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Sample records for abdominal mycobacterial infection

  1. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  2. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  3. Therapy of environmental mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Fabroni, Caterina; Buggiani, Gionata; Lotti, Torello

    2008-01-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of environmental mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult because these agents can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. The most common environmental mycobacteria that can cause cutaneous infections are Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium marinum. All mycobacteria are characterized by low pathogenicity and they can contaminate affected or traumatized skin only in immunocompetent subjects (mainly in fishermen, swimming-pool attendants, and aquarium owners) whereas medical and esthetic procedures are at risk for the infections because of the quick-growing mycobacteria. Immunocompromised subjects can instead easily develop environmental mycobacterial infections of differing degrees of severity.

  4. Body piercing complicated by atypical mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ferringer, Tammie; Pride, Howard; Tyler, William

    2008-01-01

    Body piercing is a growing trend, especially in young people, but the literature on complications of piercing consists mostly of case reports involving ear piercing. Previous reported complications of piercing include contact dermatitis, keloids, traumatic tearing, viral transmission, and bacterial infections. We report two patients who presented with atypical mycobacterial infections of body piercing sites. It is important to recognize the association of piercing and mycobacterial infections so that tissue can be obtained for histopathologic examination and appropriate culture.

  5. Mycobacterial infections in striped bass from Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Brown, J.J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Starliper, C.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Weyers, H.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    Eighty striped bass Morone saxatilis were obtained from Delaware Bay using commercial gill nets set adjacent to Woodland Beach (n = 70) and Bowers Beach (n = 10) in December 2003. Fish were examined for gross lesions. Total lengths (TLs) and eviscerated weights were determined to calculate condition factors (K). Portions of spleens were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture, and portions of spleens, kidneys (anterior and posterior), livers, and gonads were obtained for histological examination. The size distribution of the striped bass was relatively homogeneous; the mean TL was about 600 mm for all samples. Mean K exceeded 0.95 in all samples and was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among samples. Significant differences in mycobacterial infection prevalence (P ??? 0.05) were observed among samples; samples obtained at Woodland Beach (WB) on December 10 (53.8%, n = 13) and December 17 (7.1%, n = 42) exhibited the most striking differences in prevalence. Mycobacterial infection intensity ranged from 1 ?? 102 to 1 ?? 107 colony-forming units per gram of spleen. Acanthocephalan infection prevalence and intensity, non-acid-fast bacterial infection prevalence, and fish sex ratio were also significantly different among the samples (P ??? 0.05). Similar to the mycobacterial infections, differences in sex ratio, acanthocephalan infection, and non-acid-fast bacterial infection were observed between the WB samples taken on December 10 and 17. However, no significant associations (P > 0.05) were observed between sex ratio or these infections and mycobacterial infection. The differences in bacterial and parasite infection prevalence and intensity and fish sex ratio in some samples indicate that these fish had a different history and that the epizootiology of mycobacterial infection in striped bass from Delaware Bay may be relatively complex. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  6. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Ocular Infections: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Wajiha J.; Sheheitli, Huda; Abdul Fattah, Maamoun; Hamam, Rola N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous or atypical mycobacterial ocular infections have been increasing in prevalence over the past few decades. They are known to cause periocular, adnexal, ocular surface and intraocular infections and are often recalcitrant to medical therapy. These infections can potentially cause detrimental outcomes, in part due to a delay in diagnosis. We review 174 case reports and series on nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) ocular infections and discuss etiology, microbiology, risk factors, diagnosis, clinical presentation, and treatment of these infections. History of interventions, trauma, foreign bodies, implants, contact lenses, and steroids are linked to NTM ocular infections. Steroid use may prolong the duration of the infection and cause poorer visual outcomes. Early diagnosis and initiation of treatment with multiple antibiotics are necessary to achieve the best visual outcome. PMID:26106601

  7. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection after Fractionated CO2 Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Miller, Becky A.; Miller, Melissa B.; MacKuen, Courteney; Groben, Pamela; White, Becky; Cox, Gary M.; Stout, Jason E.

    2013-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are increasingly associated with cutaneous infections after cosmetic procedures. Fractionated CO2 resurfacing, a widely used technique for photorejuvenation, has been associated with a more favorable side effect profile than alternative procedures. We describe 2 cases of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after treatment with a fractionated CO2 laser at a private clinic. Densely distributed erythematous papules and pustules developed within the treated area within 2 weeks of the laser procedure. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic analysis and culture. Both infections responded to a 4-month course of a multidrug regimen. An environmental investigation of the clinic was performed, but no source of infection was found. The case isolates differed from each other and from isolates obtained from the clinic, suggesting that the infection was acquired by postprocedure exposure. Papules and pustules after fractionated CO2 resurfacing should raise the suspicion of nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. PMID:23628077

  8. Studies of transmission of mycobacterial infections in Chinook salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Johnson, H.E.

    1962-01-01

    THE INCLUSION OF VISCERA AND CARCASSES OF TUBERCULOUS ADULT SALMON IN THE DIET OF JUVENILE SALMONIDS is considered to be the major source of mycobacterial infections in hatchery-reared fish (Wood and Ordal, 1958; Ross, Earp, and Wood, 1959). In considering additional modes of infection, we speculated about transovarian transmission or a mechanical process arising from contamination of the ova at the egg-taking stage with subsequent entry of the bacteria into the egg at the time of fertilization. This paper is a report on observations made during an experiment designed to test the latter theories.

  9. Biomarker Discovery in Subclinical Mycobacterial Infections of Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Janagama, Harish K.; Widdel, Andrea; Vulchanova, Lucy; Stabel, Judith R.; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine tuberculosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease of cattle worldwide; however, infection in the United States is limited to 0.01% of dairy herds. Thus detection of bovine TB is confounded by high background infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study addresses variations in the circulating peptidome based on the pathogenesis of two biologically similar mycobacterial diseases of cattle. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesized that serum proteomes of animals in response to either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis infection will display several commonalities and differences. Sera prospectively collected from animals experimentally infected with either M. bovis or M. paratuberculosis were analyzed using high-resolution proteomics approaches. iTRAQ, a liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry approach, was used to simultaneously identify and quantify peptides from multiple infections and contemporaneous uninfected control groups. Four comparisons were performed: 1) M. bovis infection versus uninfected controls, 2) M. bovis versus M. paratuberculosis infection, 3) early, and 4) advanced M. paratuberculosis infection versus uninfected controls. One hundred and ten differentially elevated proteins (P≤0.05) were identified. Vitamin D binding protein precursor (DBP), alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, alpha-1B glycoprotein, fetuin, and serine proteinase inhibitor were identified in both infections. Transthyretin, retinol binding proteins, and cathelicidin were identified exclusively in M. paratuberculosis infection, while the serum levels of alpha-1-microglobulin/bikunin precursor (AMBP) protein, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, fetuin, and alpha-1B glycoprotein were elevated exclusively in M. bovis infected animals. Conclusions/Significance The discovery of these biomarkers has significant impact on the elucidation of pathogenesis of two mycobacterial diseases at the cellular and the molecular level and can be applied in the

  10. Biallelic JAK1 mutations in immunodeficient patient with mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Eletto, Davide; Burns, Siobhan O.; Angulo, Ivan; Plagnol, Vincent; Gilmour, Kimberly C.; Henriquez, Frances; Curtis, James; Gaspar, Miguel; Nowak, Karolin; Daza-Cajigal, Vanessa; Kumararatne, Dinakantha; Doffinger, Rainer; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the immune system cause primary immunodeficiencies. Here, we study a patient with recurrent atypical mycobacterial infection and early-onset metastatic bladder carcinoma. Exome sequencing identified two homozygous missense germline mutations, P733L and P832S, in the JAK1 protein that mediates signalling from multiple cytokine receptors. Cells from this patient exhibit reduced JAK1 and STAT phosphorylation following cytokine stimulations, reduced induction of expression of interferon-regulated genes and dysregulated cytokine production; which are indicative of signalling defects in multiple immune response pathways including Interferon-γ production. Reconstitution experiments in the JAK1-deficient cells demonstrate that the impaired JAK1 function is mainly attributable to the effect of the P733L mutation. Further analyses of the mutant protein reveal a phosphorylation-independent role of JAK1 in signal transduction. These findings clarify JAK1 signalling mechanisms and demonstrate a critical function of JAK1 in protection against mycobacterial infection and possibly the immunological surveillance of cancer. PMID:28008925

  11. Expect the Unexpected: Mycobacterial Infection in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty Patients

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mohan M; Wade, Roshan N; Bava, Surendar S

    2017-01-01

    Orthopaedic Surgeons rarely encounter mycobacterial infections in Post Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) patients. We present series of two cases to create awareness among clinicians to expect the unexpected. Tuberculosis typical/ atypical is a hidden culprit in catch clinical situations when chronic infection is Suspected, but the lab investigations are negative in persistently symptomatic patients. In such situations clinicians should suspect atypical or complex mycobacterial infections and evaluate the patients accordingly. Clinical suspicion, evaluation, isolation and treatment of atypical or complex mycobacterial infections with sensitive chemotherapy, leads to complete resolution of infection and full functional rehabilitation.

  12. A genetic perspective on granulomatous diseases with an emphasis on mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Un-In; Holland, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the genetic factors predisposing to mycobacterial infections has been a subject of intense research activities. Current knowledge of the genetic and immunological basis of susceptibility to mycobacteria largely comes from natural human and experimental models of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections. These observations support the central role of the IL-12/IFN-γ pathway in controlling mycobacterial infection. In this review, we discuss the knowledge that associates both simple and complex inheritance with susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases. We place a special emphasis on monogenic disorders, since these clearly pinpoint pathway and can adduce mechanism. We also describe the clinical, immunological and pathological features that may steer clinical investigation in the appropriate directions. PMID:26733044

  13. Regulation of phagocyte triglyceride by a STAT-ATG2 pathway controls mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Péan, Claire B.; Schiebler, Mark; Tan, Sharon W. S.; Sharrock, Jessica A.; Kierdorf, Katrin; Brown, Karen P.; Maserumule, M. Charlotte; Menezes, Shinelle; Pilátová, Martina; Bronda, Kévin; Guermonprez, Pierre; Stramer, Brian M.; Andres Floto, R.; Dionne, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a global threat to human health, yet the molecular mechanisms regulating immunity remain poorly understood. Cytokines can promote or inhibit mycobacterial survival inside macrophages and the underlying mechanisms represent potential targets for host-directed therapies. Here we show that cytokine-STAT signalling promotes mycobacterial survival within macrophages by deregulating lipid droplets via ATG2 repression. In Drosophila infected with Mycobacterium marinum, mycobacterium-induced STAT activity triggered by unpaired-family cytokines reduces Atg2 expression, permitting deregulation of lipid droplets. Increased Atg2 expression or reduced macrophage triglyceride biosynthesis, normalizes lipid deposition in infected phagocytes and reduces numbers of viable intracellular mycobacteria. In human macrophages, addition of IL-6 promotes mycobacterial survival and BCG-induced lipid accumulation by a similar, but probably not identical, mechanism. Our results reveal Atg2 regulation as a mechanism by which cytokines can control lipid droplet homeostasis and consequently resistance to mycobacterial infection in Drosophila. PMID:28262681

  14. Defensins: The Case for Their Use against Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Haodi; Lv, Yue; Zhao, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Human tuberculosis remains a huge global public health problem with an estimated 1/3rd of the population being infected. Defensins are antibacterial cationic peptides produced by a number of cell types, most notably neutrophil granulocytes and epithelial cells. All three defensin types (α-, β-, and θ-defensins) have antibacterial activities, mainly through bacterial membrane permeabilization. Defensins are effective against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including mycobacteria and are active both intra- and extracellularly. Mycobacterial resistance has never been demonstrated although the mprF gene encoding resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. In addition to their antibacterial effect, defensins are chemoattractants for macrophages and neutrophils. There are many cases for their use for therapy or prophylaxis in tuberculosis as well. In conclusion, we propose that there is considerable scope and potential for exploring their use as therapeutic/prophylactic agents and more comprehensive survey of defensins from different species and their bioactivity is timely. PMID:27725944

  15. Atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections in Egyptians: a clinicopathological study.

    PubMed

    El-Khalawany, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Atypical mycobacteria comprise an uncommon heterogenous non-tuberculous group of acid-fast bacteria that rarely involve skin. The pattern of atypical mycobacterial cutaneous infections (AMCI) has not been previously studied in Egypt. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics, pathological features and species profile of AMCI among Egyptian patients. A retrospective study included 46 cases, diagnosed with AMCI during the period 2002 to 2012. The study included 34 males (73.9%) and 12 females (26.9%). The average age of patients was 39 years while the average duration of lesions was 15 months. The lesions were mostly located on the extremities (91.3%) and there was predominance of single (65.2%) and nodular (41.4%) lesions. History of trauma was confirmed in 91.3%. Histologically, the granulomas were mostly superficial (67.4%) with predominance of nodular suppurative pattern (84.8%). Other significant histological findings included epidermal hypertrophy (100%), presence of large-sized multinucleated giant cells (87%) and intrafollicular neutrophilic abscesses (84.8%). The diagnosis was proved by direct smear in 6.5%, skin biopsy in 10.9%, tissue culture in 47.8% and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 34.8%. Isolated species included Mycobacterium marinum (84.8%), Mycobacterium fortuitum (10.9%) and Mycobacterium kansasii (4.3%). Although the results of this study recommend that the diagnosis of AMCI is based mainly on culture and PCR, other clinicopathological features such as history of trauma, acral location of the lesion and suppurative granulomatous reaction with intrafollicular abscesses could be helpful clues in suspecting AMCI.

  16. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  17. Species distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-related mycobacterial infections: implications for selection of initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Montessori, V; Phillips, P; Montaner, J; Haley, L; Craib, K; Bessuille, E; Black, W

    1996-06-01

    Management of mycobacterial infection is species specific; however, treatment is prompted by positive smears or cultures, often several weeks before species identification. The objective of this study was to determine the species distribution of mycobacterial isolates from various body sites in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). All mycobacterial isolates recovered at St. Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) from April 1989 to March 1993 were reviewed. Among 357 HIV-positive patients with mycobacterial infections, 64% (96) of the sputum isolates were Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), 18% were Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and 17% were Mycobacterium kansasii. Lymph node involvement (25 patients) was due to either MAC (72%) or M. tuberculosis (24%). Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of mycobacteremia were due to MAC (98%), M. tuberculosis (1%), and M. kansasii (1%). Similarly, cultures of 84 bone marrow biopsy specimens (99%), 19 intestinal biopsy specimens (100%), and 30 stool specimens (97%) yielded predominantly MAC. These results have implications for initial therapy, particularly in areas where rapid methods for species identification are not readily available. Because of considerable geographic variation, development of guidelines for selection of initial therapy depends on regional determination of species distribution in HIV-related mycobacterial infections.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of mycobacterial infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Kiehn, T E; Cammarata, R

    1986-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial infections are commonly seen in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, and laboratory culture is the best method for diagnosing these infections. In addition to conventional agar media, we used BACTEC 12A (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) broth medium for culture. More isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were recovered from 12A broth than from Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H11 agar. Also, the average detection time of these mycobacteria was the earliest with 12A broth. Stool examination has been helpful in diagnosing mycobacterial disease in AIDS patients, and in this study both acid-fast stain and culture of fecal material was necessary for efficient detection of mycobacteria. Another sensitive and practical method for detecting mycobacterial infections in patients with AIDS is the Isolator lysis-centrifugation system (Du Pont Co., Wilmington, Del.) which offers the advantage of quantitating the degree of mycobacteremia. Laboratories should be alerted to the possibility of mixed mycobacterial infection in patients with AIDS, and positive cultures should be repeatedly examined to detect coinfection with a slower-growing mycobacterium such as M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium complex. PMID:3095369

  19. Macrophage form, function, and phenotype in mycobacterial infection: lessons from tuberculosis and other diseases.

    PubMed

    McClean, Colleen M; Tobin, David M

    2016-10-01

    Macrophages play a central role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. Recent work has highlighted the importance of diverse macrophage types and phenotypes that depend on local environment and developmental origins. In this review, we highlight how distinct macrophage phenotypes may influence disease progression in tuberculosis. In addition, we draw on work investigating specialized macrophage populations important in cancer biology and atherosclerosis in order to suggest new areas of investigation relevant to mycobacterial pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the repertoire of macrophage phenotypes and behaviors during infection may provide opportunities for novel control of disease through modulation of macrophage form and function.

  20. Hypoxia inducible factor signaling modulates susceptibility to mycobacterial infection via a nitric oxide dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Elks, Philip M; Brizee, Sabrina; van der Vaart, Michiel; Walmsley, Sarah R; van Eeden, Fredericus J; Renshaw, Stephen A; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a current major world-health problem, exacerbated by the causative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), becoming increasingly resistant to conventional antibiotic treatment. Mtb is able to counteract the bactericidal mechanisms of leukocytes to survive intracellularly and develop a niche permissive for proliferation and dissemination. Understanding of the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis (TB) remains limited, especially for early infection and for reactivation of latent infection. Signaling via hypoxia inducible factor α (HIF-α) transcription factors has previously been implicated in leukocyte activation and host defence. We have previously shown that hypoxic signaling via stabilization of Hif-1α prolongs the functionality of leukocytes in the innate immune response to injury. We sought to manipulate Hif-α signaling in a well-established Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) zebrafish model of TB to investigate effects on the host's ability to combat mycobacterial infection. Stabilization of host Hif-1α, both pharmacologically and genetically, at early stages of Mm infection was able to reduce the bacterial burden of infected larvae. Increasing Hif-1α signaling enhanced levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in neutrophils prior to infection and was able to reduce larval mycobacterial burden. Conversely, decreasing Hif-2α signaling enhanced RNS levels and reduced bacterial burden, demonstrating that Hif-1α and Hif-2α have opposing effects on host susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. The antimicrobial effect of Hif-1α stabilization, and Hif-2α reduction, were demonstrated to be dependent on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling at early stages of infection. Our findings indicate that induction of leukocyte iNOS by stabilizing Hif-1α, or reducing Hif-2α, aids the host during early stages of Mm infection. Stabilization of Hif-1α therefore represents a potential target for therapeutic

  1. MicroRNA in innate immunity and autophagy during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Kyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Basu, Joyoti; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-01-01

    The fine-tuning of innate immune responses is an important aspect of host defenses against mycobacteria. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding RNAs, play essential roles in regulating multiple biological pathways including innate host defenses against various infections. Accumulating evidence shows that many miRNAs regulate the complex interplay between mycobacterial survival strategies and host innate immune pathways. Recent studies have contributed to understanding the role of miRNAs, the levels of which can be modulated by mycobacterial infection, in tuning host autophagy to control bacterial survival and innate effector function. Despite considerable efforts devoted to miRNA profiling over the past decade, further work is needed to improve the selection of appropriate biomarkers for tuberculosis. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of miRNAs in regulating innate immune signaling and autophagy may provide insights into new therapeutic modalities for host-directed anti-mycobacterial therapies. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the recent literature regarding miRNA profiling in tuberculosis and the roles of miRNAs in modulating innate immune responses and autophagy defenses against mycobacterial infections.

  2. [Alterations in recruitment and activation of Rab proteins during mycobacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    At the phagosome level, Mycobacterium spp. alters activation and recruitment of several "Ras gene from rat brain" proteins, commonly known as Rab. Mycobacterial phagosomes have a greater and sustained expression of Rab5, Rab11, Rab14 and Rab22a, and lowered or no expression of Rab7, Rab9 and Rab6. This correlates with increased fusion of the phagosomes with early and recycling endosomes acquiring some features of early phagosomes, allowing the bacteria to gain access to nutrients and preventing the activation of anti-mycobacterial mechanisms. The expression of constitutively active mutants of Rab from the early stage endosomes prevents the maturation of phagosomes containing latex beads or heat-inactivated mycobacteria. Silencing of these mutants by interference RNA or dominant negative forms induces the maturation of mycobacterial phagosomes. The mechanisms have not been established by which mycobacteria alter the expression of these GTPases and thereby shift the phagolysosomal maturation. The problem can be explained by alterations in the recruitment of proteins that interact with Rab, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases and early endosomal antigen 1. Identifying the mechanisms used by Mycobacterium spp. to disrupt the cycle of Rab activation will be essential to understand the pathophysiology of mycobacterial infections and usefully to potential drug targets.

  3. Husbandry stress exacerbates mycobacterial infections in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsay, J.M.; Watral, V.; Schreck, C.B.; Kent, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacteria are significant pathogens of laboratory zebrafish, Danio rerio (Hamilton). Stress is often implicated in clinical disease and morbidity associated with mycobacterial infections but has yet to be examined with zebrafish. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of husbandry stressors on zebrafish infected with mycobacteria. Adult zebrafish were exposed to Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium chelonae, two species that have been associated with disease in zebrafish. Infected fish and controls were then subjected to chronic crowding and handling stressors and examined over an 8-week period. Whole-body cortisol was significantly elevated in stressed fish compared to non-stressed fish. Fish infected with M. marinum ATCC 927 and subjected to husbandry stressors had 14% cumulative mortality while no mortality occurred among infected fish not subjected to husbandry stressors. Stressed fish, infected with M. chelonae H1E2 from zebrafish, were 15-fold more likely to be infected than non-stressed fish at week 8 post-injection. Sub-acute, diffuse infections were more common among stressed fish infected with M. marinum or M. chelonae than non-stressed fish. This is the first study to demonstrate an effect of stress and elevated cortisol on the morbidity, prevalence, clinical disease and histological presentation associated with mycobacterial infections in zebrafish. Minimizing husbandry stress may be effective at reducing the severity of outbreaks of clinical mycobacteriosis in zebrafish facilities. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut.

    PubMed

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M; Gigliotti Rothfuchs, Antonio; Nylén, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4(+) T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus-infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory-secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus-infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test-based diagnosis of microbial infections.

  5. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  6. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  7. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection of the musculoskeletal system in immunocompetent hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gundavda, Manit K; Patil, Hitendra G; Agashe, Vikas M; Soman, Rajeev; Rodriques, Camilla; Deshpande, Ramesh B

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) were considered saprophytic organisms for many years but now are recognized as human pathogens. Although humans are routinely exposed to NTM, the rate of clinical infection is low. Such infections usually occur in the elderly and in patients who are immunocompromised. However, there has been an increasing incidence in recent years of infections in immunocompetent hosts. NTM infections in immunocompetent individuals are secondary to direct inoculation either contamination from surgical procedures or penetrating injuries rather than hematogenous dissemination. Clinically and on histopathology, musculoskeletal infections caused by NTM resemble those caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis but are mostly resistant to routine antituberculosis medicines. Materials and Methods: Six cases of NTM infection in immunocompetent hosts presenting to the department from 2004 to 2015 were included in study. Of which two cases (one patella and one humerus) of infection were following an open wound due to trauma while two cases (one hip and one shoulder) of infection were by inoculation following an intraarticular injection for arthrogram of the joint, one case was infection following arthroscopy of knee joint and one case (calcaneum) was infection following local injection for the treatment of plantar fasciitis. All patients underwent inaging and tissue diagnosis with samples being sent for culture, staining, and histopathology. Results: Clinical suspicion of NTM inoculation led to the correct diagnosis (four cases with culture positive and two cases with histopathological diagnosis). There treatment protocol for extrapulmonary NTM infection was radical surgical debridement and medical management based on drug sensitivity testing in culture positive cases. At a mean follow up of 3 years (range1–9 years) all patients had total remission and excellent results. Conclusions: Whenever a case of chronic granulomatous infection is encountered

  8. Biomarker Discovery in Subclinical Mycobacterial Infections of Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Bovine tuberculosis is a highly prevalent infectious disease of cattle worldwide; however, infection in the United States is limited to 0.01% of dairy herds. Thus detection of bovine TB is confounded by high background infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study a...

  9. Influence of trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) during mycobacterial infection of bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Indrigo, Jessica; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2002-07-01

    The relative role of surface lipids in the innate macrophage response to infection with mycobacteria remains unknown. Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a major component of the mycobacterial cell wall, can elicit hypersensitive as well as T-cell-independent foreign body responses. The T-cell-independent contribution of TDM to the primary macrophage response to mycobacterial infection was investigated. Bone-marrow-derived macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice were infected with native Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) or with MTB delipidated using petroleum ether extraction methods. The removal of surface lipids caused decreased bacterial survival in macrophages, but there was no loss of bacterial growth in broth culture. Bacterial survival within macrophages was restored upon reconstitution of the bacteria with purified TDM. The cytokine and chemokine parameters of the macrophage responses were also investigated. The amounts of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and MIP-1alpha produced were significantly reduced following delipidation, but were restored upon reconstitution with TDM. The amount of IL-12 produced, but not the amount of IL-10 produced, was also significantly reduced upon macrophage infection with delipidated MTB. Furthermore, nitric oxide responses were not impaired upon infection with delipidated MTB, suggesting that intracellular survival and macrophage secretion of cytokines and chemokines are differentially controlled. These studies indicate that TDM is a major component contributing to the innate macrophage responses to MTB infection.

  10. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Karen; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-15

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms. In immunocompetent hosts, they are a rare cause of disease. In immunocompromised hosts, disease due to NTM is well documented. Reports of NTM disease have increased in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. This increase may reflect increased numbers of transplants, intensification of immune suppressive regimens, prolonged survival of transplant recipients, and/or improved diagnostic techniques. The difficulty of diagnosis and the impact associated with infections due to NTM in HSCT and SOT recipients necessitates that, to ensure prompt diagnosis and early initiation of therapy, a high level of suspicion for NTM disease be maintained. The most common manifestations of NTM infection in SOT recipients include cutaneous and pleuropulmonary disease, and, in HSCT recipients, catheter-related infection. Skin and pulmonary lesions should be biopsied for histologic examination, special staining, and microbiologic cultures, including cultures for bacteria, Nocardia species, fungi, and mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections associated with catheters may be documented by tunnel or blood (isolator) cultures. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is an essential component of optimal care. The frequent isolation of NTM other than Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) from transplant recipients limits the extrapolation of therapeutic data from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals to the population of transplant recipients. Issues involved in the management of NTM disease in transplant recipients are characterized by a case of disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium avium complex in a lung transplant recipient, with a review of the relevant literature.

  11. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences. PMID:24914222

  12. Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection. A Multisystem, Multigenic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szymanski, Eva P.; Leung, Janice M.; Fowler, Cedar J.; Haney, Carissa; Hsu, Amy P.; Chen, Fei; Duggal, Priya; Oler, Andrew J.; McCormack, Ryan; Podack, Eckhard; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Browne, Sarah K.; Prevots, D. Rebecca; Knowles, Michael; Cutting, Gary; Liu, Xinyue; Devine, Scott E.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Olivier, Kenneth N.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The clinical features of patients infected with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacteria (PNTM) are well described, but the genetic components of infection susceptibility are not. Objectives: To examine genetic variants in patients with PNTM, their unaffected family members, and a control group. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was done on 69 white patients with PNTM and 18 of their white unaffected family members. We performed a candidate gene analysis using immune, cystic fibrosis transmembrance conductance regulator (CFTR), cilia, and connective tissue gene sets. The numbers of patients, family members, and control subjects with variants in each category were compared, as was the average number of variants per person. Measurements and Main Results: A significantly higher number of patients with PNTM than the other subjects had low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue categories (35, 26, 90, and 90%, respectively). Patients with PNTM also had significantly more cilia and connective tissue variants per person than did control subjects (2.47 and 2.55 compared with 1.38 and 1.40, respectively; P = 1.4 × 10−6 and P = 2.7 × 10−8, respectively). Patients with PNTM had an average of 5.26 variants across all categories (1.98 in control subjects; P = 2.8 × 10−17), and they were more likely than control subjects to have variants in multiple categories. We observed similar results for family members without PNTM infection, with the exception of the immune category. Conclusions: Patients with PNTM have more low-frequency, protein-affecting variants in immune, CFTR, cilia, and connective tissue genes than their unaffected family members and control subjects. We propose that PNTM infection is a multigenic disease in which combinations of variants across gene categories, plus environmental exposures, increase susceptibility to the infection. PMID:26038974

  13. Developments on drug delivery systems for the treatment of mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M M; Cruz, A; Fraga, A G; Castro, A G; Cruz, M E M; Pedrosa, J

    2008-01-01

    The clinical management of tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases with antimycobacterial chemotherapy remains a difficult task. The classical treatment protocols are long-lasting; the drugs reach mycobacteria-infected macrophages in low amounts and/or do not persist long enough to develop the desired antimycobacterial effect; and the available agents induce severe toxic effects. Nanotechnology has provided a huge improvement to pharmacology through the designing of drug delivery systems able to target phagocytic cells infected by intracellular pathogens, such as mycobacteria. Liposomes and nanoparticles of polymeric nature represent two of the most efficient drug carrier systems that after in vivo administration are endocytosed by phagocytic cells and then release the carried agents into these cells. This article reviews the relevant publications describing the effectiveness of the association of antimycobacterial agents with liposomes or nanoparticles for the treatment of mycobacterioses, particularly for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium infections. The increased therapeutic index of antimycobacterial drugs; the reduction of dosing frequency; and the improvement of solubility of hydrophobic agents, allowing the administration of higher doses, have been demonstrated in experimental infections. These advantages may lead to new therapeutic protocols that will improve patient compliance and, consequently, lead to a more successful control of mycobacterial infections. The potential therapeutic advantages resulting from the use of non-invasive administration routes for nanoparticulate systems are also discussed.

  14. Human TYK2 deficiency: Mycobacterial and viral infections without hyper-IgE syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreins, Alexandra Y.; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Okada, Satoshi; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Ramírez-Alejo, Noé; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Ailal, Fatima; Bousfiha, Aziz; Mansouri, Davood; Nievas, Elma; Ma, Cindy S.; Rao, Geetha; Bernasconi, Andrea; Sun Kuehn, Hye; Niemela, Julie; Stoddard, Jennifer; Deveau, Paul; Cobat, Aurelie; El Azbaoui, Safa; Sabri, Ayoub; Lim, Che Kang; Sundin, Mikael; Avery, Danielle T.; Halwani, Rabih; Grant, Audrey V.; Boisson, Bertrand; Bogunovic, Dusan; Itan, Yuval; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Migaud, Melanie; Deswarte, Caroline; Alsina, Laia; Kotlarz, Daniel; Klein, Christoph; Muller-Fleckenstein, Ingrid; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rose-John, Stefan; Picard, Capucine; Hammarstrom, Lennart; Puel, Anne; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Abel, Laurent; Chaussabel, Damien; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bustamante, Jacinta; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, complete TYK2 deficiency was previously described in a patient (P1) with intracellular bacterial and viral infections and features of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), including atopic dermatitis, high serum IgE levels, and staphylococcal abscesses. We identified seven other TYK2-deficient patients from five families and four different ethnic groups. These patients were homozygous for one of five null mutations, different from that seen in P1. They displayed mycobacterial and/or viral infections, but no HIES. All eight TYK2-deficient patients displayed impaired but not abolished cellular responses to (a) IL-12 and IFN-α/β, accounting for mycobacterial and viral infections, respectively; (b) IL-23, with normal proportions of circulating IL-17+ T cells, accounting for their apparent lack of mucocutaneous candidiasis; and (c) IL-10, with no overt clinical consequences, including a lack of inflammatory bowel disease. Cellular responses to IL-21, IL-27, IFN-γ, IL-28/29 (IFN-λ), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) were normal. The leukocytes and fibroblasts of all seven newly identified TYK2-deficient patients, unlike those of P1, responded normally to IL-6, possibly accounting for the lack of HIES in these patients. The expression of exogenous wild-type TYK2 or the silencing of endogenous TYK2 did not rescue IL-6 hyporesponsiveness, suggesting that this phenotype was not a consequence of the TYK2 genotype. The core clinical phenotype of TYK2 deficiency is mycobacterial and/or viral infections, caused by impaired responses to IL-12 and IFN-α/β. Moreover, impaired IL-6 responses and HIES do not appear to be intrinsic features of TYK2 deficiency in humans. PMID:26304966

  15. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  16. 2013 WSES guidelines for management of intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high. The 2013 update of the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) guidelines for the management of intra-abdominal infections contains evidence-based recommendations for management of patients with intra-abdominal infections. PMID:23294512

  17. Structure-guided, target-based drug discovery - exploiting genome information from HIV to mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Sony; Thomas, Sherine E; Ochoa Montano, Bernardo; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-01-01

    The use of protein crystallography in structure-guided drug discovery allows identification of potential inhibitor-binding sites and optimisation of interactions of hits and lead compounds with a target protein. An early example of this approach was the use of the structure of HIV protease in designing AIDS antivirals. More recently, use of structure-guided design with fragment-based drug discovery, which reduces the size of screening libraries by decreasing complexity, has improved ligand efficiency in drug design. Here, we discuss the use of structure-guided target identification and lead optimisation using fragment-based approaches in the development of new antimicrobials for mycobacterial infections.

  18. [New drugs against tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections: a review].

    PubMed

    Amitani, R; Kuze, F

    1994-11-01

    The number of cases with tuberculosis is again increasing in many countries, and recently several nosocomial outbreaks of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis have occurred in the United States. The number of patients with disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections in AIDS population, and patients with MAC pulmonary disease unassociated with HIV seem to be also increasing. It takes at least 6 to 9 months for an initial treatment of active tuberculosis due to drug-sensitive strains with the standard regimen which includes isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP). Treatment for the diseases caused by drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and MAC is much more time-consuming and more toxic than for the diseases caused by drug-sensitive strains, and often unsuccessful. For the reasons described above, the developments of new agents with potent antimycobacterial activities are highly desired. The new agents should also be useful for treating patients who have acquired resistance to many of the currently available drugs. In this review the new antimycobacterial drugs are summarized. Some of them have already been used clinically, but many are still in experimental evaluations. 1) Rifamycin derivatives: rifabutin (RBT), KRM-1648 (KRM), rifapentin (RPT), FCE-22250, FCE-22807, CGP-7040, SPA-S-565 and other rifamycin derivatives. New rifamycin derivatives including RBT, KRM have increased in vitro antimycobacterial activities. RBT and KRM are much more active in vitro and in vivo than RFP against both M. tuberculosis and MAC. KRM seems to be more potent than RBT against MAC in experimental studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Lingual ulcer as the only sign of recurrent mycobacterial infection in an HIV/AIDS-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Amador, Velia; Anaya-Saavedra, Gabriela; González-Ramírez, Imelda; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan Luis; Esquivel-Pedraza, Lilly; Reyes-Gutiérrez, Edgardo; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    The report describes an HIV/AIDS patient seen at a referral center in Mexico City, in whom a mycobacterial infection in the oral mucosa, probably tuberculosis (TB) was identified. The purpose is to describe the clinical and histological findings in an HIV-infected patient, who after being treated successfully for tuberculous lymphangitis 4 years ago, presented with a lingual ulcer as the only suggestive sign of recurrence of mycobacterial infection, probably M. tuberculosis. A 39-year-old man seen in the HIV clinic of the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición "Salvador Zubirán" in Mexico City since 1991 for HIV infection. In 1999 the patient developed tuberculous lymphangitis; he was managed with a 4-drug regimen for 12 months, with improvement of local and systemic symptoms. In May of 2003, the patient presented a painful superficial lingual ulcer, 0.7 cm in diameter, well circumscribed, crateriform with slightly elevated, irregular and indurated borders, of 4 months duration. The histopathological examination showed chronic granulomatous inflammation with giant multinucleated cells, suggestive of mycobacterial infection, and recurrence of TB was considered. Rifampin, isoniazide, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and streptomycin were administered. The lingual lesion improved with partial healing at the first week and total remission at 45 days after the beginning of the antituberculous treatment. In June, 2003, the patient began highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) that included two NRTIs and one NNRTI. At 7 months of follow-up, the patient remains free of lingual lesions. The particularity of the present case is that the lingual ulcer was the only sign of infection by mycobacteria, suggestive of TB, in an HIV/AIDS patient that probably represented a recurrence of a previous episode.

  20. The CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis mediates macrophage recruitment and dissemination of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Cui, Chao; Boland, Ralf; Bebelman, Jan-Paul; van der Sar, Astrid M; Smit, Martine J; Siderius, Marco; Spaink, Herman P; Meijer, Annemarie H

    2015-03-01

    The recruitment of leukocytes to infectious foci depends strongly on the local release of chemoattractant mediators. The human CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is an important node in the chemokine signaling network and is expressed by multiple leukocyte lineages, including T cells and macrophages. The ligands of this receptor originate from an ancestral CXCL11 gene in early vertebrates. Here, we used the optically accessible zebrafish embryo model to explore the function of the CXCR3-CXCL11 axis in macrophage recruitment and show that disruption of this axis increases the resistance to mycobacterial infection. In a mutant of the zebrafish ortholog of CXCR3 (cxcr3.2), macrophage chemotaxis to bacterial infections was attenuated, although migration to infection-independent stimuli was unaffected. Additionally, attenuation of macrophage recruitment to infection could be mimicked by treatment with NBI74330, a high-affinity antagonist of CXCR3. We identified two infection-inducible CXCL11-like chemokines as the functional ligands of Cxcr3.2, showing that the recombinant proteins exerted a Cxcr3.2-dependent chemoattraction when locally administrated in vivo. During infection of zebrafish embryos with Mycobacterium marinum, a well-established model for tuberculosis, we found that Cxcr3.2 deficiency limited the macrophage-mediated dissemination of mycobacteria. Furthermore, the loss of Cxcr3.2 function attenuated the formation of granulomatous lesions, the typical histopathological features of tuberculosis, and led to a reduction in the total bacterial burden. Prevention of mycobacterial dissemination by targeting the CXCR3 pathway, therefore, might represent a host-directed therapeutic strategy for treatment of tuberculosis. The demonstration of a conserved CXCR3-CXCL11 signaling axis in zebrafish extends the translational applicability of this model for studying diseases involving the innate immune system.

  1. [Disseminated mycobacterial infections in patients with HIV/AIDS. Evaluation of blood cultures].

    PubMed

    Coitinho, C; Brandes, E; Pardiñas, M; Rivas, C

    2005-01-01

    One thousand-forty blood cultures corresponding to 451 Uruguayan patients with AIDS and clinic diagnosis of disseminated mycobacterial infection were evaluated between 1999 and 2003. Samples were processed in the National Reference Center for Mycobacteria (Montevideo, Uruguay), using the automated blood culture system for mycobacteria MB-BacT (BioMérieux). Forty-five positive samples were detected (4.3%) corresponding to 26 patients with AIDS (average 2.3 samples per patient). In 10/26 patients M. avium complex (MAC) was identified and in 13/26 the isolated germ was M. tuberculosis. The average time of incubation was of 12.4 days (range 6-19 days) for MAC and of 22.6 days (range 7-35 days) for M. tuberculosis. Blood culture has demonstrated to be the best sample for the bacteriological confirmation of the disseminated mycobacterial infections when at least 2 samples by patient are studied. The frequency of isolates of M. tuberculosis and MAC in AIDS patients is according with a moderate prevalence of tuberculosis in Uruguay.

  2. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  3. Tracheal granuloma because of infection with a novel mycobacterial species in an old FIV-positive cat.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzi, D; Solano-Gallego, L

    2009-03-01

    A 15-year-old domestic shorthair feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat was presented with a five day history of productive cough and acute respiratory distress. Physical examination revealed inspiratory dyspnoea and diffuse gingivostomatitis. Radiographs showed an intratracheal mass located at the level of the sixth and the seventh cervical vertebrae. Bronchoscopy revealed a unique intratracheal mass occluding about 85 per cent of the tracheal lumen. The tracheal mass was removed bronchoscopically. A diagnosis of pyogranulomatous inflammation referable to a mycobacterial infection was made based on cytological and histopathological findings. 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction testing and sequence analysis identified a novel mycobacterial species, likely a slow grower, with 95 per cent identity with Mycobacterium xenopi. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a tracheal mycobacterial granuloma in a cat, and the first time, a mycobacterium with this sequence has been identified.

  4. Tattoo-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial skin infections--multiple states, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    2012-08-24

    Permanent tattoos have become increasingly common, with 21% of adults in the United States reporting having at least one tattoo. On rare occasions, outbreaks of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) skin infections have been reported after tattooing. In January 2012, public health officials in New York received reports of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infections in 14 New York residents who received tattoos during September-December 2011. All infections were associated with use of the same nationally distributed, prediluted gray ink manufactured by company A. CDC disseminated an Epi-X public health alert to identify additional tattoo-associated NTM skin infections; previously identified cases were reported from three states (Washington, Iowa, and Colorado). Public health investigations by CDC, state and local health departments, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found NTM contamination in tattoo inks used in two of five identified clusters. All infected persons were exposed to one of four different brands of ink. NTM contamination of inks can occur during the manufacturing process as a result of using contaminated ingredients or poor manufacturing practices, or when inks are diluted with nonsterile water by tattoo artists. No specific FDA regulatory requirement explicitly provides that tattoo inks must be sterile. However, CDC recommends that ink manufacturers ensure ink is sterile and that tattoo artists avoid contamination of ink through dilution with nonsterile water. Consumers also should be aware of the health risks associated with getting an intradermal tattoo.

  5. Plasma Membrane Profiling Reveals Upregulation of ABCA1 by Infected Macrophages Leading to Restriction of Mycobacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jing; Basu Roy, Robindra; Zhang, Yanjia J.; Antrobus, Robin; Du, Yuxian; Smith, Duncan L.; Weekes, Michael P.; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane represents a critical interface between the internal and extracellular environments, and harbors multiple proteins key receptors and transporters that play important roles in restriction of intracellular infection. We applied plasma membrane profiling, a technique that combines quantitative mass spectrometry with selective cell surface aminooxy-biotinylation, to Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-infected THP-1 macrophages. We quantified 559 PM proteins in BCG-infected THP-1 cells. One significantly upregulated cell-surface protein was the cholesterol transporter ABCA1. We showed that ABCA1 was upregulated on the macrophage cell-surface following infection with pathogenic mycobacteria and knockdown of ABCA1 resulted in increased mycobacterial survival within macrophages, suggesting that it may be a novel mycobacterial host-restriction factor. PMID:27462310

  6. IL-37 Confers Protection against Mycobacterial Infection Involving Suppressing Inflammation and Modulating T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; He, Xin; Ji, Qun; Bai, Wenjuan; Chen, Hao; Chen, Jianxia; Peng, Wenxia; Liu, Siyu; Liu, Zhonghua; Ge, Baoxue

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37), a novel member of the IL-1 family, plays fundamental immunosuppressive roles by broadly reducing both innate inflammation and acquired immunity, but whether it is involved in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB) has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis demonstrated an association of the genetic variant rs3811047 of IL-37 with TB susceptibility. In line with previous report, a significant elevated IL-37 abundance in the sera and increased expression of IL-37 protein in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were observed in TB patients in comparison to healthy controls. Moreover, release of IL-37 were detected in either macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or the lung of BCG-infected mice, concurrent with reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, in contrast to wild-type mice, BCG-infected IL-37-Tg mice manifested with reduced mycobacterial burden and tissue damage in the lung, accompanied by higher frequency of Th1 cell and less frequencies of regulatory T cells and Th17 cells in the spleen. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that IL-37 conferred resistance to Mtb infection possibly involving suppressing detrimental inflammation and modulating T cell responses. These findings implicated that IL-37 may be employed as a new molecular target for the therapy and diagnosis of TB. PMID:28076390

  7. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Infection in NADPH Oxidase Deficiency: Defective Mycobacterial Sequestration and Granuloma Formation

    PubMed Central

    Deffert, Christine; Schäppi, Michela G.; Pache, Jean-Claude; Cachat, Julien; Vesin, Dominique; Bisig, Ruth; Ma Mulone, Xiaojuan; Kelkka, Tiina; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) lack generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the phagocyte NADPH oxidase NOX2. CGD is an immune deficiency that leads to frequent infections with certain pathogens; this is well documented for S. aureus and A. fumigatus, but less clear for mycobacteria. We therefore performed an extensive literature search which yielded 297 cases of CGD patients with mycobacterial infections; M. bovis BCG was most commonly described (74%). The relationship between NOX2 deficiency and BCG infection however has never been studied in a mouse model. We therefore investigated BCG infection in three different mouse models of CGD: Ncf1 mutants in two different genetic backgrounds and Cybb knock-out mice. In addition, we investigated a macrophage-specific rescue (transgenic expression of Ncf1 under the control of the CD68 promoter). Wild-type mice did not develop severe disease upon BCG injection. In contrast, all three types of CGD mice were highly susceptible to BCG, as witnessed by a severe weight loss, development of hemorrhagic pneumonia, and a high mortality (∼50%). Rescue of NOX2 activity in macrophages restored BCG resistance, similar as seen in wild-type mice. Granulomas from mycobacteria-infected wild-type mice generated ROS, while granulomas from CGD mice did not. Bacterial load in CGD mice was only moderately increased, suggesting that it was not crucial for the observed phenotype. CGD mice responded with massively enhanced cytokine release (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17 and IL-12) early after BCG infection, which might account for severity of the disease. Finally, in wild-type mice, macrophages formed clusters and restricted mycobacteria to granulomas, while macrophages and mycobacteria were diffusely distributed in lung tissue from CGD mice. Our results demonstrate that lack of the NADPH oxidase leads to a markedly increased severity of BCG infection through mechanisms including increased cytokine production and impaired

  8. A spatial epidemiological analysis of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been changing and the incidence has been increasing in some settings. The main route of transmission to humans is considered to be from the environment. We aimed to describe spatial clusters of cases of NTM infections and to identify associated climatic, environmental and socio-economic variables. Methods NTM data were obtained from the Queensland Mycobacterial Reference Laboratory for the period 2001–2011. A Bayesian spatial conditional autoregressive model was constructed at the postcode level, with covariates including soil variables, maximum, mean and minimum rainfall and temperature, income (proportion of population earning < $32,000 and < $52,000) and land use category. Results Significant clusters of NTM infection were identified in the central Queensland region overlying the Surat sub-division of the Great Artesian Basin, as well as in the lower North Queensland Local Government Area known as the Whitsunday region. Our models estimated an expected increase of 21% per percentage increase of population earning < $52,000 (95% CI 9–34%) and an expected decrease of 13% for every metre increase of average topsoil depth for risk of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection (95% CI -3 – -22%). There was an estimated increase of 79% per mg/m3 increase of soil bulk density (95% CI 26–156%) and 19% decrease for every percentage increase in population earning < $32,000 for risk of M. kansasii infection (95% CI -3 – -49%). Conclusions There were distinct spatial clusters of M. kansasii, M. intracellulare and M. abscessus infections in Queensland, and a number of socio-ecological, economic and environmental factors were found to be associated with NTM infection risk. PMID:24885916

  9. High Mortality of Disseminated Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in HIV-Infected Patients in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Teruya, Katsuji; Aoki, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Oka, Shinichi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Little information is available on the mortality and risk factors associated with death in disseminated non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection (dNTM) in HIV-infected patients in the ART-era. Methods In a single-center study, HIV-infected dNTM with positive NTM culture from sterile sites between 2000 and 2013 were analysed. The clinical characteristics at commencement of anti-mycobacterial treatment (baseline) were compared between those who survived and died. Results Twenty-four patients were analyzed. [The median CD4 27/μL (range 2–185)]. Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare accounted for 20 (83%) and 3 (13%) of isolated NTM. NTM bacteremia was diagnosed in 15 (63%) patients. Seven (29%) patients died, and NTM bacteremia was significantly associated with mortality (p = 0.022). The baseline CD4 count was significantly lower in the non-survivors than the survivors (median 7/μL versus 49, p = 0.034). Concomitant AIDS-defining diseases or malignancies were not associated with mortality. Immune-reconstitution syndrome (IRS) occurred to 19 (79%) patients (8 paradoxical and 11 unmasking), and prognosis tended to be better in unmasking-IRS than the other patients (n = 13) (p = 0.078). Patients with paradoxical-IRS had marginally lower CD4 count and higher frequency of bacteremia than those with unmasking-IRS (p = 0.051, and 0.059). Treatment with systemic corticosteroids was applied in 63% and 55% of patients with paradoxical and unmasking-IRS, respectively. Conclusion dNTM in HIV-infected patients resulted in high mortality even in the ART-era. NTM bacteremia and low CD4 count were risk factors for death, whereas patients presented with unmasking-IRS had marginally better prognosis. IRS occurred in 79% of the patients, suggesting difficulty in the management of dNTM. PMID:26985832

  10. Occurrence of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Infection in an Endemic Area of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Lopes, Maria Luiza; Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felicio, João Soares; Sales, Lúcia Helena Messias; Bahia, Jeann Ricardo da Costa; Conceição, Emilyn Costa; Lima, Karla Valéria Batista

    2013-01-01

    The majority of investigations of the epidemiology of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have focused on highly developed nations with a low prevalence of tuberculosis. In contrast, the Para state of north Brazil represents an area of high tuberculosis prevalence and increasing NTM incidence. Toward the goal of understanding the dynamics of infection by all Mycobacterium species, we report patient characteristics and the identification of NTM strains isolated from sputum samples from patients that were residents of Para, a state in the Amazon region, Northern of Brazil, over the period January 2010 through December 2011 (2 years). The 29 NTM patients comprised 13.5% of positive mycobacterial cultures over the 2-year period. A major risk factor for NTM pulmonary disease was previous tuberculosis (76%). Further, the average age of NTM patients (52 years) was significantly higher than that of tuberculosis patients (39 years) and more were female (72.4% vs. 37.4%). Unlike other Brazilian states, NTM pulmonary patients in Para were infected with a different spectrum of mycobacteria; primarily the rapidly growing Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium simiae complex. PMID:23875055

  11. Clinical Usefulness of PCR for Differential Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection in Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Ha Na; Lee, Ju Hyung; Park, Ho Sung; Jang, Kyu Yun; Moon, Woo Sung; Kang, Myoung Jae; Lee, Dong Geun; Chung, Myoung Ja

    2015-09-01

    The need for isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) from clinical specimens has increased in recent years. Our aim was to determine the clinical usefulness of PCR for differential diagnosis of tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in lung tissue that show chronic granulomatous inflammation. A total of 199 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, including 137 Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), 17 NTM cases, and 45 other than mycobacterial cases were collected. We performed acid-fast staining, MTB and NTM nested PCRs, and MTB and NTM real-time PCRs. No histologic difference between MTB and NTM infections was observed. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MTB were 70.1% and 95.1% by nested PCR, respectively, and 70.8% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting NTM were 52.9% and 96.15% by nested PCR, respectively, and 35.3% and 100.0% by real-time PCR, respectively. Mycobacteria were identified by acid-fast staining in 50 of 154 cases (32.5%). All 50 acid-fast staining-positive cases showed positive nested and real-time PCR results (n = 47 MTB PCR positive; n = 3 NTM PCR positive), and results agreed with final diagnosis. PCR will be useful for the rapid diagnosis of mycobacterial infection and differentiation of MTB from NTM in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, especially in acid-fast staining-positive specimens.

  12. Do Polymicrobial Intra-Abdominal Infections Have Worse Outcomes than Monomicrobial Intra-Abdominal Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Brandy L.; Dietch, Zachary C.; Guidry, Christopher A.; Davies, Stephen W.; Hennessy, Sara A.; Duane, Therese M.; O'Neill, Patrick J.; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H.; Askari, Reza; Popovsky, Kimberly; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated microorganism interaction through signaling molecules, some of which are recognized by other bacterial species. This interspecies synergy can prove detrimental to the human host in polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that polymicrobial intra-abdominal infections (IAI) have worse outcomes than monomicrobial infections. Methods: Data from the Study to Optimize Peritoneal Infection Therapy (STOP-IT), a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, were reviewed for all occurrences of IAI having culture results available. Patients in STOP-IT had been randomized to receive four days of antibiotics vs. antibiotics until two days after clinical symptom resolution. Patients with polymicrobial and monomicrobial infections were compared by univariable analysis using the Wilcoxon rank sum, χ2, and Fisher exact tests. Results: Culture results were available for 336 of 518 patients (65%). The durations of antibiotic therapy in polymicrobial (n = 225) and monomicrobial IAI (n = 111) were equal (p = 0.78). Univariable analysis demonstrated similar demographics in the two populations. The 37 patients (11%) with inflammatory bowel disease were more likely to have polymicrobial IAI (p = 0.05). Polymicrobial infections were not associated with a higher risk of surgical site infection, recurrent IAI, or death. Conclusion: Contrary to our hypothesis, polymicrobial IAI do not have worse outcomes than monomicrobial infections. These results suggest polymicrobial IAI can be treated the same as monomicrobial IAI. PMID:26397376

  13. Effects of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection on Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Collett, Geoffrey; Lopez, Natalia; Lopez, Pedro F

    2016-01-01

    Our patient, in the 7th decade of life, presented with worsening blurry vision over 3 weeks. The pertinent history included nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, recent pulmonary mycobacterial infection, and autoimmune pancreatitis. The patient had decreased visual acuity in both eyes; the remaining findings of our examination were relatively benign. The diagnosis of bilateral exudative age-related macular degeneration was aided by ocular imaging. Not only were exudative changes confirmed, but one modality suggested an underlying occult choroiditis, which presumably fueled a local inflammatory drive leading to evolution of the disease. Given the choroiditis developed in the setting of a recent Mycobacterium chelonae infection, dissemination of the organism must be considered a potential culprit. Additionally, a chronic inflammatory state perhaps played a simultaneous immunologic role. We feel the proposed pathogenic mechanism outlined sufficiently accounts for the rare event, that is, development of subacute bilateral exudative maculopathy. The patient responded well to bilateral intravitreal aflibercept injections. After 1 month, visual acuity was found to be near baseline and ocular imaging showed significant resolution of the exudative changes. An additional follow-up 3 months after confirmed similar stability. This case required thorough investigation of seemingly unrelated components within the patient's history. We stress the importance of obtaining appropriate documentation from fellow health care teams when suspicious clinical presentations arise. During our investigation, we identified cryptic retinal lesions by way of angiography - leading us to recommend usage of such methods in complex cases. We also summarize the implemented aflibercept course and the favorable response to such treatment.

  14. Bilateral Candida and atypical mycobacterial infection after frontalis sling suspension with silicone rod to correct congenital ptosis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Brett W; Bratton, Emily M; Durairaj, Vikram D; Hink, Eric M

    2013-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe an unusual complication of a frontalis sling suspension with silicone rods. A 5-year-old girl with blepharophimosis syndrome underwent frontalis sling suspension using an open sky technique. Four weeks after surgery, she was noted to have pustules over both upper eyelids and eyebrows. Cultures from the surgical sites grew Mycobacterium chelonae and Candida parapsilosis. Intravenous antibiotics and antifungals and sling explantation were curative. One month after sling explantation, the patient maintained an adequate marginal reflex distance 1. Atypical mycobacterial and Candida infection should be considered in the differential diagnoses of postoperative infection after frontalis sling suspension with silicone rods.

  15. Systemic Expression of Notch Ligand Delta-Like 4 during Mycobacterial Infection Alters the T Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Matthew A.; Allen, Ronald M.; Kimura, Soichiro; Day, Cheryl L.; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    The Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) is known to fine-tune the CD4+ T cell cytokine response. DLL4 is expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in a MyD88-dependent manner. We found that DLL4 expression was upregulated on bone marrow progenitor cells and APCs in mice infected with BCG Mycobacterium. Transfer of DLL4+ progenitor cells from infected hosts resulted in an increase DLL4+ myeloid cells in the spleen, indicating that expression of the dll4 gene is propagated throughout hematopoiesis. We also found an increase in DLL4+ monocytes from individuals who were infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In latent individuals, DLL4 expression correlated with increased cytokine production from T cells in response to PPD stimulation. Finally, antibody blockade of DLL4 reduced T cell cytokine production from naïve T cells stimulated with antigen. These results demonstrate that the Notch ligand DLL4 can influence T cell cytokine production in both humans and mice, and further reveal that expression of DLL4 is upregulated on early hematopoietic progenitors in response to chronic mycobacterial infection. These data suggest that widespread DLL4 expression may occur as a result of mycobacterial infection, and that this expression may alter CD4+ T cell responses to both previously encountered and novel antigens. PMID:27933064

  16. Treatment Experience of Severe Abdominal Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y-G; Wu, J-S; Jiang, B; Wang, J-H; Liu, C-P; Peng, C; Tian, B-Z

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the causes and treatment experience of severe abdominal infection after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical data were retrospectively analysed in perioperative severe abdominal infection of 186 orthotopic liver transplantation cases from March 2004 to November 2011. Among the 186 patients, 16 cases had severe abdominal infection: five cases had bile duct anastomotic leakage-inducing massive hydrops and infection under liver interstice, 10 cases had extensive bleeding of surgical wound leading to massive haematocele and infection around the liver, and one case had postoperative lower oesophageal fistula leakage causing massive hydrops and infection under the left diaphragm. After definite diagnosis, 12 cases underwent surgery within three days, with no death. Among the four cases that underwent surgery three days after diagnosis, one case died of multiple-organ failure five days after abdominal cavity exploration, which was performed 21 days after liver transplantation. Severe abdominal infections after liver transplantation were the most common causes of death in perioperative liver transplantation. Comprehensive treatment with efficacious antibiotics, multiple-organ support, controlled surgical removal of the lesion, and adequate drainage establishment was the key to the entire treatment.

  17. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells.

  18. Use of siRNA molecular beacons to detect and attenuate mycobacterial infection in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    George, Remo; Cavalcante, Renata; Jr, Celso Carvalho; Marques, Elyana; Waugh, Jonathan B; Unlap, M Tino

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infectious diseases plaguing mankind and is mediated by the facultative pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Once the pathogen enters the body, it subverts the host immune defenses and thrives for extended periods of time within the host macrophages in the lung granulomas, a condition called latent tuberculosis (LTB). Persons with LTB are prone to reactivation of the disease when the body’s immunity is compromised. Currently there are no reliable and effective diagnosis and treatment options for LTB, which necessitates new research in this area. The mycobacterial proteins and genes mediating the adaptive responses inside the macrophage is largely yet to be determined. Recently, it has been shown that the mce operon genes are critical for host cell invasion by the mycobacterium and for establishing a persistent infection in both in vitro and in mouse models of tuberculosis. The YrbE and Mce proteins which are encoded by the MTB mce operons display high degrees of homology to the permeases and the surface binding protein of the ABC transports, respectively. Similarities in structure and cell surface location impute a role in cell invasion at cholesterol rich regions and immunomodulation. The mce4 operon is also thought to encode a cholesterol transport system that enables the mycobacterium to derive both energy and carbon from the host membrane lipids and possibly generating virulence mediating metabolites, thus enabling the bacteria in its long term survival within the granuloma. Various deletion mutation studies involving individual or whole mce operon genes have shown to be conferring varying degrees of attenuation of infectivity or at times hypervirulence to the host MTB, with the deletion of mce4A operon gene conferring the greatest degree of attenuation of virulence. Antisense technology using synthetic siRNAs has been used in knocking down genes in bacteria and over the years this has evolved into a powerful tool for

  19. Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection of the musculoskeletal system: pattern of infection and efficacy of combined surgical/antimicrobial treatment.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Kim, Y S; Yoon, J O; Kim, J S; Chang, J S; Kim, J M; Chun, J M; Jeon, I H

    2014-11-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection of the musculoskeletal tissue is a rare disease. An early and accurate diagnosis is often difficult because of the indolent clinical course and difficulty of isolating pathogens. Our goal was to determine the clinical features of musculoskeletal NTM infection and to present the treatment outcomes. A total of 29 patients (nine females, 20 males between 34 and 85 years old, mean age 61.7 years; 34 to 85) with NTM infection of the musculoskeletal system between 1998 to 2011 were identified and their treatment retrospectively analysed. Microbiological studies demonstrated NTM in 29 patients: the isolates were Mycobacterium intracellulare in six patients, M. fortuitum in three, M. abscessus in two and M. marinum in one. In the remaining patients we failed to identify the species. The involved sites were the hand/wrist in nine patients the knee in five patients, spine in four patients, foot in two patients, elbow in two patients, shoulder in one, ankle in two patients, leg in three patients and multiple in one patient. The mean interval between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis was 20.8 months (1.5 to 180). All patients underwent surgical treatment and antimicrobial medication according to our protocol for chronic musculoskeletal infection: 20 patients had NTM-specific medication and nine had conventional antimicrobial therapy. At the final follow-up 22 patients were cured, three failed to respond to treatment and four were lost to follow-up. Identifying these diseases due the initial non-specific presentation can be difficult. Treatment consists of surgical intervention and adequate antimicrobial therapy, which can result in satisfactory outcomes.

