required to produce 50% of maximal response (EC50) was 4.3 x 10(-6) M Ach. Both gallopamil and verapamil inhibited the Ach-induced contractions of ovine tracheal smooth muscle, by shifting the dose-response curves to Ach to the right. EC50 Ach for gallopamil (10(-6) M) and verapamil (10(-6) M) was 2.6 x 10(-5) and 5.2 x 10(-6) M, respectively. Dose ratio defined as postantagonist EC50 Ach/control EC50 Ach, was 7.7 for gallopamil and 2.0 for verapamil. Thus, the inhibitory effect of gallopamil was approximately 4-fold more potent than that of verapamil. Gallopamil was 17-fold more potent than verapamil in relaxing precontracted tracheal strips. The dose of calcium antagonists required to produce 25% relaxation (EC25) of tracheal strips precontracted with 10(-4) Ach was 3.7 x 10(-5) M for verapamil and 2.2 x 10(-6) M for gallopamil. These results indicate that gallopamil is effective against Ach-induced contractions of ovine trachealis muscles, and is more potent than verapamil. PMID:8469817

  6. A Statistical Physicist's Approach to Biological Motion: From the the Kinesin Walk to Muscle Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamas

    1997-03-01

    It is demonstrated that a wide range of experimental results on biological motion can be successfully interpreted in terms of statistical physics motivated models taking into account the relevant microscopic details of motor proteins and allowing analytic solutions. Two important examples are considered, i) the motion of a single kinesin molecule along microtubules inside individual cells and ii) muscle contraction which is a macroscopic phenomenon due to the collective action of a large number of myosin heads along actin filaments. i) Recently individual two-headed kinesin molecules have been studied in in vitro motility assays revealing a number of their peculiar transport properties. Here we propose a simple and robust model for the kinesin stepping process with elastically coupled Brownian heads showing all of these properties. The analytic treatment of our model results in a very good fit to the experimental data and practically has no free parameters. ii) Myosin is an ATPase enzyme that converts the chemical energy stored in ATP molecules into mechanical work. During muscle contraction, the myosin cross-bridges attach to the actin filaments and exert force on them yielding a relative sliding of the actin and myosin filaments. In this paper we present a simple mechanochemical model for the cross-bridge interaction involving the relevant kinetic data and providing simple analytic solutions for the mechanical properties of muscle contraction, such as the force-velocity relationship or the relative number of the attached cross-bridges. So far the only analytic formula which could be fitted to the measured force-velocity curves has been the well known Hill equation containing parameters lacking clear microscopic origin. The main advantages of our new approach are that it explicitly connects the mechanical data with the kinetic data and the concentration of the ATP and ATPase products and as such it leads to new analytic solutions which agree extremely well with a

  7. Drebrin-like protein DBN-1 is a sarcomere component that stabilizes actin filaments during muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Butkevich, Eugenia; Bodensiek, Kai; Fakhri, Nikta; von Roden, Kerstin; Schaap, Iwan A T; Majoul, Irina; Schmidt, Christoph F; Klopfenstein, Dieter R

    2015-07-06

    Actin filament organization and stability in the sarcomeres of muscle cells are critical for force generation. Here we identify and functionally characterize a Caenorhabditis elegans drebrin-like protein DBN-1 as a novel constituent of the muscle contraction machinery. In vitro, DBN-1 exhibits actin filament binding and bundling activity. In vivo, DBN-1 is expressed in body wall muscles of C. elegans. During the muscle contraction cycle, DBN-1 alternates location between myosin- and actin-rich regions of the sarcomere. In contracted muscle, DBN-1 is accumulated at I-bands where it likely regulates proper spacing of α-actinin and tropomyosin and protects actin filaments from the interaction with ADF/cofilin. DBN-1 loss of function results in the partial depolymerization of F-actin during muscle contraction. Taken together, our data show that DBN-1 organizes the muscle contractile apparatus maintaining the spatial relationship between actin-binding proteins such as α-actinin, tropomyosin and ADF/cofilin and possibly strengthening actin filaments by bundling.

  8. The anatomy of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vertebrate skeletal muscle: its implications for excitation contraction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sommer, J R

    1982-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum in situ is an intricate tubular network that surrounds the contractile material in striated muscle cells. Its topographical relationship to other intracellular components, especially the myofibrils, is rather rigidly maintained by a cytoskeleton which enmeshes Z line material and sarcoplasmic reticulum and, ultimately, is anchored at the plasmalemma. As a result, the two main components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the junctional SR and the free SR, retain their typical location in the A band region and in the I band region, respectively. The junctional SR, which is thought to be the site for calcium storage and release for contraction, is, thus, always well within one micron of the regulatory proteins associated with the actin filaments. The junctional SR, a synonym for terminal cisterna applying to both skeletal and cardiac muscle, is generally held to be involved in the translation of the action potential into calcium release, mainly because of the close topographic apposition between the junctional SR and the plasmalemma, especially in skeletal muscle. This attractive structure-function correlation is challenged by the observation that in bird cardiac muscle 80% of the junctional SR is spacially far removed from plasmalemma, the site of electrical activity. This anomalous topography is not in conflict with the notion that translation of the action potential into calcium release may be accomplished by a differential transmitter substance, e.g. calcium. Any hypothesis dealing with this problem must account for the anatomy of the bird heart.

  9. Attenuation of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage conferred by maximal isometric contractions: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo C. R.; Denadai, Benedito S.

    2015-01-01

    Although, beneficial in determined contexts, eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) might be unwanted during training regimens, competitions and daily activities. There are a vast number of studies investigating strategies to attenuate EIMD response after damaging exercise bouts. Many of them consist of performing exercises that induce EIMD, consuming supplements or using equipment that are not accessible for most people. It appears that performing maximal isometric contractions (ISOs) 2–4 days prior to damaging bouts promotes significant attenuation of EIMD symptoms that are not related to muscle function. It has been shown that the volume of ISOs, muscle length in which they are performed, and interval between them and the damaging bout influence the magnitude of this protection. In addition, it appears that this protection is not long-lived, lasting no longer than 4 days. Although no particular mechanisms for these adaptations were identified, professionals should consider applying this non-damaging stimulus before submitting their patients to unaccustomed exercised. However, it seems not to be the best option for athletes or relatively trained individuals. Future, studies should focus on establishing if ISOs protect other populations (i.e., trained individuals) or muscle groups (i.e., knee extensors) against EIMD, as well as investigate different mechanisms for ISO-induced protection. PMID:26578972

  10. The Influence of Vibration on Muscle Activation and Rate of Force Development during Maximal Isometric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Brendan; Warman, Geoff; Purton, Jason; Doyle, Tim L A; Dugan, Eric

    2004-03-01

    At present there appears to be a need for research conducted on the effects of vibration on the contractile ability of skeletal muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50.42±1.16 Hz (acceleration 13.24 ± 0.18ms(-2): displacement ≈5mm) on muscular activation and maximal isometric contraction. Sixteen participants with a mean age, body mass, and height of 22 ± 4.4 years, 73.2 ± 11.7 kg and 173.1 ± 9.7 cms, respectively, were recruited for this study. Electromyography and accelerometry from the rectus femoris, and maximal isometric force data characteristics were collected from the dominant limb under conditions of vibration, and no-vibration. A superimposed 50 Hz vibration was used during the contraction phase for the maximal isometric leg extension for the condition of vibration. A one-way ANOVA revealed no significant (p > 0.05) differences between the vibration and no-vibration conditions for peak normalized EMGRMS (84.74% Vs 88.1%) values. An ANOVA revealed significant (p > 0.05) differences between the peak fundamental frequencies of the FFT between the conditions vibration (27.1 ± 12.2 Hz) and no-vibration (9.8 ± 3.5 Hz). Peak isometric force, peak rate of force development, rate of force development at times 0.05, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 seconds, and rate of force development at 50, 75, and 90% of peak force were not significantly different. The results of this study suggest that the application of vibration stimulation at 50 Hz during the contraction does not contribute to muscle activation, or enhance force production for maximal isometric contractions. Key PointsThe application of a vibratory stimulation to the human body increases the normal acceleration resulting in an increase in force and a change in performanceThis study was to address this issue by examining the effects of a direct superimposed muscle/tendon vibration at 50 Hz on isometric strength

  11. Airway smooth muscle in asthma: linking contraction and mechanotransduction to disease pathogenesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Noble, Peter B; Pascoe, Chris D; Lan, Bo; Ito, Satoru; Kistemaker, Loes E M; Tatler, Amanda L; Pera, Tonio; Brook, Bindi S; Gosens, Reinoud; West, Adrian R

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is an obstructive airway disease, with a heterogeneous and multifactorial pathogenesis. Although generally considered to be a disease principally driven by chronic inflammation, it is becoming increasingly recognised that the immune component of the pathology poorly correlates with the clinical symptoms of asthma, thus highlighting a potentially central role for non-immune cells. In this context airway smooth muscle (ASM) may be a key player, as it comprises a significant proportion of the airway wall and is the ultimate effector of acute airway narrowing. Historically, the contribution of ASM to asthma pathogenesis has been contentious, yet emerging evidence suggests that ASM contractile activation imparts chronic effects that extend well beyond the temporary effects of bronchoconstriction. In this review article we describe the effects that ASM contraction, in combination with cellular mechanotransduction and novel contraction-inflammation synergies, contribute to asthma pathogenesis. Specific emphasis will be placed on the effects that ASM contraction exerts on the mechanical properties of the airway wall, as well as novel mechanisms by which ASM contraction may contribute to more established features of asthma such as airway wall remodelling.

  12. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  13. High-Intensity Interval Training Alters ATP Pathway Flux During Maximal Muscle Contractions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ryan G.; Maynard, Logan; Kent, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim High-intensity interval training (HIT) results in potent metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the influence of these adaptations on energetics in vivo. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine the effects of HIT on ATP synthesis from net PCr breakdown (ATPCK), oxidative phosphorylation (ATPOX) and non-oxidative glycolysis (ATPGLY) in vivo in vastus lateralis during a 24-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Methods Eight young men performed 6 sessions of repeated, 30-s “all-out” sprints on a cycle ergometer; measures of muscle energetics were obtained at baseline, and after the first and sixth sessions. Results Training increased peak oxygen consumption (35.8±1.4 to 39.3±1.6 ml·min−1·kg−1, p=0.01) and exercise capacity (217.0±11.0 to 230.5±11.7 W, p=0.04) on the ergometer, with no effects on total ATP production or force-time integral during the MVC. While ATP production by each pathway was unchanged after the first session, 6 sessions increased the relative contribution of ATPOX (from 31±2 to 39±2% of total ATP turnover, p<0.001), and lowered the relative contribution from both ATPCK (49±2 to 44±1%, p=0.004) and ATPGLY (20±2 to 17±1%, p=0.03). Conclusion These alterations to muscle ATP production in vivo indicate that brief, maximal contractions are performed with increased support of oxidative ATP synthesis, and relatively less contribution from anaerobic ATP production following training. These results extend previous reports of molecular and cellular adaptations to HIT and show that 6 training sessions are sufficient to alter in vivo muscle energetics, which likely contributes to increased exercise capacity after short-term HIT. PMID:24612773

  14. Rapid biphasic arteriolar dilations induced by skeletal muscle contraction are dependent on stimulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mihok, Marika L; Murrant, Coral L

    2004-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that measurable changes in microvasculature dilation occur in response to a single short-duration tetanic contraction, we contracted three to five skeletal muscle fibres of the hamster cremaster muscle microvascular preparation (in situ) and evaluated the response of an arteriole overlapping the active muscle fibres. Arteriolar diameter (baseline diameter = 16.4 +/- 0.9 micro m, maximum diameter = 34.7 +/- 1.2 micro m) was measured before and after a single contraction resulting from a range of stimulus frequencies (4, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 Hz) within a 250- or 500-ms train. Four and 10 Hz produced a significant dilation at 2.9 +/- 0.4 and 6.5 +/- 2.8 s, respectively, within a 250-ms train and 3.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.1 +/- 1.3 s, respectively, within a 500-ms train. Biphasic dilations were observed within a 250-ms train at 20 Hz (at 3.9 +/- 0.9 and 22.1 +/- 4.3 s), 30 Hz (at 2.7 +/- 0.3 and 17.5 +/- 2.9 s), and 40 Hz (at 3.8 +/- 0.4 and 23.2 +/- 2.6 s) and within a 500-ms train at 20 Hz (at 4.8 +/- 0.4 and 31.9 +/- 3.8 s) and 30 Hz (at 3.4 +/- 0.3 and 27.6 +/- 3.0 s). A single dilation was observed within a 250-ms train at 60 Hz (at 5.1 +/- 0.7 s) and 80 Hz (at 14.2 +/- 3.3 s) and within a 500-ms train at 40 Hz (at 9.9 +/- 3.2 s), 60 Hz (at 7.9 +/- 2.1 s), and 80 Hz (at 13.4 +/- 4.0 s). We have shown that a single contraction ranging from a single twitch (4 Hz, 250 ms) to fused tetanic contractions produces significant arteriolar dilations and that the pattern of dilation is dependent on the stimulus frequency and train duration.

  15. Imaging mass spectrometry reveals fiber-specific distribution of acetylcarnitine and contraction-induced carnitine dynamics in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Manabe, Yasuko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Masuda, Kazumi; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2014-10-01

    Carnitine is well recognized as a key regulator of long-chain fatty acyl group translocation into the mitochondria. In addition, carnitine, as acetylcarnitine, acts as an acceptor of excess acetyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Here, we provide a new methodology for accurate quantification of acetylcarnitine content and determination of its localization in skeletal muscles. We used matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to visualize acetylcarnitine distribution in rat skeletal muscles. MALDI-IMS and immunohistochemistry of serial cross-sections showed that acetylcarnitine was enriched in the slow-type muscle fibers. The concentration of ATP was lower in muscle regions with abundant acetylcarnitine, suggesting a relationship between acetylcarnitine and metabolic activity. Using our novel method, we detected an increase in acetylcarnitine content after muscle contraction. Importantly, this increase was not detected using traditional biochemical assays of homogenized muscles. We also demonstrated that acetylation of carnitine during muscle contraction was concomitant with glycogen depletion. Our methodology would be useful for the quantification of acetylcarnitine and its contraction-induced kinetics in skeletal muscles.

