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Sample records for abdominal obesity insulin

  1. ABDOMINAL OBESITY, MUSCLE COMPOSITION, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The independent relationships between visceral and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AT) depots, muscle composition, and insulin sensitivity were examined in 40 abdominally obese, premenopausal women. Measurements included glucose disposal by euglycemic clamp, muscle composition by computed to...

  2. Abdominal Obesity and Insulin Resistance in People Exposed to Moderate-to-High Levels of Dioxin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung-Wei; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Su, Huey-Jen; Lee, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, a risk factor for developing metabolic complications, is a major public health problem. Abdominal obesity is strongly accompanied by a cluster of metabolic abnormalities characterized by insulin resistance. The link between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and insulin resistance has been investigated in animal and epidemiological studies. We aimed to examine whether insulin resistance is greater in people with abdominal obesity (AO) and concomitant exposure to serum dioxins (PCDD/Fs). We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study of 2876 participants living near a PCDD/Fs contaminated area. Seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs congeners were measured, and then the associations between the main predictor variable, serum TEQDF-1998, abdominal obesity (AO), dependent variables, and insulin resistance were examined. Twelve of the 17 congeners, widely distributed among PCDDs, and PCDFs, had trends for associations with abdominal adiposity. In men, the highest quintiles of 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF; 1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD; 2,3,7,8-TCDD; 2,3,7,8-TCDF; and 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF had the top five adjusted odds ratios (AORs) + 95% confidence intervals (CIs):[4.2; 2.7–6.4], [3.6; 2.3–5.7], [3.2; 2.1–5.0], [3.0; 2.0–4.5], and [2.9; 1.9–4.7], respectively. In women, the highest quintiles of 1,2,3,4,7,8,9-HpCDF; 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF; and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF had the top three AORs + 95% CIs:[3.0; 1.9–4.7], [2.0; 1.3–3.1], and [1.9; 1.3–2.9], respectively. After confounding factors had been adjusted for, men, but not women, with higher serum TEQDF-1998 levels or abdominal obesity had a significantly (Ptrend < 0.001) greater risk for abnormal insulin resistance. The groups with the highest joint serum TEQDF-1998 and abdominal obesity levels were associated with elevated insulin resistance at 5.0 times the odds of the groups with the lowest joint levels (AOR 5.23; 95% CI: 3.53–7.77). We hypothesize that serum TEQDF-1998 and abdominal obesity affect the association with

  3. Altered subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue lipid synthesis in obese, insulin-resistant humans

    PubMed Central

    Tuvdendorj, Demidmaa; Chandalia, Manisha; Batbayar, Tumurbaatar; Saraf, Manish; Beysen, Carine; Murphy, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (AT) dynamics in obese subjects with a wide range of insulin sensitivity (IS) and the correlation between these two metabolic measures. Ten obese (BMI 30–40 kg/m2) nondiabetic subjects with (n = 6) and without (n = 4) the metabolic syndrome were studied following a 12-wk 2H2O labeling period. Subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies were collected. Deuterium incorporation into triglyceride (TG)-glycerol and TG-palmitate were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the calculation of fractional TG synthesis (fTG) and fractional de novo lipogenesis (fDNL). Muscle IS and insulin-mediated nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) suppression (a measure for adipose IS) indexes were derived from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The ability of subcutaneous abdominal AT to synthesize lipids varied significantly in obese subjects (fTG range 7–28%, fDNL range 1.1–4.6%) with significantly lower values (>35% reduction) for both parameters in obese with the metabolic syndrome. fTG correlated positively with muscle IS (r = 0.64, P = 0.04) and inversely with NEFA suppression during the OGTT (r = −0.69, P = 0.03). These results demonstrate a large variability in subcutaneous abdominal AT lipid turnover in obesity. Moreover, a reduced capacity for subcutaneous abdominal AT fat storage is associated with muscle and adipose tissue insulin resistance as well as with the metabolic syndrome, thus identifying a form of obesity at heightened risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23982159

  4. Carotid Intima-media thickness in childhood and adolescent obesity relations to abdominal obesity, high triglyceride level and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Zhang, Jian Ping; Luo, Cai Xia; Yu, Xiao Mei; Lv, Lan Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate risk factors which impact on common carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT). Methods: A total of 86 obese children and adolescents and 22 healthy children and adolescents with normal weight were enrolled. Moreover, 23 of 86 obese children and adolescents were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The clinical, biochemical data and the IMT of the common carotid artery were measured in all subjects. Results: Obese and obese with MetS subjects demonstrated a significantly (p < 0.01) thicker intima media (0.69mm, 0.66mm) as compared to the control group (0.38mm), but there was no significant difference of IMT between obese and MetS group. IMT was correlated to body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting insulin, homoeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein- cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and fatty liver. Waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, triglyceride and homoeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance were independent determinants of mean IMT level. Conclusion: Obesity especially abdominal obesity, high TG and insulin resistance may be the main risk predictors of increased IMT. PMID:20827427

  5. Improvement in insulin sensitivity following a 1-year lifestyle intervention program in viscerally obese men: contribution of abdominal adiposity.

    PubMed

    Borel, Anne-Laure; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Smith, Jessica; Alméras, Natalie; Tremblay, Angelo; Bergeron, Jean; Poirier, Paul; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to quantify the effect of a 1-year healthy eating-physical activity/exercise lifestyle modification program on insulin sensitivity in viscerally obese men classified according to their glucose tolerance status and to evaluate the respective contributions of changes in body fat distribution vs changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) to the improvements in indices of plasma glucose/insulin homeostasis. Abdominally obese, dyslipidemic men (waist circumference ≥90 cm, triglycerides ≥1.69 mmol/L, and/or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol <1.03 mmol/L) were recruited. The 1-year intervention/evaluation was completed by 104 men. Body weight, composition, and fat distribution were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry/computed tomography. Cardiorespiratory fitness and cardiometabolic risk profile were measured. After 1 year, insulin sensitivity improved in association with decreases in both visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adiposity (SAT) as well as with the improvement in CRF, regardless of baseline glucose tolerance. Further analyses were performed according to changes in glucose tolerance status: improvement (group I, n = 39), no change (group N, n = 50), or worsening (group W, n = 15) after 1 year. Groups I and N improved their insulin sensitivity and their CRF, whereas group W did not, while losing less VAT than groups I and N. Multiple regressions showed that reduction in VAT was associated with an improvement in homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, whereas reduction in SAT was rather associated with improvement of the insulin sensitivity index of Matsuda. Changes in CRF were not independently associated with changes in indices of plasma glucose/insulin homeostasis. A 1-year lifestyle intervention improved plasma glucose/insulin homeostasis in viscerally obese men, including those with normal glucose tolerance status at baseline. Changes in SAT and VAT but not in CRF appeared to mediate these improvements

  6. Effects of aerobic versus resistance exercise without caloric restriction on abdominal fat, intrahepatic lipid, and insulin sensitivity in obese adolescent boys: a randomized, controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimal exercise modality for reductions of abdominal obesity and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth is unknown. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise (AE) versus resistance exercise (RE) without caloric restriction on abdominal adiposity, ectopic fat, and insulin sensitivity and se...

  7. Effects of Aerobic Versus Resistance Exercise Without Caloric Restriction on Abdominal Fat, Intrahepatic Lipid, and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SoJung; Bacha, Fida; Hannon, Tamara; Kuk, Jennifer L.; Boesch, Chris; Arslanian, Silva

    2012-01-01

    The optimal exercise modality for reductions of abdominal obesity and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth is unknown. We examined the effects of aerobic exercise (AE) versus resistance exercise (RE) without caloric restriction on abdominal adiposity, ectopic fat, and insulin sensitivity and secretion in youth. Forty-five obese adolescent boys were randomly assigned to one of three 3-month interventions: AE, RE, or a nonexercising control. Abdominal fat was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and intrahepatic lipid and intramyocellular lipid were assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were evaluated by a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and a 2-h hyperglycemic clamp. Both AE and RE prevented the significant weight gain that was observed in controls. Compared with controls, significant reductions in total and visceral fat and intrahepatic lipid were observed in both exercise groups. Compared with controls, a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity (27%) was observed in the RE group. Collapsed across groups, changes in visceral fat were associated with changes in intrahepatic lipid (r = 0.72) and insulin sensitivity (r = −0.47). Both AE and RE alone are effective for reducing abdominal fat and intrahepatic lipid in obese adolescent boys. RE but not AE is also associated with significant improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:22751691

  8. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter to Measure Visceral Adipose Tissue in Overweight or Obese Adolescent Children and Its Role as A Marker of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yashoda, H.T.; Boraiah, Ganga; Vishwa, Suma

    2015-01-01

    Background Measurement of sagittal abdominal diameter using a revalidated caliper is simple, inexpensive, non-invasive method. It strongly correlates with insulin resistance and can be used as a surrogate marker to predict risk for Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Aim To assess visceral abdominal fat by measuring sagittal abdominal diameter using sliding calipers and to predict insulin resistance in obese or overweight adolescent children. Study design Explorative study for Paediatric age group among over weight and obese children aged 10-18 years in urban population in a Tertiary Care Centre. Materials and Methods Paediatric population satisfying ADA guidelines for diagnosis of prediabetes were included in the study. Anthropometric measurements with SAD were recorded. Blood was collected to investigate for prediabetes and insulin resistance using HOMA-IR. Results Out of 924 subjects who gave assent to participate in study 108 fulfilled ADA criteria. 33 subjects who didn’t come for the follow up were excluded. Out of 75 subjects 12 were detected to have insulin resistance (16%) and 63 were normal (84%). Pearson’s partial correlation of HOMA-IR and OGTT with SAD has demonstrated it to be better correlation with Insulin Resistance (IR) than other anthropometric measurements. Fasting Glucose correlated better with Waist Hip Circumference. Conclusion Insulin Resistance was diagnosed in 16% of the population and these had high levels of insulin resistance. SAD in relation to glucose metabolism, had a better correlation with OGTT followed by HOMA-IR and fasting Insulin. SAD with anthropometric measurements had better correlation all the parameters other than Waist Circumference, which had negative correlation. SAD can be used in evaluation of obese or overweight children for evaluation. PMID:26673888

  9. Cellularity and Adipogenic Profile of the Abdominal Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue From Obese Adolescents: Association With Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kursawe, Romy; Eszlinger, Markus; Narayan, Deepak; Liu, Teresa; Bazuine, Merlijn; Cali, Anna M.G.; D'Adamo, Ebe; Shaw, Melissa; Pierpont, Bridget; Shulman, Gerald I.; Cushman, Samuel W.; Sherman, Arthur; Caprio, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We explored whether the distribution of adipose cell size, the estimated total number of adipose cells, and the expression of adipogenic genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue are linked to the phenotype of high visceral and low subcutaneous fat depots in obese adolescents. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 38 adolescents with similar degrees of obesity agreed to have a subcutaneous periumbilical adipose tissue biopsy, in addition to metabolic (oral glucose tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp) and imaging studies (MRI, DEXA, 1H-NMR). Subcutaneous periumbilical adipose cell-size distribution and the estimated total number of subcutaneous adipose cells were obtained from tissue biopsy samples fixed in osmium tetroxide and analyzed by Beckman Coulter Multisizer. The adipogenic capacity was measured by Affymetrix GeneChip and quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS Subjects were divided into two groups: high versus low ratio of visceral to visceral + subcutaneous fat (VAT/[VAT+SAT]). The cell-size distribution curves were significantly different between the high and low VAT/(VAT+SAT) groups, even after adjusting for age, sex, and ethnicity (MANOVA P = 0.035). Surprisingly, the fraction of large adipocytes was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in the group with high VAT/(VAT+SAT), along with the estimated total number of large adipose cells (P < 0.05), while the mean diameter was increased (P < 0.01). From the microarray analyses emerged a lower expression of lipogenesis/adipogenesis markers (sterol regulatory element binding protein-1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase) in the group with high VAT/(VAT+SAT), which was confirmed by RT-PCR. CONCLUSIONS A reduced lipo-/adipogenic capacity, fraction, and estimated number of large subcutaneous adipocytes may contribute to the abnormal distribution of abdominal fat and hepatic steatosis, as well as to insulin resistance in obese adolescents. PMID:20805387

  10. Effects of Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF)-I/IGF-Binding Protein-3 Treatment on Glucose Metabolism and Fat Distribution in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients with Abdominal Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhu N.; Mulligan, Kathleen; Tai, Viva; Wen, Michael J.; Dyachenko, Artem; Weinberg, Melissa; Li, Xiaojuan; Lang, Thomas; Grunfeld, Carl; Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Schambelan, Morris

    2010-01-01

    Context: HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy are at increased risk for excess visceral adiposity and insulin resistance. Treatment with GH decreases visceral adiposity but worsens glucose metabolism. IGF-I, which mediates many of the effects of GH, improves insulin sensitivity in HIV-negative individuals. Objective: Our objective was to determine whether IGF-I, complexed to its major binding protein, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), improves glucose metabolism and alters body fat distribution in HIV-infected patients with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Methods: We conducted a pilot, open-label study in 13 HIV-infected men with excess abdominal adiposity and insulin resistance to assess the effect of 3 months of treatment with IGF-I/IGFBP-3 on glucose metabolism and fat distribution. Glucose metabolism was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Endogenous glucose production (EGP), gluconeogenesis, whole-body lipolysis, and de novo lipogenesis (DNL) were measured with stable isotope infusions. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and abdominal computed tomography scan. Results: Glucose tolerance improved and insulin-mediated glucose uptake increased significantly during treatment. EGP increased under fasting conditions, and suppression of EGP by insulin was blunted. Fasting triglycerides decreased significantly in association with a decrease in hepatic DNL. Lean body mass increased and total body fat decreased, whereas visceral adipose tissue did not change. Conclusions: Treatment with IGF-I/IGFBP-3 improved whole-body glucose uptake and glucose tolerance, while increasing hepatic glucose production. Fasting triglycerides improved, reflecting decreased DNL, and visceral adiposity was unchanged. PMID:20610601

  11. Abdominal fat and metabolic risk in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Revenga-Frauca, J; González-Gil, E M; Bueno-Lozano, G; De Miguel-Etayo, P; Velasco-Martínez, P; Rey-López, J P; Bueno-Lozano, O; Moreno, L A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate fat distribution, mainly abdominal fat, and its relationship with metabolic risk variables in a group of 126 children and adolescents (60 males and 66 females) aged 5.0 to 14.9. According to IOTF criteria, 46 were classified as normal weight, 28 overweight and 52 obese. Weight, height, waist (WC) and hip circumferences were measured. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Total body fat, trunkal and abdominal fat were also assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Glucose, insulin, HDL-Cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), ferritine, homocystein and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Obesity status was related with insulin concentrations, CRP, TG and HDL. Obese patients had higher abdominal fat and higher CRP values than overweight and normal subjects. All markers of central body adiposity were related with insulin and lipid metabolism; however, they were not related with homocystein or ferritin. A simple anthropometric measurement, like waist circumference, seems to be a good predictor of the majority of the obesity related metabolic risk variables. PMID:20358355

  12. Factors associated with abdominal obesity in children

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Matheus Ribeiro Theodósio Fernandes; Magrini, Isabella Mastrangi; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Martins, Paula Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association of dietary, socioeconomic factors, sedentary behaviors and maternal nutritional status with abdominal obesity in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study with household-based survey, in 36 randomly selected census tracts in the city of Santos, SP. 357 families were interviewed and questionnaires and anthropometric measurements were applied in mothers and their 3-10 years-old children. Assessment of abdominal obesity was made by maternal and child's waist circumference measurement; for classification used cut-off points proposed by World Health Organization (1998) and Taylor et al. (2000) were applied. The association between variables was performed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: 30.5% of children had abdominal obesity. Associations with children's and maternal nutritional status and high socioeconomic status were shown in the univariate analysis. In the regression model, children's body mass index for age (OR=93.7; 95%CI 39.3-223.3), female gender (OR=4.1; 95%CI 1.8-9.3) and maternal abdominal obesity (OR=2.7; 95%CI 1.2-6.0) were significantly associated with children's abdominal obesity, regardless of the socioeconomic status. Conclusions: Abdominal obesity in children seems to be associated with maternal nutritional status, other indicators of their own nutritional status and female gender. Intervention programs for control of childhood obesity and prevention of metabolic syndrome should consider the interaction of the nutritional status of mothers and their children. PMID:26298655

  13. Chronic sub-clinical inflammation in the abdominal adipose tissue – Evaluation of inflammatory cytokines and their link with insulin resistance in metabolically obese South Indians: A cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Premanath, M.; Basavanagowdappa, H.; Mahesh, M.; Babu, M. Suresh; Devananda, D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure the levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6(IL-6), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine adiponectin (AN) in obese South Indian subjects and to ascertain whether or not a causal role could be ascribed to these cytokines in the development of insulin resistance (IR). Materials and Methods: Forty obese and forty nonobese volunteers of both genders were recruited. Parameters such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were evaluated. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin level, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), lipid profile, TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP, and AN levels were measured. IR was evaluated by homeostatic model assessment-IR method. Abdominal adiposity was measured by ultrasonography. The results were statistically evaluated by appropriate tests. Results: BMI, WC, and visceral fat were high in the obese group. Females had higher subcutaneous fat in both groups. HbA1C was marginally high in the obese group (P = 0.014). IR was high in all the groups, obese males showing higher values (not significant[NS]). Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein were high in the obese group (P = 0.028, P = 0.003). TNF-α was high in obese males (NS), IL-6 was high in both groups, higher in nonobese females (NS), hs-CRP was high in both groups, higher in females of both groups (NS). AN was high in females of both groups (P = 0.002). Conclusions: In this study on South Indian subjects, proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and hs-CRP, despite being high, did not show any causal correlation either with abdominal obesity or with IR. TNF-α being normal showed some correlation which was inconsistent. Even the anti-inflammatory adipokine, AN did not show any correlation with IR. Cytokines had an inconsistent correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome hence were not useful. PMID:26904474

  14. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Gobato, Amanda Oliva; Vasques, Ana Carolina J.; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Barros, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To verify the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese adolescents and its relationship with different body composition indicators. Methods: A cross-sectional study comprising 79 adolescents aged ten to 18 years old. The assessed body composition indicators were: body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, abdominal circumference, and subcutaneous fat. The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by Cook et al. The insulin resistance was determined by the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) index for values above 3.16. The analysis of ROC curves was used to assess the BMI and the abdominal circumference, aiming to identify the subjects with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The cutoff point corresponded to the percentage above the reference value used to diagnose obesity. Results: The metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 45.5% of the patients and insulin resistance, in 29.1%. Insulin resistance showed association with HDL-cholesterol (p=0.032) and with metabolic syndrome (p=0.006). All body composition indicators were correlated with insulin resistance (p<0.01). In relation to the cutoff point evaluation, the values of 23.5 and 36.3% above the BMI reference point allowed the identification of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. The best cutoff point for abdominal circumference to identify insulin resistance was 40%. Conclusions: All body composition indicators, HDL-cholesterol and metabolic syndrome showed correlation with insulin resistance. The BMI was the most effective anthropometric indicator to identify insulin resistance. PMID:24676191

  15. Abdominal Obesity, Race and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Adults: Results from NHANES 1999-2010

    PubMed Central

    Sarathy, Harini; Henriquez, Gabriela; Abramowitz, Matthew K.; Kramer, Holly; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Johns, Tanya; Kumar, Juhi; Skversky, Amy; Kaskel, Frederick; Melamed, Michal L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Kidney dysfunction in obesity may be independent of and may precede the development of hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus. We aimed to examine if abdominal obesity is associated with early markers of CKD in a young healthy population and whether these associations differ by race and/or ethnicity. Methods We analyzed data from the NHANES 1999–2010 for 6918 young adults ages 20–40 years. Abdominal obesity was defined by gender criteria of waist circumference. CKD markers included estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria ≥30 mg/g. Race stratified analyses were done overall and in subgroups with normal blood pressures, normoglycemia and normal insulin sensitivity. Awareness of CKD was assessed in participants with albuminuria. Results Abdominal obesity was present in over one-third of all young adults and was more prevalent among non-Hispanic blacks (45.4%) versus Mexican-Americans (40.6%) or non-Hispanic whites (37.4%) (P-value = 0.004). Mexican-American young adults with abdominal obesity had a higher odds of albuminuria even among those with normal blood pressure, normal glucose, and normal insulin sensitivity [adjusted odds ratio 4.5; 95% confidence interval (1.6–12.2), p = 0.004]. Less than 5% of young adults with albuminuria of all races and ethnicities had been told they had kidney disease. Conclusion Abdominal obesity in young adults, especially in Mexican-Americans, is independently associated with albuminuria even with normal blood pressures, normoglycemia and normal insulin levels. Greater awareness of CKD is needed to protect this young population from long-standing exposure to abdominal obesity and early progressive renal disease. PMID:27224643

  16. Abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and oxidized low-density lipoproteins in Latino adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Justin R; Vega-López, Sonia; Djedjos, Constantine S; Shaibi, Gabriel Q

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and insulin resistance (IR) place youth at higher risk for premature cardiovascular disease (CVD), but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. In adults, abdominal obesity and IR contribute to the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Whether similar mechanisms are operational in Latino adolescents is unknown. Therefore, we determined whether IR and abdominal adiposity are associated with higher oxLDL concentrations in Latino adolescents. Data from 123 Latino adolescents (16.3 ± 2.5 years; female = 74) were used for the present analysis. Participants were assessed for waist circumference, fasting serum oxLDL, and insulin sensitivity by the whole body insulin sensitivity index. In separate linear regression models adjusting for age and sex, both waist circumference and insulin sensitivity were significant predictors of oxLDL (β = 1.9; p = 0.002; R2 = 0.13, β = -1.7; p = 0.006; R2 = 0.11, respectively). When insulin sensitivity and waist circumference were included in the same model, both remained independent predictors of oxLDL (β = 1.7; p = 0.016 and, β = -1.5; p = 0.055, respectively; R2 = 0.16). These results suggest that insulin resistance and abdominal adiposity are associated with higher levels of LDL oxidation which may be a mechanism contributing to increased CVD risk in Latino adolescents. PMID:24238302

  17. The Impact of Abdominal Obesity Status on Cardiovascular Response to the Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Bédard, Alexandra; Dodin, Sylvie; Corneau, Louise; Lemieux, Simone

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the impact of abdominal obesity status on the cardiovascular response to a fully controlled 4-week isoenergetic Mediterranean diet (MedDiet). Thirty-eight abdominally obese individuals (waist circumference >102 cm in men and >88 cm in women) and thirty-one nonabdominally obese individuals were recruited and studied before and after the MedDiet. All analyses were adjusted for the slight decrease in body weight, which occurred during the MedDiet (mean: 0.9 ± 1.2 kg). A group by time interaction was noted for waist circumference (P = 0.02), abdominally obese subjects showing a significant decrease and nonabdominally obese subjects a nonsignificant increase (resp., −1.1 and +0.3%). The MedDiet resulted in decreases in total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, apolipoprotein B, A-1, and A-2, total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (time effect: P < 0.05). For all variables related to glucose/insulin homeostasis, no change was observed except for a decrease in 2 h glucose concentrations (time effect: P = 0.03). No group by time interaction was observed in any of the metabolic variables studied. Results from our study suggest that the adoption of the MedDiet leads to beneficial metabolic effects, irrespective of the abdominal obesity status. PMID:23133745

  18. Adipose Tissue Hypoxia, Inflammation, and Fibrosis in Obese Insulin-Sensitive and Obese Insulin-Resistant Subjects.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Helen M; Underkofler, Chantal M; Kern, Philip A; Erickson, Christopher; Bredbeck, Brooke; Rasouli, Neda

    2016-04-01

    We confirmed fat hypoxia in obese as compared to lean subjects. However, fat oxygenation was similar in obese insulin sensitive and insulin resistant subjects suggesting fat hypoxia may be simply a consequence of fat expansion. PMID:26871994

  19. Evaluation of the impact of abdominal obesity on glucose and lipid metabolism disorders in adults with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Real de Asua, Diego; Parra, Pedro; Costa, Ramón; Moldenhauer, Fernando; Suarez, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to describe anthropometric differences in weight-related disorders between adults with Down syndrome (DS) and healthy controls, as well as their disparate impact on glucose and lipid metabolism disorders. We underwent a cross-sectional study of 49 consecutively selected, community-residing adults with DS and 49 healthy controls in an outpatient clinic of a tertiary care hospital in Madrid, Spain. Siblings of adults with DS were studied as controls in 42 cases. Epidemiological data (age and gender), anthropometric data (body mass index, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio [WHR]), coexisting clinical conditions, and laboratory data (fasting glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, creatinine, thyroid hormones, and lipid profile) were measured and compared between the groups. Adults with DS were significantly younger and more often male, with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than controls. Adults with DS also had a higher WHR, and more frequently presented abdominal obesity. Moreover, insulin resistance measured using the homeostatic model assessment was more prevalent among adults with DS and abdominal obesity. However, lipid profiles were similar between groups. The kappa correlation index for the diagnosis of abdominal obesity between waist circumference and WHR was 0.24 (95%CI: 0.13-0.34). We concluded that the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity was higher in adults with DS than in controls. Adults with DS and abdominal obesity showed higher indexes of insulin resistance than their non-obese peers. WHR was a useful tool for the evaluation of abdominal obesity in this population. PMID:25108610

  20. Unsaturated Oral Fat Load Test Improves Glycemia, Insulinemia and Oxidative Stress Status in Nondiabetic Subjects with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Hervas, Sergio; Navarro, Inmaculada; Real, Jose T.; Artero, Ana; Peiro, Marta; Gonzalez-Navarro, Herminia; Carmena, Rafael; Ascaso, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the changes in glycemia, insulinemia, and oxidative stress markers during an oral fat load test in nondiabetic subjects with abdominal obesity and to analyze the association between postprandial oxidative stress markers and postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Methods We included 20 subjects with abdominal obesity (waist circumference > 102 cm for men and > 88 cm for women) and 20 healthy lean controls (waist circumference < 102 cm for men and < 88 cm for women). After 12 hours of fasting we performed a standardized fat load test (0–8 hours) with supracal® (50 g/m2). We determined metabolic parameters, oxidized and reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde. Results In both groups, insulin, HOMA, oxidized/reduced glutathione ratio, and malondialdehyde significantly decreased in the postprandial state after the OFLT. All these parameters were significantly higher in the abdominal obesity group at baseline and during all the postprandial points, but the reduction from the baseline levels was significantly higher in the abdominal obesity group. Conclusion Unsaturated fat improves insulin resistance and oxidative stress status. It is possible that a consumption of unsaturated fat could be beneficial even in subjects with abdominal obesity in postprandial state. PMID:27537847

  1. Stearic acid content of abdominal adipose tissues in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Caron-Jobin, M; Mauvoisin, D; Michaud, A; Veilleux, A; Noël, S; Fortier, M P; Julien, P; Tchernof, A; Mounier, C

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissue stearic acid (18:0) content and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1)-mediated production of oleic acid (18:1) have been suggested to be altered in obesity. The objective of our study was to examine abdominal adipose tissue fatty acid content and SCD1 mRNA/protein level in women. Subjects and methods: Fatty acid content was determined by capillary gas chromatography in SC and omental (OM) fat tissues from two subgroups of 10 women with either small or large OM adipocytes. Samples from 10 additional women were used to measure SCD1 mRNA and protein expression, total extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein as well as insulin receptor (IR) expression levels. Results: OM fat 18:0 content was significantly lower in women with large OM adipocytes compared with women who had similar adiposity, but small OM adipocytes (2.37±0.45 vs 2.75±0.30 mg per 100 g adipose tissue, respectively, P⩽0.05). OM fat 18:0 content was negatively related to the visceral adipose tissue area (r=−0.44, P=0.05) and serum triglyceride levels (r=−0.56, P<0.05), while SC fat 18:0 content was negatively correlated with total body fat mass (BFM) (r=−0.48, P<0.05) and fasting insulin concentration (r=−0.73, P<0.005). SC adipose tissue desaturation index (18:1/18:0), SCD1 expression and protein levels were positively correlated with BFM. Moreover, obese women were characterized by a reduced OM/SC ratio of SCD1 mRNA and protein levels. A similar pattern was observed for ERK1/2 and IR expression. Conclusion: The presence of large adipocytes and increased adipose mass in a given fat compartment is related to reduced 18:0 content and increased desaturation index in women, independently of dietary fat intake. The depot-specific difference in ERK1/2 expression and activation, as well as in SCD1 and IR expression in obese women is consistent with the hypothesis that they may predominantly develop SC fat, which

  2. Vascular stiffness in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aroor, Annayya R.; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are associated with a substantially increased prevalence of vascular fibrosis and stiffness, with attendant increased risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Although the underlying mechanisms and mediators of vascular stiffness are not well understood, accumulating evidence supports the role of metabolic and immune dysregulation related to increased adiposity, activation of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system, reduced bioavailable nitric oxide, increased vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM remodeling in the pathogenesis of vascular stiffness. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance and increased vascular stiffness to provide a contemporary understanding of the proposed underlying mechanisms and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26321962

  3. Cardiovascular Disease Risk of Abdominal Obesity versus Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Rachel P.; McGinn, Aileen P.; Lin, Juan; Wang, Dan; Muntner, Paul; Cohen, Hillel W.; Reynolds, Kristi; Fonseca, Vivian; Sowers, MaryFran R.