  20. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.

    1987-11-01

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate.

  1. ESX-1-induced apoptosis during mycobacterial infection: to be or not to be, that is the question

    PubMed Central

    Aguiló, Nacho; Marinova, Dessislava; Martín, Carlos; Pardo, Julián

    2013-01-01

    The major Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence factor ESAT-6 exported by the ESX-1 secretion system has been described as a pro-apoptotic factor by several independent groups in recent years, sustaining a role for apoptosis in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. This role has been supported by independent studies in which apoptosis has been shown as a hallmark feature in human and mouse lungs infected with virulent strains. Nevertheless, the role of apoptosis during mycobacterial infection is subject to an intense debate. Several works maintain that apoptosis is more evident with attenuated strains, whereas virulent mycobacteria tend to inhibit this process, suggesting that apoptosis induction may be a host mechanism to control infection. In this review, we summarize the evidences that support the involvement of ESX-1-induced apoptosis in virulence, intending to provide a rational treatise for the role of programmed cell death during M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:24364000

  2. Atypical Mycobacterial Infection after Abdominoplasty Overseas: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez Guillamet, Laia Jimena; Miljkovic, Goran

    2016-01-01

    Increasing number of medical tourists travel internationally for cosmetic procedures. Lipotourism is a form of medical tourism becoming popular among patients of developed countries due to the cost efficiency of cosmetic procedures when performed in developing nations. There is a paucity of data on quality, safety, and risks involved with these surgeries. Many cases of infections have been documented in patients following cosmetic surgeries in developing countries. We present a case of a 34-year-old female who underwent abdominoplasty in Dominican Republic that was complicated with development of multiple abdominal wall abscesses due to infection from rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). In the absence of clear treatment guidelines, she was treated with a combination of intermittent surgical drainage and prolonged antibiotic course. This case is of interest as more than one species of RGM was isolated from the same patient. Our case highlights the fact that identification of these organisms can be difficult requiring referral of samples to specialized laboratories and treatment duration can last several months, which is determined by clinical and microbiological response. PMID:28116185

  3. A Novel Inhibitor of Gyrase B Is a Potent Drug Candidate for Treatment of Tuberculosis and Nontuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven M.; Hanzelka, Brian L.; Perola, Emanuele; Shoen, Carolyn M.; Cynamon, Michael H.; Ngwane, Andile H.; Wiid, Ian J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Betoudji, Fabrice; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Thomson, John A.

    2014-01-01

    New drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis are urgently needed. Extensively drug-resistant and probably the totally drug-resistant tuberculosis strains are resistant to fluoroquinolones like moxifloxacin, which target gyrase A, and most people infected with these strains die within a year. In this study, we found that a novel aminobenzimidazole, VXc-486, which targets gyrase B, potently inhibits multiple drug-sensitive isolates and drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro (MICs of 0.03 to 0.30 μg/ml and 0.08 to 5.48 μg/ml, respectively) and reduces mycobacterial burdens in lungs of infected mice in vivo. VXc-486 is active against drug-resistant isolates, has bactericidal activity, and kills intracellular and dormant M. tuberculosis bacteria in a low-oxygen environment. Furthermore, we found that VXc-486 inhibits the growth of multiple strains of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium kansasii (MICs of 0.1 to 2.0 μg/ml), as well as that of several strains of Nocardia spp. (MICs of 0.1 to 1.0 μg/ml). We made a direct comparison of the parent compound VXc-486 and a phosphate prodrug of VXc-486 and showed that the prodrug of VXc-486 had more potent killing of M. tuberculosis than did VXc-486 in vivo. In combination with other antimycobacterial drugs, the prodrug of VXc-486 sterilized M. tuberculosis infection when combined with rifapentine-pyrazinamide and bedaquiline-pyrazinamide in a relapse infection study in mice. Furthermore, the prodrug of VXc-486 appeared to perform at least as well as the gyrase A inhibitor moxifloxacin. These findings warrant further development of the prodrug of VXc-486 for the treatment of tuberculosis and nontuberculosis mycobacterial infections. PMID:25534737

  4. Central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T lymphocytes primed and expanded by bacillus Calmette-Guérin-infected dendritic cells kill mycobacterial-infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Martino, Angelo; Casetti, Rita; Sacchi, Alessandra; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2007-09-01

    In humans, innate immune recognition of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), is a feature of cells as dendritic cells (DC) and gammadelta T cells. In this study, we show that BCG infection of human monocyte-derived DC induces a rapid activation of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells (the major subset of gammadelta T cell pool in human peripheral blood). Indeed, in the presence of BCG-infected DC, Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells increase both their expression of CD69 and CD25 and the production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, in contrast to DC treated with Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell-specific Ags. Without further exogenous stimuli, BCG-infected DC expand a functionally cytotoxic central memory Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell population. This subset does not display lymph node homing receptors, but express a high amount of perforin. They are highly efficient in the killing of mycobacterial-infected primary monocytes or human monocytic THP-1 cells preserving the viability of cocultured, infected DC. This study provides further evidences about the complex relationship between important players of innate immunity and suggests an immunoregulatory role of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in the control of mycobacterial infection.

  5. Incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain: estimate from feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories.

    PubMed

    Gunn-Moore, D A; Gaunt, C; Shaw, D J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of mycobacterial infections in cats in Great Britain (GB). This was performed using the proxy measure of feline tissue samples submitted to diagnostic laboratories in GB that were found to have histopathological changes typical of mycobacterial infection ('MYC'). Sixteen primary diagnostic laboratories were asked for information on the number of feline samples submitted in 2009, the number with MYC, the number undergoing Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) staining and, for comparison, the number diagnosed with lymphoma. Eight laboratories provided full data for the whole year: 11,782 samples; lymphoma 3.2% (mean, 95% CI: 2.89, 3.5), MYC 1.16% (0.98; 1.37) and ZN-positive 0.31% (0.22; 0.43). Data on 1569 samples from seven laboratories that provided partial data on samples for the whole year revealed similar results, although all changes were more frequent: lymphoma 5.42% (4.35; 6.66), MYC 2.36% (1.66; 3.23) and ZN-positive 0.77% (0.40; 1.33). One laboratory only provided data for part of the year (4.5 months), reporting all three types of histopathology less frequently: 18,232 samples; lymphoma 0.2% (0.18; 0.32), MYC 0.07% (0.04; 0.12) and ZN-positive 0.05% (0.02; 0.09). The reasons for low reporting rates in this high-throughput laboratory are unclear. In total, 187 samples were reported as having MYC. Five Reference laboratories were also contacted, reporting 174 feline tissue submissions in 2009, with mycobacteria being cultured from 90. The study shows that MYC are frequently reported in tissue samples from cats in GB, being reported in ~1% of samples, with confirmation as ZN-positive in ~0.3%. Lymphoma is recognized as a common disease in cats, being seen in ~3% of samples in this study. When compared against MYC, lymphoma was reported only twice as frequently. This confirms that far from being rare, clinically significant mycobacterial infections occur commonly in cats in GB.

  6. Diagnosis of mycobacterial infections by nucleic acid amplification: 18-month prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, P; Rosenau, J; Springer, B; Teschner, K; Feldmann, K; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the use of DNA amplification by PCR for the detection of mycobacteria in clinical specimens, with the gene encoding the 16S rRNA as a target. Following generic amplification of mycobacterial nucleic acids, screening was done with genus-specific probe; this was followed by species differentiation by use of highly discriminating probes or nucleic acid sequencing. In a prospective 18-month evaluation, criteria to select specimens for PCR analysis were defined. Of a total of 8,272 specimens received, 729 samples satisfied the criteria and were subjected to DNA amplification. Clinical specimens included material from the respiratory tract (sputa and bronchial washings), aspirates, biopsies, and various body fluids (cerebrospinal, pleural, peritoneal, and gastric fluids). After resolution of discrepant results, the sensitivity of the PCR assay was 84.5%, the specificity was 99.5%, the positive predictive value was 97.6%, and the negative predictive value was 96.4%. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of culture (with a combination of broth and solid media) were 77.5 and 94.8%, respectively. In conclusion, this PCR assay provides an efficient strategy to detect and identify multiple mycobacterial species and performs well in comparison with culture. PMID:8789005

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta response to mycobacterial infection in striped bass Morone saxatilis and hybrid tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Howard, Kristina E; Wolf, Jeffrey C; Smith, Stephen A; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2003-10-15

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium marinum. Splenic mononuclear cell transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) mRNA was measured by reverse transcription quantitative-competitive PCR (RT-qcPCR). In histologic sections of liver and anterior kidney, the area of each section that was occupied by granulomas and the total area of each section were measured by computer-assisted image analysis and compared as a proportion (the granuloma proportion). Infected striped bass splenic mononuclear cell TGF-beta mRNA expression was significantly lower than uninfected controls, while for tilapia there was no significant difference between infected and control fish. Mycobacterial granuloma proportion of liver and anterior kidney sections was significantly greater for infected striped bass than tilapia. Three (of 10) infected tilapia with the most pronounced inflammatory response displayed a decrease in TGF-beta mRNA expression, similar to the overall striped bass response to mycobacterium challenge. Downregulation of TGF-beta and failure to modulate the immune response may be related to excessive inflammatory damage to organs observed in mycobacteria-sensitive fish species.

  8. Diphyllobothrium latum infection in a child with recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium latum infection in humans is not common in Republic of Korea. We report a case of fish tapeworm infection in a 10-year-old boy after ingestion of raw perch about 8 months ago. The patient complained of recurrent abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. A tapeworm, 85 cm in length, without scolex and neck, was spontaneously discharged in the feces of the patient. The patient was treated with 15-mg/kg single dose praziquantel, and follow-up stool examination was negative after one month. There was no evidence of relapse during the next six months. PMID:26692882

  9. Newly Detected Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection and Peripheral Lung Cancers in Patients During Follow-Up of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Mi Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Shim, Tae Sun; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the difference between the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with newly detected pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (NTM-IIP) and Cancer-IIP. We retrospectively evaluated 35 NTM-IIP and 78 Cancer-IIP patients in reference to their null idiopathic interstitial pneumonia CT (n = 113), using >10 years of data. Two independent radiologists analyzed the CT characteristics and the axial location of the main opacity. The interobserver agreement was good (κ > 0.771). The NTM-IIP patients were older (P = 0.034). The median size of the main opacity in the NTM-IIP (27 mm; 11–73) was larger (19 mm; 5–60; P = 0.002). Consolidation (n = 30; 85.7%; odds ratio [OR], 45) and cavities (n = 14; 40%, OR, 25) were more common in NTM-IIP (all P < 0.001). The midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts (n = 16; 45.7%, OR, 4.95) was more common in NTM-IIP (P = 0.006). NTM-IIP appeared larger, with more frequent consolidation and cavities, and was more likely to have been located in the midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts at the CT, which showed that it was older than Cancer-IIP. PMID:25837763

  10. Mycobacterial infection in Northern snakehead (Channa argus) from the Potomac River catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Henderson, A.P.; Iwanowicz, D.D.; Odenkirk, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    The Northern snakehead, Channa argus (Cantor), is a non-native predatory fish that has become established regionally in some temperate freshwater habitats within the United States. Over the past decade, Northern snakehead populations have developed within aquatic ecosystems throughout the eastern USA, including the Potomac River system within Virginia, Maryland and Washington, D.C. Since this species was initially observed in this region in 2002, the population has expanded considerably (Odenkirk & Owens 2007). In the Chesapeake Bay watershed, populations of Northern snakehead exist in the lower Potomac River and Rappahannock Rivers on the Western shore of the Bay, and these fish have also been found in middle or upper reaches of river systems on the Eastern shore of the Bay, including the Nanticoke and Wicomico Rivers among others. Over the past several years, many aspects of Northern snakehead life history in the Potomac River have been described, including range and dispersal patterns, microhabitat selection and diet (Lapointe, Thorson & Angermeier 2010; Saylor, Lapointe & Angermeier 2012; Lapointe, Odenkirk & Angermeier 2013). However, comparatively little is known about their health status including susceptibility to parasitism and disease and their capacity to serve as reservoirs of disease for native wildlife. Although considered hardy by fisheries biologists, snakehead fish have demonstrated susceptibility to a number of described piscine diseases within their native range and habitat in Asia. Reported pathogens of significance in snakehead species in Asia include snakehead rhabdovirus (Lio-Po et al. 2000), aeromonad bacteria (Zheng, Cao & Yang 2012), Nocardia (Wang et al. 2007) andMycobacterium spp. (Chinabut, Limsuwan & Chantatchakool 1990; ). Mycobacterial isolates recovered from another snakehead species (Channa striata) in the previous studies have included M. marinum and M. fortuitum, as identified through molecular

  11. A novel mycobacterial In Vitro infection assay identifies differences of induced macrophage apoptosis between CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Nkwouano, Vanesa; Witkowski, Sven; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Nausch, Norman; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are natural host cells for pathogenic mycobacteria, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb). Immune surveillance by T cells and interaction with M.tb infected macrophages is crucial for protection against M.tb reactivation and development of active tuberculosis. Several factors play a role in the control of M.tb infection but reliable biomarkers remain elusive. One major obstacle is the absence of functional in vitro assays which allow concomitant determination of i) mycobacterial eradication; ii) cytotoxic effects on host macrophages; and iii) effector T-cell functions. We established a novel functional in vitro assay based on flow cytometry analysis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) infected with a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain containing a tetracycline inducible live/dead reporter plasmid (LD-BCG). MDM of healthy human donors were generated in vitro and infected with defined LD-BCG numbers. After short-term MDM/LD-BCG co-incubation with autologous effector T cells or in the presence of antibiotics, proportions of MDM containing live or dead LD-BCG were determined by flow cytometry. Concomitant measure of defined numbers of added beads allowed comparison of absolute MDM numbers between samples. Differential effects of T-cell subpopulations on anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and on MDM apoptosis were determined. Flow cytometry measure of MDM/LD-BCG treated with rifampicin correlated well with mycobacterial colony forming units and fluorescence microscopy results. Co-culture with pre-activated effector T cells reduced viability of both, LD-BCG and MDM, in a concentration-dependent manner. M.tb protein specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells contributed similarly to anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity but CD4+ T cells induced higher levels of apoptosis in infected MDMs. This novel assay enables rapid quantification of anti-mycobacterial cytotoxicity and characterization of effector functions. Our functional in vitro assay has the potential to contribute to the

  12. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections in a French Hospital: A 12-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Peggy; Dutronc, Hervé; Peuchant, Olivia; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Cazanave, Charles; Neau, Didier; Wirth, Gaëtane; Pellegrin, Jean-Luc; Morlat, Philippe; Mercié, Patrick; Tunon-de-Lara, José-Manuel; Doutre, Marie-Sylvie; Pélissier, Philippe; Dupon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental organisms associated with a range of infections. Reports of NTM epidemiology are mainly focused on pulmonary infections and isolations, and extrapulmonary infections are less frequently described. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of NTM infections at the Bordeaux University Hospital, France, between January 2002 and December 2013. We used the microbiologic component of the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America's pulmonary NTM disease criteria to define cases of pulmonary NTM, and patients with isolates from a normally sterile site were classified as having extrapulmonary disease. Results In our setting, 170 patients were included. Pulmonary cases predominated (54.1%), followed by skin and soft tissue infections (22.9%), disseminated cases (10.6%), lymphadenitis (7.7%), bone and joint infections (2.9%) and the remaining 1.8% catheter-related infections. Overall, 16 NTM species were isolated. Mycobacterium avium (31.8%) and M. intracellulare (20%) were the most common species identified, followed by M. marinum (13.5%), M. kansasii (10.6%), M. xenopi (9.4%), rapidly growing mycobacteria (9.4%) and other slowly growing mycobacteria (5.3%). In general, NTM isolates were largely prevalent in people older than 50 (62.4%); patients aged 1–10 year-old exclusively yielded M. avium from lymph nodes, almost cases having being diagnosed after 2007. Among the 121 patients with complete follow-up, 78 (64.5%), 24 (19.8%), and 19 (15.7%) were cured, experienced relapse, or died, respectively. Conclusion In our study, extrapulmonary NTM infections represented almost half of cases, consisting mainly in skin and soft tissue infections. The increase lymphadenitis cases in children after 2007 could be linked to the cessation of mandatory BCG vaccination in France. We observed similar cure rates (64%) between pulmonary and extrapulmonary infections. PMID:27959960

  13. Recommendations for intra-abdominal infections consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Avkan-Oğuz, Vildan; Baykam, Nurcan; Sökmen, Selman; Güner, Rahmet; Agalar, Fatih; Alp, Emine; Doğrul, Ahmet; Turhan, Özge; Ağalar, Canan; Kurtaran, Behice; Geçim, İbrahim Ethem; Özaras, Reşat; Yılmaz, Gürdal; Akbulut, Ayhan; Koksal, İftihar

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines include the recommendations of experts from various specialties within a topic in consideration of data specific to each country. However, to date there has not been a guideline standardizing the nomenclature and offering recommendations for intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in Turkey. This is mainly due to the paucity of laboratory studies regarding the clinical diagnosis and treatment of IAIs or the sensitivity of microorganisms isolated from patients with IAIs. However, due to the diversification of host characteristics and advancements in technological treatment methods, it has become imperative to ‘speak a common language’. For this purpose May 2015, a group of 15 experts in intra-abdominal infections, under the leadership of the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Specialty Society of Turkey (EKMUD) and with representatives from the Turkish Surgical Association, Turkish Society of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Hernia Society, Turkish Society of Hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery, and the Turkish Society of Hospital Infections and Control, was formed to analyze relevant studies in the literature. Ultimately, the suggestions for adults found in this consensus report were developed using available data from Turkey, referring predominantly to the 2010 guidelines for diagnosing and managing complicated IAIs in adults and children by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the Surgical Infection Society. The recommendations are presented in two sections, from the initial diagnostic evaluation of patients to the treatment approach for IAI. This Consensus Report was presented at the EKMUD 2016 Congress in Antalya and was subsequently opened for suggestions on the official websites of the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Specialty Society of Turkey and Turkish Surgical Association for one month. The manuscript was revised according to the feedback received. PMID:28149134

  14. Mycobacterial endocarditis: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Shi-Min, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic analysis was made in view of the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and main outcomes of mycobacterial endocarditis. Methods The data source of the present study was based on a comprehensive literature search in MEDLINE, Highwire Press and Google search engine for publications on mycobacterial endocarditis published between 2000 and 2013. Results The rapidly growing mycobacteria become the predominant pathogens with Mycobacterium chelonae being the most common. This condition has changed significantly in terms of epidemiology since the 21st century, with more broad patient age range, longer latency, prevailed mitral valve infections and better prognosis. Conclusion Mycobacterial endocarditis is rare and the causative pathogens are predominantly the rapidly growing mycobacteria. Amikacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin are the most frequently used targeted antimicrobial agents but often show poor responses. Patients with deep infections may warrant a surgical operation or line withdrawal. With periodic multidrug therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing, and surgical managements, patients may achieve good therapeutic results. PMID:25859873

  15. [Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections related to esthetic care in France, 2001-2010].

    PubMed

    Couderc, C; Carbonne, A; Thiolet, J M; Brossier, F; Savey, A; Bernet, C; Ortmans, C; Lecadet-Morin, C; Coudière, I; Aggoune, M; Astagneau, P; Coignard, B; Cambau, E

    2011-07-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections usually occur in immunocompromised patients but also in immunocompetent patients following invasive procedures, especially for esthetic purposes. Since 2001, 20 episodes (57 cases) of NTM infections, seven of which (43 cases) were related to esthetic care, have been reported to the regional infection control coordinating centers (RICCC), the local health authorities (LHA), and the national institute for public health surveillance. Four notifications (40 cases) were related to non-surgical procedures performed by general practitioners in private settings: mesotherapy, carboxytherapy, and sclerosis of microvaricosities. The three other notifications (three cases) concerned surgical procedures-lifting and mammary prosthesis. Practice evaluations performed by the RICCC and LHA for five notifications showed deficiency of standard hygiene precautions and tap water misuse for injection equipment cleaning, or skin disinfection. Microbiological investigations (national reference center for mycobacteria) demonstrated the similarity of patient and environmental strains: in one episode (16 cases after mesotherapy), M. chelonae isolated from tap water was similar to those isolated from 11 cases. Healthcare-associated NTM infections are rare but have a potentially severe outcome. These cases stress the need of healthcare-associated infection notifications in outpatient settings.

  16. Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in M1-polarized macrophages during mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Ji; Yi, Min-Hee; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Junghwan; Han, Ji-Ye; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Woon; Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of macrophage function has an important regulatory impact on the survival of intracellular mycobacteria. We found that macrophages infected with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Ra had elevated expression of M1-related molecules, whereas the M2 phenotype was dominant in macrophages infected with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Further, the TLR signalling pathway played an important role in modulating macrophage polarization against Mtb infection. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was significantly increased in M1 polarized macrophages and these macrophages effectively removed intracellular Mtb, indicating that ER stress may be an important component of the host immune response to Mtb in M1 macrophages. This improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate macrophage polarization could provide new therapeutic strategies for tuberculosis. PMID:27845414

  17. Outbreak of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Subcutaneous Infections Related to Multiple Mesotherapy Injections▿

    PubMed Central

    Carbonne, Anne; Brossier, Florence; Arnaud, Isabelle; Bougmiza, Iheb; Caumes, Eric; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Dubrou, Sylvie; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Astagneau, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an outbreak of severe subcutaneous infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria following mesotherapy. Epidemiological studies and molecular comparisons of Mycobacterium chelonae strains from different patients and the environment suggested that contamination may be associated with inappropriate cleaning of the multiple-injection device with tap water. PMID:19386853

  18. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Miguel; Tchana-Sato, Vincent; Lavigne, Jean Paul

    2016-10-19

    Early diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is still a medical challenge due to its diverse and non-specific symptoms and signs. The most common responsible pathogens are Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Campylobacter and Streptococcus species. The authors report the case of a 67-year-old man, admitted for high fever and finally diagnosed with Escherichia coli (E.coli)-related IAAA. The IAAA ruptured during the general anaesthesia induction, leading to an emergency surgery. The authors successfully proceeded to an open aneurysmectomy with extensive debridement and in situ graft replacement. This case emphasizes the potential for rapid IAAA expansion, its high-rupture risk and the importance of computed tomography as a diagnostic tool.

  19. The looming tide of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections in Portugal and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Alarico, Susana; Dalcolmo, Margareth Pretti; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are widely disseminated in the environment and an emerging cause of infectious diseases worldwide. Their remarkable natural resistance to disinfectants and antibiotics and an ability to survive under low-nutrient conditions allows NTM to colonize and persist in man-made environments such as household and hospital water distribution systems. This overlap between human and NTM environments afforded new opportunities for human exposure, and for expression of their often neglected and underestimated pathogenic potential. Some risk factors predisposing to NTM disease have been identified and are mainly associated with immune fragilities of the human host. However, infections in apparently immunocompetent persons are also increasingly reported. The purpose of this review is to bring attention to this emerging health problem in Portugal and Brazil and to emphasize the urgent need for increased surveillance and more comprehensive epidemiological data in both countries, where such information is scarce and seriously thwarts the adoption of proper preventive strategies and therapeutic options.

  20. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12–interferon-γ–tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette–Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis. PMID:25915177

  1. Nontuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Hu, Fei-Shu; Yu, Hai-Ying; Xu, Kai-Jin; Zheng, Bei-Wen; Ji, Zhong-Kang; Li, Jun-Jie; Deng, Mei; Hu, Hai-Yang; Sheng, Ji-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) can have severe consequences and a poor prognosis. Physicians therefore need to be alert to this condition, especially in immunocompromised patients. Although the pathogenesis of NTM osteomyelitis is still unclear, studies in immunodeficient individuals have revealed close relationships between NTM osteomyelitis and defects associated with the interleukin-12-interferon-γ-tumor necrosis factor-α axis, as well as human immunodeficiency virus infection, various immunosuppressive conditions, and diabetes mellitus. Culture and species identification from tissue biopsies or surgical debridement tissue play crucial roles in diagnosing NTM osteomyelitis. Suitable imaging examinations are also important. Adequate surgical debridement and the choice of appropriate, combined antibiotics for long-term anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy, based on in vitro drug susceptibility tests, are the main therapies for these bone infections. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination might have limited prophylactic value. The use of multiple drugs and long duration of treatment mean that the therapeutic process needs to be monitored closely to detect potential side effects. Adequate duration of anti-mycobacterial chemotherapy together with regular monitoring with blood and imaging tests are key factors determining the recovery outcome in patients with NTM osteomyelitis.

  2. Mycobacterial culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... test to look for the bacteria that cause tuberculosis and similar infections. How the Test is Performed ... order this test if you have signs of tuberculosis or a related infection. Normal Results If there ...

  3. Limited clonal heterogeneity of antigen-specific T cells localizing in the pleural space during mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Manca, F; Rossi, G; Valle, M T; Lantero, S; Li Pira, G; Fenoglio, D; De Bruin, J; Costantini, M; Damiani, G; Balbi, B

    1991-01-01

    To detect possible differences in phenotype and fine specificity for mycobacterial antigens between CD4-positive T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and from inflammatory sites, we identified four patients presenting with a mycobacterial pleural exudate (PE) rich in PPD-specific lymphocytes and with a negative skin test to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and a negative proliferative response of PB lymphocytes to PPD at the same time. Several weeks after chemotherapy, these patients converted to PPD responsiveness in the periphery, and PPD-specific clones could be generated from PB at this stage. The phenotypic comparison of PE lymphocytes and concomitant PB lymphocytes obtained before treatment showed an increase of CD8 cells and a high frequency of HLA-DR-positive activated T cells in PE. The frequency of tetanus toxoid-specific and Candida albicans-specific proliferating T cells was lower than that of PPD-specific cells in PE but not in PB. PPD-specific clones were derived initially from PE and from PB once the patients had converted to PPD responsiveness. The two sets of clones from each patient were compared for proliferative response to mycobacterial antigen clusters of defined molecular weight ranges. A large number of PE-derived clones (36%) responded to a fraction of 27 to 35 kDa, whereas only one clone from PB responded to the same fraction. The purified antigen P32 (32 kDa), a soluble mycobacterial protein, stimulated PE-derived clones that were responsive to the 37- to 27-kDa fraction but did not stimulate PB-derived clones. The data demonstrate that PE- and PB-derived lymphocytes differ both in phenotype and in fine specificity, suggesting a limited clonal heterogeneity of T cells localizing at the inflammatory site in tuberculous patients without a PPD response in the periphery. Therefore T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory sites provide information that is different from that provided by T cells in the periphery. PMID:1898906

  4. A Novel Rapidly Growing Mycobacterium Species Causing an Abdominal Cerebrospinal Fluid Pseudocyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Cory K.; de Man, Tom J. B.; Toney, Nadege C.; Kamboj, Kamal; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Wang, Shu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are a rare cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infections. We describe the isolation and identification of a novel, rapidly growing, nonpigmented NTM from an abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst. The patient presented with fevers, nausea, and abdominal pain and clinically improved after shunt removal. NTM identification was performed by amplicon and whole-genome sequencing. PMID:27704004

  5. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFα blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF α blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF α therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF α blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  6. Phosphoantigen-activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells antagonize IL-2–induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in mycobacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Guangming; Shao, Lingyun; Wang, Yunqi; Chen, Crystal Y.; Huang, Dan; Yao, Shuyu; Zhan, Ximei; Sicard, Helene; Wang, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Although Foxp3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) are well documented for their ability to suppress various immune cells, T-cell subsets capable of counteracting Tregs have not been demonstrated. Here, we assessed phosphoantigen-activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for the ability to interplay with Tregs in the context of mycobacterial infection. A short-term IL-2 treatment regimen induced marked expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and subsequent suppression of mycobacterium-driven increases in numbers of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Surprisingly, activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by adding phosphoantigen Picostim to the IL-2 treatment regimen down-regulated IL-2–induced expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Consistently, in vitro activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by phosphoantigen plus IL-2 down-regulated IL-2–induced expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Interestingly, anti–IFN-γ–neutralizing antibody, not anti–TGF-β or anti–IL-4, reduced the ability of activated Vγ2Vδ2 T cells to down-regulate Tregs, suggesting that autocrine IFN-γ and its network contributed to Vγ2Vδ2 T cells' antagonizing effects. Furthermore, activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells by Picostim plus IL-2 treatment appeared to reverse Treg-driven suppression of immune responses of phosphoantigen-specific IFNγ+ or perforin+ Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and PPD-specific IFNγ+αβ T cells. Thus, phos-phoantigen activation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells antagonizes IL-2–induced expansion of Tregs and subsequent suppression of Ag-specific antimicrobial T-cell responses in mycobacterial infection. PMID:18981295

  7. Listeriosis Infection of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Papadoulas, Spyros I; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kraniotis, Pantelis A; Manousi, Maria E; Marangos, Markos N; Tsolakis, Ioannis A

    2013-01-01

    A rare case of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) infected by Listeria monocytogenes in a 72-year-old male diabetic farmer, is reported. Our patient had a history of a recent pneumonia that could have been caused by Listeria too. Aneurysm infection was manifested by fever and abdominal and back pain, which prompted investigation with CT scanning that revealed a 4.9 cm AAA with typical signs of infection. He underwent urgent AAA repair with aortobifemoral bypass grafting and had an uneventful course. Aneurysm content microbiology revealed Listeria monocytogenes and following a 9-week course of antibiotics our patient remains asymptomatic 11 months later. PMID:23599616

  8. A rare case of abdominal infection: Emphysematous pyelonephritis without diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ünlüer, Erden Erol; Şahı̇n, Yusuf; Oyar, Orhan; Tan, Gözde Canan; Karagöz, Arı̇f; Turan, Celaleddı̇n

    2016-01-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare form of necrotizing pyelonephritis. It is a life-threatening condition that usually affects patients with diabetes, and a small percentage may be due to urinary tract obstruction. Here, we present the case of an EP caused by urinary tract obstruction without diabetes. A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, chills, and abdominal pain. There was no significant past history. Physical examination depicted bilateral lower abdominal and right flank knocking tenderness. Laboratory exams revealed leukocytosis, neutrophilia, a high C-reactive protein level, and pyuria. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) showed diffuse gas in the right renal collecting system and dilatation of the right renal pelvis compared to the right side, in addition to multiple millimetric stones located in the right kidney and right ureter. After emergent placement of a percutaneous nephrostomy, she was admitted. Control abdominal CT without contrast revealed the absence of gas, hydronephrosis of the right renal pelvis, and the presence of nephrolithiasis. The patient was discharged 10 days of post-procedure with instructions for follow-up. Emergency physicians need to remain alert about this life-threatening disease and the typical CT findings of this disease to make a timely diagnosis and navigate management. PMID:28250980

  9. T cell reactivity against mycolyl transferase antigen 85 of M. tuberculosis in HIV-TB coinfected subjects and in AIDS patients suffering from tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Launois, Pascal; Drowart, Annie; Bourreau, Eliane; Couppie, Pierre; Farber, Claire-Michèle; Van Vooren, Jean-Paul; Huygen, Kris

    2011-01-01

    The mycolyl transferase antigen 85 complex is a major secreted protein family from mycobacterial culture filtrate, demonstrating powerful T cell stimulatory properties in most HIV-negative, tuberculin-positive volunteers with latent M.tuberculosis infection and only weak responses in HIV-negative tuberculosis patients. Here, we have analyzed T cell reactivity against PPD and Ag85 in HIV-infected individuals, without or with clinical symptoms of tuberculosis, and in AIDS patients with disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria. Whereas responses to PPD were not significantly different in HIV-negative and HIV-positive tuberculin-positive volunteers, responses to Ag85 were significantly decreased in the HIV-positive (CDC-A and CDC-B) group. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated low T cell reactivity against Ag85, irrespective of HIV infection, and finally AIDS patients suffering from NTM infections were completely nonreactive to Ag85. A one-year follow-up of twelve HIV-positive tuberculin-positive individuals indicated a decreased reactivity against Ag85 in patients developing clinical tuberculosis, highlighting the protective potential of this antigen.

  10. Mycobacterial manipulation of vacuolar sorting.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jennifer A

    2008-12-01

    Approximately one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the World Health Organization estimates 1.6 million deaths were caused by M. tuberculosis in 2005. The enormous worldwide burden of disease underscores the proficiency by which M. tuberculosis is able to evade eradication by the host, subverting innate and adaptive defences. At the cellular level, mycobacteria are able to modulate macrophage defences by altering phagosome maturation. This review focuses on the bacterial proteins and lipids that are important in establishing the mycobacterial replicative niche. While there is a detailed molecular description of the vacuole and an increasing number of bacterial effectors have been implicated in creating this compartment, exactly how they intersect host cell processes remains ill-defined. However, the emerging picture is that an array of lipid and protein effectors collaborate to create and maintain the mycobacterial phagosome.

  11. Risk Factors and Outcome for Massive Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Among Patients With Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of acute bleeding is reported to be 13.5% in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, of all the bleeding events, intra-abdominal bleeding was less studied in the literature and its risk factors have not been well defined yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding among the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis and assessed the outcome of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for evaluating risk factors for intra-abdominal bleeding using 33 indices, including age, sex, etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), APACHE II score, etc. Outcome assessments such as mortality, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) durations, and cost were also compared between patients with or without intra-abdominal bleeding. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (odds ratio [OR]: 7.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.53-22.52, P < 0.001) and number of operation (OR: 8.84, 95% CI: 2.01-38.86, P = 0.004) were 2 predictors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding in the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In addition, AP patients with intra-abdominal bleeding also showed significantly higher mortality rate, prolonged hospital and ICU durations, more complications and invasive treatments, as well as increased cost. Our study revealed that AKI and multiple operations were 2 critical factors increasing the risk of intra-abdominal bleeding among patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. Additionally, massive intra-abdominal bleeding was also associated with poor prognosis.

  12. Risk Factors and Outcome for Massive Intra-Abdominal Bleeding Among Patients With Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Jingzhu; Ke, Lu; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Gang; Jiang, Wei; Li, Weiqin; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of acute bleeding is reported to be 13.5% in patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. However, of all the bleeding events, intra-abdominal bleeding was less studied in the literature and its risk factors have not been well defined yet. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding among the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis and assessed the outcome of these patients. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were applied for evaluating risk factors for intra-abdominal bleeding using 33 indices, including age, sex, etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), APACHE II score, etc. Outcome assessments such as mortality, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) durations, and cost were also compared between patients with or without intra-abdominal bleeding. Acute kidney injury (AKI) (odds ratio [OR]: 7.54, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.53–22.52, P < 0.001) and number of operation (OR: 8.84, 95% CI: 2.01–38.86, P = 0.004) were 2 predictors for massive intra-abdominal bleeding in the patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In addition, AP patients with intra-abdominal bleeding also showed significantly higher mortality rate, prolonged hospital and ICU durations, more complications and invasive treatments, as well as increased cost. Our study revealed that AKI and multiple operations were 2 critical factors increasing the risk of intra-abdominal bleeding among patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. Additionally, massive intra-abdominal bleeding was also associated with poor prognosis. PMID:26181564

  13. Ceftazidime-avibactam for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and complicated intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Mawal, Yogesh; Critchley, Ian A; Riccobene, Todd A; Talley, Angela K

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and complicated intra-abdominal infections is increasingly difficult due to the rising prevalence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Ceftazidime-avibactam is a combination of the established third-generation cephalosporin ceftazidime with avibactam, a novel non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor, which restores the activity of ceftazidime against many β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases. Clinical and nonclinical studies supporting the safety and efficacy of ceftazidime-avibactam include microbiological surveillance studies of clinically relevant pathogens, in vivo animal models of infection, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment analyses, Phase I clinical pharmacology studies, and Phase II/III studies in the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated urinary tract infections, including patients with ceftazidime-nonsusceptible Gram-negative infections.

  14. [Dientamoeba fragilis infection as cause of severe abdominal discomfort and flatulence].

    PubMed

    Halkjær, Sofie; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Petersen, Andreas Munk

    2015-01-26

    The clinical significance of Dientamoeba fragilis infection is controversial. We describe a case-history of a 16-year-old patient, who had suffered severe abdominal discomfort and flatulence through his lifetime. He was eventually diagnosed with D. fragilis infection, and eradication of D. fragilis with high-dose metronidazole kept him without symptoms for one year. Recurrence of the symptoms and recurrence of the D. fragilis infection was thereafter treated successfully with paromomycin.

  15. Aortoiliac Artery Reconstruction Using Bilateral Reversed Superficial Femoral Veins for an Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hanako; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hatori, Kyohei; Miki, Takao; Obayashi, Tamiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is difficult and the ideal graft material is a subject of debate. A 60-year-old man with untreated diabetes mellitus was referred to our hospital presenting with fever and left lower abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with an IAAA by blood culture and computed tomography. We treated the patient surgically for the IAAA using bilateral reversed superficial femoral veins which were shaped into a bifurcated graft. No signs of recurrent infection or aneurysmal dilation were observed for 3 years after the procedure. PMID:27087879

  16. Aortoiliac Artery Reconstruction Using Bilateral Reversed Superficial Femoral Veins for an Infected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Satoshi; Hirai, Hanako; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hatori, Kyohei; Miki, Takao; Obayashi, Tamiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is difficult and the ideal graft material is a subject of debate. A 60-year-old man with untreated diabetes mellitus was referred to our hospital presenting with fever and left lower abdominal pain. The patient was diagnosed with an IAAA by blood culture and computed tomography. We treated the patient surgically for the IAAA using bilateral reversed superficial femoral veins which were shaped into a bifurcated graft. No signs of recurrent infection or aneurysmal dilation were observed for 3 years after the procedure.

  17. Mycobacterial infections in adult salmon and steelhead trout returning to the Columbia River Basin and other areas in 1957

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1959-01-01

    The degree of incidence of acid -fast bacillus infections in adult salmonid fishes was determined. The disease was shown to be widely distributed in the area examined. It is believed the primary source of infection is derived from the hatchery practice of feeding infected salmon products to juvenile fish. One group of marked adults that had been hatchery reared for 370 days showed a 62 percent incidence of infection. A statistical analysis indicated that length of fish is independent of infection

  18. Pathogenesis of tuberculosis in mice exposed to low and high doses of an environmental mycobacterial saprophyte before infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Pando, R; Pavön, L; Arriaga, K; Orozco, H; Madrid-Marina, V; Rook, G

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacteria are ubiquitous in the environment, but they are not part of the normal human microbial flora. It has been suggested that variable contact with mycobacteria can influence susceptibility to mycobacterial pathogens and the efficacy of subsequent Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination. To test this, mice were immunized with high or low doses of an environmental saprophyte, M. vaccae, that is intensely immunogenic as an autoclaved preparation. Two months later, they received an intratracheal challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Recipients of a low Th1-inducing dose (10(7) organisms) were partially protected and maintained a high ratio of interleukin 2 (IL-2)-positive to IL-4-positive cells in the perivascular, peribronchial, and granulomatous areas of the lung, whereas in unimmunized controls the IL-4-positive cells increased markedly between days 21 and 28. In contrast, recipients of the high dose (10(9) organisms), which primes Th2 as well as Th1 cytokine production, died more rapidly than unimmunized controls and showed massive pneumonia from day 7. The ratio of IL-2-positive to IL-4-positive cells in all compartments of the lung rapidly fell to 1 by day 14 for these animals. These events correlated with cytokine mRNA profiles and with increases in the local toxicity of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), demonstrable only when a major Th2 component was present. These data indicate that cross-reactive epitopes present in an environmental saprophyte can evoke either protective responses or responses that increase susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. The latter are associated with the presence of a Th2 component and increased sensitivity to TNF-alpha. PMID:9234793

  19. Safety and Effectiveness of Meropenem in Infants With Suspected or Complicated Intra-abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Poindexter, Brenda; Bidegain, Margarita; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; Schelonka, Robert L.; Randolph, David A.; Ward, Robert M.; Wade, Kelly; Valencia, Gloria; Burchfield, David; Arrieta, Antonio; Mehta, Varsha; Walsh, Michele; Kantak, Anand; Rasmussen, Maynard; Sullivan, Janice E.; Finer, Neil; Rich, Wade; Brozanski, Beverly S.; van den Anker, John; Blumer, Jeffrey; Laughon, Matthew; Watt, Kevin M.; Kearns, Gregory L.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Martz, Karen; Berezny, Katherine; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal infections are common in young infants and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Meropenem is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial with excellent activity against pathogens associated with intra-abdominal infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and effectiveness of meropenem in young infants with suspected or complicated intra-abdominal infections. Methods. Preterm and term infants <91 days of age with suspected or confirmed intra-abdominal infections hospitalized in 24 neonatal intensive care units were studied in an open-label, multiple-dose study. Adverse events and serious adverse events were collected through 3 and 30 days following the last meropenem dose, respectively. Effectiveness was assessed by 3 criteria: death, bacterial cultures, and presumptive clinical cure score. Results. Of 200 subjects enrolled in the study, 99 (50%) experienced an adverse event, and 34 (17%) had serious adverse events; no adverse events were probably or definitely related to meropenem. The most commonly reported adverse events were sepsis (6%), seizures (5%), elevated conjugated bilirubin (5%), and hypokalemia (5%). Only 2 of the serious adverse events were determined to be possibly related to meropenem (isolated ileal perforation and an episode of fungal sepsis). Effectiveness was evaluable in 192 (96%) subjects, and overall treatment success was 84%. Conclusions. Meropenem was well tolerated in this cohort of critically ill infants, and the majority of infants treated with meropenem met the definition of therapeutic success. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00621192. PMID:22955430

  20. Mycotic Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Secondary to Septic Embolism of a Thoracic Aorta Graft Infection.

    PubMed

    Blanco Amil, Carla Lorena; Vidal Rey, Jorge; López Arquillo, Irene; Pérez Rodríguez, María Teresa; Encisa de Sá, José Manuel

    2016-05-01

    Mycotic aneurysms account for 1% of abdominal aortic aneurysms. There are very few cases published that describe the formation of mycotic aneurysms after septic embolism due to graft infection. We present the first case to our knowledge to be described in the literature of a mycotic aneurysm caused by septic embolism derived from a thoracic aorta graft infection, treated with conventional surgery leading to a successful outcome and evolution.

  1. Modulation of mycobacterial-specific Th1 and Th17 cells in latent tuberculosis by coincident hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    George, Parakkal Jovvian; Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Kumaran, Paramasivam Paul; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2013-05-15

    Hookworm infections and tuberculosis (TB) are coendemic in many parts of the world. It has been suggested that infection with helminth parasites could suppress the predominant Th1 (IFN-γ-mediated) response needed to control Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and enhance susceptibility to infection and/or disease. To determine the role of coincident hookworm infection on responses at steady-state and on M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses in latent TB (LTB), we examined the cellular responses in individuals with LTB with or without concomitant hookworm infection. By analyzing the expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 subsets of CD4(+) T cells, we were able to demonstrate that the presence of coincident hookworm infection significantly diminished both spontaneously expressed and M. tuberculosis-specific mono- and dual-functional Th1 and Th17 cells. Hookworm infection, in contrast, was associated with expanded frequencies of mono- and dual-functional Th2 cells at both steady-state and upon Ag stimulation. This differential induction of CD4(+) T cell subsets was abrogated upon mitogen stimulation. Additionally, coincident hookworm infection was associated with increased adaptive T regulatory cells but not natural regulatory T cells in LTB. Finally, the CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression pattern was also associated with alterations in the systemic levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Thus, coincident hookworm infection exerts a profound inhibitory effect on protective Th1 and Th17 responses in LTB and may predispose toward the development of active tuberculosis in humans.

  2. Cytomegalovirus infection modulates the phenotype and functional profile of the T-cell immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life☆

    PubMed Central

    Terrazzini, Nadia; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Thomas, David; Smith, Helen; Vescovini, Rosanna; Sansoni, Paolo; Kern, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Infection with Cytomegalovirus is associated with accelerated immunosenescence. Expansions of CMV-specific T cell responses have previously been demonstrated to affect the ability of T cells to respond to other infections. Most people above 60 years of age display M. tuberculosis-specific immunity because of vaccination, exposure, or both. T-cell responses can be assessed by measuring intracellular IFN-γ in vitro after tuberculin stimulation. Here we investigated tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell responses in independently living healthy older people in the South of England using flow-cytometry. Individuals were investigated for tuberculin and CMV-specific T-cell immunity using in vitro antigen stimulation followed by intracellular staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL2, as well as degranulation and CD154 upregulation. We also examined a control group of younger individuals (20–35 years of age). There was no significant difference between older and young people in regards to tuberculin responsiveness of CD4 T-cells; however, older people seemed to show more outliers. Increased responsiveness to tuberculin was significantly correlated to CMV responsiveness but not age. In older donors, the memory phenotype of tuberculin-induced T-cells was significantly skewed towards a more terminal differentiation phenotype in CMV-infected compared to uninfected individuals and the degree of skewing correlated quantitatively with the size of the CMV-specific CD4 T-cell response. This is a fundamental advance over previous reports of changes of the tuberculin-specific CD4 T-cell response with CMV serostatus. Our results show that how the immune system responds to CMV has a fundamental impact on the phenotype and function of the immune response to mycobacterial antigens in older life. PMID:24370373

  3. A Case of Infective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm due to Haemophilus influenzae Type B

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Toshimitsu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Infective abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is relatively rare, but a case which is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B is very rare. We experienced one IAAA case due to H. influenzae type B. The patient was 69-year-old man presenting with severe abdominal and back pain and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), as inflammatory marker. The patient was found to have saccular aneurysm infrarenal aorta on computed tomography scanning. First, we started to treat him with antibiotic agent and second, we operated him at day 8 after admission with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft. Revascularization was made in situ reconstruction. As the result of culture with aneurysm wall, we found that the cause of this aneurysm was the infection of H. influenzae type B. As far as we know, this bacterium is scarcely reported as the cause of infective aortic aneurysms. We reported this IAAA case with the review of the English literature. PMID:23997558

  4. A Case of Infective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm due to Haemophilus influenzae Type B.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshimitsu; Kobayashi, Masayoshi

    2012-09-01

    Infective abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is relatively rare, but a case which is caused by Haemophilus influenzae type B is very rare. We experienced one IAAA case due to H. influenzae type B. The patient was 69-year-old man presenting with severe abdominal and back pain and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), as inflammatory marker. The patient was found to have saccular aneurysm infrarenal aorta on computed tomography scanning. First, we started to treat him with antibiotic agent and second, we operated him at day 8 after admission with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene graft. Revascularization was made in situ reconstruction. As the result of culture with aneurysm wall, we found that the cause of this aneurysm was the infection of H. influenzae type B. As far as we know, this bacterium is scarcely reported as the cause of infective aortic aneurysms. We reported this IAAA case with the review of the English literature.

  5. DNA-Launched Alphavirus Replicons Encoding a Fusion of Mycobacterial Antigens Acr and Ag85B Are Immunogenic and Protective in a Murine Model of TB Infection.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Neha; Klimstra, William B; Mason, Carol; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for effective prophylactic measures against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, particularly given the highly variable efficacy of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). Most studies indicate that cell-mediated immune responses involving both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are necessary for effective immunity against Mtb. Genetic vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses, including CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, against a variety of bacterial, viral, parasitic and tumor antigens, and this strategy may therefore hold promise for the development of more effective TB vaccines. Novel formulations and delivery strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines have recently been evaluated, and have shown varying degrees of success. In the present study, we evaluated DNA-launched Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons (Vrep) encoding a novel fusion of the mycobacterial antigens α-crystallin (Acr) and antigen 85B (Ag85B), termed Vrep-Acr/Ag85B, for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in a murine model of pulmonary TB. Vrep-Acr/Ag85B generated antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses that persisted for at least 10 wk post-immunization. Interestingly, parenterally administered Vrep-Acr/Ag85B also induced T cell responses in the lung tissues, the primary site of infection, and inhibited bacterial growth in both the lungs and spleens following aerosol challenge with Mtb. DNA-launched Vrep may, therefore, represent an effective approach to the development of gene-based vaccines against TB, particularly as components of heterologous prime-boost strategies or as BCG boosters.

  6. Multistate US Outbreak of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infections Associated with Medical Tourism to the Dominican Republic, 2013-2014(1).

    PubMed

    Schnabel, David; Esposito, Douglas H; Gaines, Joanna; Ridpath, Alison; Barry, M Anita; Feldman, Katherine A; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Ahmad, Nina; Nyangoma, Edith N; Nguyen, Duc B; Perz, Joseph F; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A; Jensen, Bette J; Lin, Ying; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Jani, Nisha; Morgan, Oliver W; Brunette, Gary W; Pritchard, P Scott; Greenbaum, Adena H; Rhee, Susan M; Blythe, David; Sotir, Mark

    2016-08-01

    During 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in Baltimore, MD, USA, received report of 2 Maryland residents whose surgical sites were infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria after cosmetic procedures at a clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic. A multistate investigation was initiated; a probable case was defined as a surgical site infection unresponsive to therapy in a patient who had undergone cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic. We identified 21 case-patients in 6 states who had surgery in 1 of 5 Dominican Republic clinics; 13 (62%) had surgery at clinic A. Isolates from 12 (92%) of those patients were culture-positive for Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Of 9 clinic A case-patients with available data, all required therapeutic surgical intervention, 8 (92%) were hospitalized, and 7 (78%) required ≥3 months of antibacterial drug therapy. Healthcare providers should consider infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in patients who have surgical site infections unresponsive to standard treatment.

  7. Prevalence of Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacterial Infections among Tuberculosis Suspects in Iran: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Dabiri, Hossein; Darban-Sarokhalil, Davood; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The infections due to Non-Tuberculosis Mycobacteria (NTM) are becoming an important health problem in many countries in the world. Globally, an increase in NTM infections has been reported from many countries around the world. However, limited information is available about the prevalence of NTM infections in Iran. Material and Methods The data of the prevalence of NTM infections were collected from databases such as PubMed, Web of science, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, Iranmedex, and Scientific Information Database. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (V2.0, Biostat) software was used to analyze the data. Results The meta-analyses showed that the prevalence of NTM infections was 10.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 6.3-15.9) among culture-positive cases of tuberculosis (TB) in Iran. The further stratified analyses indicated that the prevalence of NTM was higher in studies that were done after year 2000. Additionally, M. simiae (43.3% [95% CI 36.8-50.0]), M. intracellucar (27.3% [95% CI 0.7-95.5]) and M. fortuitum (22.7% [95% CI 16.1-30.9]) were the most prevalent NTM species, respectively. Discussion The relatively high prevalence of NTM infections (10.2%) among culture positive cases for TB underlines the need for greater enforcement of infection control strategies. Establishment of appropriate diagnostic criteria and management guidelines for NTM diseases and expanding the number and quality of regional reference laboratories may facilitate more accurate action for prevention and control of NTM infections in Iran. PMID:26052701

  8. Laparoscopic management of intra-abdominal infections: Systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Tranà, Cristian; Sartelli, Massimo; Catena, Fausto; Saverio, Salomone Di; Manfredi, Roberto; Montori, Giulia; Ceresoli, Marco; Falcone, Chiara; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of laparoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of intra abdominal infections. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed including studies where intra abdominal infections were treated laparoscopically. RESULTS: Early laparoscopic approaches have become the standard surgical technique for treating acute cholecystitis. The laparoscopic appendectomy has been demonstrated to be superior to open surgery in acute appendicitis. In the event of diverticulitis, laparoscopic resections have proven to be safe and effective procedures for experienced laparoscopic surgeons and may be performed without adversely affecting morbidity and mortality rates. However laparoscopic resection has not been accepted by the medical community as the primary treatment of choice. In high-risk patients, laparoscopic approach may be used for exploration or peritoneal lavage and drainage. The successful laparoscopic repair of perforated peptic ulcers for experienced surgeons, is demonstrated to be safe and effective. Regarding small bowel perforations, comparative studies contrasting open and laparoscopic surgeries have not yet been conducted. Successful laparoscopic resections addressing iatrogenic colonic perforation have been reported despite a lack of literature-based evidence supporting such procedures. In post-operative infections, laparoscopic approaches may be useful in preventing diagnostic delay and controlling the source. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopy has a good diagnostic accuracy and enables to better identify the causative pathology; laparoscopy may be recommended for the treatment of many intra-abdominal infections. PMID:26328036

  9. Antimicrobials: a global alliance for optimizing their rational use in intra-abdominal infections (AGORA).

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Weber, Dieter G; Ruppé, Etienne; Bassetti, Matteo; Wright, Brian J; Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Federico; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Coimbra, Raul; Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick A; Maier, Ronald V; De Waele, Jan J; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Griffiths, Ewen A; Eckmann, Christian; Brink, Adrian J; Mazuski, John E; May, Addison K; Sawyer, Rob G; Mertz, Dominik; Montravers, Philippe; Kumar, Anand; Roberts, Jason A; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Watkins, Richard R; Lowman, Warren; Spellberg, Brad; Abbott, Iain J; Adesunkanmi, Abdulrashid Kayode; Al-Dahir, Sara; Al-Hasan, Majdi N; Agresta, Ferdinando; Althani, Asma A; Ansari, Shamshul; Ansumana, Rashid; Augustin, Goran; Bala, Miklosh; Balogh, Zsolt J; Baraket, Oussama; Bhangu, Aneel; Beltrán, Marcelo A; Bernhard, Michael; Biffl, Walter L; Boermeester, Marja A; Brecher, Stephen M; Cherry-Bukowiec, Jill R; Buyne, Otmar R; Cainzos, Miguel A; Cairns, Kelly A; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrian; Chandy, Sujith J; Che Jusoh, Asri; Chichom-Mefire, Alain; Colijn, Caroline; Corcione, Francesco; Cui, Yunfeng; Curcio, Daniel; Delibegovic, Samir; Demetrashvili, Zaza; De Simone, Belinda; Dhingra, Sameer; Diaz, José J; Di Carlo, Isidoro; Dillip, Angel; Di Saverio, Salomone; Doyle, Michael P; Dorj, Gereltuya; Dogjani, Agron; Dupont, Hervé; Eachempati, Soumitra R; Enani, Mushira Abdulaziz; Egiev, Valery N; Elmangory, Mutasim M; Ferrada, Paula; Fitchett, Joseph R; Fraga, Gustavo P; Guessennd, Nathalie; Giamarellou, Helen; Ghnnam, Wagih; Gkiokas, George; Goldberg, Staphanie R; Gomes, Carlos Augusto; Gomi, Harumi; Guzmán-Blanco, Manuel; Haque, Mainul; Hansen, Sonja; Hecker, Andreas; Heizmann, Wolfgang R; Herzog, Torsten; Hodonou, Adrien Montcho; Hong, Suk-Kyung; Kafka-Ritsch, Reinhold; Kaplan, Lewis J; Kapoor, Garima; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kees, Martin G; Kenig, Jakub; Kiguba, Ronald; Kim, Peter K; Kluger, Yoram; Khokha, Vladimir; Koike, Kaoru; Kok, Kenneth Y Y; Kong, Victory; Knox, Matthew C; Inaba, Kenji; Isik, Arda; Iskandar, Katia; Ivatury, Rao R; Labbate, Maurizio; Labricciosa, Francesco M; Laterre, Pierre-François; Latifi, Rifat; Lee, Jae Gil; Lee, Young Ran; Leone, Marc; Leppaniemi, Ari; Li, Yousheng; Liang, Stephen Y; Loho, Tonny; Maegele, Marc; Malama, Sydney; Marei, Hany E; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Marwah, Sanjay; Massele, Amos; McFarlane, Michael; Melo, Renato Bessa; Negoi, Ionut; Nicolau, David P; Nord, Carl Erik; Ofori-Asenso, Richard; Omari, AbdelKarim H; Ordonez, Carlos A; Ouadii, Mouaqit; Pereira Júnior, Gerson Alves; Piazza, Diego; Pupelis, Guntars; Rawson, Timothy Miles; Rems, Miran; Rizoli, Sandro; Rocha, Claudio; Sakakhushev, Boris; Sanchez-Garcia, Miguel; Sato, Norio; Segovia Lohse, Helmut A; Sganga, Gabriele; Siribumrungwong, Boonying; Shelat, Vishal G; Soreide, Kjetil; Soto, Rodolfo; Talving, Peep; Tilsed, Jonathan V; Timsit, Jean-Francois; Trueba, Gabriel; Trung, Ngo Tat; Ulrych, Jan; van Goor, Harry; Vereczkei, Andras; Vohra, Ravinder S; Wani, Imtiaz; Uhl, Waldemar; Xiao, Yonghong; Yuan, Kuo-Ching; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Zahar, Jean-Ralph; Zakrison, Tanya L; Corcione, Antonio; Melotti, Rita M; Viscoli, Claudio; Viale, Perluigi

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in high-risk patients. The cornerstones in the management of complicated IAIs are timely effective source control with appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is important in the management of intra-abdominal infections and must be broad enough to cover all likely organisms because inappropriate initial antimicrobial therapy is associated with poor patient outcomes and the development of bacterial resistance. The overuse of antimicrobials is widely accepted as a major driver of some emerging infections (such as C. difficile), the selection of resistant pathogens in individual patients, and for the continued development of antimicrobial resistance globally. The growing emergence of multi-drug resistant organisms and the limited development of new agents available to counteract them have caused an impending crisis with alarming implications, especially with regards to Gram-negative bacteria. An international task force from 79 different countries has joined this project by sharing a document on the rational use of antimicrobials for patients with IAIs. The project has been termed AGORA (Antimicrobials: A Global Alliance for Optimizing their Rational Use in Intra-Abdominal Infections). The authors hope that AGORA, involving many of the world's leading experts, can actively raise awareness in health workers and can improve prescribing behavior in treating IAIs.