  16. Whole-body electromyostimulation as a means to impact muscle mass and abdominal body fat in lean, sedentary, older female adults: subanalysis of the TEST-III trial

    PubMed Central

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; von Stengel, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of 12 months of whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) exercise on appendicular muscle mass and abdominal fat mass in subjects specifically at risk for sarcopenia and abdominal obesity, but unable or unwilling to exercise conventionally. Methods Forty-six lean, nonsportive (<60 minutes of exercise per week), elderly women (aged 75 ± 4 years) with abdominal obesity according to International Diabetes Federation criteria were randomly assigned to either a WB-EMS group (n=23) which performed 18 minutes of intermittent, bipolar WB-EMS (85 Hz) three sessions in 14 days or an “active” control group (n=23). Whole-body and regional body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry to determine appendicular muscle mass, upper leg muscle mass, abdominal fat mass, and upper leg fat mass. Maximum strength of the leg extensors was determined isometrically by force plates. Results After 12 months, significant intergroup differences were detected for the primary end-points of appendicular muscle mass (0.5% ± 2.0% for the WB-EMS group versus −0.8% ± 2.0% for the control group, P=0.025) and abdominal fat mass (−1.2% ± 5.9% for the WB-EMS group versus 2.4% ± 5.8% for the control group, P=0.038). Further, upper leg lean muscle mass changed favorably in the WB-EMS group (0.5% ± 2.5% versus −0.9% ± 1.9%, in the control group, P=0.033), while effects for upper leg fat mass were borderline nonsignificant (−0.8% ± 3.5% for the WB-EMS group versus 1.0% ± 2.6% for the control group, P=0.050). With respect to functional parameters, the effects for leg extensor strength were again significant, with more favorable changes in the WB-EMS group (9.1% ± 11.2% versus 1.0% ± 8.1% in the control group, P=0.010). Conclusion In summary, WB-EMS showed positive effects on the parameters of sarcopenia and regional fat accumulation. Further, considering the good acceptance of this technology by

  17. Tetanic contraction induces enhancement of fatigability and sarcomeric damage in atrophic skeletal muscle and its underlying molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Muscle unloading due to long-term exposure of weightlessness or simulated weightlessness causes atrophy, loss of functional capacity, impaired locomotor coordination, and decreased resistance to fatigue in the antigravity muscles of the lower limbs. Besides reducing astronauts' mobility in space and on returning to a gravity environment, the molecular mechanisms for the adaptation of skeletal muscle to unloading also play an important medical role in conditions such as disuse and paralysis. The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness on skeletal muscles and to induce muscle unloading in the rat hindlimb. Our series studies have shown that the maximum of twitch tension and the twitch duration decreased significantly in the atrophic soleus muscles, the maximal tension of high-frequency tetanic contraction was significantly reduced in 2-week unloaded soleus muscles, however, the fatigability of high-frequency tetanic contraction increased after one week of unloading. The maximal isometric tension of intermittent tetanic contraction at optimal stimulating frequency did not alter in 1- and 2-week unloaded soleus, but significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus. The 1-week unloaded soleus, but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL), was more susceptible to fatigue during intermittent tetanic contraction than the synchronous controls. The changes in K+ channel characteristics may increase the fatigability during high-frequency tetanic contraction in atrophic soleus muscles. High fatigability of intermittent tetanic contraction may be involved in enhanced activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) and switching from slow to fast isoform of myosin heavy chain, tropomyosin, troponin I and T subunit in atrophic soleus muscles. Unloaded soleus muscle also showed a decreased protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the reduction in nNOS-derived NO increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated

  18. Age affects the contraction-induced mitochondrial redox response in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Claflin, Dennis R; Jackson, Malcolm J; Brooks, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Compromised mitochondrial respiratory function is associated with advancing age. Damage due to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) with age is thought to contribute to the mitochondrial deficits. The coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its reduced (NADH) and oxidized (NAD(+)) forms plays an essential role in the cyclic sequence of reactions that result in the regeneration of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Monitoring mitochondrial NADH/NAD(+) redox status during recovery from an episode of high energy demand thus allows assessment of mitochondrial function. NADH fluoresces when excited with ultraviolet light in the UV-A band and NAD(+) does not, allowing NADH/NAD(+) to be monitored in real time using fluorescence microscopy. Our goal was to assess mitochondrial function by monitoring the NADH fluorescence response following a brief period of high energy demand in muscle from adult and old wild-type mice. This was accomplished by isolating whole lumbrical muscles from the hind paws of 7- and 28-month-old mice and making simultaneous measurements of force and NADH fluorescence responses during and after a 5 s maximum isometric contraction. All muscles exhibited fluorescence oscillations that were qualitatively similar and consisted of a brief transient increase followed by a longer transient period of reduced fluorescence and, finally, an increase that included an overshoot before recovering to resting level. Compared with the adult mice, muscles from the 28 mo mice exhibited a delayed peak during the first fluorescence transient and an attenuated recovery following the second transient. These findings indicate an impaired mitochondrial capacity to maintain NADH/NAD(+) redox homeostasis during contractile activity in skeletal muscles of old mice. PMID:25698975

  19. A circuit mechanism for the propagation of waves of muscle contraction in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Fushiki, Akira; Zwart, Maarten F; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Fetter, Richard D; Cardona, Albert; Nose, Akinao

    2016-01-01

    Animals move by adaptively coordinating the sequential activation of muscles. The circuit mechanisms underlying coordinated locomotion are poorly understood. Here, we report on a novel circuit for the propagation of waves of muscle contraction, using the peristaltic locomotion of Drosophila larvae as a model system. We found an intersegmental chain of synaptically connected neurons, alternating excitatory and inhibitory, necessary for wave propagation and active in phase with the wave. The excitatory neurons (A27h) are premotor and necessary only for forward locomotion, and are modulated by stretch receptors and descending inputs. The inhibitory neurons (GDL) are necessary for both forward and backward locomotion, suggestive of different yet coupled central pattern generators, and its inhibition is necessary for wave propagation. The circuit structure and functional imaging indicated that the commands to contract one segment promote the relaxation of the next segment, revealing a mechanism for wave propagation in peristaltic locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13253.001 PMID:26880545

  20. Smooth muscle modeling and experimental identification: application to bladder isometric contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforêt, Jérémy; Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Taillades, Hubert; Azevedo Coste, Christine

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an original smooth muscle model based on the Huxley microscopic approach. This model is the main part of a comprehensive lower urinary track model. The latter is used for simulation studies and is assessed through experiments on rabbits, for which a subset of parameters is estimated, using intravesical pressure measurements in isometric conditions. Bladder contraction is induced by electrical stimulation that determines the onset and thus synchronizes simulation and experimental data. Model sensitivity versus parameter accuracy is discussed and allows the definition of a subset of four parameters that must be accurately identified in order to obtain good fitting between experimental and acquired data. Preliminary experimental data are presented as well as model identification results. They show that the model is able to follow the pressure changes induced by an artificial stimulus in isometric contractions. Moreover, the model gives an insight into the internal changes in calcium concentration and the ratio of the different chemical species present in the muscle cells, in particular the bounded and unbounded actin and myosin and the normalized concentration of intracellular calcium.

  1. Identification of excitatory premotor interneurons which regulate local muscle contraction during Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Eri; Truman, James W.; Nose, Akinao

    2016-01-01

    We use Drosophila larval locomotion as a model to elucidate the working principles of motor circuits. Larval locomotion is generated by rhythmic and sequential contractions of body-wall muscles from the posterior to anterior segments, which in turn are regulated by motor neurons present in the corresponding neuromeres. Motor neurons are known to receive both excitatory and inhibitory inputs, combined action of which likely regulates patterned motor activity during locomotion. Although recent studies identified candidate inhibitory premotor interneurons, the identity of premotor interneurons that provide excitatory drive to motor neurons during locomotion remains unknown. In this study, we searched for and identified two putative excitatory premotor interneurons in this system, termed CLI1 and CLI2 (cholinergic lateral interneuron 1 and 2). These neurons were segmentally arrayed and activated sequentially from the posterior to anterior segments during peristalsis. Consistent with their being excitatory premotor interneurons, the CLIs formed GRASP- and ChAT-positive putative synapses with motoneurons and were active just prior to motoneuronal firing in each segment. Moreover, local activation of CLI1s induced contraction of muscles in the corresponding body segments. Taken together, our results suggest that the CLIs directly activate motoneurons sequentially along the segments during larval locomotion. PMID:27470675

  2. Computation of fractal features based on the fractal analysis of surface electromyogram to estimate force of contraction of different muscles.

    PubMed

    Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2014-01-01

    This research study investigates the fractal properties of surface Electromyogram (sEMG) to estimate the force levels of contraction of three muscles with different cross-sectional areas (CSA): m. quadriceps--vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, andm. flexor digitorum superficialis. The fractal features were computed based on the fractal analysis of sEMG, signal recorded while performing sustained muscle contraction at different force levels. A comparison was performed between the fractal features and five other features reported in the literature. Linear regression analysis was carried out to determine the relationship between the force of contraction (20-100%) and features of sEMG. The results from the coefficients of regression r² show that the new fractal feature, maximum fractal length of the signal has highest correlation (range 0.88-0.90) when compared with other features which ranges from 0.34 to 0.74 for the three different muscles. This study suggests that the estimation of various levels of sustained contraction of muscles with varied CSA will provide a better insight into the biomechanics model that involves muscle properties and muscle activation.

  3. Validity and Reliability of an Instrumented Speculum Designed to Minimize the Effect of Intra-abdominal Pressure on the Measurement of Pelvic Floor Muscle Strength

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Miller, James A.; Zielinski, Ruth; Miller, Janis M.; DeLancey, John O.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Existing clinical measurements of pelvic floor muscle strength are contaminated by crosstalk from intra-abdominal pressure. We tested an improved instrumented speculum designed to minimize this crosstalk. The hypotheses were that the speculum yields: 1) maximum vaginal closure forces unrelated to intra-abdominal pressure, 2) discriminatory validity between women who have strong vs. weak pelvic floor muscles, and 3) acceptable test-retest reliability. Methods Maximum voluntary vaginal closure force was measured in 40 incontinent women (20–77 years) using the improved instrumented speculum on two visits spaced one month apart. At the baseline visit, intra-abdominal pressure was also estimated via intra-vesical catheterization during the vaginal closure force measurement. Subjective estimate of pelvic floor muscle strength was also assessed using digital palpation by a skilled examiner to determine group placement as “strong” (n=31) or “weak” (n=9). Findings Vaginal closure force was not significantly correlated with intra-abdominal pressure (r = −.26, p = .109). The groups with subjectively scored strong and weak pelvic floor muscles differed significantly by mean [SD] maximum vaginal closure force (3.8 [1.7] vs. 1.9 [0.8] N respectively, p < .01.) Across both time points the mean vaginal closure force was 3.42 [1.67] N with a range of .68 to 9.05 N. Mean Visit 1 and Visit 2 vaginal closure force scores did not differ (3.41 [1.8] and 3.42 [1.6] N, respectively). The vaginal closure force repeatability coefficient was 3.1 N. Interpretation The improved speculum measured maximum vaginal closure force without evidence of crosstalk from intra-abdominal pressure, while retaining acceptable discriminant validity and repeatability. PMID:25307868

  4. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  5. Non–Ca2+-conducting Ca2+ channels in fish skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    Schredelseker, Johann; Shrivastav, Manisha; Dayal, Anamika; Grabner, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    During skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, membrane depolarizations activate the sarcolemmal voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1). CaV1.1 in turn triggers opening of the sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release channel (RyR1) via interchannel protein–protein interaction to release Ca2+ for myofibril contraction. Simultaneously to this EC coupling process, a small and slowly activating Ca2+ inward current through CaV1.1 is found in mammalian skeletal myotubes. The role of this Ca2+ influx, which is not immediately required for EC coupling, is still enigmatic. Interestingly, whole-cell patch clamp experiments on freshly dissociated skeletal muscle myotubes from zebrafish larvae revealed the lack of such Ca2+ currents. We identified two distinct isoforms of the pore-forming CaV1.1α1S subunit in zebrafish that are differentially expressed in superficial slow and deep fast musculature. Both do not conduct Ca2+ but merely act as voltage sensors to trigger opening of two likewise tissue-specific isoforms of RyR1. We further show that non-Ca2+ conductivity of both CaV1.1α1S isoforms is a common trait of all higher teleosts. This non-Ca2+ conductivity of CaV1.1 positions teleosts at the most-derived position of an evolutionary trajectory. Though EC coupling in early chordate muscles is activated by the influx of extracellular Ca2+, it evolved toward CaV1.1-RyR1 protein–protein interaction with a relatively small and slow influx of external Ca2+ in tetrapods. Finally, the CaV1.1 Ca2+ influx was completely eliminated in higher teleost fishes. PMID:20212109

  6. Age Related Differences in the Surface EMG Signals on Adolescent's Muscle during Contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin Ahamed, Nizam; Taha, Zahari; Alqahtani, Mahdi; Altwijri, Omar; Rahman, Matiur; Deboucha, Abdelhakim

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are differences in the amplitude of the EMG signal among five different age groups of adolescent's muscle. Fifteen healthy adolescents participated in this study and they were divided into five age groups (13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 years). Subjects were performed dynamic contraction during lifting a standard weight (3-kg dumbbell) and EMG signals were recorded from their Biceps Brachii (BB) muscle. Two common EMG analysis techniques namely root mean square (RMS) and mean absolute values (MAV) were used to find the differences. The statistical analysis was included: linear regression to examine the relationships between EMG amplitude and age, repeated measures ANOVA to assess differences among the variables, and finally Coefficient of Variation (CoV) for signal steadiness among the groups of subjects during contraction. The result from RMS and MAV analysis shows that the 17-years age groups exhibited higher activity (0.28 and 0.19 mV respectively) compare to other groups (13-Years: 0.26 and 0.17 mV, 14-years: 0.25 and 0.23 mV, 15-Years: 0.23 and 0.16 mV, 16-years: 0.23 and 0.16 mV respectively). Also, this study shows modest correlation between age and signal activities among all age group's muscle. The experiential results can play a pivotal role for developing EMG prosthetic hand controller, neuromuscular system, EMG based rehabilitation aid and movement biomechanics, which may help to separate age groups among the adolescents.

  7. Depolarization-contraction coupling in short frog muscle fibers. A voltage clamp study

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Short muscle fibers (1.5 mm) were dissected from hindlimb muscles of frogs and voltage clamped with two microelectrodes to study phenomena related to depolarization-contraction coupling. Isometric myograms obtained in response to depolarizing pulses of durations between 10 and 500 ms and amplitudes up to 140 mV had the following properties. For suprathreshold pulses of fixed duration (in the range of 20-100 ms), the peak tension achieved, the time to peak tension, and contraction duration increased as the internal potential was made progressively more positive. Peak tension eventually saturates with increasing internal potentials. For pulse durations of greater than or equal to 50 ms, the rate of tension development becomes constant for increasing internal potentials when peak tensions become greater than one-third of the maximum tension possible. Both threshold and maximum steepness of the relation between internal potential and peak tension depend on pulse duration. The relation between the tension-time integral and the stimulus amplitude-duration product was examined. The utility of this relation for excitation-contraction studies is based on the observation that once a depolarizing pulse configuration has elicited maximum tension, further increases in either stimulus duration or amplitude only prolong the contractile response, while the major portion of the relaxation phase after the end of a pulse is exponential, with a time constant that is not significantly affected by either the amplitude or the duration of the pulse. Hence, the area under the tension-response curve provides a measure of the availability to troponin of the calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to membrane depolarization. The results from this work complement those obtained in experiments in which intramembrane charge movements related to contractile activation were studied and those in which intracellular Ca++ transients were measured. PMID:6611386

  8. The effect of summation of contraction on acceleration signals in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Shima, Norihiro; Yabe, Kyonosuke

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of summation of contraction on acceleration signals in human skeletal muscle. The torque parameters of dorsiflexion and acceleration signals in the tibialis anterior muscle were measured during evoked isometric contractions. In an examination of two-pulse trains with different inter-pulse intervals, the torque and accelerometer responses to inter-pulse intervals of 10-100 ms were recorded. In an investigation of the effects of different numbers of stimuli, the torque and accelerometer responses to 1-8 pulses with a constant inter-pulse interval of 10 ms were recorded. The present study found that there was a difference in acceleration amplitude between the single-pulse and two-pulse trains with an inter-pulse interval of 10 ms but not two-pulse trains with an inter-pulse interval of 20 ms or more. In the investigation of different numbers of stimuli, we found a similar MMG amplitude across 2-8 pulses. Moreover, we observed that the maximal time to the peak acceleration signal was approximately 27 ms. In a comparison of torque parameters with acceleration signals, the present study clearly shows that acceleration amplitude is poorly correlated to changes in force parameters when the inter-pulse interval or the number of stimuli are increased. These results suggest that the absence of associated changes in acceleration peak is due to the long interval for the subsequent pulses relative to the time at which acceleration peak is achieved ( approximately 27 ms). These findings will provide useful information concerning the method for assessing summation of contraction with an accelerometer.