    2011-01-01

    It remains unclear whether abdominal obesity increases cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk independent of the metabolic abnormalities which often accompany it. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the independent effects of abdominal obesity versus metabolic syndrome and diabetes on the risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The Framingham Offspring, Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities, and Cardiovascular Health studies were pooled to assess the independent effects of abdominal obesity (waist circumference >102 cm for men and >88 cm for women) versus metabolic syndrome (excluding the waist circumference criterion) and diabetes on risk for incident coronary heart disease and stroke in 20,298 men and women aged ≥45 years. The average follow-up was 8.3 (standard deviation 1.9) years. There were 1,766 CVD events. After adjustment for demographic factors, smoking, alcohol intake, number of metabolic syndrome components and diabetes, abdominal obesity was not significantly associated with an increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 1.09 [0.98, 1.20]). However, after adjustment for demographics, smoking, alcohol intake, and abdominal obesity, having 1–2 metabolic syndrome components, the metabolic syndrome, and diabetes were each associated with a significantly increased risk of CVD (2.12 [1.80, 2.50], 2.82 [1.92, 4.12] and 5.33 [3.37, 8.41], respectively). Although abdominal obesity is an important clinical tool for identification of individuals likely to possess metabolic abnormalities, these data suggest that the metabolic syndrome and diabetes are considerably more important prognostic indicators of CVD risk. PMID:20725064

  4. Central obesity, type 2 diabetes and insulin: exploring a pathway full of thorns

    PubMed Central

    Papakyriakou, Panagiotis; Panagiotou, Themistoklis N.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is rapidly increasing. This is strongly related to the contemporary lifestyle changes that have resulted in increased rates of overweight individuals and obesity. Central (intra-abdominal) obesity is observed in the majority of patients with T2D. It is associated with insulin resistance, mainly at the level of skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver. The discovery of macrophage infiltration in the abdominal adipose tissue and the unbalanced production of adipocyte cytokines (adipokines) was an essential step towards novel research perspectives for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, in an obese state, the increased cellular uptake of non-esterified fatty acids is exacerbated without any subsequent β-oxidation. This in turn contributes to the accumulation of intermediate lipid metabolites that cause defects in the insulin signaling pathway. This paper examines the possible cellular mechanisms that connect central obesity with defects in the insulin pathway. It discusses the discrepancies observed from studies organized in cell cultures, animal models and humans. Finally, it emphasizes the need for therapeutic strategies in order to achieve weight reduction in overweight and obese patients with T2D. PMID:26170839

  5. Hyperinsulinemia in Individuals with obesity: Role of Insulin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee Kyoung; Reaven, Gerald M.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Kim, Eric; Kim, Sun H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several studies have shown decreased insulin clearance rate (ICR) in individuals with obesity, but it remains unclear whether this is predominately due to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR) or obesity itself. We aimed to clarify the complex interrelationship that exists between obesity, IR and ICR. Methods Healthy volunteers (n = 277) had measurement of IR and ICR using the insulin suppression test (IST). IR was quantified by determining the steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) during the IST. ICR was estimated by dividing the insulin infusion rate by the steady-state plasma insulin concentration. We performed our analysis by stratifying the experimental population into 4 dichotomous categories, varying in obesity and IR. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2, and IR was defined as SSPG ≥ 150 mg/dl. Results Individuals with obesity had higher fasting insulin compared with individuals without obesity, regardless of IR. ICR was similar between individuals with and without obesity but was higher in IR individuals compared with insulin sensitive individuals. In multivariate analysis, both fasting insulin and SSPG were significantly associated with ICR. No significant relationships were observed between BMI and ICR. Conclusions Reduced ICR in obesity is secondary to IR, not excess adiposity. PMID:26524351

  6. Relationship of obesity and insulin resistance with the cerebrovascular reactivity: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with increased risk for stroke. The breath-holding index (BHI) is a measure of vasomotor reactivity of the brain which can be measured with the transcranial Doppler (TCD). We aim to evaluate obesity as an independent factor for altered cerebrovascular reactivity. Methods Cerebrovascular hemodynamics (mean flow velocities MFV, pulsatility index, PI, resistance index, RI, and BHI) was determined in 85 non-obese (Body Mass Index, BMI ≤27 kg/m2) and 85 obese subjects (BMI ≥35 kg/m2) without diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Anthropometric and metabolic variables, and scores to detect risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were analyzed for their association with the cerebrovascular reactivity. Results The BHI was significantly lower in subjects with obesity according to BMI and in subjects with abdominal obesity, but the PI and RI were not different between groups. There was a linear association between the BMI, the HOMA-IR, the Matsuda index, the waist circumference, and the neck circumference, with the cerebrovascular reactivity. After adjusting for insulin resistance, neck circumference, and abdominal circumference, obesity according to BMI was negatively correlated with the cerebrovascular reactivity. Conclusions We found a diminished vasomotor reactivity in individuals with obesity which was not explained by the presence of insulin resistance. PMID:24383894

  7. Linking Gut Microbiota and Inflammation to Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Saad, M J A; Santos, A; Prada, P O

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are the major predisposing factors to comorbidities, such as Type 2 diabetes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and several types of cancer. The prevalence of obesity is still increasing worldwide and now affects a large number of individuals. Here, we review the role of the gut microbiota in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance/obesity. The human intestine is colonized by ∼100 trillion bacteria, which constitute the gut microbiota. Studies have shown that lean and overweight rodents and humans may present differences in the composition of their intestinal flora. Over the past 10 years, data from different sources have established a causal link between the intestinal microbiota and obesity/insulin resistance. It is important to emphasize that diet-induced obesity promotes insulin resistance by mechanisms independent and dependent on gut microbiota. In this review, we present several mechanisms that contribute to explaining the link between intestinal flora and insulin resistance/obesity. The LPS from intestinal flora bacteria can induce a chronic subclinical inflammatory process and obesity, leading to insulin resistance through activation of TLR4. The reduction in circulating SCFA may also have an essential role in the installation of reduced insulin sensitivity and obesity. Other mechanisms include effects of bile acids, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), and some other lesser-known factors. In the near future, this area should open new therapeutic avenues for obesity/insulin resistance and its comorbidities. PMID:27252163

  8. The association between abdominal obesity and serum cholesterol level

    PubMed Central

    Veghari, Gholamreza; Sedaghat, Mehdi; Maghsodlo, Siavash; Banihashem, Samieh; Moharloei, Pooneh; Angizeh, Abdolhamid; Tazik, Ebrahim; Moghaddami, Abbas; Joshaghani, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: The main aim of this study is to evaluate the association between serum cholesterol level and abdominal obesity in adult men and women in the north of Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional and analytical study was conducted on the 1956 subjects (990 men and 966 women) between 25 and 65 years old chosen by cluster sampling. Plasma cholesterol was measured in the morning after a 12 h fast and determined by auto-analyzer. Hypercholesterolemia (HC) was defined by a total plasma cholesterol level over 200 mg/dl. Waist circumference ≥102 cm and ≥88 cm in men and women were defined as abdominal obesity. SPSS 16.0 software was used for statistical analysis and P < 0.05 considered as statistical significance. Results: Averagely, the mean of age was 44.2 years and mean ± standard deviation of plasma total cholesterol level was 203 ± 11.3 mg/dl. The HC was seen in 50.8% of subjects with a more common in women than in men. Compared with normal subjects, in abdominal obese people, the odds ratio (OR) of HC was (OR = 4.208 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.939–9.130]) and (OR = 3.956 [95% CI: 1.821–8.592]) in men aged 25–35 and 35–45 years, respectively. In women aged 25–35 years, it was (OR = 3.444 [95% CI: 1.959–6.056]) in abdominal obese compared with normal subjects. Conclusion: Hypercholesterolemia was revealed as a major health problem among adults, and it was associated with abdominal obesity especially in the early middle-age in the north of Iran. This association was not significant in men and women after the age of 45 and 35, respectively. PMID:26097812

  9. Obesity and Insulin Resistance: An Abridged Molecular Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Biswajit; Hossain, Chowdhury M; Mondal, Laboni; Paul, Paramita; Ghosh, Miltu K

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between obesity and type 2 diabetes is now generally well accepted. This relationship represents several major health hazards including morbid obesity and cardiovascular complications worldwide. Diabetes mellitus is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by impaired insulin release and insulin resistance. Lipids play an important physiological role in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and pancreas. Deregulation of fatty acid metabolism is the main culprit for developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A predominant predisposing factor to developing obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is the permanent elevation of free fatty acids in plasma followed by impaired utilization of lipids by muscle. Diabetes-induced inflammation and oxidative stress have also vital role for development of insulin resistance in diabetic patients. The present review is intended to describe the correlation between lipids, obesity and insulin resistance based on current literature, in order to elucidate involved molecular mechanisms in depth. PMID:25278764

  10. Sedentary Behavior Is Not Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk in Adults with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K. Ashlee; Ross, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of this study was to determine whether time spent in sedentary behaviors (SED) was associated with 2-hour glucose and insulin resistance in adults with abdominal obesity. We also examined the association between light physical activity (LPA) and sporadic (accumulated in bouts <10 minutes in duration) moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with glucose metabolism. Methods Participants were 135 inactive, abdominally obese adults recruited from Kingston, Canada. SED and physical activity were determined by accelerometry over 7 days and summarized as SED (accelerometer counts/min <100), LPA (counts/min 100–1951), and MVPA (counts/min ≥1952). A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was used to ascertain 2-hour glucose; the homeostasis model of assessment was used to determine insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); lipid, lipoproteins and blood pressure were determined using standard protocols. Secondary analyses considered the association between SED and physical activity with other cardiometabolic risk factors. Results Participants spent 627.2±82.9 min/d in SED, 289.0±91.7 min/d in LPA and 19.2±13.5 min/d in MVPA. Neither SED nor the physical activity variables were associated with 2-hour glucose or HOMA-IR (p>0.05). In secondary analyses, SED was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); with the exception of blood pressure (p<0.05), LPA was not associated with any cardiometabolic risk factor (p>0.1); and MVPA was independently associated with total cholesterol and triglycerides (p<0.05). Conclusions Objectively measured SED was not associated with 2-hr glucose or HOMA-IR. Our findings also suggest that the accumulation of LPA and sporadic MVPA is not associated with glucose metabolism in adults with abdominal obesity. PMID:21695179

  11. Dysregulation of the Peripheral and Adipose Tissue Endocannabinoid System in Human Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blüher, Matthias; Engeli, Stefan; Klöting, Nora; Berndt, Janin; Fasshauer, Mathias; Bátkai, Sádor; Pacher, Pál; Schön, Michael R.; Jordan, Jens; Stumvoll, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been suspected to contribute to the association of visceral fat accumulation with metabolic diseases. We determined whether circulating endocannabinoids are related to visceral adipose tissue mass in lean, subcutaneous obese, and visceral obese subjects (10 men and 10 women in each group). We further measured expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes in paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in all 60 subjects. Circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) was significantly correlated with body fat (r = 0.45, P = 0.03), visceral fat mass (r = 0.44, P = 0.003), and fasting plasma insulin concentrations (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) but negatively correlated to glucose infusion rate during clamp (r = 0.39, P = 0.009). In visceral adipose tissue, CB1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), fasting insulin (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.5, P < 0.001), whereas FAAH gene expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that abdominal fat accumulation is a critical correlate of the dysregulation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity. Thus, the endocannabinoid system may represent a primary target for the treatment of abdominal obesity and associated metabolic changes. PMID:17065342

  12. Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Portuguese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sardinha, Luís B.; Santos, Diana A.; Silva, Analiza M.; Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J.; Raimundo, Armando M.; Moreira, Helena; Santos, Rute; Vale, Susana; Baptista, Fátima; Mota, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity in the Portuguese adults and examined the relationship between above mentioned prevalences and educational level. Body mass, stature, and waist circumference were measured in a representative sample of the Portuguese population aged 18–103 years (n = 9,447; 18–64 years: n = 6,908; ≥65 years: n = 2,539). Overweight and obesity corresponded to a body mass index ranging between 25–29.9 kg/m2 and ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. Abdominal obesity was assessed as >102 cm for males and >88 cm for females. After adjusting for educational level, the combined prevalences of overweight and obesity were 66.6% in males and 57.9% in females (18–64 years). Respective values in older adults (≥65 years) were 70.4% for males and 74.7% for females. About 19.3% of adult males and 37.9% of adult females presented abdominal obesity. Correspondent values in older adults were 32.1%, for males, and 69.7%, for females. In adults, low educational level was related to an increased risk for overweight (OR = 2.54; 95% CI: 2.08–3.09), obesity (OR = 2.76; 95% CI: 2.20–3.45), and abdominal obesity (OR = 5.48; 95% CI: 4.60–6.52). This reinforces the importance of adjusting public health strategies for educational level. PMID:23118905

  13. Autonomic blockade improves insulin sensitivity in obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Alfredo; Okamoto, Luis E; Arnold, Amy C; Figueroa, Rocio A; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Paranjape, Sachin Y; Farley, Ginnie; Abumrad, Naji; Biaggioni, Italo

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for the development of insulin resistance. Initial compensatory mechanisms include an increase in insulin levels, which are thought to induce sympathetic activation in an attempt to restore energy balance. We have previously shown, however, that sympathetic activity has no beneficial effect on resting energy expenditure in obesity. On the contrary, we hypothesize that sympathetic activation contributes to insulin resistance. To test this hypothesis, we determined insulin sensitivity using a standard hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp protocol in obese subjects randomly assigned in a crossover design 1 month apart to receive saline (intact day) or trimetaphan (4 mg/min IV, autonomic blocked day). Whole-body glucose uptake (MBW in mg/kg per minute) was used as index of maximal muscle glucose use. During autonomic blockade, we clamped blood pressure with a concomitant titrated intravenous infusion of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine. Of the 21 obese subjects (43±2 years; 35±2 kg/m(2) body mass index) studied, 14 were insulin resistant; they were more obese, had higher plasma glucose and insulin, and had higher muscle sympathetic nerve activity (23.3±1.5 versus 17.2±2.1 burst/min; P=0.03) when compared with insulin-sensitive subjects. Glucose use improved during autonomic blockade in insulin-resistant subjects (MBW 3.8±0.3 blocked versus 3.1±0.3 mg/kg per minute intact; P=0.025), with no effect in the insulin-sensitive group. These findings support the concept that sympathetic activation contributes to insulin resistance in obesity and may result in a feedback loop whereby the compensatory increase in insulin levels contributes to greater sympathetic activation. PMID:25001269

  14. Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O Lynne; Jansen, Heiko T; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Morgenstern, Kurt; Gehring, Jamie Lauren; Rigano, Kimberly Scott; Lee, Jae; Gong, Jianhua; Shaywitz, Adam J; Vella, Chantal A; Robbins, Charles T; Corbit, Kevin C

    2014-08-01

    The confluence of obesity and diabetes as a worldwide epidemic necessitates the discovery of new therapies. Success in this endeavor requires translatable preclinical studies, which traditionally employ rodent models. As an alternative approach, we explored hibernation where obesity is a natural adaptation to survive months of fasting. Here we report that grizzly bears exhibit seasonal tripartite insulin responsiveness such that obese animals augment insulin sensitivity but only weeks later enter hibernation-specific insulin resistance (IR) and subsequently reinitiate responsiveness upon awakening. Preparation for hibernation is characterized by adiposity coupled to increased insulin sensitivity via modified PTEN/AKT signaling specifically in adipose tissue, suggesting a state of "healthy" obesity analogous to humans with PTEN haploinsufficiency. Collectively, we show that bears reversibly cope with homeostatic perturbations considered detrimental to humans and describe a mechanism whereby IR functions not as a late-stage metabolic adaptation to obesity, but rather a gatekeeper of the fed-fasting transition. PMID:25100064

  15. The Adipose Transcriptional Response to Insulin Is Determined by Obesity, Not Insulin Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta; Raman, Amitha; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Toft, Eva; Qvist, Veronica; Näslund, Erik; Thorell, Anders; Andersson, Daniel P; Dahlman, Ingrid; Gao, Hui; Sandelin, Albin; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Peter

    2016-08-30

    Metabolically healthy obese subjects display preserved insulin sensitivity and a beneficial white adipose tissue gene expression pattern. However, this observation stems from fasting studies when insulin levels are low. We investigated adipose gene expression by 5'Cap-mRNA sequencing in 17 healthy non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small effects observed in NO subjects. In the obese, 231 genes were altered; 71 were enriched in ISO subjects (e.g., phosphorylation processes), and 52 were enriched in IRO subjects (e.g., cellular stimuli). Common cardio-metabolic risk factors and gender do not influence these findings. This study demonstrates that differences in the acute transcriptional response to insulin are primarily driven by obesity per se, challenging the notion of healthy obese adipose tissue, at least in severe obesity. PMID:27545890

  16. Arginine supplementation improves insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine through a NO mediated mechanism improves insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To assess the effect of a short-term (1 week) dietary arginine supplementation on insulin resistance in glucose intolerant obese adolescents, we conducted a randomized, cross-over study in 12 subjects (16 +/- 1 ...

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of abdominal obesity in Polish rural children.

    PubMed

    Suder, A; Janusz, M; Jagielski, P; Głodzik, J; Pałka, T; Cisoń, T; Pilch, W

    2015-08-01

    Secular trends of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference indicate greater increase in abdominal obesity compared to general obesity. Determinants of obesity described by BMI are relatively well documented in various populations, unlike abdominal obesity described by waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). The aim of the study was to determine prevalence and abdominal obesity (WHtR) risk factors in a cohort of 3048 rural children aged 7-12 years from southern Poland. Biological, socio-demographic and lifestyle factors were analysed, and odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated using a logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of abdominal obesity in rural boys and girls in the sample was 11% and 9% respectively. Obesity in both parents, irregular breakfasts, irregular meals during the day and regularly consumed tea were significant factors of abdominal obesity risks in rural girls. Being the only child, low number of people in a household, obesity in both parents, high energy-dense food index and no exercise significantly increased the risk of abdominal obesity in rural boys. The study demonstrated tendencies similar to other European countries in the prevalence of abdominal obesity among sexes. Lifestyle behaviours should be changed and adapted to each sex since risk factors differ between the sexes and indicate higher eco-sensitivity in boys. PMID:25796137

  18. Insulin and Leptin Relations in Obesity: A Multimedia Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokaichiya, Daniela K.; Galembeck, Eduardo; Torres, Bayardo B.; Da Silva, Jose Antonio; de Araujo, Daniele R.

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has been recognized as a worldwide public health problem. It significantly increases the chances of developing several diseases, including Type II diabetes. The roles of insulin and leptin in obesity involve reactions that can be better understood when they are presented step by step. The aim of this work was to design software with data…

  19. Homocysteine levels in morbidly obese patients: its association with waist circumference and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Rivera, Leonor; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; de la Fuente, Miguel; Solá, Eva; Romagnoli, Marco; Alis, R; Laiz, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    The association between morbid obesity and hyperhomocysteinemia (HH) remains controversial and the nature of this relationship needs to be clarified as several metabolic, lipidic, inflammatory and anthropometric alterations that accompany morbid obesity may be involved. In 66 morbidly obese patients, 47 women and 19 men aged 41 ± 12 years and 66 normo-weight subjects, 43 women and 23 men, aged 45 ± 11 years, we determined homocysteine (Hcy) levels along with lipidic, anthropometric, inflammatory and insulin resistance markers. In addition, we investigated the effect of Metabolic Syndrome (MS) and its components on Hcy levels. Obese patients had statistically higher Hcy levels than controls: 12.76 ± 5.30 μM vs. 10.67 ± 2.50 μM; p = 0.006. Moreover, morbidly obese subjects showed higher waist circumference, glucose, insulin, HOMA, leptin, triglycerides, fibrinogen, C reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.001, respectively), and lower vitamin B12 (p = 0.002), folic acid and HDL-cholesterol (p < 0.001, respectively). In the multivariate regression analysis, waist circumference, glucose, leptin and folic acid levels were independent predictors for Hcy values (p < 0.050). When obese patients were classified as having MS or not, no differences in Hcy levels were found between the two groups (p = 0.752). Yet when we analysed separately each MS component, only abdominal obesity was associated with Hcy levels (p = 0.031). Moreover when considering glucose >110 mg/dL (NCEP-ATPIII criteria) instead of glucose intolerance >100 mg/dl (updated ATPIII criteria), it also was associated with HH (p = 0.042). These results were confirmed in the logistic regression analysis where abdominal obesity and glucose >115 mg/dL constitute independent predictors for HH (OR = 3.2; CI: 1.23-13.2; p = 0.032, OR: 4.6; CI: 1.7-22.2; p = 0.016, respectively). The results of our study indicate that increased Hcy levels are related mostly with abdominal obesity and with insulin resistance. Thus, HH may

  20. Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome in burns, obesity, pregnancy, and general medicine.

    PubMed

    Malbrain, Manu L N G; De Keulenaer, Bart L; Oda, Jun; De Laet, Inneke; De Waele, Jan J; Roberts, Derek J; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Kimball, Edward; Ivatury, Rao

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is an important contributor to early organ dysfunction in trauma and sepsis. However, relatively little is known about the impact of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) in general internal medicine, pregnant patients, and those with obesity or burns. The aim of this paper is to review the pathophysiologic implications and treatment options for IAH in these specific situations. A MEDLINE and PubMed search was performed and the resulting body-of-evidence included in the current review on the basis of relevance and scientific merit. There is increasing awareness of the role of IAH in different clinical situations. Specifically, IAH will develop in most (if not all) severely burned patients, and may contribute to early mortality. One should avoid over-resuscitation of these patients with large volumes of fluids, especially crystalloids. Acute elevations in IAP have similar effects in obese patients compared to non-obese patients, but the threshold IAP associated with organ dysfunction may be higher. Chronic elevations in IAP may, in part, be responsible for the pathogenesis of obesity-related co-morbid conditions such as hypertension, pseudotumor cerebri, pulmonary dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and abdominal wall hernias. At the bedside, measuring IAP and considering IAH in all critical maternal conditions is essential, especially in preeclampsia/eclampsia where some have hypothesized that IAH may have an additional role. IAH in pregnancy must take into account the precautions for aorto-caval compression and has been associated with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Recently, IAP has been associated with the cardiorenal dilemma and hepatorenal syndrome, and this has led to the recognition of the polycompartment syndrome. In conclusion, IAH and ACS have been associated with several patient populations beyond the classical ICU, surgical, and trauma patients. In all at risk conditions the focus should be on the early

  1. Obesity, insulin resistance and comorbidities – Mechanisms of association

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kolka, Cathryn M.; Kim, Stella P.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Overall excess of fat, usually defined by the body mass index, is associated with metabolic (e.g. glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), dyslipidemia) and non-metabolic disorders (e.g. neoplasias, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fat liver disease, glomerulopathy, bone fragility etc.). However, more than its total amount, the distribution of adipose tissue throughout the body is a better predictor of the risk to the development of those disorders. Fat accumulation in the abdominal area and in non-adipose tissue (ectopic fat), for example, is associated with increased risk to develop metabolic and non-metabolic derangements. On the other hand, observations suggest that individuals who present peripheral adiposity, characterized by large hip and thigh circumferences, have better glucose tolerance, reduced incidence of T2DM and of metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the main culprits in the association between obesity, particularly visceral, and metabolic as well as non-metabolic diseases. In this review we will highlight the current pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms possibly involved in the link between increased VAT, ectopic fat, IR and comorbidities. We will also provide some insights in the identification of these abnormalities. PMID:25211442

  2. [Obesity and fatty acids in the etiology of insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Galgani, J; Díaz, E

    2000-12-01

    Fatty acids, obesity and insulin resistance relationship are discussed. In the last decades fatty acids (FA) have been implicated in the etiology of insulin resistance. Initially, this process was related to FA inhibitory effects on glucose uptake mediated by the FA oxidation metabolites. This mechanism known as the Randle cycle has been presently discarded based on recent evidence for FA effects on glucose metabolism. Now is known that cytosolic lipid content and FA molecular structure determines higher or lower storage and oxidation capacity. Another factor is given by Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, which is overexpressed in animal and human obesity, producing insulin signaling and glucose uptake inhibition. This paper discuss the role played by FA and obesity on insulin resistance, mainly in relation to FA effects on glucose metabolism in the liver, muscle and adipose tissues. In the obesity condition adipose tissue releases higher levels of free FA which in turn stimulates hepatic glucose production. Adipose tissue also, increase TNF-alpha secretion impairing glucose utilization and insulin signaling. In muscle, cytosolic lipid content activate a Protein Kinase that inhibits the insulin signaling and reduce GLUT-4 translocation. The study of cellular and metabolic changes associated to weight gain and its relationship with insulin resistance etiology are encouraged. PMID:11227245

  3. Inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 ameliorates obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shiying; Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Muxun

    2016-09-01

    Excess 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) may be implicated in the development of obesity related metabolic disorders. The present study measured the expression level of 11β-HSD1 in visceral adipose tissues from 23 patients undergoing abdominal operation. Correlation of 11β-HSD1 expression with BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), HOMA-IR, and serum lipids was evaluated by spearman correlation analysis. High-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) rats were orally dosed with BVT.2733 for 4 weeks. Weight, plasma insulin, and lipids were detected at the end of the treatment. The effects of 11β-HSD1 inhibition on the key insulin-signaling cascade and adipocytokines were measured by western blot and ELISA respectively. 11β-HSD1 was increased in patients with central obesity, the expression level of which was closely related with WHR (r = 0.5851), BMI (r = 0.4952), and HOMA-IR (r = 0.4637). Obesity related insulin resistance in high-fat DIO rats, as reflected by a marked decrease in IRS-1, IRS-2, GLUT4, and PI3K, could be attenuated by 11β-HSD1 inhibition. Furthermore, the down-regulation of 11β-HSD1 could correct the disordered profiles of adipocytokines including adiponectin, IL-6, and TNF-α. These findings indicated that 11β-HSD1 inhibition can give a potential benefit in reducing obesity and lowering insulin resistance by modulating the insulin-signaling pathway and adipocytokine production. PMID:27268236