  10. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P < 0.001] and clean-contaminated (obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P < 0.001) cases. Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population.

  11. A case report of Mycobacterium chelonae keratitis and a review of mycobacterial infections of the eye and orbit.

    PubMed

    Khooshabeh, R; Grange, J M; Yates, M D; McCartney, A C; Casey, T A

    1994-10-01

    Mycobacteria are unusual causes of keratitis and other ocular infections but the outcome of infection is often serious. We report a case of keratitis due to Mycobacterium chelonae, a rapidly growing environmental mycobacterium, in a soft contact-lens wearer, and discuss the difficulty and delay in identifying the organism, twice erroneously identified as Nocardia asteroides on morphological grounds. Despite in vitro susceptibility, the response to anti-bacterial agents was negligible and a second keratoplasty was required after a recurrence of disease at the donor-host junction. We review the role of mycobacteria as the cause of keratitis and other forms of ocular disease.

  12. In vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 anaerobes isolated from human intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Warren, Yumi A; Tyrrell, Kerin L; Merriam, C Vreni; Fernandez, Helen

    2006-01-01

    The in vitro activity of moxifloxacin against 923 recent anaerobic isolates obtained from pretreatment cultures in patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections was studied using the CLSI M11-A-6 agar dilution method. Moxifloxacin was active against 87% (96 of 110) Bacteroides fragilis strains at < or = 1 microg/ml and 87% (79 of 90) B. thetaiotaomicron strains at < or = 2 microg/ml. Species variation was seen, with B. uniformis, B. vulgatus, Clostridium clostridioforme, and C. symbiosum being least susceptible and accounting for most of the resistant isolates; excluding the aforementioned four resistant species, 86% (303 of 363) of Bacteroides species isolates and 94% (417 of 450) of all other genera and species were susceptible to < or = 2 microg/ml of moxifloxacin. Overall, moxifloxacin was active against 763 of 923 (83%) of strains at < or = 2 microg/ml, supporting its use as a monotherapy for some community-acquired intra-abdominal infections.

  13. Multistate US Outbreak of Rapidly Growing Mycobacterial Infections Associated with Medical Tourism to the Dominican Republic, 2013–20141

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Douglas H.; Gaines, Joanna; Ridpath, Alison; Barry, M. Anita; Feldman, Katherine A.; Mullins, Jocelyn; Burns, Rachel; Ahmad, Nina; Nyangoma, Edith N.; Nguyen, Duc B.; Perz, Joseph F.; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A.; Jensen, Bette J.; Lin, Ying; Posivak-Khouly, Leah; Jani, Nisha; Morgan, Oliver W.; Brunette, Gary W.; Pritchard, P. Scott; Greenbaum, Adena H.; Rhee, Susan M.; Blythe, David; Sotir, Mark

    2016-01-01

    During 2013, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in Baltimore, MD, USA, received report of 2 Maryland residents whose surgical sites were infected with rapidly growing mycobacteria after cosmetic procedures at a clinic (clinic A) in the Dominican Republic. A multistate investigation was initiated; a probable case was defined as a surgical site infection unresponsive to therapy in a patient who had undergone cosmetic surgery in the Dominican Republic. We identified 21 case-patients in 6 states who had surgery in 1 of 5 Dominican Republic clinics; 13 (62%) had surgery at clinic A. Isolates from 12 (92%) of those patients were culture-positive for Mycobacterium abscessus complex. Of 9 clinic A case-patients with available data, all required therapeutic surgical intervention, 8 (92%) were hospitalized, and 7 (78%) required ≥3 months of antibacterial drug therapy. Healthcare providers should consider infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria in patients who have surgical site infections unresponsive to standard treatment. PMID:27434822

  14. Toll-like receptor 6 senses Mycobacterium avium and is required for efficient control of mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Fábio A V; de Paula, Rafaella R; Mendes, Aline C; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Gomes, Marco T R; Carvalho, Natália B; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Caliari, Marcelo V; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2013-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium has been reported to signal through both Toll-like receptor (TLR2) and TLR9. To investigate the role of TLR6 in innate immune responses to M. avium, TLR6, MyD88, TLR2, and TLR2/6 KO mice were infected with this pathogen. Bacterial burdens were higher in the lungs and livers of infected TLR6, TLR2, TLR2/6, and MyD88 KO mice compared with those in C57BL/6 mice, which indicates that TLR6 is required for the efficient control of M. avium infection. However, TLR6 KO spleen cells presented with normal M. avium induced IFN-γ responses as measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. In contrast, the production of IFN-γ in lung tissue was diminished in all studied KO mice. Furthermore, only MyD88 deficiency reduced granuloma areas in mouse livers. Moreover, we determined that TLR6 plays an important role in controlling bacterial growth within macrophages and in the production of TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-6 by M. avium infected DCs. Finally, the lack of TLR6 reduced activation of MAPKs and NF-κB in DCs. In summary, TLR6 is required for full resistance to M. avium and for the activation of DCs to produce proinflammatory cytokines.

  15. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  16. Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in a clinical presentation of Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome: a case report with multigene diagnostic approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome (FHCS) is caused by inflammation of perihepatic capsules associated with pelvic inflammatory disease. In recent years, infections with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been increasingly occurring in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. However, NTM has never been reported in patients with FHCS. We present the first case of a patient with extrapulmonary NTM infection in a clinical presentation of FHCS. Case presentation A 26-year-old Korean woman presented with right upper quadrant and suprapubic pain. She was initially suspected to have FHCS. However, she was refractory to conventional antibiotic therapy. Laparoscopy revealed multiple violin-string adhesions of the parietal peritoneum to the liver and miliary-like nodules on the peritoneal surfaces. Diagnosis of NTM was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis results of biopsy specimens that showed caseating granulomas with positive acid-fast bacilli. Treatment with anti-NTM medications was initiated, and the patient’s symptoms were considerably ameliorated. Conclusions An awareness of NTM as potential pathogens, even in previously healthy adults, and efforts to exclude other confounding diseases are important to establish the diagnosis of NTM disease. NTM infection can cause various clinical manifestations, which in the present case, overlapped with the symptoms of perihepatic inflammation seen in FHCS. PMID:25115526

  17. Purification of modified mycobacterial A60 antigen by affinity chromatography and its use for rapid diagnostic tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Yari, Sh; Hadizadeh Tasbiti, A; Fateh, A; Karimi, A; Yari, F; Sakhai, F; Ghazanfari, M; Bahrmand, A

    2011-11-01

    Tuberculosis has been declared a global emergency. The mainstay for its control is the rapid and accurate identification of infected individual. Antibodies to A60, one of the macromolecular antigen complexes of mycobacteria were commonly used in the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to prepare specific antibodies against A60 for detection of tuberculosis infection. Specific polyclonal antibodies against A60, (A60-Ab) were prepared in rabbits using 2 boosted injections of the antigen (A60). The antibodies were purified and treated with normal oral flora to remove any non-specific and cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were conjugated to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B and used to isolate subunits of A60 with more specificity for M. tuberculosis. A new affinity column was designed to prepare modified (purified) A60 antigen. Purified A60 antigen (PA60-Ag) was used to develop antibody production by Immunoaffinity chromatography. 113 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pulmonary TB at Pasteur Institute were selected for the study. The specificity of the results was analyzed with TB-rapid test by using PA60-antibodies. TB-rapid test revealed that normal oral flora-absorbed antibodies could lead to more specific results than that of the non-absorbed antibodies. The developed, modified A60 antibodies, (PA60-Ab)-rapid test showed higher sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) and overall efficiency (93.0%, 86.0%, 90.0%, 91.0%, and 90.0% respectively) for the detection of the Mycobacterium antigen. Moreover, PA60-Ag showed only two protein bands of molecular weight 45 and 66kDa in SDS-PAGE while untreated A60 showed multiple bands. Thus, our study helped in the purification of a novel and well characterized A60 antigen and good diagnostic potential for detecting tuberculosis infection.

  18. Mycobacterium fortuitum pneumonia in a cat and the role of lipid in the pathogenesis of atypical mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Couto, S S; Artacho, C A

    2007-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a saprophytic, fast-growing, nontuberculous, and nonlepromatous mycobacterium that can cause infections in animals and humans. In dogs and cats, it is one of the most common agents of ulcerative dermatitides and panniculitides caused by atypical mycobacteria. In humans, it is frequently found in lipoid pneumonias or contaminated surgical sites. We report a cat with granulomatous pneumonia caused by M fortuitum resembling lipoid pneumonia in humans. The similarity between the histopathology of the lung and skin lesions caused by this organism in dogs and cats is emphasized. We discuss the role of lipids in the pathogenesis of mycobacterioses and suggest an association between atypical mycobacteria and lipid-rich environments. We conclude that M fortuitum should be included as a differential in cases of lipid-rich pneumonias that do not respond to common antibiotics.

  19. Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis and bursitis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Zor, Fatih; Kocaoğlu, Murat; Bulakbaşi, Nail

    2009-12-01

    Atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis of the wrist can easily be misdiagnosed as synovial chondromatosis. Both sonography and magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in depicting "rice bodies" within the distended tendon sheaths and bursae of atypical mycobacterial infection. An endemic place for Mycobacterium species and the occupation of the patient should raise the suspicion for the disease. Polymerase chain reaction of the distended tendon fluid is a sensitive, specific and rapid method in identification of the mycobacteria.

  20. Searches among mycobacterial cultures for antileprosy vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; van Landingham, R; Walker, L L

    1980-01-01

    All mycobacteria species share some antigens, so there may be cultivable mycobacterial cultures that can provide vaccine protection against leprosy. Vaccine protection against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice has been demonstrated for M. leprae itself, as living or heat-killed suspensions, and for Mycobacterium bovis (BCG), as living suspensions. Results are reported here with 17 other cultures. The mycobacterial suspensions were injected intradermally, and the mice were challenged in the footpad with infectious suspensions of M. leprae. In two experiments the mice were also challenged by footpad injections of 10(7) heat-killed M. leprae so the footpad enlargment could be measured. That some mycobacterial suspensions were immunogenic for some of their own antigens was suggested by reactions at the vaccine site and enlargement of the regional lymph nodes. Some mycobacterial suspensions also stimulated footpad enlargement on challenge by homologous suspensions or by challenge with M. leprae suspensions. Consistent protection against infectious challenge with M. leprae was observed only with BCG and M. leprae, however. PMID:7000701

  1. Cord factor trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) mediates trafficking events during mycobacterial infection of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Indrigo, Jessica; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2003-08-01

    The persistence of tuberculosis within pulmonary granulomatous lesions is a complex phenomenon, with bacterial survival occurring in a focal region of high immune activity. In part, the survival of the organism may be linked to the ability of the surface glycolipid trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM; cord factor) to inhibit fusion events between phospholipid vesicles inside the host macrophage. At the same time, TDM contributes to macrophage activation and a cascade of events required for initiation and maintenance of granulomatous responses. This allows increased sequestration of organisms and further survival and persistence within host tissues. Bacterial viability, macrophage cytokine and chemokine response, and intracellular trafficking were investigated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis from which TDM had been removed. Removal of surface lipids led to enhanced trafficking of organisms to acidic compartments; reconstitution of delipidated organisms with either pure TDM or the petroleum ether extract containing crude surface lipids restored normal responses. Use of TDM-coated polystyrene beads demonstrated that TDM can mediate intracellular trafficking events, as well as influence macrophage production of pro-inflammatory molecules. Thus, the presence of TDM may be an important determinant for successful infection and survival of M. tuberculosis within macrophages.

  2. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry: a predictor of clinical response to treatment in pulmonary opportunist mycobacterial infection: preliminary work with M. malmoense.

    PubMed

    Heginbothom, M L; Magee, J T

    1997-01-01

    Pyrolysis mass spectrometry (Py-MS) yields data reflecting overall cell composition. The changes in composition induced by treatment with rifampicin and ethambutol, alone and in combination, were investigated for a collection of seven strains of Mycobacterium malmoense from pulmonary infections. Two strains, both from patients that had responded to therapy with this combination, showed large changes in composition from control, untreated cultures. The difference was particularly marked for the ethambutol treated cultures. Four strains, all from patients who had failed to respond to therapy with this combination, showed minimal changes in composition for all treatments. The remaining strain also showed minimal treatment-induced change, but, for this patient, therapy with the combination had proved successful. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined radiometrically. All strains showed MICs < 0.5 microgram/mL for rifampicin (sensitive) and of 8 micrograms/mL for ethambutol (resistant). MIC results did not correlate with clinical response, whereas the Py-MS results correlated with clinical response for six of the seven isolates. Py-MS may have a role in predicting effective therapy for this problem group.

  3. Abdominal aortic endograft infection: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, Gian Franco; Genco, Bruno; Minicozzi, Annamaria; Zecchinelli, Marco Paolo; Segattini, Christian; Momo, Rostand Emmanuel; Pacca, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Endovascular prosthesis infection after exclusion of an abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare, dramatic event and its diagnosis and treatment are extremely complex. This particular complication has been less well explored in the literature than others such as endoleaks, migration or stent rupture. The incidence of aorto-iliac stent-graft infection is almost 0.7%, while the infection rate in open surgery varies from 0.6% to 3%. Moreover, the infection can be early when it arises within 4 months of the implant or late when it arises after 4 months. Since 1991 only 94 cases of endograft infections have been reported in the world literature, to which our two cases need to be added, making a total of 96 cases. The first of our patients was diagnosed with an early infection that was successfully treated by explanting the infected graft followed by aortic reconstruction with a homograft. Six months after the operation the patient died of cardiac failure. The second case was a late infection which developed 8 years after the first intervention in a patient with chronic renal failure treated with dialytic therapy. After aneurysmectomy and stent-graft removal, a bifurcated dacron silver graft was implanted. The patient died of cardiogenic shock 40 days after surgery. The surgical treatment of this serious complication is associated with high perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and requires very careful planning of the operation.

  4. Parasitic Infection of the Gallbladder: Cystoisospora belli Infection as a Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain and Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Matthew G; Lee, Johnathan Y

    2016-06-01

    Herein we describe two cases of Cystoisospora belli infection of the gallbladder in patients with chronic abdominal pain and review the published literature to date. C. belli is an intracellular protozoan parasite that typically infects the small bowel of immunocompromised hosts. Little is known of the significance of C. belli infection of the gallbladder at this point as only four cases have been reported as yet, only one of which occurred in an immunocompetent patient. It is often treatable with antibiotics, and the patient's immune status, including HIV testing, should be investigated. Neither of the patients at our institution was found to be immunocompromised, and HIV-1/2 antibody testing was non-reactive in both.

  5. Risk Factors for the Development of Intra-Abdominal Fungal Infections in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Brian J.; Gordon, Stuart R.; Gardner, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intra-abdominal fungal infections (AFI) complicating acute pancreatitis arise in the context of pancreatic necrosis. Our goal was to determine which risk factors contribute to AFI in patients with acute pancreatitis. Methods Records were reviewed from 479 non-transfer patients admitted to our medical center with acute pancreatitis from 1985–2009. Using multivariable regression models, risk factors for AFI were identified. Results Out of 479 patients admitted with acute pancreatitis, 17 patients were subsequently found to have an AFI and 3 of these patients expired. The mean length of stay for patients with an AFI was 24 days and 76% were admitted to the intensive care unit. Patients with AFI were more likely to have received prophylactic antibiotics on admission (OR 1.7, 95% C.I. 1.2–2.3), TPN within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7) or to have necrosis on CT scan within 7 days of admission (OR 1.4, 95% C.I. 1.1–1.7). Multivariable regression models identified admission antibiotic use (OR 1.6, 95% C.I. 1.4–1.8) as the strongest predictor of AFI. Conclusion Admission antibiotics are the biggest risk factor for the development of intra-abdominal fungal infections in acute pancreatitis. Prophylactic antibiotics to prevent infected necrosis should therefore be discouraged. PMID:25872170

  6. Treatment Modalities and Antimicrobial Stewardship Initiatives in the Management of Intra-Abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Charles; Zak, Matthew; Avery, Lisa; Brown, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) focus on improving the utilization of broad spectrum antibiotics to decrease the incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. Hospital admission for both medical and surgical intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) commonly results in the empiric use of broad spectrum antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones, beta-lactam beta-lactamase inhibitors, and carbapenems that can select for resistant organisms. This review will discuss the management of uncomplicated and complicated IAIs as well as highlight stewardship initiatives focusing on the proper use of broad spectrum antibiotics. PMID:27025526

  7. Childhood recurrent abdominal pain and Helicobacter pylori infection, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, H; Fouladi, N; Salehzadeh, F; Alipour, S A; Javadi, M S

    2017-02-01

    We examined the role of Helicobacter pylori infection as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) among Iranian children in a population-based case-control study to determine the association between H. pylori infection and RAP among schoolchildren. A total of 1558 children aged 6-13 years were examined. Children with RAP confirmed by the Apley and Naish criteria were selected; 145 cases were selected for inclusion and were compared with 145 healthy children recruited from the same area. Both groups underwent stool antigen testing. The prevalence of RAP in the children tested was 9.3%. Children with RAP had a higher H. pylori infection rate than the control group (58.6% vs 44.8%) (OR = 1.744; 95% CI: 1.095-2.776). There was no significant difference between the RAP symptoms in children with positive stool test, i.e. infected with H. pylori, and those whose tests were negative. We identified H. pylori infection in more than 55% of the case group. Therefore, H. pylori infection can be considered an important factor for RAP in children.

  8. Abdominal surgical site infections: a prospective study of determinant factors in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Muchuweti, David; Jönsson, Kent U G

    2015-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are reported in lower frequencies in the developed countries than in the developing world. A prospective evaluation of risk factors in 285 patients undergoing abdominal surgery procedures in Zimbabwe was therefore undertaken. Overall infection rate was 26%. The age group 30-39 years had the highest number of dirty wounds and the highest rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Multivariate regression analysis showed a correlation between wound class and SSI (P < 0·05). This was also noted for American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score (P < 0·05). HIV-infected patients had 52% SSIs and non-infected patients had 26% (P < 0·05). Patients receiving blood transfusion had 51% SSIs and those not transfused had 17% (P < 0·01). Patients receiving pre- and intra-operative prophylactic antibiotics had 18% SSIs and those receiving postoperative administration had 37% (P < 0·01). Treatment ranged from dressings only in 11% to surgical intervention in 30% resulting in prolongation of median hospital stay from 8 to 18 days (P < 0·001). Mortality was 7%. High wound class, high ASA score, blood transfusion, HIV infection and delayed use of prophylactic antibiotics were risk factors for SSIs, resulting in surgical interventions, prolonged hospital stay and mortality.

  9. [Prevention of surgical site infection in abdominal surgery. A critical review of the evidence].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Tovar, Jaime; Badia, Josep M

    2014-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased morbidity, mortality and sanitary costs, and reduced patients quality of life. Many hospitals have adopted guidelines of scientifically-validated processes for prevention of surgical site and central-line catheter infections and sepsis. Most of these guidelines have resulted in an improvement in postoperative results. A review of the best available evidence on these measures in abdominal surgery is presented. The best measures are: avoidance of hair removal from the surgical field, skin decontamination with alcoholic antiseptic, correct use of antibiotic prophylaxis (administration within 30-60 min before incision, use of 1(st) or 2(nd) generation cephalosporins, single preoperative dosis, dosage adjustments based on body weight and renal function, intraoperative re-dosing if the duration of the procedure exceeds 2 half-lives of the drug or there is excessive blood loss), prevention of hypothermia, control of perioperative glucose levels, avoid blood transfusion and restrict intraoperative liquid infusion.

  10. Antibiotic management of complicated intra-abdominal infections in adults: The Asian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, Asok; Liau, Kui-Hin; Ren, Jianan; Lu, Min-Chi; Navarro, Narciso S.; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Usman, Nurhayat; Destura, Raul V.; Sirichindakul, Boonchoo; Tantawichien, Terapong; Lee, Christopher K.C.; Solomkin, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Regional epidemiological data and resistance profiles are essential for selecting appropriate antibiotic therapy for intra-abdominal infections (IAIs). However, such information may not be readily available in many areas of Asia and current international guidelines on antibiotic therapy for IAIs are for Western countries, with the most recent guidance for the Asian region dating from 2007. Therefore, the Asian Consensus Taskforce on Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections (ACT-cIAI) was convened to develop updated recommendations for antibiotic management of complicated IAIs (cIAIs) in Asia. This review article is based on a thorough literature review of Asian and international publications related to clinical management, epidemiology, microbiology, and bacterial resistance patterns in cIAIs, combined with the expert consensus of the Taskforce members. The microbiological profiles of IAIs in the Asian region are outlined and compared with Western data, and the latest available data on antimicrobial resistance in key pathogens causing IAIs in Asia is presented. From this information, antimicrobial therapies suitable for treating cIAIs in patients in Asian settings are proposed in the hope that guidance relevant to Asian practices will prove beneficial to local physicians managing IAIs. PMID:25568794

  11. Piperacillin-tazobactam versus imipenem-cilastatin for treatment of intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Brismar, B; Malmborg, A S; Tunevall, G; Wretlind, B; Bergman, L; Mentzing, L O; Nyström, P O; Kihlström, E; Bäckstrand, B; Skau, T

    1992-01-01

    In order to compare the clinical and microbiological efficacies and safety of piperacillin plus tazobactam with those of imipenem plus cilastatin, 134 patients with intra-abdominal infections (73 patients with appendicitis) participated in an open randomized comparative multicenter trial. A total of 40 men and 29 women (mean age, 53 years; age range, 18 to 92 years) were enrolled in the piperacillin-tazobactam group and 40 men and 25 women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 16 to 91 years) were enrolled in the imipenem-cilastatin group. The patients received either piperacillin (4 g) and tazobactam (500 mg) every 8 h or imipenem and cilastatin (500 mg each) every 8 h. Both regimens were given by intravenous infusion. A total of 113 patients were clinically evaluable. Of 55 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam, 50 were clinically cured, while 40 of 58 patients in the imipenem-cilastatin group were clinically cured. The differences were significant (Wilcoxon test; P = 0.005). There were 4 failures or relapses in the piperacillin-tazobactam group and 18 failures or relapses in the imipenem-cilastatin group. The microorganisms isolated were eradicated in similar proportions in the two patient groups. Adverse reactions, mainly gastrointestinal disturbances and nausea, were noted in 13 patients who received piperacillin-tazobactam and in 14 patients who received imipenem-cilastatin. Results of the present study show that piperacillin-tazobactam is effective and safe for the treatment of intra-abdominal infections. PMID:1336347

  12. Mycobacterial signaling through toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Joyoti; Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2012-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have helped to decipher molecular networks dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, in mycobacteria-infected macrophages. Stimulation of TLRs by mycobacteria and their antigenic components rapidly induces intracellular signaling cascades involved in the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play important roles in orchestrating proinflammatory responses and innate defense through generation of a variety of antimicrobial effector molecules. Recent studies have provided evidence that mycobacterial TLR-signaling cross talks with other intracellular antimicrobial innate pathways, the autophagy process and functional vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling. In this article we describe recent advances in the recognition, responses, and regulation of mycobacterial signaling through TLRs. PMID:23189273

  13. MiR-23a-5p modulates mycobacterial survival and autophagy during mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway by targeting TLR2.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xing; Gao, Yan; Mu, De-Guang; Fu, En-Qing

    2017-03-19

    Autophagy plays a pivotal role in activating the antimicrobial host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb.). The emerging roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating immune responses have attracted increasing attention in recent years. Appreciating the potential of host-directed therapies designed to control autophagy during mycobacterial infection, we focused on the influence of miR-23a-5p on the activation of macrophage autophagy during M.tb. infection in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and murine RAW264.7 cells. Here, we demonstrated that M.tb.-infection of macrophages lead to markedly enhanced expression of miR-23a-5p in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, forced expression of miR-23a-5p accelerated the survival rate of intracellular mycobacteria, while transfection with miR-23a-5p inhibitors attenuated mycobacterial survival. More importantly, overexpression of miR-23a-5p dramatically prevented M.tb.-induced activation of autophagy in macrophages, whereas inhibitors of miR-23a-5p remarkably accelerated M.tb.-induced autophagy. Mechanistically, miR-23a-5p is able to modulate TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB signaling activity by targeting TLR2 in RAW264.7 cells in response to M.tb.-infection. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that miR-23a-5p modulated the innate host defense by promoting mycobacteria survival and inhibiting the activation of autophagy against M.tb. through TLR2/MyD88/NF-κB pathway by targeting TLR2, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for tuberculosis.

  14. Uterine Perforation with Intra-Abdominal Clostridium perfringens Gas Gangrene: A Rare and Fatal Infection.

    PubMed

    Kashan, David; Muthu, Nagarajan; Chaucer, Benjamin; Davalos, Fidencio; Bernstein, Michael; Chendrasekhar, Akella

    2016-06-01

    Background:Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene is an extremely rare and fatal infection. Necrosis of the myometrium is rarely seen and has only been recorded in 18 cases to date. Of these 18 reported cases, only 5 have occurred in nonpregnant women. This article presents the 6th case of myometrium necrosis from C. perfringens.Case: A 72-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 2, presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. After examinations, laboratory testing, and several surgical interventions, she was found to have C. perfringens infection and advanced high-grade serous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with >50% invasion into the myometrium. Results: Despite the surgical interventions and use of several antibiotics, this patient did not improve. She was weaned from treatment per her advance directive and died after weaning. Conclusions: Awareness of the many etiologies for peritonitis is of great importance when a fatal infection may be the cause of the condition. Correct diagnosis and proper treatment is essential for the survival of patients infected with C. perfringens. (J GYNECOL SURG 32:182).

  15. Uterine Perforation with Intra-Abdominal Clostridium perfringens Gas Gangrene: A Rare and Fatal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kashan, David; Muthu, Nagarajan; Davalos, Fidencio; Bernstein, Michael; Chendrasekhar, Akella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Clostridium perfringens gas gangrene is an extremely rare and fatal infection. Necrosis of the myometrium is rarely seen and has only been recorded in 18 cases to date. Of these 18 reported cases, only 5 have occurred in nonpregnant women. This article presents the 6th case of myometrium necrosis from C. perfringens. Case: A 72-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 2, presented with abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. After examinations, laboratory testing, and several surgical interventions, she was found to have C. perfringens infection and advanced high-grade serous adenocarcinoma of the endometrium with >50% invasion into the myometrium. Results: Despite the surgical interventions and use of several antibiotics, this patient did not improve. She was weaned from treatment per her advance directive and died after weaning. Conclusions: Awareness of the many etiologies for peritonitis is of great importance when a fatal infection may be the cause of the condition. Correct diagnosis and proper treatment is essential for the survival of patients infected with C. perfringens. (J GYNECOL SURG 32:182) PMID:27274183

  16. Infection of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm stent graft after urosepsis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Veger, H T C; Hedeman Joosten, P Ph; Thoma, S R; Visser, M J T

    2013-02-01

    Infection of endovascular abdominal aneurysm stent grafts is an uncommon but known complication. Inoculation with bacteria of the endovascular abdominal aneurysm stent graft during the actual implantation, in the periprocedural hospitalization or later due to an aortoenteric fistula, has been described in the literature. We report a case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm stent graft infection occurring 40 months after implantation in a patient doing well up to an episode of urosepsis. In conclusion, we postulate that poor intraluminal healing of stent grafts, as observed in several explant studies, may result in a higher susceptibility to episodes of bacteremia than prosthetic vascular grafts inserted during open repair. We therefore consider the administration of prophylactic antibiotics in patients with endovascular stent grafts during periods with a likelihood of bacteremia.

  17. Optimal times above MICs of ceftibuten and cefaclor in experimental intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Onyeji, C O; Nicolau, D P; Nightingale, C H; Quintiliani, R

    1994-01-01

    The duration of time that serum drug levels remain above the MIC (time above the MIC) for the pathogen has been shown to be the most significant parameter determining the efficacies of beta-lactam antibiotics. In the described study, we investigated the optimal time above the MIC of ceftibuten and cefaclor using a nonneutropenic mouse model of intra-abdominal infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The abilities of the drugs to protect mice against the organisms were determined in mouse protection tests, and the doses were fractionated to produce various dosing regimens with different times above the MIC. All drug-organism combinations showed a significant correlation (r > 0.9) between drug efficacy and the time above the MIC. Also, with ceftibuten treatment, the different dosing regimens that produced equal times above the MIC resulted in the same efficacy, whereas with cefaclor, an apparent dose-dependent effect was observed. These results showed that for a 100% recovery from K. pneumoniae and E. coli infections, the optimal times above the MIC with ceftibuten treatment were 2.2 and 1.6 h, respectively. Relatively high doses of both antibiotics were required to ensure recovery from S. pneumoniae infections. In vitro time-kill studies demonstrated that cefaclor exhibits a marked inoculum effect against the pathogens, and there was a concentration-dependent killing at a large inoculum size. On the other hand, ceftibuten showed no inoculum effect. It is suggested that optimization of both dose and time above the MIC appears to be necessary for the treatment of S. aureus infections with cefaclor, and this may apply to other beta-lactams tht exhibit marked inoculum effects. PMID:8067747

  18. Intra-abdominal Infections: The Role of Anaerobes, Enterococci, Fungi, and Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Gil; Levy, Samuel; Salhab, Ghaleb; Mengesha, Bethlehem; Tzuman, Oran; Shur, Shira; Burke, Erica; Mayeda, Rebecca Cruz; Cochavi, Lior; Perluk, Idan; Zaidenstein, Ronit; Lazarovitch, Tsilia; Dadon, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal infections (IAI) constitute a common reason for hospitalization. However, there is lack of standardization in empiric management of (1) anaerobes, (2) enterococci, (3) fungi, and (4) multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO). The recommendation is to institute empiric coverage for some of these organisms in “high-risk community-acquired” or in “healthcare-associated” infections (HCAI), but exact definitions are not provided. Methods. Epidemiological study of IAI was conducted at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center (May–November 2013). Logistic and Cox regressions were used to analyze predictors and outcomes of IAI, respectively. The performances of established HCAI definitions to predict MDRO-IAI upon admission were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Results. After reviewing 8219 discharge notes, 253 consecutive patients were enrolled (43 [17%] children). There were 116 patients with appendicitis, 93 biliary infections, and 17 with diverticulitis. Cultures were obtained from 88 patients (35%), and 44 of them (50%) yielded a microbiologically confirmed IAI: 9% fungal, 11% enterococcal, 25% anaerobic, and 34% MDRO. Eighty percent of MDRO-IAIs were present upon admission, but the area under the ROC curve of predicting MDRO-IAI upon admission by the commonly used HCAI definitions were low (0.73 and 0.69). Independent predictors for MDRO-IAI were advanced age and active malignancy. Conclusions. Multidrug-resistant organism-IAIs are common, and empiric broad-spectrum coverage is important among elderly patients with active malignancy, even if the infection onset was outside the hospital setting, regardless of current HCAI definitions. Outcomes analyses suggest that empiric regimens should routinely contain antianaerobes (except for biliary IAI); however, empiric antienterococcal or antifungals regimens are seldom needed. PMID:28018930

  19. Decreased Risk of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Sepsis Due to Intra-Abdominal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Philippart, François; Bouroche, Gaëlle; Timsit, Jean-François; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Azoulay, Elie; Darmon, Michael; Adrie, Christophe; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Ara-Somohano, Claire; Ruckly, Stéphane; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Souweine, Bertrand; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Bouadma, Lila; Misset, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Experimental studies suggest that intra-abdominal infection (IAI) induces biological alterations that may affect the risk of lung infection. Objectives To investigate the potential effect of IAI at ICU admission on the subsequent occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Methods We used data entered into the French prospective multicenter Outcomerea database in 1997–2011. Consecutive patients who had severe sepsis and/or septic shock at ICU admission and required mechanical ventilation for more than 3 days were included. Patients with acute pancreatitis were not included. Measurements and Main Results Of 2623 database patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 290 (11.1%) had IAI and 2333 (88.9%) had other infections. The IAI group had fewer patients with VAP (56 [19.3%] vs. 806 [34.5%], P<0.01) and longer time to VAP (5.0 vs.10.5 days; P<0.01). After adjustment on independent risk factors for VAP and previous antimicrobial use, IAI was associated with a decreased risk of VAP (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.46–0.83; P<0.0017). The pathogens responsible for VAP were not different between the groups with and without IAI (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 345 [42.8%] and 24 [42.8%]; Enterobacteriaceae, 264 [32.8%] and 19 [34.0%]; and Staphylococcus aureus, 215 [26.7%] and 17 [30.4%], respectively). Crude ICU mortality was not different between the groups with and without IAI (81 [27.9%] and 747 [32.0%], P = 0.16). Conclusions In our observational study of mechanically ventilated ICU patients with severe sepsis and/or septic shock, VAP occurred less often and later in the group with IAIs compared to the group with infections at other sites. PMID:26339904

  20. Epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative aerobic bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections during 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert E; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Biedenbach, Douglas; Hackel, Meredith; Morrissey, Ian

    2015-02-01

    The study for monitoring antimicrobial resistance trends (SMART) surveillance program monitors the epidemiology and trends in antibiotic resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to currently used therapies. The current report describes such trends during 2010-2011. A total of 25,746 Gram-negative clinical isolates from intra-abdominal infections were collected and classified as hospital-associated (HA) if the hospital length of stay (LOS) at the time of specimen collection was ≥48 hours, community-associated (CA) if LOS at the time of specimen collection was <48 hours, or unknown (no designation given by participating centre). A total of 92 different species were collected of which the most common was Escherichia coli: 39% of all isolates in North America to 55% in Africa. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the second most common pathogen: 11% of all isolates from Europe to 19% of all isolates from Asia. Isolates were from multiple intra-abdominal sources of which 32% were peritoneal fluid, 20% were intra-abdominal abscesses, and 16.5% were gall bladder infections. Isolates were further classified as HA (55% of all isolates), CA (39% of all isolates), or unknown (6% of all isolates). The most active antibiotics tested were imipenem, ertapenem, amikacin, and piperacillin-tazobactam. Resistance rates to all other antibiotics tested were high. Considering the current data set and high-level resistance of intra-abdominal pathogens to various antibiotics, further monitoring of the epidemiology of intra-abdominal infections and their susceptibility to antibiotics through SMART is warranted.

  1. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  2. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  3. Recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis: a diagnostic conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Nandini; Yeaney, Gabrielle; Chung, Mina; Hindman, Holly B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a case of recurrent nontuberculous mycobacterial endophthalmitis in the context of neurotrophic keratopathy secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus that had an atypical presentation and complex course, and highlights the challenges of causative organism identification and therapeutic interventions in this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted to determine the visual outcomes of the patient. Results A 68-year-old pseudophakic male with long-standing neurotrophic keratopathy and perforated descemetocele managed with cyanoacrylate glue and a contact bandage lens in the left eye, began experiencing recurrent episodes of endophthalmitis after undergoing a penetrating keratoplasty. Several therapeutic procedures including an anterior chamber washout, two pars plana vitrectomies, explantation of the posterior chamber intraocular lens and capsular bag, and multiple intravitreal antimicrobial injections, were performed to which he has ultimately responded favorably, with no signs of infection to date and stable visual acuity. The causative organism of his recurrent infections was initially identified as Mycobacterium abscessus through biochemical testing and 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing; however, repeat polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of the 65 kDa heat shock protein (hsp65) gene for experimental purposes confirmed the accurate identification of the organism to be Mycobacterium chelonae. Given the greater reliability of PCR and sequencing of the hsp65 gene over traditional biochemical tests and culture techniques, M. chelonae was likely the infectious agent all along, and the organism was originally misidentified on the basis of less accurate tests. Conclusion Recurrent atypical mycobacterial endophthalmitis requires expedient identification and management to prevent poor visual outcomes. Standard biochemical testing can identify the causative organism but is limited by the inability to distinguish

  4. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  5. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Maria J.; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection. PMID:27868075

  6. Novel Mutation of Interferon-γ Receptor 1 Gene Presenting as Early Life Mycobacterial Bronchial Disease.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Maria J; Kalra, Neelu; Horwitz, Alexandra; Nino, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) are a spectrum of inherited disorders characterized by localized or disseminated infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNGR1) deficiency was the first identified genetic disorder recognized as MSMD. Mutations in the genes encoding IFNGR1 can be recessive or dominant and cause complete or partial receptor deficiency. We present the case of a 2½-year-old boy with a history of recurrent wheezing, diagnosed with endobronchial mycobacterial infection. Immunological workup revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in the IFNGR1 gene, a novel mutation predicted in silico to cause complete IFNGR1 deficiency. This case demonstrates that (a) Interferon-γ receptor deficiency can present resembling common disorders of the lung; (b) mycobacterial infections should be suspected when parenchymal lung disease, hilar lymphadenopathy, and endobronchial disease are present; and (c) high index of suspicion for immunodeficiency should be maintained in patients with disseminated nontubercular mycobacterial infection.

  7. Critical evaluation of ceftolozane–tazobactam for complicated urinary tract and intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    Giancola, Stephanie E; Mahoney, Monica V; Bias, Tiffany E; Hirsch, Elizabeth B

    2016-01-01

    The rise in resistant Gram-negative pathogens continues to challenge clinicians treating infections. These resistant infections have inspired the development of new antimicrobial agents, including ceftolozane–tazobactam, a novel β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs) in combination with metronidazole. Ceftolozane exhibits bactericidal activity by inhibiting penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), with high affinity for PBP1b, PBP1c, and PBP3. The addition of tazobactam protects ceftolozane from hydrolysis by irreversibly binding to some β-lactamase enzymes. Ceftolozane–tazobactam is active against a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, several streptococcal species, and Bacteroides fragilis. When anaerobic coverage is needed, it should be used in combination with metronidazole. Ceftolozane demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics, low protein binding, and minimal accumulation with repeated dosing. The major pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index for ceftolozane is the percentage of the dosing interval in which the plasma free drug concentration remains higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (%T.MIC). Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of cUTIs and cIAIs have been completed, showing that it is an effective and safe alternative for the treatment of these infections. The approved dose for cUTIs and cIAIs is 1.5 g (1 g ceftolozane and 500 mg tazobactam) infused over 1 hour every 8 hours. A higher 3 g dose is currently in Phase III trials for the treatment of ventilated nosocomial pneumonia. Dosage adjustments are necessary for patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment. Current data suggest that ceftolozane–tazobactam is a promising carbapenem

  8. Molecular immunity to mycobacteria: knowledge from the mutation and phenotype spectrum analysis of Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Hui-Qi; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; McCormick, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Understanding molecular immunity against mycobacterial infection is critical for the development of effective strategies to control tuberculosis (TB), which is a major health issue in the developing world. Host immunogenetic studies represent an indispensable approach to understand the molecular mechanisms against mycobacterial infection. A superb paradigm is the identification of rare mutations causing Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD). Mutations in the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) receptor genes are highly specific (although not exclusive) for mycobacterial infection. Only dominant negative mutations of STAT1 have specific susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. Mutations in the interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling genes have phenotypes with non-specificity. Current studies highlight a complex molecular network in antimycobacterial immunity, centered on IFN-γ signaling. PMID:21330176

  9. Ceftolozane/Tazobactam: A Review in Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-02-01

    Globally, the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens continues to pose major problems in healthcare systems and, at least in part, is driving an initiative to develop new antibacterials, such as ceftolozane (a cephalosporin β-lactam). Adding a β-lactamase inhibitor (e.g. tazobactam) to a β-lactam extends its spectrum of activity against β-lactamase-producing microorganisms (a key mechanism of resistance to β-lactams). Ceftolozane/tazobactam (Zerbaxa™), a β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination, is indicated for the treatment of adults with complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) or complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including pyelonephritis. In multinational, phase 3 noninferiority trials, intravenous ceftolozane/tazobactam was an effective and generally well tolerated treatment in patients with cIAI or cUTI. In the ASPECT-cIAI trial, ceftolozane/tazobactam plus metronidazole was noninferior to meropenem in terms of clinical cure rates at the test-of-cure (TOC) visit, with clinical cure rates in subgroup analyses consistent with those in the primary analysis. In the ASPECT-cUTI trial, ceftolozane/tazobactam was superior to levofloxacin in terms of composite cure rates (clinical cure plus microbiological eradiation) at the TOC visit. Further clinical experience should help to more definitively position ceftolozane/tazobactam in the treatment of cIAI and cUTI, including in patients with renal impairment. In the meantime, given its very good in vitro activity against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, ceftolozane/tazobactam provides a potential alternative to currently approved antibacterials for empirical treatment of cIAI and cUTI in adults.

  10. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Triggered by Infection with Human Parvovirus B19 after Total Abdominal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Satoh, Shuji; Nakagaki, Suguru; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an adhesive ileus 14 years after total abdominal colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). The ileus decreased with conservative treatment, however, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed due to worsening anemia, a positive direct Coombs test, low haptoglobin, high lactase dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis, and an increase in the erythroblastic series in a bone-marrow examination. Human parvovirus B19 (PV-B19) IgM and PV-B19 DNA were present, indicating the development of AIHA triggered by an infection with PV-B19. The patient is currently being monitored after spontaneous remission. This is the first report of UC after total abdominal colectomy complicated by AIHA triggered by PV-B19 infection.

  11. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  12. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    Goodlet, Kellie J; Nicolau, David P; Nailor, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) represent a large proportion of all hospital admissions and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit. Rising rates of multidrug resistant organisms (MDRO), including extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenem-nonsusceptible Pseudomonas spp., for which there are few remaining active antimicrobial agents, pose an increased challenge to clinicians. Patients with frequent exposures to the health care system or multiple recurrent IAIs are at increased risk for MDRO; however, treatment options have traditionally been limited, in some cases necessitating the utilization of last-line agents with unfavorable side-effect profiles. Ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam are two new cephalosporin and β-lactamase inhibitor combinations with recent US Food and Drug Administration approvals for the treatment of cIAI in combination with metronidazole. Ceftolozane/tazobactam has demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against MDR and extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas spp., including carbapenem-nonsusceptible strains, while ceftazidime/avibactam effectively inhibits a broad range of β-lactamases, making it an excellent option for the treatment of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Both agents were shown to be noninferior to meropenem for treatment of cIAI in Phase III trials; however, reduced responses in patients with renal impairment at baseline highlight the importance of routine serum creatinine monitoring and ongoing dose adjustments. This review highlights in vitro and in vivo data of these two agents and suggests their proper place in cIAI treatment to ensure adequate therapy in our most at-risk patients while sparing unnecessary use in patients without MDRO risk factors. PMID:27942218

  13. Diagnostic value of FASH ultrasound and chest X-ray in HIV-co-infected patients with abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Heller, T; Goblirsch, S; Bahlas, S; Ahmed, M; Giordani, M-T; Wallrauch, C; Brunetti, E

    2013-03-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected tuberculosis (TB) patients with negative acid-fast bacilli smears, chest radiography (CXR) is usually the first imaging step in the diagnostic work-up. Ultrasound, also in the form of focused assessment with sonography for TB-HIV (FASH), is an additional imaging modality used to diagnose extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB). Findings from 82 patients with abdominal TB diagnosed by ultrasound were analysed and compared with CXR results. Enlarged abdominal lymph nodes were seen in 75.6% of the patients, spleen abscesses in 41.2% and liver lesions in 30.6%. CXR showed a miliary pattern in 21.9% of the patients; 26.8% of the CXR had no radiological changes suggestive of pulmonary TB. This patient group would benefit from ultrasound in diagnostic algorithms for HIV-associated EPTB.

  14. Mycobacterial Arthritis and Synovitis in Painted Reed Frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Barrows, M; Koeppel, K; Michel, A; Mitchell, E

    2017-02-20

    Several species of atypical mycobacteria have been isolated from wild and captive amphibians. In captive anurans, cutaneous and visceral mycobacteriosis are common and can result in significant mortality, particularly when animals are immunocompromised. Mycobacterial arthritis and synovitis are reported rarely in amphibians. We describe 20 cases in painted reed frogs (Hyperolius marmoratus), which presented with cachexia, limb paresis or paralysis or 'spindly leg syndrome'. Histopathology revealed multifocal histiocytic to granulomatous synovitis affecting appendicular, rib or spinal intervertebral joints. Periarticular granulomata, granulomatous cellulitis and skeletal muscle atrophy, necrosis and degeneration were also present. In one case, granulomatous spinal osteomyelitis was recorded. Ziehl-Neelsen stains showed large numbers of acid-fast bacteria in macrophages and histiocytes. The mycobacterial isolates obtained from culture were identified as members of the Mycobacterium chelonae complex (either M. chelonae or Mycobacteriumabscessus). This was confirmed by 5'-16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequencing. In 17 cases mycobacterial lesions were present only in the joints and skeleton, highlighting the importance of not ruling out mycobacterial infection on the basis of absence of cutaneous or visceral lesions.

  15. Drug Targets in Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Muse, Wilson B.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:17970225

  16. [Buruli ulcer--Africa's latest mycobacterial scourge].

    PubMed

    Roupe, Gösta

    2003-11-06

    Buruliulcer is an extensive ulceration usually on the extremities. The ulcer can spread to subcutaneous fat, muscle and even bone causing osteomyelitis and death. It is the the third most common mycobacterial disease in humans after tuberculosis and leprosy. The bacterium grows in still standing water and infects children through small ulcerations in their skin. Mycobacterium ulcerans may also be transmitted by the bite of aquatic bugs (Naucordiae), which harbor the bacterium in their salivary glands. The disease affects poor people in rural, tropical areas where deforestation has led to flooding rivers, stagnant bodies of water and marsh. Benin, Cote d'Ivoire and Ghana in West Africa are seriously hit. Skin transplantation is the treatment of choice. Treatment with antibiotics has been disappointing.

  17. Complement Depletion Deteriorates Clinical Outcomes of Severe Abdominal Sepsis: A Conspirator of Infection and Coagulopathy in Crime?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunzhao; Han, Gang; Li, Weiqin; Huang, Qian; Tong, Zhihui; Li, Jieshou

    2012-01-01

    Background The complement depletion commonly occurred during sepsis, but it was often underestimated compared with severe infection or coagulation dysfunction. Objective This study was designed to investigate the alteration of complement system in patients with severe abdominal sepsis and evaluate the role of complement depletion in prognosis of such patients. The relationship between complement depletion and infection or coagulopathy was also explored. Methods Forty-five patients with severe abdominal sepsis were prospectively conducted among individuals referral to SICU. Currently recommended treatments, such as early goal-directed resuscitation, source control and antibiotics therapy, were performed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) and sepsis related organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores were employed to evaluate severity. Plasma levels of C3, C4, CRP, PCT, D-dimer and other parameters were detected within eight times of observation. The 28-day mortality, length of stay, and postoperative complications were compared between complement depletion and non-complement depletion groups. Results Within the study period, eight (17.8%) patients died, five of them suffering from complement depletion. The overall incidence of complement depletion was 64.4%. At admission, mean complement C3 and C4 levels were 0.70 and 0.13 mg/mL, respectively. Using ROC analysis for mortality prediction, the area under the curve of C3 was 0.926 (95% CI, 0.845–0.998, P<0.001), with optimal cutpoint value of 0.578 mg/mL. Complement C3 depletion was shown to be no correlation to severity scores, however, strongly correlated with elevated D-dimer, PCT concentrations and increased postoperative complications. Conclusions Complement C3 depletion was found to be connected to poor prognosis in severe abdominal sepsis. This depletion seems to be associated with coagulopathy and aggravated infection during sepsis, which should be paid close attention in critical care

  18. Mycobacterial pseudotumor of the plantar fascia: how common is it?

    PubMed

    Sideras, Panagiotis A; Heiba, Sherif; Machac, Josef; Hechtman, Jaclyn; Vatti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial spindle cell pseudotumor (MSCP) is an extremely rare complication of mycobacterial infections. It has been reported to occur in various sites such as skin, lymph nodes, bone marrow, lungs, and spleen. This tumor-like lesion can be confused clinically as well as radiographically with dermatofibroma, nodular fasciitis, xanthogranuloma, and Kaposi's sarcoma. While this lesion is rare and has been previously reported to occur only in superficial skin, we emphasize its consideration and inclusion in the differential diagnoses when a deep soft tissue mass is complicated by symptoms of deep tissue infection secondary to abscess formation in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we present the clinical and radiologic findings of a case of MSCP involving the deep plantar sheaths.

  19. Spectrally selective UV bactericidal effect for curative treatment of post-surgical intra-abdominal abscesses and other infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Miller, Mark A.; Babichenko, Sergey M.

    2004-07-01

    Results of in-vitro studies of bactericidal effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on strains causing drug-resistant endo-cavital infections (Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and others) are presented. An original technique to measure effects of UV-irradiation on bacterial growth at different wavelengths has been developed. Spectral dependences of the bactericidal effect have been observed, and spectral maxima of bactericidal efficiency have been found. Applications to curative treatments of wounds, post-surgical intra-abdominal abscesses and other diseases are discussed.

  20. Serratia marcescens infected silk suture rejected by combined acupuncture, moxibustion and low-power laser therapy from the abdominal fascia.

    PubMed

    Sternfeld, M; Finkelstein, Y; Hod, I

    1988-01-01

    Upper abdominal pains lasting 12 years after cholecystectomy, were improved in an 82-year-old woman following the rejection of indigestable silk surgical sutures induced by combined therapy of acupuncture, moxibustion and low-power laser beam irradiation directed to an old post-cholecystectomy scar. An inflammatory reaction followed by granulation tissue mass was developed. Embedded in the granulation tissue were the above mentioned silk sutures which finally were expelled through the skin at the operation scar. A surgical procedure suggested to the patient, in case of acupuncture therapy failure, was obviously avoided. Serratia-marcescens infection of the expelled material was bacteriologically defined.

  1. A species-specific activation of Toll-like receptor signaling in bovine and sheep bronchial epithelial cells triggered by Mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Han, Fei; Liang, Jinping; Yang, Jiali; Shi, Juan; Xue, Jing; Yang, Li; Li, Yong; Luo, Meihui; Wang, Yujiong; Wei, Jun; Liu, Xiaoming

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by a Mycobacterium infection remains a major public health problem in most part of the world, in part owing to the transmission of its pathogens between hosts including human, domestic and wild animals. To date, molecular mechanisms of the pathogenesis of TB are still incompletely understood. In addition to alveolar macrophages, airway epithelial cells have also been recently recognized as main targets for Mycobacteria infections. In an effort to understand the pathogen-host interaction between Mycobacteria and airway epithelial cells in domestic animals, in present study, we investigated the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in bovine and sheep airway epithelial cells in response to an infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis avirulent H37Ra stain or Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain, using primary air-liquid interface (ALI) bronchial epithelial culture models. Our results revealed a host and pathogen species-specific TLR-mediated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), induction and activation of TLR signaling pathways, and substantial induction of inflammatory response in bronchial epithelial cells in response to Mycobacteria infections between these two species. Interestingly, the activation TLR signaling in bovine bronchial epithelial cells induced by Mycobacteria infection was mainly through a myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-independent TLR signaling pathway, while both MyD88-dependent and independent TLR signaling cascades could be induced in sheep epithelial cells. Equally noteworthy, a BCG infection was able to induce both MyD88-dependent and independent signaling in sheep and bovine airway epithelial cells, but more robust inflammatory responses were induced in sheep epithelial cells relative to the bovines; whereas an H37Ra infection displayed an ability to mainly trigger a MyD88-independent TLR signaling cascade in these two host species, and induce a more extent expression of

  2. Mycobacterial disease, immunosuppression, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M

    1989-01-01

    The mycobacteria are an important group of acid-fast pathogens ranging from obligate intracellular parasites such as Mycobacterium leprae to environmental species such as M. gordonae and M. fortuitum. The latter may behave as opportunistic human pathogens if the host defenses have been depleted in some manner. The number and severity of such infections have increased markedly with the emergence of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. These nontuberculous mycobacteria tend to be less virulent for humans than M. tuberculosis, usually giving rise to self-limiting infections involving the cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes of young children. However, the more virulent serovars of M. avium complex can colonize the bronchial and intestinal mucosal surfaces of healthy individuals, becoming virtual members of the commensal gut microflora and thus giving rise to low levels of skin hypersensitivity to tuberculins prepared from M. avium and M. intracellulare. Systemic disease develops when the normal T-cell-mediated defenses become depleted as a result of old age, cancer chemotherapy, or infection with human immunodeficiency virus. As many as 50% of human immunodeficiency virus antibody-positive individuals develop mycobacterial infections at some time during their disease. Most isolates of M. avium complex from AIDS patients fall into serotypes 4 and 8. The presence of these drug-resistant mycobacteria in the lungs of the AIDS patient makes their effective clinical treatment virtually impossible. More effective chemotherapeutic, prophylactic, and immunotherapeutic reagents are urgently needed to treat this rapidly increasing patient population. PMID:2680057

  3. Sulfatase-activated fluorophores for rapid discrimination of mycobacterial species and strains

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Kimberly E.; Williams, Monique; Carlson, Brian L.; Swarts, Benjamin M.; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Most current diagnostic tests for tuberculosis do not reveal the species or strain of pathogen causing pulmonary infection, which can lead to inappropriate treatment regimens and the spread of disease. Here, we report an assay for mycobacterial strain assignment based on genetically conserved mycobacterial sulfatases. We developed a sulfatase-activated probe, 7-hydroxy-9H-(1,3-dichloro-9,9-dimethylacridin-2-one)–sulfate, that detects enzyme activity in native protein gels, allowing the rapid detection of sulfatases in mycobacterial lysates. This assay revealed that mycobacterial strains have distinct sulfatase fingerprints that can be used to judge both the species and lineage. Our results demonstrate the potential of enzyme-activated probes for rapid pathogen discrimination for infectious diseases. PMID:23878250

  4. Specific recognition of mycobacterial protein and peptide antigens by gamma-delta T cell subsets following infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoting effective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogens is a challenge that is of interest to the fields of human and veterinary medicine alike. We report that gamma delta T cells from virulent Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle respond specifically and directly to complex, pro...

  5. Species dependent impact of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Direct effect on the innate anti-mycobacterial response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Susmita K.; McKay, Derek M.

    2017-01-01

    Background In countries with a high prevalence of tuberculosis there is high coincident of helminth infections that might worsen disease outcome. While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gives rise to a pro-inflammatory Th1 response, a Th2 response is typical of helminth infections. A strong Th2 response has been associated with decreased protection against tuberculosis. Principal findings We investigated the direct effect of helminth-derived antigens on human macrophages, hypothesizing that helminths would render macrophages less capable of controlling Mtb. Measuring cytokine output, macrophage surface markers with flow cytometry, and assessing bacterial replication and phagosomal maturation revealed that antigens from different species of helminth directly affect macrophage responses to Mtb. Antigens from the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta and the nematode Trichuris muris caused an anti-inflammatory response with M2-type polarization, reduced macrophage phagosome maturation and ability to activate T cells, along with increased Mtb burden, especially in T. muris exposed cells which also induced the highest IL-10 production upon co-infection. However, antigens from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni had the opposite effect causing a decrease in IL-10 production, M1-type polarization and increased control of Mtb. Conclusion We conclude that, independent of any adaptive immune response, infection with helminth parasites, in a species-specific manner can influence the outcome of tuberculosis by either enhancing or diminishing the bactericidal function of macrophages. PMID:28192437

  6. Wound Edge Protectors in Open Abdominal Surgery to Reduce Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mihaljevic, André L.; Müller, Tara C.; Kehl, Victoria; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Importance Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality. Objective To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections. Evidence Review A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted. Findings We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51–0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%). The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44–0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%). Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15–0.55) than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54–0.92), but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28–0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23%) than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57–0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46%) and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24–0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%). Conclusions and Relevance Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of

  7. The Macrophage-Specific Promoter mfap4 Allows Live, Long-Term Analysis of Macrophage Behavior during Mycobacterial Infection in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Walton, Eric M; Cronan, Mark R; Beerman, Rebecca W; Tobin, David M

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic labeling of innate immune cell lineages within the larval zebrafish allows for real-time, in vivo analyses of microbial pathogenesis within a vertebrate host. To date, labeling of zebrafish macrophages has been relatively limited, with the most specific expression coming from the mpeg1 promoter. However, mpeg1 transcription at both endogenous and transgenic loci becomes attenuated in the presence of intracellular pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium marinum. Here, we describe mfap4 as a macrophage-specific promoter capable of producing transgenic lines in which transgene expression within larval macrophages remains stable throughout several days of infection. Additionally, we have developed a novel macrophage-specific Cre transgenic line under the control of mfap4, enabling macrophage-specific expression using existing floxed transgenic lines. These tools enrich the repertoire of transgenic lines and promoters available for studying zebrafish macrophage dynamics during infection and inflammation and add flexibility to the design of future macrophage-specific transgenic lines.

  8. Targeting drug tolerance in mycobacteria: a perspective from mycobacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S; Richards, Jacob P; Ojha, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug chemotherapy for 6–9-months is one of the primary treatments in effective control of tuberculosis, although the mechanisms underlying the persistence of its etiological agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, against antibiotics remain unclear. Ever-mounting evidence indicates that the survival of many environmental and pathogenic microbial species against antibiotics is influenced by their ability to grow as surface-associated multicellular communities called biofilms. In recent years, several mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis, have been found to form drug-tolerant biofilms in vitro through genetically controlled mechanisms. In this review, the authors discuss the relevance of the in vitro mycobacterial biofilms in understanding the antibiotic recalcitrance of tuberculosis infections. PMID:23106280

  9. Mycobacterium lentiflavum, a recently identified slow-growing mycobacterial species: clinical significance in immunosuppressed cancer patients and summary of reported cases of infection.

    PubMed

    Safdar, A; Han, X Y

    2005-08-01

    The clinical significance of Mycobacterium lentiflavum, a recently identified nontuberculous mycobacterium, remains uncertain, especially in immunosuppressed cancer patients. The records of all patients in whom M. lentiflavum was identified using a gene sequencing technique between January 2001 and December 2003 were reviewed. The mean age among 12 patients was 51+/-20 years, and 11 (92%) patients had a hematologic malignancy. Six of seven (86%) hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients had received allogeneic donor grafts. Nine (75%) patients had predisposing risk factors for infection, seven (58%) had severe lymphocytopenia (<400 cells/microl), five (42%) were receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy, and three (25%) had acute graft-versus-host disease. Only 1 of the 12 (8%) patients had evidence of probable pulmonary M. lentiflavum infection. Six M. lentiflavum strains were initially misidentified as Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex using traditional biochemical tests. Four M. lentiflavum isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility; they were susceptible to isoniazid, ethambutol, clarithromycin, and amikacin, and resistant to rifampin. M. lentiflavum was not clinically significant, even in these severely immunosuppressed cancer patients.