  9. Investigation of trunk muscle co-contraction and its association with low back pain development during prolonged sitting.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Nairn, Brian C; Drake, Janessa D M

    2013-08-01

    Previous work has shown muscle activation differences between chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls in sitting postures, and between asymptomatic individuals who do (PDs: pain developers) and do not (NPDs: non-pain developers) develop transient back pain during prolonged standing (as determined using a visual analog scale). The current study aimed to investigate differences in trunk muscle co-contraction between PD and NPD individuals over 2h of prolonged sitting. Ten healthy males sat continuously for 2h while performing tasks that simulated computer-aided-drafting; four were classified as PDs, and six as NPDs. Co-contraction indices were calculated from EMG data collected from eight trunk muscles bilaterally, and compared between pain groups and over time. PDs exhibited higher levels of co-contraction than NPDs. Additionally, co-contraction tended to increase over time, and was significantly correlated to pain development. The relationship between co-contraction and back pain development may actually be circular, in that it is both causal and adaptive: high co-contraction initially predisposes to pain development, following which co-contraction further increases in an attempt to alleviate the pain, and the cycle perpetuates. Further work will be required to elucidate the exact nature of this relationship, and to confirm the generalizability to other populations. PMID:23489715

  10. Desensitized morphological and cytokine response after stretch-shortening muscle contractions as a feature of aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Kashon, Michael L; Gu, Ja K; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2015-12-01

    Recovery from contraction-induced injury is impaired with aging. At a young age, the secondary response several days following contraction-induced injury consists of edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and segmental muscle fiber degeneration to aid in the clearance of damaged tissue and repair. This morphological response has not been wholly established at advanced age. Our aim was to characterize muscle fiber morphology 3 and 10 days following stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs) varying in repetition number (i.e. 0, 30, 80, and 150) for young and old rats. For muscles of young rats, muscle fiber degeneration was overt at 3 days exclusively after 80 or 150 SSCs and returned significantly closer to control values by 10 days. For muscles of old rats, no such responses were observed. Transcriptional microarray analysis at 3 days demonstrated that muscles of young rats differentially expressed up to 2144 genes while muscles of old rats differentially expressed 47 genes. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that cellular movement was a major biological process over-represented with genes that were significantly altered by SSCs especially for young rats. Protein levels in muscle for various cytokines and chemokines, key inflammatory factors for cell movement, increased 3- to 50-fold following high-repetition SSCs for young rats with no change for old rats. This age-related differential response was insightful given that for control (i.e. 0 SSCs) conditions, protein levels of circulatory cytokines/chemokines were increased with age. The results demonstrate ongoing systemic low-grade inflammatory signaling and subsequent desensitization of the cytokine/chemokine and morphological response to contraction-induced injury with aging - features which accompany age-related impairment in muscle recovery.

  11. Contraction-by-contraction VO2 and computer-controlled pump perfusion as novel techniques to study skeletal muscle metabolism in situ.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Andrés; Goodwin, Matthew L; Lai, Nicola; Cabrera, Marco E; McDonald, James R; Gladden, L Bruce

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop new techniques to 1) rapidly sample venous O(2) saturation to determine contraction-by-contraction oxygen uptake (Vo(2)), and 2) precisely control the rate and pattern of blood flow adjustment from one chosen steady state to another. An indwelling inline oximeter probe connected to an Oximetrix 3 meter was used to sample venous oxygen concentration ([O(2)]) (via fractional saturation of Hb with O(2)). Data from the Oximetrix 3 were filtered, deconvolved, and processed by a moving average second by second. Computer software and a program written in-house were used to control blood flow with a peristaltic pump. The isolated canine gastrocnemius muscle complex (GS) in situ was utilized to test these techniques. A step change in metabolic rate was elicited by stimulating GS muscles via their sciatic nerves (supramaximal voltage, 8 V; 50 Hz, 0.2-ms pulse width; train duration 200 ms) at a rate of either 1 contraction/2 s, or 2 contractions/3 s. With arterial [O(2)] maintained constant, blood flow and calculated venous [O(2)] were averaged over each contraction cycle and used in the Fick equation to calculate contraction-by-contraction Vo(2). About 5-8 times more data points were obtained with this method compared with traditional manual sampling. Software-controlled pump perfusion enabled the ability to mimic spontaneous blood flow on-kinetics (tau: 14.3 s) as well as dramatically speed (tau: 2.0 s) and slow (tau: 63.3 s) on-kinetics. These new techniques significantly improve on existing methods for mechanistically altering blood flow kinetics as well as accurately measuring muscle oxygen consumption kinetics during transitions between metabolic rates. PMID:20035064

  12. A Model for the Transient and Steady-State Mechanical Behavior of Contracting Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Julian, F. J.; Sollins, K. R.; Sollins, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    A model was developed which can simulate both the transient and steady-state mechanical behavior of contracting skeletal striated muscle. Thick filament cross-bridges undergo cycles of attachment to and detachment from thin filament sites. Cross-bridges can attach only while in the first of two stable states. Force is then generated by a transition to the second state after which detachment can occur. Cross-bridges are assumed to be connected to the thin filaments by an elastic element whose extension or compression influences the rate constants for attachment, detachment, and changes between states. The model was programmed for a digital computer and attempts made to match both the transient and the steady-state responses of the model to that of real muscle in two basic types of experiment: force response to sudden change in length and length response to sudden reduction of load from Po. Values for rate constants and other parameters were chosen to try to match the model's output to results from real muscles, while at the same time trying to accommodate structural and biochemical information. PMID:4836669

  13. A role of stretch-activated potassium currents in the regulation of uterine smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Iain L O; Heyman, Nathanael; Wu, Yi-ying; Barnett, Scott; Ulrich, Craig

    2011-06-01

    Rates of premature birth are alarming and threaten societies and healthcare systems worldwide. Premature labor results in premature birth in over 50% of cases. Preterm birth accounts for three-quarters of infant morbidity and mortality. Children that survive birth before 34 weeks gestation often face life-long disability. Current treatments for preterm labor are wanting. No treatment has been found to be generally effective and none are systematically evaluated beyond 48 h. New approaches to the treatment of preterm labor are desperately needed. Recent studies from our laboratory suggest that the uterine muscle is a unique compartment with regulation of uterine relaxation unlike that of other smooth muscles. Here we discuss recent evidence that the mechanically activated 2-pore potassium channel, TREK-1, may contribute to contraction-relaxation signaling in uterine smooth muscle and that TREK-1 gene variants associated with human labor and preterm labor may lead to a better understanding of preterm labor and its possible prevention. PMID:21642947

  14. Twitchin as a regulator of catch contraction in molluscan smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    FUNABARA, DAISUKE; KANOH, SATOSHI; SIEGMAN, MARION J.; BUTLER, THOMAS M.; HARTSHORNE, DAVID J.; WATABE, SHUGO

    2006-01-01

    Molluscan catch muscle can maintain tension for a long time with little energy consumption. This unique phenomenon is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of twitchin, a member of the titin/connectin family. The catch state is induced by a decrease of intracellular Ca2+ after the active contraction and is terminated by the phosphorylation of twitchin by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Twitchin, from the well-known catch muscle, the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of the mollusc Mytilus, incorporates three phosphates into two major sites D1 and D2, and some minor sites. Dephosphorylation is required for re-entering the catch state. Myosin, actin and twitchin are essential players in the mechanism responsible for catch during which force is maintained while myosin cross-bridge cycling is very slow. Dephosphorylation of twitchin allows it to bind to Factin, whereas phosphorylation decreases the affinity of the two proteins. Twitchin has been also been shown to be a thick filament-binding protein. These findings raise the possibility that twitchin regulates the myosin cross-bridge cycle and force output by interacting with both actin and myosin resulting in a structure that connects thick and thin filaments in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:16453161

  15. Mechanisms of excitation-contraction uncoupling relevant to activity-induced muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Graham D

    2009-06-01

    If the free [Ca2+] in the cytoplasm of a skeletal muscle fiber is raised substantially for a period of seconds to minutes or to high levels just briefly, it leads to disruption of the normal excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling process and a consequent long-lasting decrease in force production. It appears that the disruption to the coupling occurs at the triad junction, where the voltage-sensor molecules (dihydropyridine receptors) normally interact with and open the Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) in the adjacent sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This disruption results in inadequate release of SR Ca2+ upon stimulation. Such E-C uncoupling may underlie the long-duration low-frequency fatigue that can occur after various types of exercise, as well as possibly being a contributing factor to the muscle weakness in certain muscle diseases. The process or processes causing the disruption of the coupling between the voltage sensors and the release channels is not known with certainty, but might be associated with structural changes at the triad junction, possibly caused by activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease, micro-calpain.

  16. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction. PMID:9134906

  17. Excitation-contraction coupling in a pre-vertebrate twitch muscle: the myotomes of Branchiostoma lanceolatum.

    PubMed

    Benterbusch, R; Herberg, F W; Melzer, W; Thieleczek, R

    1992-09-01

    The segmented trunk muscle (myotome muscle) of the lancelet (Branchiostoma lanceolatum), a pre-vertebrate chordate, was studied in order to gain information regarding the evolution of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Myotome membrane vesicles could be separated on isopycnic sucrose gradients into two main fractions, probably comprising solitary microsomes and diads of plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Both fractions bound the dihydropyridine PN 200/110 and the phenylalkylamine (-)D888 (devapamil) while specific ryanodine binding was observed in the diad preparation only. Pharmacological effects on Ca2+ currents measured under voltage-clamp conditions in single myotome fibers included a weak block by the dihydropyridine nifedipine and a shift of the voltage dependences of inactivation and restoration to more negative potentials by (-)D888. After blocking the Ca2+ current by cadmium in voltage-clamped single fibers, the contractile response persisted and a rapid intramembrane charge movement could be demonstrated. Both responses exhibited a voltage sensitivity very similar to the one of the voltage-activated Ca2+ channels. Our biochemical and electrophysiological results indicate that the EC coupling mechanism of the protochordate myotome cell is similar to that of the vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber: Intracellular Ca2+ release, presumably taking place via the ryanodine receptor complex, is under control of the cell membrane potential. The sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels might serve as voltage sensors for this process.

  18. Inefficient functional sympatholysis is an overlooked cause of malperfusion in contracting skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Saltin, Bengt; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2012-01-01

    Contracting skeletal muscle can overcome sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis), which allows for a blood supply that matches the metabolic demand. This ability is thought to be mediated by locally released substances that modulate the effect of noradrenaline (NA) on the α-receptor. Tyramine induces local NA release and can be used in humans to investigate the underlying mechanisms and physiological importance of functional sympatholysis in the muscles of healthy and diseased individuals as well as the impact of the active muscles’ training status. In sedentary elderly men, functional sympatholysis and muscle blood flow are impaired compared to young men, but regular physical activity can prevent these age related impairments. In young subjects, two weeks of leg immobilization causes a reduced ability for functional sympatholysis, whereas the trained leg maintained this function. Patients with essential hypertension have impaired functional sympatholysis in the forearm, and reduced exercise hyperaemia in the leg, but this can be normalized by aerobic exercise training. The effect of physical activity on the local mechanisms that modulate sympathetic vasoconstriction is clear, but it remains uncertain which locally released substance(s) block the effect of NA and how this is accomplished. NO and ATP have been proposed as important inhibitors of NA mediated vasoconstriction and presently an inhibitory effect of ATP on NA signalling via P2 receptors appears most likely. PMID:22988143

  19. EMG control of a bionic knee prosthesis: exploiting muscle co-contractions for improved locomotor function.

    PubMed

    Dawley, James A; Fite, Kevin B; Fulk, George D

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the development and experimental evaluation of a volitional control architecture for a powered-knee transfemoral prosthesis that affords the amputee user with direct control of knee impedance using measured electromyogram (EMG) potentials of antagonist muscles in the residual limb. The control methodology incorporates a calibration procedure performed with each donning of the prosthesis that characterizes the co-contraction levels as the user performs volitional phantom-knee flexor and extensor contractions. The performance envelope for EMG control of impedance is then automatically shaped based on the flexor and extensor calibration datasets. The result is a control architecture that is optimized to the user's current co-contraction activity, providing performance robustness to variation in sensor placement or physiological changes in the residual-limb musculature. Experimental results with a single unilateral transfemoral amputee user demonstrate consistent and repeatable control performance for level walking at self-selected speed over a multi-week, multi-session period of evaluation.

  20. Microscopic feature extraction from optical sections of contracting cardiac muscle cells recorded at high speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Kenneth P.; Lake, David S.; Lubell, Bradford A.

    1991-05-01

    The rapid motion of microscopic features such as the cross-striations of contracting cardiac muscle cells are difficult to capture with conventional RS-170 video systems and image processing approaches. In this report, efforts to extract, enhance and analyze striation data from widefield optical sections of single contracting cells recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) video camera modified for high-speed RS-170 compatible operation are described. Each video field from the camera provides four 1/4 height images separated by 4 ms in time for a 240 Hz image acquisition rate. Data are continuously recorded on S-VHS video tape during each experiment. Selected image sequences are digitized field by field and stored in a computer system under automated software control. The four individual images in each video field are separated, geometrically corrected for time base error, and reassembled as a single sequence of images for interpretable visualization. The images are then processed with digital filters and gray scale expansion to preferentially enhance the cross-striations and minimize out of focus features. Regions within each image containing striations are identified and their positions determined and followed during the contraction cycle to obtain individual, regional and cellular sarcomere dynamics. This approach permits the critical evaluation of the magnitude, time course and uniformity of contractile function throughout the volume of a single cell with higher temporal and spatial resolutions than previously possible.

  1. Distinct Skeletal Muscle Gene Regulation from Active Contraction, Passive Vibration, and Whole Body Heat Stress in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Kimball, Amy L.; McHenry, Colleen L.; Suneja, Manish; Yen, Chu-Ling; Sharma, Arpit; Shields, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle exercise regulates several important metabolic genes in humans. We know little about the effects of environmental stress (heat) and mechanical stress (vibration) on skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical stress or systemic heat stress are often used in combination with many active exercise programs. We designed a method to deliver a vibration stress and systemic heat stress to compare the effects with active skeletal muscle contraction. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether active mechanical stress (muscle contraction), passive mechanical stress (vibration), or systemic whole body heat stress regulates key gene signatures associated with muscle metabolism, hypertrophy/atrophy, and inflammation/repair. Methods: Eleven subjects, six able-bodied and five with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) participated in the study. The six able-bodied subjects sat in a heat stress chamber for 30 minutes. Five subjects with SCI received a single dose of limb-segment vibration or a dose of repetitive electrically induced muscle contractions. Three hours after the completion of each stress, we performed a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis or soleus) to analyze mRNA gene expression. Results: We discovered repetitive active muscle contractions up regulated metabolic transcription factors NR4A3 (12.45 fold), PGC-1α (5.46 fold), and ABRA (5.98 fold); and repressed MSTN (0.56 fold). Heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05); while vibration induced FOXK2 (2.36 fold change; p < 0.05). Vibration similarly caused a down regulation of MSTN (0.74 fold change; p < 0.05), but to a lesser extent than active muscle contraction. Vibration induced FOXK2 (p < 0.05) while heat stress repressed PGC-1α (0.74 fold) and ANKRD1 genes (0.51 fold; p < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings support a distinct gene regulation in response to heat stress, vibration, and muscle contractions. Understanding these responses may assist in developing regenerative

  2. PDH activation during in vitro muscle contractions in PDH kinase 2 knockout mice: effect of PDH kinase 1 compensation.