  4. Metabolic inflammation: connecting obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Mecili, Mustapha; Ricci, Roméo; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Insulin resistance is a pathological condition that arises when insulin signaling is impaired, forcing β-cells to produce more insulin in order to cope with body demands and to maintain glucose homeostasis. When the pancreas is no more able to support an appropriate insulin secretion, insulin resistance becomes decompensated and hyperglycemia is detected. One of the mechanisms leading to insulin resistance is low-grade inflammation that involves a number of protagonists such as inflammatory cytokines, lipids and their metabolites, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypoxia and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and changes in gut microbiota profiles. We review here the molecular aspects of metabolic inflammation converging to insulin resistance and secondarily to type 2 diabetes. We also discuss the place of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the assessment of metabolic inflammation and potential therapeutic interventions aimed to impede inflammation and therefore prevent insulin resistance. PMID:22834949

  5. The expression of ob gene is not acutely regulated by insulin and fasting in human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Vidal, H; Auboeuf, D; De Vos, P; Staels, B; Riou, J P; Auwerx, J; Laville, M

    1996-07-15

    The regulation of ob gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue was investigated using a reverse transcription-competitive PCR method to quantify the mRNA level of leptin. Leptin mRNA level was highly correlated with the body mass index of 26 subjects (12 lean, 7 non-insulin-dependent diabetic, and 7 obese patients). The effect of fasting on ob gene expression was investigated in 10 subjects maintained on a hypocaloric diet (1045 KJ/d) for 5 d. While their metabolic parameters significantly changed (decrease in insulinemia, glycemia, and resting metabolic rate and increase in plasma ketone bodies), the caloric restriction did not modify the leptin mRNA level in the adipose tissue. To verify whether insulin regulates ob gene expression, six lean subjects underwent a 3-h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (846 +/- 138 pmol/liter) clamp. Leptin and Glut 4 mRNA levels were quantified in adipose tissue biopsies taken before and at the end of the clamp. Insulin infusion produced a significant threefold increase in Glut 4 mRNA while leptin mRNA was not affected. It is concluded that ob gene expression is not acutely regulated by insulin or by metabolic factors related to fasting in human abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:8755631

  6. Impaired protein metabolism: interlinks between obesity, insulin resistance and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guillet, C; Masgrau, A; Walrand, S; Boirie, Y

    2012-12-01

    Metabolic and structural changes in skeletal muscle that accompany obesity are often associated with the development of insulin resistance. The first events in the pathogenesis of this disorder are considered as an accumulation of lipids within skeletal muscle due to blunted muscle capacity to oxidize fatty acids. Fat infiltration is also associated with muscle fibre typology modification, decrease in muscle mass and impairments in muscle strength. Thus, as a result of obesity, mobility and quality of life are affected, and this is in part due to quantitative and qualitative impairments in skeletal muscle. In addition, the insulin resistance related to obesity results not only in defective insulin-stimulated glucose disposal but has also detrimental consequences on protein metabolism at the skeletal muscle level and whole-body level. This review highlights the involvement of fat accumulation and insulin resistance in metabolic disorders occurring in skeletal muscle during the development of obesity, and the impairments in the regulation of protein metabolism and protein turnover in the links between obesity, metabolic inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:23107259

  7. Obesity and the Risk for Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Robert D; Reese, Stacey; Bochicchio, Kelly; Mazuski, John E; Bochicchio, Grant V

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after abdominal procedures; however, data characterizing the risk of SSI in obese patients during abdominal procedures are lacking. We hypothesized that obesity is an independent risk factor for SSI across wound classes. We analyzed American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) data for 2011. We calculated body mass index (BMI), classifying patients according to National Institute of Health (NIH) BMI groups. We excluded records in which height/weight was not recorded and patients with BMI less than 18.5. We examined patients undergoing open abdominal procedures, performing univariate and multivariate analyses to assess the relative contribution of obesity to SSI. Study criteria were met by 89,148 patients. Obese and morbidly obese patients had significantly greater SSI rates in clean and clean-contaminated cases but not contaminated or dirty/infected cases. Logistic regression confirmed obesity and morbid obesity as being independently associated with the overall SSI development, specifically in clean [Obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.757, morbid obesity OR = 2.544, P < 0.001] and clean-contaminated (obesity OR = 1.239, morbid obesity OR = 1.287, P < 0.001) cases. Obesity is associated with increased risk of SSI overall, specifically in clean and clean-contaminated abdominal procedures; this is independent of diabetes mellitus. Novel techniques are needed to reduce SSI in this high-risk patient population. PMID:27097626

  8. Educational inequality in the occurrence of abdominal obesity: Pró-Saúde Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Ronaldo Fernandes Santos; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the degree of educational inequality in the occurrence of abdominal obesity in a population of non-faculty civil servants at university campi. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, we used data from 3,117 subjects of both genders aged 24 to 65-years old, regarding the baseline of Pró-Saúde Study, 1999-2001. Abdominal obesity was defined according to abdominal circumference thresholds of 88 cm for women and 102 cm for men. A multi-dimensional, self-administered questionnaire was used to evaluate education levels and demographic variables. Slope and relative indices of inequality, and Chi-squared test for linear trend were used in the data analysis. All analyses were stratified by genders, and the indices of inequality were standardized by age. RESULTS Abdominal obesity was the most prevalent among women (43.5%; 95%CI 41.2;45.9), as compared to men (24.3%; 95%CI 22.1;26.7), in all educational strata and age ranges. The association between education levels and abdominal obesity was an inverse one among women (p < 0.001); it was not statistically significant among men (p = 0.436). The educational inequality regarding abdominal obesity in the female population, in absolute terms (slope index of inequality), was 24.0% (95%CI 15.5;32.6). In relative terms (relative index of inequality), it was 2.8 (95%CI 1.9;4.1), after the age adjustment. CONCLUSIONS Gender inequality in the prevalence of abdominal obesity increases with older age and lower education. The slope and relative indices of inequality summarize the strictly monotonous trend between education levels and abdominal obesity, and it described educational inequality regarding abdominal obesity among women. Such indices provide relevant quantitative estimates for monitoring abdominal obesity and dealing with health inequalities. PMID:26465669

  9. Vitamin D insufficiency and insulin resistance in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tosh, Aneesh K.; Belenchia, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    Obese adolescents represent a particularly vulnerable group for vitamin D deficiency which appears to have negative consequences on insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis. Poor vitamin D status is also associated with future risk of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome in the obese. The biological mechanisms by which vitamin D influences glycemic control in obesity are not well understood, but are thought to involve enhancement of peripheral/hepatic uptake of glucose, attenuation of inflammation and/or regulation of insulin synthesis/secretion by pancreatic β cells. Related to the latter, recent data suggest that the active form of vitamin, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, does not impact insulin release in healthy pancreatic islets; instead they require an environmental stressor such as inflammation or vitamin D deficiency to see an effect. To date, a number of observational studies exploring the relationship between the vitamin D status of obese adolescents and markers of glucose homeostasis have been published. Most, although not all, show significant associations between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamn D concentrations and insulin sensitivity/resistance indices. In interpreting the collective findings of these reports, significant considerations surface including the effects of pubertal status, vitamin D status, influence of parathyroid hormone status and the presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The few published clinical trials using vitamin D supplementation to improve insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance in obese adolescents have yielded beneficial effects. However, there is a need for more randomized controlled trials. Future investigations should involve larger sample sizes of obese adolescents with documented vitamin D deficiency, and careful selection of the dose, dosing regimen and achievement of target 25-hydroxyvitamn D serum concentrations. These trials should also include clamp-derived measures of in vivo sensitivity and

  10. Abdominal obesity is associated with heart disease in dogs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between overall obesity and fat distribution in dogs and the development of heart disease is unclear. In the present study we evaluated the association between overall obesity and fat distribution and clinical heart disease by morphometric and computed tomography (CT)-based measurements. Body condition score (BCS), modified body mass index (MBMI, kg/m2), waist-to-hock-to-stifle distance ratio (WHSDR), waist-to-ilium wing distance ratio (WIWDR), and waist-to-truncal length ratio (WTLR) were compared between dogs with (n = 44) and without (n = 43) heart disease using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) and subcutaneous fat (SQF) were measured in dogs with (n = 8) and without (n = 9) heart disease at the center of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae by CT. Results BCS was similar between heart disease and healthy groups (3.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.3 ± 0.1, P = 0.126). The following morphometric measurements were greater in the heart disease group compared with healthy canines: MBMI (65.0 ± 4.5 vs. 52.5 ± 3.7 kg/m2, respectively, P = 0.035); WIWDR (4.1 ± 0.1 vs. 3.1 ± 0.1, P < 0.01); and WTLR (1.25 ± 0.04 vs. 1.05 ± 0.04, P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in WHSDR (3.6 ± 0.1 vs. 3.7 ± 0.2, P = 0.875). Interestingly, IAF was significantly increased in dogs with heart disease compared with healthy dogs (23.5 ± 1.5% vs. 19.4 ± 1.2%, P = 0.039) whereas SQF was similar between two groups (35.5 ± 2.7% vs. 38.6 ± 3.5%, P = 0.496). Of the five morphometric indices studied, WIWDR and WTLR provided acceptable discrimination for diagnosing heart disease in dogs, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.778 (95% confidence interval [CI]:0.683-0.874) and 0.727 (95% CI:0.619-0.835), respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is associated

  11. Insulin Resistance and Impaired Mitochondrial Function in Obese Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Thakur, Hena; Torriani, Martin; Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a role in the development of muscle insulin resistance (IR) and the accumulation of intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) in skeletal muscle that can, in turn, interfere with insulin signaling. The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function (MF) and IMCL in obese adolescent girls with and without IR to determine whether: (1) Girls with IR have impaired MF, and (2) impaired MF in girls with IR is related to higher IMCL. Methods: We examined 22 obese girls aged 13–21 years old for IR [defined as a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) value >4. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), respectively, were used to determine MF and IMCL of the soleus muscle along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of visceral, subcutaneous, and total adipose tissue (VAT, SAT, and TAT) in girls with HOMA-IR >4 (insulin-resistant group) versus HOMA-IR ≤4 (insulin-sensitive group). Serum lipids and waist-to-hip ratio (W/H) were also measured. Results: Girls with IR (n=8) did not differ from the insulin-sensitive group (n=14) for age, bone age, weight, VAT, SAT, TAT, or IMCL. However, the insulin-resistant group had higher W/H. Additionally the insulin-resistance group had a lower log rate of postexercise phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery (ViPCr) and a higher log PCr recovery constant (tau), indicative of impaired MF. Conclusions: Obese girls with increased IR have impaired mitochondrial function. This association is not mediated by alterations in IMCL or adipose tissue. Further studies are necessary to determine whether there is a causal relation between impaired mitochondrial function and IR in obesity and mediators of such a relationship. PMID:24251951

  12. A Role of the Inflammasome in the Low Storage Capacity of the Abdominal Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kursawe, Romy; Dixit, Vishwa D; Scherer, Philipp E; Santoro, Nicola; Narayan, Deepak; Gordillo, Ruth; Giannini, Cosimo; Lopez, Ximena; Pierpont, Bridget; Nouws, Jessica; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    The innate immune cell sensor leucine-rich-containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome controls the activation of caspase-1, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The NLRP3 inflammasome is implicated in adipose tissue inflammation and the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that adipose tissue inflammation and NLRP3 inflammasome are linked to the downregulation of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) adipogenesis/lipogenesis in obese adolescents with altered abdominal fat partitioning. We performed abdominal SAT biopsies on 58 obese adolescents and grouped them by MRI-derived visceral fat to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) plus SAT (VAT/VAT+SAT) ratio (cutoff 0.11). Adolescents with a high VAT/VAT+SAT ratio showed higher SAT macrophage infiltration and higher expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome-related genes (i.e., TLR4, NLRP3, IL1B, and CASP1). The increase in inflammation markers was paralleled by a decrease in genes related to insulin sensitivity (ADIPOQ, GLUT4, PPARG2, and SIRT1) and lipogenesis (SREBP1c, ACC, LPL, and FASN). Furthermore, SAT ceramide concentrations correlated with the expression of CASP1 and IL1B. Infiltration of macrophages and upregulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome together with the associated high ceramide content in the plasma and SAT of obese adolescents with a high VAT/VAT+SAT may contribute to the limited expansion of the subcutaneous abdominal adipose depot and the development of insulin resistance. PMID:26718495

  13. Obesity-associated Gingival Vascular Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, K; Park, K; Mima, A; Katagiri, S; King, G L

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for periodontitis, but the pathogenic mechanism involved is unclear. We studied the effects of insulin in periodontal tissues during the state of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Gingival samples were collected from fatty (ZF) and lean (ZL, control) Zucker rats. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression was decreased, and activities of protein kinase C (PKC) α, ß2, δ, and ϵ isoforms were significantly increased in the gingiva from ZF rats compared with those from ZL rats. Expression of oxidative stress markers (mRNA) and the p65 subunit of NF-κB was significantly increased in ZF rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that NF-κB activation was also increased in the gingival endothelial cells from transgenic mice overexpressing NF-κB-dependent enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and on a high-fat vs. normal chow diet. Analysis of the gingiva showed that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and eNOS was significantly decreased in ZF rats, but Erk1/2 activation was not affected. General PKC inhibitor and an anti-oxidant normalized the action of insulin on Akt and eNOS activation in the gingiva from ZF rats. This provided the first documentation of obesity-induced insulin resistance in the gingiva. Analysis of our data suggested that PKC activation and oxidative stress may selectively inhibit insulin-induced Akt and eNOS activation, causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. PMID:24744283

  14. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  15. Impact of obesity on recovery and pulmonary functions of obese women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A M; Abdelazim, Ibrahim A

    2016-06-01

    To determine impact of obesity on recovery parameters and pulmonary functions of women undergoing major abdominal gynecological surgeries. Eighty women undergoing major gynecological surgeries were included in this study. Anesthesia was induced by remifentanil bolus, followed by propofol and cisatracurium to facilitate oro-tracheal intubation and was maintained by balanced anesthesia of remifentanil intravenous infusion and sevoflurane in oxygen and air. Time from discontinuation of maintenance anesthesia to fully awake were recorded at 1-min intervals and time from discontinuation of anesthesia until patient was transferred to post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) and discharged from PACU was also recorded. Pulmonary function tests were performed before surgery and repeated 4 h, days 1, 2 and 3 post-operative for evaluation of forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. Occurrence of post-operative complications, re-admission to ICU, hospital stay and morbidities were also recorded. Induction of anesthesia using remifentanil bolus injection resulted in significant decrease of heart rate and arterial pressures compared to pre-operative and pre-induction values. Recovery times were significantly shorter in obese compared to morbidly obese women. Post-operative pulmonary function tests showed significant deterioration compared to pre-operative measures but showed progressive improvement through first 3 post-operative days. Hospital stay was significantly shorter for obese compared to morbid obese women. Obesity delays recovery from general anesthesia, adversely affects pulmonary functions and increases post-operative complications. Remifentanil infusion and sevoflurane could be appropriate combination for obese and morbidly obese women undergoing major surgeries. PMID:26072156

  16. Abdominal Obesity and Brain Atrophy in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Callisaya, Michele; Blizzard, Leigh; Sharman, James E.; Venn, Alison; Phan, Thanh G.; Beare, Richard; Forbes, Josephine; Blackburn, Nicholas B.; Srikanth, Velandai

    2015-01-01

    Aim Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with gray matter atrophy. Adiposity and physical inactivity are risk factors for T2D and brain atrophy. We studied whether the associations of T2D with total gray matter volume (GMV) and hippocampal volume (HV) are dependent on obesity and physical activity. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, we measured waist-hip ratio (WHR), body mass index (BMI), mean steps/day and brain volumes in a community dwelling cohort of people with and without T2D. Using multivariable linear regression, we examined whether WHR, BMI and physical activity mediated or modified the association between T2D, GMV and HV. Results There were 258 participants with (mean age 67±7 years) and 302 without (mean age 72±7 years) T2D. Adjusting for age, sex and intracranial volume, T2D was independently associated with lower total GMV (p = 0.001) and HV (p<0.001), greater WHR (p<0.001) and BMI (p<0.001), and lower mean steps/day (p = 0.002). After adjusting for covariates, the inclusion of BMI and mean steps/day did not significantly affect the T2D-GMV association, but WHR attenuated it by 32% while remaining independently associated with lower GMV (p<0.01). The T2D-HV association was minimally changed by the addition of BMI, steps/day or WHR in the model. No statistical interactions were observed between T2D and measures of obesity and physical activity in explaining brain volumes. Conclusions Abdominal obesity or its downstream effects may partially mediate the adverse effect of T2D on brain atrophy. This requires confirmation in longitudinal studies. PMID:26560876

  17. [Childhhood obesity, insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk].

    PubMed

    Carlone, Angela; Venditti, Chiara; Cipolloni, Laura; Zampetti, Simona; Spoletini, Marialuisa; Capizzi, Marco; Leto, Gaetano; Buzzetti, Raffaella

    2012-10-01

    Excess fat is one of the major risk factors for insulin resistance predisposing to the development of cardiovascular diseases in western countries. We know that obese patients are strongly at risk of cardiovascular diseases, like myocardial infarction or stroke. These diseases are the most frequent cause of death in the adult population, representing a social and economic problem. Today there are not available and useful markers for screening and diagnosis of insulin- resistance in young people. "Easy-to-detect" clinical markers must be found to identify young subjects at risk of cardiovascular diseases. Very interesting the relationship between wrist circumference, its bone composition and insulin resistance. PMID:23114400

  18. The gut microbiota, obesity and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The human gut is densely populated by commensal and symbiotic microbes (the "gut microbiota"), with the majority of the constituent microorganisms being bacteria. Accumulating evidence indicates that the gut microbiota plays a significant role in the development of obesity, obesity-associated inflam...

  19. Relationship between overall and abdominal obesity and periodontal disease among young adults.

    PubMed

    Amin, H El-Sayed

    2010-04-01

    To assess overall and abdominal obesity and their relation to periodontal disease among young adults, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were measured and clinical attachment loss (CAL), gingival index (GI) and Community Periodontal Index (CPI) were estimated. The sample comprised 380 adults (170 males and 210 females) aged 20-26 years. There was a significant correlation between both BMI and WC and CAL, GI and CPI in females. In males, a significant correlation was only recorded between WC and GI and CPI. Overall and abdominal obesity in young adult females and abdominal obesity in males were significantly associated with periodontal disease. PMID:20795429

  20. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  1. Immunity as a link between obesity and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major health problem in the United States and worldwide. Obesity is causally linked to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and T2DM. A chronic low-grade inflammation occurring in adipose tissue is at least in part responsible for the obesit...

  2. SORLA facilitates insulin receptor signaling in adipocytes and exacerbates obesity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Vanessa; Schulz, Nadja; Yan, Xin; Schürmann, Annette; Kempa, Stefan; Kern, Matthias; Blüher, Matthias; Poy, Matthew N; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Willnow, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    In humans, genetic variation of sortilin-related receptor, L(DLR class) A repeats containing (SORL1), which encodes the intracellular sorting receptor SORLA, is a major genetic risk factor for familial and sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease. Recent GWAS analysis has also associated SORL1 with obesity in humans and in mouse models, suggesting that this receptor may play a role in regulating metabolism. Here, using mouse models with genetic loss or tissue-specific overexpression of SORLA as well as data from obese human subjects, we observed a gene-dosage effect that links SORLA expression to obesity and glucose tolerance. Overexpression of human SORLA in murine adipose tissue blocked hydrolysis of triacylglycerides and caused excessive adiposity. In contrast, Sorl1 gene inactivation in mice accelerated breakdown of triacylglycerides in adipocytes and protected animals from diet-induced obesity. We then identified the underlying molecular mechanism whereby SORLA promotes insulin-induced suppression of lipolysis in adipocytes. Specifically, we determined that SORLA acts as a sorting factor for the insulin receptor (IR) that redirects internalized receptor molecules from endosomes to the plasma membrane, thereby enhancing IR surface expression and strengthening insulin signal reception in target cells. Our findings provide a molecular mechanism for the association of SORL1 with human obesity and confirm a genetic link between neurodegeneration and metabolism that converges on the receptor SORLA. PMID:27322061

  3. The Insulin-Like Growth Factor System in Obesity, Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lewitt, Moira S.; Dent, Mairi S.; Hall, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, acting in concert with other hormone axes, is important in normal metabolism. In obesity, the hyperinsulinaemia that accompanies peripheral insulin resistance leads to reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion, while total IGF-I levels are relatively unchanged due to increased hepatic GH sensitivity. IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1 levels are suppressed in relation to the increase in insulin levels in obesity and low levels predict the development of type 2 diabetes several years later. Visceral adiposity and hepatic steatosis, along with a chronic inflammation, contribute to the IGF system phenotype in individuals with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus, including changes in the normal inverse relationship between IGFBP-1 and insulin, with IGFBP-1 concentrations that are inappropriately normal or elevated. The IGF system is implicated in the vascular and other complications of these disorders and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26237614

  4. Recent advances in obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tateya, Sanshiro; Kim, Francis; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated in rodents and humans that chronic inflammation characterized by macrophage infiltration occurs mainly in adipose tissue or liver during obesity, in which activation of immune cells is closely associated with insulin sensitivity. Macrophages can be classified as classically activated (M1) macrophages that support microbicidal activity or alternatively activated (M2) macrophages that support allergic and antiparasitic responses. In the context of insulin action, M2 macrophages sustain insulin sensitivity by secreting IL-4 and IL-10, while M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα. Polarization of M1/M2 is controlled by various dynamic functions of other immune cells. It has been demonstrated that, in a lean state, TH2 cells, Treg cells, natural killer T cells, or eosinophils contribute to the M2 activation of macrophages by secreting IL-4 or IL-10. In contrast, obesity causes alteration of the constituent immune cells, in which TH1 cells, B cells, neutrophils, or mast cells induce M1 activation of macrophages by the elevated secretion of TNFα and IFNγ. Increased secretion of TNFα and free fatty acids from hypertrophied adipocytes also contributes to the M1 activation of macrophages. Since obesity-induced insulin resistance is established by macrophage infiltration and the activation of immune cells inside tissues, identification of the factors that regulate accumulation and the intracellular signaling cascades that define polarization of M1/M2 would be indispensable. Regulation of these factors would lead to the pharmacological inhibition of obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this review, we introduce molecular mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology and review the most recent studies of clinical applications targeting chronic inflammation. PMID:23964268

  5. Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance and Absence of Inflammation Characterize Insulin-Resistant Grade I Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Annick; Lambert, Karen; Birot, Olivier; Fédou, Christine; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Sutra, Thibault; Molinari, Nicolas; Maimoun, Laurent; Mariano-Goulart, Denis; Galtier, Florence; Avignon, Antoine; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise; Mercier, Jacques; Sultan, Ariane; Bisbal, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Context Obesity is associated with insulin-resistance (IR), the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Although chronic low-grade inflammation has been identified as a central effector of IR development, it has never been investigated simultaneously at systemic level and locally in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in obese humans characterized for their insulin sensitivity. Objectives We compared metabolic parameters and inflammation at systemic and tissue levels in normal-weight and obese subjects with different insulin sensitivity to better understand the mechanisms involved in IR development. Methods 30 post-menopausal women were classified as normal-weight insulin-sensitive (controls, CT) and obese (grade I) insulin-sensitive (OIS) or insulin-resistant (OIR) according to their body mass index and homeostasis model assessment of IR index. They underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, blood sampling, skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies, an activity questionnaire and a self-administrated dietary recall. We analyzed insulin sensitivity, inflammation and IR-related parameters at the systemic level. In tissues, insulin response was assessed by P-Akt/Akt expression and inflammation by macrophage infiltration as well as cytokines and IκBα expression. Results Systemic levels of lipids, adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, and lipopolysaccharides were equivalent between OIS and OIR subjects. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, the number of anti-inflammatory macrophages was higher in OIR than in CT and OIS and was associated with higher IL-6 level. Insulin induced Akt phosphorylation to the same extent in CT, OIS and OIR. In skeletal muscle, we could not detect any inflammation even though IκBα expression was lower in OIR compared to CT. However, while P-Akt/Akt level increased following insulin stimulation in CT and OIS, it remained unchanged in OIR. Conclusion Our results show that systemic IR occurs without any change in systemic and tissues

  6. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  7. Alveolar recruitment maneuver and perioperative ventilatory support in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Forgiarini Júnior, Luiz Alberto; Rezende, Juliana Castilhos; Forgiarini, Soraia Genebra Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The development of abdominal surgery represents an alternative therapy for the morbidly obese; however, patients undergoing this surgical procedure often experience postoperative pulmonary complications. The use of alveolar recruitment maneuvers and/or perioperative ventilatory strategies is a possible alternative to reduce these complications, focusing on the reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. In this review, the benefits of perioperative ventilatory strategies and the implementation of alveolar recruitment maneuvers in obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery are described. PMID:24553513

  8. Abdominal obesity and hypertension: a double burden to the heart.

    PubMed

    Krzesiński, Paweł; Stańczyk, Adam; Piotrowicz, Katarzyna; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Zyczkowska, Beata; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal obesity (AO) is strongly associated with increased cardiovascular risk in hypertensives. Visceral adipose tissue has an important part in water retention, the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, which may influence central and systemic hemodynamics. The aim of this study was to estimate the relationship between AO and the hemodynamic profile of patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The clinical evaluation of 144 hypertensives included the following: (1) echocardiographic assessment of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), the global longitudinal systolic strain (GLSS) and diastolic function (E/A-phase ratio of mitral flow early (E) and late (A) and E/e'-ratio of early mitral flow and mitral septal annulus early diastolic velocity (e')); (2) the applanation tonometry including the central pulse pressure (CPP) and augmentation index (AI); and (3) the impedance cardiography, acceleration index (ACI), velocity index (VI), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) and total artery compliance (TAC). Obese hypertensives in comparison with non-obese ones were characterized with the following values: (1) lower echocardiographic (GLSS: -17.2±2.5% vs. -19.0±2.8%, P=0.0002) and impedance indices of left ventricular performance (VI: 44.8±12.4 vs. 51.6±14.2 × 1000*Ω* s(-1), P=0.006; ACI: 66.7±27.8 vs. 79.1±31.2 100*Ω* s(-)(2), P=0.003) and (2) worse diastolic function (e': 9.08±2.69 vs. 10.39±2.34 cm*s(-1), P=0.003; E/e': 7.54±1.81 vs. 6.74±1.40, P=0.007; E/A: 1.02±0.34 vs. 1.15±0.33, P=0.008). No relevant differences for gender, age, blood pressure, heart rate, LVEF, SVRI, TAC, CPP and AI were identified. AH and AO have overlapping effects on cardiovascular hemodynamics. At the early asymptomatic stage, this overlap is exhibited in the impaired cardiac function. PMID:26791010

  9. Obesity and cancer, a case for insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Poloz, Y; Stambolic, V

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, with the number of overweight and obese individuals climbing from just over 500 million in 2008 to 1.9 billion in 2014. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease have long been associated with the obese state, whereas cancer is quickly emerging as another pathological consequence of this disease. Globally, at least 2.8 million people die each year from being overweight or obese. It is estimated that by 2020 being overweight or obese will surpass the health burden of tobacco consumption. Increase in the body mass index (BMI) in overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2) and obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) individuals is a result of adipose tissue (AT) expansion, which can lead to fat comprising >50% of the body weight in the morbidly obese. Extensive research over the last several years has painted a very complex picture of AT biology. One clear link between AT expansion and etiology of diseases like T2D and cancer is the development of insulin resistance (IR) and hyperinsulinemia. This review focuses on defining the link between obesity, IR and cancer. PMID:26720346

  10. Abdominal Obesity Indicators: Waist Circumference or Waist-to-hip Ratio in Malaysian Adults Population

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Norfazilah; Adam, Samia Ibrahim Mohamed; Nawi, Azmawati Mohammed; Hassan, Mohd Rohaizat; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Waist circumference (WC) is an accurate and simple measure of abdominal obesity as compared to waist–hip ratio (WHR). The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between body mass index (BMI) with WC and WHR and suggest cutoff points for WC among Rural Malaysian adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 669 respondents from three villages in Tanjung Karang, located in the district of Kuala Selangor. Data collection was carried out by guided questionnaires and anthropometric measures. Results: The prevalence of abdominal obesity for BMI was almost similar for both gender across Caucasian and Asian BMI cutoff points. Based on Caucasian cutoff points, the prevalence of abdominal obesity for WC was 23.8% (male) and 66.4% (female) while for WHR was 6.2% (male) and 54.2% (female). Asian cutoff points gave higher prevalence of abdominal obesity compared to that of WC among male respondents and WHR for both genders. WC showed strong and positive correlation with BMI compared to WHR (in male WC r = 0.78, WHR r = 0.24 and in female WC r = 0.72, WHR r = 0.19; P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggested WC cutoff points of 92.5 cm in men and 85.5 cm in women is the optimal number for detection of abdominal obesity. Conclusions: WC is the best indicator as compared with WHR for abdominal obesity for Malaysian adults. PMID:27330688

  11. Lipogenic potential of liver from morbidly obese patients with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, H.A.; McLendon, V.D.; Carpenter, J.W.; Marks, R.H.; Legett, N.; O'Brien, K.; Caro, J.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Intra-abdominal liver biopsies were obtained during surgery from fasted obese patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), obese normoglycemic controls, and lean controls. Lipid synthesis was studied in freshly isolated hepatocytes and liver homogenates from the three groups of subjects. Incorporation of 3H2O into the lipids of hepatocytes was determined in the absence and presence of insulin (0.1 mumol/L). The activities of five enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, and the incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate into lipids were determined in liver homogenates. Basal lipid synthesis by hepatocytes was not different in the three groups of patients. Insulin stimulated lipogenesis by 8% +/- 30% in the lean controls, 33% +/- 8% in the obese controls and 17% +/- 6% in the NIDDM patients. No significant differences in the activities of the five enzymes that are involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis among the three groups of patients were observed. Similarly, incorporation of 14C-glycerol-3-phosphate by liver homogenates, in the presence of saturating or submaximal concentrations of fatty acids, did not differ among the three groups. These results show that under the experimental conditions of this study, including the fasted state of the patients, the basal capacity of liver of NIDDM patients to synthesize fatty acids or glycerides is the same as that of liver from obese and lean controls. Thus, it is likely that an increase in fatty acid flux into a liver with normal lipogenic potential may contribute to the increased synthesis of triglycerides by the liver of these patients in vivo.