  10. The Macrophage-Specific Promoter mfap4 Allows Live, Long-Term Analysis of Macrophage Behavior during Mycobacterial Infection in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Eric M.; Cronan, Mark R.; Beerman, Rebecca W.; Tobin, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic labeling of innate immune cell lineages within the larval zebrafish allows for real-time, in vivo analyses of microbial pathogenesis within a vertebrate host. To date, labeling of zebrafish macrophages has been relatively limited, with the most specific expression coming from the mpeg1 promoter. However, mpeg1 transcription at both endogenous and transgenic loci becomes attenuated in the presence of intracellular pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium and Mycobacterium marinum. Here, we describe mfap4 as a macrophage-specific promoter capable of producing transgenic lines in which transgene expression within larval macrophages remains stable throughout several days of infection. Additionally, we have developed a novel macrophage-specific Cre transgenic line under the control of mfap4, enabling macrophage-specific expression using existing floxed transgenic lines. These tools enrich the repertoire of transgenic lines and promoters available for studying zebrafish macrophage dynamics during infection and inflammation and add flexibility to the design of future macrophage-specific transgenic lines. PMID:26445458

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Assists Mycobacterial Dissemination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Medisetti, Raghavender; Ganji, Rakesh; Jakkala, Kiran; Sankati, Swetha; Chatti, Kiranam; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacillus, is a virulence factor involved in inflammasome inactivation and phagosome maturation arrest. We earlier reported that Zmp1 was secreted under granuloma-like stress conditions, induced Th2 cytokine microenvironment and was highly immunogenic in TB patients as evident from high anti-Zmp1 antibody titers in their sera. In this study, we deciphered a new physiological role of Zmp1 in mycobacterial dissemination. Exogenous treatment of THP-1 cells with 500 nM and 1 μM of recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1) resulted in necrotic cell death. Apart from inducing secretion of necrotic cytokines, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β, it also induced the release of chemotactic chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-8, suggesting its likely function in cell migration and mycobacterial dissemination. This was confirmed by Gap closure and Boyden chamber assays, where Zmp1 treated CHO or THP-1 cells showed ∼2 fold increased cell migration compared to the untreated cells. Additionally, Zebrafish-M. marinum based host–pathogen model was used to study mycobacterial dissemination in vivo. Td-Tomato labeled M. marinum (TdM. marinum) when injected with rZmp1 showed increased dissemination to tail region from the site of injection as compared to the untreated control fish in a dose-dependent manner. Summing up these observations along with the earlier reports, we propose that Zmp1, a multi-faceted protein, when released by mycobacteria in granuloma, may lead to necrotic cell damage and release of chemotactic chemokines by surrounding infected macrophages, attracting new immune cells, which in turn may lead to fresh cellular infections, thus assisting mycobacterial dissemination. PMID:27621726

  12. In Vitro Responsiveness of γδ T Cells from Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Cattle to Mycobacterial Antigens: Predominant Involvement of WC1+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Allister J.; Welsh, Michael D.; Girvin, R. Martyn; Pollock, John M.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally accepted that protective immunity against tuberculosis is generated through the cell-mediated immune (CMI) system, and a greater understanding of such responses is required if better vaccines and diagnostic tests are to be developed. γδ T cells form a major proportion of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the ruminant system and, considering data from other species, may have a significant role in CMI responses in bovine tuberculosis. This study compared the in vitro responses of αβ and γδ T cells from Mycobacterium bovis-infected and uninfected cattle. The results showed that, following 24 h of culture of PBMC with M. bovis-derived antigens, the majority of γδ T cells from infected animals became highly activated (upregulation of interleukin-2R), while a lower proportion of the αβ T-cell population showed activation. Similar responses were evident to a lesser degree in uninfected animals. Study of the kinetics of this response showed that γδ T cells remained significantly activated for at least 7 days in culture, while activation of αβ T cells declined during that period. Subsequent analysis revealed that the majority of activated γδ T cells expressed WC1, a 215-kDa surface molecule which is not expressed on human or murine γδ T cells. Furthermore, in comparison with what was found for CD4+ T cells, M. bovis antigen was found to induce strong cellular proliferation but relatively little gamma interferon release by purified WC1+ γδ T cells. Overall, while the role of these cells in protective immunity remains unclear, their highly activated status in response to M. bovis suggests an important role in antimycobacterial immunity, and the ability of γδ T cells to influence other immune cell functions remains to be elucidated, particularly in relation to CMI-based diagnostic tests. PMID:11119493

  13. A Rhesus Macaque Model of Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Winthrop, Kevin; Rivera, Andrea; Engelmann, Flora; Rose, Sasha; Lewis, Anne; Ku, Jennifer; Bermudez, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we sought to develop a nonhuman primate model of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were collected from three female rhesus macaques infected intrabronchially with escalating doses of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Immunity was determined by measuring cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and antigen-specific responses. Disease progression was monitored clinically and microbiologically with serial thoracic radiographs, computed tomography scans, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures. The animal subjected to the highest inoculum showed evidence of chronic pulmonary MAC disease. Therefore, rhesus macaques could provide a robust model in which to investigate host–pathogen interactions during MAC infection. PMID:26562499

  14. Role of interleukin-12 family cytokines in the cellular response to mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a multifunctional cytokine acting as a key regulator of cell-mediated immune responses through the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into type 1 helper T cells (Th1) producing interferon-gamma. As our knowledge of IL-12 family members is rapidly growing, it will be important to specify their involvement in the regulation of mycobacterial infection. This article is a review of the current knowledge regarding the functions of the IL-12 family cytokines in the immune host defense system against mycobacteria. Specifically, this review aims to describe recent scientific evidence concerning the protective role of some members of the IL-12 family cytokines for the control of mycobacterial infection, as well as to summarize knowledge of the potential use of the IL-12 family members as potent adjuvants in the prevention and treatment of mycobacterial infectious diseases. In addition, recent data supporting the importance of the IL-12 family members in mycobacterial diseases in relation to Th17 function are discussed. This examination will help to improve our understanding of the immune response to mycobacterial infection and also improve vaccine design and immunotherapeutic intervention against tuberculosis.

  15. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  16. New drugs for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections in the era of increasing antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Syue, Ling-Shan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2016-04-01

    The continuing increase in multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) worldwide has created new challenges in treating complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs). A number of novel antimicrobial agents have been developed against resistant pathogens. To target extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing pathogens, novel β-lactam antibiotics, such as ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam, aztreonam/avibactam, imipenem/relebactam and S-649266, are antimicrobial alternatives for cIAIs. Two new drugs, eravacycline and plazomicin, have activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and ESBL-producers. New lipoglycopeptides and oxazolidinones provide feasible options against resistant Gram-positive pathogens. These novel antimicrobials may play a role in improving the clinical outcomes of cIAIs caused by MDROs.

  17. Clinical findings in relation to mortality in non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections: patients with Mycobacterium avium complex have better survival than patients with other mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, H; Valtonen, V; Tukiainen, P; Poussa, T; Eskola, J; Järvinen, A

    2015-09-01

    We compared the clinical findings and survival in patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and other non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). A total of 167 adult non-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with at least one positive culture for NTM were included. Medical records were reviewed. The patients were categorised according to the 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) criteria. MAC comprised 59 % of all NTM findings. MAC patients were more often female (70 % vs. 34 %, p < 0.001) and had less fatal underlying diseases (23 % vs. 47 %, p = 0.001) as compared to other NTM patients. Symptoms compatible with NTM infection had lasted for less than a year in 34 % of MAC patients but in 54 % of other NTM patients (p = 0.037). Pulmonary MAC patients had a significantly lower risk of death compared to pulmonary other NTM (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.77, p = 0.002) or subgroup of other slowly growing NTM (HR 0.55, 95 % CI 0.31-0.99, p = 0.048) or as rapidly growing NTM (HR 0.47, 95 % CI 0.25-0.87, p = 0.02). The median survival time was 13.0 years (95 % CI 5.9-20.1) for pulmonary MAC but 4.6 years (95 % CI 3.4-5.9) for pulmonary other NTM. Serious underlying diseases (HR 3.21, 95 % CI 2.05-5.01, p < 0.001) and age (HR 1.07, 95 % CI 1.04-1.09, p < 0.001) were the significant predictors of mortality and female sex was a predictor of survival (HR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.24-0.59, p < 0.001) in the multivariate analysis. Pulmonary MAC patients had better prognosis than pulmonary other NTM patients. The symptom onset suggests a fairly rapid disease course.

  18. Reconstruction of a four-quadrant full-thickness abdominal wall defect after removal and debridement of an infected mesh hernioplasty.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C; Schramm, S; Hankiss, J

    2011-02-01

    This case-report shows our experience with a patient, who underwent mesh hernioplasty followed by infection of the mesh and full-thickness loss of the abdominal wall after debridement due to necrosis. The anamnesis included generalised arteriosclerosis, chronic nicotine and alcohol abuse and recurring wound-healing disorders after surgical procedures. The initial infection was treated by radical debridement, targeted antibiotics and V.A.C.(®) Therapy. After this, a staged plastic reconstructive procedure with four pedicled flaps was performed. The functional integrity of the abdominal wall was completely re-established. The patient was able to continue her occupation as a facility manager. Although the use of free flaps is very common in modern plastic and reconstructive surgery, procedures such as pedicled flaps still have their significance for special indications. In this case, a full recovery of the abdominal wall with autologous tissue was successful under difficult vascular conditions by using local flaps.

  19. Population Pharmacokinetics of Meropenem in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Infants with Suspected or Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, P. BRIAN; COHEN-WOLKOWIEZ, MICHAEL; CASTRO, LISA M.; POINDEXTER, BRENDA; BIDEGAIN, MARGARITA; WEITKAMP, JOERN-HENDRIK; SCHELONKA, ROBERT L.; WARD, ROBERT M.; WADE, KELLY; VALENCIA, GLORIA; BURCHFIELD, DAVID; ARRIETA, ANTONIO; BHATT-MEHTA, VARSHA; WALSH, MICHELE; KANTAK, ANAND; RASMUSSEN, MAYNARD; SULLIVAN, JANICE E.; FINER, NEIL; BROZANSKI, BEVERLY S.; SANCHEZ, PABLO; ANKER, JOHN VAN DEN; BLUMER, JEFFREY; KEARNS, GREGORY L.; CAPPARELLI, EDMUND V.; ANAND, RAVINDER; BENJAMIN, DANIEL K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Suspected or complicated intra-abdominal infections are common in young infants and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Meropenem is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent with excellent activity against pathogens associated with intra-abdominal infections in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics (PK) of meropenem in young infants as a basis for optimizing dosing and minimizing adverse events. Methods Premature and term infants <91 days of age hospitalized in 24 neonatal intensive care units were studied. Limited PK sampling was performed following single and multiple doses of meropenem 20–30 mg/kg of body weight every 8–12 hours based on postnatal and gestational age at birth. Population and individual patient (Bayesian) PK parameters were estimated using NONMEM®. Results Two hundred infants were enrolled and received study drug. One hundred eighty-eight infants with 780 plasma meropenem concentrations were analyzed. Their median (range) gestational age at birth and postnatal age at PK evaluation were 28 (23–40) weeks and 21 (1–92) days, respectively. In the final PK model, meropenem clearance (CL) was strongly associated with serum creatinine (SCR) and postmenstrual age (PMA) (CL [L/h/kg] = 0.12*[(0.5/SCR)**0.27]*[(PMA/32.7)**1.46]). Meropenem concentrations remained >4 μg/mL for 50% of the dose interval and >2 μg/mL for 75% of the dose interval in 96% and 92% of patients, respectively. The estimated penetration of meropenem into the cerebrospinal fluid was 70% (5–148). Conclusions Meropenem dosing strategies based on postnatal and gestational age achieved therapeutic drug exposure in almost all infants. PMID:21829139

  20. Extended Swan-Neck Catheter With Upper Abdominal Exit-Site Reduces Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Eriguchi, Masahiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Yoshida, Hisako; Haruyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Shigeru; Tsuchimoto, Akihiro; Fujisaki, Kiichiro; Torisu, Kumiko; Masutani, Kosuke; Kitazono, Takanari

    2016-04-01

    Extended catheters with an upper abdominal exit-site (UAE) are reportedly associated with a lower incidence of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related infections. However, little information about the optimal peritoneal catheter configuration for UAE is available. In this nonrandomized multicenter trial, 147 consecutive cases of a UAE involving either a conventional straight (CS; 80 cases) or extended swan-neck catheter (SN; 67 cases) were analyzed to compare exit-site and tunnel infections (ESTI), peritonitis, and catheter survival. The ESTI-free and catheter survival rates were significantly lower in the SN than in the CS group (P <0.01). However, the peritonitis-free survival rate was not different (P = 0.26). In terms of analyses for infection rates, fewer episodes of ESTI (1.284 vs 0.608 episodes/patient-year; P <0.01) and peritonitis (0.345 vs 0.152 episodes/patient-year; P = 0.06) were observed in the SN than CS group. Recurrence analyses showed that the mean number of cumulative episodes of ESTI and peritonitis between two groups were significantly different.

  1. Expression of Bacteroides fragilis hemolysins in vivo and role of HlyBA in an intra-abdominal infection model.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leandro A; Jenkins, Audrey L; Jeffrey Smith, C; Rocha, Edson R

    2013-04-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the most frequent opportunistic pathogen isolated from anaerobic infections. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the genetic and molecular aspects of gene expression of its virulence factors during extra-intestinal infections. A potential virulence factor that has received little attention is the ability of B. fragilis to produce hemolysins. In this study, an implanted perforated table tennis "ping-pong" ball was used as an intra-abdominal artificial abscess model in the rat. This procedure provided sufficient infected exudate for gene expression studies in vivo. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantify the relative expression of hlyA, hlyB, hlyC, hlyD, hlyE, hlyF, hlyG, and hlyIII mRNAs. The hlyA mRNA was induced approximately sixfold after 4 days postinfection compared with the mRNA levels in the inoculum culture prior to infection. The hlyB mRNA increased approximately sixfold after 4 days and 12-fold after 8 days postinfection. Expression of hlyC mRNA increased sixfold after 1 day, 45-fold after 4 days, and 16-fold after 8 days postinfection, respectively. The hlyD and hlyE mRNAs were induced approximately 40-fold and 30-fold, respectively, after 4-days postinfection. The hlyF expression increased approximately threefold after 4-days postinfection. hlyG was induced approximately fivefold after 4 and 8 days postinfection. The hlyIII mRNA levels had a steady increase of approximately four-, eight-, and 12-fold following 1, 4, and 8 days postinfection, respectively. These findings suggest that B. fragilis hemolysins are induced and differentially regulated in vivo. Both parent and hlyBA mutant strains reached levels of approximately 3-8 × 10(9) cfu/mL after 1 day postinfection. However, the hlyBA mutant strain lost 2 logs in viable cell counts compared with the parent strain after 8 days postinfection. This is the first study showing HlyBA is a virulence factor which plays a

  2. 77 FR 59928 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... responsible for cIAIs, including Gram-negative aerobic bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and anaerobic bacteria, and there are also mixed infections. This draft guidance includes recommendations for an...

  3. Clinical characteristics of patients with community-acquired complicated intra-abdominal infections: a prospective, multicentre, observational study.

    PubMed

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Ko, Wen-Chien; Xie, Yang; Pawar, Vaishali; Zhang, Dongmu; Prajapati, Girish; Mendoza, Myrna; Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Ramalheira, Elmano; Castro, Ana Paula; Rosso, Fernando; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-09-01

    In this prospective, observational, multicentre study using data from five countries (Columbia, The Philippines, Portugal, Taiwan and Thailand), the clinical impact of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing organisms on hospitalised patients with community-acquired complicated intra-abdominal infections (CA-cIAIs) was compared with that of non-ESBL-producing organisms during the period April 2010 to December 2011. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) requiring surgery or percutaneous drainage were enrolled and were followed during the first hospitalisation course. An unadjusted statistical comparison of risk factors for ESBL-positive and ESBL-negative patients was performed. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to assess whether length of stay (LOS) in hospital, clinical cure rate and some important clinical characteristics were associated with ESBL positivity. During the study period, a total of 105 adult patients from five countries were enrolled, of whom 17 (16.2%) had CA-cIAI due to ESBL-positive organisms and 88 (83.8%) had CA-cIAI due to ESBL-negative organisms. Escherichia coli was isolated in 73.3% of all samples. Infections were cured in 8 (47.1%) of the patients with CA-cIAI due to ESBL-positive organisms and in 59 (67.0%) of the patients with CA-cIAI due to ESBL-negative organisms (P=0.285). The median LOS was 11.6 days for patients with infections due to ESBL-negative organisms and 17.6 days for patients with infections due to ESBL-positive organisms (P=0.011). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that pre-existing co-morbidities, but not ESBL positivity, were adversely associated with clinical cure of CA-cIAIs. In contrast, duration of hospitalisation was longer for patients with CA-cIAI due to ESBL-positive organisms.

  4. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or cancer Infection of the tubes (salpingitis) Ectopic pregnancy Fibroid tumors of the uterus (womb) Malignant tumors of the uterus or cervix Endometriosis Adhesions (scars) Screening and Diagnosis How is the cause of abdominal pain determined? ...

  5. Clinical characteristics and antimicrobial patterns in complicated intra-abdominal infections: a 6-year epidemiological study in southern China.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wenwei; Xue, Huiling; Chen, Yunqin; Gao, Weiguo; Li, Xiaoyan; Wei, Jia; Wen, Zehuai

    2016-03-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAIs) are a common and important cause of morbidity worldwide. In this study, the clinical features, microbiological profiles, antimicrobial patterns and treatments of 3233 cIAI patients (mean age, 47.6 years; 54.7% male) with 3531 hospitalisations from 2008-2013 were retrospectively investigated. The most commonly isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli (47.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (16.9%), Enterococcus faecalis (10.4%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.8%). Ciprofloxacin, aminoglycoside (gentamicin), piperacillin/tazobactam and carbapenems exhibited activity against 53%, 76%, 88% and 100% of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates, respectively. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exhibited 100%, 95%, 88%, 71% and 76% susceptibility to aminoglycoside (gentamicin), ciprofloxacin, meropenem, imipenem and ceftazidime, respectively, and Enterococcus remained 100% susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. β-Lactam antibacterials other than penicillin (specifically third-generation cephalosporins) and imidazole derivatives (ornidazole and metronidazole) were the most common first-line treatments. Patients subjected to regimen change after initial antibiotic treatment had predisposing conditions (e.g. older age, more severe co-morbidities) and a higher incidence of P. aeruginosa infection; in addition, these patients encountered a higher average cost of care and worse clinical outcomes compared with those without medication modification. Taken together, these findings indicate the importance of appropriate initial empirical therapy and suggest the use of combination therapy comprising cephalosporins and metronidazole.

  6. Phase 2, Dose-Ranging Study of Relebactam with Imipenem-Cilastatin in Subjects with Complicated Intra-abdominal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lucasti, Christopher; Vasile, Liviu; Sandesc, Dorel; Venskutonis, Donatas; McLeroth, Patrick; Lala, Mallika; Rizk, Matthew L.; Brown, Michelle L.; Losada, Maria C.; Pedley, Alison; Kartsonis, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Relebactam (REL [MK-7655]) is a novel class A/C β-lactamase inhibitor intended for use with imipenem for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. REL restores imipenem activity against some resistant strains of Klebsiella and Pseudomonas. In this multicenter, double-blind, controlled trial (NCT01506271), subjects who were ≥18 years of age with complicated intra-abdominal infection were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive 250 mg REL, 125 mg REL, or placebo, each given intravenously (i.v.) with 500 mg imipenem-cilastatin (IMI) every 6 h (q6h) for 4 to 14 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the proportion of microbiologically evaluable (ME) subjects with a favorable clinical response at discontinuation of i.v. therapy (DCIV). A total of 351 subjects were randomized, 347 (99%) were treated, and 255 (73%) were ME at DCIV (55% male; mean age, 49 years). The most common diagnoses were complicated appendicitis (53%) and complicated cholecystitis (17%). Thirty-six subjects (13%) had imipenem-resistant Gram-negative infections at baseline. Both REL doses plus IMI were generally well tolerated and demonstrated safety profiles similar to that of IMI alone. Clinical response rates at DCIV were similar in subjects who received 250 mg REL plus IMI (96.3%) or 125 mg REL plus IMI (98.8%), and both were noninferior to IMI alone (95.2%; one-sided P < 0.001). The treatment groups were also similar with respect to clinical response at early and late follow-up and microbiological response at all visits. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic simulations show that imipenem exposure at the proposed dose of 500 mg IMI with 250 mg REL q6h provides coverage of >90% of carbapenem-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27503659

  7. Prevention of infections associated with combat-related thoracic and abdominal cavity injuries.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory J; Dunne, James R; Cho, John M; Solomkin, Joseph S

    2011-08-01

    Trauma-associated injuries of the thorax and abdomen account for the majority of combat trauma-associated deaths, and infectious complications are common in those who survive the initial injury. This review focuses on the initial surgical and medical management of torso injuries intended to diminish the occurrence of infection. The evidence for recommendations is drawn from published military and civilian data in case reports, clinical trials, meta-analyses, and previously published guidelines, in the interval since publication of the 2008 guidelines. The emphasis of these recommendations is on actions that can be taken in the forward-deployed setting within hours to days of injury. This evidence-based medicine review was produced to support the Guidelines for the Prevention of Infections Associated With Combat-Related Injuries: 2011 Update contained in this supplement of Journal of Trauma.

  8. Evidence of low prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Poland.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Lucjan; Orłowska, Blanka; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Czopowicz, Michał; Welz, Mirosław; Anusz, Krzysztof; Kita, Jerzy

    2017-01-25

    Mycobacterium spp. and Rhodococcus equi are generally regarded as the main causes of lymphadenitis in pigs and wild boars. In Poland, mycobacterial submandibular lymphadenitis was first diagnosed in a wild boar in 2012 but Mycobacterium spp. infections are also present in the Polish population of European bison (Bison bonasus). The prevalence of lymphadenitis in Polish wild boars has been found to 8.4% (95% CI 6.2-11.3%) and it has been proved that R. equi is not an important cause of purulent lesions in these animals. The current study was carried out to assess the prevalence of mycobacterial lymphadenitis in the Polish wild boar population. Submandibular lymph nodes with purulent lesions collected from 38 wild boars in 2010/2011 and negative for R. equi were included. Calculations based on the hypergeometric approximation were used to determine the probability that at least one positive individual would be detected if the infection had been present at a prevalence greater than or equal to the design prevalence. All 38 samples were negative for Mycobacterium spp. [0% (95% CI 0, 9.2%)]. Epidemiological analysis showed that the true prevalence was 95% likely to be lower than 10%. In conclusion, mycobacterial lymphadenitis seems to occur rarely in wild boars in Poland. Due to the presence of Mycobacterium spp. infections in other wildlife, the surveillance of mycobacterial infections in wild animals in Poland remains an important issue.

  9. The path of anti-tuberculosis drugs: from blood to lesions to mycobacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    For the successful treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, drugs need to penetrate complex lung lesions and permeate the mycobacterial cell wall in order to reach their intracellular targets. However, most currently used anti-tuberculosis drugs were introduced into clinical use without considering the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that influence drug distribution, and this has contributed to the long duration and limited success of current therapies. In this Progress article, I describe new methods to quantify and image drug distribution in infected lung tissue and in mycobacterial cells, and I explore how this technology could be used to design optimized multidrug regimens. PMID:24487820

  10. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  11. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  12. Ceftazidime/avibactam: a novel cephalosporin/nonbeta-lactam beta-lactamase inhibitor for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and complicated intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Jose A; Vinluan, Celeste M; Antony, Nishaal

    2016-01-01

    There has been greater interest in developing additional antimicrobial agents due to the increasing health care costs and resistance resulting from bacterial pathogens to currently available treatment options. Gram-negative organisms including Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are some of the most concerning threats due to their resistance mechanisms: extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase enzymes. Ceftazidime is a third-generation broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against P. aeruginosa and avibactam is a novel nonbeta-lactam beta-lactamase inhibitor. Avycaz®, the trade name for this new combination antibiotic, restores the activity of ceftazidime against some of the previously resistant pathogens. Avycaz was approved in 2015 for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections, including pyelonephritis, and complicated intra-abdominal infections with the addition of metronidazole in patients with little to no other treatment options. This review article assesses the clinical trials and data that led to the approval of this antibiotic, in addition to its spectrum of activity and limitations. PMID:27528799

  13. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  14. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    ... tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap Images Digestive system Peritoneal sample References Garcia-Tiso G. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  15. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... call your doctor. In Spanish— Dolor abdominal en niños menores de 12 años What is recurrent abdominal ... Functional abdominal pain (FAP) typically affects kids ages 4-12, and is quite common, affecting up to ...

  16. Identification of mycobacterial lectins from genomic data.

    PubMed

    Abhinav, K V; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, M

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-four sequences containing lectin domains with homologs of known three-dimensional structure were identified through a search of mycobacterial genomes. They appear to belong to the β-prism II, the C-type, the Microcystis virdis (MV), and the β-trefoil lectin folds. The first three always occur in conjunction with the LysM, the PI-PLC, and the β-grasp domains, respectively while mycobacterial β-trefoil lectins are unaccompanied by any other domain. Thirty heparin binding hemagglutinins (HBHA), already annotated, have also been included in the study although they have no homologs of known three-dimensional structure. The biological role of HBHA has been well characterized. A comparison between the sequences of the lectin from pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacteria provides insights into the carbohydrate binding region of the molecule, but the structure of the molecule is yet to be determined. A reasonable picture of the structural features of other mycobacterial proteins containing one or the other of the four lectin domains can be gleaned through the examination of homologs proteins, although the structure of none of them is available. Their biological role is also yet to be elucidated. The work presented here is among the first steps towards exploring the almost unexplored area of the structural biology of mycobacterial lectins.

  17. [Abdominal catastrophe--surgeon's view].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2010-07-01

    Abdominal catastrophe is a serious clinical condition, usually being a complication arising during treatment of intraabdominal nontraumatic disorders or abdominal injuries. Most commonly, inflamation- secondary peritonitis, is concerned. Abdominal catastrophe also includes secondary signs of sepsis, abdominal compartment syndrome and enterocutaneous fistules. Most septic abdominal disorders which show signs of abdominal catastrophy, require surgical intervention and reinterventions--planned or "on demand" laparotomies. During the postoperative period, the patient requires intensive care management, including steps taken to stabilize his/hers condition, management of sepsis and metabolic and nutritional support measures, as well as adequate indication for reoperations. New technologies aimed at prevention of complications in laparostomies and to improve conditions for final laparotomy closure are used in phase procedures for surgical management of intraabdominal infections. Despite the new technologies, abdominal catastrophe has higher morbidity and lethality risk rates.

  18. The C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8/CLEC4D is a key component of anti-mycobacterial immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Gillian J; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J; Hoving, Jennifer C; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Drummond, Rebecca A; Kerscher, Bernhard; Keeton, Roanne; van de Vosse, Esther; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Plantinga, Theo S; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Govender, Dhirendra; Besra, Gurdyal S; Netea, Mihai G; Reid, Delyth M; Willment, Janet A; Jacobs, Muazzam; Yamasaki, Sho; van Crevel, Reinout; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-02-11

    The interaction of microbes with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) is essential for protective immunity. While many PRRs that recognize mycobacteria have been identified, none is essentially required for host defense in vivo. Here, we have identified the C-type lectin receptor CLECSF8 (CLEC4D, MCL) as a key molecule in anti-mycobacterial host defense. Clecsf8-/- mice exhibit higher bacterial burdens and increased mortality upon M. tuberculosis infection. Additionally, Clecsf8 deficiency is associated with exacerbated pulmonary inflammation, characterized by enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Clecsf8-/- mice show reduced mycobacterial uptake by pulmonary leukocytes, but infection with opsonized bacteria can restore this phagocytic defect as well as decrease bacterial burdens. Notably, a CLECSF8 polymorphism identified in humans is associated with an increased susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis. We conclude that CLECSF8 plays a non-redundant role in anti-mycobacterial immunity in mouse and in man.

  19. [Abdominal paracentesis].

    PubMed

    Glauser, Frédéric; Barras, Anne-Catherine; Pache, Isabelle; Monti, Matteo

    2008-10-29

    Abdominal paracentesis is frequently performed in the clinical setting. Every newly developed ascites need to be investigated by abdominal paracentesis. Any clinical or biological deterioration in patients with chronic ascites also requires a new paracentesis. Therapeutically abdominal paracentesis is performed for refractory or symptomatic ascites. As other invasive procedures, it is critical to master its indications, contra-indications and complications. The aim of this article is to review the basics of abdominal paracentesis in order to help physicians to carry out this technical skill.

  20. Disseminated herpes zoster infection initially presenting with abdominal pain in patients with lymphoma undergoing conventional chemotherapy: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hitomi Sumiyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Makita, Shinichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Dai; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral disseminated varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease has a high mortality rate, and occurs in immunocompromised hosts, mostly subsequent to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Only a few cases of this disease that onset during conventional chemotherapy in patients with lymphoma have been reported. The present study reports the cases of 3 patients with disseminated and visceral VZV infection undergoing treatment for follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. All 3 patients presented with initial symptoms of abdominal pain, and 2 patients demonstrated syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone and hepatitis. All patients developed widespread cutaneous dissemination, and all had a low cluster of differentiation 4 cell count or lymphocyte count at the time of VZV diagnosis and at least 4 month prior. With intravenous systemic acyclovir therapy (Cases 1 and 3, 1500 mg/day; Case 2, 750 mg/day), the patients achieved complete recovery by day 14 of therapy. Visceral disseminated VZV infection is not limited to patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, and may present with abdominal pain with or without skin eruption. Visceral infection may take a poor clinical course, therefore, in patients with prolonged duration of low lymphocyte count and/or long-term use of steroids, the prophylactic use of acyclovir may be considered. PMID:27446355

  1. Abdominal distention and constipation followed by herpes zoster infection in a 2-month-old female infant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongfeng; Fang, Fang

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms of herpes zoster in infants are rarely reported. A 2-month-old female infant presented with herpes zoster and additional complication of abdominal distention and constipation. While rashes resolved, abdominal distention and constipation improved soon. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gastrointestinal complication of herpes zoster in infants. Physicians should be aware of the potential for motor involvement of herpes zoster in such infants. Herpes zoster should be considered during the diagnosis in the event of infants presenting with constipation.

  2. Synchronous infection of the aorta and the testis: emphysematous epididymo-orchitis, abdominal aortic mycotic aneurysm, and testicular artery pseudoaneurysm diagnosed by use of MDCT.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Rahul G; Balani, Ankit; Merchant, Suleman A; Joshi, Anagha R

    2014-07-01

    We report clinical details and imaging findings for a case of emphysematous epididymo-orchitis with co-existing mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm and a testicular artery pseudoaneurysm in a diabetic 65-year-old male. We report imaging findings from ultrasonography (USG) and contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Use of MDCT to identify, confirm, and define the extent of the disease, and its utility in understanding the pathogenesis of this rare condition are highlighted. For such lethal infections, early diagnosis and intervention can be lifesaving; imaging can be of crucial importance in this.

  3. Macrophage-mediated inflammatory response decreases mycobacterial survival in mouse MSCs by augmenting NO production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Yongjian; Xie, Heping; Li, Miao; Ming, Siqi; Li, Liyan; Li, Meiyu; Wu, Minhao; Gong, Sitang; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a hard-to-eradicate intracellular microbe, which escapes host immune attack during latent infection. Recent studies reveal that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide a protective niche for MTB to maintain latency. However, the regulation of mycobacterial residency in MSCs in the infectious microenvironment remains largely unknown. Here, we found that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during MTB infection facilitated the clearance of bacilli residing in mouse MSCs. Higher inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production were observed in mouse MSCs under macrophage-mediated inflammatory circumstance. Blocking NO production in MSCs increased the survival of intracellular mycobacteria, indicating NO-mediated antimycobacterial activity. Moreover, both nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathways were involved in iNOS expression and NO production in inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β could trigger NO production in MSCs and exert anti-mycobacterial activity via NF-κB signaling pathway. Neutralization of interleukin-1β in macrophage-mediated inflammatory microenvironment dampened the ability of mouse MSCs to produce NO. Together, our findings demonstrated that macrophage-mediated inflammatory response during mycobacterial infection promotes the clearance of bacilli in mouse MSCs by increasing NO production, which may provide a better understanding of latent MTB infection. PMID:27251437

  4. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F. D.; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C. R.; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (stagnant or slow-flowing water). Examination of the histologic and pathogenic characteristics of these mycobacteria suggests differences in the modes of transmission and pathogenesis, though no singular mechanism for either characteristic has been definitively described for any of these mycobacteria. PMID:10341173

  5. New Targets and Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Sulfur Metabolism§

    PubMed Central

    Paritala, Hanumantharao; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of new antibacterial targets is urgently needed to address multidrug resistant and latent tuberculosis infection. Sulfur metabolic pathways are essential for survival and the expression of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In addition, microbial sulfur metabolic pathways are largely absent in humans and therefore, represent unique targets for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the enzymes associated with the production of sulfated and reduced sulfur-containing metabolites in Mycobacteria. Small molecule inhibitors of these catalysts represent valuable chemical tools that can be used to investigate the role of sulfur metabolism throughout the Mycobacterial lifecycle and may also represent new leads for drug development. In this light, we also summarize recent progress made in the development of inhibitors of sulfur metabolism enzymes. PMID:23808874

  6. Metabolomics: Applications and Promise in Mycobacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Banoei, Mohammad Mehdi; Winston, Brent W.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the study of mycobacterial diseases was trapped in culture-based technology that is more than a century old. The use of nucleic acid amplification is changing this, and powerful new technologies are on the horizon. Metabolomics, which is the study of sets of metabolites of both the bacteria and host, is being used to clarify mechanisms of disease, and can identify changes leading to better diagnosis, treatment, and prognostication of mycobacterial diseases. Metabolomic profiles are arrays of biochemical products of genes in their environment. These complex patterns are biomarkers that can allow a more complete understanding of cell function, dysfunction, and perturbation than genomics or proteomics. Metabolomics could herald sweeping advances in personalized medicine and clinical trial design, but the challenges in metabolomics are also great. Measured metabolite concentrations vary with the timing within a condition, the intrinsic biology, the instruments, and the sample preparation. Metabolism profoundly changes with age, sex, variations in gut microbial flora, and lifestyle. Validation of biomarkers is complicated by measurement accuracy, selectivity, linearity, reproducibility, robustness, and limits of detection. The statistical challenges include analysis, interpretation, and description of the vast amount of data generated. Despite these drawbacks, metabolomics provides great opportunity and the potential to understand and manage mycobacterial diseases. PMID:26196272

  7. In situ detection of frequent and active infection of human cytomegalovirus in inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms: possible pathogenic role in sustained chronic inflammatory reaction.

    PubMed

    Yonemitsu, Y; Nakagawa, K; Tanaka, S; Mori, R; Sugimachi, K; Sueishi, K

    1996-04-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is histopathologically characterized by extensive adventitial fibrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration with lymph follicle formation, and severe atheromatous changes in the aneurysmal wall. We previously reported a frequent prevalence and immediate early gene expression of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) in IAAA by solution-phase PCR and reverse transcription PCR, respectively, and suggested that this virus might play a role in chronic inflammatory reaction in IAAA. To evaluate the pathogenic role of CMV infection, the frequency and distribution of CMV infected cells in IAAA were examined by in situ PCR, and compared with those in atherosclerotic aneurysms (AA) and control cases with minimal atherosclerotic changes. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR was simultaneously evaluated as a marker for immune response related to CMV infection. Immediate early gene expression was also detected by reverse transcription PCR and in situ hybridization, to certify whether the CMV infection in IAAA is active or latent. In the fibrously thickened adventitia of IAAA, CMV infected cells and HLA-DR-positive cells were more frequently encountered than in that of AA and control cases (p < 0.01). CMV infected cells were largely identified as macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and lymphocytes. The expression of CMV immediate early mRNA, which suggests an active infection inducing active inflammatory reaction, was detected in most of the macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Our results strongly suggest that frequent and active infection of CMV in IAAA plays a significant role in the induction and acceleration of chronic inflammatory reaction in aortas of IAAA.

  8. Purification and characterization of the acyltransferase involved in biosynthesis of the major mycobacterial cell envelope glycolipid--monoacylated phosphatidylinositol dimannoside.

    PubMed

    Svetlíková, Zuzana; Baráth, Peter; Jackson, Mary; Korduláková, Jana; Mikušová, Katarína

    2014-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol mannosides are essential structural components of the mycobacterial cell envelope. They are implicated in host-pathogen interactions during infection and serve as a basis for biosynthesis of other unique molecules with immunomodulatory properties - mycobacterial lipopolysaccharides lipoarabinomannan and lipomannan. Acyltransferase Rv2611 is involved in one of the initial steps in the assembly of these molecules in Mycobacterium tuberculosis - the attachment of an acyl group to position-6 of the 2-linked mannosyl residue of the phosphatidylinositol mannoside anchor. Although the function of this enzyme was annotated 10 years ago, it has never been completely biochemically characterized due to lack of the pure protein. We have successfully overexpressed and purified MSMEG_2934, the ortholog of Rv2611c from the non-pathogenic model organism Mycobacteriumsmegmatis mc(2)155 using mycobacterial pJAM2 expression system, which allowed confirmation of its in vitro acyltransferase activity, and establishment of its substrate specificity.

  9. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  10. [Abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Gschossmann, J M; Holtmann, G; Netzer, P; Essig, M; Balsiger, B M; Scheurer, U

    2005-10-01

    Abdominal pain can result from a variety of different intra- and extra-abdominal disorders. Given the wide variety of etiological triggers for this pain, the primary task during the first stage of the diagnostic work-up is to determine as soon as possible the underlying cause and the degree of emergency. The aim of this evaluation is to adapt the therapeutic measures which are necessary for a causal treatment to the individual situation. Contrary to somatic causes of abdominal pain, the availability of such a causal therapy for functional bowel disorders is still very limited. Given this dilemma, the therapeutic focus of abdominal pain associated with these functional syndromes has to be placed on symptom-oriented treatment.

  11. General secretion signal for the mycobacterial type VII secretion pathway

    PubMed Central

    Daleke, Maria H.; Ummels, Roy; Bawono, Punto; Heringa, Jaap; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Luirink, Joen; Bitter, Wilbert

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterial pathogens use specialized type VII secretion (T7S) systems to transport crucial virulence factors across their unusual cell envelope into infected host cells. These virulence factors lack classical secretion signals and the mechanism of substrate recognition is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that the model T7S substrates PE25/PPE41, which form a heterodimer, are targeted to the T7S pathway ESX-5 by a signal located in the C terminus of PE25. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues within this C terminus resulted in the identification of a highly conserved motif, i.e., YxxxD/E, which is required for secretion. This motif was also essential for the secretion of LipY, another ESX-5 substrate. Pathogenic mycobacteria have several different T7S systems and we identified a PE protein that is secreted by the ESX-1 system, which allowed us to compare substrate recognition of these two T7S systems. Surprisingly, this ESX-1 substrate contained a C-terminal signal functionally equivalent to that of PE25. Exchange of these C-terminal secretion signals between the PE proteins restored secretion, but each PE protein remained secreted via its own ESX secretion system, indicating that an additional signal(s) provides system specificity. Remarkably, the YxxxD/E motif was also present in and required for efficient secretion of the ESX-1 substrates CFP-10 and EspB. Therefore, our data show that the YxxxD/E motif is a general secretion signal that is present in all known mycobacterial T7S substrates or substrate complexes. PMID:22733768

  12. Antibiotic optimization in the difficult-to-treat patient with complicated intra-abdominal or complicated skin and skin structure infections: focus on tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Reygaert, Wanda C

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal and skin and skin structure infections are widely varied in presentation. These infections very often lead to an increase in length of hospital stay, with a resulting increase in costs and mortality. In addition, these infections may be caused by a wide variety of bacteria and are often polymicrobial with the possibility of the presence of antimicrobial-resistant strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, extended-spectrum β-lactamase strains (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae), and K. pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing strains. In combination with patients’ immunosuppression or comorbidities, the treatment and management options for initial therapy success are few. Tigecycline, a new glycylcyline antimicrobial from the tetracycline drug class, represents a viable option for the successful treatment of these infections. It has been shown to have activity against a wide variety of bacteria, including the antimicrobial-resistant strains. As with all tetracycline drugs, it is not recommended for pregnant or nursing women. The potential side effects are those typical of tetracycline drugs: nausea, vomiting, and headaches. Drug–drug interactions are not expected, and renal function monitoring is not necessary. PMID:20856688

  13. Immune defects in active mycobacterial diseases in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs).

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Jaing, Tang-Her; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2011-12-01

    Natural human immunity to the mycobacteria group, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and/or Salmonella species, relies on the functional IL-12/23-IFN-γ integrity of macrophages (monocyte/dendritic cell) connecting to T lymphocyte/NK cells. Patients with severe forms of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) have more profound immune defects involving this impaired circuit in patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID) including complete DiGeorge syndrome, X-linked hyper IgM syndrome (HIGM) (CD40L mutation), CD40 deficiency, immunodeficiency with or without anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (NEMO and IKBA mutations), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) and hyper IgE recurrent infection syndromes (HIES). The patients with severe PIDs have broader diverse infections rather than mycobacterial infections. In contrast, patients with an isolated inborn error of the IL-12/23-IFN-γ pathway are exclusively prone to low-virulence mycobacterial infections and nontyphoid salmonella infections, known as Mendelian susceptibility to the mycobacterial disease (MSMD) phenotype. Restricted defective molecules in the circuit, including IFN-γR1, IFN-γR2, IL-12p40, IL-12R-β1, STAT-1, NEMO, IKBA and the recently discovered CYBB responsible for autophagocytic vacuole and proteolysis, and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) for dendritic cell immunodeficiency, have been identified in around 60% of patients with the MSMD phenotype. Among all of the patients with PIDs referred for investigation since 1985, we have identified four cases with the specific defect (IFNRG1 for three and IL12RB for one), presenting as both BCG-induced diseases and NTM infections, in addition to some patients with SCID, HIGM, CGD and HIES. Furthermore, manifestations in patients with autoantibodies to IFN-γ (autoAbs-IFN-γ), which is categorized as an anticytokine autoantibody syndrome, can resemble the relatively persistent

  14. Treatment of Infected Aneurysms of the Abdominal Aorta and Iliac Artery with Endovascular Aneurysm Repair and Percutaneous Drainage.

    PubMed

    Chino, Shuji; Kato, Noriyuki; Noda, Yoshihiro; Oue, Kensuke; Tanaka, Satofumi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Higashigawa, Takatoshi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Okabe, Manabu

    2016-10-01

    Infected aneurysm remains one of the most challenging diseases for vascular surgeons. We describe the successful treatment of 2 cases of infected aneurysms with endovascular aneurysm repair and percutaneous computed tomography-guided drainage. This strategy may be an effective alternative to open surgical repair in selected patients.

  15. Hyperplasia of gastric mucosa in donor rats orally infected with Taenia taeniaeformis eggs and in recipient rats surgically implanted with the larvae in the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Konno, K; Oku, Y; Nonaka, N; Kamiya, M

    1999-06-01

    Rats heavily infected with Taenia taeniaeformis larvae in the liver show a remarkable increase in their stomach weight, hyperplasia, and hypergastrinemia. However, it is unknown what causes these phenomena. Hence, as a preliminary study to investigate the importance of larval parasitism in the liver, two experiments were done. In the first experiment, 14 donor rats were orally inoculated with 3,000 T. taeniaeformis eggs. In the second experiment, 136-300 of the larvae obtained from the rats were surgically implanted into the abdominal cavity of 7 recipient rats. Gastrin levels and histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa were investigated. In all, 11 donor rats showed hypergastrinemia and hyperplasia, 5 recipient rats showed gastric mucosal hyperplasia accompanied by excessive mucous cell proliferation, and 2 recipient rats showed hypergastrinemia. These results suggest that parasitism of the liver by the larvae is not essential for the development of hyperplasia and that factors from the larvae might cause these phenomena.

  16. Mycobacterial lesions in fish, amphibians, reptiles, rodents, lagomorphs, and ferrets with reference to animal models.

    PubMed

    Reavill, Drury R; Schmidt, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis is a serious disease across many animal species. Approximately more than 120 species are currently recognized in the genus Mycobacterium. This article describes the zoonotic potential of mycobacteria and mycobacteriosis in fish, amphibians, rodents, rabbits, and ferrets. It considers clinical signs; histology; molecular methods of identification, such as polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing; routes of infection; and disease progression. Studying the disease in animals may aid in understanding the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections in humans and identify better therapy and preventative options such as vaccines.

  17. Clinical and Economic Consequences of Failure of Initial Antibiotic Therapy for Patients with Community-Onset Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yong Pil; Bae, In-Gyu; Lee, Sang-Rok; Chung, Jin-Won; Jun, Jae-Bum; Choo, Eun Ju; Moon, Soo-youn; Lee, Mi Suk; Jeon, Min Hyok; Song, Eun Hee; Lee, Eun Jung; Park, Seong Yeon; Kim, Yang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) is infection that extends beyond the hollow viscus of origin into the peritoneal space, and is associated with either abscess formation or peritonitis. There are few studies that have assessed the actual costs and outcomes associated with failure of initial antibiotic therapy for cIAI. The aims of this study were to evaluate risk factors and impact on costs and outcomes of failure of initial antibiotic therapy for community-onset cIAI. Methods A retrospective study was performed at eleven tertiary-care hospitals. Hospitalized adults with community-onset cIAI who underwent an appropriate source control procedure between August 2008 and September 2011 were included. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was defined as a change of antibiotics due to a lack of improvement of the clinical symptoms and signs associated with cIAI in the first week. Results A total of 514 patients hospitalized for community-onset cIAI were included in the analysis. The mean age of the patients was 53.3 ± 17.6 years, 72 patients (14%) had health care-associated infection, and 48 (9%) experienced failure of initial antibiotic therapy. Failure of initial antibiotic therapy was associated with increased costs and morbidity. After adjustment for covariates, patients with unsuccessful initial therapy received an additional 2.9 days of parenteral antibiotic therapy, were hospitalized for an additional 5.3 days, and incurred $3,287 in additional inpatient charges. Independent risk factors for failure of initial antibiotic therapy were health care-associated infection, solid cancer, and APACHE II ≥13. Conclusions To improve outcomes and costs in patients with community-onset cIAI, rapid assessment of health care-associated risk factors and severity of disease, selection of an appropriate antibiotic regimen accordingly, and early infection source control should be performed. PMID:25910171

  18. Epidemiology of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease and Tuberculosis, Hawaii, USA

    PubMed Central

    Frankland, Timothy B.; Daida, Yihe G.; Honda, Jennifer R.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Zelazny, Adrian; Honda, Stacey; Prevots, D. Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies found Hawaiians and Asian-Americans/Pacific Islanders to be independently at increased risk for nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) and tuberculosis (TB). To better understand NTM infection and TB risk patterns in Hawaii, USA, we evaluated data on a cohort of patients in Hawaii for 2005–2013. Period prevalence of NTMPD was highest among Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese patients (>300/100,000 persons) and lowest among Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders (50/100,000). Japanese patients were twice as likely as all other racial/ethnic groups to have Mycobacterium abscessus isolated (adjusted odds ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.2) but were not at increased risk for infection with other mycobacteria species. In contrast, incidence of TB was stable and was lowest among Japanese patients (no cases) and highest among Filipino, Korean, and Vietnamese patients (>50/100,000). Substantial differences exist in the epidemiology of NTMPD by race/ethnicity, suggesting behavioral and biologic factors that affect disease susceptibility. PMID:28221128

  19. Fibrinogen Regulates the Cytotoxicity of Mycobacterial Trehalose Dimycolate but Is Not Required for Cell Recruitment, Cytokine Response, or Control of Mycobacterial Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kaori; Geisel, Rachel E.; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Wyatt, Bryce T.; Sellers, Llewelyn B.; Smiley, Stephen T.; Cooper, Andrea M.; Russell, David G.; Rhoades, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    During inflammatory responses and wound healing, the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to fibrin, an insoluble extracellular matrix, long has been assumed to create a scaffold for the migration of leukocytes and fibroblasts. Previous studies concluded that fibrinogen is a necessary cofactor for mycobacterial trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate-induced responses, because trehalose dimycolate-coated beads, to which fibrinogen was adsorbed, were more inflammatory than those to which other plasma proteins were adsorbed. Herein, we investigate roles for fibrin(ogen) in an in vivo model of mycobacterial granuloma formation and in infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. In wild-type mice, the subcutaneous injection of trehalose dimycolate-coated polystyrene microspheres, suspended within Matrigel, elicited a pyogranulomatous response during the course of 12 days. In fibrinogen-deficient mice, neutrophils were recruited but a more suppurative lesion developed, with the marked degradation and disintegration of the matrix. Compared to that in wild-type mice, the early formation of granulation tissue in fibrinogen-deficient mice was edematous, hypocellular, and disorganized. These deficiencies were complemented by the addition of exogenous fibrinogen. The absence of fibrinogen had no effect on cell recruitment or cytokine production in response to trehalose dimycolate, nor was there a difference in lung histopathology or overall bacterial burden in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this model, fibrin(ogen) was not required for cell recruitment, cytokine response, or response to infection, but it promoted granulation tissue formation and suppressed leukocyte necrosis. PMID:20028811

  20. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  1. The molecular biology of mycobacterial trehalose in the quest for advanced tuberculosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Maranha, Ana; Mendes, Vitor; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2014-08-01

    Trehalose is a natural glucose disaccharide identified in the 19th century in fungi and insect cocoons, and later across the three domains of life. In members of the genus Mycobacterium, which includes the tuberculosis (TB) pathogen and over 160 species of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), many of which are opportunistic pathogens, trehalose has been an important focus of research over the last 60 years. It is a crucial player in the assembly and architecture of the remarkable mycobacterial cell envelope as an element of unique highly antigenic glycolipids, namely trehalose dimycolate ('cord factor'). Free trehalose has been detected in the mycobacterial cytoplasm and occasionally in oligosaccharides with unknown function. TB and NTM infection statistics and death toll, the decline in immune responses in the aging population, human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS or other debilitating conditions, and the proliferation of strains with different levels of resistance to the dated drugs in use, all merge into a serious public-health threat urging more effective vaccines, efficient diagnostic tools and new drugs. This review deals with the latest findings on mycobacterial trehalose biosynthesis, catabolism, processing and recycling, as well with the ongoing quest for novel trehalose-related mechanisms to be targeted by novel TB therapeutics. In this context, the drug-discovery pipeline has recently included new lead compounds directed toward trehalose-related targets highlighting the potential of these pathways to stem the tide of rising drug resistance.

  2. Mycofactocin-associated mycobacterial dehydrogenases with non-exchangeable NAD cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Haft, Daniel H.; Pierce, Phillip G.; Mayclin, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Amy; Gardberg, Anna S.; Abendroth, Jan; Begley, Darren W.; Phan, Isabelle Q.; Staker, Bart L.; Myler, Peter J.; Marathias, Vasilios M.; Lorimer, Donald D.; Edwards, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    During human infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives the normally bacteriocidal phagosome of macrophages. Mtb and related species may be able to combat this harsh acidic environment which contains reactive oxygen species due to the mycobacterial genomes encoding a large number of dehydrogenases. Typically, dehydrogenase cofactor binding sites are open to solvent, which allows NAD/NADH exchange to support multiple turnover. Interestingly, mycobacterial short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) within family TIGR03971 contain an insertion at the NAD binding site. Here we present crystal structures of 9 mycobacterial SDRs in which the insertion buries the NAD cofactor except for a small portion of the nicotinamide ring. Line broadening and STD-NMR experiments did not show NAD or NADH exchange on the NMR timescale. STD-NMR demonstrated binding of the potential substrate carveol, the potential product carvone, the inhibitor tricyclazol, and an external redox partner 2,6-dichloroindophenol (DCIP). Therefore, these SDRs appear to contain a non-exchangeable NAD cofactor and may rely on an external redox partner, rather than cofactor exchange, for multiple turnover. Incidentally, these genes always appear in conjunction with the mftA gene, which encodes the short peptide MftA, and with other genes proposed to convert MftA into the external redox partner mycofactocin. PMID:28120876

  3. Ubiquitination as a Mechanism To Transport Soluble Mycobacterial and Eukaryotic Proteins to Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victoria L; Jackson, Liam; Schorey, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-15

    Exosomes are extracellular vesicles of endocytic origin that function in intercellular communication. Our previous studies indicate that exosomes released from Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages contain soluble mycobacterial proteins. However, it was unclear how these secreted proteins were targeted to exosomes. In this study, we determined that exosome production by the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 requires the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport and that trafficking of mycobacterial proteins from phagocytosed bacilli to exosomes was dependent on protein ubiquitination. Moreover, soluble mycobacterial proteins, when added exogenously to RAW264.7 or human HEK293 cells, were endocytosed, ubiquitinated, and released via exosomes. This suggested that endocytosed proteins could be recycled from cells through exosomes. This hypothesis was supported using the tumor-associated protein He4, which, when endocytosed by RAW264.7 or HEK293 cells, was transported to exosomes in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ubiquitination is a modification sufficient for trafficking soluble proteins within the phagocytic/endocytic network to exosomes.

  4. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease in Children – Epidemiology, Diagnosis & Management at a Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Duncan; Gonis, Gena; Leslie, David; Sedda, Luigi; Ritz, Nicole; Connell, Tom; Curtis, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the epidemiology, diagnosis and optimal management of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease in children. Methods Retrospective cohort study of NTM cases over a 10-year-period at a tertiary referral hospital in Australia. Results A total of 140 children with NTM disease, including 107 with lymphadenitis and 25 with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), were identified. The estimated incidence of NTM disease was 0.6–1.6 cases / 100,000 children / year; no increasing trend was observed over the study period. Temporal analyses revealed a seasonal incidence cycle around 12 months, with peaks in late winter/spring and troughs in autumn. Mycobacterium-avium-complex accounted for most cases (77.8%), followed by Mycobacterium ulcerans (14.4%) and Mycobacterium marinum (3.3%). Polymerase chain reaction testing had higher sensitivity than culture and microscopy for acid-fast bacilli (92.0%, 67.2% and 35.7%, respectively). The majority of lymphadenitis cases underwent surgical excision (97.2%); multiple recurrences in this group were less common in cases treated with clarithromycin and rifampicin compared with clarithromycin alone or no anti-mycobacterial drugs (0% versus 7.1%; OR:0.73). SSTI recurrences were also less common in cases treated with two anti-mycobacterial drugs compared with one or none (10.5% versus 33.3%; OR:0.23). Conclusions There was seasonal variation in the incidence of NTM disease, analogous to recently published observations in tuberculosis, which have been linked to seasonal variation in vitamin D. Our finding that anti-mycobacterial combination therapy was associated with a reduced risk of recurrences in patients with NTM lymphadenitis or SSTI requires further confirmation in prospective trials. PMID:26812154

  5. Effect of Tesamorelin on Liver Fat and Visceral Fat in HIV-Infected Patients With Abdominal Fat Accumulation: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Takara L.; Feldpausch, Meghan N.; Oh, Jinhee; Branch, Karen L.; Lee, Hang; Torriani, Martin; Grinspoon, Steven K.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Among HIV-infected patients, visceral adiposity is associated with metabolic dysregulation and ectopic fat accumulation. Tesamorelin, a growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue, specifically targets visceral fat reduction, but its effects on liver fat are unknown. Objective To investigate the effect of tesamorelin on visceral and liver fat. Design, Setting, and Participants Fifty antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected men and women with abdominal fat accumulation were recruited for this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial at Massachusetts General Hospital. The first patient was enrolled on 1/10/2011; the final patient completed his 6 month study visit on 9/6/2013. Intervention Tesamorelin 2mg vs. placebo SC daily for 6 months Main Outcomes Primary endpoints were changes in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver fat. Secondary endpoints included glucose and other metabolic endpoints. Results 76 patients were screened and 54 randomized. 50 presented for baseline assessment and 48 received treatment with study drug. Tesamorelin significantly reduced VAT (Δ −34 [−53, −15] vs. 8 [−14, 30] cm2, mean [95% CI], tesamorelin vs. placebo, treatment effect −42cm2 [95% CI −71, −14], P = 0.005) and liver fat (Δ −2.0 [−6.4, 0.1] vs. 0.9 [−0.6, 3.7] lipid-to-water %, median [IQR], tesamorelin vs. placebo, P=0.003) over 6 months, for a net treatment effect of −2.9 lipid-to-water %. Fasting glucose increased in the tesamorelin group at 2 weeks (Δ 9 [5, 13] vs. 2 [−3, 8] mg/dL, mean [95% CI], treatment effect 7mg/dL [95% CI 1, 14], P=0.03), but overall changes over 6 months in fasting glucose (Δ 4 [−2, 10] vs. 2 [−4, 7] mg/dL, mean [95% CI], treatment effect 2mg/dL [95% CI −6, 10], P=0.72) and 2 hour glucose (Δ −1 [−18, 15] vs. −8 [−24, 8] mg/dL, mean [95% CI], treatment effect 7mg/dL [95% CI −16, 29], P=0.53) were not significant. Conclusions and Relevance In this preliminary study of HIV-infected patients with

  6. Correlation between carbapenem consumption and resistance to carbapenems among Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected from patients with intra-abdominal infections at five medical centers in Taiwan, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Ho, Mao-Wang; Liu, Yung-Ching; Toh, Han-Siong; Lee, Yu-Lin; Liu, Yuag-Meng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lu, Po-Liang; Liu, Chun-Eng; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tang, Hung-Jen; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the trend in resistance to carbapenems among isolates of Enterobacteriaceae that had been collected from patients with intra-abdominal infections at five medical centers in Taiwan from 2006 to 2010 and evaluated the correlation between resistance to carbapenems and consumption of said agents as part of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART). During the study period, the usage of ertapenem and that of total carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem, and meropenem) increased significantly from 6.13 to 13.38 defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days for ertapenem and from 20.43 to 34.25 defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days for total carbapenems. The most common species were Escherichia coli (n = 1095), Klebsiella spp. (n = 663), and Enterobacter spp. (n = 202). The susceptibility of all isolates to ertapenem and to imipenem varied during the study period. For ertapenem, the rates of nonsusceptibility ranged from 3.5% to 10.3% and those for imipenem ranged from 3.5% to 10.7%. Although the use of carbapenems increased during the study period, there was no marked increase in resistance to carbapenems. Continuous monitoring of resistance trends is necessary so that antimicrobial prescription policies can be adjusted and infection control intervention programs can be implemented.

  7. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  8. Inhibition of phagosome maturation by mycobacteria does not interfere with presentation of mycobacterial antigens by MHC molecules.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Combaluzier, Benoit; Albrecht, Imke; Garcia, Jessica E; Nouze, Clémence; Pieters, Jean; Leclerc, Claude

    2007-08-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria escape host innate immune responses by surviving within phagosomes of host macrophages and blocking their delivery to lysosomes. Avoiding lysosomal delivery may also be involved in the capacity of living mycobacteria to modulate MHC class I- or II-dependent T cell responses, which may contribute to their pathogenicity in vivo. In this study, we show that the presentation of mycobacterial Ags is independent of the site of intracellular residence inside professional APCs. Infection of mouse macrophages or dendritic cells in vitro with mycobacterial mutants that are unable to escape lysosomal transfer resulted in an identical efficiency of Ag presentation compared with wild-type mycobacteria. Moreover, in vivo, such mutants induced CD4(+) Th1 or CD8(+) CTL responses in mice against various mycobacterial Ags that were comparable to those induced by their wild-type counterparts. These results suggest that the limiting factor for the generation of an adaptive immune response against mycobacteria is not the degree of lysosomal delivery. These findings are important in the rational design of improved vaccines to combat mycobacterial diseases.