    PubMed

    Dunford, Emily C; Herbst, Eric A; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Gittings, William; Inglis, J Greig; Vandenboom, Rene; LeBlanc, Paul J; Harris, Robert A; Peters, Sandra J

    2011-06-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) plays an important role in regulating carbohydrate oxidation in skeletal muscle. PDH is deactivated by a set of PDH kinases (PDK1, PDK2, PDK3, PDK4), with PDK2 and PDK4 being the most predominant isoforms in skeletal muscle. Although PDK2 is the most abundant isoform, few studies have examined its physiological role. The role of PDK2 on PDH activation (PDHa) at rest and during muscle stimulation at 10 and 40 Hz (eliciting low- and moderate-intensity muscle contractions, respectively) in isolated extensor digitorum longus muscles was studied in PDK2 knockout (PDK2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (n = 5 per group). PDHa activity was unexpectedly 35 and 77% lower in PDK2KO than WT muscle (P = 0.043), while total PDK activity was nearly fourfold lower in PDK2KO muscle (P = 0.006). During 40-Hz contractions, initial force was lower in PDK2KO than WT muscle (P < 0.001) but fatigued similarly to ∼75% of initial force by 3 min. There were no differences in initial force or rate of fatigue during 10-Hz contractions. PDK1 compensated for the lack of PDK2 and was 1.8-fold higher in PDK2KO than WT muscle (P = 0.019). This likely contributed to ensuring that resting PDHa activity was similar between the groups and accounts for the lower PDH activation during muscle contraction, as PDK1 is a very potent inhibitor of the PDH complex. Increased PDK1 expression appears to be regulated by hypoxia inducible factor-1α, which was 3.5-fold higher in PDK2KO muscle. It is clear that PDK2 activity is essential, even at rest, in regulation of carbohydrate oxidation and production of reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain. In addition, these results underscore the importance of the overall kinetics of the PDK isoform population, rather than total PDK activity, in determining transformation of the PDH complex and PDHa activity during muscle contraction. PMID:21411764

  3. Phorbol 12,13-Dibutyrate-Induced, Protein Kinase C-Mediated Contraction of Rabbit Bladder Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tanchun; Kendig, Derek M.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Smolock, Elaine M.; Moreland, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Contraction of bladder smooth muscle is predominantly initiated by M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of the Gq/11-phospholipase C β-protein kinase C (PKC) and the G12/13-RhoGEF-Rho kinase (ROCK) pathways. However, these pathways and their downstream effectors are not well understood in bladder smooth muscle. We used phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), and 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (DOG), activators of PKC, in this investigation. We were interested in dissecting the role(s) of PKC and to clarify the signaling pathways in bladder smooth muscle contraction, especially the potential cross-talk with ROCK and their downstream effectors in regulating myosin light chain phosphatase activity and force. To achieve this goal, the study was performed in the presence or absence of the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis) or the ROCK inhibitor H-1152. Phosphorylation levels of Thr38-CPI-17 and Thr696/Thr850 myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) were measured during PDBu or DOG stimulation using site specific antibodies. PDBu-induced contraction in bladder smooth muscle involved both activation of PKC and PKC-dependent activation of ROCK. CPI-17 as a major downstream effector, is phosphorylated by PKC and ROCK during PDBu and DOG stimulation. Our results suggest that Thr696 and Thr850-MYPT1 phosphorylation are not involved in the regulation of a PDBu-induced contraction. The results also demonstrate that bladder smooth muscle contains a constitutively active isoform of ROCK that may play an important role in the regulation of bladder smooth muscle basal tone. Together with the results from our previous study, we developed a working model to describe the complex signaling pathways that regulate contraction of bladder smooth muscle. PMID:22232602

  4. AMP kinase activation with AICAR further increases fatty acid oxidation and blunts triacylglycerol hydrolysis in contracting rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela C; Bruce, Clinton R; Dyck, David J

    2005-06-01

    Muscle contraction increases glucose uptake and fatty acid (FA) metabolism in isolated rat skeletal muscle, due at least in part to an increase in AMP-activated kinase activity (AMPK). However, the extent to which AMPK plays a role in the regulation of substrate utilization during contraction is not fully understood. We examined the acute effects of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR; 2 mm), a pharmacological activator of AMPK, on FA metabolism and glucose oxidation during high intensity tetanic contraction in isolated rat soleus muscle strips. Muscle strips were exposed to two different FA concentrations (low fatty acid, LFA, 0.2 mm; high fatty acid, HFA, 1 mm) to examine the role that FA availability may play in both exogenous and endogenous FA metabolism with contraction and AICAR. Synergistic increases in AMPK alpha2 activity (+45%; P<0.05) were observed after 30 min of contraction with AICAR, which further increased exogenous FA oxidation (LFA: +71%, P<0.05; HFA: +46%, P<0.05) regardless of FA availability. While there were no changes in triacylglycerol (TAG) esterification, AICAR did increase the ratio of FA partitioned to oxidation relative to TAG esterification (LFA: +65%, P<0.05). AICAR significantly blunted endogenous TAG hydrolysis (LFA: -294%, P<0.001; HFA: -117%, P<0.05), but had no effect on endogenous oxidation rates, suggesting a better matching between TAG hydrolysis and subsequent oxidative needs of the muscle. There was no effect of AICAR on the already elevated rates of glucose oxidation during contraction. These results suggest that FA metabolism is very sensitive to AMPK alpha2 stimulation during contraction.

  5. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-Chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject’s hand. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM, RA, and EO during the curl-up. [Results] There was significantly lower EMG activity of the SCM during the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction compared to the traditional curl-up exercise. Conversely, the activity of the RA and EO muscles was significantly higher in the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction than in the traditional curl-up exercise. [Conclusion] Neck flexion restriction is recommended to prevent excessive activation of superficial cervical flexors during the curl-up exercise. PMID:26957735

  6. Investigation of motor unit recruitment during stimulated contractions of tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Mesin, L; Merlo, E; Merletti, R; Orizio, C

    2010-08-01

    This work investigated motor unit (MU) recruitment during transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) of the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle, using experimental and simulated data. Surface electromyogram (EMG) and torque were measured during electrically-elicited contractions at different current intensities, on eight healthy subjects. EMG detected during stimulation (M-wave) was simulated selecting the elicited MUs on the basis of: (a) the simulated current density distribution in the territory of each MU and (b) the excitation threshold characteristic of the MU. Exerted force was simulated by adding the contribution of each of the elicited MUs. The effects of different fat layer thickness (between 2 and 8mm), different distributions of excitation thresholds (random excitation threshold, higher threshold for larger MUs or smaller MUs), and different MU distributions within the muscle (random distribution, larger MU deeper in the muscle, smaller MU deeper) on EMG variables and torque were tested. Increase of the current intensity led to a first rapid increase of experimental M-wave amplitude, followed by a plateau. Further increases of the stimulation current determined an increase of the exerted force, without relevant changes of the M-wave. Similar results were obtained in simulations. Rate of change of conduction velocity (CV) and leading coefficient of the second order polynomial interpolating the force vs. stimulation level curve were estimated as a function of increasing current amplitudes. Experimental data showed an increase of estimated CV with increasing levels of the stimulation current (for all subjects) and a positive leading coefficient of force vs. stimulation current curve (for five of eight subjects). Simulations matched the experimental results only when larger MUs were preferably located deeper in the TA muscle (in line with a histochemical study). Marginal effect of MU excitation thresholds was observed, suggesting that MUs closer to the

  7. The inhibition of muscle contraction by adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate and by pyrophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Pate, E; Cooke, R

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the inhibition of the contraction of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle caused by ligands that bind to the ATPase site of myosin. Two ligands, adenosine 5' (beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate (AMPPNP) and pyrophosphate (PPi), decreased the force and stiffness developed in isometric contractions and the velocity of shortening of isotonic contractions. The force exerted by isometric fibers was measured as a function of MgATP in the presence and absence of a constant concentration of the ligands. As the MgATP concentration decreased, the inhibition of tension caused by the ligand increased, reaching approximately 50% at 25 microM MgATP and either 2 mM MgPPi or 2 mM MgAMPPNP. The maximum velocity of shortening was also measured as a function of MgATP concentration in the presence of 1 and 2 mM MgPPi and 2.5 and 5 mM MgAMPPNP. Both ligands acted as pure competitive inhibitors with Ki = 3.0 mM for PPi and 5.1 mM for MgAMPPNP. These data show that both ligands are weak inhibitors of the contraction of fibers. The results provided information on the energetics of actin-myosin-ligand states that occur in the portion of the cross-bridge cycle where MgATP binds to myosin. A simple analysis of the inhibition of velocity suggests that MgAMPPNP binds to the actomyosin complex at this step of the cycle with an effective affinity constant of approximately 2 X 10(2) M-1. PMID:2990586

  8. Local Muscle Metabolic Demand Induced by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation and Voluntary Contractions at Different Force Levels: A NIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Muthalib, Makii; Kerr, Graham; Nosaka, Kazunori; Perrey, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Functional Muscle metabolic demand during contractions evoked by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been consistently documented to be greater than voluntary contractions (VOL) at the same force level (10-50% maximal voluntary contraction-MVC). However, we have shown using a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique that local muscle metabolic demand is similar between NMES and VOL performed at MVC levels, thus controversy exists. This study therefore compared biceps brachii muscle metabolic demand (tissue oxygenation index-TOI and total hemoglobin volume-tHb) during a 10s isometric contraction of the elbow flexors between NMES (stimulation frequency of 30Hz and current level to evoke 30% MVC) and VOL at 30% MVC (VOL-30%MVC) and MVC (VOL-MVC) level in 8 healthy men (23-33-y). Greater changes in TOI and tHb induced by NMES than VOL-30%MVC confirm previous studies of a greater local metabolic demand for NMES than VOL at the same force level. The same TOI and tHb changes for NMES and VOL-MVC suggest that local muscle metabolic demand and intramuscular pressure were similar between conditions. In conclusion, these findings indicate that NMES induce a similar local muscle metabolic demand as that of maximal VOL. PMID:27478574

  9. Acetyl cholinesterase activity and muscle contraction in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus (Lamarck) following chronic phosphate exposure.

    PubMed

    Boettger, S Anne; McClintock, James B

    2012-03-01

    The common shallow-water sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus is capable of surviving inorganic phosphate exposures as high as 3.2 mg L(-1) and organic phosphate exposures of 1000 mg L(-1) . Nonetheless, chronic exposure to low, medium, and high-sublethal concentrations of organic phosphate inhibits the muscle enzyme acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), responsible for the break down of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, as well as inhibiting contractions in the muscles associated with the Aristotle's lantern. AChE activity, measured in both a static enzyme assay and by vesicular staining, displayed concentration-dependent declines of activity in individuals maintained in organic phosphate for 4 weeks. The activity of AChE was not adversely affected by exposure to inorganic phosphate or seawater controls over the same time period. Maximum force of muscle contraction and rates of muscle contraction and relaxation also decreased with chronic exposure to increasing concentrations of organic phosphate. Chronic exposure to inorganic phosphates elicited no response except at the highest concentration, where the maximum force of muscular contraction increased compared to controls. These findings indicate that shallow-water populations of Lytechinus variegatus subjected to organic phosphate pollutants may display impaired muscular activity that is potentially related to the inhibition of the muscle relaxant enzyme AChE, and subsequently muscular overstimulation, and fatigue.

  10. The effects of PGC-1α on control of microvascular P(O2) kinetics following onset of muscle contractions.

    PubMed

    Kano, Yutaka; Miura, Shinji; Eshima, Hiroaki; Ezaki, Osamu; Poole, David C

    2014-07-15

    During contractions, regulation of microvascular oxygen partial pressure (Pmv(O2)), which drives blood-myocyte O2 flux, is a function of skeletal muscle fiber type and oxidative capacity and can be altered by exercise training. The kinetics of Pmv(O2) during contractions in predominantly fast-twitch muscles evinces a more rapid fall to far lower levels compared with slow-twitch counterparts. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) improves endurance performance, in part, due to mitochondrial biogenesis, a fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that improvement of exercise capacity by genetic overexpression of PGC-1α would be associated with an altered Pmv(O2) kinetics profile of the fast-twitch (white) gastrocnemius during contractions toward that seen in slow-twitch muscles (i.e., slowed response kinetics and elevated steady-state Pmv(O2)). Phosphorescence quenching techniques were used to measure Pmv(O2) at rest and during separate bouts of twitch (1 Hz) and tetanic (100 Hz) contractions in gastrocnemius muscles of mice with overexpression of PGC-1α and wild-type littermates (WT) mice under isoflurane anesthesia. Muscles of PGC-1α mice exhibited less fatigue than WT (P < 0.01). However, except for the Pmv(O2) response immediately following onset of contractions, WT and PGC-1α mice demonstrated similar Pmv(O2) kinetics. Specifically, the time delay of the Pmv(O2) response was shortened in PGC-1α mice compared with WT (1 Hz: WT, 6.6 ± 2.4 s; PGC-1α, 2.9 ± 0.8 s; 100 Hz: WT, 3.3 ± 1.1 s, PGC-1α, 0.9 ± 0.3 s, both P < 0.05). The ratio of muscle force to Pmv(O2) was higher for the duration of tetanic contractions in PGC-1α mice. Slower dynamics and maintenance of higher Pmv(O2) following muscle contractions is not obligatory for improved fatigue resistance in fast-twitch muscle of PGC-1α mice. Moreover, overexpression of PGC-1α may accelerate O2 utilization

  11. Removal of visual feedback alters muscle activity and reduces force variability during constant isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Harsimran S; Patel, Bhavini K; Martinkewiz, Julie D; Vu, Julie; Christou, Evangelos A

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare force accuracy, force variability and muscle activity during constant isometric contractions at different force levels with and without visual feedback and at different feedback gains. In experiment 1, subjects were instructed to accurately match the target force at 2, 15, 30, 50, and 70% of their maximal isometric force with abduction of the index finger and maintain their force even in the absence of visual feedback. Each trial lasted 22 s and visual feedback was removed from 8-12 to 16-20 s. Each subject performed 6 trials at each target force, half with visual gain of 51.2 pixels/N and the rest with a visual gain of 12.8 pixels/N. Force error was calculated as the root mean square error of the force trace from the target line. Force variability was quantified as the standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CVF) of the force trace. The EMG activity of the agonist (first dorsal interosseus; FDI) was measured with bipolar surface electrodes placed distal to the innervation zone. Independent of visual gain and force level, subjects exhibited lower force error with the visual feedback condition (2.53 +/- 2.95 vs. 2.71 +/- 2.97 N; P < 0.01); whereas, force variability was lower when visual feedback was removed (CVF: 4.06 +/- 3.11 vs. 4.47 +/- 3.14, P < 0.01). The EMG activity of the FDI muscle was higher during the visual feedback condition and this difference increased especially at higher force levels (70%: 370 +/- 149 vs. 350 +/- 143 microV, P < 0.01). Experiment 2 examined whether the findings of experiment 1 were driven by the higher force levels and proximity in the gain of visual feedback. Subjects performed constant isometric contractions with the abduction of the index finger at an absolute force of 2 N, with two distinct feedback gains of 15 and 3,000 pixels/N. In agreement with the findings of experiment 1, subjects exhibited lower force error in the presence of visual feedback especially when the feedback

  12. A neuroprosthesis for tremor management through the control of muscle co-contraction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathological tremor is the most prevalent movement disorder. Current treatments do not attain a significant tremor reduction in a large proportion of patients, which makes tremor a major cause of loss of quality of life. For instance, according to some estimates, 65% of those suffering from upper limb tremor report serious difficulties during daily living. Therefore, novel forms for tremor management are required. Since muscles intrinsically behave as a low pass filter, and tremor frequency is above that of volitional movements, the authors envisioned the exploitation of these properties as a means of developing a novel treatment alternative. This treatment would rely on muscle co-contraction for tremor management, similarly to the strategy employed by the intact central nervous system to stabilize a limb during certain tasks. Methods We implemented a neuroprosthesis that regulated the level of muscle co-contraction by injecting current at a pair of antagonists through transcutaneous neurostimulation. Co-contraction was adapted to the instantaneous parameters of tremor, which were estimated from the raw recordings of a pair of solid state gyroscopes with a purposely designed adaptive algorithm. For the experimental validation, we enrolled six patients suffering from parkinsonian or essential tremor of different severity, and evaluated the effect of the neuroprosthesis during standard tasks employed for neurological examination. Results The neuroprosthesis attained significant attenuation of tremor (p<0.001), and reduced its amplitude up to a 52.33±25.48%. Furthermore, it alleviated both essential and parkinsonian tremor in spite of their different etiology and symptomatology. Tremor severity was not a limiting factor on the performance of the neuroprosthesis, although there was a subtle trend towards larger attenuation of more severe tremors. Tremor frequency was not altered during neurostimulation, as expected from the central origin of Parkinson

  13. Muscle Contraction Velocity: A Suitable Approach to Analyze the Functional Adaptations in Elite Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Loturco, Irineu; Pereira, Lucas A.; Kobal, Ronaldo; Kitamura, Katia; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Zanetti, Vinicius; Abad, Cesar C. Cal; Nakamura, Fabio Y.