  12. Intra-abdominal fat is related to metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fat liver disease in obese youth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown an association between adiposity, especially intra-abdominal adipose tissue, and hemodynamic/metabolic comorbidities in adults, however it is not clear in pediatric population. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and components of metabolic syndrome (MS) with values of intra-abdominal (IAAT) and subcutaneous (SCAT) adipose tissue in obese children and adolescents. Methods Cross-sectional study. Subjects: 182 obese sedentary children and adolescents (aged 6 to 16 y), identified by the body mass index (BMI). Measurements: Body composition and trunk fat by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry- DXA; lipid profile, blood pressure and pubertal stage were also assessed. NAFLD was classified as absent (0), mild (1), moderate (2) and severe (3), and intra-abdominal and subcutaneous abdominal fat thickness were identified by ultrasound. The MS was identified according to the cut offs proposed by World Health Organization adapted for children and adolescents. The chi-square test was used to compare categorical variables, and the binary logistic regression indicated the magnitude of the associations adjusted by potential cofounders (sex, age, maturation, NAFLD and HOMA-IR). Results Higher quartile of SCAT was associated with elevated blood pressure (p = 0.015), but not associated with NAFLD (p = 0.665). Higher IAAT was positively associated with increased dyslipidemia (p = 0.001), MS (p = 0.013) and NAFLD (p = 0.005). Intermediate (p = 0.007) and highest (p = 0.001) quartile of IAAT were also associated with dyslipidemia, independently of age, sex, maturation, NAFLD and HOMA-IR (homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance). Conclusion Obese children and adolescents, with higher IAAT are more prone to develop MS and NAFLD than those with higher values of SCAT, independent of possible confounding variables. PMID:23919592

  13. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Aliaga, María J.; Romero-Lozano, M. Asunción; Castaño, David; Prieto, Jesús; Bustos, Matilde

    2012-01-01

    Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) is a member of the gp130 family of cytokines. In a recent study we examined the metabolic features of ct-1 null mice and the effects on body composition, glucose and lipid metabolism of acute and chronic administration of recombinant CT-1. Our data revealed that CT-1 is a key regulator of energy metabolism with potential applications in the treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. This commentary discusses the significance of these findings in the context of other key studies in the field of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:23700521

  14. Long-term effect of insulin on glucose transport and insulin binding in cultured adipocytes from normal and obese humans with and without non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, M K; Taylor, L G; Pories, W J; Flickinger, E G; Meelheim, D; Atkinson, S; Sehgal, N S; Caro, J F

    1987-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that in vitro exposure of insulin-resistant adipocytes with insulin results in improved insulin action. A primary culture system of adipocytes from obese subjects with or without non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and nonobese control subjects has been developed. The adipocytes when cultured in serum-free medium do not lose their original characteristics in regard to insulin binding and glucose transport. The adipocytes from three groups were incubated with insulin (0, 10(-10) M, and 10(-7) M) for 24 h at 37 degrees C, receptor-bound insulin was dissociated, and basal and insulin (1 X 10(-11)-10(-7) M)-stimulated glucose transport and 125I-insulin binding were determined. The 24-h insulin exposure of adipocytes from control subjects decreased basal and insulin-stimulated glucose transport. The effects of 1 X 10(-7) M insulin were more pronounced than 1 X 10(-10) M insulin. Similarly, insulin exposure decreased insulin sensitivity and responsiveness of cultured adipocytes from obese and NIDDM patients. The insulin-induced reduction in insulin sensitivity and responsiveness for glucose transport in three groups were due to alterations at insulin binding and postbinding levels. In conclusion, insulin induces insulin resistance in control adipocytes and further worsens the insulin resistance of adipocytes from obese and NIDDM subjects. For insulin to improve the insulin resistance of adipocytes from NIDDM patients, either more prolonged in vitro insulin exposure and/or other hormonal factors might be required. PMID:3308958

  15. Effect of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition on Insulin Resistance in Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jennifer E.; Arora, Pankaj; Walford, Geoffrey A.; Ghorbani, Anahita; Guanaga, Derek P.; Dhakal, Bishnu P.; Nathan, Daniel I.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Florez, Jose C.; Newton‐Cheh, Christopher; Lewis, Gregory D.; Wang, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with cardiometabolic disease, including insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling affects energy balance, IR, and glucose metabolism in experimental models. We sought to examine effects of phosphodiesterase‐5 inhibition with tadalafil on IR in a pilot study of obese nondiabetic individuals. Methods and Results We conducted a randomized, double‐blinded, placebo‐controlled trial of adults age 18 to 50 years with obesity and elevated fasting insulin levels (≥10 μU/mL). Participants were randomized to tadalafil 20 mg daily or placebo for 3 months. Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and the effect of tadalafil on IR was examined. A total of 53 participants (mean age, 33 years; body mass index [BMI], 38 kg/m2) were analyzed, 25 randomized to tadalafil and 28 to placebo. In the overall sample, measures of IR did not differ between tadalafil and placebo groups at 3 months. However, in individuals with severe obesity (BMI ≥36.2 kg/m2), tadalafil use was associated with improved IR (homeostatic model assessment for IR), compared to placebo (P=0.02, respectively). Furthermore, one measure of β‐cell compensation for IR (oral disposition index) improved with tadalafil in the overall sample (P=0.009) and in the subgroup with severe obesity (P=0.01). Conclusion Results of this pilot study did not show improvements in IR with tadalafil, compared to placebo. However, tadalafil may have favorable effects on β‐cell compensation, particularly in individuals with severe obesity. Future studies evaluating the potential metabolic benefits of cGMP modulation in obesity are warranted. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01444651. PMID:25213566

  16. Effect of fucoidan administration on insulin secretion and insulin resistance in overweight or obese adults.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Corona, Diana M; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; González-Ortiz, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate the effect of fucoidan administration on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in overweight or obese adults. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 25 obese or overweight volunteers. Thirteen patients received an oral dose of 500 mg of fucoidan once daily before breakfast and 12 patients received placebo for 3 months. Before and after the intervention, fasting glucose and 2-h postload, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and insulin levels were measured. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and homeostasis model analysis formulas (HOMA) for β-cell function and insulin resistance were calculated. The results showed a significant decrease in diastolic blood pressure (71.7 ± 12.2 vs. 67.8 ± 13.8 mmHg; P<.05) and LDL-C (3.1 ± 0.5 vs. 2.7 ± 0.6 mmol/l; P<.01) with increase in insulin levels (60.6 ± 24.0 vs. 78.6 ± 32.4 pmol/l; P<.05), HOMA β-cell (35.0 ± 20.8 vs. 50.6 ± 18.7; P<.05) and HOMA IR (1.9 ± 1.2 vs. 2.6 ± 1.8; P<.05) were observed after fucoidan administration. We conclude that fucoidan administration during a 3-month period in overweight or obese adults decreased diastolic blood pressure and LDL-C concentrations, increasing insulin secretion and insulin resistance. PMID:24611906

  17. Smoking status and abdominal obesity among normal- and overweight/obese adults: Population-based FINRISK study.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Eeva-Liisa; Saarni, Suoma E; Männistö, Satu; Borodulin, Katja; Patja, Kristiina; Kinnunen, Taru H; Kaprio, Jaakko; Korhonen, Tellervo

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have reported direct associations of smoking with body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity. However, the interplay between them is poorly understood. Our first aim was to investigate the interaction between smoking status and BMI on abdominal obesity (waist circumference, WC). Our second aim was to examine how the association of smoking status with WC varies among normal and overweight/obese men and women. We examined 5833 participants from the National FINRISK 2007 Study. The interactions between smoking and BMI on WC were analyzed. Participants were categorized into eight groups according to BMI (normal weight vs. overweight/obese) and smoking status (never smoker, ex-smoker, occasional/light/moderate daily smoker, heavy daily smoker). The associations between each BMI/smoking status -group and WC were analyzed by multiple regressions, the normal-weight never smokers as the reference group. The smoking status by BMI-interaction on WC was significant for women, but not for men. Among the overweight/obese women, ex-smokers (β = 2.73; 1.99, 3.46) and heavy daily smokers (β = 4.90; 3.35, 6.44) had the highest estimates for WC when adjusted for age, BMI, alcohol consumption and physical activity. In comparison to never smoking overweight/obese women, the β-coefficients of ex-smokers and heavy daily smokers were significantly higher. Among men and normal weight women the β -coefficients did not significantly differ by smoking status. An interaction between smoking status and BMI on abdominal obesity was observed in women: overweight/obese heavy daily smokers were particularly vulnerable for abdominal obesity. This risk group should be targeted for cardiovascular disease prevention. PMID:27486563

  18. Differences in Cardiometabolic Risk between Insulin-Sensitive and Insulin-Resistant Overweight and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    McGinn, Aileen P.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Groisman-Perelstein, Adriana; Diamantis, Pamela M.; Ginsberg, Mindy; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: It is known that 15–30% overweight/obese adults do not suffer cardiometabolic consequences. There is limited literature examining factors that can be used to assess cardiometabolic health in overweight/obese children. If such factors can be identified, they would aid in differentiating those most in need for aggressive management. Methods: Baseline data from 7- to 12-year-old, overweight, and obese children enrolled in a weight management program at an urban hospital were analyzed. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) <2.6 was used to define insulin-sensitive and HOMA-IR ≥2.6 was used to defined insulin-resistant participants. Demographics, physical activity measures, and cardiometabolic risk factors were compared between the two phenotypes. Odds ratios (ORs) examining the association between intermediate endpoints (metabolic syndrome [MetS], nonalcoholic fatty liver disease [NAFLD], systemic inflammation, and microalbuminuria) and the two metabolic phenotypes were evaluated. Results: Of the 362 overweight/obese participants, 157 (43.5%) were insulin sensitive and 204 (56.5%) were insulin resistant. Compared to the insulin-sensitive group, the insulin-resistant group was older (8.6±1.6 vs. 9.9±1.7; p<0.001) and had a higher BMI z-score (1.89±0.42 vs. 2.04±0.42; p=0.001). After multivariable adjustment, compared to the insulin-sensitive group, the insulin-resistant group had higher odds of having MetS (OR, 5.47; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.72, 17.35; p=0.004) and NAFLD (OR, 8.66; 95% CI, 2.48, 30.31; p=0.001), but not systemic inflammation (OR, 1.06; 95% CI: 0.56, 2.03; p=0.86) or microalbuminuria (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 0.49, 6.04; p=0.403). Conclusions: Using a HOMA-IR value of ≥2.6, clinical providers can identify prepubertal and early pubertal children most at risk. Focusing limited resources on aggressive weight interventions may lead to improvement in cardiometabolic health. PMID:25774664

  19. Insulin depletion leads to adipose-specific cell death in obese but not lean mice.

    PubMed

    Loftus, T M; Kuhajda, F P; Lane, M D

    1998-11-24

    Mutation of the obese gene produces obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and compensatory "overexpression" of the defective gene. As insulin activates obese gene expression, it seemed possible that hyperinsulinemia might be responsible for overexpression of the gene. To address this question we rapidly neutralized circulating insulin by injection of an insulin antibody. Unexpectedly, insulin depletion in obese (ob/ob or db/db) mice caused massive adipose RNA degradation confirmed by histological analysis to result from adipocyte cell death by a largely necrotic mechanism. This effect was not observed in lean littermates and was completely corrected by coadministration of insulin. Comparison of multiple tissues demonstrated that the effect was restricted to adipose tissue. Insulin depletion in obese mice by administration of streptozotocin also led to cell death, but this death was less extensive and appeared to be apoptotic in mechanism. Thus insulin may promote the survival side of the physiological balance between adipocyte survival and death. PMID:9826672

  20. The Risk of Abdominal Obesity according to the Degree of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has been reported as a cardiometabolic risk factor, the effect of non-alcoholic fatty liver is yet to be clarified on abdominal obesity. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the longitudinal relationship of non-alcoholic fatty liver on the development of abdominal obesity. The study participants were composed of 11,212 Korean men without abdominal obesity. They were followed up from 2005 to 2010 to be monitored for the development of abdominal obesity according to their degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (normal, mild, and moderate to severe). Cox-proportional hazard model was used to calculate the hazard ratios for abdominal obesity according to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. While the average incidence was 15.5%, the incidence of abdominal obesity increased according to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver (normal: 11.6%, mild: 25.2%, moderate to severe: 41.0%, P < 0.001). Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for abdominal obesity independently increased proportionally to the degree of NAFLD (mild [1.07; 0.94-1.23], moderate to severe [1.58; 1.11-2.26], P for trend < 0.001). The risk of abdominal obesity increased proportionally to the degree of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This finding guarantees further studies to reveal the incidental relationship of abdominal obesity with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:26955242

  1. Do obese but metabolically normal women differ in intra-abdominal fat and physical activity levels from those with the expected metabolic abnormalities? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity remains a major public health problem, associated with a cluster of metabolic abnormalities. However, individuals exist who are very obese but have normal metabolic parameters. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent differences in metabolic health in very obese women are explained by differences in body fat distribution, insulin resistance and level of physical activity. Methods This was a cross-sectional pilot study of 39 obese women (age: 28-64 yrs, BMI: 31-67 kg/m2) recruited from community settings. Women were defined as 'metabolically normal' on the basis of blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to determine body fat distribution. Detailed lifestyle and metabolic profiles of participants were obtained. Results Women with a healthy metabolic profile had lower intra-abdominal fat volume (geometric mean 4.78 l [95% CIs 3.99-5.73] vs 6.96 l [5.82-8.32]) and less insulin resistance (HOMA 3.41 [2.62-4.44] vs 6.67 [5.02-8.86]) than those with an abnormality. The groups did not differ in abdominal subcutaneous fat volume (19.6 l [16.9-22.7] vs 20.6 [17.6-23.9]). A higher proportion of those with a healthy compared to a less healthy metabolic profile met current physical activity guidelines (70% [95% CIs 55.8-84.2] vs 25% [11.6-38.4]). Intra-abdominal fat, insulin resistance and physical activity make independent contributions to metabolic status in very obese women, but explain only around a third of the variance. Conclusion A sub-group of women exists who are metabolically normal despite being very obese. Differences in fat distribution, insulin resistance, and physical activity level are associated with metabolic differences in these women, but account only partially for these differences. Future work should focus on strategies to identify those obese individuals most at risk of the negative metabolic consequences of obesity and on identifying other factors that contribute to metabolic status

  2. IGF-binding protein 1 and abdominal obesity in the development of type 2 diabetes in women

    PubMed Central

    Lewitt, Moira S; Hilding, Agneta; Brismar, Kerstin; Efendic, Suad; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Hall, Kerstin

    2010-01-01

    Objective Low levels of IGF-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) are associated with metabolic syndrome and predict diabetes development in men. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of IGFBP1 in women who later develop diabetes, in relation to abdominal obesity, and to compare these levels with those of men. Methods IGFBP1 levels were determined at baseline and after 8 years in a case–control, prospective study of Swedish women aged 35–56 years. Individuals with normal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) who developed abnormal glucose regulation (n=240) were pair matched to controls for age and family history of diabetes and also compared to men of the same age (n=355). Results Low fasting IGFBP1 and increased waist measurement predicted development of diabetes in women (n=60; odds ratio (OR) 70, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8–661, lowest tertile and OR 27, 95% CI 5–141, highest tertile). In women developing diabetes, baseline IGFBP1 levels were lower than expected for fasting insulin values, were associated with impaired suppression after OGTT and increased during 8 years despite an increase in fasting insulin. All individuals in the highest tertile for waist and with ≤40% suppression of IGFBP1 developed diabetes within 8 years. Circulating IGFBP1 concentrations were higher in women compared to men. Women and men who developed diabetes had a similar degree of abdominal obesity, corrected for height. Conclusions We conclude that low IGFBP1 and elevated waist measurement predict diabetes development and that IGFBP1 production is suppressed by a novel factor(s) in women developing diabetes. Increasing levels of IGFBP1 during the emergence of diabetes in men and women suggest the emergence of hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:20508082

  3. Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight or Obese Subjects May Be Linked Through Intrahepatic Lipid Content

    PubMed Central

    Haufe, Sven; Engeli, Stefan; Budziarek, Petra; Utz, Wolfgang; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Hermsdorf, Mario; Wiesner, Susanne; Otto, Christoph; Haas, Verena; de Greiff, Armin; Luft, Friedrich C.; Boschmann, Michael; Jordan, Jens

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) predisposes one to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in part independently of body weight. Given the close relationship between intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) and insulin sensitivity, we hypothesized that the direct relationship between fitness and insulin sensitivity may be explained by IHL. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We included 138 overweight to obese, otherwise healthy subjects (aged 43.6 ± 8.9 years, BMI 33.8 ± 4 kg/m2). Body composition was estimated by bioimpedance analyses. Abdominal fat distribution, intramyocellular, and IHL were assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and tomography. Incremental exercise testing was performed to estimate an individual's CRF. Insulin sensitivity was determined during an oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS For all subjects, CRF was related to insulin sensitivity (r = 0.32, P < 0.05), IHL (r = −0.27, P < 0.05), and visceral (r = −0.25, P < 0.05) and total fat mass (r = −0.32, P < 0.05), but not to intramyocellular lipids (r = −0.08, NS). Insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with all fat depots. In multivariate regression analyses, independent predictors of insulin sensitivity were IHL, visceral fat, and fitness (r2 = −0.43, P < 0.01, r2 = −0.34, and r2 = 0.29, P < 0.05, respectively). However, the positive correlation between fitness and insulin sensitivity was abolished after adjustment for IHL (r = 0.16, NS), whereas it remained significant when adjusted for visceral or total body fat. Further, when subjects were grouped into high versus low IHL, insulin sensitivity was higher in those subjects with low IHL, irrespective of fitness levels. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that the positive effect of increased CRF on insulin sensitivity in overweight to obese subjects may be mediated indirectly through IHL reduction. PMID:20357364

  4. Vitamin D Insufficiency Is Associated with Abdominal Obesity in Urban Asian Indians Without Diabetes in North India

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Sharma, Mukti; Guleria, Randeep; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Luthra, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We evaluated the associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH) D] levels with clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric profiles and total abdominal adipose tissue (TAAT), subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAT), and intraabdominal adipose tissue (IAAT) depots in Asian Indians without diabetes residing in north India. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study (n=137; 74 males and 63 females; 18–60 years of age), anthropometric (body mass index, waist and hip circumferences, and skinfold thickness at four sites) and biochemical (fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, and fasting insulin levels) assessments were done. Measurement of percentage body fat was done by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and areas of TAAT, SCAT and IAAT were measured at the L2–L3 intervertebral level by single-slice magnetic resonance imaging. Levels of 25(OH) D were measured by radioimmunoassay. Correlation analysis was used to assess relationships among clinical, biochemical, and anthropometric profiles, areas of TAAT, SCAT, and IAAT, and 25(OH) D levels. Results: The mean concentration of 25(OH) D was 40.5±8.6 ng/mL. Overall, 6.6% had vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/mL), 87.6% had insufficiency (<30 ng/mL), and 5.8% had a sufficient level (>30 ng/mL). Levels of 25(OH) D did not correlate with demographic, biochemical, and anthropometric profiles or with abdominal fat depots (TAAT, SCAT, and IAAT). In the correlation regression model, 25(OH) D was associated with TAAT in obese subjects. Conclusions: In obese urban Asian Indians without diabetes, higher values of total abdominal fat at the L2–L3 intervertebral level were associated with low 25(OH) D levels. PMID:24528222

  5. Does Inflammation Mediate the Association Between Obesity and Insulin Resistance?

    PubMed

    Adabimohazab, Razieh; Garfinkel, Amanda; Milam, Emily C; Frosch, Olivia; Mangone, Alexander; Convit, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    In adult obesity, low-grade systemic inflammation is considered an important step in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance (IR). The association between obesity and inflammation is less well established in adolescents. Here, we ascertain the importance of inflammation in IR among obese adolescents by utilizing either random forest (RF) classification or mediation analysis approaches. The inflammation balance score, composed of eight pro- and anti-inflammatory makers, as well as most of the individual inflammatory markers differed significantly between lean and overweight/obese. In contrast, adiponectin was the only individual marker selected as a predictor of IR by RF, and the balance score only revealed a medium-to-low importance score. Neither adiponectin nor the inflammation balance score was found to mediate the relationship between obesity and IR. These findings do not support the premise that low-grade systemic inflammation is a key for the expression of IR in the human. Prospective longitudinal studies should confirm these findings. PMID:26956471

  6. Decreased Transcription of ChREBP-α/β Isoforms in Abdominal Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Obese Adolescents With Prediabetes or Early Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Giannini, Cosimo; Narayan, Deepak; Lin, Aiping; D’Adamo, Ebe; Shaw, Melissa; Pierpont, Bridget; Cushman, Samuel W.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance associated with altered fat partitioning in liver and adipose tissues is a prediabetic condition in obese adolescents. We investigated interactions between glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and the expression of lipogenic genes in abdominal subcutaneous adipose and liver tissue in 53 obese adolescents. Based on their 2-h glucose tests they were stratified in the following groups: group 1, 2-h glucose level <120 mg/dL; group 2, 2-h glucose level between 120 and 140 mg/dL; and group 3, 2-h glucose level >140 mg/dL. Liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity were greater in group 1 than in group 2 and group 3, and muscle insulin sensitivity progressively decreased from group 1 to group 3. The expression of the carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) was decreased in adipose tissue but increased in the liver (eight subjects) in adolescents with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes. The expression of adipose ChREBPα and ChREBPβ was inversely related to 2-h glucose level and positively correlated to insulin sensitivity. Improvement of glucose tolerance in four subjects was associated with an increase of ChREBP/GLUT4 expression in the adipose tissue. In conclusion, early in the development of prediabetes/type 2 diabetes in youth, ChREBPβ expression in adipose tissue predicts insulin resistance and, therefore, might play a role in the regulation of glucose tolerance. PMID:23209190

  7. Association between meal intake behaviour and abdominal obesity in Spanish adults.

    PubMed

    Keller, Kristin; Rodríguez López, Santiago; Carmenate Moreno, Margarita M

    2015-09-01

    The study aims to evaluate the association between abdominal obesity with meal intake behaviour such as having a forenoon meal, having an afternoon meal and snacking. This cross-sectional study includes n = 1314 participants aged 20-79 who were interviewed during the Cardiac health "Semanas del Corazon" events in four Spanish cities (Madrid, Las Palmas, Seville and Valencia) in 2008. Waist circumference, weight and height were assessed to determine abdominal obesity (waist circumference: ≥88 cm in women and ≥102 cm in men) and BMI, respectively. The intake of forenoon and afternoon meal and snacking between the participants' regular meals were assessed with a questionnaire that also included individual risk factors. The information obtained about diet was required to calculate an Unhealthy Habit Score and a score reflecting the Achievement of Dietary Guidelines. Adjusted logistic regressions were used to examine the association between abdominal obesity and the mentioned meal intake behaviour controlling for sex, age, individual risk factors, BMI and diet. Having an afternoon meal (OR 0.60; 95% CI (0.41-0.88)) was negatively associated with abdominal obesity after adjusting for all confounders, whereas the positive association of snacking (OR 1.39; 95% CI (1.05-1.85)) was not independent of BMI (OR 1.25; 95% CI (0.84-1.87)). Taking a forenoon meal did not show any associations (OR 0.92; 95% CI (0.63-1.34)) with abdominal obesity. The results obtained could be helpful in the promotion of healthy habits in nutritional education programmes and also in health programmes preventing abdominal obesity. PMID:25953598

  8. Effects of insulin on lipolysis and lipogenesis in adipocytes from genetically obese (ob/ob) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Carnie, J A; Smith, D G; Mavris-Vavayannis, M

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of isolated adipocytes from obese mice is described. Similar yields of adipocytes (50--60%), as judged by several criteria, are obtained from obese mice and lean controls. Few fat-globules and no free nuclei were observed in cell preparations, which are metabolically active, respond to hormonal control and appear to be representative of intact adipose tissue. Noradrenaline-stimulated lipolysis was inhibited by insulin, equally in adipocytes from lean and obese mice. Inhibition in obese cells required exogenous glucose, and the insulin dose--response curve was shifted to the right. Basal lipogenesis from glucose was higher in adipocytes from obese mice, and the stimulatory effect of insulin was greater in cells from obese mice compared with lean controls. A rightward shift in the insulin dose--response curve was again observed with cells from obese animals. This suggests that adipose tissue from obese mice is insulin-sensitive at the high blood insulin concentrations found in vivo. The resistance of obese mice to the hypoglycaemic effect of exogenous insulin and their impaired tolerance to glucose loading appear to be associated with an impaired insulin response by muscle rather than by adipose tissue. PMID:534511

  9. Mildly compromised tetrahydrobiopterin cofactor biosynthesis due to Pts variants leads to unusual body fat distribution and abdominal obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Korner, Germaine; Scherer, Tanja; Adamsen, Dea; Rebuffat, Alexander; Crabtree, Mark; Rassi, Anahita; Scavelli, Rossana; Homma, Daigo; Ledermann, Birgit; Konrad, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Wolfrum, Christian; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klingenspor, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Wolf, Eckhard; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Blau, Nenad; Rozman, Jan; Thöny, Beat

    2016-03-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for the aromatic amino acid hydroxylases, alkylglycerol monooxygenase, and nitric oxide synthases (NOS). Inborn errors of BH4 metabolism lead to severe insufficiency of brain monoamine neurotransmitters while augmentation of BH4 by supplementation or stimulation of its biosynthesis is thought to ameliorate endothelial NOS (eNOS) dysfunction, to protect from (cardio-) vascular disease and/or prevent obesity and development of the metabolic syndrome. We have previously reported that homozygous knock-out mice for the 6-pyruvolytetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS; Pts-ko/ko) mice with no BH4 biosynthesis die after birth. Here we generated a Pts-knock-in (Pts-ki) allele expressing the murine PTPS-p.Arg15Cys with low residual activity (15% of wild-type in vitro) and investigated homozygous (Pts-ki/ki) and compound heterozygous (Pts-ki/ko) mutants. All mice showed normal viability and depending on the severity of the Pts alleles exhibited up to 90% reduction of PTPS activity concomitant with neopterin elevation and mild reduction of total biopterin while blood L-phenylalanine and brain monoamine neurotransmitters were unaffected. Yet, adult mutant mice with compromised PTPS activity (i.e., Pts-ki/ko, Pts-ki/ki or Pts-ko/wt) had increased body weight and elevated intra-abdominal fat. Comprehensive phenotyping of Pts-ki/ki mice revealed alterations in energy metabolism with proportionally higher fat content but lower lean mass, and increased blood glucose and cholesterol. Transcriptome analysis indicated changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes associated with obesity, weight loss, hepatic steatosis, and insulin sensitivity were consistent with the observed phenotypic alterations. We conclude that reduced PTPS activity concomitant with mildly compromised BH4-biosynthesis leads to abnormal body fat distribution and abdominal obesity at least in mice. This study associates a novel

  10. The relationship between insulin resistance and vascular calcification in coronary arteries, and the thoracic and abdominal aorta: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Kwok-Leung; McClelland, Robyn L.; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Cheung, Bernard M.Y.; Post, Wendy S.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Criqui, Michael H.; Cushman, Mary; Barter, Philip J.; Allison, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance may be related to vascular calcification as both are associated with abdominal obesity. We investigated the association of insulin resistance with abdominal aortic calcium (AAC), coronary artery calcium (CAC) and thoracic aortic calcium (TAC), and whether it differs according to different levels of subcutaneous fat area (SFA) and visceral fat area (VFA) in a cross-sectional study design. Methods We investigated 1632 participants without diabetes from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis with valid data on homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR), AAC, CAC, and TAC. Adipocytokines, SFA, and VFA were also determined. Results HOMA-IR was associated with the presence of CAC, but not AAC and TAC, and the association remained significant after adjusting for traditional risk factors, adipocytokines, abdominal muscle mass, SFA, and VFA (prevalence ratio=1.04 per one interquartile range [IQR] increase, P=0.01). As the strength of the association of HOMA-IR with vascular calcification may differ by abdominal fat composition, subgroup analysis was performed among participants with different tertiles of SFA and VFA. Significant interactions between HOMA-IR with SFA and VFA separately were observed for the presence of TAC, but not AAC and CAC, even after adjusting for confounding factors. The association of HOMA-IR with TAC tended to be stronger in participants with more SFA and VFA. Conclusions Atherosclerotic calcification, especially in the coronary arteries, is related to insulin resistance. Further studies are needed to delineate the mechanisms by which visceral obesity can lead to vascular calcification. PMID:25108074

  11. [Impact of abdominoplasty on quality of life in patients, suffering anterior abdominal wall deformity and obesity].