  9. Dynamics of Mycobacteriophage-Mycobacterial Host Interaction: Evidence for Secondary Mechanisms for Host Lethality.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sourabh; Grewal, Rajdeep Kaur; Sinha, Saptarshi; Ghosh, Shrestha; Roy, Soumen; Das Gupta, Sujoy K

    2015-10-16

    Mycobacteriophages infect mycobacteria, resulting in their death. Therefore, the possibility of using them as therapeutic agents against the deadly mycobacterial disease tuberculosis (TB) is of great interest. To obtain better insight into the dynamics of mycobacterial inactivation by mycobacteriophages, this study was initiated using mycobacteriophage D29 and Mycobacterium smegmatis as the phage-host system. Here, we implemented a goal-oriented iterative cycle of experiments on one hand and mathematical modeling combined with Monte Carlo simulations on the other. This integrative approach lends valuable insight into the detailed kinetics of bacterium-phage interactions. We measured time-dependent changes in host viability during the growth of phage D29 in M. smegmatis at different multiplicities of infection (MOI). The predictions emerging out of theoretical analyses were further examined using biochemical and cell biological assays. In a phage-host interaction system where multiple rounds of infection are allowed to take place, cell counts drop more rapidly than expected if cell lysis is considered the only mechanism for cell death. The phenomenon could be explained by considering a secondary factor for cell death in addition to lysis. Further investigations reveal that phage infection leads to the increased production of superoxide radicals, which appears to be the secondary factor. Therefore, mycobacteriophage D29 can function as an effective antimycobacterial agent, the killing potential of which may be amplified through secondary mechanisms.

  10. Genetic variations in toll-like receptor 4 in Mexican-Mestizo patients with intra-abdominal infection and/or pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Osorio, Carlos A; Lima, Guadalupe; Herrera-Caceres, Jaime O; Villegas-Torres, Beatriz E; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Ponce-de-Leon, Sergio; Llorente, Luis; Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of death around the world, and 73-83% of all sepsis cases requiring attention in intensive care units are linked to intra-abdominal infection (IAI) or pneumonia. The activation of innate immunity is central to the manifestation of sepsis, and toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 plays an important role in this activation process. The 299G and 399I alleles of TLR4 have been linked with an increased risk of Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) infections and septic shock in some populations. This case-control study evaluated the prevalence of D299G/T399I polymorphisms in Mexican patients with IAI and/or pneumonia and in healthy controls. Genotyping revealed that 1 in 44 patients (2.3%; CI 95%: 0.05-12.0%) and 4 in 126 controls (3.2%; CI 95%: 0.9-7.9%) were heterozygous for both the D299G and T399l polymorphisms (OR: 0.71, CI 95%: 0.01-7.44, p = NS), confirming the co-segregation of these alleles in this population. Furthermore, the patients with a GNB infection and severe sepsis were not carriers of the risk alleles. In summary, this report shows that the frequency of the D299G and T399I polymorphisms in Mexican-Mestizos is lower than anticipated in comparison with other ethnic groups, emphasizing the variable distribution of TLR4 polymorphisms among different populations. Consequently, this study was not able to detect associations between TLR4 polymorphisms and sepsis in this population.

  11. Trichinella spiralis infection changes immune response in mice performed abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplantation and prolongs cardiac allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gengguo; Deng, Ronghai; Yao, Jianping; Liao, Bing; Chen, Yinghua; Wu, Zhongdao; Hu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xingwang; Ma, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Allograft rejection has been an obstacle for long-term survival of patients for many years. Current strategies for transplant rejection are not as optimal as we expected, especially for long-term treatments. Trichinella spiralis, a nematode parasitized in mammalian muscle and as an invader, maintains harmonious with host in the long term by evading host immune attack. To determine whether T. spiralis infection impacts on allograft rejection, we performed mice cardiac allograft transplantation model by using BALB/c (H-2(b)) mice as donors and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice orally infected with 300 muscle larvae for 28 days as recipients. Graft survival was monitored by daily palpation of the abdomen; histologic change was observed by H&E stain; and CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)IFN-γ(+), and CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and regulatory T cells were examined with the use of flow cytometry. Serum cytokine levels were measured by Luminex. Finally, we found that mean survival time of cardiac allografts in T. spiralis group was 23.40 ± 1.99 days, while the vehicle control group was 10.60 ± 0.75 days. Furthermore, we observed alleviated histological changes in the heart allograft, decreased corresponding CD8(+) T cells, suppressed Th1 and Th17 responses, and increased regulatory T cell frequency in a murine cardiac transplantation model at day 7 post-transplantation in experimental group. These data suggest that T. spiralis infection resulted in prolonged allograft survival following murine cardiac transplantation, with suppressed Th1/Th17 responses and augmented regulatory T cells.

  12. Fourth-generation fluoroquinolone-resistant mycobacterial keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Meyer, Jay J; Espandar, Ladan

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial keratitis resistant to fourth-generation fluoroquinolones after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) with fourth-generation fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. While receiving moxifloxacin post LASIK, the patient was diagnosed with moxifloxacin-resistant Mycobacterium chelonae keratitis. Culture susceptibilities revealed isolates resistant to moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin, and treatment with topical amikacin and clarithromycin with oral doxycycline and clarithromycin along with flap amputation was necessary to control the infection. This case demonstrates the potential limitations in the coverage of these antibiotic agents.

  13. Anaphylaxis, Intra-Abdominal Infections, Skin Lacerations, and Behavioral Emergencies: A Literature Review of Austere Analogs for a near Earth Asteroid Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chough, Natacha G.; Watkins, Sharmi; Menon, Anil S.

    2012-01-01

    As space exploration is directed towards destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, the consequent new set of medical risks will drive requirements for new capabilities and more resources to ensure crew health. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), developed by the Exploration Medical Capability element of the Human Research Program, addresses the risk of "unacceptable health and mission outcomes due to limitations of in-flight medical capabilities". It itemizes 85 evidence-based clinical requirements for eight different mission profiles and identifies conditions warranting further research and technology development. Each condition is given a clinical priority for each mission profile. Four conditions -- intra-abdominal infections, skin lacerations, anaphylaxis, and behavioral emergencies -- were selected as a starting point for analysis. A systematic literature review was performed to understand how these conditions are treated in austere, limited-resource, space-analog environments (i.e., high-altitude and mountain environments, submarines, military deployments, Antarctica, isolated wilderness environments, in-flight environments, and remote, resource-poor, rural environments). These environments serve as analogs to spaceflight because of their shared characteristics (limited medical resources, delay in communication, confined living quarters, difficulty with resupply, variable time to evacuation). Treatment of these four medical conditions in austere environments provides insight into medical equipment and training requirements for exploration-class missions.

  14. Recognition of the mycobacterial cord factor by Mincle: relevance for granuloma formation and resistance to tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The world's most successful intracellular bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), survives inside macrophages by blocking phagosome maturation and establishes chronic infection characterized by the formation of granulomas. Trehalose-6,6-dimycolate (TDM), the mycobacterial cord factor, is the most abundant cell wall lipid of virulent mycobacteria, is sufficient to cause granuloma formation, and has long been known to be a major virulence factor of MTB. Recently, TDM has been shown to activate the Syk-Card9 signaling pathway in macrophages through binding to the C-type lectin receptor Mincle. The Mincle-Card9 pathway is required for activation of macrophages by TDM in vitro and for granuloma formation in vivo following injection of TDM. Whether this pathway is also exploited by MTB to reprogram the macrophage into a comfortable niche has not been explored yet. Several recent studies have investigated the phenotype of Mincle-deficient mice in mycobacterial infection, yielding divergent results in terms of a role for Mincle in host resistance. Here, we review these studies, discuss possible reasons for discrepant results and highlight open questions in the role of Mincle and other C-type lectin receptors in the infection biology of MTB. PMID:23355839

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Aerobic and Facultative Gram-Negative Bacilli from Intra-abdominal Infections in Patients from Seven Regions in China in 2012 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Qiwen; Liao, Kang; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Luo, Yanping; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Chen, Shulan; Cao, Bin; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng; Kong, Haishen; Badal, Robert E; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-10-19

    To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative bacilli that caused hospital-acquired and community-acquired intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China between 2012 and 2013, we determined the susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobials and the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) statuses of 3,540 IAI isolates from seven geographic areas in China in a central laboratory using CLSI broth microdilution and interpretive standards. Most infections were caused by Escherichia coli (46.3%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.7%). Rates of ESBL-producing E. coli (P = 0.031), K. pneumoniae (P = 0.017), and Proteus mirabilis (P = 0.004) were higher in hospital-acquired IAIs than in community-acquired IAIs. Susceptibilities of enterobacteriaceae to ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem were 71.3% to 100%, 81.3% to 100%, 64.7% to 100%, and 83.1% to 100%, respectively, but imipenem was ineffective against P. mirabilis (<20%). Although most ESBL-positive hospital-acquired isolates were resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, the majority were susceptible to cefoxitin (47.9% to 83.9%). Susceptibilities of ESBL-positive isolates to ampicillin-sulbactam (<10%) were low, whereas susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin (0% to 54.6%) and levofloxacin (0% to 63.6%) varied substantially. The prevalences of cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and K. pneumoniae were higher in the northeastern and southern regions than in the central and eastern regions, reflecting the ESBL-positive rates in these areas, and were lowest in the Jiangsu-Zhejiang (Jiang-Zhe) area where the rates of carbapenem resistance were also highest. Ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem are the most efficacious antibiotics for treating IAIs in China, especially those caused by E. coli or K. pneumoniae. Resistance to cephalosporins and carbapenems is more common in the Jiang-Zhe area than in other regions in China.

  16. Evaluation of Tigecycline Efficacy and Post-Discharge Outcomes in a Clinical Practice Population with Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infection: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, C. Daniel; Quintana, Alvaro; Eckmann, Christian; Shelbaya, Ahmed; Ernst, Frank R.; Krukas, Michelle R.; Reisman, Arlene

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The utility of tigecycline as compared with other antibiotic therapies in the treatment of patients with complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) and the short- and long-term outcomes of a large cohort of severely ill patients were examined. We provide the first published data on post-discharge events for these patients. Methods: Retrospective data for the cIAI cohort were obtained from a large clinical database. Patients aged ≥18 y were selected for inclusion based on hospitalization with a relevant diagnosis code and procedure code, and guideline-compliant antimicrobial therapy. Propensity scoring was used to reduce treatment-selection bias introduced by the use of observational data. Tigecycline patients were placed into quintiles based on propensity score and were matched 1:3. Results: The final model based on propensity score matching included 2,424 patients: Tigecycline (n = 606) and other antibiotic therapy (n = 1,818). Treatment was successful in 426 (70.3%) tigecycline-treated patients and in 1,294 (71.2%) patients receiving other antibiotics. Similar treatment success occurred across all infection sites. Among survivors, treatment failure was associated with a greater need for all-cause re-hospitalization at 30 d and 180 d. No differences in cIAI-related re-hospitalization and discharge status were observed. Conclusions: Using propensity scores to match populations, similar outcomes were demonstrated between treatment with tigecycline and other antibiotics as expressed by treatment success, the need for re-admission, similar 30-d discharge status, and the need for re-admission at 180 d. PMID:26981640

  17. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Aerobic and Facultative Gram-Negative Bacilli from Intra-abdominal Infections in Patients from Seven Regions in China in 2012 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Qiwen; Liao, Kang; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Wang, Yong; Wu, Anhua; Feng, Xianju; Luo, Yanping; Hu, Zhidong; Chu, Yunzhuo; Chen, Shulan; Cao, Bin; Su, Jianrong; Gui, Bingdong; Duan, Qiong; Zhang, Shufang; Shao, Haifeng; Kong, Haishen; Badal, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative bacilli that caused hospital-acquired and community-acquired intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China between 2012 and 2013, we determined the susceptibilities to 12 antimicrobials and the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) statuses of 3,540 IAI isolates from seven geographic areas in China in a central laboratory using CLSI broth microdilution and interpretive standards. Most infections were caused by Escherichia coli (46.3%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.7%). Rates of ESBL-producing E. coli (P = 0.031), K. pneumoniae (P = 0.017), and Proteus mirabilis (P = 0.004) were higher in hospital-acquired IAIs than in community-acquired IAIs. Susceptibilities of enterobacteriaceae to ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem were 71.3% to 100%, 81.3% to 100%, 64.7% to 100%, and 83.1% to 100%, respectively, but imipenem was ineffective against P. mirabilis (<20%). Although most ESBL-positive hospital-acquired isolates were resistant to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, the majority were susceptible to cefoxitin (47.9% to 83.9%). Susceptibilities of ESBL-positive isolates to ampicillin-sulbactam (<10%) were low, whereas susceptibilities to ciprofloxacin (0% to 54.6%) and levofloxacin (0% to 63.6%) varied substantially. The prevalences of cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli and K. pneumoniae were higher in the northeastern and southern regions than in the central and eastern regions, reflecting the ESBL-positive rates in these areas, and were lowest in the Jiangsu-Zhejiang (Jiang-Zhe) area where the rates of carbapenem resistance were also highest. Ertapenem, amikacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem are the most efficacious antibiotics for treating IAIs in China, especially those caused by E. coli or K. pneumoniae. Resistance to cephalosporins and carbapenems is more common in the Jiang-Zhe area than in other regions in China. PMID:26482308

  18. Detection and Characterization of Infections and Infection Susceptibility

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-10

    Immune Disorders; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Genetic Immunological Deficiencies; Hyperimmunoglobulin-E Recurrent Infection Syndrome; Recurrent Infections; Unknown Immune Deficiency; GATA2 Deficiency (MonoMAC); Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections; Hyper IgE (Job s) Syndrome; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Susceptibility to Disseminated Infections; Primary Immune Deficiency Disease (PIDD)

  19. Evaluation of the effects of ozone therapy in the treatment of intra-abdominal infection in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Yglesio Moyses; Fontes, Belchor; Martins, Joilson O; Sannomiya, Paulina; Brito, Glacus S.; Younes, Riad N.; Rasslan, Samir

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The antibacterial effect of ozone (O3) has been described in the extant literature, but the role of O3 therapy in the treatment of certain types of infection remains controversial. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effect of intraperitoneal (i.p.) O3 application in a cecal ligation/puncture rat model on interleukins (IL-6, IL-10) and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 serum levels, acute lung injury and survival rates. METHODS Four animal groups were used for the study: a) the SHAM group underwent laparotomy; b) the cecal ligation/puncture group underwent cecal ligation/puncture procedures; and c) the CLP+O2 and CLP+O3 groups underwent CLP+ corresponding gas mixture infusions (i.p.) throughout the observation period. IL-6, CINC-1 and IL-10 concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Acute lung injury was evaluated with the Evans blue dye lung leakage method and by lung histology. P<0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS CINC-1 was at the lowest level in the SHAM group and was lower for the CLP+O3 group vs. the CLP+O2 group and the cecal ligation/puncture group. IL-10 was lower for the SHAM group vs. the other three groups, which were similar compared to each other. IL-6 was lower for the SHAM group vs. all other groups, was lower for the CLP+O3 or CLP+O2 group vs. the cecal ligation/puncture group, and was similar for the CLP+O3 group vs. the CLP+O2 group. The lung histology score was lower for the SHAM group vs. the other groups. The Evans blue dye result was lower for the CLP+O3 group vs. the CLP+O2 group and the cecal ligation/puncture group but similar to that of the SHAM group. The survival rate for the CLP+O3 group was lower than for the SHAM group and similar to that for the other 2 groups (CLP and CLP+O2). CONCLUSION Ozone therapy modulated the inflammatory response and acute lung injury in the cecal ligation/puncture infection model in rats, although there was no improvement on survival rates. PMID

  20. Recognition of a common mycobacterial T-cell epitope in MPB59 of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Lightbody, K A; Girvin, R M; Pollock, D A; Mackie, D P; Neill, S D; Pollock, J M

    1998-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, which persists as a residual level of infection in many European countries, has implications not only for the economy of farming communities but also for human health. The aim of this study was to identify a common mycobacterial antigen which was recognized in bovine tuberculosis and to characterize the response to this antigen at the epitope level. A T-cell clone, phenotype CD4+, raised from an animal experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis was shown to proliferate in response to a panel of sonicates derived from different mycobacterial species indicating recognition of an antigen with broad specificity. This antigen was subsequently shown to be MPB59. Recognition of MPB59 at the epitope level was determined in experimental and field cases of bovine tuberculosis using a panel of synthetic peptides (20-mers with 10-residue overlaps) incorporating the signal sequence and mature protein. The results showed that in vitro interferon-gamma was predominantly produced in response to adjacent peptides numbers 10 and 11, suggesting that the dominant epitope was contained in the overlap, correlating to residues 101-110 (YYQSGLSIVM). This epitope was recognized by 54% of tuberculous cattle of mixed breeds, which suggests that it may be genetically permissive in terms of major histocompatibility complex presentation. Sequence analysis confirmed that there were only minor differences in the amino acid composition within this region for various mycobacterial species, which could explain the common T-cell recognition described in this study. Common recognition of this epitope indicates that it would have limited potential for use as a diagnostic reagent per se but may have potential for inclusion in a subunit vaccine. PMID:9640240

  1. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  2. Novel targeting of PEGylated liposomes for codelivery of TGF-β1 siRNA and four antitubercular drugs to human macrophages for the treatment of mycobacterial infection: a quantitative proteomic study

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ning-Kui; Yin, Juan-Juan; Yang, Yin-Xue; Wang, Zi-Li; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhang, Xueji; Duan, Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health issue in developing countries, and its chemotherapy is compromised by poor drug compliance and severe side effects. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize new multimodal PEGylated liposomes encapsulated with clinically commonly used anti-TB drugs with linkage to small interfering RNA (siRNA) against transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). The novel NP-siRNA liposomes could target THP-1-derived human macrophages that were the host cells of mycobacterium infection. The biological effects of the NP-siRNA liposomes were evaluated on cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, autophagy, and the gene silencing efficiency of TGF-β1 siRNA in human macrophages. We also explored the proteomic responses to the newly synthesized NP-siRNA liposomes using the stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture approach. The results showed that the multifunctional PEGylated liposomes were successfully synthesized and chemically characterized with a mean size of 265.1 nm. The novel NP-siRNA liposomes functionalized with the anti-TB drugs and TGF-β1 siRNA were endocytosed efficiently by human macrophages as visualized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, the liposomes showed a low cytotoxicity toward human macrophages. There was no significant effect on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis in THP-1-derived macrophages after drug exposure at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 62.5 μg/mL. Notably, there was a 6.4-fold increase in the autophagy of human macrophages when treated with the NP-siRNA liposomes at 62.5 μg/mL. In addition, the TGF-β1 and nuclear factor-κB expression levels were downregulated by the NP-siRNA liposomes in THP-1-derived macrophages. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis data showed that there were over 40 signaling pathways involved in the proteomic responses to NP-siRNA liposome exposure in human macrophages, with 160 proteins mapped. The top five canonical

  3. Abdominal Mass Secondary to Human Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Ghoroobi, Javad; Khoddami, Maliheh; Mirshemirani, Alireza; Sadeghian, Naser; Mahdavi, Alireza; Hatefi, Sayeh

    2017-01-01

    Toxocariasis is an extensive helminthic infection that leads to visceral larva migrans in humans. A 2.5-year-old girl referred for abdominal mass. She had history of pharyngitis for two weeks. There were no other symptoms. Abdominal examination revealed an irregular solid mass in right lower quadrant (RLQ). Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an echohetrogenic large mass in RLQ, liver, and retroperitoneal area. Abdominal CT scan showed a huge mass. At laparotomy a large retroperitoneal mass that involved right liver lobe, bladder, ileocecal valve, small and large intestines was found. At histopathology diagnosis of toxocariasis was made. PMID:28164001

  4. Empyema following intra-abdominal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, K C; Sethia, B; Reece, I J; Davidson, K G

    1984-09-01

    Over the past 9 years, ten patients have presented to the Thoracic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, with 12 empyemas secondary to intra-abdominal sepsis. In eight patients, the presenting signs and symptoms were wrongly attributed to primary intra-thoracic pathology. All were subsequently found to have intra-abdominal sepsis. The presence of empyema after recent abdominal surgery or abdominal pain strongly suggests a diagnosis of ipsilateral subphrenic abscess. Adequate surgical drainage is essential. In our experience, limited thoracotomy with subdiaphragmatic extension offers the best access to both pleural and subphrenic spaces and provides the greatest chance of eradicating infection on both sides of the diaphragm.

  5. [Diagnostic value of IgG antibody levels against 38 kDa mycobacterial antigen].

    PubMed

    Demkow, U; Zielonka, T M; Strzałkowski, J; Michałowska-Mitczuk, D; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, E; Białas-Chromiec, B; Kuś, J; Skopińska-Rózewska, E; Zwolska, Z

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis diagnosis bases on clinical and radiological symptoms and identification of mycobacteria. Accuracy of both methods is limited. Therefore reliable serological test would have considerable advantage. The present study was aimed at evaluating IgG-mediated immune response against specific mycobacterial antigens 38 kDa in group of 200 patients and control subjects. Our material consisted of 104 tuberculosis patients, 25 with sarcoidosis, 24 with lung cancer, 13 with bacterial or fungal pulmonary infection, 8 with mycobacterial infections other than tuberculosis and 26 healthy persons. We used commercially available ELISA based kits (Pathozyme TB-complex). Specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 49% was achieved. Sensitivity increased to 59% in chronic cases and to 52% in culture positive cases. Sensitivity decreased to only 14% in group of new culture negative cases. Measurement of IgG serum level against 38 kDa can be helpful in tuberculosis diagnosis. As the test lacks falsely positive results it indicates its high positive predictive value.

  6. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacterial species from ferrets and stoats.

    PubMed

    de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Kawakami, R Pamela; Yates, Gary F; Collins, Desmond M

    2008-12-10

    As part of wildlife surveillance for bovine tuberculosis, pooled lymph nodes from 21,481 ferrets, 1056 stoats and 83 weasels were cultured for mycobacteria. A total of 268 isolates of Mycobacterium bovis were obtained from ferrets, 2 from stoats and none from weasels, demonstrating the presence of a wildlife reservoir of infection in ferrets. DNA typing by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) of 48 selected isolates of M. bovis revealed 23 REA types. Twenty-one of these types had previously been isolated from cattle and farmed deer, demonstrating a complex cycle of infection involving wildlife and domestic animals. Apart from M. bovis, a further 208 mycobacterial isolates were obtained, the majority of which (178) were members of the M. avium complex. Speciation of the remaining 30 mycobacterial isolates by DNA sequencing of the 16s rRNA gene, identified half the isolates as M. triplex. Other species identified included M. fortuitum, M. florentinum, M. interjectum, M. intracellulare, M. holsaticum, and M. septicum/M. peregrinum.

  7. Systematic Analysis of Mycobacterial Acylation Reveals First Example of Acylation-mediated Regulation of Enzyme Activity of a Bacterial Phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Anshika; Arora, Gunjan; Virmani, Richa; Kundu, Parijat; Khanna, Tanya; Sajid, Andaleeb; Misra, Richa; Joshi, Jayadev; Yadav, Vikas; Samanta, Sintu; Saini, Neeru; Pandey, Amit K; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Hentschker, Christian; Becher, Dörte; Gerth, Ulf; Singh, Yogendra

    2015-10-23

    Protein lysine acetylation is known to regulate multiple aspects of bacterial metabolism. However, its presence in mycobacterial signal transduction and virulence-associated proteins has not been studied. In this study, analysis of mycobacterial proteins from different cellular fractions indicated dynamic and widespread occurrence of lysine acetylation. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins regulating diverse physiological processes were then selected and expressed in the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis. The purified proteins were analyzed for the presence of lysine acetylation, leading to the identification of 24 acetylated proteins. In addition, novel lysine succinylation and propionylation events were found to co-occur with acetylation on several proteins. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase B (PtpB), a secretory phosphatase that regulates phosphorylation of host proteins and plays a critical role in Mycobacterium infection, is modified by acetylation and succinylation at Lys-224. This residue is situated in a lid region that covers the enzyme's active site. Consequently, acetylation and succinylation negatively regulate the activity of PtpB.

  8. Mycobacterium marinum infection on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This bacterial infection is caused by Mycobacterium marinum . Marinum is a relative of the organism which causes tuberculosis. This lesion is often referred to as a swimming pool granuloma. Atypical mycobacterial ...

  9. Animal Models of Mycobacteria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ordway, Diane J.; Orme, Ian M.

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the infection of mice and guinea pigs with mycobacteria via various routes, as well as necropsy methods for the determination of mycobacterial loads within target organs. Additionally, methods for cultivating mycobacteria and preparing stocks are described. The protocols outlined are primarily used for M. tuberculosis, but can also be used for the study of other non-tuberculosis mycobacterial species. PMID:18432756

  10. Effect of Mycobacterial Drug Resistance Patterns on Patients’ Survival: A Cohort Study in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Whitehead, Sara J.; Varma, Jay K.; Silachamroon, Udomsak; Kasetjaroen, Yuthichai; Moolphate, Saiyud; Limsomboon, Pranom; Inyaphong, Jiraphun; Suriyon, Narin; Kavinum, Suporn; Chiengson, Navarat; Tunteerapat, Phatchara; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug resistance substantially increases tuberculosis (TB) mortality. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of mycobacterial drug resistance pattern and association of common resistance patterns with TB mortality in Thailand. Method: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using TB surveillance data. A total of 9,518 culture-confirmed, pulmonary TB patients registered from 1 October 2004 to 31 December 2008 from the Thailand TB Active Surveillance Network were included in this study. Patients were followed up until TB treatment completion or death. Mycobacterial drug resistance patterns were categorized as pan-susceptible, rifampicin resistance, isoniazid monoresistance, and ethambutol/streptomycin resistance. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) was determined by Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) liquid culture systems. Survival analysis was applied. Result: Isoniazid monoresistance was the most common pattern, while rifampicin resistance had the largest impact on mortality. Cox regression analysis showed a significantly higher risk of death among patients with rifampicin resistance (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.9, 95% confident interval (CI), 1.5-2.5) and isoniazid monoresistance (aHR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7) than those with pan-susceptible group after adjustment for age, nationality, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and antiretroviral therapy (ART) status, diabetes mellitus, cavitary disease on chest x-ray, treatment observation, and province. HIV co-infection was associated with higher mortality in patients both on ART (aHR 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.5) and not on ART (aHR 8.1, 95% CI 6.8-9.8). Conclusion: Rifampicin resistance and isoniazid monoresistance were associated with increased TB mortality. HIV-coinfection was associated with a higher risk of death including among those taking antiretroviral therapy. PMID:24171875

  11. Recombinant Human Growth Hormone and Rosiglitazone for Abdominal Fat Accumulation in HIV-Infected Patients with Insulin Resistance: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Factorial Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glesby, Marshall J.; Albu, Jeanine; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Ham, Kirsis; Engelson, Ellen; He, Qing; Muthukrishnan, Varalakshmi; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Donovan, Daniel; Ernst, Jerry; Lesser, Martin; Kotler, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) reduces visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume in HIV-infected patients but can worsen glucose homeostasis and lipoatrophy. We aimed to determine if adding rosiglitazone to rhGH would abrogate the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity (SI) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) volume. Methodology/Principal Findings Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial using a 2×2 factorial design in which HIV-infected subjects with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance were randomized to rhGH 3 mg daily, rosiglitazone 4 mg twice daily, combination rhGH + rosiglitazone, or double placebo (control) for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in SI by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test from entry to week 12. Body composition was assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual Xray absorptiometry (DEXA). Seventy-seven subjects were randomized of whom 72 initiated study drugs. Change in SI from entry to week 12 differed across the 4 arms by 1-way ANCOVA (P = 0.02); by pair-wise comparisons, only rhGH (decreasing SI; P = 0.03) differed significantly from control. Changes from entry to week 12 in fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve on 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test differed across arms (1-way ANCOVA P = 0.004), increasing in the rhGH arm relative to control. VAT decreased significantly in the rhGH arms (−17.5% in rhGH/rosiglitazone and −22.7% in rhGH) but not in the rosiglitazone alone (−2.5%) or control arms (−1.9%). SAT did not change significantly in any arm. DEXA results were consistent with the MRI data. There was no significant rhGH x rosiglitazone interaction for any body composition parameter. Conclusions/Significance The addition of rosiglitazone abrogated the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance while not significantly modifying the lowering effect of rhGH on VAT. Trial Registration

  12. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  13. Visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography due to abdominal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Bhatia, Anmol; Malik, Sarthak; Singh, Navjeet; Rana, Surinder S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scalloping of visceral organs is described in pseudomyxoma peritonei, malignant ascites, among other conditions, but not tuberculosis. Methods: We report findings from a retrospective study of patients with abdominal tuberculosis who had visceral scalloping on abdominal computed tomography (CT). Diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis was made on the basis of combination of clinical, biochemical, radiological and microbiological criteria. The clinical data, hematological and biochemical parameters, and findings of chest X-ray, CT, Mantoux test, and HIV serology were recorded. Results: Of 72 patients with abdominal tuberculosis whose CT scans were included, seven patients had visceral scalloping. The mean age of these patients was 32.14 ± 8.43 years and four were men. While six patients had scalloping of liver, one had splenic scalloping. The patients presented with abdominal pain (all), abdominal distension (five patients), loss of weight or appetite (all), and fever (four patients). Mantoux test was positive in five, while none had HIV infection. The diagnosis was based on fluid (ascitic or collections) evaluation in four patients, ileo-cecal biopsy in one patient, fine needle aspiration from omental thickening in one patient, and sputum positivity for acid fast bacilli (AFB) in one patient. On CT examination, four patients had ascites, five had collections, one had lymphadenopathy, four had peritoneal involvement, three had pleural effusion, and two had ileo-cecal thickening. All except one patient received standard ATT for 6 months or 9 months (one patient). Pigtail drainage for collections was needed for two patients. Discussion: This report is the first description of visceral scalloping of liver and spleen in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Previously, this finding has been reported primarily with pseudomyxoma peritonei and peritoneal carcinomatosis. Conclusion: Visceral scalloping may not conclusively distinguish peritoneal

  14. Abattoir-based estimates of mycobacterial infections in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Egbe, N. F.; Muwonge, A.; Ndip, L.; Kelly, R. F.; Sander, M.; Tanya, V.; Ngwa, V. Ngu; Handel, I. G.; Novak, A.; Ngandalo, R.; Mazeri, S.; Morgan, K. L.; Asuquo, A.; Bronsvoort, B. M. de C.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria cause major diseases including human tuberculosis, bovine tuberculosis and Johne’s disease. In livestock, the dominant species is M. bovis causing bovine tuberculosis (bTB), a disease of global zoonotic importance. In this study, we estimated the prevalence of Mycobacteria in slaughter cattle in Cameroon. A total of 2,346 cattle were examined in a cross-sectional study at four abattoirs in Cameroon. Up to three lesions per animal were collected for further study and a retropharyngeal lymph node was collected from a random sample of non-lesioned animals. Samples were cultured on Lowenstein Jensen media and the BACTEC MGIT 960 system, and identified using the Hain® Genotype kits. A total of 207/2,346 cattle were identified with bTB-like lesions, representing 4.0% (45/1,129), 11.3% (106/935), 23.8% (38/160) and 14.8% (18/122) of the cattle in the Bamenda, Ngaoundere, Garoua and Maroua abattoirs respectively. The minimum estimated prevalence of M. bovis was 2.8% (1.9–3.9), 7.7% (6.1–9.6), 21.3% (15.2–28.4) and 13.1% (7.7–20.4) in the four abattoirs respectively. One M. tuberculosis and three M. bovis strains were recovered from non-lesioned animals. The high prevalence of M. bovis is of public health concern and limits the potential control options in this setting without a viable vaccine as an alternative. PMID:27075056

  15. Evaluation and management of patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jason E

    2006-12-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are emerging pathogens increasingly associated with chronic pulmonary disease. NTM are environmental saprophytes found in soil, dust and water and, unlike Mycobacterium tuberculosis, NTM are not transmitted from person to person. Pulmonary disease caused by NTM is a particular problem in older people without underlying immune compromise. The diagnosis of NTM pulmonary disease usually requires either multiple respiratory cultures that grow NTM or heavy growth of NTM from a single bronchoscopy or lung-biopsy specimen. High resolution computed tomography is the most useful radiographic study for diagnosis and to determine the extent of disease. Treatment includes multiple medications with activity against the particular NTM species, as single-drug therapy is likely to select for resistant organisms. Data demonstrating the effectiveness of specific drug regimens for NTM pulmonary disease are limited. Clarithromycin and azithromycin form the backbone of most treatment regimens because these drugs are active against many NTM species. Drug tolerability and cost are the major barriers to successful treatment of NTM pulmonary disease. Adjunctive therapies, including mucus clearance techniques and appetite stimulants, are unproven but may be of value in management of NTM pulmonary disease. Multicenter, randomized trials of macrolide-based therapies are sorely needed to determine the safest and most effective treatments for NTM pulmonary disease.

  16. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  17. Mycobacterial Peritonitis in CAPD Patients in Limpopo: A 6-Year Cumulative Report from a Single Center in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Isla, Ramon A; de la Cruz, Mauro Cuba; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    2016-01-01

    South Africa has one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis (TB) worldwide due to the ongoing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. There are, however, no reports on peritonitis in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in South Africa. The aim of this study is to discuss our experience of tuberculous peritonitis in CAPD patients from a rural endemic area of South Africa. This is a retrospective descriptive study of CAPD patients diagnosed with mycobacterium peritonitis infection from January 2008 to August 2014 at the Limpopo Kidney and Dialysis Centre (LKDC) in South Africa. The diagnosis of peritonitis was based on the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) 2010 recommendations. Peritoneal fluid samples were collected in BACTEC Myco/F Lytic Culture Vials (Becton, Dickinson and Company, Dublin, Ireland). Tenckhoff catheter tips were sent for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and TB culture. Mycobacterium infection was considered in patients with clinical features of peritonitis if 1) AFB smear or TB culture was positive or 2) if the patient was smear- or culture-negative but had suggestive radiological features of TB in the lungs or abdomen or 3) if the patient improved clinically following treatment with anti-tuberculous drugs. Of 170 patients on CAPD for the period reviewed, 12 (7.1%) were diagnosed and treated for mycobacterial peritonitis. There was an equal number of males and females, and all the patients were Black Africans with a mean age of 35.4 years (17-51 years). Eight of the 12 patients (66.7%) had had previous episodes of non-tuberculous peritonitis. Four patients (33.3%) had elevated white blood cell count (WCC) while 9 had higher polymorph count in the PD fluid than lymphocyte count. Mycobacterial organism was confirmed in 9/12 (75%), while the diagnosis was made on clinical and radiological features in the remaining 3 patients. Seven patients (58.3%) died, 10 patients were

  18. Mycobacterial p(1)-type ATPases mediate resistance to zinc poisoning in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Botella, Hélène; Peyron, Pascale; Levillain, Florence; Poincloux, Renaud; Poquet, Yannick; Brandli, Irène; Wang, Chuan; Tailleux, Ludovic; Tilleul, Sylvain; Charrière, Guillaume M; Waddell, Simon J; Foti, Maria; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Gao, Qian; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Butcher, Philip D; Castagnoli, Paola Ricciardi; Gicquel, Brigitte; de Chastellier, Chantal; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis thrives within macrophages by residing in phagosomes and preventing them from maturing and fusing with lysosomes. A parallel transcriptional survey of intracellular mycobacteria and their host macrophages revealed signatures of heavy metal poisoning. In particular, mycobacterial genes encoding heavy metal efflux P-type ATPases CtpC, CtpG, and CtpV, and host cell metallothioneins and zinc exporter ZnT1, were induced during infection. Consistent with this pattern of gene modulation, we observed a burst of free zinc inside macrophages, and intraphagosomal zinc accumulation within a few hours postinfection. Zinc exposure led to rapid CtpC induction, and ctpC deficiency caused zinc retention within the mycobacterial cytoplasm, leading to impaired intracellular growth of the bacilli. Thus, the use of P(1)-type ATPases represents a M. tuberculosis strategy to neutralize the toxic effects of zinc in macrophages. We propose that heavy metal toxicity and its counteraction might represent yet another chapter in the host-microbe arms race.

  19. Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation.

    PubMed

    Paik, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, Ki-Hye; Yang, Chul-Su; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2010-11-23

    Mycobacterial cell-wall skeleton (CWS) is an immunoactive and biodegradable particulate adjuvant and has been used for immunotherapy in patients with cancer. The CWS of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-CWS) was studied as a universal vaccine vehicle for antigen conjugation, to develop potentially effective and safe vaccines. Here, we describe experiments in which protein antigens, such as keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), ovalbumin (OVA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were highly efficiently coupled to 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS)-activated carboxyl groups of BCG-CWS, and tested the immunogenicity of OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine. We found that a strong immune response was induced in mice immunised with OVA-conjugated BCG-CWS, which was similar to the enhancement of the immune responses in mice immunised with OVA and complete Freund's adjuvant. Covalent conjugation of OVA to BCG-CWS was essential for Th1-skewed immune responses, with prominent expression of IFN-γ. Furthermore, antigen-conjugated BCG-CWS vaccine is simple to manufacture, safe, and easy to use. Our results suggest that mycobacterial CWS as a universal vaccine vehicle for conjugation of a wide variety of antigens constitutes a breakthrough for development of the most promising vaccines for infections, allergic diseases, and cancer.

  20. Development of a murine mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcela; Yang, Amy L; Lim, JaeHyun; Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven; Cadieux, Nathalie; Perera, Liyanage P; Jacobs, William R; Brennan, Michael; Morris, Sheldon L

    2009-07-01

    The development and characterization of new tuberculosis (TB) vaccines has been impeded by the lack of reproducible and reliable in vitro assays for measuring vaccine activity. In this study, we developed a murine in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assay for evaluating TB vaccines that directly assesses the capacity of immune splenocytes to control the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within infected macrophages. Using this in vitro assay, protective immune responses induced by immunization with five different types of TB vaccine preparations (Mycobacterium bovis BCG, an attenuated M. tuberculosis mutant strain, a DNA vaccine, a modified vaccinia virus strain Ankara [MVA] construct expressing four TB antigens, and a TB fusion protein formulated in adjuvant) can be detected. Importantly, the levels of vaccine-induced mycobacterial growth-inhibitory responses seen in vitro after 1 week of coculture correlated with the protective immune responses detected in vivo at 28 days postchallenge in a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, similar patterns of cytokine expression were evoked at day 7 of the in vitro culture by immune splenocytes taken from animals immunized with the different TB vaccines. Among the consistently upregulated cytokines detected in the immune cocultures are gamma interferon, growth differentiation factor 15, interleukin-21 (IL-21), IL-27, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Overall, we have developed an in vitro functional assay that may be useful for screening and comparing new TB vaccine preparations, investigating vaccine-induced protective mechanisms, and assessing manufacturing issues, including product potency and stability.

  1. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  2. [Intra-abdominal mycoses].

    PubMed

    Boos, C; Kujath, P; Bruch, H-P

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses in patients undergoing abdominal surgery amounts to approximately 8% and shows an upward trend in epidemiological studies. The lethality of these systemic mycoses, which are mostly based on Candida infections constitutes up to 60%. The development of a sytemic mycosis is marked by exogenic, endogenic and iatrogenic risk factors and typically displays tissue invasion after an initial fungal contamination or systemic dissemination via fungal sepsis. Fungal peritonitis is generally a monoinfection with Candida spp., where Candida albicans outweighs in 70% of cases. Aspergillus spp. are only detected abdominally in rare cases. The histological verification of a fungal invasion is regarded as proof of the existence of an invasive mycosis, but typical macroscopic findings with corresponding cultural findings can also confirm the diagnosis. Systemic mycosis requires an early initiation of a consistent antimycotic therapy as well as definitive surgical eradication of the focus in order to reduce high lethal rate. Resistances or incorrect dosages can be validated objectively by means of histological monitoring of the antimycotic therapy, thus affording early recognition of the need to change the substance class.

  3. Expression of a long pentraxin, PTX3, by monocytes exposed to the mycobacterial cell wall component lipoarabinomannan.

    PubMed Central

    Vouret-Craviari, V; Matteucci, C; Peri, G; Poli, G; Introna, M; Mantovani, A

    1997-01-01

    PTX3 is a prototypic long pentraxin composed of a C-terminal domain similar to those of classical pentraxins (e.g., C reactive protein) and an unrelated N-terminal portion. PTX3 is expressed in a variety of cell types, notably mononuclear phagocytes and endothelial cells, after exposure to the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). The present study was designed to assess whether mycobacterial components were able to induce expression and production of PTX3. Mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan (LAM) induced expression of PTX3 mRNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The non-mannose-capped version of lipoarabinomannan (AraLAM) was considerably more potent than the mannose-capped version ManLAM or the simpler version phosphatidylinositol mannoside. Among mononuclear cells, monocytes were responsible for LAM-induced PTX3 mRNA expression. Whole mycobacteria (Mycobacterium bovis BCG) strongly induced PTX3 expression. Pretreatment with actinomycin D abolished LAM-induced PTX3 expression, whereas cycloheximide only partially reduced the expression. LAM-induced PTX3 expression was associated with the production of immunoreactive PTX3. IL-10 and IL-13 did not inhibit the induction of PTX3 by LAM. Under the same conditions, these anti-inflammatory cytokines inhibited MCP-1 expression. In contrast, gamma interferon inhibited LAM-induced PTX3 expression. Thus, in addition to IL-1, TNF, and lipopolysaccharide, mycobacterial cell wall components also induce expression and production of the long pentraxin PTX3. The significance of PTX3 in the immunobiology of mycobacterial infection and its relevance in relation to clinical involvement remain to be determined. PMID:9119472

  4. The cost of medical management of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Leber, A; Marras, T K

    2011-05-01

    Treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is complex, requiring multiple antibiotics and a prolonged treatment course. We determined the monthly cost of treating patients with pulmonary NTM infections in our clinic, a tertiary care centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We reviewed records of a single clinic at the University Health Network (Toronto) for all patients with pulmonary NTM isolates. Pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment costs were calculated using a number of Canadian references. 172 patients were reviewed, 91 of whom were treated pharmacologically. The median total duration and cost per treated patient were 14 months (interquartile range (IQR) 9-23 months) and CAD 4,916 (IQR CAD 2,934-9,063), respectively. Median monthly drug treatment cost was CAD 321 (IQR CAD 254-458) for all patients, CAD 289 (IQR CAD 237-341) for patients receiving exclusively oral antibiotics and CAD 1,161 (IQR CAD 795-1,646) for patients whose treatment included i.v. antibiotics. The most costly oral regiment consisted of a fluroquinolone, macrolide and rifampin. In multivariable analysis, Mycobacterium abscessus infection, i.v. therapy and Mycobacterium xenopi infection were all associated with increased monthly treatment costs. The direct medical costs of NTM infections are substantial. Less expensive alternative therapies might be most helpful for M. abscessus infection and when i.v. antibiotics are deemed necessary.

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  7. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  8. [Detection and identification of tuberculosis by amplification of mycobacterial DNA from clinical cultured samples].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, N; Hai, S; Ohya, N

    1993-02-01

    We examined 57 cultured mycobacteria using a method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), slot blot hybridization and dideoxy sequencing of nucleotides for detection of M. tuberculosis. Using standard microbiological tests, 34 of 57 specimens were identified as M. tuberculosis and the rest as atypical mycobacteria. Two of 34 specimens that contained M. tuberculosis were not hybridized with a probe specific for M. tuberculosis. These two specimens were identified as atypical mycobacterium by nucleotide sequencing. An atypical mycobacterium specimen that was hybridized with a prove specific for M. tuberculosis was identified as M. tuberculosis using nucleotide sequencing. These results suggest that the approach using PCR and slot blot hybridization for detection of mycobacterium may be more accurate than standard microbiological tests in the rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection.

  9. Mycobacterial toxin induces analgesia in buruli ulcer by targeting the angiotensin pathways.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Song, Ok-Ryul; Christophe, Thierry; Babonneau, Jérémie; Fenistein, Denis; Eyer, Joël; Letournel, Frank; Henrion, Daniel; Clere, Nicolas; Paille, Vincent; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Gersbach, Philipp; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Stinear, Timothy Paul; Comoglio, Yannick; Sandoz, Guillaume; Preisser, Laurence; Delneste, Yves; Yeramian, Edouard; Marsollier, Laurent; Brodin, Priscille

    2014-06-19

    Mycobacterium ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, causes extensive skin lesions, which despite their severity are not accompanied by pain. It was previously thought that this remarkable analgesia is ensured by direct nerve cell destruction. We demonstrate here that M. ulcerans-induced hypoesthesia is instead achieved through a specific neurological pathway triggered by the secreted mycobacterial polyketide mycolactone. We decipher this pathway at the molecular level, showing that mycolactone elicits signaling through type 2 angiotensin II receptors (AT2Rs), leading to potassium-dependent hyperpolarization of neurons. We further validate the physiological relevance of this mechanism with in vivo studies of pain sensitivity in mice infected with M. ulcerans, following the disruption of the identified pathway. Our findings shed new light on molecular mechanisms evolved by natural systems for the induction of very effective analgesia, opening up the prospect of new families of analgesics derived from such systems.

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of Mycobacterium iranicum UM_TJL against representative mycobacterial species suggests its environmental origin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joon Liang; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Wee, Wei Yee; Wong, Guat Jah; Ng, Hien Fuh; Choo, Siew Woh

    2014-11-24

    Mycobacterium iranicum is a newly reported mycobacterial species. We present the first comparative study of M. iranicum UM_TJL and other mycobacteria. We found M. iranicum to have a close genetic association with environmental mycobacteria infrequently associated with human infections. Nonetheless, UM_TJL is also equipped with many virulence genes (some of which appear to be the consequence of transduction-related gene transfer) that have been identified in established human pathogens. Taken all together, our data suggest that M. iranicum is an environmental bacterium adapted for pathogenicity in the human host. This comparative study provides important clues and forms the basis for future functional studies on this mycobacterium.

  11. Mycobacterial proteins--immune targets for antituberculous subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, N; Khuller, G K

    1999-12-01

    Cellular and humoral immunity induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to identification of newer vaccine candidates, but despite this, many questions concerning the protection against tuberculosis remain unanswered. Recent progress in this field has centered on T cell subset responses and cytokines that these cells secrete. There has been a steady progress in identification and characterization of several classes of major mycobacterial proteins which includes secretory/export proteins, cell wall associated proteins, heat shock proteins and cytoplasmic proteins. The protein antigens are now believed to represent the key protective immunity inducing antigens in the bacillus. In this review, various mycobacterial protein antigens of vaccination potential are compared for their efficacy in light of current immunological knowledge.

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis manifesting as a large abdominal cyst in a HIV-infected patient with a CD4 count greater than 400 cells/mm(3).

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy; Truett, April; R Wallace, Mark

    2008-05-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis usually occurs among HIV-positive patients with CD4 counts less than 100 cells/mm(3) and manifests as headaches, fevers, and mental status changes. We present an unusual case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 34-year-old HIV-positive man presenting as a large abdominal cyst at the ventriculoperitoneal shunt site despite receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for more than 5 years and having a CD4 count more than 400 cells/mm(3).

  13. Vaccination Against Tuberculosis With Whole-Cell Mycobacterial Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Thomas J; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Henri Lambert, Paul; Sanicas, Melvin; Martin, Carlos; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Live attenuated and killed whole-cell vaccines (WCVs) offer promising vaccination strategies against tuberculosis. A number of WCV candidates, based on recombinant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or related mycobacterial species are in various stages of preclinical or clinical development. In this review, we discuss the vaccine candidates and key factors shaping the development pathway for live and killed WCVs and provide an update on progress.

  14. Characterization of bovine gamma delta T cells phenotype during post-natal development and following Mycobacterium bovis vaccination or virulent infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a globally significant veterinary health problem. Gamma delta T cells are known to participate in the immune control of mycobacterial infections. Data in human and non-human primates suggest that mycobacterial infection regulates memory/effector p...

  15. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae intra-abdominal abscess.

    PubMed

    Feasi, Marcello; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Cappato, Stefano; Pontali, Emanuele; Usiglio, David; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Filauro, Marco; Mori, Marco; Cassola, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Most human cases present as localized or generalized cutaneous infections. An invasive septic form, usually associated with endocarditis, has rarely been described. We report here an invasive infection caused by E. rhusiopathiae without endocardium involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intra-abdominal abscess due to this pathogen.

  16. Elucidating population-wide mycobacterial replication dynamics at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Mouton, Jacoba M.; Helaine, Sophie; Holden, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections result in a spectrum of clinical outcomes, and frequently the infection persists in a latent, clinically asymptomatic state. The within-host bacterial population is likely to be heterogeneous, and it is thought that persistent mycobacteria arise from a small population of viable, but non-replicating (VBNR) cells. These are likely to be antibiotic tolerant and necessitate prolonged treatment. Little is known about these persistent mycobacteria, since they are very difficult to isolate. To address this, we have successfully developed a replication reporter system for use in M. tuberculosis. This approach, termed fluorescence dilution, exploits two fluorescent reporters; a constitutive reporter allows the tracking of bacteria, while an inducible reporter enables the measurement of bacterial replication. The application of fluorescence single-cell analysis to characterize intracellular M. tuberculosis identified a distinct subpopulation of non-growing mycobacteria in murine macrophages. The presence of VBNR and actively replicating mycobacteria was observed within the same macrophage after 48 h of infection. Furthermore, our results suggest that macrophage uptake resulted in enrichment of non- or slowly replicating bacteria (as revealed by d-cycloserine treatment); this population is likely to be highly enriched for persisters, based on its drug-tolerant phenotype. These results demonstrate the successful application of the novel dual fluorescence reporter system both in vitro and in macrophage infection models to provide a window into mycobacterial population heterogeneity. PMID:27027532

  17. Zebrafish embryo screen for mycobacterial genes involved in the initiation of granuloma formation reveals a newly identified ESX-1 component.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Esther J M; Schipper, Tim; Rosendahl Huber, Sietske K; Nezhinsky, Alexander E; Verbeek, Fons J; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Besra, Gurdyal S; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Sar, Astrid M

    2011-07-01

    The hallmark of tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas, which are clusters of infected macrophages surrounded by additional macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes. Although it has long been thought that granulomas are beneficial for the host, there is evidence that mycobacteria also promote the formation of these structures. In this study, we aimed to identify new mycobacterial factors involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation. We exploited the zebrafish embryo Mycobacterium marinum infection model to study initiation of granuloma formation and developed an in vivo screen to select for random M. marinum mutants that were unable to induce granuloma formation efficiently. Upon screening 200 mutants, three mutants repeatedly initiated reduced granuloma formation. One of the mutants was found to be defective in the espL gene, which is located in the ESX-1 cluster. The ESX-1 cluster is disrupted in the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strain and encodes a specialized secretion system known to be important for granuloma formation and virulence. Although espL has not been implicated in protein secretion before, we observed a strong effect on the secretion of the ESX-1 substrates ESAT-6 and EspE. We conclude that our zebrafish embryo M. marinum screen is a useful tool to identify mycobacterial genes involved in the initial stages of granuloma formation and that we have identified a new component of the ESX-1 secretion system. We are confident that our approach will contribute to the knowledge of mycobacterial virulence and could be helpful for the development of new TB vaccines.

  18. Molecular basis of mycobacterial survival in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Flo, Trude Helen

    2017-05-01

    Macrophages play an essential role in the immune system by ingesting and degrading invading pathogens, initiating an inflammatory response and instructing adaptive immune cells, and resolving inflammation to restore homeostasis. More interesting is the fact that some bacteria have evolved to use macrophages as a natural habitat and tools of spread in the host, e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and some non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Mtb is considered one of humanity's most successful pathogens and is the causal agent of tuberculosis, while NTMs cause opportunistic infections all of which are of significant public health concern. Here, we describe mechanisms by which intracellular pathogens, with an emphasis on mycobacteria, manipulate macrophage functions to circumvent killing and live inside these cells even under considerable immunological pressure. Such macrophage functions include the selective evasion or engagement of pattern recognition receptors, production of cytokines, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, phagosome maturation, as well as other killing mechanisms like autophagy and cell death. A clear understanding of host responses elicited by a specific pathogen and strategies employed by the microbe to evade or exploit these is of significant importance for the development of effective vaccines and targeted immunotherapy against persistent intracellular infections like tuberculosis.

  19. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  20. Host immune responses to mycobacterial antigens and their implications for the development of a vaccine to control tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem, causing around 2 million deaths per year. Despite the bacillus Calmette Guérin vaccine being available for more than 80 years, it has limited effectiveness in preventing TB, with inconsistent results in trials. This highlights the urgent need to develop an improved TB vaccine, based on a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions and immune responses during mycobacterial infection. Recent studies have revealed a potential role for autophagy, an intracellular homeostatic process, in vaccine development against TB, through enhanced immune activation. This review attempts to understand the host innate immune responses induced by a variety of protein antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and to identify future vaccine candidates against TB. We focus on recent advances in vaccine development strategies, through identification of new TB antigens using a variety of innovative tools. A new understanding of the host-pathogen relationship, and the usefulness of mycobacterial antigens as novel vaccine candidates, will contribute to the design of the next generation of vaccines, and to improving the host protective immune responses while limiting immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

  1. In Vitro Activity of Ceftazidime-Avibactam against Isolates in a Phase 3 Open-Label Clinical Trial for Complicated Intra-Abdominal and Urinary Tract Infections Caused by Ceftazidime-Nonsusceptible Gram-Negative Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregory G; Bradford, Patricia A; Newell, Paul; Wardman, Angela

    2017-02-01

    The in vitro activity of ceftazidime-avibactam was evaluated against 341 Gram-negative isolates from 333 patients in a randomized, phase 3 clinical trial of patients with complicated urinary tract or intra-abdominal infections caused by ceftazidime-nonsusceptible pathogens (NCT01644643). Ceftazidime-avibactam MIC90 values against Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (including several class B or D enzyme producers that avibactam does not inhibit) were 1 and 64 μg/ml, respectively. Overall, the ceftazidime-avibactam activity against ceftazidime-nonsusceptible isolates was comparable to the activity of ceftazidime-avibactam previously reported against ceftazidime-susceptible isolates. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01644643.).

  2. Incidence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in community- and hospital-associated intra-abdominal infections in Europe: results of the 2008 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Hawser, Stephen P; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert E; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2010-07-01

    From 2002 to 2008, there was a significant increase in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Escherichia coli isolates in European intra-abdominal infections, from 4.3% in 2002 to 11.8% in 2008 (P < 0.001), but not for ESBL-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (16.4% to 17.9% [P > 0.05]). Hospital-associated isolates were more common than community-associated isolates, at 14.0% versus 6.5%, respectively, for E. coli (P < 0.001) and 20.9% versus 5.3%, respectively, for K. pneumoniae (P < 0.01). Carbapenems were consistently the most active drugs tested.

  3. Elevated serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Young; Jang, Sun Hee; Kim, Song Yee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Song, Joo Han; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum CA 19-9 levels in patients with nonmalignant diseases have been investigated in previous reports. This study evaluates the clinical significance of serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. The median CA 19-9 level was higher in patients with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease than in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease: 13.80, tuberculosis: 5.85, p<0.001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis performed in this study showed that Mycobacterium abscessus (OR 9.97, 95% CI: 1.58, 62.80; p=0.014) and active phase of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease (OR 12.18, 95% CI: 1.07, 138.36, p=0.044) were found to be risk factors for serum CA 19-9 elevation in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease. The serum CA 19-9 levels showed a tendency to decrease during successful treatment of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease but not in pulmonary tuberculosis. These findings suggest that CA 19-9 may be a useful marker for monitoring therapeutic responses in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, although it is not pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease-specific marker.

  4. Chemotherapy of arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, B. B.

    1963-01-01

    Arthritis induced in rats by mycobacterial adjuvant has been used for the study of compounds of known value in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in man. The development of the arthritic syndrome in treated and control rats was followed by measuring the changes in foot thickness of both hind-feet with a micrometer. This method allowed the effect of anti-inflammatory compounds to be expressed quantitatively. Anti-inflammatory activity was readily observed in certain steroids, pyrazolidines, salicylates and sodium aurothiomalate. Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine were inactive. The inhibition obtained by daily treatment with the steroid paramethasone disappeared when treatment was withdrawn. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14066137

  5. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy.

  6. Real-Time PCR Assay Using Fine-Needle Aspirates and Tissue Biopsy Specimens for Rapid Diagnosis of Mycobacterial Lymphadenitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    van Coppenraet, E. S. Bruijnesteijn; Lindeboom, J. A.; Prins, J. M.; Peeters, M. F.; Claas, E. C. J.; Kuijper, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay was developed to diagnose and identify the causative agents of suspected mycobacterial lymphadenitis. Primers and probes for the real-time PCR were designed on the basis of the internal transcribed spacer sequence, enabling the recognition of the genus Mycobacterium and the species Mycobacterium avium and M. tuberculosis. The detection limit for the assay was established at 1,100 CFU/ml of pus, and the specificity tests showed no false-positive reaction with other mycobacterial species and other pathogens causing lymphadenitis. From 67 children with suspected mycobacterial lymphadenitis based on a positive mycobacterial skin test, 102 samples (58 fine-needle aspirates [FNA] and 44 tissue specimens) were obtained. The real-time PCR assay detected a mycobacterial infection in 48 patients (71.6%), whereas auramine staining and culturing were positive for 31 (46.3%) and 28 (41.8%) of the patients. The addition of the real-time PCR assay to conventional diagnostic tests resulted in the recognition of 13 more patients with mycobacterial disease. These results indicate that the real-time PCR is more sensitive than conventional staining and culturing techniques (P = 0.006). The M. avium-specific real-time PCR was positive for 38 patients, and the M. tuberculosis-specific real-time PCR was positive for 1 patient. Analysis of 27 patients from whom FNA and tissue biopsy specimens were collected revealed significantly more positive real-time PCR results for FNA than for tissue biopsy specimens (P = 0.003). Samples from an age-matched control group of 50 patients with PCR-proven cat scratch disease were all found to be negative by the real-time PCR. We conclude that this real-time PCR assay with a sensitivity of 72% for patients with lymphadenitis and a specificity of 100% for the detection of atypical mycobacteria can provide excellent support for clinical decision making in children with lymphadenitis. PMID:15184446

  7. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule.

    PubMed

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C; Preston, Stephen G; Buesching, Christina D; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W; Smith, Adrian L

    2017-04-06

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers.