    2016-01-01

    Tensiomyography (TMG) has been used as a simple and non-invasive tool to assess the mechanical properties of skeletal muscles. The TMG-derived velocity of contraction (Vc), which can be calculated from the ratio between maximal radial displacement and the sum of contraction time and delay time, has been proposed for evaluating athletes. However, its sensitivity to training effects and possible relation with changes in soccer players’ neuromuscular performance have not yet been addressed. To test this possibility, twenty-two male Brazilian elite soccer players were assessed using TMG-derived Vc, unloaded squat jump, countermovement jump and drop jump at 45 cm, loaded jump squat and linear (20 m) and change of direction (COD) sprint tests, prior to and after an 8-week period, between two consecutive official tournaments, during which the concurrency between endurance and strength-power training commonly impairs neuromuscular capacities. Magnitude-based inference was used to detect meaningful training effects. From pre- to post-tests, it was observed likely to almost certainly improvements in all modes of jumping tests. In addition, we could verify decrements in the 20-m and COD sprint performances, which were rated as very likely and almost certainly, respectively. Finally, both rectus femoris and biceps femoris muscles presented a likely reduction in Vc. Therefore, chronic decreases in sprinting speed are possibly accompanied by a reduced TMG-derived Vc. From a practical standpoint, the TMG-derived Vc can be used to monitor negative specific-soccer training effects related to potential impairments in maximum speed. Key points Tensiomyography (TMG) can be considered a useful technology for coaches and sport scientists seeking for non-invasive and practical tools to assess the muscle function of elite athletes; Velocity of contraction (Vc) is a single index able to integrate several of the reliable mechanical outcomes provided by TMG, which was shown to be sensitive

  14. Activation of protein kinase C accelerates contraction kinetics of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Peiper, U; Knipp, S C; Thies, B; Henke, R

    1996-01-01

    Contraction kinetics of isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle were studied by analysing the increase of force subsequent to force-inhibiting passive length changes lasting 1 s (100 Hz, sinus, 5% of muscle length). Compared with carbachol activation, phorboldibutyrate (PDBu)-induced stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) demonstrated no significant difference in the extent of force development in the polarized preparation [mean peak force 9.16 +/- 0.37 mN (carbachol) vs. 9.12 +/- 0.37 mN (PDBu)]. However, the time constant calculated for the slow component of post-vibration force recovery was 6.40 +/- 0.29 s after addition of PDBu vs. 22.39 +/- 1.40 s during carbachol activation, indicating a significant phorbol ester-induced acceleration of the cross-bridge cycling rate. In the K-depolarized preparation, treatment with 26.4 microM indolactam (IL) to activate PKC produced muscle relaxation (9.94 +/- 0.16 mN measured 0-30 min after the onset of depolarization vs. 4.13 +/- 0.05 mN measured during 30-60 min of IL treatment). Again, even in the presence of high sarcoplasmic Ca2+ resulting from tonic depolarization, PKC activation was associated with a distinct diminution of the time constant (25.99 +/- 0.79 s during the first 30 min of depolarization vs. 10.32 +/- 0.21 s during 30-60 min of IL treatment). In contrast, addition of 0.035 microM verapamil, 1.5 microM isoproterenol, and 32 microM dibutyryl-cAMP to the bathing medium induced relaxation without affecting the rate of post-vibration force recovery. The results suggest that the calcium-dependent signal cascade (agonist receptor/inositol trisphosphate/ Ca(2+)-calmodulin/myosin light chain kinase) hardly affects the regulation of contraction kinetics in the tonically activated intact smooth muscle preparation. PKC stimulation, however, accelerates actin/myosin interaction kinetics, possibly by inhibition of phosphatase(s).

  15. Fatigability and recovery of arm muscles with advanced age for dynamic and isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tejin; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Hunter, Sandra K

    2013-02-01

    This study determined whether age-related mechanisms can increase fatigue of arm muscles during maximal velocity dynamic contractions, as it occurs in the lower limb. We compared elbow flexor fatigue of young (n=10, 20.8±2.7 years) and old men (n=16, 73.8±6.1 years) during and in recovery from a dynamic and an isometric postural fatiguing task. Each task was maintained until failure while supporting a load equivalent to 20% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess supraspinal fatigue (superimposed twitch, SIT) and muscle relaxation. Time to failure was longer for the old men than for the young men for the isometric task (9.5±3.1 vs. 17.2±7.0 min, P=0.01) but similar for the dynamic task (6.3±2.4 min vs. 6.0±2.0 min, P=0.73). Initial peak rate of relaxation was slower for the old men than for the young men, and was associated with a longer time to failure for both tasks (P<0.05). Low initial power during elbow flexion was associated with the greatest difference (reduction) in time to failure between the isometric task and the dynamic task (r=-0.54, P=0.015). SIT declined after both fatigue tasks similarly with age, although the recovery of SIT was associated with MVIC recovery for the old (both sessions) but not for the young men. Biceps brachii and brachioradialis EMG activity (% MVIC) of the old men were greater than that of the young men during the dynamic fatiguing task (P<0.05), but were similar during the isometric task. Muscular mechanisms and greater relative muscle activity (EMG activity) explain the greater fatigue during the dynamic task for the old men compared with the young men in the elbow flexor muscles. Recovery of MVC torque however relies more on the recovery of supraspinal fatigue among the old men than among the young men.

  16. The influence of confounding factors on the relationship between muscle contraction level and MF and MPF values of EMG signal: a review.

    PubMed

    Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to gather results of studies on the relationship between median frequency (MF) and mean power frequency (MPF) and the level of muscle contraction, and to use those results to discuss the differences in the trends according to factors related to measurement technique and subject. Twenty-one studies with 63 cases for upper limb muscles and nine studies with 31 cases for lower limb muscles were analysed. Most results showed an increase in parameters with an increased level of muscle contraction, only some studies showed a decrease. The influence on parameters of the level of muscle contraction and factors such as subjects, type of contraction, muscle length and electrodes was analysed for each muscle. It was concluded that when analysing the influence of different factors on MF and MPF, because those factors interact they should be considered together, not separately.

  17. Less indication of muscle damage in the second than initial electrical muscle stimulation bout consisting of isometric contractions of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael R; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    This study compared the first and second exercise bouts consisting of electrically evoked isometric contractions for muscle damage profile. Nine healthy men (31 +/- 4 years) had two electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) bouts separated by 2 weeks. The knee extensors of one leg were stimulated by biphasic rectangular pulses (75 Hz, 400 mus, on-off ratio 5-15 s) at the knee joint angle of 100 degrees (0 degrees , full extension) to induce 40 isometric contractions, while the current amplitude was increased to maintain maximal force generation. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of the knee extensors at 100 degrees , muscle soreness, pressure pain threshold and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were used as indirect markers of muscle damage, and measured before and 1, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after EMS bout, and the changes over time were compared between bouts. The torque produced during exercise was approximately 30% of MVC, and no significant difference between bouts was evident for the changes in peak and average torque over 40 contractions. MVC decreased significantly (P < 0.05) by 26% immediately and 1 h after both bouts, but the recovery was significantly (P < 0.05) faster after the second bout (100% at 96 h) compared with the first bout (81% at 96 h). Development of muscle soreness and tenderness, and increases in plasma CK activity were significantly (P < 0.05) smaller after the second than the first bout. These results show that changes in muscle damage markers were attenuated in the second EMS bout compared with the initial EMS bout.

  18. Oxidative stress exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation in rats with hypertension induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Koba, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Kano, Naoko; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle contraction stimulates thin fiber muscle afferents and evokes reflex sympathoexcitation. In hypertension, this reflex is exaggerated. ANG II, which is elevated in hypertension, has been reported to trigger the production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that increased ANG II in hypertension exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation by inducing oxidative stress in the muscle. In rats, subcutaneous infusion of ANG II at 450 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 14 days significantly (P < 0.05) elevated blood pressure compared with sham-operated (sham) rats. Electrically induced 30-s hindlimb muscle contraction in decerebrate rats with hypertension evoked larger renal sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses [+1,173 ± 212 arbitrary units (AU) and +35 ± 5 mmHg, n = 10] compared with sham normotensive rats (+419 ± 103 AU and +13 ± 2 mmHg, n = 11). Tempol, a SOD mimetic, injected intra-arterially into the hindlimb circulation significantly reduced responses in hypertensive rats, whereas this compound had no effect on responses in sham rats. Tiron, another SOD mimetic, also significantly reduced reflex renal sympathetic and pressor responses in a subset of hypertensive rats (n = 10). Generation of muscle superoxide, as evaluated by dihydroethidium staining, was increased in hypertensive rats. RT-PCR and immunoblot experiments showed that mRNA and protein for gp91(phox), a NADPH oxidase subunit, in skeletal muscle tissue were upregulated in hypertensive rats. Taken together, hese results suggest that increased ANG II in hypertension induces oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, thereby exaggerating the muscle reflex.

  19. Effects of the hold and relax-agonist contraction technique on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to verify the effects of the hold relax-agonist contraction and passive straight leg raising techniques on muscle activity, fatigue, and range of motion of the hip joint after the induction of delayed onset muscle soreness in the hamstring muscle. [Subjects] Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a hold relax-agonist contraction group and a passive straight leg raising group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group underwent hold relax-agonist contraction at the hamstring muscle, while subjects in the control group underwent passive straight leg raising at the hamstring muscle. [Results] Subjects in the hold relax-agonist contraction group showed a significant increase in hamstring muscle activity and hip joint angle and a significant decrease in muscle fatigue. In the passive straight leg raising group, the hip joint angle increased significantly after the intervention. In the hold relax-agonist contraction group, hamstring muscle activity increased significantly and muscle fatigue decreased significantly. [Conclusion] We conclude that the hold relax-agonist contraction technique may be beneficial for improving muscle activation and decreasing muscle fatigue. PMID:26644691

  20. Surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle relieves chronic tension-type headache caused by tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle in patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    Proprioceptively innervated intramuscular connective tissues in Müller's muscle function as exterior mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the levator and occipitofrontalis muscles. In aponeurotic blepharoptosis, since the levator aponeurosis is disinserted from the tarsus, stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle is increased even on primary gaze to induce phasic and tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. It was hypothesised that in certain patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, the presence of tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle due to the sensitised mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle, can cause chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) associated with occipitofrontalis tenderness. To verify this hypothesis, this study evaluated (1) what differentiates patients with CTTH from patients without CTTH, (2) how pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres as a method for desensitising the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle affects electromyographic activity of the frontalis muscle, and (3) how surgical aponeurotic reinsertion to desensitise the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle electromyographically or subjectively affects activities of the occipitofrontalis muscle or CTTH. It was found that patients had sustained CTTH when light eyelid closure did not markedly reduce eyebrow elevation. However, pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres or surgery to desensitise the mechanoreceptor electromyographically reduced the tonic contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle on primary gaze and subjectively relieved aponeurotic blepharoptosis-associated CTTH. Over-stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle on primary gaze may induce CTTH due to tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. Therefore, surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appears to relieve CTTH.

  1. Effect of pressure and timing of contraction on human rib cage muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, L; Fitting, J W; Majani, U; Fracchia, C; Rampulla, C; Grassino, A

    1993-04-01

    Breathing against inspiratory loads can be accomplished with different degrees of coupling between the diaphragm and the other muscles attached to the rib cage (RCM). Thus, the electromyographic signs of fatigue develop separately in each muscle group. While breathing with diaphragm emphasis, the occurrence of diaphragmatic fatigue was found to be related to the tension-time index TTdi (= Pdi/Pdimax x Ti/Ttot). Above the critical range of 0.15 to 0.18, the endurance of the diaphragm is less than 1 h and it is inversely related to the TTdi value. However, in most loaded breathing conditions, the spontaneous pattern of breathing is characterized by predominant activation of RCM. The tension-time conditions at which fatigue develops during breathing with RCM emphasis are not known. We assessed the critical tension-time value in four normal subjects breathing with RCM emphasis against inspiratory threshold loads. RCM predominance was achieved by developing negative abdominal pressure swings during inspiration, and it was characterized by the tension-time index TTrc (Ppl/Pplmax x Tl/Ttot), where Ppl is pleural pressure developed under this condition. Above a critical TTrc value of 0.30, endurance time was inversely related to TTrc, and it resulted from failure of the RCM rather than of the diaphragm. We conclude that the critical threshold, as assessed by TTrc, is higher for breathing patterns with RCM emphasis than previously described by TTdi for diaphragm emphasis. However, when predominantly recruited, as in breathing patterns commonly adopted in loaded conditions, the RCM fatigue earlier than the diaphragm. PMID:8466120

  2. Protein diffusion in living skeletal muscle fibers: dependence on protein size, fiber type, and contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, S; Jürgens, K D; Gros, G

    2000-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic protein diffusion was studied under different conditions, using microinjection in combination with microspectrophotometry. Six globular proteins with molecular masses between 12 and 3700 kDa, with diameters from 3 to 30 nm, were used for the experiments. Proteins were injected into single, intact skeletal muscle fibers taken from either soleus or extensor digitorum longus (edl) muscle of adult rats. No correlation was found between sarcomere spacing and the sarcoplasmic diffusion coefficient (D) for all proteins studied. D of the smaller proteins cytochrome c (diameter 3.1 nm), myoglobin (diameter 3.5 nm), and hemoglobin (diameter 5.5 nm) amounted to only approximately 1/10 of their value in water and was not increased by auxotonic fiber contractions. D for cytochrome c and myoglobin was significantly higher in fibers from edl (mainly type II fibers) compared to fibers from soleus (mainly type I fibers). Measurements of D for myoglobin at 37 degrees C in addition to 22 degrees C led to a Q(10) of 1.46 for this temperature range. For the larger proteins catalase (diameter 10.5 nm) and ferritin (diameter 12.2 nm), a decrease in D to approximately 1/20 and approximately 1/50 of that in water was observed, whereas no diffusive flux at all of earthworm hemoglobin (diameter 30 nm) along the fiber axis could be detected. We conclude that 1) sarcoplasmic protein diffusion is strongly impaired by the presence of the myofilamental lattice, which also gives rise to differences in diffusivity between different fiber types; 2) contractions do not cause significant convection in sarcoplasm and do not lead to increased diffusional transport; and 3) in addition to the steric hindrance that slows down the diffusion of smaller proteins, diffusion of large proteins is further hindered when their dimensions approach the interfilament distances. This molecular sieve property progressively reduces intracellular diffusion of proteins when the molecular diameter increases to

  3. Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation Emitted from Common Mobile Phone Jammers Alters the Pattern of Muscle Contractions: an Animal Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, A.; Rahimi, S.; Talebi, A.; Soleimani, A.; Haghani, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rapid growth of wireless communication technologies has caused public concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic radiations on human health. Some early reports indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians such as the alterations of the pattern of muscle extractions. This study is aimed at investigating the effects of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from mobile phone jammers on the pulse height of contractions, the time interval between two subsequent contractions and the latency period of frog’s isolated gastrocnemius muscle after stimulation with single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz). Materials and Methods Frogs were kept in plastic containers in a room. Animals in the jammer group were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation emitted from a common Jammer at a distance of 1m from the jammer’s antenna for 2 hours while the control frogs were only sham exposed. Then animals were sacrificed and isolated gastrocnemius muscles were exposed to on/off jammer radiation for 3 subsequent 10 minute intervals. Isolated gastrocnemius muscles were attached to the force transducer with a string. Using a PowerLab device (26-T), the pattern of muscular contractions was monitored after applying single square pulses of 1V (1 Hz) as stimuli. Results The findings of this study showed that the pulse height of muscle contractions could not be affected by the exposure to electromagnetic fields. However, the latency period was effectively altered in RF-exposed samples. However, none of the experiments could show an alteration in the time interval between two subsequent contractions after exposure to electromagnetic fields. Conclusion These findings support early reports which indicated a wide variety of non-thermal effects of electromagnetic radiation on amphibians including the effects on the pattern of muscle extractions. PMID:26396969

  4. Periodic increases in force during sustained contraction reduce fatigue and facilitate spatial redistribution of trapezius muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Falla, Deborah; Farina, Dario

    2007-09-01

    This study compared fatigue and the spatial distribution of upper trapezius electromyographic (EMG) amplitude during a 6-min constant force shoulder elevation task at 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction force (MVC) (constant force) and during the same task interrupted by brief (2 s) periodic increases in force to 25% MVC every 30 s (variable force). Surface EMG signals were recorded with a 13 x 5 grid of electrodes from the upper trapezius muscle of nine healthy subjects. The centroid (center of activity) of the EMG root mean square map was computed to assess changes over time in the spatial distribution of EMG amplitude. MVC force decreased by (mean +/- SD) 9.0 +/- 3.9% after the constant force task (P < 0.05) but was unchanged following the variable force contraction. The centroid of EMG amplitude shifted in the cranial direction across the duration of the variable force contraction (P < 0.05) but not during the constant force contraction (shift of 2.9 +/- 2.3 mm and 1.4 +/- 1.1 mm, respectively). The results demonstrate that periodic increases in force during a sustained contraction enhance the modifications in spatial distribution of upper trapezius EMG amplitude and reduce fatigue compared to a constant force contraction performed at a lower average load. The change in spatial distribution of EMG amplitude over time during a sustained contraction may reflect a mechanism to counteract fatigue during prolonged muscle activity.