    PubMed

    Dronov, O I; Koval's'ka, I O; Roshchyna, L O; Fedoruk, V I; Burov, E Iu; Fedoruk, P V

    2011-12-01

    The modern tendencies of surgery development include not only the operative procedures improvement but guaranteeing also a maximally high level achievement in the patients quality of life in the early, as well as during remote, postoperative period. The quality of life analysis was done in 132 patients, operated on for the anterior abdominal wall defects, obesity and other surgical diseases, using special questionnaire SF-36. The patients have aged 23-65 years old, in all of them the excessive body mass or obesity of abdominal type was noted. PMID:22432186

  12. [Overweight and abdominal obesity in adults in aquilombocommunity in Bahia State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Soares, Daniela Arruda; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes nutritional status, estimates the prevalence of overweight and abdominal obesity, and investigates factors associated with these outcomes in a two-stage random sample of adults (> 20 years) in quilombos (communities that descend from African slaves) in Vitória da Conquista, Bahia State, Brazil, in 2011. Among 739 participants, prevalence rates were 31.8% and 10.2% for overweight and obesity, respectively, and 55.7% for increased waist-to-height ratio (> 0.50). Prevalence of overweight was higher among 30-39-year-olds, while abdominal obesity was more frequent among older individuals. Female sex, eating chicken or beef with untrimmed fat, and hypertension were associated with higher odds of overweight and abdominal obesity, while smoking and single marital status were associated with lower odds. The results show high prevalence rates for overweight and abdominal obesity in these very poor and socially isolated communities. Specific preventive and control measures are urgently needed. PMID:24627062

  13. Obesity-related insulin resistance: implications for the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Tewari, N; Awad, S; Macdonald, I A; Lobo, D N

    2015-11-01

    In healthy surgical patients, preoperative fasting and major surgery induce development of insulin resistance (IR). IR can be present in up to 41% of obese patients without diabetes and this can rise in the postoperative period, leading to an increased risk of postoperative complications. Inflammation is implicated in the aetiology of IR. This review examines obesity-associated IR and its implications for the surgical patient. Searches of the Medline and Science Citation Index databases were performed using various key words in combinations with the Boolean operators AND, OR and NOT. Key journals, nutrition and metabolism textbooks and the reference lists of key articles were also hand searched. Adipose tissue has been identified as an active endocrine organ and the chemokines secreted as a result of macrophage infiltration have a role in the pathogenesis of IR. Visceral adipose tissue appears to be the most metabolically active, although results across studies are not consistent. Results from animal and human studies often provide conflicting results, which has rendered the pursuit of a common mechanistic pathway challenging. Obesity-associated IR appears, in part, to be related to inflammatory changes associated with increased adiposity. Postoperatively, the surgical patient is in a proinflammatory state, so this finding has important implications for the obese surgical patient. PMID:26028059

  14. The relationship between job enrichment and abdominal obesity: a longitudinal field study of apparently healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Fried, Yitzhak; Laurence, Gregory A; Shirom, Arie; Melamed, Samuel; Toker, Sharon; Berliner, Shlomo; Shapira, Itzhak

    2013-10-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic in modern society. However, there is a paucity of research about how job context affects obesity. To enhance our knowledge we used a large, heterogeneous sample of apparently healthy employees (n = 1,949) across two time periods with an average of close to 3.5 years between measures. We tested a hypothesized curvilinear effect of job enrichment on changes in two stress related indicators of abdominal obesity over time: waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). Job enrichment consisted of the job dimensions of variety, identity, significance, autonomy, and feedback, and in our analysis we controlled for demographics and health related behaviors, including weekly sports activity, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and weekly alcohol consumption. The results supported the hypothesized U-shaped relationship between job enrichment and changes in both indicators of abdominal obesity over time, such that the level of abdominal obesity was reduced when job enrichment was moderate and was increased when job enrichment was either high or low. As expected, no such association was observed for the general obesity measure of body mass index (BMI). We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these results. PMID:24001329

  15. Contractile activity restores insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, P L; Tapscott, E B; Dorton, P J; Dohm, G L

    1993-01-01

    Both insulin and contraction stimulate glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Insulin-stimulated glucose transport is decreased in obese humans and rats. The aims of this study were (1) to determine if contraction-stimulated glucose transport was also compromised in skeletal muscle of genetically obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats, and (2) to determine whether the additive effects of insulin and contraction previously observed in muscle from lean subjects were evident in muscle from the obese animals. To measure glucose transport, hindlimbs from lean and obese Zucker rats were perfused under basal, insulin-stimulated (0.1 microM), contraction-stimulated (electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve) and combined insulin-(+)contraction-stimulated conditions. One hindlimb was stimulated to contract while the contralateral leg served as an unstimulated control. 2-Deoxyglucose transport rates were measured in the white gastrocnemius, red gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus muscles. As expected, the insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate in each of the three muscles was significantly slower (P < 0.05) in obese rats when compared with lean animals. When expressed as fold stimulation over basal, there was no significant difference in contraction-induced muscle glucose transport rates between lean and obese animals. Insulin-(+)contraction-stimulation was additive in skeletal muscle of lean animals, but synergistic in skeletal muscle of obese animals. Prior contraction increased insulin responsiveness of glucose transport 2-5-fold in the obese rats, but had no effect on insulin responsiveness in the lean controls. This contraction-induced improvement in insulin responsiveness could be of clinical importance to obese subjects as a way to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in resistant skeletal muscle. PMID:8424787

  16. Hepatocyte Toll-like receptor 4 regulates obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and thought to contribute to the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) is a key mediator of pro-inflammatory responses. Mice lacking Tlr4s are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammat...

  17. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms. PMID:21526994

  18. The Insulin-Mediated Modulation of Visually Evoked Magnetic Fields Is Reduced in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Tschritter, Otto; Rogic, Maja; Heni, Martin; Stingl, Katarina; Hallschmid, Manfred; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert; Hennige, Anita M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin is an anorexigenic hormone that contributes to the termination of food intake in the postprandial state. An alteration in insulin action in the brain, named “cerebral insulin resistance”, is responsible for overeating and the development of obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze the direct effect of insulin on food-related neuronal activity we tested 10 lean and 10 obese subjects. We conducted a magnetencephalography study during a visual working memory task in both the basal state and after applying insulin or placebo spray intranasally to bypass the blood brain barrier. Food and non-food pictures were presented and subjects had to determine whether or not two consecutive pictures belonged to the same category. Intranasal insulin displayed no effect on blood glucose, insulin or C-peptide concentrations in the periphery; however, it led to an increase in the components of evoked fields related to identification and categorization of pictures (at around 170 ms post stimuli in the visual ventral stream) in lean subjects when food pictures were presented. In contrast, insulin did not modulate food-related brain activity in obese subjects. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that intranasal insulin increases the cerebral processing of food pictures in lean whereas this was absent in obese subjects. This study further substantiates the presence of a “cerebral insulin resistance” in obese subjects and might be relevant in the pathogenesis of obesity. PMID:21589921

  19. Insulin resistance modifies the association between obesity and current asthma in adults.

    PubMed

    Cardet, Juan Carlos; Ash, Samuel; Kusa, Tope; Camargo, Carlos A; Israel, Elliot

    2016-08-01

    Insulin resistance potentiates the association between obesity and childhood asthma, but this relationship appears inconsistent in relatively small studies of adults. We investigated effect modification in adults using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2012, a large, nationally representative database.Insulin resistance and a history of physician-diagnosed current asthma were obtained from 12 421 adults, ages 18-85 years. We used logistic regression to determine associations between obesity and current asthma, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, poverty income ratio and smoking status. An interaction term evaluated effect modification by insulin resistance of the obesity-asthma association.As expected, obesity was positively associated with current asthma. Insulin resistance modified this association, with obesity measured as body mass index, waist circumference or waist-to-height ratio. The relationship between obesity and current asthma was stronger with increasing insulin resistance tertiles (OR 2.05, 95% CI 2.76-3.00; p-value for interaction 0.03). This association was robust to adjustments for other components of the metabolic syndrome (hypertriglyceridaemia, hypertension, hyperglycaemia and systemic inflammation). None of these components were themselves effect modifiers of the obesity-asthma association.In this large, nationally representative sample, insulin resistance modified the association between obesity and current asthma in adults. Targeting insulin resistance may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for obese patients with asthma. PMID:27103388

  20. Excess weight and abdominal obesity in postmenopausal Brazilian women: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The menopause is associated with a tendency to gain weight. Several alterations in fat deposits occur, leading to changes in the distribution of body fat. There are strong indications that, in middle age, obesity is associated with increased mortality. This study set out to determine the factors associated with the prevalence of overweight and abdominal obesity in postmenopausal women in a population-based study in Brazil. Methods The sample included 456 women, aged 45–69 years, residing in the urban area of Maringa, Parana. Systematic sampling, with a probability proportional to the size of the census sector, was performed. Behavioral, economic, and sociodemographic data were collected, and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were determined. Results According to BMI criteria (≥25.0 kg/m2), 72.6% of the women were overweight, and according to WC (≥88 cm), 63.6% had abdominal obesity. Based on logistic regression analysis, the factors that were most closely associated with overweight were: having three or more children (odds ratio (OR): 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06–3.00); and not taking hormone replacement therapy (OR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06–2.63). The prevalence of abdominal obesity was positively associated with greater parity (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.05–1.72) and age older than 65 years (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.03–2.19). Conclusions This study found that the prevalences of overweight and abdominal obesity were higher for postmenopausal women who had three or more children. Age over 65 years was also a risk factor for abdominal obesity and no use of hormonal replacement therapy was a risk factor for overweight. PMID:24228934

  1. Impact of obesity and insulin-resistance on cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is sharply rising worldwide and is increasingly recognized in patients with cirrhosis. This review summarizes the available data documenting a detrimental role of obesity and insulin-resistance on the risk of appearance of clinical events in patients with cirrhosis. Molecular pathways explaining the harmful effect of obesity and insulin resistance in the natural history of cirrhosis are largely unknown. Increasing knowledge of mechanisms leading to white adipose tissue dysfunction on one side, and to portal hypertension on the other side, allow hypothesizing that a link between the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance and portal hypertension in cirrhosis exists. Mechanisms likely involved in this interplay are discussed in this article. PMID:23731977

  2. Insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities in polycystic ovarian syndrome: Comparison between obese and non-obese PCOS patients

    PubMed Central

    Layegh, Parvin; Mousavi, Zohreh; Farrokh Tehrani, Donya; Parizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insulin resistance has an important role in pathophysiology of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Yet there are certain controversies regarding the presence of insulin resistance in non-obese patients. Objective: The aim was to compare the insulin resistance and various endocrine and metabolic abnormalities in obese and non-obese PCOS women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed from 2007-2010, 115 PCOS patients, aged 16-45 years were enrolled. Seventy patients were obese (BMI ≥25) and 45 patients were non-obese (BMI <25). Presence of insulin resistance and endocrine-metabolic abnormalities were compared between two groups. Collected data were analyzed with SPSS version 16.0 and p<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: There was no significant difference in presence of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.3) between two groups (p=0.357). Waist circumference (p<0.001), waist/hip ratio (p<0.001), systolic (p<0.001) and diastolic (p<0.001) blood pressures, fasting blood sugar (p=0.003) and insulin (p=0.011), HOMA-IR (p=0.004), total cholesterol (p=0.001) and triglyceride (p<0.001) were all significantly higher in obese PCOS patients. There was no significant difference in total testosterone (p=0.634) and androstenedione (p=0.736) between groups whereas Dehydroepiandrotendione sulfate (DHEAS) was significantly higher in non-obese PCOS women (p=0.018). There was no case of fatty liver and metabolic syndrome in non-obese patients, whereas they were seen in 31.3% and 39.4% of obese PCOS women, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed that metabolic abnormalities are more prevalent in obese PCOS women, but adrenal axis activity that is reflected in higher levels of DHEAS was more commonly pronounced in our non-obese PCOS patients. PMID:27351028

  3. Altered insulin response to an acute bout of exercise in pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Tran, Brian D; Leu, Szu-Yun; Oliver, Stacy; Graf, Scott; Vigil, Diana; Galassetti, Pietro

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric obesity typically induces insulin resistance, often later evolving into type 2 diabetes. While exercise, enhancing insulin sensitivity, is broadly used to prevent this transition, it is unknown whether alterations in the exercise insulin response pattern occur in obese children. Therefore, we measured exercise insulin responses in 57 healthy weight (NW), 20 overweight (OW), and 56 obese (Ob) children. Blood samples were drawn before and after 30 min of intermittent (2 min on, 1 min off) cycling at ~80% VO2max. In a smaller group (14 NW, 6 OW, 15 Ob), a high-fat meal was ingested 45 min preexercise. Baseline glycemia was similar and increased slightly and similarly in all groups during exercise. Basal insulin (pmol/L) was significantly higher in Ob vs. other groups; postexercise, insulin increased in NW (+7± 3) and OW (+5 ± 8), but decreased in Ob (-15±5, p < .0167 vs. NW). This insulin drop in Ob was disproportionately more pronounced in the half of Ob children with higher basal insulin (Ob-H). In all groups, high-fat feeding caused a rapid rise in insulin, promptly corrected by exercise. In Ob, however, insulin rose again 30 min postexercise. Our data indicates a distinct pattern of exercise-induced insulin modulation in pediatric obesity, possibly modulated by basal insulin concentrations. PMID:24723046

  4. Prevalence of obesity and abdominal obesity from four to 16 years old children living in the Mexico-USA border.

    PubMed

    Bacardí-Gascón, Montserrat; Jones, Elizabeth G; Jiménez-Cruz, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among Mexicans is alarming in both the child and adult populations. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of overweight, obesity and abdominal obesity in pre-school (PS), elementary (ES), and middle high (MHS) public school children from Tijuana. From February to April of 2011, a bietapic random sample was selected by cluster method of 30 PS, 30 ES, and 30 MHS children. And a sample of 30 groups for each level was chosen. Twenty elementary teachers and eight graduate students were trained at one central location on how to take anthropometric measurements using a portable scale, a stadiometer, and a measuring tape to determine weight, height, and waist circumference. Body Mass Index values were computed and compared to age/gender BMI percentiles according to WHO criteria. Waist circumference for-age at the 90th percentile from NHANES III (Mexican-American) was used to define abdominal obesity. The sample was composed of 646 PS children, 961 ES children, and 1,095 MHS children. Their ages ranged from 4- 16 years. Results showed an overall prevalence of overweight and obesity in younger than 5y preschool children (> 2 SD) of 23.1%, in ≥ 5 y PS (> 1 SD) of 33.8%, in ES children of 46.3%, and in MHS children of 41.9%. Abdominal obesity in PS children was 18%, in ES children was 16.7%, and in MHS children was 15.2%. These results warrant immediate and comprehensive actions to prevent a critical public health problem in Mexico. PMID:23822701

  5. A major role of insulin in promoting obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, David J.; Guilherme, Adilson; Danai, Laura V.; Heyda, Lauren; Matevossian, Anouch; Cohen, Jessica; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Straubhaar, Juerg; Noh, Hye Lim; Jung, DaeYoung; Kim, Jason K.; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is associated with systemic insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in obese rodents and humans. A longstanding concept is that hyperinsulinemia may promote systemic insulin resistance through downregulation of its receptor on target tissues. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that insulin also impairs systemic insulin sensitivity by specifically enhancing adipose inflammation. Methods Circulating insulin levels were reduced by about 50% in diet-induced and genetically obese mice by treatments with diazoxide or streptozotocin, respectively. We then examined AT crown-like structures, macrophage markers and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in AT. AT lipogenesis and systemic insulin sensitivity was also monitored. Conversely, insulin was infused into lean mice to determine its affects on the above parameters. Results Lowering circulating insulin levels in obese mice by streptozotocin treatment decreased macrophage content in AT, enhancing insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Moreover, responsiveness of blood glucose levels to injected insulin was improved by streptozotocin and diazoxide treatments of obese mice without changes in body weight. Remarkably, even in lean mice, infusion of insulin under constant euglycemic conditions stimulated expression of cytokines in AT. Consistent with these findings, insulin treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes caused a 10-fold increase in CCL2 mRNA levels within 6 h, which was blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that obesity-associated hyperinsulinemia unexpectedly drives AT inflammation in obese mice, which in turn contributes to factors that suppress insulin-stimulated adipocyte DNL and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:26137438

  6. Survey of abdominal obesities in an adult urban population of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Kasiam Lasi On’kin, JB; Longo-Mbenza, B; Okwe, A Nge; Kabangu, N Kangola

    2007-01-01

    Summary Background The prevalence of overweight/obesity, which is an important cardiovascular risk factor, is rapidly increasing worldwide. Abdominal obesity, a fundamental component of the metabolic syndrome, is not defined by appropriate cutoff points for sub-Saharan Africa. Objective To provide baseline and reference data on the anthropometry/body composition and the prevalence rates of obesity types and levels in the adult urban population of Kinshasa, DRC, Central Africa. Methods During this cross-sectional study carried out within a random sample of adults in Kinshasa town, body mass index, waist circumference and fatty mass were measured using standard methods. Their reference and local thresholds (cut-off points) were compared with those of WHO, NCEP and IFD to define the types and levels of obesity in the population. Results From this sample of 11 511 subjects (5 676 men and 5 835 women), the men presented with similar body mass index and fatty mass values to those of the women, but higher waist measurements. The international thresholds overestimated the prevalence of denutrition, but underscored that of general and abdominal obesity. The two types of obesity were more prevalent among women than men when using both international and local thresholds. Body mass index was negatively associated with age; but abdominal obesity was more frequent before 20 years of age and between 40 and 60 years old. Local thresholds of body mass index (≥ 23, ≥ 27 and ≥ 30 kg/m2) and waist measurement (≥ 80, ≥ 90 and ≥ 94 cm) defined epidemic rates of overweight/general obesity (52%) and abdominal obesity (40.9%). The threshold of waist circumference ≥ 94 cm (90th percentile) corresponding to the threshold of the body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 (90th percentile) was proposed as the specific threshold of definition of the metabolic syndrome, without reference to gender, for the cities of sub-Saharan Africa. Conclusion Further studies are required to define the

  7. Validation of Candidate Causal Genes for Abdominal Obesity Which Affect Shared Metabolic Pathways and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xia; Deignan, Joshua L.; Qi, Hongxiu; Zhu, Jun; Qian, Su; Zhong, Judy; Torosyan, Gevork; Majid, Sana; Falkard, Brie; Kleinhanz, Robert R.; Karlsson, Jenny; Castellani, Lawrence W.; Mumick, Sheena; Wang, Kai; Xie, Tao; Coon, Michael; Zhang, Chunsheng; Estrada-Smith, Daria; Farber, Charles R.; Wang, Susanna S.; Van Nas, Atila; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Zhang, Bin; MacNeil, Douglas J.; Lamb, John R.; Dipple, Katrina M.; Reitman, Marc L.; Mehrabian, Margarete; Lum, Pek Y.; Schadt, Eric E.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2010-01-01

    A major task in dissecting the genetics of complex traits is to identify causal genes for disease phenotypes. We previously developed a method to infer causal relationships among genes through the integration of DNA variation, gene transcription, and phenotypic information. Here we validated our method through the characterization of transgenic and knockout mouse models of candidate genes that were predicted to be causal for abdominal obesity. Perturbation of eight out of the nine genes, with Gas7, Me1 and Gpx3 being novel, resulted in significant changes in obesity related traits. Liver expression signatures revealed alterations in common metabolic pathways and networks contributing to abdominal obesity and overlapped with a macrophage-enriched metabolic network module that is highly associated with metabolic traits in mice and humans. Integration of gene expression in the design and analysis of traditional F2 intercross studies allows high confidence prediction of causal genes and identification of involved pathways and networks. PMID:19270708

  8. Mechanisms in obesity-related hypertension: role of insulin and catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Krieger, D R; Landsberg, L

    1988-01-01

    Although the association of obesity and hypertension is well recognized, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of increased blood pressure in the obese are poorly understood. Recent studies addressing the impact of 1) body fat distribution on blood pressure and 2) dietary intake on sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity suggest a plausible hypothesis that relates the hypertension of the obese to hyperinsulinemia and SNS stimulation. Hypertension in the obese is associated with fat accumulation in the upper body segments; this type of obesity is also characterized by hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Insulin, moreover, is an important signal in the relationship between dietary intake and SNS activity: increased insulin levels are associated with SNS stimulation. The hyperinsulinemia of obesity may, therefore, increase blood pressure by 1) direct effects of insulin to stimulate renal sodium reabsorption, and 2) sympathetic stimulation of the heart, blood vessels, and kidney. Conversely, SNS suppression and diminished insulin following caloric restriction may explain the hypotensive effects of caloric restriction in obese hypertensive subjects. The hypothesis presented here emphasizes the important role of diet in the treatment of obese hypertensive subjects. The efficacy of caloric restriction, weight loss, and exercise in reducing blood pressure in the obese is linked to diminished insulin and SNS activity and may be viewed as evidence in favor of this hypothesis. PMID:3285861

  9. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  10. Castration influences intestinal microflora and induces abdominal obesity in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Harada, Naoki; Hanaoka, Ryo; Horiuchi, Hiroko; Kitakaze, Tomoya; Mitani, Takakazu; Inui, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism (i.e. androgen deficiency) raises the risk for abdominal obesity in men. The mechanism for this obesity is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that hypogonadism after castration caused abdominal obesity in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed, but not in standard diet (SD)-fed, C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, the phenotype was not induced in mice treated with antibiotics that disrupt the intestinal microflora. In HFD-fed mice, castration increased feed efficiency and decreased fecal weight per food intake. Castration also induced in an increase of visceral fat mass only in the absence of antibiotics in HFD-fed mice, whereas subcutaneous fat mass was increased by castration irrespective of antibiotics. Castration reduced the expression in the mesenteric fat of both adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase in HFD-fed mice, which was not observed in the presence of antibiotics. Castration decreased thigh muscle (i.e. quadriceps and hamstrings) mass, elevated fasting blood glucose levels, and increased liver triglyceride levels in a HFD-dependent manner, whereas these changes were not observed in castrated mice treated with antibiotics. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and Lactobacillus species increased in the feces of HFD-fed castrated mice. These results show that androgen (e.g. testosterone) deficiency can alter the intestinal microbiome and induce abdominal obesity in a diet-dependent manner. PMID:26961573

  11. Hepatocyte-Specific Ptpn6 Deletion Protects From Obesity-Linked Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Elaine; Charbonneau, Alexandre; Rolland, Yannève; Bellmann, Kerstin; Pao, Lily; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Beauchemin, Nicole; Marette, André

    2012-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine phosphatase Shp1 negatively regulates insulin action on glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle, but its potential role in obesity-linked insulin resistance has not been examined. To investigate the role of Shp1 in hepatic insulin resistance, we generated hepatocyte-specific Shp1 knockout mice (Ptpn6H-KO), which were subjected to extensive metabolic monitoring throughout an 8-week standard chow diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD) feeding. We report for the first time that Shp1 expression is upregulated in metabolic tissues of HFD-fed obese mice. When compared with their Shp1-expressing Ptpn6f/f littermates, Ptpn6H-KO mice exhibited significantly lowered fasting glycemia and heightened hepatic insulin sensitivity. After HFD feeding, Ptpn6H-KO mice developed comparable levels of obesity as Ptpn6f/f mice, but they were remarkably protected from liver insulin resistance, as revealed by euglycemic clamps and hepatic insulin signaling determinations. Although Ptpn6H-KO mice still acquired diet-induced peripheral insulin resistance, they were less hyperinsulinemic during a glucose tolerance test because of reduced insulin secretion. Ptpn6H-KO mice also exhibited increased insulin clearance in line with enhanced CC1 tyrosine phosphorylation in liver. These results show that hepatocyte Shp1 plays a critical role in the development of hepatic insulin resistance and represents a novel therapeutic target for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:22698917

  12. Human obesity and insulin resistance: lessons from experiments of nature.

    PubMed

    O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The past decade or so has seen the adipocyte catapulted from a position of relative obscurity onto the centre stage of biomedical science. Having long been viewed largely as a passive storage depot for energy in times of plenty and a fuel reservoir called upon in times of need, the discovery that the adipocyte is an active participant in the control mechanisms for both energy balance and intermediary metabolism represents one of the most stunning paradigm shifts in modern mammalian biology. The normal control of energy homeostasis is now known to be highly dependent on the adipocyte-secreted hormone, leptin. Defects in the leptin signalling pathway, both inherited and acquired, are now known to contribute to the important clinical problem of obesity. Dysfunction of adipocytes, in both obesity and lipodystrophies, is now considered to be critically involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The range of metabolites, steroids and bioactive peptides now known to be actively produced by adipocytes and influencing organs as diverse as brain, muscle, liver and pancreatic islet has increased dramatically. Our understanding of how these are co-ordinated to regulate normal metabolism and are dysregulated in metabolic disease is still in its infancy. However what is clear is that the adipocyte, until recently the 'Cinderella Cell' of metabolism, has rapidly become the 'Belle of the Ball'. PMID:18269171

  13. Insulin resistance and beta-cell function in different ethnic groups in Kenya: the role of abdominal fat distribution.