  8. Badger macrophages fail to produce nitric oxide, a key anti-mycobacterial effector molecule

    PubMed Central

    Bilham, Kirstin; Boyd, Amy C.; Preston, Stephen G.; Buesching, Christina D.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2017-01-01

    The European badger is recognised as a wildlife reservoir for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); the control of which is complex, costly and controversial. Despite the importance of badgers in bTB and the well-documented role for macrophages as anti-mycobacterial effector cells, badger macrophage (bdMφ) responses remain uncharacterised. Here, we demonstrate that bdMφ fail to produce nitric oxide (NO) or upregulate inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA following Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist treatment. BdMφ also failed to make NO after stimulation with recombinant badger interferon gamma (bdIFNγ) or a combination of bdIFNγ and lipopolysaccharide. Exposure of bdMφ to TLR agonists and/or bdIFNγ resulted in upregulated cytokine (IL1β, IL6, IL12 and TNFα) mRNA levels indicating that these critical pathways were otherwise intact. Although stimulation with most TLR agonists resulted in strong cytokine mRNA responses, weaker responses were evident after exposure to TLR9 agonists, potentially due to very low expression of TLR9 in bdMφ. Both NO and TLR9 are important elements of innate immunity to mycobacteria, and these features of bdMφ biology would impair their capacity to resist bTB infection. These findings have significant implications for the development of bTB management strategies, and support the use of vaccination to reduce bTB infection in badgers. PMID:28382943

  9. A Mycobacterial Phosphoribosyltransferase Promotes Bacillary Survival by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Autophagy Pathways in Macrophages and Zebrafish*

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Jagannathan, Lakshmanan; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Roy, Debasish; Alaridah, Nader; Saha, Pratip; Nongthomba, Upendra; Godaly, Gabriela; Gopal, Ramesh Kumar; Banerjee, Sulagna; Sonawane, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis employs various strategies to modulate host immune responses to facilitate its persistence in macrophages. The M. tuberculosis cell wall contains numerous glycoproteins with unknown roles in pathogenesis. Here, by using Concanavalin A and LC-MS analysis, we identified a novel mannosylated glycoprotein phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by Rv3242c from M. tuberculosis cell walls. Homology modeling, bioinformatic analyses, and an assay of phosphoribosyltransferase activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis expressing recombinant Rv3242c (MsmRv3242c) confirmed the mass spectrometry data. Using Mycobacterium marinum-zebrafish and the surrogate MsmRv3242c infection models, we proved that phosphoribosyltransferase is involved in mycobacterial virulence. Histological and infection assays showed that the M. marinum mimG mutant, an Rv3242c orthologue in a pathogenic M. marinum strain, was strongly attenuated in adult zebrafish and also survived less in macrophages. In contrast, infection with wild type and the complemented ΔmimG:Rv3242c M. marinum strains showed prominent pathological features, such as severe emaciation, skin lesions, hemorrhaging, and more zebrafish death. Similarly, recombinant MsmRv3242c bacteria showed increased invasion in non-phagocytic epithelial cells and longer intracellular survival in macrophages as compared with wild type and vector control M. smegmatis strains. Further mechanistic studies revealed that the Rv3242c- and mimG-mediated enhancement of intramacrophagic survival was due to inhibition of autophagy, reactive oxygen species, and reduced activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes. Infection with MsmRv3242c also activated the MAPK pathway, NF-κB, and inflammatory cytokines. In summary, we show that a novel mycobacterial mannosylated phosphoribosyltransferase acts as a virulence and immunomodulatory factor, suggesting that it may constitute a novel target for antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25825498

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Abdominal candidiasis is a hidden reservoir of echinocandin resistance.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2014-12-01

    FKS mutant Candida isolates were recovered from 24% (6/25) of abdominal candidiasis patients exposed to echinocandin. Candida glabrata (29%) and Candida albicans (14%) mutants were identified. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were recovered from 83% of FKS mutant infections. Mutations were associated with prolonged echinocandin exposure (P = 0.01), breakthrough infections (P = 0.03), and therapeutic failures despite source control interventions (100%). Abdominal candidiasis is a hidden reservoir for the emergence of echinocandin-resistant Candida.

  12. Comparison of clinical and laboratory findings between those with pulmonary tuberculosis and those with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Thanachartwet, Vipa; Desakorn, Varunee; Duangrithi, Duangjai; Chunpongthong, Pongsak; Phojanamongkolkij, Kamol; Jitruckthai, Pasakorn; Kasetjaroen, Yuttichai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    In tuberculosis endemic areas, patients with sputum positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) are usually diagnosed and treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung disease is often ascertained only after lung disease progression occurs, increasing the risk of severe morbidity and mortality. We conducted a matched case-control study among a prospective cohort of 300 patients with newly diagnosed AFB-positive sputum in Thailand during 2010-2012. We compared clinical and laboratory parameters and outcomes among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, NTM lung disease and NTM colonization. A mycobacterial culture was performed in all patients. Ten patients with NTM lung disease were compared to 50 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 10 patients with NTM colonization. The presence of diabetes mellitus or human immunodeficiency virus infection, were associated with NTM lung disease (p = 0.030). Patients with NTM lung disease had a significantly lower body weight prior to treatment (p = 0.021), a higher body weight change from baseline (p = 0.038), and were more likely to have cavitations on chest radiograph (p = 0.033) than those with NTM colonization. In tuberculosis endemic areas, mycobacterial identification should be performed among patients with impaired immune function. NTM lung disease treatment should be considered in patients with NTM sputum isolates who have a history of significant weight loss or cavitations on chest radiography.

  13. RNA interference in J774 macrophages reveals a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial trafficking but not in actin-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; Gatfield, John; Massner, Jan; Albrecht, Imke; Zanolari, Bettina; Pieters, Jean

    2008-03-01

    Macrophages are crucial for innate immunity, apoptosis, and tissue remodeling, processes that rely on the capacity of macrophages to internalize and process cargo through phagocytosis. Coronin 1, a member of the WD repeat protein family of coronins specifically expressed in leukocytes, was originally identified as a molecule that is recruited to mycobacterial phagosomes and prevents the delivery of mycobacteria to lysosomes, allowing these to survive within phagosomes. However, a role for coronin 1 in mycobacterial pathogenesis has been disputed in favor for its role in mediating phagocytosis and cell motility. In this study, a role for coronin 1 in actin-mediated cellular processes was addressed using RNA interference in the murine macrophage cell line J774. It is shown that the absence of coronin 1 in J774 macrophages expressing small interfering RNA constructs specific for coronin 1 does not affect phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, cell locomotion, or regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. However, in coronin 1-negative J774 cells, internalized mycobacteria were rapidly transferred to lysosomes and killed. Therefore, these results show that in J774 cells coronin 1 has a specific role in modulating phagosome-lysosome transport upon mycobacterial infection and that it is dispensable for most F-actin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements.

  14. The mycolyltransferase 85A, a putative drug target of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: development of a novel assay and quantification of glycolipid-status of the mycobacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Ayssar A; Stehr, Matthias; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir

    2009-12-01

    The enzymes of the antigen 85 complex (Ag85A, B, and C) possess mycolyltransferase activity and catalyze the synthesis of the most abundant glycolipid of the mycobacterial cell wall, the cord factor. The cord factor (trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, TDM) is essential for the integrity of the mycobacterial cell wall and pathogenesis of the bacillus. Thus, TDM biosynthesis is regarded as a potential drug target for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is synthesized from two molecules of trehalose-6'-monomycolate (TMM) by antigen 85A. We report here a novel enzyme assay using the natural substrate TMM. The novel colorimetric assay is based on the quantification of glucose from the degradation of trehalose, which is the product from catalytic activity of antigen 85A. Using the new assay, K(m) and K(cat) were determined with values of 129.6+/-8.1 microM and 65.4+/-4.1 min(-1), respectively. This novel assay is also suitable for robust high-throughput screening (HTS) for compound library screening against mycolyltransferase (antigen 85A). The assay is significantly faster and more convenient to use than all assays currently in use. The assay has a very low coefficient of variance (0.04) in 96-well plates and shows a Z' factor of 0.67-0.73, indicating the robustness of the assay. In addition, this new assay is highly suitable for the quantification of total TMM of the mycobacterial cell envelope.

  15. Disseminated Tuberculosis Presenting as Baker's Cyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Sami; Waqar, Sana

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of coexisting immunocompromised state and lack of specific symptoms a reactivation of treated mycobacterial tuberculosis (MTB) infection is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis of leg pain. We present a unique case of disseminated tuberculosis presenting as an infected Baker's cyst in a 73-year-old immunocompetent male. PMID:28163945

  16. Association between caudal fold tuberculin test responses and results of an ELISA for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and mycobacterial culture of feces in tuberculosis-free dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Brito, Barbara P; Aly, Sharif S; Anderson, Randall J; Fossler, Charles P; Garry, Franklyn B; Gardner, Ian A

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate associations between Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) and caudal fold tuberculin (CFT) test results in cattle. DESIGN--Longitudinal and cross-sectional evaluations. ANIMALS--1 California (approx 3,600 cows) and 3 Colorado (approx 640, 1,190, and 1,480 cows) dairy herds considered free of Mycobacterium bovis infection. PROCEDURES--In the California herd, the association between CFT response and MAP status was determined with ELISA and mycobacterial culture of feces within 1 year before and after CFT testing. The association between CFT and MAP status in all herds was modeled with mixed-effects logistic regression. RESULTS--In the California herd, significantly higher odds of being classified as suspect by CFT were found for cows with results of MAP ELISA negative before and positive after CFT testing (OR, 5.6) and cows positive before and after CFT testing (OR, 8.1). Higher odds were found for cows positive for mycobacterial culture of feces before and negative for culture after CFT testing (OR, 4.6) and cows negative for mycobacterial culture of feces before and positive for culture after CFT testing (OR, 13.2). All herds had higher odds of being classified as suspect by CFT testing for cows with positive results for ELISA (OR, 2.9) or mycobacterial culture of feces (OR, 5.0), compared with cows with negative results of the same tests. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE--A strong association was found between positive MAP test results and being classified as a suspect by CFT testing. Within-herd MAP prevalence may affect specificity of CFT testing for tuberculosis in cattle.

  17. [The abdominal catastrophe].

    PubMed

    Seiler, Christian A

    2011-08-01

    Patients with an abdominal catastrophe are in urgent need of early, interdisciplinary medical help. The treatment plan should be based on medical priorities and clear leadership. First priority should be given to achieve optimal oxygenation of blood and stabilization of circulation during all treatment-phases. The sicker the patient, the less invasive the (surgical) treatment should to be, which means "damage control only". This short article describes 7 important, pragmatic rules that will help to increase the survival of a patient with an abdominal catastrophe. Preexisting morbidity and risk factors must be included in the overall risk-evaluation for every therapeutic intervention. The challenge in patients with an abdominal catastrophe is to carefully balance the therapeutic stress and the existing resistance of the individual patient. The best way to avoid abdominal disaster, however, is its prevention.

  18. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  19. Acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1998-01-01

    Abdominal pain is among the most frequent ailments reported in the office setting and can account for up to 40% of ailments in the ambulatory practice. Also, it is in the top three symptoms of patients presenting to emergency departments (ED) and accounts for 5-10% of all ED primary presenting ailments. There are several common sources for acute abdominal pain and many for subacute and chronic abdominal pain. This article explores the history-taking, initial evaluation, and examination of the patient presenting with acute abdominal pain. The goal of this article is to help differentiate one source of pain from another. Discussion of acute cholecystitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, ectopic pregnancy, diverticulitis, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are undertaken. Additionally, there is discussion of common laboratory studies, diagnostic studies, and treatment of the patient with the above entities.

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  1. Abdominal wall surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the results of abdominoplasty. Many feel a new sense of self-confidence. Alternative Names Cosmetic surgery of the abdomen; Tummy tuck; Abdominoplasty Images Abdominoplasty - series Abdominal muscles References McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend ...

  2. Are mouse models of human mycobacterial diseases relevant? Genetics says: ‘yes!’

    PubMed Central

    Apt, Alexander S

    2011-01-01

    Relevance and accuracy of experimental mouse models of tuberculosis (TB) are the subject of constant debate. This article briefly reviews genetic aspects of this problem and provides a few examples of mycobacterial diseases with similar or identical genetic control in mice and humans. The two species display more similarities than differences regarding both genetics of susceptibility/severity of mycobacterial diseases and the networks of protective and pathological immune reactions. In the opinion of the author, refined mouse models of mycobacterial diseases are extremely useful for modelling the corresponding human conditions, if genetic diversity is taken into account. PMID:21896006

  3. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains. PMID:28300074

  6. Total synthesis of mycobacterial arabinogalactan containing 92 monosaccharide units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Xiong, De-Cai; Chen, Si-Cong; Wang, Yong-Shi; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2017-03-01

    Carbohydrates are diverse bio-macromolecules with highly complex structures that are involved in numerous biological processes. Well-defined carbohydrates obtained by chemical synthesis are essential to the understanding of their functions. However, synthesis of carbohydrates is greatly hampered by its insufficient efficiency. So far, assembly of long carbohydrate chains remains one of the most challenging tasks for synthetic chemists. Here we describe a highly efficient assembly of a 92-mer polysaccharide by the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol. Several linear and branched oligosaccharide/polysaccharide fragments ranging from 5-mer to 31-mer in length have been rapidly constructed in one-pot manner, which enables the first total synthesis of a biologically important mycobacterial arabinogalactan through a highly convergent [31+31+30] coupling reaction. Our results show that the preactivation-based one-pot glycosylation protocol may provide access to the construction of long and complicated carbohydrate chains.

  7. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J.; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S.; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M. Rita; Clarke, Anthony J.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies. PMID:26324178

  8. Octanoylation of early intermediates of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Maranha, Ana; Moynihan, Patrick J; Miranda, Vanessa; Correia Lourenço, Eva; Nunes-Costa, Daniela; Fraga, Joana S; José Barbosa Pereira, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Ventura, M Rita; Clarke, Anthony J; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacteria synthesize unique intracellular methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLP) proposed to modulate fatty acid metabolism. In addition to the partial esterification of glucose or methylglucose units with short-chain fatty acids, octanoate was invariably detected on the MGLP reducing end. We have identified a novel sugar octanoyltransferase (OctT) that efficiently transfers octanoate to glucosylglycerate (GG) and diglucosylglycerate (DGG), the earliest intermediates in MGLP biosynthesis. Enzymatic studies, synthetic chemistry, NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry approaches suggest that, in contrast to the prevailing consensus, octanoate is not esterified to the primary hydroxyl group of glycerate but instead to the C6 OH of the second glucose in DGG. These observations raise important new questions about the MGLP reducing end architecture and about subsequent biosynthetic steps. Functional characterization of this unique octanoyltransferase, whose gene has been proposed to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, adds new insights into a vital mycobacterial pathway, which may inspire new drug discovery strategies.

  9. Reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Tukiainen, E

    2013-01-01

    Complex abdominal wall defects refer to situations where simple ventral hernia repair is not feasible because the defect is very large, there is a concomitant infection or failed previous re-pair attempt, or if there is not enough original skin to cover the repair. Usually a complex abdominal wall repair is preceded by a period of temporary abdominal closure where the short-term aims include closure of the catabolic drain, protection of the viscera and preventing fistula formation, preventing bowel adherence to the abdominal wall, and enabling future fascial and skin closure. Currently the best way to achieve these goals is the vacuum- and mesh-mediated fascial traction method achieving close to 90% fascial closure rates. The long-term aims of an abdominal closure following a planned hernia strategy include intact skin cover, fascial closure at midline (if possible), good functional outcome with innervated abdominal musculature, no pain and good cosmetic result. The main methods of abdominal wall reconstruction include the use of prosthetic (mesh) or autologous material (tissue flaps). In patients with original skin cover over the fascial defect (simple ventral hernia), the most commonly used method is hernia repair with an artificial mesh. For more complex defects, our first choice of reconstruction is the component separation technique, sometimes combined with a mesh. In contaminated fields where component separation alone is not feasible, a combination with a biological mesh can be used. In large defects with grafted skin, a free TFL flap is the best option, sometimes reinforced with a mesh and enhanced with components separation.

  10. Mycobacterial gene cuvA is required for optimal nutrient utilization and virulence.

    PubMed

    Mir, Mushtaq; Prisic, Sladjana; Kang, Choong-Min; Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Murry, Jeffrey P; Rubin, Eric J; Husson, Robert N

    2014-10-01

    To persist and cause disease in the host, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to its environment during infection. Adaptations include changes in nutrient utilization and alterations in growth rate. M. tuberculosis Rv1422 is a conserved gene of unknown function that was found in a genetic screen to interact with the mce4 cholesterol uptake locus. The Rv1422 protein is phosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinases PknA and PknB, which regulate cell growth and cell wall synthesis. Bacillus subtilis strains lacking the Rv1422 homologue yvcK grow poorly on several carbon sources, and yvcK is required for proper localization of peptidoglycan synthesis. Here we show that Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis strains lacking Rv1422 have growth defects in minimal medium containing limiting amounts of several different carbon sources. These strains also have morphological abnormalities, including shortened and bulging cells, suggesting a cell wall defect. In both mycobacterial species, the Rv1422 protein localizes uniquely to the growing cell pole, the site of peptidoglycan synthesis in mycobacteria. An M. tuberculosis ΔRv1422 strain is markedly attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, where it elicits decreased inflammation in the lungs and shows impaired bacterial persistence. These findings led us to name this gene cuvA (carbon utilization and virulence protein A) and to suggest a model in which deletion of cuvA leads to changes in nutrient uptake and/or metabolism that affect cell wall structure, morphology, and virulence. Its role in virulence suggests that CuvA may be a useful target for novel inhibitors of M. tuberculosis during infection.

  11. Creation of Abdominal Adhesions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Clement D; Hu, Michael S; Leavitt, Tripp; Barnes, Leandra A; Cheung, Alexander T M; Malhotra, Samir; Lorenz, H Peter; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-08-27

    Abdominal adhesions consist of fibrotic tissue that forms in the peritoneal space in response to an inflammatory insult, typically surgery or intraabdominal infection. The precise mechanisms underlying adhesion formation are poorly understood. Many compounds and physical barriers have been tested for their ability to prevent adhesions after surgery with varying levels of success. The mouse and rat are important models for the study of abdominal adhesions. Several different techniques for the creation of adhesions in the mouse and rat exist in the literature. Here we describe a protocol utilizing abrasion of the cecum with sandpaper and sutures placed in the right abdominal sidewall. The mouse is anesthetized and the abdomen is prepped. A midline laparotomy is created and the cecum is identified. Sandpaper is used to gently abrade the surface of the cecum. Next, several figure-of-eight sutures are placed into the peritoneum of the right abdominal sidewall. The abdominal cavity is irrigated, a small amount of starch is applied, and the incision is closed. We have found that this technique produces the most consistent adhesions with the lowest mortality rate.

  12. Systems-level modeling of mycobacterial metabolism for the identification of new (multi-)drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rienksma, Rienk A; Suarez-Diez, Maria; Spina, Lucie; Schaap, Peter J; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P

    2014-12-01

    Systems-level metabolic network reconstructions and the derived constraint-based (CB) mathematical models are efficient tools to explore bacterial metabolism. Approximately one-fourth of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) genome contains genes that encode proteins directly involved in its metabolism. These represent potential drug targets that can be systematically probed with CB models through the prediction of genes essential (or the combination thereof) for the pathogen to grow. However, gene essentiality depends on the growth conditions and, so far, no in vitro model precisely mimics the host at the different stages of mycobacterial infection, limiting model predictions. These limitations can be circumvented by combining expression data from in vivo samples with a validated CB model, creating an accurate description of pathogen metabolism in the host. To this end, we present here a thoroughly curated and extended genome-scale CB metabolic model of Mtb quantitatively validated using 13C measurements. We describe some of the efforts made in integrating CB models and high-throughput data to generate condition specific models, and we will discuss challenges ahead. This knowledge and the framework herein presented will enable to identify potential new drug targets, and will foster the development of optimal therapeutic strategies.

  13. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  14. Greater preexisting interferon γ responses to mycobacterial antigens and lower bacillary load during HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lahey, Timothy; Czechura, Tom; Crabtree, Scott; Arbeit, Robert D; Matee, Mecky; Horsburgh, C Robert; MacKenzie, Todd; Bakari, Muhammad; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham

    2013-11-15

    The role of preexisting interferon (IFN) γ responses in controlling bacillary burden in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated tuberculosis is not known. Among BCG-immunized HIV-infected adults who developed tuberculosis in a phase III trial of an investigational tuberculosis vaccine, greater baseline IFN-γ responses to early secretory antigenic target 6 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell lysate were associated with reduced bacillary burden on sputum smear grade, days to culture positivity on agar, and sputum culture grade during subsequent tuberculosis. This association was most consistent among recipients of the investigational vaccine. When HIV-associated tuberculosis develops, greater preexisting IFN-γ responses to mycobacterial antigens are associated with reduced tuberculosis bacillary burden. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier. NCT0052195.

  15. Characterization of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases and antimicrobial resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae in intra-abdominal infection isolates in Latin America, 2008-2012. Results of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, Krystyna M; Lob, Sibylle H; Hoban, Daryl J; Hackel, Meredith A; Badal, Robert E; Bouchillon, Samuel K

    2015-07-01

    The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends has monitored the in vitro activity of several recommended antimicrobials used in the management of intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) globally since 2002. In this report, we document the changing susceptibility patterns to recommended antimicrobials in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from patients with IAIs in 11 Latin American countries between 2008 and 2012 and describe the beta-lactamases encoded by phenotypically extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive and ertapenem-nonsusceptible isolates. Overall, the incidence of phenotypically ESBL-positive K. pneumoniae did not change significantly from 2008 (40.4%) to 2012 (41.2%) (P > 0.05). However, trend analysis documented an increase in isolates encoding K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) or both KPC and an ESBL. Decreasing susceptibility (P < 0.05) was noted for cefepime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, and imipenem among all K. pneumoniae, as well as for cefepime, cefotaxime, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, and imipenem among ESBL-positive isolates, while susceptibility of ESBL-negative isolates to ampicillin-sulbactam actually increased (P < 0.05).

  16. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  17. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  18. [Abdominal actinomycosis with IUD].

    PubMed

    Kamprath, S; Merker, A; Kühne-Heid, R; Schneider, A

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of abdominal actinomycosis in a 54 year old woman using an intrauterine device for a period of 8 years. The most important finding was a tuboovarialabscess at the left pelvic side with involvement of the serosa of the jejunum, ileum, sigma, and omentum majus. Intraoperative exploration showed a solid retroperitoneal infiltration between the pelvic side wall and sigma. Another infiltration was found on the left side of the abdominal wall. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and the patient was treated by a combination of Aminopenicillin and Metronidazol. After a period of three months we observed a complete regression of the clinical and the MRI findings.

  19. Secondary abdominal pregnancy in human immunodeficiency virus-positive woman

    PubMed Central

    Manyanga, Hudson; Lwakatare, Flora

    2016-01-01

    We report on an abdominal pregnancy in human immunodeficiency virus-positive mother, currently on antiretroviral therapy, which was discovered incidentally while training the obstetric ultrasound capacity building program. Although abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy, it may be more common in women with HIV infection because they tend to have a higher rate of sexually transmitted diseases than the general population. The positive diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy is difficult to establish and is usually missed during prenatal assessment particularly in settings that lack routine ultrasound examination as is the case in most developing countries. For the management of abdominal pregnancy, surgical intervention is recommended and removal of the placenta is a key controversy. Ultrasonography is considered the front-line and most effective imaging method and an awareness with a high index of suspicion of abdominal pregnancy is vital for reducing associated high maternal and even higher perinatal mortality. PMID:27896258

  20. Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    standing, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal infections. Key Words: musculoskeletal infection, biofilm , bacteria, biomaterial (J Orthop Trauma...form a biofilm , or slime layer.1 The recurrence of infections is often the result of microbial biofilm formation on the implant, enabling the persistence...Klebsiella pneumoniae). Staphylococcus species is by far the most studied pathogen in musculoskeletal infections and can produce a multilayered biofilm

  1. Mycobacterial receptor, Clec4d (CLECSF8, MCL), is coregulated with Mincle and upregulated on mouse myeloid cells following microbial challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Bernhard; Wilson, Gillian J.; Reid, Delyth M.; Mori, Daiki; Taylor, Julie A.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Yamasaki, Sho; Brown, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    The C‐type lectin receptor (CTLR), Clec4d (MCL, CLECSF8), is a member of the Dectin‐2 cluster of CTLRs, which also includes the related receptors Mincle and Dectin‐2. Like Mincle, Clec4d recognizes mycobacterial cord factor, trehalose dimycolate, and we recently demonstrated its key role in anti‐mycobacterial immunity in mouse and man. Here, we characterized receptor expression in naïve mice, under inflammatory conditions, and during Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection using newly generated monoclonal antibodies. In naïve mice, Clec4d was predominantly expressed on myeloid cells within the peritoneal cavity, blood, and bone marrow. Unexpectedly, basal expression of Clec4d was very low on leukocytes in the lung. However, receptor expression was significantly upregulated on pulmonary myeloid cells during M. bovis BCG infection. Moreover, Clec4d expression could be strongly induced in vitro and in vivo by various microbial stimuli, including TLR agonists, but not exogenous cytokines. Notably, we show that Clec4d requires association with the signaling adaptor FcRγ and Mincle, but not Dectin‐2, for surface expression. In addition, we provide evidence that Clec4d and Mincle, but not Dectin‐2, are interdependently coregulated during inflammation and infection. These data show that Clec4d is an inducible myeloid‐expressed CTLR in mice, whose expression is tightly linked to that of Mincle. PMID:26558717

  2. Effect of Apoptotic Cell Recognition on Macrophage Polarization and Mycobacterial Persistence

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Fulco, Tatiana; Andrade, Priscila Ribeiro; de Mattos Barbosa, Mayara Garcia; Pinto, Thiago Gomes Toledo; Ferreira, Paula Fernandez; Ferreira, Helen; da Costa Nery, José Augusto; Real, Suzana Côrte; Borges, Valéria Matos; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Sampaio, Elizabeth Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Mycobacterium leprae infection modifies host macrophage programming, creating a protective niche for bacterial survival. The milieu regulating cellular apoptosis in the tissue plays an important role in defining susceptible and/or resistant phenotypes. A higher density of apoptotic cells has been demonstrated in paucibacillary leprosy lesions than in multibacillary ones. However, the effect of apoptotic cell removal on M. leprae-stimulated cells has yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether apoptotic cell removal (efferocytosis) induces different phenotypes in proinflammatory (Mϕ1) and anti-inflammatory (Mϕ2) macrophages in the presence of M. leprae. We stimulated Mϕ1 and Mϕ2 cells with M. leprae in the presence or absence of apoptotic cells and subsequently evaluated the M. leprae uptake, cell phenotype, and cytokine pattern in the supernatants. In the presence of M. leprae and apoptotic cells, Mϕ1 macrophages changed their phenotype to resemble the Mϕ2 phenotype, displaying increased CD163 and SRA-I expression as well as higher phagocytic capacity. Efferocytosis increased M. leprae survival in Mϕ1 cells, accompanied by reduced interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-6 levels and increased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and IL-10 secretion. Mϕ1 cells primed with M. leprae in the presence of apoptotic cells induced the secretion of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in autologous T cells compared with cultures stimulated with M. leprae or apoptotic cells alone. Efferocytosis did not alter the Mϕ2 cell phenotype or cytokine secretion profile, except for TGF-β. Based on these data, we suggest that, in paucibacillary leprosy patients, efferocytosis contributes to mycobacterial persistence by increasing the Mϕ2 population and sustaining the infection. PMID:25024361

  3. Clofazimine Enteropathy: A Rare and Underrecognized Complication of Mycobacterial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Szeto, Winnie; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T.; Abbo, Lilian; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.; Moshiree, Baharak; Morris, Michele I.

    2016-01-01

    Clofazimine-induced crystal-storing histiocytosis is a rare complication of treatment previously reported in dermatology literature as a complication of leprosy therapy. We report a case of disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus requiring treatment with high-dose oral clofazimine resulting in enteropathy in a patient who presented with abdominal pain, malnutrition, and melena. PMID:27800519

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients with intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections in Asia-Pacific countries: SMART 2013-2015.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, James A; Hoban, Daryl J; Hackel, Meredith A; Lob, Sibylle H; Sahm, Daniel F

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter spp.) are responsible for increases in antimicrobial-resistant infections worldwide. We determined in vitro susceptibilities to eight parenteral antimicrobial agents using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute broth microdilution methodology for Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens isolated from hospitalized patients with intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) (n=3052) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) (n=1088) in 11 Asia-Pacific countries/regions from 2013 to 2015. Amikacin (98.3, 96.4 %), imipenem (97.1, 95.5 %) and ertapenem (95.3, 93.2 %) demonstrated the highest rates of susceptibility for isolates of K. pneumoniae from IAI and UTI, respectively, whereas susceptibility to advanced-generation cephalosporins was <84 and <71 %, respectively. K. pneumoniae with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive phenotype were more common in UTI (27.1 %) than IAI (16.2 %). Imipenem and amikacin were the most active agents against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive K. pneumoniae from IAI (95.1, 91.8 %) and UTI (94.9, 92.3 %), respectively, whereas <54 % were susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam. Against Enterobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa, amikacin demonstrated the highest rates of susceptibility for isolates from IAI (99.7, 95.5 %) and UTI (90.9, 91.5 %), respectively. K. pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp. and P. aeruginosa from urine demonstrated lower susceptibility to levofloxacin (74.1, 81.8 and 73.8 %) than from IAI (87.6, 91.8 and 85.4 %). For A. baumannii, rates of susceptibility to all agents tested were <43 %. We conclude that the studied Gram-negative ESKAPE pathogens demonstrated reduced susceptibility to commonly prescribed advanced-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam and levofloxacin, while amikacin and carbapenems were the most active. Ongoing surveillance to monitor evolving resistance trends and

  5. Abdominal exploration - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100049.htm Abdominal exploration - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  6. Incision for abdominal laparoscopy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal laparoscopy is a useful aid in diagnosing disease or trauma in the abdominal cavity with less scarring than ... as liver and pancreatic resections may begin with laparoscopy to exclude the presence of additional tumors (metastatic ...

  7. Over-Expression of the Mycobacterial Trehalose-Phosphate Phosphatase OtsB2 Results in a Defect in Macrophage Phagocytosis Associated with Increased Mycobacterial-Macrophage Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Wu, Mei; Shi, Yan; Javid, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (OtsB2) is involved in the OtsAB trehalose synthesis pathway to produce free trehalose and is strictly essential for mycobacterial growth. We wished to determine the effects of OtsB2 expression on mycobacterial phenotypes such as growth, phagocytosis and survival in macrophages. Mycobacterium bovis-bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) over-expressing OtsB2 were able to better survive in stationary phase. Over-expression of OtsB2 led to a decrease in phagocytosis but not survival in THP-1 macrophage-like cells, and this was not due to a decrease in general macrophage phagocytic activity. Surprisingly, when we investigated macrophage–mycobacterial interactions by flow cytometry and atomic force microscopy, we discovered that BCG over-expressing OtsB2 have stronger binding to THP-1 cells than wild-type BCG. These results suggest that altering OtsB2 expression has implications for mycobacterial host–pathogen interactions. Macrophage–mycobacteria phagocytic interactions are complex and merit further study. PMID:27867377

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Hepatic Portal Venous Gas after Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Satomi; Azuma, Takashi; Kawashita, Yujo; Matsuo, Shigetoshi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic portal venous gas (HPVG) is induced by various abdominal diseases. Since HPVG is accompanied by bowel ischemia, intestinal infection and hypovolemia, various modes of critical management are needed to treat the underlying conditions. HPVG associated with abdominal complications after surgery has rarely been reported. We present 4 patients with HPVG after abdominal surgery: 2 of the 4 patients died of multiple organ failure, and the other 2 recovered with solely conservative therapy. Although postoperative HPVG is a severe and life-threatening condition, early detection and systemic treatment lead to a better patient outcome. PMID:27403110

  9. Fournier's gangrene secondary to intra-abdominal processes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, G S; Guss, S P; Pielet, R W

    1994-11-01

    We report 2 cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum, perianal area, and male genitalia (Fournier's gangrene) that arose secondary to intra-abdominal infectious processes (ruptured appendicitis and diverticulitis). Management consisted of immediate debridement of necrotic tissue, exploratory laparotomy, and diverting colostomy. The presence of an acute abdominal process was not immediately evident on initial evaluation of either patient. This demonstrates the critical importance of considering intra-abdominal infection in patients with Fournier's gangrene when the more commonly seen urinary tract, perirectal, and traumatic causes are not readily apparent.

  10. Cholesterol Ester Oxidation by Mycobacterial Cytochrome P450*

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel J.; Madrona, Yarrow; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacteria share a common cholesterol degradation pathway initiated by oxidation of the alkyl side chain by enzymes of cytochrome P450 (CYP) families 125 and 142. Structural and sequence comparisons of the two enzyme families revealed two insertions into the N-terminal region of the CYP125 family (residues 58–67 and 100–109 in the CYP125A1 sequence) that could potentially sterically block the oxidation of the longer cholesterol ester molecules. Catalytic assays revealed that only CYP142 enzymes are able to oxidize cholesteryl propionate, and although CYP125 enzymes could oxidize cholesteryl sulfate, they were much less efficient at doing so than the CYP142 enzymes. The crystal structure of CYP142A2 in complex with cholesteryl sulfate revealed a substrate tightly fit into a smaller active site than was previously observed for the complex of CYP125A1 with 4-cholesten-3-one. We propose that the larger CYP125 active site allows for multiple binding modes of cholesteryl sulfate, the majority of which trigger the P450 catalytic cycle, but in an uncoupled mode rather than one that oxidizes the sterol. In contrast, the more unhindered and compact CYP142 structure enables enzymes of this family to readily oxidize cholesteryl esters, thus providing an additional source of carbon for mycobacterial growth. PMID:25210044

  11. Structural insights into antibody recognition of mycobacterial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tomohiko; Zheng, Ruixiang Blake; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Marcus, Sandra L; Lowary, Todd L; Ng, Kenneth K S

    2009-09-18

    Mycobacteria are major human pathogens responsible for such serious and widespread diseases as tuberculosis and leprosy. Among the evolutionary adaptations essential for pathogenicity in mycobacteria is a complex carbohydrate-rich cell-wall structure that contains as a major immunomodulatory molecule the polysaccharide lipoarabinomannan (LAM). We report here crystal structures of three fragments from the non-reducing termini of LAM in complex with a murine antibody Fab fragment (CS-35Fab). These structures reveal for the first time the three-dimensional structures of key components of LAM and the molecular basis of LAM recognition at between 1.8- and 2.0-A resolution. The antigen-binding site of CS-35Fab forms three binding pockets that show a high degree of complementarity to the reducing end, the branch point and one of the non-reducing ends of the Y-shaped hexasaccharide moiety found at most of the non-reducing termini of LAM. Structures of CS-35Fab bound to two additional tetrasaccharides confirm the general mode of binding seen in the hexasaccharide and indicate how different parts of LAM are recognized. Altogether, these structures provide a rational basis for understanding the overall architecture of LAM and identify the key elements of an epitope that may be exploited for the development of novel and more effective anti-mycobacterial vaccines. Moreover, this study represents the first high-resolution X-ray crystallographic investigation of oligofuranoside-protein recognition.

  12. Visualization of mycobacterial membrane dynamics in live cells

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with a highly impermeable mycomembrane that confers intrinsic resistance to many antibiotics. Several unique mycomembrane glycolipids have been isolated and structurally characterized, but the underlying organization and dynamics of glycolipids within the cell envelope remain poorly understood. We report here a study of mycomembrane dynamics that was enabled by trehalose–fluorophore conjugates capable of labeling trehalose glycolipids in live actinomycetes. We identified fluorescein–trehalose analogues that are metabolically incorporated into the trehalose mycolates of representative Mycobacterium, Corynebacterium, Nocardia, and Rhodococcus species. Using these probes, we studied the mobilities of labeled glycolipids by time-lapse microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and found that mycomembrane fluidity varies widely across species and correlates with mycolic acid structure. Finally, we discovered that treatment of mycobacteria with ethambutol, a front-line tuberculosis (TB) drug, significantly increases mycomembrane fluidity. These findings enhance our understanding of mycobacterial cell envelope structure and dynamics and have implications for development of TB drug cocktails. PMID:28075574

  13. [Abdominal tuberculosis in children. A review apropos of 13 cases].

    PubMed

    Vidal, M L; del Castillo, F; Arroba, M L; Borque, C; García Hortelano, J

    1986-04-01

    Thirteen cases of abdominal tuberculosis are presented; some of them in active or symptomatic stage and others in latent or abdominal calcification form. Many of these patients were diagnosed through the finding of a source of infected cattle after diagnosis of one of symptomatic patients. Pathogenesis, clinical findings and diagnostic difficulty are commented, as well a sanitary importance of the problem, since M. bovis is still a currently found organism in daily practice.

  14. Practical Approaches to Definitive Reconstruction of Complex Abdominal Wall Defects.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Rifat

    2016-04-01

    With advances in abdominal surgery and the management of major trauma, complex abdominal wall defects have become the new surgical disease, and the need for abdominal wall reconstruction has increased dramatically. Subsequently, how to reconstruct these large defects has become a new surgical question. While most surgeons use native abdominal wall whenever possible, evidence suggests that synthetic or biologic mesh needs to be added to large ventral hernia repairs. One particular group of patients who exemplify "complex" are those with contaminated wounds, enterocutaneous fistulas, enteroatmospheric fistulas, and/or stoma(s), where synthetic mesh is to be avoided if at all possible. Most recently, biologic mesh has become the new standard in high-risk patients with contaminated and dirty-infected wounds. While biologic mesh is the most common tissue engineered used in this field of surgery, level I evidence is needed on its indication and long-term outcomes. Various techniques for reconstructing the abdominal wall have been described, however the long-term outcomes for most of these studies, are rarely reported. In this article, I outline current practical approaches to perioperative management and definitive abdominal reconstruction in patients with complex abdominal wall defects, with or without fistulas, as well as those who have lost abdominal domain.

  15. [Myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Janů, F

    2016-01-01

    A number of benign and malignant tumors may develop in the abdominal cavity. Sarcomas are rather rare tumors of the abdominal cavity. They are often diagnosed at advanced growth stages as their local growth can cause clinical problems to the patients. The author presents a case report of myxofibrosarcoma in the abdominal cavity.Key words: myxofibrosarcoma.

  16. [The cutaneous groin flap for coverage of a full-thickness abdominal wall defect].

    PubMed

    Doebler, O; Spierer, R

    2010-08-01

    A full-thickness defect of the abdominal wall is rare and may occur as a complication of extended abdominal surgery procedures. We report about a 69-year-old patient who was presented to our department with a full-thickness abdominal wall defect and a fully exposed collagen-mesh for reconstructive wound closure. 13 operations with resections of necrotic parts of the abdominal wall were performed following a complicated intraabdominal infection. After debridement and mesh explantation, closure of the remaining defect of the lower abdominal region was achieved by a cutaneous groin flap.

  17. Distribution of extended-spectrum β-lactamases, AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases among Enterobacteriaceae isolates causing intra-abdominal infections in the Asia-Pacific region: results of the study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Sheng, Wang-Huei; Badal, Robert E; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2013-07-01

    The increasing trend of β-lactam resistance among Enterobacteriaceae is a worldwide threat. Enterobacteriaceae isolates causing intra-abdominal infections (IAI) from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) collected in 2008 and 2009 from the Asia-Pacific region were investigated. Detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC β-lactamases, and carbapenemases was performed by multiplex PCR. A total of 699 Enterobacteriaceae isolates with positive genotypic results, included Escherichia coli (n = 443), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 187), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 45), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 9), Citrobacter freundii (n = 5), Proteus mirabilis (n = 3), Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 2), Morganella morganii (n = 2), and one each of Enterobacter asburiae, Proteus vulgaris, and Providencia rettgeri were analyzed. Nearly 20% of these β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates were from community-associated IAI. CTX-M (588 isolates, including 428 [72.8%] with CTX-M-15) was the most common ESBL, followed by SHV (n = 59) and TEM (n = 4). CMY (n = 110, including 102 [92.7%] with CMY-2) was the most common AmpC β-lactamase, followed by DHA (n = 46) and ACT/MIR (n = 40). NDM (n = 65, including 62 [95.4%] with NDM-1) was the most common carbapenemase, followed by IMP (n = 7) and OXA (n = 7). Isolates from hospital-associated IAI had more complicated β-lactamase combinations than isolates from the community. Carbapenemases were all exclusively detected in Enterobacteriaceae isolates from India, except that IMP β-lactamases were also detected in Philippines and Australia. CTX-M β-lactamases were the predominant ESBLs produced by Enterobacteriaceae causing IAI in the Asia-Pacific region. Emergence of CTX-M-15-, CMY-2-, and NDM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates is of major concern and highlights the need for further surveillance in this area.

  18. Surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections in China: the 2002-2009 Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwen; Wang, Hui; Chen, Minjun; Ni, Yuxing; Yu, Yunsong; Hu, Bijie; Sun, Ziyong; Huang, Wenxiang; Hu, Yunjian; Ye, Huifen; Badal, Robert E; Xu, Yingchun

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution and susceptibility of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) isolated from patients with intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in China. From 2002 to 2009, minimum inhibitory concentrations of 14 antibiotics for 3420 aerobic and facultative GNB from up to eight hospitals in six cities were determined by the broth microdilution method. Enterobacteriaceae comprised 82.9% (2834/3420) of the total isolates, with Escherichia coli (49.2%) being the most commonly isolated species followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (17.0%), Enterobacter cloacae (5.8%) and Citrobacter freundii (2.3%). Amongst the antimicrobial agents tested, the three carbapenems (ertapenem, imipenem and meropenem) were the most active agents against Enterobacteriaceae, with susceptibility rates of 96.1-99.6% (2002-2009), 98.2-100% (2002-2009) and 99.6-100% (2002-2004), respectively, followed by amikacin (86.8-95.1%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (84.5-94.3%). Susceptibility rates of all tested third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins against Enterobacteriaceae declined by nearly 30%, with susceptibility rates of 40.2%, 39.1%, 56.3% and 51.8% in 2009 for ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, ceftazidime and cefepime, respectively. The occurrence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases increased rapidly, especially for E. coli (from 20.8% in 2002 to 64.9% in 2009). Susceptibility of E. coli to ciprofloxacin decreased from 57.6% in 2002 to 24.2% in 2009. The least active agent against Enterobacteriaceae was ampicillin/sulbactam (SAM) (25.3-44.3%). In conclusion, Enterobacteriaceae were the major pathogens causing IAIs, and carbapenems retained the highest susceptibility rates over the 8-year study period. Third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and SAM may not be ideal choices for empirical therapy of IAIs in China.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase rates in aerobic gram-negative bacteria causing intra-abdominal infections in Vietnam: report from the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART 2009-2011).

    PubMed

    Biedenbach, Douglas J; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Hoban, Daryl J; Hackel, Meredith; Phuong, Doan Mai; Nga, Tran Thi Thanh; Phuong, Nguyen Tran My; Phuong, Tran Thi Lan; Badal, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Treatment options for multidrug-resistant pathogens remain problematic in many regions and individual countries, warranting ongoing surveillance and analysis. Limited antimicrobial susceptibility information is available for pathogens from Vietnam. This study determined the bacterial susceptibility of aerobic gram-negative pathogens of intra-abdominal infections among patients in Vietnam during 2009-2011. A total of 905 isolates were collected from 4 medical centers in this investigation as part of the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends. Antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) rates among the appropriate species were determined by a central laboratory using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods. Among the species collected, Escherichia coli (48.1% ESBL-positive) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.5% ESBL-positive) represented the majority (46.4%) of the isolates submitted for this study. Ertapenem MIC90 values were lowest for these 2 species at 0.12 and 0.25μg/mL and remained unchanged for ESBL-positive isolates. Imipenem MIC90 values were also the same for all isolates and ESBL-positive strains at 0.25 and 0.5μg/mL, respectively. Ertapenem MIC90 values for additional species with sufficient numbers for analysis, including Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were 1, 0.06, >4, and >4μg/mL, respectively. Analysis of beta-lactamases in a subset of 132 phenotypically ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae demonstrated that CTX-M variants, particularly CTX-M-27 and CTX-M-15, were the predominant enzymes. High resistance rates in Vietnam hospitals dictate continuous monitoring as antimicrobial inactivating enzymes continue to spread throughout Asia and globally.

  20. Mycobacterial RNA polymerase forms unstable open promoter complexes that are stabilized by CarD

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth; Chen, James; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli has served as the archetypal organism on which the overwhelming majority of biochemical characterizations of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) have been focused; the properties of E. coli RNAP have been accepted as generally representative for all bacterial RNAPs. Here, we directly compare the initiation properties of a mycobacterial transcription system with E. coli RNAP on two different promoters. The detailed characterizations include abortive transcription assays, RNAP/promoter complex stability assays and DNAse I and KMnO4 footprinting. Based on footprinting, we find that promoter complexes formed by E. coli and mycobacterial RNAPs use very similar protein/DNA interactions and generate the same transcription bubbles. However, we find that the open promoter complexes formed by E. coli RNAP on the two promoters tested are highly stable and essentially irreversible (with lifetimes much greater than 1 h), while the open promoter complexes on the same two promoters formed by mycobacterial RNAP are very unstable (lifetimes of about 2 min or less) and readily reversible. We show here that CarD, an essential mycobacterial transcription activator that is not found in E. coli, stabilizes the mycobacterial RNAP/open promoter complexes considerably by preventing transcription bubble collapse. PMID:25510492

  1. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  2. The Abdominal Circulatory Pump

    PubMed Central

    Aliverti, Andrea; Bovio, Dario; Fullin, Irene; Dellacà, Raffaele L.; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs) is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50–75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4–6% and an output of 750–1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61±0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57±0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart. PMID:19440240

  3. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  4. Rapid Detection and Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogens in Fish by Using High-Resolution Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Thu Nguyet; Caruso, Domenico; Godreuil, Sylvain; Keck, Nicolas; Vallaeys, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in fish are commonly referred to as piscine mycobacteriosis, irrespectively of the specific identity of the causal organism. They usually cause a chronic disease and sometimes may result in high mortalities and severe economic losses. Nearly 20 species of Mycobacterium have been reported to infect fish. Among them, Mycobacterium marinum, M. fortuitum, and M. chelonae are generally considered the major agents responsible for fish mycobacteriosis. As no quick and inexpensive diagnostic test exists, we tested the potential of high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA) to rapidly identify and differentiate several Mycobacterium species involved in fish infections. By analyzing both the melting temperature and melting profile of the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), we were able to discriminate 12 different species simultaneously. Sensitivity tests conducted on purified M. marinum and M. fortuitum DNA revealed a limit of detection of 10 genome equivalents per reaction. The primers used in this procedure did not lead to any amplification signal with 16 control non-Mycobacterium species, thereby demonstrating their specificity for the genus Mycobacterium. PMID:24123734

  5. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  6. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  7. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  8. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection of the shoulder and spine in a patient with steroid-treated systemic Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Zvetina, J.R.; Rubinstein, H.; Demos, T.C.

    1982-05-01

    Atypical mycobacterial infections of bone are rare. A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus treated with steroids developed an M. intracellulare infection of the shoulder and spine. These infections are insidious and diagnosis is difficult. Marked involvement of one joint, large effusion, or aspirated small synovial fragments suggest an atypical tuberculous joint infection.

  9. Ultrastructural morphologic changes in mycobacterial biofilm in different extreme condition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Sachan, Tarun Kumar; Sharma, Pragya; Rawat, Krishna Dutta

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the morphologic and ultrastructural features of biofilms of slow and fast-growing mycobacteria in different stress conditions, presence and absence of oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase (OADC) enrichment and at different temperatures: 30, 37 and 42 °C. Four hundred mycobacterial isolates were taken. The biomass of each biofilm was quantified using a modified microtiter plate assay method. Isolates were divided into those that formed fully established biofilms, moderately attached biofilms and weakly adherent biofilms by comparison with a known biofilm-forming strain. The large quantity of biofilm was produced by Mycobacterium smegmatis at temperature 37 and 42 °C as compared to 30 °C. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M. avium developed large amount of biofilm at 30 °C as compared to 37 and 42 °C. Mycobacterium tuberculosis developed strong biofilm at 37 °C and no biofilm at 30 and 42 °C in Sauton's media. The selected non-tuberculous mycobacteria and H37Rv developed strong biofilm in the presence of OADC enrichment in Sauton's medium. Microscopic examination of biofilms by scanning electron microscopy revealed that poorly adherent biofilm formers failed to colonize the entire surface of the microtiter well. While moderately adherent biofilm formers grew in uniform monolayers but failed to develop a mature three-dimensional structure. SEM analysis of an isolate representative of the group formed fully established biofilms with a textured, multi-layered, three-dimensional structure.

  10. In vitro antimycobacterial activity and toxicity of eight medicinal plants against pathogenic and nonpathogenic mycobacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nguta, Joseph M; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Nyarko, Alexander K; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Addo, Phyllis G A; Otchere, Isaac Darko; Kissi-Twum, Abena

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a serious public health challenge towards which new hits are urgently needed. Medicinal plants remains a major source of new ligands against global infectious illnesses. In our laboratories, we are currently investigating locally used ethnobotanicals for novel compounds against zoonotic tuberculosis. The microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) was used to study the anti-TB activity while the CellTiter 96® AQueous Assay, which is composed of solutions of a novel tetrazolium compound [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] and an electron coupling reagent (phenazine methosulfate) PMS, was used for cytotoxic studies. Correlation coefficients (R(2)) were used to compare the relationship between antimycobacterial activity of the eight crude extracts against nonpathogenic strains and the pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) values indicated that all the eight tested medicinal plant species had activity against all the three tested mycobacterial strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration value as low as 19.5µg/mL was observed against non-pathogenic strains M. bovis. Activity of the crude extracts against M. aurum was the best predictor of natural product activity against the pathogenic Mycobacterium bovis strain, with a correlation coefficient value (R(2)) of 0.1371. Results obtained from the current study validate, in part, the traditional utilization of the tested medicinal plants against tuberculosis. The unripe fruits from Solanum torvum are a potential source of safe and efficacious anti-TB crude drugs as well as a source for natural compounds that act as new anti-infection agents, and thus deserve further investigation towards development of a new class of molecules with activity against sensitive and drug resistant strains of M. bovis.

  11. Total abdominal colectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine and the rectum. This can cause an infection or abscess. Scarring of the connection between the small intestine and the rectum. This can cause a blockage of the intestine Wound breaking open Wound infections

  12. Abdominal tumors in children

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chaeyoun; Youn, Joong Kee; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Sung-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in pediatric patients has been steadily increasing in recent years. However, its use for diagnosing and treating abdominal tumors in children is still limited compared with adults, especially when malignancy is a matter of debate. Here, we describe the experience at our center with pediatric abdominal tumors to show the safety and feasibility of MIS. Based on a retrospective review of patient records, we selected for study those pediatric patients who had undergone diagnostic exploration or curative resection for abdominal tumors at a single center from January 2010 through August 2015. Diagnostic exploration for abdominal tumors was performed in 32 cases and curative resection in 173 cases (205 operations). MIS was performed in 11 cases of diagnostic exploration (34.4%) and 38 cases of curative resection (21.9%). The mean age of the children who underwent MIS was 6.09 ± 5.2 years. With regard to diagnostic exploration, patient characteristics and surgical outcomes were found to be similar for MIS and open surgery. With regard to curative resection, however, the mean age was significantly lower among the patients who underwent open surgery (4.21 ± 4.20 vs 6.02 ± 4.99 for MIS, P = 0.047), and the proportion of malignancies was significantly higher (80% vs 39.4% for MIS, P < 0.001). MIS compared favorably with open surgery with respect to the rate of recurrence (6.7% vs 35.1%, P = 0.035), the rate of intraoperative transfusions (34.2% vs 58.5%, P = 0.01), the median amount of blood transfused (14 vs 22 mL/kg, P = 0.001), and the mean number of hospital days (4.66 ± 2.36 vs 7.21 ± 5.09, P < 0.001). Complication rates did not differ significantly between the MIS and open surgery groups. The operation was converted to open surgery in 3 cases (27.2%) of diagnostic MIS and in 5 cases (13.1%) of curative MIS. MIS was found to be both feasible and effective for the

  13. Isolation by genetic labeling of a new mycobacterial plasmid, pJAZ38, from Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, J A; Aínsa, J A; Pérez, E; Otal, I; Martín, C

    1997-01-01

    In a two-step mating experiment with recipient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, the Mycobacterium fortuitum cryptic plasmid pJAZ38 was isolated. Plasmid pJAZ38 was genetically labeled by cointegration formation mediated by the kanamycin-resistant mycobacterial transposon Tn611. The region responsible for replication of pJAZ38 was located and sequenced. This region showed homology with the Mycobacterium avium plasmid pLR7 and the Mycobacterium scrofulaceum plasmid pMSC262, a family of plasmids which have been found to be widespread throughout the mycobacteria. Further experiments showed pJAZ38 to be stably inherited in the absence of selection pressure and compatible with the most commonly used mycobacterial replicon, pAL5000. In contrast to pLR7 and pMSC262, pJAZ38 was able to replicate in M. smegmatis mc(2)155, making it a useful tool for mycobacterial genetics. PMID:9209023

  14. Abdominal Drainage Following Appendectomy and Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Stone, H. Harlan; Hooper, C. Ann; Millikan, William J.

    1978-01-01

    Consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendectomy (283) or urgent cholecystectomy (51) were prospectively studied for the development of post-operative incisional or peritoneal sepsis. Severity of the original peritoneal infection was carefully recorded, while use of a Penrose dam to drain the peritoneum was randomized according to pre-assigned hospital number. Both aerobic and anaerobic cultures were taken from the abdomen at the time of operation as well as from all postoperative infectious foci. Results demonstrated no essential differences in incidence of wound and peritoneal infection following appendectomy for simple or suppurative appendicitis (187) or following cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis (51). However, with gangrenous or perforative appendicitis (94), incisional and intra-abdominal infection rates were 43% and 45%, respectively, when a drain was used; yet only 29 and 13%, respectively, without a drain. These latter differences were significant (p < 0.001). In addition, intra-abdominal abscesses were three times as likely to drain through the incision than along any tract provided by the rubber conduit. Cultures revealed that hospital pathogens accounted for a greater proportion of wound and peritoneal sepsis after cholecystectomy and appendectomy for simple or suppurative appendicitis if a drain had been inserted than if managed otherwise. By contrast, a mixed bacterial flora was responsible for most infections following appendectomy for gangrenous or perforated appendicitis, irrespective as to use of a drain. PMID:646499

  15. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  16. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23(4):251-69. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) guideline. Back to Top Administration ... : Hospital Scope | Glossary | References | Site Map | Credits Freedom of ...

  17. Synthesis of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Suthagar, Kajitha; Watson, Andrew J A; Wilkinson, Brendan L; Fairbanks, Antony J

    2015-09-18

    A series of arabinose glycosyl sulfamides with varying alkyl chain types and lengths were synthesised as mimics of decaprenolphosphoarabinose (DPA), and as potential inhibitors of mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. Unprecedented conversion of the desired furanose to the thermodynamically more stable pyranose form occurred during final de-protection. Biological testing against Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed low to moderate anti-mycobacterial activity with marked dependence on alkyl chain length, which in the case of mono-substituted sulfamides was maximal for a C-10 chain.

  18. Enhanced mycobacterial diagnostics in liquid medium by microaerobic bubble flow in Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit.

    PubMed

    Hakalehto, Elias

    2013-06-01

    Portable Microbe Enrichment Unit (PMEU) method with microaerobic bubbling speeded up the growth of otherwise slowly starting and propagating Mycobacterium sp. Mycobacterium fortuitum growth was detected after 10-11h and Mycobacterium marinum produced clear growth in 4 days. A mycobacterial environmental isolate was verified in 2 days in the PMEU Spectrion(®) equipped with infrared sensors. In parallel static (without gas bubbling) cultures hardly any growth occurred. In conclusion, PMEU technology provided thus a rapid detection of environmental and clinical mycobacterial isolates. It would also help in the field diagnosis of antibiotic resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  19. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  20. Abdominal perfusion computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis.

  1. Abdominal Perfusion Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ogul, Hayri; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Kizrak, Yesim; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Yuceler, Zeynep; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Yilmaz, Omer; Aydinli, Bulent; Ozturk, Gurkan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an up to date review on the spectrum of applications of perfusion computed tomography (CT) in the abdomen. New imaging techniques have been developed with the objective of obtaining a structural and functional analysis of different organs. Recently, perfusion CT has aroused the interest of many researchers who are studying the applicability of imaging modalities in the evaluation of abdominal organs and diseases. Per-fusion CT enables fast, non-invasive imaging of the tumor vascular physiology. Moreover, it can act as an in vivo biomarker of tumor-related angiogenesis. PMID:25610249

  2. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, phase II trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ceftolozane-tazobactam plus metronidazole compared with meropenem in adult patients with complicated intra-abdominal infections.

    PubMed

    Lucasti, Christopher; Hershberger, Ellie; Miller, Benjamin; Yankelev, Sara; Steenbergen, Judith; Friedland, Ian; Solomkin, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Ceftolozane-tazobactam (TOL-TAZ) is a novel antibacterial with activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other common Gram-negative pathogens, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, that are associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAIs). This prospective, double-blind, randomized, multicenter, phase II trial assessed patient clinical and microbiological responses to and the safety of TOL-TAZ plus metronidazole compared with those of meropenem. Hospitalized adults with cIAIs that required surgical intervention were randomized (2:1) to receive intravenous (i.v.) TOL-TAZ (1.5 g [containing 1,000 mg TOL and 500 mg TAZ] every 8 h [q8h]) with or without i.v. metronidazole (500 mg q8h) or i.v. meropenem (1 g q8h) for 4 to 7 days. The primary endpoint was the clinical response at the test-of-cure visit in the microbiologically modified intent-to-treat (mMITT) and microbiologically evaluable (ME) populations. Secondary measures included the patients' microbiological response and safety. In total, 82 patients received TOL-TAZ (90.2% with metronidazole), and 39 received meropenem. For the mMITT population, clinical cure was seen in 83.6% of the patients (51/61; 95% confidence interval [CI], 71.9 to 91.8) who received TOL-TAZ and 96.0% of the patients (24/25; 95% CI, 79.6 to 99.9) who received meropenem (difference, -12.4%; 95% CI, -34.9% to 11.1%); in the ME population, clinical cure was seen in 88.7% and 95.8% of the patients (difference, -7.1%; 95% CI, -30.7% to 16.9%) who received TOL-TAZ and meropenem, respectively. TOL-TAZ demonstrated microbiological success against Escherichia coli (89.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (100%), and P. aeruginosa (100%). The adverse event rates were similar in the groups (50.0% with TOL-TAZ and 48.8% with meropenem). TOL-TAZ in combination with metronidazole was well tolerated and resulted in clinical and microbiological success rates supportive of further clinical development in

  3. Recurrent pneumothorax following abdominal paracentesis.

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    A 62 year old man presented with abdominal ascites, without pleural effusion, due to peritoneal mesothelioma. He had chronic obstructive airways disease and a past history of right upper lobectomy for tuberculosis. On two occasions abdominal paracentesis was followed within 72 hours by pneumothorax. This previously unreported complication of abdominal paracentesis may be due to increased diaphragmatic excursion following the procedure and should be considered in patients with preexisting lung disease. PMID:2385561

  4. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  5. Abdominal pregnancy- a case report.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ii; Ude, Ac; Aderibigbe, Aso; Amu, Oc; Udeh, Pe; Obianyo, Nen; Ani, Coc

    2011-01-01

    A case of abdominal pregnancy in a 39 year old female gravida 4, para 0(+3) is presented. Ultrasonography revealed a viable abdominal pregnancy at 15 weeks gestational age. She was initially managed conservatively. Surgical intervention became necessary at 20 weeks gestational age following Ultrasound detection of foetal demise. The maternal outcome was favourable. This case is presented to highlight the dilemma associated with diagnosis and management of abdominal pregnancy with a review of literature.