  5. Electrical models of excitation-contraction coupling and charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Mathias, R T; Levis, R A; Eisenberg, R S

    1980-07-01

    The consequences of ionic current flow from the T system to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscle are examined. The Appendix analyzes a simple model in which the conductance gx, linking T system and SR, is in series with a parallel resistor and capacitor having fixed values. The conductance gx is supposed to increase rapidly with depolarization and to decrease slowly with repolarization. Nonlinear transient currents computed from this model have some of the properties of gating currents produced by intramembrane charge movement. In particular, the integral of the transient current upon depolarization approximates that upon repolarization. Thus, equality of nonlinear charge movement can occur without intramembrane charge movement. A more complicated model is used in the text to fit the structure of skeletal muscle and other properties of its charge movement. Rectification is introduced into gx and the membrane conductance of the terminal cisternae to give asymmetry in the time-course of the transient currents and saturation in the curve relating charge movement to depolarization, respectively. The more complex model fits experimental data quite well if the longitudinal tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum are isolated from the terminal cisternae by a substantial resistance and if calcium release from the terminal cisternae is, for the most part, electrically silent. Specific experimental tests of the model are proposed, and the implications for excitation-contraction coupling are discussed.

  6. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  7. Water drinking-related muscle contraction induces the pressor response via mechanoreceptors in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chikara; Iwata, Chihiro; Morita, Hironobu

    2013-01-01

    Water drinking is known to induce the pressor response. The efferent pathway in this response involves sympathoexcitation, because the pressor response was completely abolished by ganglionic blockade or an α(1)-adrenergic antagonist. However, the afferent pathway in this response has not been identified. In the present study, we hypothesized that water itself stimulates the upper digestive tract to induce the pressor response, and/or drinking-related muscle contraction induces the pressor response via mechanoreceptors. To examine this hypothesis, we evaluated the pressor response induced by spontaneous or passive water drinking in conscious rats. Since the baroreflex modulates and obscures the pressor response, the experiments were conducted using rats with sinoaortic denervation. The pressor response was not suppressed by 1) transient oral surface anesthesia using lidocaine, 2) bilateral denervation of the glossopharyngeal nerve and sensory branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, or 3) denervation of the tunica adventitia in the esophagus. However, the pressor response was significantly suppressed (by -52%) by intravenous gadolinium chloride administration. Electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve induced the pressor response, which was significantly suppressed (by -57%) by intravenous gadolinium chloride administration and completely abolished by severing the distal end of this nerve. These results indicate that afferent signals from mechanoreceptors in drinking-related muscles are involved in the water drinking-induced pressor response.

  8. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  9. Effects of selective exercise for the deep abdominal muscles and lumbar stabilization exercise on the thickness of the transversus abdominis and postural maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-seok; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Da-yeon; Shim, Jae-ho; Lim, Jin-yong

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of selective exercise for the deep abdominal muscles (SEDA) and lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE) on the thickness of the transversus abdominis and postural maintenance on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain. They were equally and randomly assigned to a SEDA group and a LSE group. The thickness of the transversus abdominis was measured using ultrasound imaging during rest and drawing-in. The thickness of the transversus abdominis was measured when subjects raised their right and left legs while lying on a Swiss ball. [Results] Initially, there were no differences between the two groups. After the intervention, significant differences were observed in all parameters. A significant interaction between group and period was not found for any parameters. [Conclusion] In conclusion, both SEDA and LSE thickened the transversus abdominis, which is a deep abdominal muscle, thereby adjusting posture, and stabilizing the trunk. These exercises increased the thickness of the deep abdominal muscles. They are important exercises for improving the stability of athletes or patients who need postural adjustment. PMID:25729169

  10. Effects of selective exercise for the deep abdominal muscles and lumbar stabilization exercise on the thickness of the transversus abdominis and postural maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Da-Yeon; Shim, Jae-Ho; Lim, Jin-Yong

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of selective exercise for the deep abdominal muscles (SEDA) and lumbar stabilization exercise (LSE) on the thickness of the transversus abdominis and postural maintenance on an unstable base of support. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 male and 10 female adults in their 20s without lumbar pain. They were equally and randomly assigned to a SEDA group and a LSE group. The thickness of the transversus abdominis was measured using ultrasound imaging during rest and drawing-in. The thickness of the transversus abdominis was measured when subjects raised their right and left legs while lying on a Swiss ball. [Results] Initially, there were no differences between the two groups. After the intervention, significant differences were observed in all parameters. A significant interaction between group and period was not found for any parameters. [Conclusion] In conclusion, both SEDA and LSE thickened the transversus abdominis, which is a deep abdominal muscle, thereby adjusting posture, and stabilizing the trunk. These exercises increased the thickness of the deep abdominal muscles. They are important exercises for improving the stability of athletes or patients who need postural adjustment.

  11. Reliability of the functional measures of the corticospinal pathways to dorsiflexor muscles during maximal voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Souron, Robin; Farabet, Adrien; Millet, Guillaume Y; Lapole, Thomas

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the intra- and inter-day reliability of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-related measurements recorded from the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Thirteen healthy young men and women (23±4years) performed 3 testing sessions to assess intra- (i.e., two sessions performed the same day) and inter-day (i.e. two sessions performed one week apart) reliability of (i) dorsiflexion cortical maximal voluntary activation level (VATMS), (ii) TA corticospinal excitability assessed through the amplitude of the motor evoked potentials (MEP) recorded during 100, 75 and 50% maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), and (iii) intracortical inhibition investigated via the cortical silent period (CSP) recorded at the same % MVC. Absolute (i.e., coefficient of variation (CV) and standard error of the mean (SEM)), and relative (i.e., intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC)) reliability parameters were calculated. VATMS demonstrated excellent intra- and inter-day reliabilities (ICC: 0.80 and 0.99; CV: 1.7 and 0.8%, respectively). MEPs and CSPs presented moderate to excellent intra- and inter-day reliabilities, while input-output curves extracted parameters presented highly variable outcomes. These results suggest that most TA corticospinal measurements during voluntary contractions can be used to quantify corticospinal adaptations after acute (e.g. fatigue) or long term (e.g. training) interventions. PMID:27653925

  12. Energetics of shortening muscles in twitches and tetanic contractions. II. Force-determined shortening heat.

    PubMed

    Homsher, E; Mommaerts, W F; Ricchiuti, N V

    1973-12-01

    The extra heat liberation accompanying muscular shortening, the force-determined shortening heat, is defined as the difference between the heat produced when shortening occurs and that produced in an isometric contraction developing the same amount of force and performing the same amount of internal work. Based on this definition, the initial energy production in twitches and tetanic contractions (E) is given by E = A + f (P, t) + alpha(F)x + W, where A is the activation heat, f(P, t), the tension-related heat (a heat production associated with the development and maintenance of tension), alpha(F)x, the force-determined shortening heat, and W, the external work. It is demonstrated that this equation accurately accounts for the time-course of heat evolution and the total initial energy production in both twitches and tetani at 0 degrees C. The force-determined shortening heat is liberated, during shortening, in direct proportion to (a) the distance shortened, and (b) the force against which shortening occurs. The normalized value of the force-determined shortening heat coefficient, alpha(F)/P(o), is the same in both the twitch and the tetanus. Finally, this formulation of the muscle's energy production also accounts for the total energy production in afterload isotonic twitches at 20 degrees C, where a Fenn effect is not demonstrable. PMID:4548714

  13. Anti-stomach serum induces contraction of isolated smooth muscle cells from gastric antrum.

    PubMed

    Bobo, M H; Ammor, S; Magous, R; Mingard, P; Bali, J P

    1993-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the ability of anti-tissue sera to cause contraction of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vitro. Therefore, we compared the effects of a horse immune serum raised against hog gastric tissue (SER 292), of its globulin fraction (SER 292 globulin), and of its IgG fraction (SER 292 IgG), on concentration of isolated SMC from the gastric antrum of the rabbit. Our results showed that SER 292 IgG induced a dose-dependent contraction of SMC with a higher potency than SER 292 globulin and SER 292. Preincubation of SER 292 globulin with anti-F(ab')2 but not with anti-Fc reduced the contractile activity of this anti-tissue serum. A serum raised against reticulo-endothelial system (SER 108) as well as a non immune serum (SENI) did not show any contractile activity. Our data provide evidence that SER 292 interacts with plasma membrane of SMC through its F(ab')2 fragments. Withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ caused a significant reduction of the contractile effect induced by SER 292 IgG. When 45 Ca influx was measured, SER 292 IgG induced a specific and significant 45 Ca uptake which was blocked by pinaverium, a 'L-type' calcium channel blocker. These findings tend to show that contraction of SMC induced by SER 292 IgG involves an increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration due in part to an influx of external Ca2+ via plasma membrane Ca2+ channels sensitive to 'L-type' channel blockers. PMID:8288445

  14. The relation of membrane changes to contraction in twitch muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Heistracher, P.; Hunt, C. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Contractile responses in short twitch-type snake muscle fibres have been studied. These fibres are sufficiently short to allow fairly uniform changes in membrane potential along their length when current is passed through an intracellular micropipette. Active sodium permeability changes were blocked with tetrodotoxin (TTX), procaine, or by using solutions low in sodium. Current and voltage micropipettes were used to voltage-clamp these fibres. Depolarization steps to about -40 mV evoked contractile responses, maximal tension being developed between -10 and 0 mV. The relation between contraction and membrane potential was sigmoid. 2. Depolarization beyond a critical threshold produced an increment of outward current which inactivated with time. The threshold for this delayed rectification was normally similar to the threshold for contractile activation. Fibres exposed to high potassium showed a reversal of this inactivating current to slightly super-threshold depolarizing pulses. At membrane potentials near 0 mV, no inactivating current was noted, while stronger depolarizing pulses produced an inactivating current in the normal direction. Fibres in high potassium show the same threshold for initiation of contraction as in normal solution. 3. Thiocyanate, nitrate, and caffeine shifted the relation between membrane potential and contraction toward higher levels of membrane potential. The threshold for inactivating rectifying current failed to shift to a corresponding extent, although some shift in rectification which did not inactivate was evident. 4. When depolarization was maintained, contractile tension was maximal for several seconds, then gradually disappeared. The rate of this contractile inactivation depended upon the level of depolarization. PMID:5767883

  15. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers. PMID:21054123

  16. Noninvasive observation of skeletal muscle contraction using near-infrared time-resolved reflectance and diffusing-wave spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belau, Markus; Ninck, Markus; Hering, Gernot; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Contini, Davide; Torricelli, Alessandro; Gisler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a method for noninvasively measuring muscle contraction in vivo, based on near-infrared diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). The method exploits the information about time-dependent shear motions within the contracting muscle that are contained in the temporal autocorrelation function g(1)(τ,t) of the multiply scattered light field measured as a function of lag time, τ, and time after stimulus, t. The analysis of g(1)(τ,t) measured on the human M. biceps brachii during repetitive electrical stimulation, using optical properties measured with time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, shows that the tissue dynamics giving rise to the speckle fluctuations can be described by a combination of diffusion and shearing. The evolution of the tissue Cauchy strain e(t) shows a strong correlation with the force, indicating that a significant part of the shear observed with DWS is due to muscle contraction. The evolution of the DWS decay time shows quantitative differences between the M. biceps brachii and the M. gastrocnemius, suggesting that DWS allows to discriminate contraction of fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  17. Do Differences in Levels, Types, and Duration of Muscle Contraction Have an Effect on the Degree of Post-exercise Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Miyaguchi, Shota; Kojima, Sho; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We conducted two experiments to determine how differences in muscle contraction levels, muscle contraction types, and movement duration affect degree of post-exercise depression (PED) after non-exhaustive, repetitive finger movement. Twelve healthy participants performed repetitive abduction movements of the right index finger at 2 Hz. In experiment 1, we examined the effects of muscle contraction levels at 10, 20, and 30% maximum voluntary contraction and the effects of muscle contraction types at isotonic and isometric contraction. In experiment 2, we examined the effects of movement duration at 2 and 6 min. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous muscle before movement tasks and 1–10 min after movement tasks. MEP amplitudes after isotonic contraction tasks were significantly smaller than those after isometric contraction tasks and decreased with increasing contraction levels, but were independent of movement duration. This study demonstrated that the degree of PED after non-exhaustive repetitive finger movement depended on muscle contraction levels and types. Thus, the degree of PED may depend on the levels of activity in the motor cortex during a movement task. This knowledge will aid in the design of rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27199696

  18. The effects of acute tension increase on rat esophageal muscle contractions: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Tutku; Kalkışım, Said; Yalcin, Sule; Müderrisoğlu, Ahmet; Taş, Sadık Taşkın; Tanyel, Feridun Cahit; Ertunç, Mert; Sara, Yıldırım

    2015-10-01

    In long-gap esophageal atresia surgeries, anastomoses can be tensioned by several traction methods in order to establish esophageal continuity. It is unclear whether the etiology of esophageal dysmotility after traction is related with esophageal atresia itself or tensioned esophagus. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of acute in vitro esophageal tension application on esophageal muscle contractility in rats. 26 Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were included to the study. After diethyl ether anesthesia, proximal segment (PS) and distal segment (DS) of esophagus were removed and suspended in an isolated organ bath kept at 37°C, Krebs-Henseleit solution. Rats were enrolled into four groups including control group (CG, n=14) without tension, 5 g (5G, n=4), 15 g (15G, n=4) and 25 g (25G, n=4) tension groups. In all groups, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), carbachol and KCl, and relaxation responses to serotonin were obtained. In CG, higher contractile responses were obtained in PS than DS after EFS. Both PS and DS showed higher contractile amplitudes in 5G with respect to that of CG, 15G and 25G (p<0.05). In 5G, contractile responses to carbachol were significantly increased in both PS and DS with respect to CG (p<0.05). However, contractile amplitudes in response to carbachol were decreased in PS when tension was increased to 15 g and 25 g. In DS, contractile responses in 15G and 25G were lower than 5G, and still higher than CG. Serotonin relaxation responses in PS were decreased when compared to CG at tension levels of 5 g, 15 g and 25 g (p<0.05). In DS, responses to serotonin were also decreased in tension groups. PS had higher contraction amplitudes than DS when contractile responses were obtained by high K(+) (p<0.05). Tension groups of both PS and DS showed increased contractions to high K(+) compared to CG (p<0.05). Increased esophageal tension led to increase in cholinergic responses of smooth muscles as well as in EFS

  19. The respiration of the anterior byssus refractor muscle of Mytilus edulis (ABRM) after a phasic contraction

    PubMed Central

    Baguet, F.; Gillis, J. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The oxygen consumption of isolated anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis (ABRM) has been measured at rest and after phasic contractions induced by a.c. stimulation. 2. The respiration was measured with a Clark oxygen electrode in successive periods of 5 or 15 min, at 20° C. 3. The resting respiration is 71·8 ± 2·4 n-moles O2/g wet weight.min (mean ± S.E., n = 70). It is increased by a release and decreased by a passive stretch. 4. After phasic stimulation of up to 30 sec the respiration is increased and returns to a slightly higher level than the resting level in an exponential fashion with a time constant of about 10 min. 5. The duration of stimulation does not change the time course of the excess respiration but it affects its magnitude. The amount of extra oxygen consumed, in n-moles O2/g, is made up of a constant amount, 449 ± 102, and an amount that depends on the duration of stimulation (t, sec), which is given by t × 13·2 ± 4·3. When due account is taken for the tension developed, these parameters become 83·1 ± 20·7 and t × 1·24 ± 0·66 n-moles O2/g muscle and kg/cm2 of tension. This regression analysis is based on forty-eight data, with a residual error based on 5 degrees of freedom. 6. Release of the tension after the last stimulus of a 30 sec tetanus reduces by half the extra oxygen consumed during the recovery whereas the same release applied 5 min later has a much smaller effect. This suggests that relaxation is an active process. 7. From these measurements of the recovery metabolism the energy cost of the contraction was estimated and compared with this cost in vertebrate striated muscle. The constant item has about the same magnitude, but the item related to the duration of stimulation is about 250 times smaller. PMID:6032199

  20. Contractions mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors and P2-purinoceptors in a cat colon circular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, K.; Milne, A.; Krier, J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The postjunctional excitatory and inhibitory effects of adrenoceptor and purinoceptor agonists and antagonists were studied in circular smooth muscle strips of cat colon. 2. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM), noradrenaline caused contraction or relaxation of circular smooth muscle at resting tension or with raised tone, respectively. The noradrenaline-evoked contractions were potentiated and the noradrenaline-evoked relaxations were antagonized by propranolol (1 microM), suggesting beta-adrenoceptor involvement. 3. At resting tension, noradrenaline, adrenaline and the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, caused concentration-dependent contractile responses, with EC50 values of 1.8 +/- 0.2 microM, 1.9 +/- 0.4 microM and 4.3 +/- 1.7 microM, respectively. The EC50 values and the amplitude of maximal responses were not significantly different from one another. Clonidine (0.1-500 microM), a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, was not effective. 4. Prazosin (0.1-9 microM), competitively antagonized the contractile effects of noradrenaline with an estimated pA2 value of 6.93 and a slope of 1.07 +/- 0.03. The Kb values, estimated from a single shift (0.1 microM prazosin) of the concentration-response curves to noradrenaline, adrenaline and phenylephrine were 92.8 +/- 9.3 nM, 108.7 +/- 6.4 nM and 18.4 +/- 3.1 nM, respectively. 5. At resting tension, adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP, 5-1000 microM), alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-MeATP, 0.05-50 microM), beta,gamma-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (beta,gamma-MeATP, 0.5-100 microM), and 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2-MeSATP, 1-500 microM) caused concentration-dependent contractions with EC50 values of 60.5 +/- 15.9 microM, 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM, 7.6 +/- 0.1 microM and 25.3 +/- 12.8 microM, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952886

  1. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders.