    PubMed

    Christensen, D L; Faurholt-Jepsen, D; Faerch, K; Mwaniki, D L; Boit, M K; Kilonzo, B; Tetens, I; Friis, H; Borch-Johnsen, K

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the pathophysiology of diabetes in Africans. Thus, we assessed whether insulin resistance and beta-cell function differed by ethnicity in Kenya and whether differences were modified by abdominal fat distribution. A cross-sectional study in 1,087 rural Luo (n = 361), Kamba (n = 378), and Maasai (n = 348) was conducted. All participants had a standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 120 min. Serum insulin was analysed at 0 and 30 min. From the OGTT, we assessed the homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance by computer model, early phase insulin secretion, and disposition index (DI) dividing insulin secretion by insulin resistance. Abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) thickness were carried out by ultrasonography. Linear regression analyses were done to assess ethnic differences in insulin indices. The Maasai had 32 and 17% higher insulin resistance than the Luo and Kamba, respectively (p < 0.001). Early phase insulin secretion was 16% higher in the Maasai compared to the Luo (p < 0.001). DI was 12% (p = 0.002) and 10% (p = 0.015) lower in the Maasai compared to the Luo and Kamba, respectively. Adjustments of SAT (range 0.1-7.1 cm) and VAT (range 1.5-14.2 cm) largely explained these inter-group differences with the Maasai having the highest combined abdominal fat accumulation. The Maasai had the highest insulin resistance and secretion, but the lowest relative beta-cell function compared to the Luo and Kamba. These differences were primarily explained by abdominal fat distribution. PMID:23563691

  14. Effect of folic acid on homocysteine and insulin resistance of overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Elham Hashemi; Sedehi, Morteza; Shahraki, Zohre Gholipour; Najafi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Considering the increasing trend of childhood obesity and subsequent burden of the disease in Iran and other countries and importance of early life intervention for achieving sustained effect on health of children and adolescents, this study aimed to investigate the effect of two different dose of folic acid on homocysteine (Hcy) level and insulin resistance of obese children. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trial study, 60 obese and overweight children aged 5–12 years were enrolled. Selected obese children randomly allocated in two interventional (1 mg/day folic acid and 5 mg/day folic acid, for 8 weeks) and one control groups. Biochemical measurements including folic acid, Hcy, insulin and insulin resistance were measured between and within groups before and after trial. Results: In each group, 20 obese children were studied. The three groups were age and sex matched. After folic acid administration, mean of Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin decreased significantly in two groups which folic acid administrated with two different doses (P < 0.05). The reduction in studied biochemical variables was similar in two interventional groups (1 and 5 mg folic acid daily) (P > 0.05). Mean differences for Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin, in two intervention groups were significantly higher than the control group (P < 0.0001). Mean differences of Hcy, insulin resistance and insulin, in two intervention groups were not different significantly (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of current trial showed that folic acid in two studied doses could be a safe and effective supplement for obese children to reduce Hcy level and insulin resistance, which consequently could prevent obesity-related complications including cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. PMID:27274503

  15. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  16. The role of uric acid in the insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda, Josiane Aparecida; Almeida, Guilherme Gomide; Martins, Raissa Isabelle Leão; Cunha, Mariana Botrel; Belo, Vanessa Almeida; dos Santos, José Eduardo Tanus; Mourão-Júnior, Carlos Alberto; Lanna, Carla Márcia Moreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between serum uric acid levels and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 245 children and adolescents (134 obese and 111 controls), aged 8-18 years. The anthropometric variables (weight, height and waist circumference), blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected. The clinical characteristics of the groups were analyzed by t-test or chi-square test. To evaluate the association between uric acid levels and insulin resistance the Pearson's test and logistic regression were applied. Results: The prevalence of insulin resistance was 26.9%. The anthropometric variables, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and biochemical variables were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.001), except for the high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. There was a positive and significant correlation between anthropometric variables and uric acid with HOMA-IR in the obese and in the control groups, which was higher in the obese group and in the total sample. The logistic regression model that included age, gender and obesity, showed an odds ratio of uric acid as a variable associated with insulin resistance of 1.91 (95%CI 1.40-2.62; p<−0.001). Conclusions: The increase in serum uric acid showed a positive statistical correlation with insulin resistance and it is associated with and increased risk of insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents. PMID:26300523

  17. REDUCED GLUTEAL EXPRESSION OF ADIPOGENIC AND LIPOGENIC GENES IN BLACK SOUTH AFRICAN WOMEN IS ASSOCIATED WITH OBESITY-RELATED INSULIN RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Goedecke, Julia H.; Evans, Juliet; Keswell, Dheshnie; Stimson, Roland H.; Livingstone, Dawn E.W.; Hayes, Philip; Adams, Kevin; Dave, Joel A.; Victor, Hendriena; Levitt, Naomi S.; Lambert, Estelle V.; Walker, Brian R.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Olsson, Tommy; Kahn, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Context Black South African women are less insulin sensitive than their white counterparts, despite less central and greater peripheral fat deposition. We hypothesized that this paradox may be explained, in part, by differences in the adipogenic capacity of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Objective To measure adipogenic and lipogenic gene expression in abdominal and gluteal SAT depots, and determine their relationships with insulin sensitivity (SI) in South African women. Design Cross-sectional. Participants 14 normal-weight (BMI <25 kg/m2) black, 13 normal-weight white, 14 obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) black and 13 obese white premenopausal South African women. Main outcomes SI (frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test) in relation to expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes in abdominal and gluteal SAT depots. Results With increasing BMI, black women had less visceral fat (P=0.03) and more abdominal (P=0.017) and gynoid (P=0.041) SAT but had lower SI (P<0.01) than white women. The expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes was proportionately lower with obesity in black, but not white women in the gluteal and deep SAT depots (P<0.05 for ethnicity x BMI effect). In black women only, the expression of these genes correlated positively with SI (all P<0.05), independently of age and fat mass. Conclusions Obese black women have reduced SAT expression of adipogenic and lipogenic genes compared to white women, which associates with reduced SI. These findings suggest that obesity in black women impairs SAT adipogenesis and storage, potentially leading to insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:21956425

  18. Dietary supplementation with short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides improves insulin sensitivity in obese horses.

    PubMed

    Respondek, F; Myers, K; Smith, T L; Wagner, A; Geor, R J

    2011-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are risk factors for laminitis in horses and ponies, and diet can play an important role in modulating these risk factors. Dietary supplementation with prebiotic fibers, such as short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scFOS), has resulted in improvement of insulin sensitivity in obese dogs and rodents. Thus, we hypothesized that scFOS may reduce insulin resistance in obese horses and designed a study to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation with scFOS on insulin sensitivity. Eight mature Arabian geldings (BW = 523.0 ± 56.5 kg) with an average BCS of 8 were included in a crossover study. In each period, 4 horses were provided 45 g/d per horse of maltodextrin (control) and 4 horses received the same amount of scFOS for 6 wk, with a 3-wk washout between periods. Resting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and leptin were measured. Minimal model analysis of a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity, glucose effectiveness, acute insulin response to glucose, and disposition index. Without affecting BW and BCS, dietary supplementation with scFOS increased (P < 0.05) insulin sensitivity and reduced (P < 0.05) acute insulin response to glucose in comparison with maltodextrin but did not alter (P > 0.05) glucose effectiveness and disposition index. Resting serum insulin concentration also was reduced (P < 0.05) by scFOS supplementation but not by maltodextrin (P > 0.05). There was no effect (P > 0.05) of scFOS supplementation on plasma glucose or serum triglyceride and leptin concentrations. This study demonstrated that scFOS can moderately improve insulin sensitivity of obese horses, a finding that has potential relevance to the dietary management of obese, insulin-resistant horses at increased risk for laminitis. PMID:20870952

  19. Antagonistic implications of sarcopenia and abdominal obesity on physical performance in COPD.

    PubMed

    van de Bool, Coby; Rutten, Erica P A; Franssen, Frits M E; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2015-08-01

    Decreased physical performance due to loss of muscle mass (i.e. sarcopenia) is prevalent in ageing and appears more pronounced in chronic disease. A comprehensive profile of the sarcopenic phenotype in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not yet available. The aim of the present study was to characterise prevalence, functional implications and predictive value of sarcopenia with or without abdominal obesity in Dutch COPD patients eligible for pulmonary rehabilitation.505 COPD patients (aged 37-87 years; 57% male) underwent assessment of lung function, body composition and physical functioning, before entering pulmonary rehabilitation. Sarcopenia was assessed by appendicular skeletal muscle index (ASMI) and abdominal obesity by android/gynoid percentage fat mass (A/G%FM) using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.86.5% of patients were sarcopenic and showed lower physical functioning, while coexistent abdominal obesity (78.0%) resulted in higher physical functioning. Implications on endurance were less pronounced in women. The predictive value for physical functioning was higher for the "three-compartment" model (ASMI, bone mineral content and A/G%FM) than the "two-compartment" model (fat-free mass index and fat mass index) or "one-compartment" model (body mass index).In patients eligible for pulmonary rehabilitation, sarcopenia is highly prevalent in all body mass index categories and associated with impaired strength, and in men also with decreased endurance. Abdominal obesity seems to have protective effects on physical functioning. ASMI is a better predictor for physical functioning than fat-free mass index. PMID:25882802

  20. Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Näyhä, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood. Methods We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression. Results A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females. Conclusion Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males. PMID:23418543

  1. Hepatocyte TRAF3 promotes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in mice with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Canet, Mark J.; Sheng, Liang; Jiang, Lin; Xiong, Yi; Yin, Lei; Rui, Liangyou

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metabolic inflammation is believed to promote insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes progression in obesity. TRAF3, a cytoplasmic signaling protein, has been known to mediate/modulate cytokine signaling in immune cells. The goal is to define the metabolic function of hepatic TRAF3 in the setting of obesity. Methods Hepatocyte-specific TRAF3 knockout mice were generated using the loxp/albumin-cre system. Liver TRAF3 was deleted in adult obese mice via Cre adenoviral infection. Both high fat diet-induced and genetic obesity were examined. TRAF3 levels and insulin signaling were measured by immunoblotting. Insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and glucose metabolism were examined by glucose, insulin, and pyruvate tolerance tests. Hepatic steatosis was examined by Oil red O staining of liver sections and measuring liver triacylglycerol levels. Results Liver TRAF3 levels were lower in the fasted states in normal mice, and were aberrantly higher in obese mice and in mice with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Glucose directly increased TRAF3 levels in primary hepatocytes. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of TRAF3 decreased hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis in mice with either high fat diet-induced obesity or genetic obesity (ob/ob); conversely, in lean mice, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of TRAF3 in the liver induced hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Deletion of TRAF3 enhanced the ability of insulin to stimulate phosphorylation of Akt in hepatocytes, whereas overexpression of TRAF3 suppressed insulin signaling. Conclusions Glucose increases the levels of hepatic TRAF3. TRAF3 in turn promotes hyperglycemia through increasing hepatic glucose production, thus forming a glucose-TRAF3 reinforcement loop in the liver. This positive feedback loop may drive the progression of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity. PMID:26909311

  2. Myeloperoxidase Deletion Prevents High-Fat Diet–Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Xie, Zhonglin; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Huaiping

    2014-01-01

    Activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein primarily expressed in granules of neutrophils, is associated with the development of obesity. However, whether MPO mediates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance remains to be determined. Here, we found that consumption of an HFD resulted in neutrophil infiltration and enhanced MPO expression and activity in epididymal white adipose tissue, with an increase in body weight gain and impaired insulin signaling. MPO knockout (MPO−/−) mice were protected from HFD-enhanced body weight gain and insulin resistance. The MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide reduced peroxidase activity of neutrophils and prevented HFD-enhanced insulin resistance. MPO deficiency caused high body temperature via upregulation of uncoupling protein-1 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue. Lack of MPO also attenuated HFD-induced macrophage infiltration and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We conclude that activation of MPO in adipose tissue contributes to the development of obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance. Inhibition of MPO may be a potential strategy for prevention and treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:25024373

  3. Abdominal Adiposity Correlates with Adenotonsillectomy Outcome in Obese Adolescents with Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Ravindra, Anjani; Nino, Cesar L.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Obese adolescents with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) have a unique pathophysiology that combines adenotonsillar hypertrophy and increased visceral fat distribution. We hypothesized that in this population waist circumference (WC), as a clinical marker of abdominal fat distribution, correlates with the likelihood of response to AT. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of obese adolescents (BMI ≥ 97th percentile) that underwent AT for therapy of severe OSA (n = 21). We contrasted WC and covariates in a group of subjects that had complete resolution of severe OSA after AT (n = 7) with those obtained in subjects with residual OSA after AT (n = 14). Multivariate linear and logistic models were built to control possible confounders. Results. WC correlated negatively with a positive AT response in young adolescents and the percentage of improvement in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) after AT (P ≤ 0.01). Extended multivariate analysis demonstrated that the link between WC and AT response was independent of demographic variables, OSA severity, clinical upper airway assessment, obesity severity (BMI), and neck circumference (NC). Conclusion. The results suggest that in obese adolescents, abdominal fat distribution determined by WC may be a useful clinical predictor for residual OSA after AT. PMID:23251797

  4. Insulin resistance and neurodegeneration: Roles of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Longato, Lisa; Tong, Ming; Wands, Jack R

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have linked obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to insulin resistance in the brain, cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Insulin resistance compromises cell survival, metabolism and neuronal plasticity, and increases oxidative stress, cytokine activation and apoptosis. T2DM/NASH has been demonstrated to be associated with increased ceramide generation, suggesting a mechanistic link between peripheral insulin resistance and neurodegeneration because ceramides mediate insulin resistance and can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Peripheral insulin resistance diseases may potentially cause brain insulin resistance via a liver-brain axis of neurodegeneration as a result of the trafficking of ceramides across the BBB. Therapy that includes insulin-sensitizing agents may help prevent brain insulin resistance-mediated cognitive impairment. PMID:19777393

  5. Indices of insulin secretion during a liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare indices of insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity (IS),and oral disposition index (oDI) during the liquid mixed-meal test in obese youth with clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and negative autoantibodies (Ab-) versus those with T2DM and positive autoantibodies (Ab+) to ...

  6. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2.

    PubMed

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L D M; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-07-21

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a physiologically relevant inhibitor of insulin signaling. GRK2 abundance is increased in humans with metabolic syndrome and in different murine models of insulin resistance. To support GRK2 as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes and obesity, we investigated whether lowering GRK2 abundance reversed an ongoing systemic insulin-resistant phenotype, using a mouse model of tamoxifen-induced GRK2 ablation after high-fat diet-dependent obesity and insulin resistance. Tamoxifen-triggered GRK2 deletion impeded further body weight gain, normalized fasting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance, and was associated with preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, thereby maintaining whole-body glucose homeostasis. Moreover, when continued to be fed a high-fat diet, these animals displayed reduced fat mass and smaller adipocytes, were resistant to the development of liver steatosis, and showed reduced expression of proinflammatory markers in the liver. Our results indicate that GRK2 acts as a hub to control metabolic functions in different tissues, which is key to controlling insulin resistance development in vivo. These data suggest that inhibiting GRK2 could reverse an established insulin-resistant and obese phenotype, thereby putting forward this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target linking glucose homeostasis and regulation of adiposity. PMID:26198359

  7. Insulin Suppresses TNF-dependent Early Osteoarthritic Changes Associated with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Daisuke; Maynard, Robert; Schott, Eric; Drinkwater, Christopher J.; Ketz, John P.; Kates, Stephen L.; Jonason, Jennifer H.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Mooney, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state that is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D), as well as an increased risk for osteoarthritis (OA). To define the links between inflammation of obesity, insulin resistance, and OA, two hypotheses were tested: 1) TNF is critical in mediating these OA changes and 2) insulin has direct effects on the synovial joint that are compromised by insulin resistance. Methods Effects of TNF and insulin on catabolic gene expression were determined in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) isolated from human osteoarthritic synovium. Synovial TNF expression and OA progression were examined in high fat-fed (HF) obese/T2D mice and TNF knockout mice. Insulin resistance was investigated in synovium from T2D patients. Results Insulin receptors (IR) were abundant in mouse and human synovial membrane. FLSs were insulin responsive with dose dependent phosphorylation of IR and Akt. While TNF markedly increased expression and release of MMP1, MMP13, and ADAMTS4 by FLSs, insulin selectively inhibited the effects by >50%. TNF expression and abundance were elevated in synovium from obese, T2D mice. In TNF knockout mice, increases in osteophyte formation and synovial hyperplasia associated with HF diet were blunted. Synovium from diabetic patients contained markedly more macrophages, TNF levels were elevated, and insulin-dependent phosphorylation of IR and Akt was blunted compared to non-diabetics. Conclusion TNF appears involved in mediating the advanced progression of OA seen in T2D. While insulin plays a protective, anti-inflammatory role in the synovium, insulin resistance of diabetes may impair this protective effect and promote OA. PMID:26713606

  8. Resistance exercise increase lean body mass and improves basal and hepatic insulin sensitivity in obese adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the metabolic effects of resistance exercise, for instance, weight lifting. We studied whether a resistance exercise program improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary obese adolescents. Elevn obese subjects (15.7 +/- 0.4 year; 35.4 +/- 0.8 kg/m2; 41.3 +/-...

  9. Tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2) regulates obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity-associated low-grade systemic inflammation resulting from increased adipose mass is strongly related to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes as well as other metabolic complications. Recent studies have demonstrated the obese metabolic state can be improved by ablating ...

  10. Abdominal adiposity, insulin and bone quality in young male rats fed a high-fat diet containing soybean or canola oil

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Carlos Alberto Soares; Carlos, Aluana Santana; de Sousa dos Santos, Aline; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Nascimento-Saba, Celly Cristina Alves

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with healthy bone properties. However, fatty diets can induce obesity. Our objective was to evaluate intra-abdominal adiposity, insulin, and bone growth in rats fed a high-fat diet containing low ratios of omega-6/omega-3 provided in canola oil. METHODS: After weaning, rats were grouped and fed either a control diet (7S), a high-fat diet containing soybean oil (19S) or a high-fat diet of canola oil (19C) until they were 60 days old. Differences were considered to be significant if p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 days, the 19S and 19C groups showed more energy intake, body density growth and intra-abdominal fat mass. However, the 19S group had a higher area (200%) and a lower number (44%) of adipocytes, while the 7S and 19C groups did not differ. The serum concentrations of glucose and insulin and the insulin resistance index were significantly increased in the 19C group (15%, 56%, and 78%, respectively) compared to the 7S group. Bone measurements of the 19S and 19C groups showed a higher femur mass (25%) and a higher lumbar vertebrae mass (11%) and length (5%). Computed tomography analysis revealed more radiodensity in the proximal femoral epiphysis and lumbar vertebrae of 19C group compared to the 7S and 19S groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the amount and source of fat used in the diet after weaning increase body growth and fat depots and affect insulin resistance and, consequently, bone health. PMID:22012056

  11. Ganglioside GM3 as a gatekeeper of obesity-associated insulin resistance: Evidence and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lipina, Christopher; Hundal, Harinder S

    2015-10-24

    Gangliosides constitute a large family of sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids which play a key regulatory role in a diverse array of cellular processes, including receptor-associated signalling. Accordingly, the aberrant production of the ganglioside GM3 has been linked to pathophysiological changes associated with obesity, which in turn can lead to metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review examines the role of GM3 in mediating obesity-induced perturbations in metabolic function, including impaired insulin action. By doing so, we highlight the potential use of therapies targeting GM3 biosynthesis in order to counteract obesity-related metabolic disorders. PMID:26434718

  12. Mesenteric Fat Lipolysis Mediates Obesity-Associated Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wueest, Stephan; Item, Flurin; Lucchini, Fabrizio C; Challa, Tenagne D; Müller, Werner; Blüher, Matthias; Konrad, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance are among the most prevalent metabolic disorders and are tightly associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanisms linking obesity to hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are incompletely understood. Glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the common signal transducer of all interleukin 6 (IL-6) cytokines. We provide evidence that gp130-mediated adipose tissue lipolysis promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. In obese mice, adipocyte-specific gp130 deletion reduced basal lipolysis and enhanced insulin's ability to suppress lipolysis from mesenteric but not epididymal adipocytes. Consistently, free fatty acid levels were reduced in portal but not in systemic circulation of obese knockout mice. Of note, adipocyte-specific gp130 knockout mice were protected from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis as well as from insulin resistance. In humans, omental but not subcutaneous IL-6 mRNA expression correlated positively with liver lipid accumulation (r = 0.31, P < 0.05) and negatively with hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp glucose infusion rate (r = -0.28, P < 0.05). The results show that IL-6 cytokine-induced lipolysis may be restricted to mesenteric white adipose tissue and that it contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis. Therefore, blocking IL-6 cytokine signaling in (mesenteric) adipocytes may be a novel approach to blunting detrimental fat-liver crosstalk in obesity. PMID:26384383

  13. Pancreatic β-Cell Adaptive Plasticity in Obesity Increases Insulin Production but Adversely Affects Secretory Function.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Cristina; Boland, Brandon B; Uchizono, Yuji; Moore, Patrick C; Peterson, Bryan; Rajan, Suryalekha; Rhodes, Olivia S; Noske, Andrew B; Haataja, Leena; Arvan, Peter; Marsh, Bradly J; Austin, Jotham; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic β-cells normally produce adequate insulin to control glucose homeostasis, but in obesity-related diabetes, there is a presumed deficit in insulin production and secretory capacity. In this study, insulin production was assessed directly in obese diabetic mouse models, and proinsulin biosynthesis was found to be contrastingly increased, coupled with a significant expansion of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (without endoplasmic reticulum stress) and Golgi apparatus, increased vesicular trafficking, and a depletion of mature β-granules. As such, β-cells have a remarkable capacity to produce substantial quantities of insulin in obesity, which are then made available for immediate secretion to meet increased metabolic demand, but this comes at the price of insulin secretory dysfunction. Notwithstanding, it can be restored. Upon exposing isolated pancreatic islets of obese mice to normal glucose concentrations, β-cells revert back to their typical morphology with restoration of regulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate an unrealized dynamic adaptive plasticity of pancreatic β-cells and underscore the rationale for transient β-cell rest as a treatment strategy for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:26307586

  14. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  15. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  16. Myocardial structure, function and ischaemic tolerance in a rodent model of obesity with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wensley, I; Salaveria, K; Bulmer, A C; Donner, D G; du Toit, E F

    2013-11-01

    Obesity and its comorbidities (dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance and hypertension) that together constitute the metabolic syndrome are all risk factors for ischaemic heart disease. Although obesity has been reported to be an independent risk factor for congestive heart failure, whether obesity-induced heart failure develops in the absence of increased afterload (induced by hypertension) is not clear. We have previously shown that obesity with insulin resistance decreases myocardial tolerance to ischaemia-reperfusion, but the mechanism for this decreased tolerance remains unclear. We hypothesize that obesity with insulin resistance induces adverse cardiac remodelling and pump dysfunction, as well as adverse changes in myocardial prosurvival reperfusion injury salvage kinase (RISK) pathway signalling to reduce myocardial tolerance to ischaemia-reperfusion. Wistar rats were fed an obesogenic (obese group) or a standard rat chow diet (control group) for 32 weeks. Echocardiography was performed over the 32 weeks before isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts were subjected to 40 min coronary artery ligation followed by reperfusion, and functional recovery (rate-pressure product), infarct size and RISK pathway function were assessed (Western blot analysis). Obesity with insulin resistance increased myocardial lipid accumulation but had no effect on in vivo or ex vivo left ventricular structure/function. Hearts from obese rats had lower reperfusion rate-pressure products (13115 ± 562 beats min(-1) mmHg for obese rats versus 17781 ± 1109 beats min(-1) mmHg for control rats, P < 0.05) and larger infarcts (36.3 ± 5.6% of area at risk in obese rats versus 14.1 ± 2.8% of area at risk in control rats, P < 0.01) compared with control hearts. These changes were associated with reductions in RISK pathway function, with 30-50 and 40-60% reductions in Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) expression and phosphorylation, respectively, in obese rat hearts compared with

  17. The effect of oxytetracycline on insulin resistance in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Bégin-Heick, Nicole; Bourassa, Michel; Heick, H. M. C.

    1974-01-01

    1. Chronic oxytetracycline treatment was found to improve the insulin resistance of the obese–hyperglycaemic mouse. 2. The improved response to insulin was accompanied by decreased concentrations of circulating insulin and glucose, by a decrease in the lipid content of the liver and by an increase in the insulin-receptor sites of the liver and adipose tissue. 3. The increase in insulin-receptor sites preceded the fall in blood glucose. 4. Comparable studies done on food-restricted animals indicated that although chronic food restriction corrected the hyperinsulinaemia it did not restore the insulin-receptor sites or the hyperglycaemia. PMID:4464837

  18. SORCS1 polymorphism and insulin secretion in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hrovat, Ana; Kravos, Nika Aleksandra; Goričar, Katja; Jensterle Sever, Mojca; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of SORCS1 polymorphisms on insulin secretion in obese women with PCOS. Metabolic status was recorded in 50 clinically well characterized PCOS patients. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and laboratory parameters of insulin resistance measured. All patients were genotyped for SORCS1 rs1358030, rs1416406 and rs11192966 polymorphisms. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney test. SORCS1 rs1416406 significantly influenced stimulated glucose plasma levels (p = 0.006) and increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion (p = 0.034). None of the polymorphisms influenced insulin resistance as measured by homeostatic model assessment. We report for the first time the relevance of SORCS1 polymorphisms for glycemic control and glucose stimulated insulin secretion in obese women with PCOS. PMID:27052493

  19. An anomaly of insulin removal in perfused livers of obese-hyperglycemic (ob/ob) mice.

    PubMed Central

    Karakash, C; Assimacopoulos-Jeannet, F; Jeanrenaud, B

    1976-01-01

    Obese-hyperglycemic (ob/ob) mice have the interesting feature of being hyperinsulinemic, thus having some characteristics in common with human maturity-onset diabetics. As the cause of hyperinsulinemia in these mice is not established, and as the liver is known to play a role in determining the amount of hormone that reaches the periphery, it was hypothesized that an anomaly in the hepatic handling of insulin might prevail in obese-hyperglycemic mice. Immunoreactive insulin was therefore measured in the perfusate before and after a single passage through perfused livers of lean and ob/ob mice, permitting. It was found that the removal of insulin by livers of lean mice increased with increasing concentrations of the hormone in the portal vein. The removal process had a limited capacity, however, and as a consequence the percentage of hormone removed by the liver actually decreased when portal insulin concentrations increased. Insulin removal by livers of ob/ob mice had qualitatively the same characteristics but was considerably less efficient than in normal livers. Due to this, more insulin was found in the perfusate leaving the liver of ob/9b mice than in that of controls, at any insulin concentration tested. These observations suggest that in obese-hyperglycemic mice more of the hormone may reach the periphery and thus contribute to hyperinsulinemia. The present study further suggests that the anomaly of insulin removal observed in perfused livers of ob/ob mice might be secondary to hyperinsulinemia, since it was partly corrected upon artificially decreasing the circulating levels of insulin (e.g. via a fast, anti-insulin serum, or streptozotocin treatment) before perfusion. The characteristics of hepatic insulin removal reported in this study, as well as the differences observed between livers of lean and ob/ob mice, may reflect changes in membrane insulin receptors and/or in processes responsible for the degradation of the horomone. PMID:1262459

  20. Correlations between surrogate measures of insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in obese and overweight patients.