  6. Mycobacterial DNA Replication As a target For Antituberculosis Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Płocińska, Renata; Korycka-Machała, Małgorzata; Płociński, Przemysław; Dziadek, Jarosław

    2017-01-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is a leading infectious disease organism, causing millions of deaths each year. This serious pathogen has been greatly spread worldwide and recent years have observed an increase in the number of multi-drug resistant and totally drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains (WHO report, 2014). The danger of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease has emphasized the need for the discovery of a new generation of antimicrobial agents. The development of novel alternative medical strategies, new drugs and the search for optimal drug targets are top priority areas of tuberculosis research. Key characteristics of mycobacteria include: slow growth, the ability to transform into a metabolically silent - latent state, intrinsic drug resistance and the relatively rapid development of acquired drug resistance. These factors make finding an ideal antituberculosis drug enormously challenging, even if it is designed to treat drug sensitive tuberculosis strains. A vast majority of canonical antibiotics including antituberculosis agents target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis or DNA/RNA processing. Novel therapeutic approaches are being tested to target mycobacterial cell division, two-component regulatory factors, lipid synthesis and the transition between the latent and actively growing states. This review discusses the choice of cellular targets for an antituberculosis therapy, describes putative drug targets evaluated in the recent literature and summarizes potential candidates under clinical and pre-clinical development. We focus on the key cellular process of DNA replication, as a prominent target for future antituberculosis therapy. We describe two main pathways: the biosynthesis of nucleic acids precursors - the nucleotides, and the synthesis of DNA molecules. We summarize data regarding replication associated proteins that are critical for nucleotide synthesis, initiation, unwinding and

  7. Novel nicotine analogues with potential anti-mycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Paresh T; Athmaram, Thimmasandra Narayanappa; Arunkumar, Gundaiah Ramesh

    2016-04-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading lethal infectious disease in the world after acquired immuno deficiency (AIDs). We have developed a series of twenty-five novel nicotine analogues with de-addiction property and tested them for their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). In an effort to increase the specificity of action and directing nicotine analogues to target MTB, four promising compounds were further optimized via molecular docking studies against the Dihydrofolate reductase of MTB. After lead optimization, one nicotine analogue [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1-methylpyrrolidin-2-one] exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 μg/mL (2.86 nM) against M. tuberculosis (H37Rv strain), a human pathogenic strain of clinically significant importance. Pharmacokinetic analysis of [3-(5-(3fluorophenyl)nicotinoyl)-1methylpyrrolidin-2-one] with lowest MIC value via oral route in Wistar rats revealed that at a dosage of 5 mg/kg body weight gave a maximum serum drug concentration (Cmax) of 2.86 μg/mL, Tmax of one hour and a half-life (T1/2) of more than 24 h and Volume of distribution (Vd) of 27.36 L. Whereas the parenteral (intra venous) route showed a Cmax of 3.37 μg/mL, Tmax of 0.05 h, T1/2 of 24 h and Vd equivalent to 23.18 L. The acute oral toxicity and repeated oral toxicity studies in female Wistar rats had an LD50>2000 mg/kg body weight. Our data suggests that nicotine derivatives developed in the present study has good metabolic stability with tunable pharmacokinetics (PK) with therapeutic potential to combat MTB. However, further in vivo studies for anti-tuberculosis activity and elucidation of mode of action could result in more promising novel drug for treating MTB. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report revealing the anti-mycobacterial potential of nicotine analogue at potential therapeutic concentrations.

  8. Design and synthesis of novel antimicrobials with activity against Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacterial species, including M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tiruveedhula, V.V.N. Phani Babu; Witzigmann, Christopher M.; Verma, Ranjit; Kabir, M. Shahjahan; Rott, Marc; Schwan, William R.; Medina-Bielski, Sara; Lane, Michelle; Close, William; Polanowski, Rebecca L.; Sherman, David; Monte, Aaron; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Cook, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming increase in bacterial resistance over the last decade along with a dramatic decrease in new treatments for infections has led to problems in the healthcare industry. Tuberculosis (TB) is caused mainly by Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is responsible for 1.4 million deaths per year. A world-wide threat with HIV co-infected with multi and extensively drug-resistant strains of TB has emerged. In this regard, herein, novel acrylic acid ethyl ester derivatives were synthesized in simple, efficient routes and evaluated as potential agents against several Mycobacterium species. These were synthesized via a stereospecific process for structure activity relationship (SAR) studies. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays indicated that esters 12, 13, and 20 exhibited greater in vitro activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis than rifampin, one of the current, first-line anti-mycobacterial chemotherapeutic agents. Based on these studies the acrylic ester 20 has been developed as a potential lead compound which was found to have an MIC value of 0.4 μg/mL against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The SAR and biological activity of this series is presented; a Michael – acceptor mechanism appears to be important for potent activity of this series of analogs. PMID:24200931

  9. Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 are targets of immunoglobulin G in individuals with past tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Tateishi, Yoshitaka; Hirayama, Yukio; Ozeki, Yuriko; Niki, Mamiko; Kitada, Seigo; Maekura, Ryoji; Tsujimura, Kunio; Koide, Yukio; Ohara, Naoya; Yamamoto, Taro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Sohkichi

    2013-01-01

    Development of accurate methods for predicting progression of tuberculosis (TB) from the latent state is recognized as vitally important in controlling TB, because a majority of cases develop from latent infections. Past TB that has never been treated has a higher risk of progressing than does latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in patients who have previously received treatment. Antibody responses against 23 kinds of M. tuberculosis proteins in individuals with past TB who had not been medicated were evaluated. These individuals had significantly higher concentrations of antibodies against Antigen 85A and mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1) than did those with active TB and uninfected controls. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of tubercle bacilli, antigen 85 and MDP1 inside tuberculous granuloma lesions in an asymptomatic subject, showing that M. tuberculosis in lesions expresses both antigen 85 and MDP1. Our study suggests the potential usefulness of measuring antibody responses to antigen 85A and MDP1 for assessing the risk of TB progression.

  10. Platelets Direct Monocyte Differentiation Into Epithelioid-Like Multinucleated Giant Foam Cells With Suppressive Capacity Upon Mycobacterial Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yonghong; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Yin, Hongyun; Dong, Zhengwei; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Jun; Bi, Aixiao; Weber, Stephan; Maertzdorf, Jeroen; Chen, Gang; Chen, Yang; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Epithelioid, foam, and multinucleated giant cells (MNGCs) are characteristics of tuberculosis granulomas, yet the precise genesis and functions of these transformed macrophages are unclear. We evaluated the role of platelets as drivers of macrophage transformation in mycobacterial infection. Methods. We employed flow cytometry and microscopy to assess cellular phenotype and phagocytosis. Immune assays allowed quantification of cytokines and chemokines, whereas gene microarray technology was applied to estimate global transcriptome alterations. Immunohistochemical investigations of tuberculosis granulomas substantiated our findings at the site of infection. Results. Monocytes differentiated in presence of platelets (MP-Macs) acquired a foamy, epithelioid appearance and gave rise to MNGCs (MP-MNGCs). MP-Macs up-regulated activation markers, phagocytosed mycobacteria, and released abundant interleukin 10. Upon extended culture, MP-Macs shared transcriptional features with epithelioid cells and M2 macrophages and up-regulated CXCL5 transcripts. In line with this, CXCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in airways of active tuberculosis patients. The platelet-specific CD42b antigen was detected in MP-Macs, likewise in macrophages, MNGCs, and epithelioid cells within tuberculosis granulomas, along with the platelet aggregation-inducing factor PDPN. Conclusions. Platelets drive macrophage differentiation into MNGCs with characteristics of epithelioid, foam, and giant cells observed in tuberculosis granulomas. Our data define platelets as novel participants in tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24987031

  11. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  12. Fertility after abdominal myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Connolly, G; Doyle, M; Barrett, T; Byrne, P; De Mello, M; Harrison, R F

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the morbidity and pregnancy outcome of myomectomy in infertile women with uterine fibroids. This was a cross-sectional study. Records were reviewed for 100 consecutive women in the Rotunda Hospital who underwent myomectomy in the years 1995-1996. A questionnaire regarding subsequent fertility was sent. The study was carried out in the infertility unit at the Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Seventy-five women responded. Multiple myomectomy was performed in 52 (70%). Mean fibroid size was 6.8 cm (range 2-14.5 cm). Nine women (12%) developed complications; five had menstrual problems, two had wound discomfort and two had abdominal discomfort. Twenty-five women (33%) became pregnant. Seven (28%) were IVF pregnancies. Overall six (24%) miscarried. In 19 of 25, pregnancy occurred where fibroids were the only identifiable cause of infertility. We conclude that abdominal myomectomy is associated with a favourable outcome in infertile women particularly if no other confounding variable is present.

  13. Granulomatous encephalomyelitis and intestinal ganglionitis in a spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) infected with Mycobacterium genavense.

    PubMed

    Gomez, G; Saggese, M D; Weeks, B R; Hoppes, S M; Porter, B F

    2011-01-01

    An approximately 30-year-old male spectacled Amazon parrot (Amazona albifrons) was presented with a 2-week history of ataxia, head shaking, weight loss and seizures. Gross findings on necropsy examination included atrophy of the musculature, ruffled feathers and minimal epicardial and abdominal fat. Microscopically, there were perivascular cuffs of macrophages with fewer lymphocytes in the grey and white matter of the brain and spinal cord. These lesions were accompanied by gliosis and mild vacuolation of the white matter. In the small intestine, up to 70% of the intestinal ganglia were effaced by infiltrates of macrophages and fewer lymphocytes. The intestinal lamina propria contained multiple inflammatory aggregates of a similar nature. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed the presence of numerous bacilli within the cytoplasm of macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric ganglia. Amplification of the DNAJ gene confirmed a mycobacterial infection and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a species-specific primer confirmed the aetiology as Mycobacterium genavense. Infection of the CNS with Mycobacterium spp. is uncommon and has not been previously reported in a parrot. This case is unusual in that the organism exhibited tropism for neural tissue.

  14. EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity plays a key role in mycobacterial cytosolic translocation and virulence: effects of single-residue mutations at glutamine 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Decheng; Jiang, Guozhong; Liu, Wei; Deng, Qing; Li, Xiujun; Qian, Wei; Ouellet, Hugues; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    EsxA is required for virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and plays an essential role in phagosome rupture and translocation to the cytosol of macrophages. Recent biochemical studies have demonstrated that EsxA is a membrane-permeabilizing protein. However, evidence that link EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity to Mtb cytosolic translocation and virulence is lacking. Here we found that mutations at glutamine 5 (Q5) could up or down regulate EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity. The mutation Q5K significantly diminished the membrane-permeabilizing activity, while Q5V enhanced the activity. By taking advantage of the single-residue mutations, we tested the effects of EsxA membrane-permeabilizing activity on mycobacterial virulence and cytosolic translocation using the esxA/esxB knockout strains of Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) and Mtb. Compared to wild type (WT), the Q5K mutant exhibited significantly attenuated virulence, evidenced by intracellular survival and cytotoxicity in mouse macrophages as well as infection of zebra fish embryos. The attenuated virulence of the Q5K mutant was correlated to the impaired cytosolic translocation. On the contrary, the Q5V mutant had a significantly increased cytosolic translocation and showed an overall increased virulence. This study provides convincing evidence that EsxA contributes to mycobacterial virulence with its membrane-permeabilizing activity that is required for cytosolic translocation. PMID:27600772

  15. Infection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-16

    inapparent infection. A refeeding program may thus become complicated by the sudden appearance of a life-threatening infectious illness (3). (3) The...Beisel, W. R. 23 Unusually low serum concentrations of inorganic phosphate have been reported in patients with gram-negative sepsis and in Reye’s syndrome ...infection should be corrected by a well-managed program of convalescent-period refeeding . This aspect of nutritional support is too often ignored. On the

  16. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Meets the Cytosol: The Role of cGAS in Anti-mycobacterial Immunity.

    PubMed

    Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2015-06-10

    The intracellular fate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a subject of long debate. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, three independent studies reveal the detection of cytosolic mycobacterial DNA by the nucleotidyltransferase cGAS, emphasizing the concept of cytosolic access by M. tuberculosis and its role in balancing immune-protection and immune-pathogenesis.

  18. Acanthamoeba Encephalitis: Isolation of Genotype T1 in Mycobacterial Liquid Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Rula; Badenoch, Paul R.; Francis, Michelle J.; Fernandez, Charles; Adamson, Penelope J.; Dendle, Claire; Woolley, Ian; Robson, Jenny; Korman, Tony M.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Acanthamoeba encephalitis diagnosed from an antemortem brain biopsy specimen, where the organism was first isolated in mycobacterial liquid medium and first identified by using a sequence generated by a commercial panfungal sequencing assay. We correlate susceptibility results with clinical outcome. PMID:25502534

  19. Dissecting the membrane cholesterol requirement for mycobacterial entry into host cells.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Jafurulla, Md; Kumar, G Aditya; Raghunand, Tirumalai R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacteria are intracellular pathogens that can invade and survive within host macrophages, and are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The molecular mechanism involved in the internalization of mycobacteria is poorly understood. In this work, we have explored the role of host membrane cholesterol in the entry of the avirulent surrogate mycobacterial strain Mycobacterium smegmatis into THP-1 macrophages. Our results show that depletion of host membrane cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin results in a significant reduction in the entry of M. smegmatis into host cells. More importantly, we show that the inhibition in the ability of M. smegmatis to enter host macrophages could be reversed upon replenishment of membrane cholesterol. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first report showing that membrane cholesterol replenishment can reverse the inhibition in the entry of mycobacteria into host cells. In addition, we demonstrate that cholesterol complexation using amphotericin B (without physical depletion) is sufficient to inhibit mycobacterial entry. Importantly, we observed a significant reduction in mycobacterial entry upon enrichment of host membrane cholesterol. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, that an optimum host plasma membrane cholesterol is necessary for the entry of mycobacteria. These results assume relevance in the context of developing novel therapeutic strategies targeting cholesterol-mediated mycobacterial host cell entry.

  20. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix.

  1. Differential Immune Responses and Protective Effects in Avirulent Mycobacterial Strains Vaccinated BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laicheng; Fu, Ruiling; Yuan, Xuefeng; Shi, Chunwei; Wang, Shuling; Lu, Xianyu; Ma, Zhao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Qin, Weiyan; Fan, Xionglin

    2015-07-01

    Screening live mycobacterial vaccine candidates is the important strategy to develop new vaccines against adult tuberculosis (TB). In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of several avirulent mycobacterial strains including Mycobacterium smegmatis, M. vaccae, M. terrae, M. phlei, M. trivial, and M. tuberculosis H37Ra were compared with M. bovis BCG in BALB/c mice. Our results demonstrated that differential immune responses were induced in different mycobacterial species vaccinated mice. As BCG-vaccinated mice did, M. terrae immunization resulted in Th1-type responses in the lung, as well as splenocytes secreting IFN-γ against a highly conserved mycobacterial antigen Ag85A. M. smegmatis also induced the same splenocytes secreting IFN-γ as BCG and M. terrae did. In addition, M. terrae and M. smegmatis-immunized mice predominantly increased expression of IL-10 and TGF-β in the lung. Most importantly, mice vaccinated with H37Ra and M. vaccae could provide the same protection in the lung against virulent M. tuberculosis challenge as BCG. The result may have important implications in developing adult TB vaccine.

  2. [Unusual abdominal complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt].

    PubMed

    Guillén, A; Costa, J M; Castelló, I; Claramunt, E; Cardona, E

    2002-10-01

    The most common complications after CSF shunting to treat hydrocephalus are shunt infection and obstruction. Although ventriculoperitoneal (VP) diversion of the CSF using artificial shunt devices is an accepted method for the management of hydrocephalus, high rates of various complications have been reported, ranging from 24% to 47%. Among these, abdominal complications account for approximately 25%. The incidence of bowel perforation by shunt-catheter is known to be as low as 0.1-0.7%. We describe a case of migration af a peritoneal catheter through a congenital hernia of Morgagni.

  3. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid bioabsorbable screw: Case report.

    PubMed

    Oh, Horng Lii; Chen, Darren B; Seeto, Bradley G; Macdessi, Samuel J

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of pretibial sinus and abscess after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a polylactic acid tricalcium phosphate bioabsorbable screw for tibial fixation. Mycobacterium fortuitum was identified as the pathogen after specific mycobacterial cultures were obtained from operative specimens. M. fortuitum is a known but rare cause of periprosthetic infection. Diagnosis is often delayed as routine microbiological cultures do not utilise specific culture requirements for mycobacterial growth. There have been several reports in the literature of sterile abscesses associated with bioabsorbable screws. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection associated with a bioabsorbable implant. This case illustrates that post-operative Mycobacterium infection can occur as a complication of ACL reconstruction with bioabsorbable screw fixation and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of post-operative periprosthetic infection.

  4. [Abdominal artery aneurysm and associated surgical abdominal diseases: towards optimal timing].

    PubMed

    Stilo, Francesco; Mirenda, Francesco; Mandolfino, Tommaso; La Spada, Michele; D'Alfonso, Mario; Carmignani, Amedeo; De Caridi, Giovanni; Benedetto, Filippo; Spinelli, Francesco

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess which modalities offered the best timing in the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms associated with other abdominal surgical diseases. From January 1984 to December 2002, 372 patients underwent surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms, 350 men (94%) and 22 women (6%), mean age 72 years. Of these 10% were operated on urgently. The traditional open technique was used in 307 patients, and the endovascular method in the remaining 65 cases. In 40 patients (11%) we observed other associated abdominal diseases which were treated during the same operation in 34 cases (85%). We had three deaths in the 34 cases treated in the same operation (9%). In the remaining cases no perioperative mortality was registered. There were no cases of prosthesis infection. The mean hospital stay was 9 days. Simultaneous treatment appears, on the one hand, to carry an increased operative risk and increased mortality and, on the other, to present the advantage of having to perform only one surgical procedure. The advent of the endovascular method allows us to postpone the treatment of the associated disease without increasing the technical difficulty of the second operation.

  5. Mesh Sutured Repairs of Abdominal Wall Defects

    PubMed Central

    Lanier, Steven T.; Jordan, Sumanas W.; Miller, Kyle R.; Ali, Nada A.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A new closure technique is introduced, which uses strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh as a suture for closure of abdominal wall defects due to failures of standard sutures and difficulties with planar meshes. Methods: Strips of macroporous polypropylene mesh of 2 cm width were passed through the abdominal wall and tied as simple interrupted sutures. The surgical technique and surgical outcomes are presented. Results: One hundred and seven patients underwent a mesh sutured abdominal wall closure. Seventy-six patients had preoperative hernias, and the mean hernia width by CT scan for those with scans was 9.1 cm. Forty-nine surgical fields were clean-contaminated, contaminated, or dirty. Five patients had infections within the first 30 days. Only one knot was removed as an office procedure. Mean follow-up at 234 days revealed 4 recurrent hernias. Conclusions: Mesh sutured repairs reliably appose tissue under tension using concepts of force distribution and resistance to suture pull-through. The technique reduces the amount of foreign material required in comparison to sheet meshes, and avoids the shortcomings of monofilament sutures. Mesh sutured closures seem to be tolerant of bacterial contamination with low hernia recurrence rates and have replaced our routine use of mesh sheets and bioprosthetic grafts. PMID:27757361

  6. How I Manage Abdominal Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Christine E.

    1986-01-01

    In sports, abdominal injuries occur most frequently in cycling, horseback riding, and skiing. Most involve children, not adults. Any athlete sustaining a severe blow to the abdomen should be examined. Guidelines are provided for recognizing and treating injuries to the abdominal muscles, kidneys, spleen, and liver. (Author/MT)

  7. Primed Mycobacterial Uveitis (PMU): Histologic and Cytokine Characterization of a Model of Uveitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Rotkis, Lauren; Van Grol, Jennifer; Wilson, Leslie; Sandt, Angela; Lam, Deborah L.; Carlson, Eric; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic features and cytokine profiles of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and a primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU) model in rats. Methods In Lewis rats, EAU was induced by immunization with interphotoreceptor binding protein peptide, and PMU was induced by immunization with a killed mycobacterial extract followed by intravitreal injection of the same extract. Clinical course, histology, and the cytokine profiles of the aqueous and vitreous were compared using multiplex bead fluorescence immunoassays. Results Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates inflammation 2 days after intravitreal injection and resolves spontaneously 14 days later. CD68+ lymphocytes are the predominant infiltrating cells and are found in the anterior chamber, surrounding the ciliary body and in the vitreous. In contrast to EAU, no choroidal infiltration or retinal destruction is noted. At the day of peak inflammation, C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), IL-1β, IL-18, and leptin were induced in the aqueous of both models. Interleukin-6 was induced 2-fold in the aqueous of PMU but not EAU. Cytokines elevated in the aqueous of EAU exclusively include regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), growth-related oncogene/keratinocyte chemokine (GRO/KC), VEGF, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and IL-17A. In the vitreous, CXCL10, GRO/KC, RANTES, and MIP-1α were elevated in both models. Interleukin-17A and IL-18 were elevated exclusively in EAU. Conclusions Primed mycobacterial uveitis generates an acute anterior and intermediate uveitis without retinal involvement. Primed mycobacterial uveitis has a distinct proinflammatory cytokine profile compared with EAU, suggesting PMU is a good complementary model for study of immune-mediated uveitis. CXCL10, a proinflammatory cytokine, was increased in the aqueous and

  8. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  9. An unusual cause of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Majid; Islamian, Ariyan Pirayesh; Lang, Josef M; Hornef, Mathias; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-08-01

    Infection associated with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt implantation can be a significant problem. VP shunt infection with Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative anaerobic rod, usually is related to underlying abdominal disease. This article describes treatment of two patients suffering from a VP shunt infection with S. marcescens without underlying abdominal disease.

  10. The Host Response to a Clinical MDR Mycobacterial Strain Cultured in a Detergent-Free Environment: A Global Transcriptomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Leisching, Gina; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; Mpongoshe, Vuyiseka; van Heerden, Carel; van Helden, Paul; Wiid, Ian; Baker, Bienyameen

    2016-01-01

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection, the initial interactions between the pathogen and the host cell determines internalization and innate immune response events. It is established that detergents such as Tween alter the mycobacterial cell wall and solubilize various lipids and proteins. The implication of this is significant since induced changes on the cell wall affect macrophage uptake and the immune response to M.tb. Importantly, during transmission between hosts, aerosolized M.tb enters the host in its native form, i.e. in a detergent-free environment, thus in vitro and in vivo studies should mimic this as closely as possible. To this end, we have optimized a procedure for growing and processing detergent-free M.tb and assessed the response of murine macrophages (BMDM) infected with multi drug-resistant M.tb (R179 Beijing 220 clinical isolate) using RNAseq. We compared the effects of the host response to M.tb cultured under standard laboratory conditions (Tween 80 containing medium -R179T), or in detergent-free medium (R179NT). RNAseq comparisons reveal 2651 differentially expressed genes in BMDMs infected with R179T M.tb vs. BMDMs infected with R179NT M.tb. A range of differentially expressed genes involved in BMDM receptor interaction with M.tb (Mrc1, Ifngr1, Tlr9, Fpr1 and Itgax) and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines (Il6, Il1b, Tnf, Ccl5 and Cxcl14) were selected for analysis through qPCR. BMDMs infected with R179NT stimulate a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, R179NT M.tb induce transcription of Fpr1, a receptor which detects bacterial formyl peptides and initiates a myriad of immune responses. Additionally we show that the host components Cxcl14, with an unknown role in M.tb infection, and Tlr9, an emerging role player, are only stimulated by infection with R179NT M.tb. Taken together, our results suggest that the host response differs significantly in response to Tween 80 cultured M.tb and should therefore not be used in

  11. [Detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction in eye discharge and gastric juices in a case of scleritis].

    PubMed

    Tanemoto, K; Ishikawa, H; Kigasawa, K; Obazawa, H; Fusegawa, H; Miyachi, H; Ando, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial scleritis in which prompt diagnosis was made by the detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in eye discharge and gastric juices, when conventional tests were negative. A 77-year-old woman who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis visited the outpatient clinic of Tokai University Hospital complaining of pain in her right eye. She was diagnosed as having scleritis and uveitis. There were no indications of active tuberculosis. We examined the gastric juices, sputum, and eye discharge by microscopy, culture, and PCR for detection of mycobacterium. The results of microscopy and culture were negative, but with PCR we detected atypical mycobacterium in eye discharge and gastric juices. After oral treatment with antituberculosis agents, the patient's eye symptoms disappeared. Detecting mycobacterial DNA with PCR could be useful for early diagnosis of mycobacterial scleritis, so that treatment with antituberculosis agents could be started.

  12. Direct visualization by cryo-EM of the mycobacterial capsular layer: a labile structure containing ESX-1-secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Sani, Musa; Houben, Edith N G; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Pierson, Jason; de Punder, Karin; van Zon, Maaike; Wever, Brigitte; Piersma, Sander R; Jiménez, Connie R; Daffé, Mamadou; Appelmelk, Ben J; Bitter, Wilbert; van der Wel, Nicole; Peters, Peter J

    2010-03-05

    The cell envelope of mycobacteria, a group of Gram positive bacteria, is composed of a plasma membrane and a Gram-negative-like outer membrane containing mycolic acids. In addition, the surface of the mycobacteria is coated with an ill-characterized layer of extractable, non-covalently linked glycans, lipids and proteins, collectively known as the capsule, whose occurrence is a matter of debate. By using plunge freezing cryo-electron microscopy technique, we were able to show that pathogenic mycobacteria produce a thick capsule, only present when the cells were grown under unperturbed conditions and easily removed by mild detergents. This detergent-labile capsule layer contains arabinomannan, alpha-glucan and oligomannosyl-capped glycolipids. Further immunogenic and proteomic analyses revealed that Mycobacterium marinum capsule contains high amounts of proteins that are secreted via the ESX-1 pathway. Finally, cell infection experiments demonstrated the importance of the capsule for binding to cells and dampening of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Together, these results show a direct visualization of the mycobacterial capsular layer as a labile structure that contains ESX-1-secreted proteins.

  13. Menaquinone synthesis is critical for maintaining mycobacterial viability during exponential growth and recovery from non-replicating persistence.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Rakesh K; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Slayden, Richard A; Boyne, Melissa E; Lenaerts, Anne; Hinshaw, Jerald C; Angala, Shiva K; Chatterjee, Delphi; Biswas, Kallolmay; Narayanasamy, Prabagaran; Kurosu, Michio; Crick, Dean C

    2009-04-01

    Understanding the basis of bacterial persistence in latent infections is critical for eradication of tuberculosis. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA expression in an in vitro model of non-replicating persistence indicated that the bacilli require electron transport chain components and ATP synthesis for survival. Additionally, low microM concentrations of aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives inhibited both the aerobic growth and survival of non-replicating, persistent M. tuberculosis. Metabolic labelling studies and quantification of cellular menaquinone levels suggested that menaquinone synthesis, and consequently electron transport, is the target of the aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives. This hypothesis is strongly supported by the observations that treatment with these compounds inhibits oxygen consumption and that supplementation of growth medium with exogenous menaquinone rescued both growth and oxygen consumption of treated bacilli. In vitro assays indicate that the aminoalkoxydiphenylmethane derivatives specifically inhibit MenA, an enzyme involved in the synthesis of menaquinone. Thus, the results provide insight into the physiology of mycobacterial persistence and a basis for the development of novel drugs that enhance eradication of persistent bacilli and latent tuberculosis.

  14. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  15. Ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway: A new strategy for inducing CD8 cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Jianying; Hisaeda, Hajime; Chou Bin; Yu Qingsheng; Tu Liping; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays an indispensable role in inducing MHC class I-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells. In this study, we exploited UPS to induce CD8{sup +} T cells specific for mycobacterial HSP65 (mHSP65), one of the leading vaccine candidates against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A chimeric DNA termed pU-HSP65 encoding a fusion protein between murine ubiquitin and mHSP65 was constructed, and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were immunized with the DNA using gene gun bombardment. Mice immunized with the chimeric DNA acquired potent resistance against challenge with the syngeneic B16F1 melanoma cells transfected with the mHSP65 gene (HSP65/B16F1), compared with those immunized with DNA encoding only mHSP65. Splenocytes from the former group of mice showed a higher grade of cytotoxic activity against HSP65/B16F1 cells and contained a larger number of granzyme B- or IFN-{gamma}-producing CD8{sup +} T cells compared with those from the latter group of mice.

  16. Economics of abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bower, Curtis; Roth, J Scott

    2013-10-01

    The economic aspects of abdominal wall reconstruction are frequently overlooked, although understandings of the financial implications are essential in providing cost-efficient health care. Ventral hernia repairs are frequently performed surgical procedures with significant economic ramifications for employers, insurers, providers, and patients because of the volume of procedures, complication rates, the significant rate of recurrence, and escalating costs. Because biological mesh materials add significant expense to the costs of treating complex abdominal wall hernias, the role of such costly materials needs to be better defined to ensure the most cost-efficient and effective treatments for ventral abdominal wall hernias.

  17. A bizarre abdominal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Giorgia; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Ricci, Claudio; Casadei, Riccardo; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-09-06

    In spite of careful intraoperative precautions and gauze counts, mistakes can still occur during surgery. In the case reported, a retained gauze leaved during a surgical approach for removing a solid-cystic papillary tumor localized in the pancreatic tail, caused both persistent abdominal discomfort and the presence of an abdominal cystic lesion at imaging techniques. When a previous operative history is present, a foreign body should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of a patient with an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Finally, radio-opaque marker should be routinely used by surgeons in order to reach a correct diagnosis in operated patients having retained gauze.

  18. Acute incarcerated external abdominal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    External abdominal hernia occurs when abdominal organs or tissues leave their normal anatomic site and protrude outside the skin through the congenital or acquired weakness, defects or holes on the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernia, umbilical hernia, femoral hernia and so on. Acute incarcerated hernia is a common surgical emergency. With advances in minimally invasive devices and techniques, the diagnosis and treatment have witnessed major changes, such as the use of laparoscopic surgery in some cases to achieve minimally invasive treatment. However, strict adherence to the indications and contraindications is still required. PMID:25489584

  19. [Penetrating abdominal injuries].

    PubMed

    Nesbakken, A; Pillgram-Larsen, J; Naess, F; Gerner, T; Solheim, K; Stadaas, J O; Gjøra, O

    1990-02-28

    We have reviewed the medical records of 111 patients treated for abdominal stab wounds during the period 1980-87. Our two hospitals serve a catchment area of about 450,000 people. Exploratory laparotomy was performed in 89 patients with suspected peritoneal penetration. In 16 patients the laparotomy was negative, and in 15 patients only minor injuries were noted. There were no serious complications in these 31 patients. Twenty-seven patients had thoracic wounds below the fourth intercostal space, 15 with intraabdominal injuries. The most common injuries were lacerations of the liver, the small bowel and the diaphragm. The mortality in the series was 2%. Stab wounds are infrequent in Norway, and most surgeons have limited experience of such injuries. We discuss whether to employ immediate exploratory laparotomy or selective management when the peritoneum has been penetrated. When there is no evidence of evisceration or omental protrusion, local exploration of the wound should be performed in order to confirm or exclude peritoneal penetration. Injury to the diaphragm and intraabdominal viscera should always be suspected in thoracic stab wounds below the fourth intercostal space.

  20. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  1. Osteopontin Expression During the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigation of the role of osteopontin (Opn) in Johne’s disease is of interest based upon its ability to influence cytokine expression and to improve host defense against mycobacterial infections. The objective of this study was to characterize Opn expression and secretion by peripheral blood mono...

  2. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  4. Incentive spirometry after abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Davis, Suja P

    Patients face various possible complications after abdominal surgery. This article examines best practice in guiding and teaching them how to use an incentive spirometer to facilitate recovery and prevent respiratory complications.

  5. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  7. Abdominal Complications after Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    abdominal compartment syndrome, schemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic ulcer disease and astritis requiring laparotomy, small bowel obstruction, rimary fungal...complications in- luded trauma exploratory laparotomy, abdominal com- artment syndrome, ischemic bowel, biliary disease, peptic lcer disease and gastritis, large...70%); 13 for other compli- ations, such as biliary or perineal conditions (26%); and 4 or feeding access (8%). For the civilians, 2 had trauma

  8. The inhibitory effects of mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan and polysaccharides upon polyclonal and monoclonal human T cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, C; Mehlert, A; Lamb, J

    1988-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was able to inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation of human CD4+ T cell clones specific for influenza virus. The inhibitory effect was also present when peripheral human T cells were stimulated with crude mycobacterial antigen extracts. Non-specific T cell stimulation, i.e. IL-2, PHA and anti-CD3 antibodies coupled to beads, was not affected. The inhibitory property was also found when arabinomannan and arabinogalactan of mycobacterial origin were tested but not with other unrelated polysaccharides used as controls. The effect appears to be related to the processing of the antigen by the antigen-presenting cells, since it was evident when T cell clones were stimulated with whole virus, whereas stimulation with a synthetic peptide containing the relevant epitope was not inhibitable. PMID:3147152

  9. T cell receptor recognition of CD1b presenting a mycobacterial glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Stephanie; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Shahine, Adam; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Bhati, Mugdha; Tan, Li Lynn; Halim, Hanim; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Gapin, Laurent; Le Nours, Jérôme; Moody, D. Branch; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    CD1 proteins present microbial lipids to T cells. Germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive (GEM) T cells with conserved αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1b presenting mycobacterial mycolates. As the molecular basis underpinning TCR recognition of CD1b remains unknown, here we determine the structure of a GEM TCR bound to CD1b presenting glucose-6-O-monomycolate (GMM). The GEM TCR docks centrally above CD1b, whereby the conserved TCR α-chain extensively contacts CD1b and GMM. Through mutagenesis and study of T cells from tuberculosis patients, we identify a consensus CD1b footprint of TCRs present among GEM T cells. Using both the TCR α- and β-chains as tweezers to surround and grip the glucose moiety of GMM, GEM TCRs create a highly specific mechanism for recognizing this mycobacterial glycolipid. PMID:27807341

  10. Mycobacterial disease and impaired IFN-γ immunity in humans with inherited ISG15 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Dusan; Byun, Minji; Durfee, Larissa A.; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sanal, Ozden; Mansouri, Davood; Salem, Sandra; Radovanovic, Irena; Grant, Audrey V.; Adimi, Parisa; Mansouri, Nahal; Okada, Satoshi; Bryant, Vanessa L.; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Kreins, Alexandra; Velez, Marcela Moncada; Boisson, Bertrand; Khalilzadeh, Soheila; Ozcelik, Ugur; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schoggins, John W.; Rice, Charles M.; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Behr, Marcel; Vogt, Guillaume; Puel, Anne; Bustamante, Jacinta; Gros, Philippe; Huibregtse, Jon M.; Abel, Laurent; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible, ubiquitin-like intracellular protein. Its conjugation to various proteins (ISGylation) contributes to antiviral immunity in mice. We describe human patients with inherited ISG15 deficiency and mycobacterial, but not viral diseases. The lack of intracellular ISG15 production and protein ISGylation was not associated with cellular susceptibility to any viruses tested, consistent with the lack of viral diseases in these patients. By contrast, the lack of mycobacterium-induced ISG15 secretion by leukocytes — granulocytes in particular — reduced the production of IFN-γ by lymphocytes, including natural killer cells, probably accounting for the enhanced susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. This experiment of Nature shows that human ISGylation is largely redundant for antiviral immunity, but that ISG15 plays an essential role as an IFN-γ-inducing secreted molecule for optimal antimycobacterial immunity. PMID:22859821

  11. Pyrazinamide and Pyrazinoic Acid Derivatives Directed to Mycobacterial Enzymes Against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Michelle Fidelis; Fernandes, João Paulo-dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious diseases responsible for thousands of deaths worldwide. Due to the use of antimycobacterial drugs, TB prevalence seemed to be controlled, but with the appearance of resistant tuberculosis cases, the concern about the disease had become significant again, as well as the need for new alternatives to TB treatment. Since pyrazinamide (PZA) is part of the firstline agents in TB treatment, several derivatives of this drug were described, besides pyrazinoic acid (POA) derivatives, the active form of PZA. POA has been used mainly to design prodrugs to be activated by mycobacterial esterases, while PZA derivatives should be activated specifically by the nicotinamidase/ pyrazinamidase (PZAse), or other PZAse-independent pathways. The intention of this paper is to discuss the state of art of PZA and POA derivatives and their activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria, besides the therapeutic potential. Focus was given in prodrugs and derivatives directed to mycobacterial enzymes involved in its activation or mechanism of action.

  12. Definition and annotation of (myco)bacterial non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Gyanu; Arnvig, Kristine B; McDonough, Kathleen A

    2013-01-01

    RNA in bacteria may be broadly classified into coding and non-coding types. The prior, also known as messenger RNA, encode proteins as their final product. The non-coding RNA include all RNAs that are not translated into a protein. Examples of extensively studied and therefore prominent non-coding RNAs include rRNA, tRNA, tmRNA, whose designations reflect the functions performed by these RNAs. Discoveries of non-coding RNAs in mycobacteria have been reported in the recent years. At this early stage of this discipline of mycobacterial research, there is an opportunity for the scientific community to establish a consistent, systematic and objective approach to annotation of these RNAs. We are providing recommendations for this systematic annotation that we hope will be adopted by the mycobacterial research community. These may also serve as templates for annotation of non-coding RNAs in other bacteria.

  13. Common abdominal emergencies in children.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, James

    2002-02-01

    Because young children often present to EDs with abdominal complaints, emergency physicians must have a high index of suspicion for the common abdominal emergencies that have serious sequelae. At the same time, they must realize that less serious causes of abdominal symptoms (e.g., constipation or gastroenteritis) are also seen. A gentle yet thorough and complete history and physical examination are the most important diagnostic tools for the emergency physician. Repeated examinations and observation are useful tools. Physicians should listen carefully to parents and their children, respect their concerns, and honor their complaints. Ancillary tests are inconsistent in their value in assessing these complaints. Abdominal radiographs can be normal in children with intussusception and even malrotation and early volvulus. Unlike the classic symptoms seen in adults, young children can display only lethargy or poor feeding in cases of appendicitis or can appear happy and playful between paroxysmal bouts of intussusception. The emergency physician therefore, must maintain a high index of suspicion for serious pathology in pediatric patients with abdominal complaints. Eventually, all significant abdominal emergencies reveal their true nature, and if one can be patient with the child and repeat the examinations when the child is quiet, one will be rewarded with the correct diagnosis.

  14. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Dick, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit.

  15. Bedaquiline Targets the ε Subunit of Mycobacterial F-ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Subhashri; Biukovic, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    The tuberculosis drug bedaquiline inhibits mycobacterial F-ATP synthase by binding to its c subunit. Using the purified ε subunit of the synthase and spectroscopy, we previously demonstrated that the drug interacts with this protein near its unique tryptophan residue. Here, we show that replacement of ε's tryptophan with alanine resulted in bedaquiline hypersusceptibility of the bacteria. Overexpression of the wild-type ε subunit caused resistance. These results suggest that the drug also targets the ε subunit. PMID:27620476

  16. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches to characterize the role of genetic recombination in mycobacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Silvia E; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Dardenne, Caitlin N; Harpending, Henry H; Martin, Darren P; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium encompasses over one hundred named species of environmental and pathogenic organisms, including the causative agents of devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The success of these human pathogens is due in part to their ability to rapidly adapt to their changing environment and host. Recombination is the fastest way for bacterial genomes to acquire genetic material, but conflicting results about the extent of recombination in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported. We examined a data set comprising 18 distinct strains from 13 named species for evidence of recombination. Genomic regions common to all strains (accounting for 10% to 22% of the full genomes of all examined species) were aligned and concatenated in the chromosomal order of one mycobacterial reference species. The concatenated sequence was screened for evidence of recombination using a variety of statistical methods, with each proposed event evaluated by comparing maximum-likelihood phylogenies of the recombinant section with the non-recombinant portion of the dataset. Incongruent phylogenies were identified by comparing the site-wise log-likelihoods of each tree using multiple tests. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify genes that may have been acquired through horizontal transfer from non-mycobacterial sources. The most frequent associated lineages (and potential gene transfer partners) in the Mycobacterium lineage-restricted gene trees are other members of suborder Corynebacterinae, but more-distant partners were identified as well. In two examined cases of potentially frequent and habitat-directed transfer (M. abscessus to Segniliparus and M. smegmatis to Streptomyces), observed sequence distances were small and consistent with a hypothesis of transfer, while in a third case (M. vanbaalenii to Streptomyces) distances were larger. The analyses described here indicate that whereas evidence of recombination in core regions within the genus is

  17. [The role of laparoscopy in emergency abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Balén, E; Herrera, J; Miranda, C; Tarifa, A; Zazpe, C; Lera, J M

    2005-01-01

    Abdominal emergencies can also be operated on through the laparoscopic approach: the approach can be diagnostic laparoscopy, surgery assisted by laparoscopy or laparotomy directed according to the findings of the laparoscopy. The general contraindications refer above all to the state of haemodynamic instability of the patient and to seriously ill patients (ASA IV). In the absence of any specific counter-indications for the specific laparoscopic procedure to be carried out, many abdominal diseases requiring emergency surgery can be performed with the laparoscopic approach. The most frequent indications are appendicitis, acute colecistitis, gastroduodenal perforation, occlusion of the small intestine, and some abdominal traumas. With a correct selection of patients and the appropriate experience of the surgeon, the results are excellent and better than open surgery (less infection of the wound, complications, hospital stay and postoperative pain). A detailed explanation is given of the basic aspects of the surgical technique in the most frequent procedures of emergency laparoscopy.

  18. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  19. Abdominal wall closure after a stomal reversal procedure.

    PubMed

    López-Cano, Manuel; Pereira, José Antonio; Villanueva, Borja; Vallribera, Francesc; Espin, Eloy; Armengol Carrasco, Manuel; Arbós Vía, María Antonia; Feliu, Xavier; Morales-Conde, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The closure of a temporary stoma involves 2 different surgical procedures: the stoma reversal procedure and the abdominal wall reconstruction of the stoma site. The management of the abdominal wall has different areas that should be analyzed such us how to avoid surgical site infection (SSI), the technique to be used in case of a concomitant hernia at the stoma site or to prevent an incisional hernia in the future, how to deal with the incision when the stoma reversal procedure is performed by laparoscopy and how to close the skin at the stoma site. The aim of this paper is to analyze these aspects in relation to abdominal wall reconstruction during a stoma reversal procedure.

  20. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA.

    PubMed

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  1. Molecular basis for the differential quinolone susceptibility of mycobacterial DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rupesh; Madhumathi, Bhavani Shankar; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils in the genomes of eubacteria. Fluoroquinolones (FQs), successful as drugs clinically, target the enzyme to trap the gyrase-DNA complex, leading to the accumulation of double-strand breaks in the genome. Mycobacteria are less susceptible to commonly used FQs. However, an 8-methoxy-substituted FQ, moxifloxacin (MFX), is a potent antimycobacterial, and a higher susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to MFX has been demonstrated. Although several models explain the mechanism of FQ action and gyrase-DNA-FQ interaction, the basis for the differential susceptibility of mycobacterial gyrase to various FQs is not understood. We have addressed the basis of the differential susceptibility of the gyrase and revisited the mode of action of FQs. We demonstrate that FQs bind both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrases in the absence of DNA and that the addition of DNA enhances the drug binding. The FQs bind primarily to the GyrA subunit of mycobacterial gyrase, while in E. coli holoenzyme is the target. The binding of MFX to GyrA of M. tuberculosis correlates with its effectiveness as a better inhibitor of the enzyme and its efficacy in cell killing.

  2. The influence of haemoglobin and iron on in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rachel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; White, Andrew D.; Müller, Julius; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Matsumiya, Magali; Dennis, Mike J.; Parizotto, Eneida A.; Harris, Stephanie; Stylianou, Elena; Naranbhai, Vivek; Bettencourt, Paulo; Drakesmith, Hal; Sharpe, Sally; Fletcher, Helen A.; McShane, Helen

    2017-01-01

    The current vaccine against tuberculosis, live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG, has variable efficacy, but development of an effective alternative is severely hampered by the lack of an immune correlate of protection. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in functional in vitro mycobacterial growth inhibition assays (MGIAs), which provide a measure of a range of different immune mechanisms and their interactions. We identified a positive correlation between mean corpuscular haemoglobin and in vitro growth of BCG in whole blood from healthy UK human volunteers. Mycobacterial growth in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and macaques was increased following the experimental addition of haemoglobin (Hb) or ferric iron, and reduced following addition of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO). Expression of Hb genes correlated positively with mycobacterial growth in whole blood from UK/Asian adults and, to a lesser extent, in PBMC from South African infants. Taken together our data indicate an association between Hb/iron levels and BCG growth in vitro, which may in part explain differences in findings between whole blood and PBMC MGIAs and should be considered when using such assays. PMID:28256545

  3. Tetrahydrolipstatin Inhibition, Functional Analyses, and Three-dimensional Structure of a Lipase Essential for Mycobacterial Viability

    SciTech Connect

    Crellin, Paul K.; Vivian, Julian P.; Scoble, Judith; Chow, Frances M.; West, Nicholas P.; Brammananth, Rajini; Proellocks, Nicholas I.; Shahine, Adam; Le Nours, Jerome; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Britton, Warwick J.; Coppel, Ross L.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Beddoe, Travis

    2010-09-17

    The highly complex and unique mycobacterial cell wall is critical to the survival of Mycobacteria in host cells. However, the biosynthetic pathways responsible for its synthesis are, in general, incompletely characterized. Rv3802c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a partially characterized phospholipase/thioesterase encoded within a genetic cluster dedicated to the synthesis of core structures of the mycobacterial cell wall, including mycolic acids and arabinogalactan. Enzymatic assays performed with purified recombinant proteins Rv3802c and its close homologs from Mycobacterium smegmatis (MSMEG{_}6394) and Corynebacterium glutamicum (NCgl2775) show that they all have significant lipase activities that are inhibited by tetrahydrolipstatin, an anti-obesity drug that coincidently inhibits mycobacterial cell wall biosynthesis. The crystal structure of MSMEG{_}6394, solved to 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, revealed an {alpha}/{beta} hydrolase fold and a catalytic triad typically present in esterases and lipases. Furthermore, we demonstrate direct evidence of gene essentiality in M. smegmatis and show the structural consequences of loss of MSMEG{_}6394 function on the cellular integrity of the organism. These findings, combined with the predicted essentiality of Rv3802c in M. tuberculosis, indicate that the Rv3802c family performs a fundamental and indispensable lipase-associated function in mycobacteria.

  4. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    PubMed Central

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the −10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22520.001 PMID:28067618

  5. Abdominal pain and asthenia as common clinical features in hospitalized children for giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Almirall, Pedro; Núñez, Fidel A; Bello, Janet; González, Odalys M; Fernández, Raquel; Escobedo, Angel A

    2013-09-01

    Giardiasis is a disease with worldwide distribution, although its prevalence differs from country to country. In order to investigate the clinical pattern of giardiasis in in-patient children, a case-control study was carried out. In-patient children who had Giardia lamblia infection were compared with non Giardia-infected children, focusing only on 4 clinical manifestations: diarrhoea, abdominal pain, asthenia and vomiting. In multivariable analysis, abdominal pain (odds ratio [OR] 4.71, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 2.66-8.32) and asthenia (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.16-9.37) had positive and independent associations with Giardia infection. The present study supports the potential role of G. lamblia in abdominal pain in children who attend- and are admitted- to a hospital in Havana City, and highlights the importance to keep abdominal pain and asthenia in mind in hospital admitted children in the event of an association with an evocative epidemiological context.

  6. Mycobacterial Hsp65 potentially cross-reacts with autoantibodies of diabetes sera and also induces (in vitro) cytokine responses relevant to diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Babajan, Banaganapalli; Tulsian, Nikhil K; Begum, Mahabubunnisa; Kumar, Ashutosh; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial disease and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Among the two types of diabetes, type-2 accounts for about 90% of all diabetic cases, whereas type-1 or juvenile diabetes is less prevalent and presents with humoral immune responses against some of the autoantigens. We attempted to test whether the sera of type-1 diabetes patients cross-react with mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) due to postulated epitope homologies between mycobacterial Hsp65 and an important autoantigen of type-1 diabetes, glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65). In our study, we used either recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or synthetic peptides corresponding to some of the potential epitopes of mycobacterial Hsp65 that are shared with GAD65 or human Hsp60, and a control peptide sourced from mycobacterial Hsp65 which is not shared with GAD65, Hsp60 and other autoantigens of type-1 diabetes. The indirect ELISA results indicated that both type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes sera cross-react with conserved mycobacterial Hsp65 peptides and recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein but do not do so with the control peptide. Our results suggest that cross-reactivity of mycobacterial Hsp65 with autoantibodies of diabetes sera could be due to the presence of significantly conserved peptides between mycobacterial Hsp65 and human Hsp60 rather than between mycobacterial Hsp65 and GAD65. The treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with recombinant mycobacterial Hsp65 protein or the synthetic peptides resulted in a significant increase in the secretion of cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10. Taken together, these findings point towards a dual role for mycobacterial Hsp65: in inducing autoimmunity and in inflammation, the two cardinal features of diabetes mellitus.

  7. Planned hernia repair and late abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, Ari; Tukiainen, Erkki

    2012-03-01

    Planned ventral hernia is a management strategy in which the abdominal fascial layer has been left unclosed and the viscera are covered only with original or grafted skin. Leaving the fascia open can be deliberate or unavoidable and most commonly results from staged repair of the abdominal wall due to trauma, peritonitis, pancreatitis, abdominal vascular emergencies, or abdominal compartment syndrome. The abdominal wall defects can be categorized as type I or II defects depending on whether there is intact, stable skin coverage. In defects with intact skin coverage, the most commonly used methods are the components separation technique and a prosthetic repair, sometimes used in combination. The advantages of the components separation technique is the ability to close the linea alba at the midline, creating a better functional result than a repair with inert mesh. Although the reherniation risk seems higher after components separation, the risk of infection is considerably lower. With a type II defect, with absent or unstable skin coverage, fascial repair alone is inadequate. Of the more complex reconstruction techniques, the use of a free tensor fasciae latae (TFL) flap utilizing a saphenous vein arteriovenous loop is the most promising. The advantages of the TFL flap include constant anatomy of the pedicle, a strong fascial layer, large-caliber vessels matching the size of the AV loop, and the ability to use large flaps (up to 20 × 35 cm). Whatever technique is used, the repair of complex abdominal wall defects requires close collaboration with plastic and abdominal surgeons, which is best managed in specialized centers.

  8. Mycobacterial Dormancy Systems and Host Responses in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha; Doddam, Sankara Narayana; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by the intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), claims more than 1.5 million lives worldwide annually. Despite promulgation of multipronged strategies to prevent and control TB, there is no significant downfall occurring in the number of new cases, and adding to this is the relapse of the disease due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance and the ability of Mtb to remain dormant after primary infection. The pathology of Mtb is complex and largely attributed to immune-evading strategies that this pathogen adopts to establish primary infection, its persistence in the host, and reactivation of pathogenicity under favorable conditions. In this review, we present various biochemical, immunological, and genetic strategies unleashed by Mtb inside the host for its survival. The bacterium enables itself to establish a niche by evading immune recognition via resorting to masking, establishment of dormancy by manipulating immune receptor responses, altering innate immune cell fate, enhancing granuloma formation, and developing antibiotic tolerance. Besides these, the regulatory entities, such as DosR and its regulon, encompassing various putative effector proteins play a vital role in maintaining the dormant nature of this pathogen. Further, reactivation of Mtb allows relapse of the disease and is favored by the genes of the Rtf family and the conditions that suppress the immune system of the host. Identification of target genes and characterizing the function of their respective antigens involved in primary infection, dormancy, and reactivation would likely provide vital clues to design novel drugs and/or vaccines for the control of dormant TB. PMID:28261197

  9. Effective vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection with a soluble mixture of secreted mycobacterial proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P

    1994-01-01

    An experimental vaccine that was based on secreted proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated in a mouse model of tuberculosis. I used a short-term culture filtrate (ST-CF) containing proteins secreted from actively replicating bacteria grown under defined culture conditions. The immunogenicity of the ST-CF was investigated in combination with different adjuvants, and peak proliferative responses were observed when ST-CF was administered with the surface-active agent dimethyldioctadecylammonium chloride. The immunity induced by this vaccine was dose dependent, and, in the optimal concentration, the vaccine induced a potent T-helper 1 response which efficiently protected the animals against a subsequent challenge with virulent M. tuberculosis. Antigenic targets for the T cells generated were mapped by employing narrow-molecular-weight fractions of ST-CF. The experimental vaccine primed a broadly defined T-cell repertoire directed to multiple secreted antigens present in ST-CF. A vaccination with viable Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), in contrast, induced a restricted T-cell reactivity directed to two secreted protein fractions with molecular masses of 5 to 12 and 25 to 35 kDa. The protective efficacy of the ST-CF vaccine was compared with that of a BCG standard vaccine, and both induced a highly significant protection of equal magnitude. The vaccination with ST-CF gave rise to a population of long-lived CD4 cells which could be isolated 22 weeks after the vaccination and could adoptively transfer acquired resistance to T-cell-deficient recipients. My results confirm the hypothesis that M. tuberculosis cells release protective antigens during growth. The high efficacy of a subunit vaccine observed in the present study is discussed as a possible alternative to a live recombinant vaccine carrier. Images PMID:7910595

  10. Host responses to mycobacterial infections: Spotlight on biomarker discovery to predict vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global spread of tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans result in enormous economic. social and public health burdens. TB vaccine development in both humans and animals has produced a growing portfolio of candidates with potential applicability across species. However, the lack of understandin...

  11. Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Opportunistic Mycobacterial Infections in HIV-Seropositive AIDS Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    PBS + 0.1 % Tween 80 (200 ul per well) at room temperature for 30 minutes. Patient’s sera were then diluted 1:100 using PBS + 0.1 % Tween 80 as diluent...goat anti-human polyvalent immunoglobulin peroxidase conjugate was diluted 1:1000 in PBS + 0.1 % Tween 80 and applied to each well in 1 00ul volumes

  12. [Abdominal pregnancy care. Case report].

    PubMed

    Morales Hernández, Sara; Díaz Velázquez, Mary Flor; Puello Tamara, Edgardo; Morales Hernández, Jorge; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, Maria Antonia; Cruz Cruz, Polita del Rocío; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2008-10-01

    Abdominal pregnancies are the implantation of gestation in some of the abdominal structures. This kind of pregnancies represents sevenfold maternal death risk than tubarian ectopic pregnancies, and 90-fold death risk than normal ones. Previous cases have erroneously reported as abscess in Douglas punch, and frequently result in obitus or postnatal deaths. We report a case of a patient with 27 years old, and diagnosis of 25.2 weeks of pregnancy, prior placenta and anhidramnios, referred due to difficult in uterine contour delimitation, easy palpation of fetal parts, cephalic pole in left hypochondrious and presence of mass in hypogastria, no delimitations, pain with mobilization, no transvaginal bleed and fetal movements. Interruption of pregnancy is decided by virtue of severe oligohidramnios, retardation in fetal intrabdominal growth, and recurrent maternal abdominal pain. Surgical intervention was carried out for resolution of the obstetrical event, in which was found ectopic abdominal pregnancy with bed placental in right uterine horn that corresponded to a pregnancy of 30 weeks of gestation. Abdominal pregnancy is still a challenge for obstetrics due to its diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis is oriented to prevent an intrabdominal hemorrhage that is the main maternal cause of mortality.

  13. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities.

  14. Antimicrobial Treatment Improves Mycobacterial Survival in Nonpermissive Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; Waddell, Simon J.; Burke, Bernard; Glenn, Sarah; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Tudo, Griselda; Labesse, Gilles; Young, Danielle I.; Young, Michael; Andrew, Peter W.; Butcher, Philip D.; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobials targeting cell wall biosynthesis are generally considered inactive against nonreplicating bacteria. Paradoxically, we found that under nonpermissive growth conditions, exposure of Mycobacterium bovis BCG bacilli to such antimicrobials enhanced their survival. We identified a transcriptional regulator, RaaS (for regulator of antimicrobial-assisted survival), encoded by bcg1279 (rv1219c) as being responsible for the observed phenomenon. Induction of this transcriptional regulator resulted in reduced expression of specific ATP-dependent efflux pumps and promoted long-term survival of mycobacteria, while its deletion accelerated bacterial death under nonpermissive growth conditions in vitro and during macrophage or mouse infection. These findings have implications for the design of antimicrobial drug combination therapies for persistent infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis. PMID:24590482

  15. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  16. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  17. Abdominal Bloating: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, A Young; Oh, Dong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal bloating is a very common and troublesome symptom of all ages, but it has not been fully understood to date. Bloating is usually associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic diseases, but it may also appear alone. The pathophysiology of bloating remains ambiguous, although some evidences support the potential mechanisms, including gut hypersensitivity, impaired gas handling, altered gut microbiota, and abnormal abdominal-phrenic reflexes. Owing to the insufficient understanding of these mechanisms, the available therapeutic options are limited. However, medical treatment with some prokinetics, rifaximin, lubiprostone and linaclotide could be considered in the treatment of bloating. In addition, dietary intervention is important in relieving symptom in patients with bloating. PMID:24199004

  18. [Gallstone ileus. Abdominal CT usefulness].

    PubMed

    Sukkarieh, F; Brasseur, P; Bissen, L

    2004-06-01

    The authors report the case of a 93-year old woman referred to the emergency department and presenting with an intestinal obstruction. Abdominal CT reveals a biliary ileus caused by the migration and the impaction of a 3 cm gallstone in the small bowel. Surgical treatment by enterolithotomy was successful. In over 90% of cases, gallstone ileus is a complication of cholelithiasis and accounts for 25% of intestinal obstruction in patients over 65 years. To reduce morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis and prompt treatment are essential. Abdominal CT-scan is the gold standard technique.