  2. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  3. Use of tissue expansion to facilitate liver and small bowel transplant in young children with contracted abdominal cavities.

    PubMed

    Vidyadharan, R; van Bommel, A C M; Kuti, K; Gupte, G L; Sharif, K; Richard, B M

    2013-11-01

    Liver and small bowel transplant is an established treatment for infants with IFALD. Despite organ reduction techniques, mortality on the waiting list remains high due to shortage of size-matched pediatric donors. Small abdominal cavity volume due to previous intestinal resection poses a significant challenge to achieve abdominal closure post-transplant. Seven children underwent tissue expansion of abdominal skin prior to multiorgan transplant. In total, 17 tissue expanders were placed subcutaneously in seven children. All seven subjects underwent re-exploration to deal with complications: hematoma, extrusion, infection, or port related. Three expanders had to be removed. Four children went on to have successful combined liver and small bowel transplant. Two children died on the waiting list of causes not related to the expander and one child died from sepsis attributed to an infected expander. Tissue expansion can generate skin to facilitate closure of abdomen post-transplant, thus allowing infants with small abdominal volumes to be considered for transplant surgery. Tissue expansion in children with end-stage liver disease and portal hypertension is associated with a very high complication rate and needs to be closely monitored during the expansion process.

  4. The effect of temperature on basal tension and thyroarytenoid muscle contraction in an isolated rat glottis model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2014-10-01

    The pitch of voice is closely related to the vocal fold tension, which is the end result of coordinated movement of the intralaryngeal muscles, and especially the thyroarytenoid muscle. It is known that vocal quality may be affected by surrounding temperature; however, the effect of temperature on vocal fold tension is mostly unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of temperature on isolated rat glottis and thyroarytenoid muscle contraction induced by electrical field stimulation. In vitro isometric tension of the glottis ring from 30 Sprague-Dawley rats was continuously recorded by the tissue bath method. Electrical field stimulation was applied to the glottis ring with two wire electrodes placed parallel to the glottis and connected to a direct-current stimulator. The tension changes of the rat glottis rings that were either untreated or treated with electrical field stimulation were recorded continuously at temperatures from 37 to 7 °C or from 7 to 37 °C. Warming from 7 to 37 °C increased the basal tension of the glottis rings and decreased the electrical field stimulation-induced glottis ring contraction, which was chiefly due to thyroarytenoid muscle contraction. In comparison, cooling from 37 to 7 °C decreased the basal tension and enhanced glottis ring contraction by electrical field stimulation. We concluded that warming increased the basal tension of the glottis in vitro and decreased the amplitude of electrical field stimulation-induced thyroarytenoid muscle contraction. Thus, vocal pitch and the fine tuning of vocal fold tension might be affected by temperature in vivo.

  5. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    5'-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr(172) phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction.

  6. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    5′-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr172 phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser473 phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction. PMID:26471759

  7. Caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase and insulin-independent glucose transport in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Satoshi; Egawa, Tatsuro; Kitani, Kazuto; Oshima, Rieko; Ma, Xiao; Hayashi, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    5'-Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as a key mediator of contraction-stimulated insulin-independent glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Caffeine acutely stimulates AMPK in resting skeletal muscle, but it is unknown whether caffeine affects AMPK in contracting muscle. Isolated rat epitrochlearis muscle was preincubated and then incubated in the absence or presence of 3 mmol/L caffeine for 30 or 120 min. Electrical stimulation (ES) was used to evoke tetanic contractions during the last 10 min of the incubation period. The combination of caffeine plus contraction had additive effects on AMPKα Thr(172) phosphorylation, α-isoform-specific AMPK activity, and 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport. In contrast, caffeine inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. Caffeine significantly delayed muscle fatigue during contraction, and the combination of caffeine and contraction additively decreased ATP and phosphocreatine contents. Caffeine did not affect resting tension. Next, rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of caffeine (60 mg/kg body weight) or saline, and the extensor digitorum longus muscle was dissected 15 min later. ES of the sciatic nerve was performed to evoke tetanic contractions for 5 min before dissection. Similar to the findings from isolated muscles incubated in vitro, the combination of caffeine plus contraction in vivo had additive effects on AMPK phosphorylation, AMPK activity, and 3MG transport. Caffeine also inhibited basal and contraction-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in vivo. These findings suggest that caffeine and contraction synergistically stimulate AMPK activity and insulin-independent glucose transport, at least in part by decreasing muscle fatigue and thereby promoting energy consumption during contraction. PMID:26471759

  8. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  9. Contraction type influences the human ability to use the available torque capacity of skeletal muscle during explosive efforts.

    PubMed

    Tillin, Neale A; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2012-06-01

    The influence of contraction type on the human ability to use the torque capacity of skeletal muscle during explosive efforts has not been documented. Fourteen male participants completed explosive voluntary contractions of the knee extensors in four separate conditions: concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC); and isometric at two knee angles (101°, ISO101 and 155°, ISO155). In each condition, torque was measured at 25 ms intervals up to 150 ms from torque onset, and then normalized to the maximum voluntary torque (MVT) specific to that joint angle and angular velocity. Explosive voluntary torque after 50 ms in each condition was also expressed as a percentage of torque generated after 50 ms during a supramaximal 300 Hz electrically evoked octet in the same condition. Explosive voluntary torque normalized to MVT was more than 60 per cent larger in CON than any other condition after the initial 25 ms. The percentage of evoked torque expressed after 50 ms of the explosive voluntary contractions was also greatest in CON (ANOVA; p < 0.001), suggesting higher concentric volitional activation. This was confirmed by greater agonist electromyography normalized to M(max) (recorded during the explosive voluntary contractions) in CON. These results provide novel evidence that the ability to use the muscle's torque capacity explosively is influenced by contraction type, with concentric contractions being more conducive to explosive performance due to a more effective neural strategy.

  10. Contraction type influences the human ability to use the available torque capacity of skeletal muscle during explosive efforts

    PubMed Central

    Tillin, Neale A.; Pain, Matthew T. G.; Folland, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of contraction type on the human ability to use the torque capacity of skeletal muscle during explosive efforts has not been documented. Fourteen male participants completed explosive voluntary contractions of the knee extensors in four separate conditions: concentric (CON) and eccentric (ECC); and isometric at two knee angles (101°, ISO101 and 155°, ISO155). In each condition, torque was measured at 25 ms intervals up to 150 ms from torque onset, and then normalized to the maximum voluntary torque (MVT) specific to that joint angle and angular velocity. Explosive voluntary torque after 50 ms in each condition was also expressed as a percentage of torque generated after 50 ms during a supramaximal 300 Hz electrically evoked octet in the same condition. Explosive voluntary torque normalized to MVT was more than 60 per cent larger in CON than any other condition after the initial 25 ms. The percentage of evoked torque expressed after 50 ms of the explosive voluntary contractions was also greatest in CON (ANOVA; p < 0.001), suggesting higher concentric volitional activation. This was confirmed by greater agonist electromyography normalized to Mmax (recorded during the explosive voluntary contractions) in CON. These results provide novel evidence that the ability to use the muscle's torque capacity explosively is influenced by contraction type, with concentric contractions being more conducive to explosive performance due to a more effective neural strategy. PMID:22258636

  11. Novel identification of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR1 that promotes contraction in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kentaro; Zhang, Yi; Mizuta, Fumiko; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshiya; Masaki, Eiji; Emala, Charles W

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that free fatty acid levels are elevated in the plasma of obese individuals. Medium- and long-chain free fatty acids act as endogenous ligands for the free fatty acid receptors FFAR1/GPR40 and FFAR4/GPR120, which couple to Gq proteins. We investigated whether FFAR1 and FFAR4 are expressed on airway smooth muscle and whether they activate Gq-coupled signaling and modulate airway smooth muscle tone. We detected the protein expression of FFAR1 and FFAR4 in freshly dissected native human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle and cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The long-chain free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) and GW9508 (FFAR1/FFAR4 dual agonist) dose-dependently stimulated transient intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increases and inositol phosphate synthesis in HASM cells. Downregulation of FFAR1 or FFAR4 in HASM cells by small interfering RNA led to a significant inhibition of the long-chain free fatty acids-induced transient [Ca(2+)]i increases. Oleic acid, linoleic acid, or GW9508 stimulated stress fiber formation in HASM cells, potentiated acetylcholine-contracted guinea pig tracheal rings, and attenuated the relaxant effect of isoproterenol after an acetylcholine-induced contraction. In contrast, TUG-891 (FFAR4 agonist) did not induce the stress fiber formation or potentiate acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that FFAR1 is the functionally dominant free fatty acid receptor in both human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle. The free fatty acid sensors expressed on airway smooth muscle could be an important modulator of airway smooth muscle tone.

  12. Reversible inhibition of contractions of mammalian cardiomyocytes and of smooth muscle by the protistan parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, R

    2005-11-25

    Myotropic neuropeptides have been isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates. Recently, a myoinhibitory peptide from the protist Leishmaniamajor was isolated, and its function in the sand fly vector was described. Similar lysates of cultured L. major were tested for their ability to inhibit contractions in mammalian cell and tissue preparations. L. major proteins (LMP) (34 microg/ml) completely stopped spontaneous contractions of cultured rat cardiomyocytes; cells resumed contracting after a saline wash. An application of 880 microg/ml LMP significantly decreased force of contractions (36%) in strips of guinea pig ileum precontracted with nicotine (p<0.01) but not with acetylcholine (p>0.01). Ileal strips rinsed with Tyrode's solution and again stimulated with nicotine contracted normally. Contractile force of ileal strips electrically stimulated with 40 V was reduced in a dose-dependent manner (30, 76, and 100%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations of LMP (220, 440, and 880 microg/ml). This ileal preparation resumed contracting after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Oxytocin-induced contractions of guinea pig uterine strips were reduced significantly in a dose-dependent manner (21 and 55%) (p<0.01) by increasing concentrations (170 and 310 microg/ml) of LMP and resumed contracting normally after rinsing with Tyrode's solution. Modes of action for L. major myoinhibitory factors may include either decreasing Ca(2+) influx or increasing Ca(2+) efflux in susceptible muscle. Protistan-induced inotropism is discussed in light of exacerbating pathology of disease.

  13. Effect of atrophy and contractions on myogenin mRNA concentration in chick and rat myoblast omega muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, J. M.; Denney, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    The skeletal rat myoblast omega (RMo) cell line forms myotubes that exhibit spontaneous contractions under appropriate conditions in culture. We examined if the RMo cells would provide a model for studying atrophy and muscle contraction. To better understand how to obtain contractile cultures, we examined levels of contraction under different growing conditions. The proliferation medium and density of plating affected the subsequent proportion of spontaneously contracting myotubes. Using a ribonuclease protection assay, we found that exponentially growing RMo myoblasts contained no detectable myogenin or herculin mRNA, while differentiating myoblasts contained high levels of myogenin mRNA but no herculin mRNA. There was no increase in myogenin mRNA concentration in either primary chick or RMo myotubes whose contractions were inhibited by depolarizing concentrations of potassium (K+). Thus, altered myogenin mRNA concentrations are not involved in atrophy of chick myotubes. Depolarizing concentrations of potassium inhibited spontaneous contractions in both RMo cultures and primary chick myotube cultures. However, we found that the myosin concentration of 6-d-old contracting RMo cells fed medium plus AraC was 11 +/- 3 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA, not significantly different from 12 +/- 4 micrograms myosin/microgram DNA (n = 3), the myosin concentration of noncontracting RMo cells (treated with 12 mM K+ for 6 d). Resolving how RMo cells maintained their myosin content when contraction is inhibited may be important for understanding atrophy.

  14. The roles of stored calcium in contractions of cat tracheal smooth muscle produced by electrical stimulation, acetylcholine and high K+.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Itoh, T

    1984-11-01

    Effects of direct or indirect (nerve-mediated) muscle stimulation, acetylcholine (ACh), caffeine and procaine on the membrane and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the cat trachea were investigated by means of double sucrose-gap and isometric tension recording methods. Outward current pulses (2 s in duration) applied to the muscle tissue in the presence of tetrodotoxin (10(-7)M), atropine (10(-6)M) and propranolol (10(-6)M) evoked no action potential (spike); however, when the depolarization exceeded 9 mV, a contraction was evoked. The spike and contraction evoked by outward current pulses in the presence of tetraethylammonium (TEA, 10 mM) were suppressed by treatment of the tissue with either Ca2+-free EGTA (2 mM) containing solution or Mn2+ (5 mM). In the presence of procaine (10 mM), outward current pulses evoked an action potential but no contraction. Field stimulation of short duration (50 microseconds) applied to the whole tissue produced an excitation of the intrinsic nerves and evoked excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps), and when the amplitude of e.j.ps exceeded 4 mV, a twitch contraction occurred. E.j.p. was more effective in producing a contraction than was the membrane depolarization evoked by outward current pulses. Amplitudes of contractions evoked by exogenous ACh (10(-5)M) were much larger than those evoked by 128 mM-[K]0 or caffeine (10 mM), in normal Krebs solution. When the amplitudes of the contractions produced by 128 mM [K]0 were defined as a relative amplitude of 1.0, the mean amplitudes of contraction produced by ACh (10(-5)M) or caffeine were 2.5 +/- 0.20 or 1.2 +/- 0.26, respectively. In Ca2+-free EGTA (2 mM)-containing solution, the contraction induced by 128 mM-[K]0 was rapidly abolished, whereas the contractions evoked by caffeine (10 mM) or the initial phasic contraction produced by ACh (10(-5)M) were largely unaffected. When the amount of Ca2+ stored in the muscle cell was estimated from the amplitude of caffeine

  15. Preceding muscle activity influences motor unit discharge and rate of torque development during ballistic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Van Cutsem, Michaël; Duchateau, Jacques

    2005-01-15

    To investigate the effect of initial conditions on the modulation of motor unit discharge during fast voluntary contractions, we compared ballistic isometric contractions of the ankle dorsiflexor muscles that were produced from either a resting state or superimposed on a sustained contraction. The torque of the dorsiflexors and the surface and intramuscular EMGs from the tibialis anterior were recorded. The results showed that the performance of a ballistic contraction from a sustained contraction ( approximately 25% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)) had a negative effect on the maximal rate of torque development. Although the electromechanical delay was shortened, the EMG activity during the ballistic contraction was less synchronized. These observations were associated with a significant decline in the average discharge rate of single motor units (89.8 +/- 3.8 versus 115 +/- 5.8 Hz) and in the percentage of units (6.2 versus 15.5% of the whole sample) that exhibited double discharges at brief intervals (= 5 ms). High-threshold units that were not recruited during the sustained contraction displayed the same activation pattern, which indicates that the mechanisms responsible for the decline in discharge rate were not restricted to previously activated units, but appear to influence the entire motor unit pool. When a premotor silent period (SP) was observed at the transition from the sustained muscular activity to the ballistic contraction (19% of the trials), these adjustments in motor unit activity were not present, and the ballistic contractions were similar to those performed from a resting state. Together, these results indicate that initial conditions can influence the capacity for motor unit discharge rate and hence the performance of a fast voluntary contraction.