    PubMed

    Lerman, Israel; Villa, Antonio R; Ríos Torres, Juan Manuel; Tamez, Laura Elena; Gómez Pérez, Francisco; del Villar Velasco, Sonia Luna; Rull Rodrigo, Juan Antonio

    2003-01-01

    There are different equations to estimate insulin sensitivity by using OGTT with a reasonable approximation to whole body sensitivity obtained with the glucose clamp. Further work is needed to address their role in clinical practice as markers of the metabolic syndrome and predictors for cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we determined plasma glucose and insulin values during an OGTT test in 144 overweight and obese individuals. We assessed insulin resistance by the use of different equations and established their relationship with cardiovascular risk factors associated to the insulin resistance syndrome. Distributed the patients by quintiles of body mass index (BMI), the different surrogate measures clearly demonstrated that the more obese individuals were the most insulin resistant, a similar but not significant trend was observed related to the other cardiovascular risk factors. Efforts to use both fasting and post-load glucose and insulin concentrations to create indexes for routine use in clinical practice do not seem to be particularly useful in overweight or obese patients, as most of these patients will be insulin-resistant and insulin resistance is closely linked but not equal to the metabolic syndrome. PMID:12614971

  1. Smoking Is Associated with More Abdominal Fat in Morbidly Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Casagrande, Daniela; Wagner, Mario; Mottin, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While the association between cigarette smoking and abdominal fat has been well studied in normal and overweight patients, data regarding the influence of tobacco use in patients with morbid obesity remain scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate body fat distribution in morbidly obese smokers. Methods We employed a cross-sectional study and grouped severely obese patients (body mass index [BMI] >40 kg/m2 or >35 kg/m2 with comorbidities) according to their smoking habits (smokers or non-smokers). We next compared the anthropometrical measurements and body composition data (measured by electric bioimpedance) of both groups. We analyzed the effect of smoking on body composition variables using univariate and multiple linear regression (MLR); differences are presented as regression coefficients (b) and their respective 95% confidence intervals. Results We included 536 morbidly obese individuals, 453 (84.5%) non-smokers and 83 (15.5%) smokers. Male smokers had a higher BMI (b=3.28 kg/m2, p=0.036), larger waist circumference (b=6.07 cm, p=0.041) and higher percentage of body fat (b=2.33%, p=0.050) than non-smokers. These differences remained significant even after controlling for confounding factors. For females, the only significant finding in MLR was a greater muscle mass among smokers (b=1.34kg, p=0.028). No associations were found between tobacco load measured in pack-years and anthropometric measures or body composition. Discussion Positive associations between smoking and BMI, and waist circumference and percentage of body fat, were found among male morbidly obese patients, but not among females. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation of these aspects in morbidly obese subjects. We speculate that our findings may indicate that the coexistence of morbid obesity and smoking helps to explain the more serious medical conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms, seen in these patients. PMID:25978682

  2. Pid1 induces insulin resistance in both human and mouse skeletal muscle during obesity.

    PubMed

    Bonala, Sabeera; McFarlane, Craig; Ang, Jackie; Lim, Radiance; Lee, Marcus; Chua, Hillary; Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; Sreekanth, Patnam; Leow, Melvin Khee Shing; Meng, Khoo Chin; Shyong, Tai E; Lee, Yung Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and abnormal peripheral tissue glucose uptake. However, the mechanisms that interfere with insulin signaling and glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle during obesity are not fully characterized. Using microarray, we have identified that the expression of Pid1 gene, which encodes for a protein that contains a phosphotyrosine-interacting domain, is increased in myoblasts established from overweight insulin-resistant individuals. Molecular analysis further validated that both Pid1 mRNA and protein levels are increased in cell culture models of insulin resistance. Consistent with these results, overexpression of phosphotyrosine interaction domain-containing protein 1 (PID1) in human myoblasts resulted in reduced insulin signaling and glucose uptake, whereas knockdown of PID1 enhanced glucose uptake and insulin signaling in human myoblasts and improved the insulin sensitivity following palmitate-, TNF-α-, or myostatin-induced insulin resistance in human myoblasts. Furthermore, the number of mitochondria in myoblasts that ectopically express PID1 was significantly reduced. In addition to overweight humans, we find that Pid1 levels are also increased in all 3 peripheral tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue) in mouse models of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. An in silico search for regulators of Pid1 expression revealed the presence of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) binding sites in the Pid1 promoter. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed that NF-κB is sufficient to transcriptionally up-regulate the Pid1 promoter. Furthermore, we find that myostatin up-regulates Pid1 expression via an NF-κB signaling mechanism. Collectively these results indicate that Pid1 is a potent intracellular inhibitor of insulin signaling pathway during obesity in humans and mice. PMID:23927930

  3. Normocaloric Diet Restores Weight Gain and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Arcidiacono, Biagio; De Rose, Roberta Francesca; Lepore, Saverio Massimo; Costa, Nicola; Montalcini, Tiziana; Brunetti, Antonio; Russo, Diego; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Celano, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of obesity is registered worldwide, and its association with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is closely related with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. A major clinical problem in the management of obesity is the non-adherence or low adherence of patients to a hypocaloric dietetic restriction. In this study, we evaluated in obese mice the effects of shifting from high-calorie foods to normal diet on insulin sensitivity. Male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice (n = 20) were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for a 24-week period. Afterward, body weight, energy, and food intake were measured in all animals, together with parameters of insulin sensitivity by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and plasma glucose levels in response to insulin administration. Moreover, in half of these mice, Glut4 mRNA levels were measured in muscle at the end of the high fat treatment, whereas the rest of the animals (n = 10) were shifted to normocaloric diet (NCD) for 10 weeks, after which the same analyses were carried out. A significant reduction of body weight was found after the transition from high to normal fat diet, and this decrease correlated well with an improvement in insulin sensitivity. In fact, we found a reduction in serum insulin levels and the recovery of insulin responsiveness in terms of glucose disposal measured by insulin tolerance test and Glut4 mRNA and protein expression. These results indicate that obesity-related insulin resistance may be rescued by shifting from HFD to NCD. PMID:27303363

  4. The early origins of obesity and insulin resistance: timing, programming and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, L M; Morrison, J L; Rattanatray, L; Zhang, S; Ozanne, S E; McMillen, I C

    2016-02-01

    Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus and it also results in an increased risk of giving birth to a large baby with increased fat mass. Furthermore, it is also contributes to an increased risk of obesity and insulin resistance in the offspring in childhood, adolescence and adult life. It has been proposed that exposure to maternal obesity may therefore result in an 'intergenerational cycle' of obesity and insulin resistance. There is significant interest in whether exposure to maternal obesity around the time of conception alone contributes directly to poor metabolic outcomes in the offspring and whether dieting in the obese mother before pregnancy or around the time of conception has metabolic benefits for the offspring. This review focusses on experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the specific impact of exposure to maternal obesity during the periconceptional period alone or extending beyond conception on adipogenesis, lipogenesis and on insulin signalling pathways in the fat, liver and muscle of the offspring. Findings from these studies highlight the need for a better evidence base for the development of dietary interventions in obese women before pregnancy and around the time of conception to maximize the metabolic benefits and minimize the metabolic costs for the next generation. PMID:26367335

  5. Insulin resistance is associated with intraocular pressure elevation in a non-obese Korean population.

    PubMed

    Chun, Yoon Hong; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Shin Hae; Park, Kyung-Min; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Won-Chul; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yong-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Based on reports of an association between elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the major role of insulin resistance (IR) in MetS pathogenesis, a positive association between IOP and IR has been hypothesized. Although Asian populations tend to have lower body mass indices (BMIs) than Western populations, they tend to have a higher risk of developing MetS. This study examined the hypothesis that the association between IOP and IR differs by obesity status in an Asian population, by examining a nationally representative sample of South Korean adults. Data collected from 4,621 South Korean adults regarding demographic, lifestyle, and laboratory parameters by the 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were subjected to linear regression analysis to evaluate the relationship between IOP and metabolic profiles. After adjusting for confounding factors, the data were subjected to multiple linear regression analysis to examine the association between IR, as measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and IOP. Obesity was defined as BMI≥27.5 kg/m2, and the subjects were divided into obese vs. non-obese groups for investigation of the association between IR and IOP according to obesity status. IOP was found to correlate with fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, insulin, and HOMA-IR values in non-obese men; and with BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HOMA-IR, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values in non-obese women, whereas no association between IOP and IR was found in obese men or women. IOP was significantly associated with IR in non-obese men and women after adjusting for age, and in non-obese men after adjusting for age, BMI, and lifestyle and demographic factors. These findings indicate that a positive and independent relationship exists between IOP and IR in non-obese individuals only, suggesting that other factors likely contribute to IOP

  6. Obesity in Spanish schoolchildren: relationship with lipid profile and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Carmen; Gutierrez-Guisado, Javier; Benavente, Mercedes; Cano, Beatriz; Viturro, Enrique; Ortega, Henar; de Oya, Manuel

    2005-06-01

    This article reports cross-sectional data from a total of 1048 children, 6 to 8 years of age, categorized by presence or absence of obesity, who participated in a voluntary survey of cardiovascular risk factors in Spain over the period of 1998 to 2000, to establish the relationship between obesity and its metabolic consequences at this age. The prevalence of obesity and overweight were 9.4% and 15.7%, respectively, in boys and 10.5% and 18.0%, respectively, in girls. We observed that, in both sexes, obese children had higher triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels than non-obese children. No differences were found in plasma glucose or low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels between normal and obese children. However, we observed that insulin levels and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance were significantly (p<0.001) higher in obese children of both sexes but that free fatty acid levels were lower in obese children than in nonobese children, with a statistical significance in girls (0.72+/-0.30 vs. 0.61+/-0.16 mEq/liter). In summary, our survey found some metabolic consequences of obesity similar to those found in adults (elevated triglycerides, insulin, and the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol). However, other features (glucose, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and free fatty acid levels) were found to behave differently, indicating that the association of obesity with risk factors seems to change as the children age and may depend on the chronology of sexual maturation. PMID:15976136

  7. Inhibition of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase-1 Activity Alleviates Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Wendy; Ussher, John R.; Jaswal, Jagdip S.; Raubenheimer, Monique; Lam, Victoria H.M.; Wagg, Cory S.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation has been suggested to contribute to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, increasing muscle fatty acid oxidation may cause a reciprocal decrease in glucose oxidation, which might impair insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. We therefore investigated what effect inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake has on whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese insulin-resistant mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% calories from fat) for 12 weeks to develop insulin resistance. Subsequent treatment of mice for 4 weeks with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor, oxfenicine (150 mg/kg i.p. daily), resulted in improved whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Exercise capacity was increased in oxfenicine-treated mice, which was accompanied by an increased respiratory exchange ratio. In the gastrocnemius muscle, oxfenicine increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, membrane GLUT4 content, and insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Intramyocellular levels of lipid intermediates, including ceramide, long-chain acyl CoA, and diacylglycerol, were also decreased. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice. This is associated with increased carbohydrate utilization and improved insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle, suggestive of an operating Randle Cycle in muscle. PMID:23139350

  8. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 activity alleviates insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Keung, Wendy; Ussher, John R; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Raubenheimer, Monique; Lam, Victoria H M; Wagg, Cory S; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2013-03-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation has been suggested to contribute to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, increasing muscle fatty acid oxidation may cause a reciprocal decrease in glucose oxidation, which might impair insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. We therefore investigated what effect inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake has on whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in obese insulin-resistant mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% calories from fat) for 12 weeks to develop insulin resistance. Subsequent treatment of mice for 4 weeks with the carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 inhibitor, oxfenicine (150 mg/kg i.p. daily), resulted in improved whole-body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Exercise capacity was increased in oxfenicine-treated mice, which was accompanied by an increased respiratory exchange ratio. In the gastrocnemius muscle, oxfenicine increased pyruvate dehydrogenase activity, membrane GLUT4 content, and insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Intramyocellular levels of lipid intermediates, including ceramide, long-chain acyl CoA, and diacylglycerol, were also decreased. Our results demonstrate that inhibition of mitochondrial fatty acid uptake improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice. This is associated with increased carbohydrate utilization and improved insulin signaling in the skeletal muscle, suggestive of an operating Randle Cycle in muscle. PMID:23139350

  9. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: effects of obesity and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J. Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L.; Klein, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. We evaluated whether monomethyl branched chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion, in 9 lean and 9 obese subjects, and in a separate group of 9 obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Results Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ~30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P = 0.02), and increased by ~65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P = 0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R2 = 35%, P = 0.01, n = 18). Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. PMID:25328153

  10. Novel adipocyte aminopeptidases are selectively upregulated by insulin in healthy and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Alves, Patricia Lucio; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2016-02-01

    The lack of a complete assembly of the sensitivity of subcellular aminopeptidase (AP) activities to insulin in different pathophysiological conditions has hampered the complete view of the adipocyte metabolic pathways and its implications in these conditions. Here we investigated the influence of insulin on basic AP (APB), neutral puromycin-sensitive AP (PSA), and neutral puromycin-insensitive AP (APM) in high and low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from adipocytes of healthy and obese rats. Catalytic activities of these enzymes were fluorometrically monitoring in these fractions with or without insulin stimulus. Canonical traffic such as insulin-regulated AP was not detected for these novel adipocyte APs in healthy and obese rats. However, insulin increased APM in low density microsomal and plasma membrane fractions from healthy rats, APB in high density microsomal fraction from obese rats and PSA in plasma membrane fraction from healthy rats. A new concept of intracellular compartment-dependent upregulation of AP enzyme activities by insulin emerges from these data. This relatively selective regulation has pathophysiological significance, since these enzymes are well known to act as catalysts and receptor of peptides directly related to energy metabolism. Overall, the regulation of each one of these enzyme activities reflects certain dysfunction in obese individuals. PMID:26577934

  11. Adipose tissue inflammation: a cause or consequence of obesity-related insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Blüher, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic has become a major health concern, because it contributes to higher mortality due to an increased risk for noncommunicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and some cancers. Insulin resistance may link accumulation of adipose tissue in obesity to metabolic diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the past decades, data from human studies and transgenic animal models strongly suggested correlative, but also causative associations between activation of proinflammatory pathways and insulin resistance. Particularly chronic inflammation in adipose tissue seems to play an important role in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. On the other hand, adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be essential for healthy adipose tissue expansion and remodelling. However, whether adipose tissue inflammation represents a consequence or a cause of impaired insulin sensitivity remains an open question. A better understanding of the molecular pathways linking excess adipose tissue storage to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance may provide the basis for the future development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies to improve adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. In this review, potential mechanisms of adipose tissue inflammation and how adipose tissue inflammation may cause insulin resistance are discussed. PMID:27503945

  12. Influence of various carbohydrate sources on postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA concentrations in obese cats.

    PubMed

    Mori, A; Ueda, K; Lee, P; Oda, H; Ishioka, K; Sako, T

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate is an important source of energy, which can significantly affect postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels in cats. In healthy animals, this is not a big concern; however, in obese and diabetic animals, this is an important detail. In the present study, the impact of four different carbohydrate sources (glucose, maltose, corn starch, and trehalose) on short-term post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations was investigated with four obese cats. Each of the carbohydrate sources was added to a commercial wet food diet for feeding the animals. A significant difference was observed in postprandial glucose, insulin, and NEFA area under the curve (AUC) values between each carbohydrate source in obese cats. Furthermore, glucose and maltose induced the highest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC values, whereas trehalose induced the lowest postprandial glucose and insulin AUC value amongst all carbohydrate sources, respectively, in obese cats. However, trehalose has a higher risk of inducing side effects, such as diarrhea, as compared to other carbohydrate sources. As such, different carbohydrate sources appear to have a very significant impact on post-prandial glycemia and subsequent insulin requirement levels in obese cats. These results might be useful when selecting a prescription diet for obese or diabetic cats. In addition, maltose appears to be capable of inducing experimentally evoked postprandial hyperglycemia in obese cats, which may serve as a good tool for use to check the impact and effectiveness of newly developed oral hypoglycemic drugs or supplements for cats in future experiments. PMID:27487514

  13. Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Obese Youth.

    PubMed

    Platt, Adrienne M

    2015-07-01

    School nurses are well aware of the childhood obesity epidemic in the United States, as one in three youth are overweight or obese. Co-morbidities found in overweight or obese adults were not commonly found in youth three decades ago but are now increasingly "normal" as the obesity epidemic continues to evolve. This article is the second of six related articles discussing the co-morbidities of childhood obesity and discusses the complex association between obesity and insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Insulin resistance increases up to 50% during puberty, which may help to explain why youth are more likely to develop co-morbidities as teens. Treatment of these disorders is focused on changing lifestyle habits, as a child cannot change his or her pubertal progression, ethnicity, or family history. School nurses and other personnel can assist youth with insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome by supporting their efforts to make changes, reinforcing that insulin resistance is not necessarily type 2 diabetes even if the child is taking medication, and intervening with negative peer pressure. PMID:25816425

  14. Preserved endothelial function in human obesity in the absence of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, obesity has long been related to IR and increased CVD. However it is not known if IR is a necessary condition for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity, allowing for preserved endothelial function in obese people when absent. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between IR and endothelial dysfunction in human obesity and the mechanisms involved. Methods Twenty non-insulin resistant morbid obese (NIR-MO), 32 insulin resistant morbid obese (IR-MO), and 12 healthy subjects were included. Serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), resistin and adiponectin were determined. IR was evaluated by HOMA-index. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to bradykinin (BK) in mesenteric microvessels was assessed in wire myograph. Results Serum IL-6, and TNF-α levels were elevated only in IR-MO patients while resistin was elevated and adiponectin reduced in all MO individuals. Mesenteric arteries from IR-MO, but not from NIR-MO subjects displayed blunted relaxation to BK. Vasodilatation was improved in IR-MO arteries by the superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or the mitochondrial-targeted SOD mimetic, mito-TEMPO. NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and VAS2870) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin failed to modify BK-induced vasodilatations. Superoxide generation was higher in vessels from IR-MO subjects and reduced by mito-TEMPO. Blockade of TNF-α with infliximab, but not inhibition of inducible NOS or cyclooxygenase, improved endothelial relaxation and decreased superoxide formation. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is observed in human morbid obesity only when insulin resistance is present. Mechanisms involved include augmented mitochondrial superoxide generation, and

  15. Proteasome Dysfunction Associated to Oxidative Stress and Proteotoxicity in Adipocytes Compromises Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Moreno, Natalia R.; García-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Membrives, Antonio; Túnez, Isaac; El Bekay, Rajaa; Fernández-Real, José M.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Obesity is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory state and adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction, which predispose individuals to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic disease. However, a subset of obese individuals, referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals, are protected from obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities. Here, we aim at identifying molecular factors and pathways in adipocytes that are responsible for the progression from the insulin-sensitive to the insulin-resistant, metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) phenotype. Results: Proteomic analysis of paired samples of adipocytes from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) human AT revealed that both types of cells are altered in the MUHO state. Specifically, the glutathione redox cycle and other antioxidant defense systems as well as the protein-folding machinery were dysregulated and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased in adipocytes from IR subjects. Moreover, proteasome activity was also compromised in adipocytes of MUHO individuals, which was associated with enhanced accumulation of oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in these cells. Proteasome activity was also impaired in adipocytes of diet-induced obese mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to palmitate. In line with these data, proteasome inhibition significantly impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Innovation: This study provides the first evidence of the occurrence of protein homeostasis deregulation in adipocytes in human obesity, which, together with oxidative damage, interferes with insulin signaling in these cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction and impaired proteostasis in adipocytes, resulting from protein oxidation and/or misfolding, constitute major pathogenic mechanisms in the development of IR in obesity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 597–612. PMID:25714483

  16. Consensus statement for diagnosis of obesity, abdominal obesity and the metabolic syndrome for Asian Indians and recommendations for physical activity, medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Misra, A; Chowbey, P; Makkar, B M; Vikram, N K; Wasir, J S; Chadha, D; Joshi, Shashank R; Sadikot, S; Gupta, R; Gulati, Seema; Munjal, Y P

    2009-02-01

    Asian Indians exhibit unique features of obesity; excess body fat, abdominal adiposity, increased subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat, and deposition of fat in ectopic sites (liver, muscle, etc.). Obesity is a major driver for the widely prevalent metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Asian Indians in India and those residing in other countries. Based on percentage body fat and morbidity data, limits of normal BMI are narrower and lower in Asian Indians than in white Caucasians. In this consensus statement, we present revised guidelines for diagnosis of obesity, abdominal obesity, the metabolic syndrome, physical activity, and drug therapy and bariatric surgery for obesity in Asian Indians after consultations with experts from various regions of India belonging to the following medical disciplines; internal medicine, metabolic diseases, endocrinology, nutrition, cardiology, exercise physiology, sports medicine and bariatric surgery, and representing reputed medical institutions, hospitals, government funded research institutions, and policy making bodies. It is estimated that by application of these guidelines, additional 10-15% of Indian population would be labeled as overweight/obese and would require appropriate management. Application of these guidelines on countrywide basis is also likely to have a deceleration effect on the escalating problem of T2DM and cardiovascular disease. These guidelines could be revised in future as appropriate, after another large and countrywide consensus process. Till that time, these should be used by clinicians, researchers and policymakers dealing with obesity and related diseases. PMID:19582986

  17. JNK1 in hematopoietically derived cells contributes to diet-induced inflammation and insulin resistance without affecting obesity.

    PubMed

    Solinas, Giovanni; Vilcu, Cristian; Neels, Jaap G; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K; Luo, Jun-Li; Naugler, Willscott; Grivennikov, Sergei; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Scadeng, Miriam; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Karin, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Obesity-induced insulin resistance is a major factor in the etiology of type 2 diabetes, and Jun kinases (JNKs) are key negative regulators of insulin sensitivity in the obese state. Activation of JNKs (mainly JNK1) in insulin target cells results in phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) at serine and threonine residues that inhibit insulin signaling. JNK1 activation is also required for accumulation of visceral fat. Here we used reciprocal adoptive transfer experiments to determine whether JNK1 in myeloid cells, such as macrophages, also contributes to insulin resistance and central adiposity. Our results show that deletion of Jnk1 in the nonhematopoietic compartment protects mice from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced insulin resistance, in part through decreased adiposity. By contrast, Jnk1 removal from hematopoietic cells has no effect on adiposity but confers protection against HFD-induced insulin resistance by decreasing obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:17983584

  18. The role of perilipin in human obesity and insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review: More than 1.1 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese. We know that obesity is determined by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Although hundreds of obesity candidate genes have been identified through different metabolic pathways, the fundamental basis o...

  19. PERIOD2 variants are associated with abdominal obesity, psycho-behavioral factors, and attrition in the dietary treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Garaulet, Marta; Corbalán-Tutau, M Dolores; Madrid, Juan A; Baraza, Juan C; Parnell, Laurence D; Lee, Yu-Chi; Ordovas, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to test for association between polymorphisms in the circadian clock-related gene PERIOD2 (PER2) and attrition in patients prone to withdrawal from a behavioral weight-reduction program based on the Mediterranean diet. A total of 454 overweight/obese participants (women=380, men=74), aged 20 to 65 years, who attended outpatient clinics specializing in obesity between January and December 2008, were studied. Anthropometric, biochemical, and dietary-intake variables were analyzed. Effectiveness of the program was assessed, and a questionnaire of barriers to weight loss was considered. Multivariate analysis and logistic regression models were performed. Results indicate that PER2 polymorphisms rs2304672C>G and rs4663302C>T were associated with abdominal obesity (P<0.05). Participants who withdrew from treatment were significantly more obese and had more barriers to lose weight (P<0.05). They also displayed a lower likelihood of planning eating in advance and experiencing stress with dieting than those who completed treatment. Frequency of rs4663307 minor allele was significantly greater in withdrawers than in those who successfully completed treatment (P<0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that rs2304672 C>G minor allele carriers had a greater probability of dropping out, displaying extreme snacking, experiencing stress with dieting, eating when bored, and skipping breakfast than noncarriers. PER2 is implicated in attrition in weight-loss treatment and may modulate eating-behavior-related phenotypes. These findings could represent a step toward personalized health care and nutrition based on a combination of genotyping and psycho-behavioral characterization. PMID:20497782

  20. Exercise-Induced Weight Loss is More Effective than Dieting for Improving Adipokine Profile, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammation in Obese Men.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Joan; Dhamodaran, Subbiah; Chen, Dan-Dan; Yap, Siew-Yoon; Chen, Richard Yuan-Tud; Tian, Roger Ho-Heng

    2015-12-01

    The adipokines chemerin and adiponectin are reciprocally related in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and inflammation in obesity. Weight loss increases adiponectin and reduces chemerin, insulin resistance, and inflammation, but the effects of caloric restriction and physical activity are difficult to separate in combined lifestyle modification. We compared effects of diet- or exercise-induced weight loss on chemerin, adiponectin, insulin resistance, and inflammation in obese men. Eighty abdominally obese Asian men (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m(2), waist circumference [WC] ≥ 90 cm, mean age 42.6 years) were randomized to reduce daily intake by ~500 kilocalories (n = 40) or perform moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise (200-300 min/week) (n = 40) to increase energy expenditure by a similar amount for 24 weeks. The diet and exercise groups had similar decreases in energy deficit (-456 ± 338 vs. -455 ± 315 kcal/day), weight (-3.6 ± 3.4 vs. -3.3 ± 4.6 kg), and WC (-3.4 ± 4.4 vs. -3.6 ± 3.2 cm). The exercise group demonstrated greater reductions in fat mass (-3.9 ± 3.5 vs. -2.7 ± 5.3 kg), serum chemerin (-9.7 ± 11.1 vs. -4.3 ± 12.4 ng/ml), the inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-2.11 ± 3.13 vs. -1.49 ± 3.08 mg/L), and insulin resistance as measured by homeostatic model assessment (-2.45 ± 1.88 vs. -1.38 ± 3.77). Serum adiponectin increased only in the exercise group. Exercise-induced fat mass loss was more effective than dieting for improving adipokine profile, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation in obese men, underscoring metabolic benefits of increased physical activity. PMID:26011919

  1. Interleukin-6 signaling promotes alternative macrophage activation to limit obesity-associated insulin resistance and endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Goldau, Julia; Vogt, Merly C.; Ruud, Johan; Nguyen, Khoa D.; Theurich, Sebastian; Hausen, A. Christine; Schmitz, Joel; Brönneke, Hella S.; Estevez, Emma; Allen, Tamara L.; Mesaros, Andrea; Partridge, Linda; Febbraio, Mark A.; Chawla, Ajay; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are closely associated with the development of low-grade inflammation. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is linked to obesity-associated inflammation, however its role in this context remains controversial. Here, we show that mice with inactivated Il6ra gene in myeloid cells (Il6raΔmyel) displayed exaggerated deterioration of glucose homeostasis upon diet-induced obesity due to enhanced insulin resistance. Insulin target tissues showed increased inflammation and a shift in macrophage polarization. IL-6 induced IL-4-receptor expression and augmented the response to IL-4 in macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Il6raΔmyel mice were resistant to IL-4-mediated alternative macrophage polarization and exhibited increased susceptibility to LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results reveal IL-6 signaling as an important determinant for alternative macrophage-activation and assign IL-6 an unexpected homeostatic role to limit inflammation. PMID:24681566

  2. Regulation of B-type natriuretic peptide synthesis by insulin in obesity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Thoonen, Robrecht; Yao, Vincent; Buys, Emmanuel S; Popovich, John; Su, Yan Ru; Wang, Thomas J; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Human studies suggest that insulin resistance and obesity are associated with a decrease in B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) plasma concentrations. The objective of the study was to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in the association between insulin resistance and decreased BNP plasma concentrations. Mice fed a high-fat, high-fructose (HFHF) diet for 4 weeks developed mild obesity and systemic insulin resistance. Elevated plasma concentrations of insulin, glucose and triglycerides were noted. The HFHF diet was also associated with myocardial insulin resistance, characterized by an impaired response of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-AKT (PI3K-AKT) pathway to insulin in the left ventricle. Myocardial BNP expression and protein were decreased in HFHF-fed mice compared with control animals. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to 100 nm insulin activated PI3K-AKT signalling (15 min) and induced a 1.9 ± 0.3-fold increase in BNP gene expression (6 h). Prolonged exposure of cardiomyocytes to a high insulin concentration (100 nm) for 48 h induced insulin resistance, characterized by an impaired response of the PI3K-AKT signalling pathway and a decreased response of the BNP gene expression to insulin. The decreased response in BNP gene expression was reproduced by treating cardiomyocytes for 7 h with a PI3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin). In conclusion, HFHF diet in vivo, prolonged exposure to an elevated concentration of insulin or inhibition of the PI3K-AKT pathway in vitro all decrease BNP mRNA levels; this decrease may in turn contribute to the decreased BNP peptide concentrations in plasma observed in insulin-resistant individuals. PMID:26446173

  3. Abdominal obesity is a risk factor for dysexecutive function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zammit, Andrea R; Katz, Mindy J; Derby, Carol; Bitzer, Markus; Lipton, Richard B

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the metabolic syndrome and its components on dysexecutive function (DF) in individuals with and without CKD. Among 588 participants aged over 70 from the Einstein Aging Study (EAS), we defined DF as performance of 2SDs below the mean on any one test or 1.5SDs below the mean on any two of the following: Block Design, Digit Symbol Coding and the Trail-making Tests A and B. We defined CKD as an eGFR below 60 mL/min/m(2). MetS was defined according to recent guidelines from the National Cholesterol Education Program. 149 participants had CKD at cross-section, 16.1% of which also showed DF. Of the 439 participants without CKD, 12.3% displayed DF. Abdominal obesity as measured by waist circumference, was an independent risk factor for dysexecutive function in CKD (OR = 14.3, 95%CI = 2.21-91.93, p = 0.005) but not in non-CKD. None of the other MetS components were associated with DF. Results suggested that abdominal obesity, recognized as an integral part of the MetS, is a strong risk factor for DF in individuals with CKD. PMID:27413673

  4. Greater physical activity levels during pregnancy are associated with lower inflammation and insulin resistance in obese women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compared to lean pregnant women, obese women develop greater insulin resistance and systemic inflammation during pregnancy. Identifying lifestyle factors that can reduce the metabolic effect of obesity during pregnancy is critical to protect both the mother and the fetus from insulin resistance and ...