  19. Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Lemieux, Isabelle

    2006-12-14

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with abdominal obesity, blood lipid disorders, inflammation, insulin resistance or full-blown diabetes, and increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Proposed criteria for identifying patients with metabolic syndrome have contributed greatly to preventive medicine, but the value of metabolic syndrome as a scientific concept remains controversial. The presence of metabolic syndrome alone cannot predict global cardiovascular disease risk. But abdominal obesity - the most prevalent manifestation of metabolic syndrome - is a marker of 'dysfunctional adipose tissue', and is of central importance in clinical diagnosis. Better risk assessment algorithms are needed to quantify diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk on a global scale.

  20. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Soo; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed.

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous organisms; their isolation from clinical specimens does not always indicate clinical disease. The incidence of NTM lung diseases has been increasing worldwide. Although the geographic diversity of NTM species is well known, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus complex (MABC), and M. kansasii are the most commonly encountered and important etiologic organisms. Two distinct types of NTM lung diseases have been reported, namely fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic forms. For laboratory diagnosis of NTM lung diseases, both liquid and solid media cultures and species-level identification are strongly recommended to enhance growth detection and determine the clinical relevance of isolates. Treatment for NTM lung diseases consists of a multidrug regimen and a long course of therapy, lasting more than 12 months after negative sputum conversion. For MAC lung disease, several new macrolide-based regimens are now recommended. For nodular bronchiectatic forms of MAC lung diseases, an intermittent three-time-weekly regimen produces outcomes similar to those of daily therapy. Treatment of MABC lung disease is very difficult, requiring long-term use of parenteral agents in combination with new macrolides. Treatment outcomes are much better for M. massiliense lung disease than for M. abscessus lung disease. Thus, precise identification of species in MABC infection is needed for the prediction of antibiotic response. Likewise, increased efforts to improve treatment outcomes and develop new agents for NTM lung disease are needed. PMID:27134484

  3. [Swimming pool lung -- extrinsic allergic alveolitis or mycobacterial disease?].

    PubMed

    Koschel, D; Pietrzyk, C; Sennekamp, J; Müller-Wening, D

    2006-05-01

    There have been several recent reports of pulmonary disease resulting from exposure to Mycobacterium avium complex in indoor hot tubs. The disease is thought to be due either to infection or extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA). In this report we describe the case of a patient who developed episodes of fever, dyspnea and cough 4-6 hours after cleaning his indoor swimming pool. A diagnosis of EAA was made on finding a restrictive lung function pattern with gas exchange abnormalities, a predominant lymphocytosis in the bronchoalveolar lavage, diffuse ground-glass opacities in the lower lobes on high-resolution computer tomography, and specific IgG antibody activity to the swimming pool water. There was no precipitin reaction or specific IgG antibody activity to microbes extracted from the water. Interestingly, the water contained Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in huge amounts and in this case the histopathological features of the lung biopsy specimens differed from those seen in typical EAA, but were similar to those described in "hot tub lung" caused by mycobacteria. Solely by avoidance of cleaning the swimming pool, without any pharmacological treatment, the patient recovered completely within three months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of EAA possibly associated with MAC exposure in a swimming pool environment.

  4. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as Selective Inhibitors of Mycobacterial Lipoamide Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J. David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S.; Lima, Christopher D.; Nathan, Carl

    2010-06-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD{sup +}, and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 {angstrom} by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD{sup +} binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD{sup +} but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD{sup +} complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD{sup +} nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  5. Triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as selective inhibitors of mycobacterial lipoamide dehydrogenase .

    PubMed

    Bryk, Ruslana; Arango, Nancy; Venugopal, Aditya; Warren, J David; Park, Yun-Hee; Patel, Mulchand S; Lima, Christopher D; Nathan, Carl

    2010-03-02

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains the leading single cause of death from bacterial infection. Here we explored the possibility of species-selective inhibition of lipoamide dehydrogenase (Lpd), an enzyme central to Mtb's intermediary metabolism and antioxidant defense. High-throughput screening of combinatorial chemical libraries identified triazaspirodimethoxybenzoyls as high-nanomolar inhibitors of Mtb's Lpd that were noncompetitive versus NADH, NAD(+), and lipoamide and >100-fold selective compared to human Lpd. Efficacy required the dimethoxy and dichlorophenyl groups. The structure of an Lpd-inhibitor complex was resolved to 2.42 A by X-ray crystallography, revealing that the inhibitor occupied a pocket adjacent to the Lpd NADH/NAD(+) binding site. The inhibitor did not overlap with the adenosine moiety of NADH/NAD(+) but did overlap with positions predicted to bind the nicotinamide rings in NADH and NAD(+) complexes. The dimethoxy ring occupied a deep pocket adjacent to the FAD flavin ring where it would block coordination of the NADH nicotinamide ring, while the dichlorophenyl group occupied a more exposed pocket predicted to coordinate the NAD(+) nicotinamide. Several residues that are not conserved between the bacterial enzyme and its human homologue were predicted to contribute both to inhibitor binding and to species selectivity, as confirmed for three residues by analysis of the corresponding mutant Mtb Lpd proteins. Thus, nonconservation of residues lining the electron-transfer tunnel in Mtb Lpd can be exploited for development of species-selective Lpd inhibitors.

  6. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Pezzone, Natalia; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Fernández, Analia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Zumárraga, Martín; Gioffré, Andrea; Magni, Carolina; Beldomenico, Pablo M; Marini, M Rocío; Canal, Ana M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the first case of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection with typical granulomatous lesions of mycobacteriosis in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). The individual was a captive-bred young female, part of the control group of an experimental study on stress. Multiple granulomatous lesions were detected in a mesenteric lymph node of this young female. Mycobacterial infection was confirmed by bacteriologic culture and molecular identification methods. Clinical lesions were characterized by histopathology.

  7. [Improvement of routine works and quality control in mycobacterial laboratory].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Higuchi, Takeshi

    2007-03-01

    Many new methods have been introduced into routine laboratory works in microbiology since 1990. Molecular biology, in particular, opened a new era and promoted a technician's skill much. PCR and hybridization technique have been ordinary one in many laboratories. Since old techniques such as smear and culture are still needed, amount of routine works is increasing gradually. Thus, improving efficiency and keeping quality of routine works are becoming more and more important issues. This symposium focused on such points, and four skilled technicians around Japan presented their own tips. 1. Coexistence of M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) in the MGIT culture system: Yasushi WATANABE (Clinical Laboratory Division, NHO Nishi-Niigata Chuo National Hospital). Sputum samples of some tuberculosis patients yielded only MAC in the MGIT culture system. Such co-infected cases presented problems to mislead proper treatment and infection control. The detection rate of MAC was significantly high, and the growth speed of MAC was significantly rapid in the MGIT culture system, compared to those of M. tuberculosis. Additionally, M. tuberculosis was not detected with even more quantity than MAC in the small amount of mixed samples. Higher sensitivity and growth speed of MAC are the important characteristics of the MGIT system. 2. Internal quality control with ordinary examination results: Akio AONO (Department of Clinical Examination, Double-Barred Cross Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association). Our laboratory utilizes ordinary examination results as the internal quality control for specimen pretreatment, culture, and drug susceptibility testing. The contamination rate of MGIT culture system is useful for the evaluation of the decontamination process. It was 6.3% on average in our laboratory in 2005. The number of drug resistant strains is also useful to assess the performance of drug susceptibility testing. The incidence of each anti-tuberculosis drug resistance

  8. A comparison of gross pathology, histopathology, and mycobacterial culture for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in elk (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed Central

    Rohonczy, E B; Balachandran, A V; Dukes, T W; Payeur, J B; Rhyan, J C; Saari, D A; Whiting, T L; Wilson, S H; Jarnagin, J L

    1996-01-01

    Using the isolation of Mycobacterium bovis as the reference standard, this study evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and kappa statistic of gross pathology (abattoir postmortem inspection), histopathology, and parallel or series combinations of the two for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in 430 elk and red deer. Two histopathology interpretations were evaluated: histopathology I, where the presence of lesions compatible with tuberculosis was considered positive, and histopathology II, where lesions compatible with tuberculosis or a select group of additional possible diagnoses were considered positive. In the 73 animals from which M. bovis was isolated, gross lesions of tuberculosis were most often in the lung (48), the retropharyngeal lymph nodes (36), the mesenteric lymph node (35), and the mediastinal lymph nodes (16). Other mycobacterial isolates included: 11 M. paratuberculosis, 11 M. avium, and 28 rapidly growing species or M. terrae complex. The sensitivity estimates of gross pathology and histopathology I were 93% (95% confidence limits [CL] 84.97%) and 88% [CL 77.94%], respectively, and the specificity of both was 89% [CL 85.92%]). The sensitivity and specificity of histopathology II were 89% (CL 79.95%) and 77% (CL 72.81%), respectively. The highest sensitivity estimates (93-95% [CL 84.98%]) were obtained by interpreting gross pathology and histopathology in parallel (where an animal had to be positive on at least one of the two, to be classified as combination positive). The highest specificity estimates (94-95% [CL 91-97%] were generated when the two tests were interpreted in series (an animal had to be positive on both tests to be classified as combination positive). The presence of gross or microscopic lesions showed moderate to good agreement with the isolation of M. bovis (Kappa = 65-69%). The results showed that post-mortem inspection, histopathology and culture do not necessarily recognize the same infected animals and that the spectra of animals

  9. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the child’s mood and emotions, and in turn cause depression and anxiety. Screening/Diagnosis Detailed information regarding the location of abdominal pain, the frequency (number of times per week) and ... about the cause, and will guide further testing. Other important pieces ...

  10. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  11. Differentiation of human mononuclear phagocytes increases their innate response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneity of mononuclear phagocytes, partially explained by cell differentiation, influences the activation of innate responses. It has been reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis inhibits monocyte differentiation into either dendritic cells or macrophages. To evaluate whether the activation of effector mechanisms against M. tuberculosis differ between less and more differentiated mononuclear phagocytes, we compared monocytes differentiated in vitro for 24 h (MON24) and 120 h (MDM120) infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, H37Ra and the clinical isolate UT127 at different multiplicity of infection. MDM120 phagocytosed more M. tuberculosis, inhibited mycobacterial growth and did not die in response to the infection, compared with MON24. In contrast, MON24 become Annexin V and Propidium iodide positive after 36 h of M. tuberculosis infection. Although, there were striking differences between MON24 and MDM120, there were also some differences in the response to the mycobacterial strains used. Finally, in MDM120 infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a lower percentage of mycobacterial phagosomes accumulated transferrin and a higher percentage co-localized with cathelicidin than in MON24. These results demonstrate that innate responses induced by M. tuberculosis depends upon the stage of differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes and support that terminally differentiated cells are more efficient anti-mycobacterial effectors than the less differentiated ones.

  12. Solar Disinfection of MODS Mycobacterial Cultures in Resource-Poor Settings

    PubMed Central

    Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Coronel, Jorge; Moore, David A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Safe disposal of TB culture material in which the infectious burden of clinical samples has been greatly amplified is an important challenge in resource-limited settings. The bactericidal capacity of solar cookers has been demonstrated previously for conventional bacteria and contaminated clinical waste. We investigated the use of a simple solar cooker for the sterilization of mycobacterial broth cultures from the microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS). Methods Simulated TB culture materials were prepared by inoculating 24-well MODS plates with 500 µL of a known concentration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In a series of experiments, samples were simultaneously placed inside a box-type solar cooker and control box and removed at timepoints between 15 minutes and 6 hours. Quantitative cultures were performed using retrieved samples to determine sterilization effect. Results All cultures from the control box were positive at or within 1–4 logs of inoculation concentration. Simulated culture plates at concentrations from 103colony-forming-units (CFU)/ml to 107 CFU/ml were completely sterilized after only one hour of cooker exposure, at temperatures between 50–102°C. At 109 CFU/ml (far in excess of diagnostic cultures), it was only possible to recover mycobacterial growth in plates removed after 15 minutes. By 30 minutes all plates were effectively sterilized. Discussion Solar disinfection provides a very effective, safe and low-cost alternative to conventional equipment used for disposal of mycobacterial culture material. Effect of climatic conditions and optimal operating procedure remain to be defined. PMID:17971863

  13. Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... myhealthfinder Immunization Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Abdominal Pain (Stomach Pain), Short-termJust about everyone has had a " ... time or another. But sudden severe abdominal pain (stomach pain), also called acute pain, shouldn't be ...

  14. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  15. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  16. The mycobacterial acyltransferase PapA5 is required for biosynthesis of cell wall-associated phenolic glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Chavadi, Sivagami Sundaram; Onwueme, Kenolisa C; Edupuganti, Uthamaphani R; Jerome, Jeff; Chatterjee, Delphi; Soll, Clifford E; Quadri, Luis E N

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) are non-covalently bound components of the outer membrane of many clinically relevant mycobacterial pathogens, and play important roles in pathogen biology. We report a mutational analysis that conclusively demonstrates that the conserved acyltransferase-encoding gene papA5 is essential for PGL production. In addition, we provide an in vitro acyltransferase activity analysis that establishes proof of principle for the competency of PapA5 to utilize diol-containing polyketide compounds of mycobacterial origin as acyl-acceptor substrates. Overall, the results reported herein are in line with a model in which PapA5 catalyses the acylation of diol-containing polyketides to form PGLs. These studies advance our understanding of the biosynthesis of an important group of mycobacterial glycolipids and suggest that PapA5 might be an attractive target for exploring the development of antivirulence drugs.

  17. Treatment of the Mycobacterium chelonae Infection after Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    For recent years, use of autologous fat injection has increased significantly in facial contouring surgery. Along with such increase in use, complications like atypical mycoplasma infection have been also on the increasing trend. The authors report two cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection that occurred after autologous fat injection. Patients were treated as infection that resistant to common antibiotics and results were negative to routine culture and Gram staining. Acid-fast bacillus stain, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and mycobacterial cultures were conducted for diagnosis under suspicion of atypical mycoplasma infection. Then, combination antibiotics therapy, surgical treatment, and steroid injection were performed for treatment. Both patients were diagnosed with Mycobacterium chelonae in PCR test. They were positive to mycobacterial cultures. Combination antibiotics therapy was repeated to improvement of symptom. However, they could not be free from side effects such as deformation in facial contour, scar and pigmentation even after full recovery. When chronic wound infections after autologous fat injection, we must suspect atypical or mycobacterial infection and conduct examinations for a early diagnosis and proper antibiotic therapy that is effective to the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:25606492

  18. Rare presentation of multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoyan; Zou, Yang; Yin, Chenghong

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid disease, which is also known as cystic echinococcosis, is a zoonotic infection caused by the cestode tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus and rarely by Echinococcus multilocularis. In this report we describe an unusual case of a 19-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital for abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Computed tomography revealed multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis. The patient recovered after undergoing surgery to excise the cyst. The diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, and prevention in this case of multi-organ abdominal echinococcosis are discussed, in light of the relevant literature. PMID:26617932

  19. [Development of CT manifestations and anatomic studies on thoracic-abdominal junctional zone].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yilan; Deng, Wen; Yang, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Thoracic-abdominal junctional zone is an area from the inferior chest to superior belly. The inferior chest contains inferior pulmonary lobes, pulmonary ligament, inferior mediastinum and lower thoracic cavity,while the superior belly contains upper abdominal cavity, spatium retroperitonaeale, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, liver, stomach, adrenal glands, kidneys and spleen. This article is to review the CT manifestations and anatomy of diseases such as infection, trauma, hemorrhage, hernia and tumor involving this area. It could provides anatomic and pathological information for instituting clinical treatments.

  20. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair in HIV Patients with Ruptured Abdominal Aneurysm and Low CD4

    PubMed Central

    Orrapin, Saritphat; Arworn, Supapong; Reanpang, Termpong

    2016-01-01

    We report two HIV infected patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm by using endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) technique. A 59-year-old Thai man had a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and a 57-year-old man had a ruptured iliac artery aneurysm. Both patients had a CD4 level below 200 μ/L indicating a low immune status at admission. They were treated by EVAR. Neither patient had any complications in 3 months postoperatively. EVAR may have a role in HIV patients with ruptured abdominal aneurysm together with very low immunity. PMID:27703834

  1. Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruption with evisceration

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Ellen; Stawicki, Stanislaw PA; Bahner, David P

    2011-01-01

    Blunt traumatic abdominal wall disruptions associated with evisceration are very rare. The authors describe a case of traumatic abdominal wall disruption with bowel evisceration that occurred after a middle-aged woman sustained direct focal blunt force impact to the lower abdomen. Abdominal exploration and surgical repair of the abdominal wall defect were performed, with good clinical outcome. A brief overview of literature pertinent to this rare trauma scenario is presented. PMID:22229144

  2. [Antibiotic therapy by suppurative diseases of the abdominal cavity and soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Sazhin, V P; Bodrova, N G; Klimov, D E; Iurishchev, V A; Avdovenko, A L; Sazhin, I V

    2010-01-01

    Microbial background of the departments of abdominal and septic surgery was monitored and analyzed. More the 950 samples from each department was worked out. Therefore, it was determined, that gram-negative bacteria were more typical for the abdominal pathology, whereas, soft tissue infection was represented by gram-positive strains. Compliant antibioticogramms were performed and analyzed. For achieving effective prophylactic and empiric antibiotic therapy, data-based formular lists of antibacterial drugs were performed.

  3. Severe cellulitis and abdominal wall emphysema following laparoscopic colonic surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Chida, Tadasu; Kanda, Tatsuo; Kano, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal wall emphysema is a common complication of laparoscopic surgery. This condition is usually harmless; however, if an infection occurs, it can develop into a serious condition such as necrotizing fasciitis. We report a case of a 51-year-old woman suffering from severe cellulitis that spread from an area of abdominal wall emphysema after laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. Recognizing this complication, early diagnosis, and prompt treatment are cornerstones for successful management of this potentially fatal disease.

  4. Anti-dormant mycobacterial activity and target analysis of nybomycin produced by a marine-derived Streptomyces sp.

    PubMed

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Pruksakorn, Patamaporn; Sumii, Yuji; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Joubert, Jean-Pierre; Moodley, Prashini; Han, Chisu; Shin, Dayoung; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anti-dormant Mycobacterial substances, nybomycin (1) was re-discovered from the culture broth of a marine-derived Streptomyces sp. on the bioassay-guided separation. Compound 1 showed anti-microbial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG with the MIC of 1.0μg/mL under both actively growing aerobic conditions and dormancy inducing hypoxic conditions. Compound 1 is also effective to Mycobacterium tuberculosis including the clinically isolated strains. The mechanistic analysis indicated that 1 bound to DNA and induces a unique morphological change to mycobacterial bacilli leading the bacterial cell death.

  5. The role of the open abdomen procedure in managing severe abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper.

    PubMed

    Sartelli, Massimo; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Ansaloni, Luca; Bala, Miklosh; Beltrán, Marcelo A; Biffl, Walter L; Catena, Fausto; Chiara, Osvaldo; Coccolini, Federico; Coimbra, Raul; Demetrashvili, Zaza; Demetriades, Demetrios; Diaz, Jose J; Di Saverio, Salomone; Fraga, Gustavo P; Ghnnam, Wagih; Griffiths, Ewen A; Gupta, Sanjay; Hecker, Andreas; Karamarkovic, Aleksandar; Kong, Victor Y; Kafka-Ritsch, Reinhold; Kluger, Yoram; Latifi, Rifat; Leppaniemi, Ari; Lee, Jae Gil; McFarlane, Michael; Marwah, Sanjay; Moore, Frederick A; Ordonez, Carlos A; Pereira, Gerson Alves; Plaudis, Haralds; Shelat, Vishal G; Ulrych, Jan; Zachariah, Sanoop K; Zielinski, Martin D; Garcia, Maria Paula; Moore, Ernest E

    2015-01-01

    The open abdomen (OA) procedure is a significant surgical advance, as part of damage control techniques in severe abdominal trauma. Its application can be adapted to the advantage of patients with severe abdominal sepsis, however its precise role in these patients is still not clear. In severe abdominal sepsis the OA may allow early identification and draining of any residual infection, control any persistent source of infection, and remove more effectively infected or cytokine-loaded peritoneal fluid, preventing abdominal compartment syndrome and deferring definitive intervention and anastomosis until the patient is appropriately resuscitated and hemodynamically stable and thus better able to heal. However, the OA may require multiple returns to the operating room and may be associated with significant complications, including enteroatmospheric fistulas, loss of abdominal wall domain and large hernias. Surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology of severe intra-abdominal sepsis and always keep in mind the option of using open abdomen to be able to use it in the right patient at the right time.

  6. Intra-Abdominal Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Abdominal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oguejiofor, Njideka; Al-Abayechi, Sarah; Njoku, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal actinomycosis is a rare infectious disease, caused by gram positive anaerobic bacteria, that may appear as an abdominal mass and/or abscess (Wagenlehner et al. 2003). This paper presents an unusual case of a hemodynamically stable 80-year-old man who presented to the emergency department with 4 weeks of worsening abdominal pain and swelling. He also complains of a 20-bound weight loss in 2 months. A large tender palpable mass in the right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Laboratory studies showed a normal white blood cell count, slightly decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit, and mildly elevated total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase. A CT with contrast was done and showed a liver mass. Radiology and general surgery suspected malignancy and recommended CT guided biopsy. The sample revealed abundant neutrophils and gram positive rods. Cytology was negative for malignancy and cultures eventually grew actinomyces. High dose IV penicillin therapy was given for 4 weeks and with appropriate response transitioned to oral antibiotic for 9 months with complete resolution of symptoms. PMID:28299215

  7. Options for Closure of the Infected Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Chris A.; Rosenberger, Laura H.; Politano, Amani D.; Davies, Stephen W.; Riccio, Lin M.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The infected abdomen poses substantial challenges to surgeons, and often, both temporary and definitive closure techniques are required. We reviewed the options available to close the abdominal wall defect encountered frequently during and after the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections. Methods A comprehensive review was performed of the techniques and literature on abdominal closure in the setting of intra-abdominal infection. Results Temporary abdominal closure options include the Wittmann Patch, Bogota bag, vacuum-assisted closure (VAC), the AbThera™ device, and synthetic or biologic mesh. Definitive reconstruction has been described with mesh, components separation, and autologous tissue transfer. Conclusion Reconstructing the infected abdomen, both temporarily and definitively, can be accomplished with various techniques, each of which is associated with unique advantages and disadvantages. Appropriate judgment is required to optimize surgical outcomes in these complex cases. PMID:23216525

  8. whmD is an essential mycobacterial gene required for proper septation and cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, James E.; Bishai, William R.

    2000-01-01

    A study of potential mycobacterial regulatory genes led to the isolation of the Mycobacterium smegmatis whmD gene, which encodes a homologue of WhiB, a Streptomyces coelicolor protein required for sporulation. Unlike its Streptomyces homologue, WhmD is essential in M. smegmatis. The whmD gene could be disrupted only in the presence of a plasmid supplying whmD in trans. A plasmid that allowed chemically regulated expression of the WhmD protein was used to generate a conditional whmD mutant. On withdrawal of the inducer, the conditional whmD mutant exhibited irreversible, filamentous, branched growth with diminished septum formation and aberrant septal placement, whereas WhmD overexpression resulted in growth retardation and hyperseptation. Nucleic acid synthesis and levels of the essential cell division protein FtsZ were unaltered by WhmD deficiency. Together, these phenotypes indicate a role for WhmD in mycobacterial septum formation and cell division. PMID:10880571

  9. Identification of a substrate domain that determines system specificity in mycobacterial type VII secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Trang H.; Ummels, Roy; Bitter, Wilbert; Houben, Edith N. G.

    2017-01-01

    Type VII secretion (T7S) systems are specialized machineries used by mycobacterial pathogens to transport important virulence factors across their highly hydrophobic cell envelope. There are up to five mycobacterial T7S systems, named ESX-1 to ESX-5, at least three of which specifically secrete a different subset of substrates. The T7S substrates or substrate complexes are defined by the general secretion motif YxxxD/E. However this motif does not determine system specificity. Here, we show that the substrate domain recognized by the EspG chaperone is the determinant factor for this specificity. We first show that the introduction of point mutations into the EspG1-binding domain of the ESX-1 substrate pair PE35/PPE68_1 affects their secretion. Subsequently, we demonstrate that replacing this domain by the EspG5-binding domain of the ESX-5 substrate PPE18 resulted in EspG5 dependence and exclusive rerouting to the ESX-5 system. This rerouting of PE35/PPE68_1 to the ESX-5 system had a negative effect on the secretion of endogenous ESX-5 substrates. PMID:28205541

  10. Crystal structures of Mycobacterial MeaB and MMAA-like GTPases.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Baugh, Loren; Bullen, Jameson; Baydo, Ruth O; Witte, Pam; Thompkins, Kaitlin; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Abendroth, Jan; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Grundner, Christoph; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-06-01

    The methylmalonyl Co-A mutase-associated GTPase MeaB from Methylobacterium extorquens is involved in glyoxylate regulation and required for growth. In humans, mutations in the homolog methylmalonic aciduria associated protein (MMAA) cause methylmalonic aciduria, which is often fatal. The central role of MeaB from bacteria to humans suggests that MeaB is also important in other, pathogenic bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, the identity of the mycobacterial MeaB homolog is presently unclear. Here, we identify the M. tuberculosis protein Rv1496 and its homologs in M. smegmatis and M. thermoresistibile as MeaB. The crystal structures of all three homologs are highly similar to MeaB and MMAA structures and reveal a characteristic three-domain homodimer with GDP bound in the G domain active site. A structure of Rv1496 obtained from a crystal grown in the presence of GTP exhibited electron density for GDP, suggesting GTPase activity. These structures identify the mycobacterial MeaB and provide a structural framework for therapeutic targeting of M. tuberculosis MeaB.

  11. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  12. Nutritional status and eating disorders: neglected risks factor for nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease?

    PubMed

    Portillo, Karina; Morera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTMLD) in immunocompetent patients is an increasingly important epidemiologic concern. However, risk factors associated with susceptibility to NTMLD are not completely known. A prevalence of NTMLD appears to be rising, mainly in some populations such as middle-aged or elderly thin women, (a group including those with Lady Windermere syndrome) with neither remarkable history of respiratory disease nor smoking habit. Right middle lobe (RML) and lingula are often involved. Various predisposing factors and genetic defects have been described as possible causes of development of NTMLD, namely: voluntary suppression of cough, RML anatomical factors, menopause and mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Malnutrition is also an important and common risk factor associated with other mycobacterial disease like tuberculosis (TB) and its probable association with NTMLD as have been pointed out for some authors. However, a real description of all nutritional aspects and eating habits of patients prior to NTMLD diagnosis is lacking. We hypothesized that malnutrition and eating disorders like anorexia nervosa could be risk factors that may promoting NTMLD. From a clinical viewpoint, if this hypothesis proves to be correct, eating habits and nutritional aspects should be taken into account in the diagnosis process of suspected NTMLD, since they are easily identifiable and treatable conditions.

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines incorporating plasmid-encoded cytokines against Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah L; Slobbe, Lynn J; Peacey, Matthew; Gilbert, Sarah C; Buddle, Bryce M; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buchan, Glenn S

    2010-08-01

    DNA-based vaccines, alone or in combination with other sub-unit vaccination regimes, represent an alternative to live mycobacterial vaccines for protective immunization against tuberculosis. Here, we have used a murine immunization or Mycobacterium bovis aerosol challenge model to assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines. Mice that received immunization with DNA constructs encoding M. bovis antigen 85A (Ag85-A) and arget(ESAT-6) produced measurable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses to CD4(+) T-cell epitope-peptide recall antigens in vitro. The magnitude of these responses was enhanced by co-delivery of a construct encoding murine cytokines (macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1 alpha or interleukin(IL)-7), although they did not the match responses observed in mice that received Bacille Calmette-Guerin(BCG) immunisation. In contrast, DNA priming followed by boosting with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine (expressing M. tuberculosis Ag85-A) invoked higher IFN-gamma levels, with the most immunogenic regime of Ag85 or ESAT or IL-7 prime followed by MVA boost being of commensurate immunogenicity to BCG. Despite this, neither DNA alone nor DNA-prime or MVA boost regimes conferred measurable protection against aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis. These data highlight both the promise and the shortcomings of new generation subunit tuberculosis vaccines, with particular emphasis on their potential as vaccines against M. bovis.

  14. Elastin, a novel extracellular matrix protein adhering to mycobacterial antigen 85 complex.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Ptak, Christopher P; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Akey, Bruce L; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2013-02-08

    The antigen 85 complex (Ag85) consists of three predominantly secreted proteins (Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C), which play a key role in the mycobacterial pathogenesis and also possess enzymatic mycolyltransferase activity involved in cell wall synthesis. Ag85 is not only considered to be a virulence factor because its expression is essential for intracellular survival within macrophages, but also because it contributes to adherence, invasion, and dissemination of mycobacteria in host cells. In this study, we report that the extracellular matrix components, elastin and its precursor (tropoelastin) derived from human aorta, lung, and skin, serve as binding partners of Ag85 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The binding affinity of M. tuberculosis Ag85 to human tropoelastin was characterized (K(D) = 0.13 ± 0.006 μm), and a novel Ag85-binding motif, AAAKAA(K/Q)(Y/F), on multiple tropoelastin modules was identified. In addition, the negatively charged Glu-258 of Ag85 was demonstrated to participate in an electrostatic interaction with human tropoelastin. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on elastin siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced (34.3%), implying that elastin acts as an important ligand contributing to mycobacterial invasion.

  15. Mycobacterial contamination of metalworking fluids: involvement of a possible new taxon of rapidly growing mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, J S; Christensen, M; Wilson, R W; Wallace, R J; Zhang, Y; Nash, D R; Shelton, B

    2000-01-01

    Contamination of air and metalworking fluid (MWF) systems with a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) was detected in 1995 in a single manufacturing plant with recent cases of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Extensive environmental sampling was performed to determine the extent of the contamination and its variability over time. RGM were present in multiple indoor air samples, 100% of the central MWF storage tanks, and 75% of the freestanding cutting, drilling, and grinding machines. With one exception, contamination was limited to a recently introduced formulation (brand) of semisynthetic MWF used in 95% of the facility's machining operations. In general, the mycobacterial counts were stable over time, with the degree of contamination ranging from 10(2)-10(7) colony forming units (CFU)/mL. A few systems were culture positive for the mycobacterium (> 10(1) CFU/mL), changed to culture negative (< 10(1) CFU/mL), then changed back to culture positive without explanation. Samples obtained from diluted (5%) but unused MWF, a replenishment line with 2% unused MWF, an MWF pasteurizer, city water, and deionized water were culture negative for this species of mycobacterium. Inoculation and growth studies demonstrated that this mycobacterium does not grow in liquid samples of 5% unused MWF. By molecular techniques, the mycobacterial isolates consisted of a single strain and represented a previously undescribed taxon closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae/abscessus. The relationship of this mycobacterium to the cases of HP is unknown.

  16. Characterization of an intracellular ATP assay for evaluating the viability of live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

    PubMed

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Derrick, Steven C; Jacobs, William R; Morris, Sheldon L

    2012-09-01

    The viability of BCG vaccine has traditionally been monitored using a colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. Despite its widespread use, results from the CFU assay can be highly variable because of the characteristic clumping of mycobacteria, their requirement for complex growth media, and the three week incubation period needed to cultivate slow-growing mycobacteria. In this study, we evaluated whether an ATP luminescence assay (which measures intracellular ATP content) could be used to rapidly estimate the viability of lyophilized and/or frozen preparations of six different BCG vaccine preparations - Danish, Tokyo, Russia, Brazil, Tice, and Pasteur - and two live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine candidates - a ΔlysAΔpanCD M. tuberculosis strain and a ΔmmaA4 BCG vaccine mutant. For every vaccine tested, a significant correlation was observed between intracellular ATP concentrations and the number of viable attenuated bacilli. However, the extractable intracellular ATP levels detected per cell among the different live vaccines varied suggesting that validated ATP luminescence assays with specific appropriate standards must be developed for each individual live attenuated vaccine preparation. Overall, these data indicate that the ATP luminescence assay is a rapid, sensitive, and reliable alternative method for quantifying the viability of varying live attenuated mycobacterial vaccine preparations.

  17. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, L.E.; Hoffner, S.E.; Ansehn, S.

    1988-08-01

    Mycobacterial growth was monitored by bioluminescence assay of mycobacterial ATP. Cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and of 25 clinical isolates of the same species were exposed to serial dilutions of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin. A suppression of ATP, indicating growth inhibition, occurred for susceptible but not resistant strains within 5 to 7 days of incubation. Breakpoint concentrations between susceptibility and resistance were determined by comparing these results with those obtained by reference techniques. Full agreement was found in 99% of the assays with the resistance ratio method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and 98% of the assays were in full agreement with the radiometric system (BACTEC). A main advantage of the bioluminescence method is its rapidity, with results available as fast as with the radiometric system but at a lower cost and without the need for radioactive culture medium. The method provides kinetic data concerning drug effects within available in vivo drug concentrations and has great potential for both rapid routine susceptibility testing and research applications in studies of drug effects on mycobacteria.

  18. A case of guilt by association: Water bug bite incriminated in M. ulcerans infection.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Yeramian, Edouard; Babonneau, Jérèmie; Kempf, Marie; Marsollier, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Buruli ulcer is a cutaneous mycobacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, whose incidence is increasing steadily, especially in West Africa. This study reports a first documented case of M. ulcerans infection which can be attributed to a water bug bite at the site of the primary lesion.

  19. The interaction of mycobacterial protein Rv2966c with host chromatin is mediated through non-CpG methylation and histone H3/H4 binding

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Garima; Upadhyay, Sandeep; Srilalitha, M.; Nandicoori, Vinay K.; Khosla, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    To effectively modulate the gene expression within an infected mammalian cell, the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis would need to bring about epigenetic modifications at appropriate genomic loci. Working on this hypothesis, we show in this study that the mycobacterial protein Rv2966c is a 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA methyltransferase that is secreted out from the mycobacterium and gets localized to the nucleus in addition to the cytoplasm inside the host cell. Importantly, Rv2966c binds to specific DNA sequences, methylates cytosines predominantly in a non-CpG context and its methylation activity is positively influenced by phosphorylation. Interestingly, like the mammalian DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3L, Rv2966c can also interact with histone proteins. Ours is the first study that identifies a protein from a pathogenic bacteria with potential to influence host DNA methylation in a non-canonical manner providing the pathogen with a novel mechanism to alter the host epigenetic machinery. This contention is supported by repression of host genes upon M. tuberculosis infection correlated with Rv2966c binding and non-CpG methylation. PMID:25824946

  20. In vitro Anti-mycobacterial activity of selected medicinal plants against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a global burden with one –third of the world’s population infected with the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and annually 1.4 million deaths occur due to the disease. This high incidence of infection and the increased rate of multi-drug resistant and extensively-drug resistant strains of the organism further complicated the problem of TB control and have called for an urgent need to develop new anti-TB drugs from plants. In this study, the in vitro activity of root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis were evaluated against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Methods Five Ethiopian medicinal plants, root of Calpurnia aurea, seeds of Ocimum basilicum, leaves of Artemisia abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, and Eucalyptus camaldulensis used locally for the management of TB. They were investigated for in vitro antimycobacterial activity against M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. 80% methanolic extracts of the plant materials were obtained by maceration. The antimycobacterial activity was determined using 96 wells of microplate with the help of visual Resazurin Microtiter Assay. Results The crude 80% methanolic extracts of the root of C. aurea, seeds of O. basilicum, and leaves of A. abyssinica, C. macrostachyus, and E. camaldulensis had anti-mycobacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranging from 6.25–100 μg/mL. The MIC of 80% methanol extracts in the order mentioned above ranged 25-100 μg/ml and 12.5-75 μg/mL, 25–100 μg/mL and 25–50 μg/mL, 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, 12.5-100 μg/mL and 18.25-50 μg/mL and 6.25-50 μg/mL and 12.5-50 μg/mL, respectively for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis strains. Conclusions The results support the local use of these plants in the treatment of TB and it is suggested that these plants may have therapeutic value in the treatment of TB. However

  1. Necrotizing cellulitis of the abdominal wall, caused by Pediococcus sp., due to rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Michalopoulos, Nick; Arampatzi, Stergiani; Papavramidis, Theodossis S.; Kotidis, Efstathios; Laskou, Styliani; Papavramidis, Spiros T.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Soft tissue necrotizing infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to present a patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall resulting from the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a 60-year-old Caucasian male patient with necrotizing infection of abdominal wall secondary to the rupture of a retroperitoneal stromal tumor. The patient was initially treated with debridement and fasciotomy of the anterior abdominal wall. Laparotomy revealed purulent peritonitis caused by infiltration and rupture of the splenic flexure by the tumor. Despite prompt intervention the patient died 19 days later. The isolated microorganism causing the infection was the rarely identified as cause of infections in humans Pediococcus sp., a gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus. DISCUSSION Necrotizing infections of abdominal wall are usually secondary either to perineal or to intra-abdominal infections. Gastrointestinal stromal cell tumors could be rarely complicated with perforation and abscess formation. In our case, the infiltrated by the extra-gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor ruptured colon was the source of the infection. The pediococci are rarely isolated as the cause of severe septicemia. CONCLUSION Ruptured retroperitoneal stromal cell tumors are extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis, and before this case, Pediococcus sp. has never been isolated as the responsible agent. PMID:23357010

  2. Disruption of Mycobacterial AftB Results in Complete Loss of Terminal β(1 → 2) Arabinofuranose Residues of Lipoarabinomannan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) and arabinogalactan (AG) are the two major mycobacterial cell wall (lipo)polysaccharides, which contain a structurally similar arabinan domain that is highly branched and assembled in a stepwise fashion by variety of arabinofuranosyltransferases (ArafT). In addition to playing an essential role in mycobacterial physiology, LAM and its biochemical precursor lipomannan possess potent immunomodulatory activities that affect the host immune response. In the search of additional mycobacterial ArafTs that participate in the synthesis of the arabinan segment of LAM, we disrupted aftB (MSMEG_6400) in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The deletion of chromosomal aftB locus could only be achieved in the presence of a rescue plasmid carrying a functional copy of aftB, strongly suggesting that it is essential for the viability of M. smegmatis. Isolation and detailed structural characterization of a LAM molecule derived from the conditional mutant deficient in AftB revealed the absence of terminal β(1 → 2)-linked arabinofuranosyl residues. Furthermore, we demonstrated that truncated LAM displays proinflammatory activity, which is due to its ability to activate Toll-like receptor 2. All together, our results indicate that AftB is an essential mycobacterial ArafT that plays a role in the synthesis of the arabinan domain of LAM. PMID:28033704

  3. Detection of mycobacterial DNA by a specific and simple lateral flow assay incorporating cadmium selenide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Cimaglia, Fabio; Liandris, Emmanouil; Gazouli, Maria; Sechi, Leonardo; Chiesa, Maurizio; De Lorenzis, Enrico; Andreadou, Margarita; Taka, Styliani; Mataragka, Antonia; Ikonomopoulos, John

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots have been incorporated to a lateral flow assay for the specific and very simple detection of different mycobacterial DNA targets within only a few minutes, bypassing the complexity of conventional DNA hybridization assays. The method extends our previous work on protein detection using an identical procedure.

  4. A Comparison Between Non-Descent Vaginal Hysterectomy and Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dibyajyoti, Gharphalia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hysterectomy is one of the most common gyneacological surgeries performed worldwide. The vaginal technique has been introduced and performed centuries back, but has been less successful due to lack of experience and enthusiasm among Gynaecologists, due to a misconception that the abdominal route is safer and easier. Aim To evaluate the most efficient route of hysterectomy in women with mobile nonprolapsed uteri of 12 weeks or lesser by comparing the intra and postoperative complications of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomies. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomized controlled trial was performed wherein, 300 consecutive patients requiring hysterectomy for benign diseases were analysed over a period of 2 years (December 2012–November 2014). Group A (n = 150) underwent vaginal hysterectomy (non descent vaginal hysterectomy, NDVH) which was compared with group B (n = 150) who had abdominal hysterectomy. The primary outcome measures were operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative analgesia, hospital stay, postoperative mobility, blood transfusion, wound infection, febrile morbidity and postoperative systemic infections. Secondary outcome measures were conversion of vaginal to abdominal route and re-laparotomy. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups. There were no intraoperative complications in either group. Regarding operation duration, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative pain, postoperative blood transfusion, mobilization in post operative ward, postoperative wound infection, febrile morbidity, duration of hospital stay, p-value was significant in vaginal hysterectomy compared to abdominal hysterectomy. Regarding postoperative systemic infections, p-value was not significant. None of the cases in the vaginal group were converted to abdominal route and none of the cases in the whole study group underwent re-laparotomy. Conclusion The present study concludes that patients requiring hysterectomy

  5. Imperforate hymen: a cause of abdominal pain in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lardenoije, Céline; Aardenburg, Robert; Mertens, Helen

    2009-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented with primary amenorrhea and had had cyclical abdominal pain for almost a year. At examination we observed a painful mass in the lower abdomen and normal secondary sex characteristics. Perineal examination showed a bluish bulging hymen. Transabdominal ultrasonography revealed a dense mass in the pelvis measuring about 12×11 cm. We diagnosed an imperforate hymen with haematocolpos and haematometra. The hymen was opened surgically and a large quantity of menstrual blood was drained from the vagina and uterus. Postoperative recovery was normal without any pain. The patient now menstruates regularly. An imperforate hymen occurs in 0.05% of women. It is important to be aware of this while examining a female adolescent presenting with cyclical abdominal pain and primary amenorrhea. Late discovery of an imperforate hymen may lead to pain, infections, hydronephrosis and endometriosis with subfertility as a possible consequence. PMID:21686660

  6. microRNA-20a Inhibits Autophagic Process by Targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and Favors Mycobacterial Survival in Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Le; Zhao, Jin; Qu, Yuliang; Yin, Runting; Gao, Qian; Ding, Shuqin; Zhang, Ying; Wei, Jun; Xu, Guangxian

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in the host immune response against mycobacterial infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) can live in macrophages owing to its ability to evade attacks by regulating autophagic response. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding, endogenously encoded RNA which plays critical roles in precise regulation of macrophage functions. Whether miRNAs specifically influence the activation of macrophage autophagy during M. tuberculosis infection are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that BCG infection of macrophages resulted in enhanced expression of miRNA-20a, which inhibits autophagic process by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1 and promotes BCG survival in macrophages. Forced overexpression of miR-20a decreased the expression levels of LC3-II and the number of LC3 puncta in macrophages, and promoted BCG survival in macrophages, while transfection with miR-20a inhibitor had the opposite effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of miR-20a on autophagy was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Quantification of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section revealed a significant reduction upon transfection with miR-20a mimic, but transfection with miR-20a inhibitor increased the number of autophagosomes per cellular cross-section. Moreover, silencing of ATG7 significantly inhibited autophagic response, and transfection with ATG7 siRNA plus miR-20a mimic could further decrease autophagic response. Collectively, our data reveal that miR-20a inhibits autophagic response and promotes BCG survival in macrophages by targeting ATG7 and ATG16L1, which may have implications for a better understanding of pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27803889

  7. Engineering Mycobacteria for the Production of Self-Assembling Biopolyesters Displaying Mycobacterial Antigens for Use as a Tuberculosis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason W.; Parlane, Natalie A.; Rehm, Bernd H. A.; Buddle, Bryce M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. Recently, engineered polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads that were produced in both Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis and displayed mycobacterial antigens were found to induce significant cell-mediated immune responses in mice. We observed that such PHA beads contained host cell proteins as impurities, which we hypothesized to have the potential to induce immunity. In this study, we aimed to develop PHA beads produced in mycobacteria (mycobacterial PHA biobeads [MBB]) and test their potential as a TB vaccine in a mouse model. As a model organism, nonpathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis was engineered to produce MBB or MBB with immobilized mycobacterial antigens Ag85A and ESAT-6 on their surface (A:E-MBB). Three key enzymes involved in the poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) pathway, namely, β-ketothiolase (PhaA), acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase (PhaB), and PHA synthase (PhaC), were engineered into E. coli-Mycobacterium shuttle plasmids and expressed in trans. Immobilization of specific antigens to the surface of the MBB was achieved by creating a fusion with the PHA synthase which remains covalently attached to the polyester core, resulting in PHA biobeads displaying covalently immobilized antigens. MBB, A:E-MBB, and an M. smegmatis vector control (MVC) were used in a mouse immunology trial, with comparison to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-vaccinated and Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated groups. We successfully produced MBB and A:E-MBB and used them as vaccines to induce a cellular immune response to mycobacterial antigens. IMPORTANCE Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis and still remains one of the world's biggest global health burdens. In this study, we produced polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biobeads in mycobacteria and used them as vaccines to

  8. The use of Surgisis for abdominal wall reconstruction in the separation of omphalopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Roshni; Wales, Paul W; Zuker, Ronald M; Fisher, David M; Langer, Jacob C

    2007-09-01

    Abdominal wall reconstruction in omphalopagus twins poses a difficult reconstructive challenge, as separation often results in a large abdominal wall defect. A number of options are available for closure, including tissue flaps, expanders and patches made of foreign material. Surgisis is a new biodegradable small intestine scaffolding substrate that permits tissue in-growth and results in a permanent durable scar. We describe its use in abdominal wall reconstruction after separation of a set of conjoined twins. A set of omphalopagus conjoined twins shared liver and abdominal wall. After separation at 6 months of age, Twin A's abdomen could be closed primarily, but Twin B could not. A 4-ply Surgisis mesh was used in the upper abdominal closure, and a skin flap was created, to completely cover the patch. Both twins survived the operation. A small portion of the skin flap over the Surgisis broke down, healing by secondary intention. In follow up of over 18 months post procedure, there have been no wound infections and the abdominal wall is intact with no evidence of a hernia. Surgisis can be successfully used for the reconstruction of complex abdominal wall defects in the pediatric patient, including reconstruction after separation of conjoined twins.

  9. Technical aspects of abdominal stomas.

    PubMed

    Link, Brian A; Kropp, Bradley; Frimberger, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Continent urinary diversion has gained increasing popularity in the pediatric population during the last few decades. In adults, continent diversions are usually needed to replace a bladder after cystectomy for invasive carcinoma. Subsequently, the creation of functional and cosmetically hidden urinary and cecal abdominal stomas has become an integral part of many urinary reconstructive procedures. These techniques, originally developed for pediatric urinary reconstruction have gained increasing popularity for adult patients in need of a continence procedure. In the current manuscript, we review the technical aspects of site selection, mucocutaneous anastomosis, cosmetic appearance, and management of associated complications.

  10. Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum infection following open fracture: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K; Ho, S T

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of dual nontuberculous mycobacterial infections complicating an open distal radius and ulna fracture after polytrauma in a 35-year-old man. There was persistent wound discharge after definitive fixation of this fracture, but microbiological cultures did not yield any organism. The patient underwent multiple debridement, and subsequent tissue grew Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Despite appropriate chemotherapy and surgical debridement the infection persisted until radical bone excision and tissue debridement were done. This case indicates that nontuberculous mycobacterial infections should be considered when conventional microbiological assays fail to identify the infecting agent in suspected osteomyelitis following open fracture. A combination of radical debridement, including removal of infected bone, and prolonged antimicrobial therapy are required to eradicate the infection completely.

  11. Leveraging Advances in Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment to Address Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Raju, Ravikiran M; Raju, Sagar M; Zhao, Yanlin; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), defined as any mycobacterial pathogen other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium leprae, are a diverse group of pathogens that collectively cause a substantive but often unappreciated worldwide burden of illness. Although NTMs may cause illness similar to M. tuberculosis, these pathogens generally do not respond to classic tuberculosis (TB) drug regimens, resulting in misdiagnosis and poor treatment, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although a few high-quality epidemiologic surveys have been made on the topic, existing evidence suggests that NTM-associated disease is much more common than previously thought: more common than TB in the industrialized world and likely increasing in prevalence globally. Despite this evidence, these organisms remain markedly understudied, and few international grants support basic science and clinical research. Here we suggest that the considerable efforts in developing new treatments and diagnostics for TB can be harnessed in the fight against NTM-associated illnesses.

  12. Highly Deviated Asymmetric Division in Very Low Proportion of Mycobacterial Mid-log Phase Cells.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that about 20% of the septating Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium xenopi cells in the exponential phase populationdivideasymmetrically, with an unusually high deviation (17 ± 4%) in the division site from the median, to generate short cells and long cells, thereby generating population heterogeneity. This mode of division is very different from the symmetric division of themajority (about 80%) of the septating cells in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG exponential phase population, with 5-10% deviation in the division site from the mid-cell site, as reported by recent studies. The short cells and the long cells further grew and divided to generate a population. We speculate that the generation of the short cells and the long cells through the highly deviated asymmetric divisionin the low proportions of mycobacterial population may have a role in stress tolerance.

  13. Rapid construction of mycobacterial mutagenesis vectors using ligation-independent cloning

    PubMed Central

    Balhana, Ricardo; Stoker, Neil G.; Sikder, Mahmudul Hasan; Chauviac, Francois-Xavier; Kendall, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted mutagenesis is one of the major tools for determining the function of a given gene and its involvement in bacterial pathogenesis. In mycobacteria, gene deletion is often accomplished by using allelic exchange techniques that commonly utilise a suicide delivery vector. We have adapted a widely-used suicide delivery vector (p1NIL) for cloning two flanking regions of a gene using ligation independent cloning (LIC). The pNILRB plasmid series produced allow a faster, more efficient and less laborious cloning procedure. In this paper we describe the making of pNILRB5, a modified version of p1NIL that contains two pairs of LIC sites flanking either a sacB or a lacZ gene. We demonstrate the success of this technique by generating 3 mycobacterial mutant strains. These vectors will contribute to more high-throughput methods of mutagenesis. PMID:20650290

  14. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis by identification of Antigen 85 in mycobacterial culture system.

    PubMed

    Phunpae, Ponrut; Chanwong, Sakarin; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Apiratmateekul, Napaporn; Makeudom, Anupong; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2014-03-01

    The standard culture for identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis takes a long time to perform. We introduce here a method for fast identification of M. tuberculosis in mycobacterial culture system. Antibodies to Antigen (Ag) 85 of M. tuberculosis were produced and subsequently used to develop enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting Ag85 in the culture filtrate. By this detection, rapid tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis was achieved in comparison to the standard culture system with 89.6% sensitivity and 94% specificity. We thus suggest a new TB diagnosis strategy in which clinical samples are cultured in mycobacteria liquid culture medium. The culture filtrates are taken for detection of the Ag85 by ELISA. Using this strategy, 25%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of TB patients will be detected within day 3, week 1, 2, and 4, respectively. The established assay will enable a faster diagnosis of TB, leading to more efficient treatment of TB patients and control of disease transmission.

  15. The effect of Toxoplasma cell fractions and mycobacterial immunostimulants against virulent Toxoplasma gondii in mice.

    PubMed

    Masihi, K N; Brehmer, W; Werner, H

    1979-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites were disrupted in a Ribi cell fractionator and separated into cell walls and protoplasm by differential centrifugation. These products were used alone or combined with a mycobacterial glycolipid (P3) and injected either as oil-in-water emulsions or incorporated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Mice were vaccinated by intravenous or intradermal routes and challenged intraperitoneally with a highly virulent strain of Toxoplasma gondii. A local granuloma formation was induced after i.d. inoculation of Toxoplasma vaccines containing P3 as this glycolipid enabled an adherence of the antigens on the mineral oil droplets. The adjuvant effect of P3 on antibody formation was also observed. Most of the fractions showed a low, but statistically significant prolongation of survival time. Vaccination by the i.v. route with homologous or heterologous antigens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, were not significantly effective, with the exception of a high dose of Toxoplasma protoplasm associated with P3.

  16. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    K. Intra- abdominal compartment syndrome as a complication of ruptured abdomi- nal aortic aneurysm repair. Am Surg 1989;55:396-402. 6. Sugrue M...00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After Hip Arthroscopy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Author’s personal copy Case Report Abdominal Compartment Syndrome After

  17. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: aid of abdominal ultrasonography in prediction of severity.

    PubMed

    Ziraman, Ipek; Celikbas, Aysel; Ergonul, Onder; Degirmenci, Tulin; Uyanik, Sadik Ahmet; Koparal, Suha; Dokuzoguz, Basak

    2014-11-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a fatal viral infection that involves multiple organs, and endothelium. We described abdominal sonographic findings of the patients infected with the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in relation to the severity of the disease. This is a prospective study performed among hospitalized patients infected with CCHF between 2005 and 2011. A total of 210 hospitalized patients with confirmed CCHF infection were included in the study. The mean age was 47 and 49.5% of the patients were female. Patients were classified as mild, moderate, or severe disease according to their clinical and laboratory findings. The relationship between the clinical severity of CCHF and the abdominal sonographic findings was analyzed. Sonographic findings of abdomen included gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) in 44 (21%), splenomegaly in 39 (19%), hepatomegaly in 52 (25%), decrease in echo of liver parenchyma in nine (4%), increase in echo liver parenchyma in 13 (6%), intra-abdominal fluid collection/ascites in 23 (11%), and enlarged periportal lymph nodes in seven (3%) cases. GBWT was detected in 3% of mild patients, 23% of moderate patients, and 61% of severe patients (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis to predict the severity, GBWT (odds ratio [OR] 5.4, confidence interval [CI] 1.76-16.49, p=0.003) and intra-abdominal fluid collection/ascites (OR 3.5, CI 1.07-12.61, p=0.049) were found to be significantly associated with disease severity. In conclusion, ultrasonography is a reliable, useful, and noninvasive diagnostic tool for evaluation of the abdominal findings of the patients with CCHFV infection. GBWT and intra-abdominal fluid collection/ascites were found to be predictors of severity.

  18. Frequency, causes and pattern of abdominal trauma: A 4-year descriptive analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Suresh; Al-Hassani, Ammar; El-Menyar, Ayman; Abdelrahman, Husham; Parchani, Ashok; Peralta, Ruben; Zarour, Ahmad; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of abdominal trauma is still underreported from the Arab Middle-East. We aimed to evaluate the incidence, causes, clinical presentation, and outcome of the abdominal trauma patients in a newly established trauma center. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted at the only level I trauma center in Qatar for the patients admitted with abdominal trauma (2008-2011). Patients demographics, mechanism of injury, pattern of organ injuries, associated extra-abdominal injuries, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Abbreviated Injury Scale, complications, length of Intensive Care Unit, and hospital stay, and mortality were reviewed. Results: A total of 6888 trauma patients were admitted to the hospital, of which 1036 (15%) had abdominal trauma. The mean age was 30.6 ± 13 years and the majority was males (93%). Road traffic accidents (61%) were the most frequent mechanism of injury followed by fall from height (25%) and fall of heavy object (7%). The mean ISS was 17.9 ± 10. Liver (36%), spleen (32%) and kidney (18%) were most common injured organs. The common associated extra-abdominal injuries included chest (35%), musculoskeletal (32%), and head injury (24%). Wound infection (3.8%), pneumonia (3%), and urinary tract infection (1.4%) were the frequently observed complications. The overall mortality was 8.3% and late mortality was observed in 2.3% cases mainly due to severe head injury and sepsis. The predictors of mortality were head injury, ISS, need for blood transfusion, and serum lactate. Conclusion: Abdominal trauma is a frequent diagnosis in multiple trauma and the presence of extra-abdominal injuries and sepsis has a significant impact on the outcome. PMID:26604524

  19. Identifying novel mycobacterial stress associated genes using a random mutagenesis screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Gopinath; Joshi, Shrilaxmi V; Sridhar, Aditi; Dutta, Sayantanee; Raghunand, Tirumalai R

    2015-12-10

    Cell envelope associated components of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) have been implicated in stress response, immune modulation and in vivo survival of the pathogen. Although many such factors have been identified, there is a large disparity between the number of genes predicted to be involved in functions linked to the envelope and those described in the literature. To identify and characterise novel stress related factors associated with the mycobacterial cell envelope, we isolated colony morphotype mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis), based on the hypothesis that mutants with unusual colony morphology may have defects in the biosynthesis of cell envelope components. On testing their susceptibility to stress conditions relevant to M.tb physiology, multiple mutants were found to be sensitive to Isoniazid, Diamide and H2O2, indicative of altered permeability due to changes in cell envelope composition. Two mutants showed defects in biofilm formation implying possible roles for the target genes in antibiotic tolerance and/or virulence. These assays identified novel stress associated roles for several mycobacterial genes including sahH, tatB and aceE. Complementation analysis of selected mutants with the M. smegmatis genes and their M.tb homologues showed phenotypic restoration, validating their link to the observed phenotypes. A mutant carrying an insertion in fhaA encoding a forkhead associated domain containing protein, showed reduced survival in THP-1 macrophages, providing in vivo validation to this screen. Taken together, these results suggest that the M.tb homologues of a majority of the identified genes may play significant roles in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  20. Randomized Trial of Liposomal Amikacin for Inhalation in Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Kenneth N; Griffith, David E; Eagle, Gina; McGinnis Ii, John P; Micioni, Liza; Liu, Keith; Daley, Charles L; Winthrop, Kevin L; Ruoss, Stephen; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen J; Flume, Patrick A; Dorgan, Daniel; Salathe, Matthias; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Gupta, Renu; Wallace, Richard J

    2016-10-17

    Rationale Lengthy multi-drug, toxic, and low efficacy regimens limit management of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (PNTM) disease. Objective This phase 2 study investigated efficacy and safety of liposomal amikacin for inhalation (LAI) in treatment-refractory PNTM (Mycobacterium avium complex [MAC] or Mycobacterium abscessus) disease. Methods During the double-blind phase, patients were randomly assigned to LAI (590 mg) or placebo once daily added to their multi-drug regimen for 84 days. Both groups could receive open-label LAI for 84 additional days. Primary endpoint was change from baseline to day 84 on a semi-quantitative mycobacterial growth scale. Other endpoints included sputum conversion, 6-minute walk distance, and adverse events. Measurements and Main Results Modified intent-to-treat population included 89 (LAI=44; placebo=45) patients. Average age was 59 years, 88% were female, 92% were Caucasian; 80 and 59 patients completed study drug dosing during the double-blind and open-label phases, respectively. Primary endpoint was not achieved (P=0.072); however, a greater proportion of the LAI group demonstrated ≥1 negative sputum cultures (32% [14/44] vs. 9% [4/45]; P=0.006) and improvement in 6-minute walk test (+20.6 vs. -25.0 meters; P=0.017) at day 84. Treatment effect was predominantly in patients without cystic fibrosis with MAC and was sustained 1 year post-LAI. Most adverse events were respiratory and in some patients led to drug discontinuation. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not reached, LAI added to a multi-drug regimen produced improvements in sputum conversion and 6-minute walk distance vs. placebo with limited systemic toxicity in patients with refractory MAC lung disease. Further research is needed. Clinical trial registration available at www.clinicaltrials.gov, ID NCT01315236.