  16. Effect of muscle load tasks with maximal isometric contractions on oxygenation of the trapezius muscle and sympathetic nervous activity in females with chronic neck and shoulder pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sympathetic nervous activity contributes to the maintenance of muscle oxygenation. However, patients with chronic pain may suffer from autonomic dysfunction. Furthermore, insufficient muscle oxygenation is observed among workers with chronic neck and shoulder pain. The aim of our study was to investigate how muscle load tasks affect sympathetic nervous activity and changes in oxygenation of the trapezius muscles in subjects with chronic neck and shoulder pain. Methods Thirty females were assigned to two groups: a pain group consisting of subjects with chronic neck and shoulder pain and a control group consisting of asymptomatic subjects. The participants performed three sets of isometric exercise in an upright position; they contracted their trapezius muscles with maximum effort and let the muscles relax (Relax). Autonomic nervous activity and oxygenation of the trapezius muscles were measured by heart rate variability (HRV) and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy. Results Oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin of the trapezius muscles in the pain group were lower during the Relax period compared with the control group. In addition, the low frequency / high frequency (LF/HF) ratio of HRV significantly increased during isometric exercise in the control group, whereas there were no significant changes in the pain group. Conclusions Subjects with neck and shoulder pain showed lower oxygenation and blood flow of the trapezius muscles responding to isometric exercise, compared with asymptomatic subjects. Subjects with neck and shoulder pain also showed no significant changes in the LF/HF ratio of HRV responding to isometric exercise, which would imply a reduction in sympathetic nervous activity. PMID:22889146

  17. Regulatory and essential light chains of myosin rotate equally during contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Borejdo, Julian; Ushakov, Dmitry S; Akopova, Irina

    2002-06-01

    Myosin head consists of a globular catalytic domain and a long alpha-helical regulatory domain. The catalytic domain is responsible for binding to actin and for setting the stage for the main force-generating event, which is a "swing" of the regulatory domain. The proximal end of the regulatory domain contains the essential light chain 1 (LC1). This light chain can interact through the N and C termini with actin and myosin heavy chain. The interactions may inhibit the motion of the proximal end. In consequence the motion of the distal end (containing regulatory light chain, RLC) may be different from the motion of the proximal end. To test this possibility, the angular motion of LC1 and RLC was measured simultaneously during muscle contraction. Engineered LC1 and RLC were labeled with red and green fluorescent probes, respectively, and exchanged with native light chains of striated muscle. The confocal microscope was modified to measure the anisotropy from 0.3 microm(3) volume containing approximately 600 fluorescent cross-bridges. Static measurements revealed that the magnitude of the angular change associated with transition from rigor to relaxation was less than 5 degrees for both light chains. Cross-bridges were activated by a precise delivery of ATP from a caged precursor. The time course of the angular change consisted of a fast phase followed by a slow phase and was the same for both light chains. These results suggest that the interactions of LC1 do not inhibit the angular motion of the proximal end of the regulatory domain and that the whole domain rotates as a rigid body.

  18. The effect of nitrate supplementation on muscle contraction in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hoon, Matthew W; Fornusek, Ché; Chapman, Phillip G; Johnson, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate ([Formula: see text] ) on markers of contractile function in human knee extensors. In a double-blinded, randomized cross-over design, 18 (12 M) healthy participants undertook four days of supplementation with either nitrate-rich beetroot juice (NITRATE; days 1-3: 525 mg [Formula: see text], day 4: 1050 mg [Formula: see text]) or nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (PLACEBO). On the fourth day, isometric knee extension force was assessed during a series of voluntary and electrically evoked (stimulation) tests. In addition, muscular fatigue was examined in two separate continuous-stimulation (0.8 s tetanus with a 1:1 work:rest ratio for 102.4 s) fatigue tests, one with and one without blood flow restriction. There were no differences for maximum voluntary contraction, peak twitch force, half-relaxation time and the force-frequency relationship for stimulations up to 100 Hz between the NITRATE and PLACEBO trials. No differences between trials were observed in the non-restricted fatigue test, however NITRATE was found to attenuate the decline in force during the restricted test, such that the force at the 80 s mark (PLACEBO: 66 ± 11 vs. NITRATE 74 ± 9% of initial force; P = .01) and 102 s mark (PLACEBO: 47 ± 8% vs. NITRATE 55 ± 8%; P < .01) were significantly higher. These results suggest that four days of [Formula: see text] supplementation elicits peripheral responses in muscle that attenuate muscular fatigue during exhaustive exercise under hypovolemic conditions. This ergogenic action is likely attributable to improved Ca(2+) handling in the muscle, or enhanced perfusion during ischemia. PMID:26681629

  19. Extracellular matrix remodeling and its contribution to protective adaptation following lengthening contractions in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Hyldahl, Robert D; Nelson, Brad; Xin, Ling; Welling, Tyson; Groscost, Logan; Hubal, Monica J; Chipkin, Stuart; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Parcell, Allen C

    2015-07-01

    This study determined the contribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling to the protective adaptation of human skeletal muscle known as the repeated-bout effect (RBE). Muscle biopsies were obtained 3 hours, 2 days, and 27 days following an initial bout (B1) of lengthening contractions (LCs) and 2 days following a repeated bout (B2) in 2 separate studies. Biopsies from the nonexercised legs served as controls. In the first study, global transcriptomic analysis indicated widespread changes in ECM structural, deadhesive, and signaling transcripts, 3 hours following LC. To determine if ECM remodeling is involved in the RBE, we conducted a second study by use of a repeated-bout paradigm. TNC immunoreactivity increased 10.8-fold following B1, was attenuated following B2, and positively correlated with LC-induced strength loss (r(2) = 0.45; P = 0.009). Expression of collagen I, III, and IV (COL1A1, COL3A1, COL4A1) transcripts was unchanged early but increased 5.7 ± 2.5-, 3.2 ± 0.9-, and 2.1 ± 0.4-fold (P < 0.05), respectively, 27 days post-B1 and were unaffected by B2. Likewise, TGF-β signaling demonstrated a delayed response following LC. Satellite cell content increased 80% (P < 0.05) 2 days post-B1 (P < 0.05), remained elevated 27 days post-B1, and was unaffected by B2. Collectively, the data suggest sequential ECM remodeling characterized by early deadhesion and delayed reconstructive activity that appear to contribute to the RBE. PMID:25808538

  20. Transverse Strains in Muscle Fascicles during Voluntary Contraction: A 2D Frequency Decomposition of B-Mode Ultrasound Images

    PubMed Central

    Wakeling, James M.

    2014-01-01

    When skeletal muscle fibres shorten, they must increase in their transverse dimensions in order to maintain a constant volume. In pennate muscle, this transverse expansion results in the fibres rotating to greater pennation angle, with a consequent reduction in their contractile velocity in a process known as gearing. Understanding the nature and extent of this transverse expansion is necessary to understand the mechanisms driving the changes in internal geometry of whole muscles during contraction. Current methodologies allow the fascicle lengths, orientations, and curvatures to be quantified, but not the transverse expansion. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate techniques for quantifying transverse strain in skeletal muscle fascicles during contraction from B-mode ultrasound images. Images were acquired from the medial and lateral gastrocnemii during cyclic contractions, enhanced using multiscale vessel enhancement filtering and the spatial frequencies resolved using 2D discrete Fourier transforms. The frequency information was resolved into the fascicle orientations that were validated against manually digitized values. The transverse fascicle strains were calculated from their wavelengths within the images. These methods showed that the transverse strain increases while the longitudinal fascicle length decreases; however, the extent of these strains was smaller than expected. PMID:25328509

  1. The effect of M & B 22948 on carbachol-induced inositol trisphosphate accumulation and contraction in iris sphincter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, R A; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1991-04-25

    The effect of a cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, M & B 22948, on carbachol-induced phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP2) breakdown and phosphatidic acid labeling, 1,4,5-inositol trisphosphate (IP3) accumulation and muscle contraction was studied in bovine iris sphincter smooth muscle. Addition of carbachol (10 microM) to 32P-labeled tissue resulted in increased labeling of phosphatidic acid and hydrolysis of PIP2. In myo[3H]inositol labeled tissue, carbachol caused rapid accumulation of IP3 which reached its maximum at about 2 min. Under identical experimental conditions, carbachol initiated a rapid increase in muscle contraction (phasic component) which was followed by a slightly lower contractile response (tonic component) that lasted for several minutes. Pretreatment of the iris sphincter with M & B 22948 did not alter carbachol-stimulated PIP2 breakdown and phosphatidic acid labeling, IP3 accumulation, or phasic component of the contractile response. However, the tonic component of the contractile response was increasingly attenuated by increasing concentrations of the drug. In conclusion, the data presented demonstrate a close correlation between carbachol-induced IP3 accumulation and muscle contraction, and that M & B 22948 does not inhibit carbachol-induced responses in the iris sphincter.

  2. Effect of Aurantii Fructus Immaturus Flavonoid on the Contraction of Isolated Gastric Smooth Muscle Strips in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peicai; Wang, Yueqi

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Aurantii fructus immaturus flavonoid (AFIF) on the contraction of isolated gastric smooth muscle in rats and explore its underlying mechanisms. Isolated antral longitudinal smooth muscle strip (ALSMS) and pyloric circular smooth muscle strip (PCSMS) of rats were suspended in tissue chambers. The responses of ALSMS and PCSMS to administration of AFIF were observed. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and protein kinase G (PKG) levels of PCSMS were measured by ELISA kits. In this study, AFIF showed no significant effect on ALSMS contraction, but it dose-dependently reduced the mean contraction amplitude of PCSMS. When the concentration of AFIF reached 3000 μg/mL, 6000 μg/mL, and 10000 μg/mL, its inhibitory effect on PCSMS contraction was significant. This effect of AFIF was weakened in Ca2+-rich environment. And Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl (L-NAME), the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), significantly inhibited AFIF's action in comparison with control (P < 0.05). After incubation with AFIF for 30 min, levels of cGMP and PKG in PCSMS were significantly increased compared with control (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that AFIF has a dose-dependent diastolic effect on PCSMS in rats, which may be related to the regulatory pathway of NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+. PMID:27429637

  3. Alcohol impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in a time-dependent manner following electrically stimulated muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Lang, Charles H

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol (EtOH) decreases protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and blunts the anabolic response to growth factors in skeletal muscle. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether acute EtOH intoxication antagonizes the contraction-induced increase in protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle. Fasted male mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3 g/kg EtOH or saline (control), and the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated (10 sets of 6 contractions). The gastrocnemius muscle complex was collected 30 min, 4 h, or 12 h after stimulation. EtOH decreased in vivo basal protein synthesis (PS) in the nonstimulated muscle compared with time-matched Controls at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. In Control, but not EtOH, PS was decreased 15% after 30 min. In contrast, PS was increased in Control 4 h poststimulation but remained unchanged in EtOH. Last, stimulation increased PS 10% in Control and EtOH at 12 h, even though the absolute rate remained reduced by EtOH. The stimulation-induced increase in the phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr(421)/Ser(424) (20-52%), S6K1 Thr(389) (45-57%), and its substrate rpS6 Ser(240/244) (37-72%) was blunted by EtOH at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 Ser(65) was also attenuated by EtOH (61%) at 4 h. Conversely, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase Thr(202)/Tyr(204) was increased by stimulation in Control and EtOH mice at 30 min but only in Control at 4 h. Our data indicate that acute EtOH intoxication suppresses muscle protein synthesis for at least 12 h and greatly impairs contraction-induced changes in synthesis and mTOR signaling. PMID:25257868

  4. Serratus Anterior and Lower Trapezius Muscle Activities During Multi-Joint Isotonic Scapular Exercises and Isometric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruike, Masaaki; Ellenbecker, Todd S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Proper scapular function during humeral elevation, such as upward rotation, external rotation, and posterior tilting of the scapula, is necessary to prevent shoulder injury. However, the appropriate intensity of rehabilitation exercise for the periscapular muscles has yet to be clarified. Objective: To identify the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, infraspinatus, and posterior deltoid muscle activities during 2 free-motion exercises using 3 intensities and to compare these muscle activities with isometric contractions during quadruped shoulder flexion and external rotation and abduction of the glenohumeral joint. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Health Science Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 16 uninjured, healthy, active, male college students (age = 19.5 ± 1.2 years, height = 173.1 ± 6.5 cm, weight = 68.8 ± 6.6 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Mean electromyographic activity normalized by the maximal voluntary isometric contraction was analyzed across 3 intensities and 5 exercises. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for electromyographic activity of the 4 muscles in each free-motion exercise. Results: Significant interactions in electromyographic activity were observed between intensities and exercises (P < .05). The quadruped shoulder-flexion exercise activated all 4 muscles compared with other exercises. Also, the modified robbery free-motion exercise activated the serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus compared with the lawn-mower free-motion exercise. However, neither exercise showed a difference in posterior deltoid electromyographic activity. Conclusions: Three intensities exposed the nature of the periscapular muscle activities across the different exercises. The free-motion exercise in periscapular muscle rehabilitation may not modify serratus anterior, lower trapezius, and infraspinatus muscle activities unless knee-joint extension is limited. PMID:25689561

  5. Wave reflection and central aortic pressure are increased in response to static and dynamic muscle contraction at comparable workloads.

    PubMed

    Edwards, David G; Mastin, Corey R; Kenefick, Robert W

    2008-02-01

    We determined the effects of static and dynamic muscle contraction at equivalent workloads on central aortic pressure and wave reflection. At random, 14 healthy men and women (23 +/- 5 yr of age) performed a static handgrip forearm contraction [90 s at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)], dynamic handgrip contractions (1 contraction/s for 180 s at 30% MVC), and a control trial. During static and dynamic trials, tension-time index was controlled by holding peak tension constant. Measurements of brachial artery blood pressure and the synthesis of a central aortic pressure waveform (by radial artery applanation tonometry and generalized transfer function) were conducted at baseline, during each trial, and during 1 min of postexercise ischemia (PEI). Aortic augmentation index (AI), an index of wave reflection, was calculated from the aortic pressure waveform. AI increased during both static and dynamic trials (static, 5.2 +/- 3.1 to 11.8 +/- 3.4%; dynamic, 5.8 +/- 3.0 to 13.3 +/- 3.4%; P < 0.05) and further increased during PEI (static, 18.5 +/- 3.1%; dynamic, 18.6 +/- 2.9%; P < 0.05). Peripheral and central systolic and diastolic pressures increased (P < 0.05) during both static and dynamic trials and remained elevated during PEI. AI and pressure responses did not differ between static and dynamic trials. Peripheral and central pressures increased similarly during static and dynamic contraction; however, the rise in central systolic pressure during both conditions was augmented by increased wave reflection. The present data suggest that wave reflection is an important determinant of the central blood pressure response during forearm muscle contractions.

  6. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity.

  7. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthesis, as described by the product of glycogen particle size and number, is dependent on the time course of recovery after exercise and carbohydrate availability. In the present study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of glycogen in fibers with high (type I) and low (type II) mitochondrial content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies for analysis included time points 3, 24 and 48 h post exercise from the exercising leg, whereas biopsies corresponding to prior to and at 48 h after the exercise bout were collected from the non-exercising, control leg. Quantitative imaging by transmission electron microscopy revealed an early (post 3 and 24 h) enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen (defined as glycogen particles located within the myofibrils) of type I fibers, which was associated with an increase in the number of particles. In contrast, late in recovery (post 48 h), intermyofibr