  5. Effect of a thermogenic agent, BRL 26830A, on insulin receptors in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Rochet, N; Tanti, J F; Grémeaux, T; Van Obberghen, E; Le Marchand-Brustel, Y

    1988-08-01

    The effect of a new type of antidiabetic agent, BRL 26830A, has been tested in obese mice. Since this drug increases thermogenesis, insulin receptor binding and kinase activity were studied in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of mice made obese by gold thioglucose. At 1 mg.kg-1.day-1, a 3-wk treatment normalized the glycemia and increased the uncoupling protein content of brown adipose tissue. The insulin receptor number and its associated kinase activity increased only in brown adipose tissue. At 2 mg.kg-1.day-1, additional effects, i.e., a 20% reduction in body weight and a normalization of insulin receptor number both in brown adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle, were observed. All those results were obtained even though hyperinsulinemia was not corrected. At the higher drug dosage, insulin receptor kinase activity evolved in direct proportion to the receptor number in brown adipose tissue. By contrast, in skeletal muscle, the receptor kinase activity toward exogenous substrates increased more than the receptor number, suggesting that the alteration of insulin receptor kinase activity previously reported in skeletal muscle of obese mice was partly reversed by BRL 26830A. None of these parameters was modified by the drug in lean mice. These results show that, even without affecting obesity, BRL 26830A improves insulin resistance in obese mice, probably through its effect on insulin receptors. This action prevails in brown adipose tissue, supporting the idea that this tissue plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. Thermogenic drugs could thus be powerful agents for the treatment of noninsulin-dependent diabetics. PMID:2841863

  6. Sagittal Abdominal Diameter as a Surrogate Marker of Insulin Resistance in an Admixtured Population—Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study (BRAMS)

    PubMed Central

    Cassani, Roberta S. L.; Forti, Adriana C. e; Vilela, Brunna S.; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) has been proposed as a surrogate marker of insulin resistance (IR). However, the utilization of SAD requires specific validation for each ethnicity. We aimed to investigate the potential use of SAD, compared with classical anthropometrical parameters, as a surrogate marker of IR and to establish the cutoff values of SAD for screening for IR. Methods A multicenter population survey on metabolic disorders was conducted. A race-admixtured sample of 824 adult women was assessed. The anthropometric parameters included: BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio and SAD. IR was determined by a hyperglycemic clamp and the HOMA-IR index. Results After adjustments for age and total body fat mass, SAD (r = 0.23 and r = -0.70) and BMI (r = 0.20 and r = -0.71) were strongly correlated with the IR measured by the HOMA-IR index and the clamp, respectively (p < 0.001). In the ROC analysis, the optimal cutoff for SAD in women was 21.0 cm. The women with an increased SAD presented 3.2 (CI 95%: 2.1-5.0) more likelihood of having IR, assessed by the HOMA-IR index compared with those with normal SAD (p < 0.001); whereas women with elevated BMI and WC were 2.1 (95% CI: 1.4-3.3) and 2.8 (95% CI: 1.7-4.5) more likely to have IR (p < 0.001), respectively. No statistically significant results were found for waist-to-hip ratio. Conclusions SAD can be a suitable surrogate marker of IR. Understanding and applying routine and simplified methods is essential because IR is associated with an increased risk of obesity-related diseases even in the presence of normal weight, slight overweight, as well as in obesity. Further prospective analysis will need to verify SAD as a determinant of clinical outcomes, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular events, in the Brazilian population. PMID:25951458

  7. Abrogating monoacylglycerol acyltransferase activity in liver improves glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin signaling in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hall, Angela M; Soufi, Nisreen; Chambers, Kari T; Chen, Zhouji; Schweitzer, George G; McCommis, Kyle S; Erion, Derek M; Graham, Mark J; Su, Xiong; Finck, Brian N

    2014-07-01

    Monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) enzymes convert monoacylglycerol to diacylglycerol (DAG), a lipid that has been linked to the development of hepatic insulin resistance through activation of protein kinase C (PKC). The expression of genes that encode MGAT enzymes is induced in the livers of insulin-resistant human subjects with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but whether MGAT activation is causal of hepatic steatosis or insulin resistance is unknown. We show that the expression of Mogat1, which encodes MGAT1, and MGAT activity are also increased in diet-induced obese (DIO) and ob/obmice. To probe the metabolic effects of MGAT1 in the livers of obese mice, we administered antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) against Mogat1 to DIO and ob/ob mice for 3 weeks. Knockdown of Mogat1 in liver, which reduced hepatic MGAT activity, did not affect hepatic triacylglycerol content and unexpectedly increased total DAG content. Mogat1 inhibition also increased both membrane and cytosolic compartment DAG levels. However, Mogat1 ASO treatment significantly improved glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin signaling in obese mice. In summary, inactivation of hepatic MGAT activity, which is markedly increased in obese mice, improved glucose tolerance and hepatic insulin signaling independent of changes in body weight, intrahepatic DAG and TAG content, and PKC signaling. PMID:24595352

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Improves Cardiac Function by Preventing Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Samniang, Bencharunan; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chunchai, Titikorn; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption leads to not only obese-insulin resistance, but also impaired left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to exert cardioprotection. However, its effects on the heart and metabolic parameters under obese-insulin resistant condition is not known. We determined the effects of VNS on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV) and LV function in obese-insulin resistant rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with HFD for 12 weeks, and were randomly divided into sham and VNS groups. VNS was applied for the next 12 weeks. Echocardiography, blood pressure and HRV were examined. Blood samples were collected for metabolic parameters. At the end, the heart was removed for determination of apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS for 12 weeks significantly decreased plasma insulin, HOMA index, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and visceral fat. Serum adiponectin was significantly increased in the VNS group. VNS also significantly decreased blood pressure, improved HRV and LV function, decreased cardiac MDA, TNF-α and Bax levels, and improved cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS improves metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, and the LV function via its ability against apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress, and preserved cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats. PMID:26830020

  9. Adipose tissue fatty acid chain length and mono-unsaturation increases with obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yew Tan, Chong; Virtue, Samuel; Murfitt, Steven; Robert, Lee D.; Phua, Yi Hui; Dale, Martin; Griffin, Julian L.; Tinahones, Francisco; Scherer, Philipp E.; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The non-essential fatty acids, C18:1n9, C16:0, C16:1n7, C18:0 and C18:1n7 account for over 75% of fatty acids in white adipose (WAT) triacylglycerol (TAG). The relative composition of these fatty acids (FA) is influenced by the desaturases, SCD1-4 and the elongase, ELOVL6. In knock-out models, loss of SCD1 or ELOVL6 results in reduced Δ9 desaturated and reduced 18-carbon non-essential FA respectively. Both Elovl6 KO and SCD1 KO mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity. Here we describe the relationship between WAT TAG composition in obese mouse models and obese humans stratified for insulin resistance. In mouse models with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, there was an increase in scWAT Δ9 desaturated FAs (SCD ratio) and FAs with 18-carbons (Elovl6 ratio) in mice. Data from mouse models discordant for obesity and insulin resistance (AKT2 KO, Adiponectin aP2-transgenic), suggested that scWAT TAG Elovl6 ratio was associated with insulin sensitivity, whereas SCD1 ratio was associated with fat mass. In humans, a greater SCD1 and Elovl6 ratio was found in metabolically more harmful visceral adipose tissue when compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:26679101

  10. Obesity and Insulin Resistance Are the Main Determinants of Postprandial Lipoprotein Dysmetabolism in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Niamh; Boran, Gerard; O'Connor, Anna-Louise; Gibney, James

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial dyslipidaemia may be a plausible mechanism by which polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) increases cardiovascular risk. We sought to investigate whether the postprandial glucose and insulin and lipid and lipoprotein responses, including that of apolipoprotein B-48 (apoB-48) containing chylomicrons, to a mixed meal are different in obese PCOS women when compared to obese control subjects and whether differences, if any, are related to obesity, insulin resistance (IR), hyperandrogenaemia, or PCOS status. 26 women with PCOS (age 30.4 ± 1.2 years (mean ± SEM), body mass index (BMI) 36.8 ± 1.5 kg/m2) and 26 non-PCOS subjects (age 34.1 ± 0.9 years, BMI 31.5 ± 1.0 kg/m2) were studied before and up to 8 hours following a standard mixed meal. AUC-triglyceride (AUC-TG) was higher and AUC-high-density lipoprotein (AUC-HDL) lower in PCOS women. These differences were not apparent when BMI was accounted for. Insulin sensitivity (SI), AUC-apoB-48, and AUC-apolipoprotein B (AUC-apoB) were found to be independent predictors of AUC-TG, accounting for 55% of the variance. Only AUC-insulin remained significantly elevated following adjustment for BMI. Obesity related IR explains postprandial hypertriglyceridaemia and hyperinsulinaemic responses. Management of obesity in premenopausal women with PCOS is likely to reduce their cardiovascular risk burden. PMID:26989412

  11. Pioglitazone Increases Whole Body Insulin Sensitivity in Obese, Insulin-Resistant Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Tozzo, Effie; Bhat, Gowri; Cheon, Kyeongmi; Camacho, Raul C.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps are considered the "gold standard" for assessing whole body insulin sensitivity. When used in combination with tracer dilution techniques and physiological insulin concentrations, insulin sensitization can be dissected and attributed to hepatic and peripheral (primarily muscle) effects. Non-human primates (NHPs), such as rhesus monkeys, are the closest pre-clinical species to humans, and thus serve as an ideal model for testing of compound efficacy to support translation to human efficacy. We determined insulin infusion rates that resulted in high physiological insulin concentrations that elicited maximal pharmacodynamic responses during hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. These rates were then used with [U-13C]-D-glucose, to assess and document the degrees of hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance between healthy and insulin-resistant, dysmetabolic NHPs. Next, dysmetabolic NHPs were treated for 28 days with pioglitazone (3 mg/kg) and again had their insulin sensitivity assessed, illustrating a significant improvement in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. This coincided with a significant increase in insulin clearance, and normalization of circulating adiponectin. In conclusion, we have determined a physiological clamp paradigm (similar to humans) for assessing glucose turnover in NHPs. We have also demonstrated that insulin-resistant, dysmetabolic NHPs respond to the established insulin sensitizer, pioglitazone, thus confirming their use as an ideal pre-clinical translational model to assess insulin sensitizing compounds. PMID:25954816

  12. Estrogen has opposing effects on vascular reactivity in obese, insulin-resistant male Zucker rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks-Asplund, Esther M.; Shoukas, Artin A.; Kim, Soon-Yul; Burke, Sean A.; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that estradiol treatment would improve vascular dysfunction commonly associated with obesity, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance. A sham operation or 17beta-estradiol pellet implantation was performed in male lean and obese Zucker rats. Maximal vasoconstriction (VC) to phenylephrine (PE) and potassium chloride was exaggerated in control obese rats compared with lean rats, but estradiol significantly attenuated VC in the obese rats. Estradiol reduced the PE EC50 in all groups. This effect was cyclooxygenase independent, because preincubation with indomethacin reduced VC response to PE similarly in a subset of control and estrogen-treated lean rats. Endothelium-independent vasodilation (VD) to sodium nitroprusside was similar among groups, but endothelium-dependent VD to ACh was significantly impaired in obese compared with lean rats. Estradiol improved VD in lean and obese rats by decreasing EC50 but impaired function by decreasing maximal VD. The shift in EC50 corresponded to an upregulation in nitric oxide synthase III protein expression in the aorta of the estrogen-treated obese rats. In summary, estrogen treatment improves vascular function in male insulin-resistant, obese rats, partially via an upregulation of nitric oxide synthase III protein expression. These effects are counteracted by adverse factors, such as hyperlipidemia and, potentially, a release of an endothelium-derived contractile agent.

  13. The blunted effect of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese subjects is partly reversed by weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, M; Arngrim, N; Simonsen, L; Asmar, A; Nordby, P; Holst, J J; Bülow, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) appears to have impaired effect on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue metabolism in obese subjects. The aim of the present study was to examine whether weight loss may reverse the impaired effect of GIP on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese subjects. Methods: Five obese males participated in a 12-week weight loss program, which consisted of caloric restriction (800 Cal day−1) followed by 4 weeks of weight-maintenance diet. Before and after weight loss, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipid metabolism was studied by conducting regional measurements of arterio-venous plasma concentrations of metabolites and blood flow (adipose tissue blood flow, ATBF) across a segment of the abdominal adipose tissue in the fasting state and during GIP infusion (1.5 pmol kg−1 min−1) in combination with a hyperinsulinemic–hyperglycemic clamp. Results: After weight loss (7.5±0.8 kg), glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity increased significantly as expected. No significant differences were seen in basal ATBF before (1.3±0.4 ml min−1 100 g tissue−1) and after weight loss (2.1±0.4 ml min−1 100 g tissue)−1; however, a tendency to increase was seen. After weight loss, GIP infusion increased ATBF significantly (3.2±0.1 ml min−1 100 g tissue−1) whereas there was no increase before weight loss. Triacylglycerol (TAG) uptake did not change after weight loss. Baseline free fatty acid (FFA) and glycerol output increased significantly after weight loss, P<0.001. During the clamp period, FFA and glycerol output declined significantly, P<0.05, with no differences before and after weight loss. Weight loss increased glucose uptake and decreased FFA/glycerol ratio during the clamp period, P<0.05. Conclusions: In obese subjects, weight loss, induced by calorie restriction, improves the blunted effect of GIP on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue metabolism. PMID:27136446

  14. Abdominal adiposity and obstructive airway disease: testing insulin resistance and sleep disordered breathing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study examined associations of abdominal adiposity with lung function, asthma symptoms and current doctor-diagnosed asthma and mediation by insulin resistance (IR) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Methods A random sample of 2500 households was drawn from the community of Whyalla, South Australia (The Whyalla Intergenerational Study of Health, WISH February 2008 - July 2009). Seven-hundred twenty-two randomly selected adults (≥18 years) completed clinical protocols (32.2% response rate). Lung function was measured by spirometry. Post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC was used to measure airway obstruction and reversibility of FEV1 was calculated. Current asthma was defined by self-reported doctor-diagnosis and evidence of currently active asthma. Symptom scores for asthma (CASS) and SDB were calculated. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) was estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). IR was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results The prevalence of current doctor-diagnosed asthma was 19.9% (95% CI 16.7 – 23.5%). The ratio of observed to expected cases given the age and sex distribution of the population was 2.4 (95%CI 2.1, 2.9). IAF was not associated with current doctor-diagnosed asthma, FEV1/FVC or FEV1 reversibility in men or women but was positively associated with CASS independent of IR and SDB in women. A 1% increase in IAF was associated with decreases of 12 mL and 20 mL in FEV1 and FVC respectively in men, and 4 mL and 7 mL respectively in women. SDB mediated 12% and 26% of these associations respectively in men but had minimal effects in women. Conclusions In this population with an excess of doctor-diagnosed asthma, IAF was not a major factor in airway obstruction or doctor-diagnosed asthma, although women with higher IAF perceived more severe asthma symptoms which did not correlate with lower FEV1. Higher IAF was significantly associated with lower FEV1 and FVC and in men SDB mechanisms may

  15. Tissue-specificity and ethnic diversity in obesity-related risk of cancer may be explained by variability in insulin response and insulin signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Goran, Michael I

    2010-06-01

    Obesity is a predisposing risk factor for several chronic diseases. The link between obesity and cancer appears to be particularly complex. Notably only the risk for development of specific cancers appear to be affected. Moreover, the obesity-related risk of cancer is very different across ethnic groups. African-Americans appear particularly prone, whereas Hispanics appear to be relatively protected. Obesity is associated with increased levels of circulating insulin. These levels of elevated insulin may serve to promote proliferation of fat cells to accommodate the elevated nutrient flux. However, elevated levels of insulin may be a major mediating factor influencing cancer risk. This hypothesis alone cannot explain the complexity of the phenomenon. We suggest here that the different insulin responses to obesity of different ethnic groups may explain their different risk profiles. Moreover, we speculate that tissue-specific variations in the insulin signaling pathways may underlie their differential susceptibility to tumorigenesis in the face of elevated obesity. Elevated cancer risk may be an unwanted side effect of insulin responding to elevated nutrient flux in the obese which it serves to proliferate fat cells that provide a location for storage of ingested fat, which consequently prevents ectopic fat storage. Hence, while Hispanics may be protected from cancer risk in obesity because of their lower insulin response, they have an elevated risk of fatty liver disease. Reduction of insulin levels in obesity as a strategy to reduce cancer risk may pose additional problems unless it is combined also with interventions that aim to limit nutrient influx. PMID:20150900

  16. Rescue of Obesity-Induced Infertility in Female Mice due to a Pituitary-Specific Knockout of the Insulin Receptor (IR)

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Kathryn J.; Wu, Sheng; DiVall, Sara A.; Messmer, Marcus R.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Miller, Ryan S.; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Wolfe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Summary Obesity is associated with insulin resistance in metabolic tissues such as adipose, liver, and muscle, but it is unclear whether non-classical target tissues, such as those of the reproductive axis, are also insulin resistant. To determine if the reproductive axis maintains insulin sensitivity in obesity in vivo, murine models of diet-induced obesity with and without intact insulin signaling in pituitary gonadotrophs were created. Diet-induced obese wild type female mice (WT DIO) were infertile and experienced a robust increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) after gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) or insulin stimulation. By contrast, both lean and obese mice with a pituitary-specific knockout of the insulin receptor (PitIRKO) exhibited reproductive competency, indicating that insulin signaling in the pituitary is required for the reproductive impairment seen in diet-induced obesity and that the gonadotroph maintains insulin sensitivity in a setting of peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:20816095

  17. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9−/−) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography–determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:27051864

  18. Dietary taurine and nutrients intake and anthropometric and body composition data by abdominal obesity in Korean male college students.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min Jung; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between abdominal obesity and dietary taurine intake, nutrient intake, anthropometric data and body composition in Korean male college students. One hundred seventy four subjects were divided into 2 groups based on abdominal obesity as estimated by waist circumference (cm) (Lee et al. 2006): normal group (waist circumference (cm): < 90 cm, n = 141), obese group (waist circumference (cm): > or = 90 cm, n = 33). A three day-recall method was used to assess diet (2 weekdays and 1 weekend). Anthropometric data and body composition were measured with Inbody 3.0 (Bioelectrical Impedance Fatness Analyzer). Average dietary intake of taurine in the normal and obese groups was 123.1 +/- 78.8 mg/day and 128.4 +/- 79.6 mg/day, respectively. There was no significant difference in dietary taurine and nutrient intake between the normal and obese groups. However, data of anthropometric measurements and body composition in the obese group were significantly elevated compared to those of the normal group. In the normal group, dietary taurine intake was positively correlated with nutrient intake (p < 0.01), the exception being the intake of plant lipid and of animal calcium. In the obese group, dietary taurine intake was positively correlated with the intake of energy foods and of animal lipid (p < 0.05). There were positive correlations between dietary taurine intake, weight and hip circumference (p < 0.05) in the normal group. However, there was no significant correlation between dietary taurine intake and anthropometric and body composition data in the obese group. Therefore, the data suggest that further study is warranted to examine the relationship between dietary taurine intake and abdominal obesity. PMID:19239175

  19. Administration of Hwang-Ryun-Haedok-tang, a Herbal Complex, for Patients With Abdominal Obesity: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seungwon; Jung, WooSang; Byun, A Ri; Moon, SangKwan; Cho, KiHo; Shin, KyoungHo

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicines have received attention as antiabdominal obesity agents. We present a series of 13 cases that demonstrate the positive effect of the herbal complex Hwang-Ryun-Haedok-Tang (HRHT; Tsumura, Tokyo, Japan) on weight and abdominal fat control in patients with abdominal obesity. We treated 13 patients with abdominal obesity treated for 54.46 ± 18.07 days with 5.0 g of HRHT daily. To evaluate the treatment, the morphometric (i.e., waist circumstance, weight, body fat) and biochemical parameters were measured once monthly. After HRHT therapy, the waist circumstance decreased from 91.96 ± 7.99 cm to 87.12 ± 8.09 cm (paired t test, P < .001) and the weight decreased from 78.09 ± 14.35 kg (average ± standard deviation) to 75.72 ± 14.60 kg (paired t test, P < .001). All 13 (100%) patients had low waist circumstances after treatment. Overall, 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients had a lower weight and body mass index. In the present study, we showed the clinical effects of HRHT on waist circumstance, weight, body mass index, and body fat in patients with abdominal obesity. Further clinical studies investigating the effects of HRHT are needed. PMID:26256500

  20. The PPARalpha/gamma dual agonist chiglitazar improves insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in MSG obese rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping-Ping; Shan, Song; Chen, Yue-Teng; Ning, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Su-Juan; Liu, Quan; Lu, Xian-Ping; Xie, Ming-Zhi; Shen, Zhu-Fang

    2006-07-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of chiglitazar to improve insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) obese rats and to determine whether its lipid-lowering effect is mediated through its activation of PPARalpha. 2. Chiglitazar is a PPARalpha/gamma dual agonist. 3. The compound improved impaired insulin and glucose tolerance; decreased plasma insulin level and increased the insulin sensitivity index and decreased HOMA index. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies showed chiglitazar increased the glucose infusion rate in MSG obese rats. 4. Chiglitazar inhibited alanine gluconeogenesis, lowered the hepatic glycogen level in MSG obese rats. Like rosiglitazone, chiglitazar promoted the differentiation of adipocytes and decreased the maximal diameter of adipocytes. In addition, chiglitazar decreased the fibrosis and lipid accumulation in the islets and increased the size of islets. 5. Chiglitazar reduced plasma triglyceride, total cholesterol (TCHO), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels; lowered hepatic triglyceride and TCHO contents; decreased muscular NEFA level. Unlike rosiglitazone, chiglitazar showed significant increase of mRNA expression of PPARalpha, CPT1, BIFEZ, ACO and CYP4A10 in the liver of MSG obese rats. 6. These data suggest that PPARalpha/gamma coagonist, such as chiglitazar, affect lipid homeostasis with different mechanisms from rosiglitazone, chiglitazar may have better effects on lipid homeostasis in diabetic patients than selective PPARgamma agonists. PMID:16751799

  1. Quantification of Abdominal Fat Depots in Rats and Mice during Obesity and Weight Loss Interventions

    PubMed Central

    KN, Bhanu Prakash; Gopalan, Venkatesh; Lee, Swee Shean; Velan, S. Sendhil

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is a leading healthcare issue contributing to metabolic diseases. There is a great interest in non-invasive approaches for quantitating abdominal fat in obese animals and humans. In this work, we propose an automated method to distinguish and quantify subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues (SAT and VAT) in rodents during obesity and weight loss interventions. We have also investigated the influence of different magnetic resonance sequences and sources of variability in quantification of fat depots. Materials and Methods High-fat diet fed rodents were utilized for investigating the changes during obesity, exercise, and calorie restriction interventions (N = 7/cohort). Imaging was performed on a 7T Bruker ClinScan scanner using fast spin echo (FSE) and Dixon imaging methods to estimate the fat depots. Finally, we quantified the SAT and VAT volumes between the L1–L5 lumbar vertebrae using the proposed automatic hybrid geodesic region-based curve evolution algorithm. Results Significant changes in SAT and VAT volumes (p<0.01) were observed between the pre- and post-intervention measurements. The SAT and VAT were 44.22±9%, 21.06±1.35% for control, −17.33±3.07%, −15.09±1.11% for exercise, and 18.56±2.05%, −3.9±0.96% for calorie restriction cohorts, respectively. The fat quantification correlation between FSE (with and without water suppression) sequences and Dixon for SAT and VAT were 0.9709, 0.9803 and 0.9955, 0.9840 respectively. The algorithm significantly reduced the computation time from 100 sec/slice to 25 sec/slice. The pre-processing, data-derived contour placement and avoidance of strong background–image boundary improved the convergence accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions We developed a fully automatic segmentation algorithm to quantitate SAT and VAT from abdominal images of rodents, which can support large cohort studies. We additionally identified the influence of non-algorithmic variables including

  2. Independent Benefits of Meeting the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines to Insulin Resistance in Obese Latino Children

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Nazrat; Palmer, Matilde; O'Connell, Johanna; DiPietro, Loretta

    2012-01-01

    We examined the independent association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and insulin resistance (IR) among obese Latino children (N = 113; 7–15 years) who were enrolled in a community-based obesity intervention. Baseline information on physical activity was gathered by self-report. Clinical assessments of body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), as well as glucose and insulin responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were performed after an overnight fast. Insulin resistance was defined as a 2 h insulin concentration >57 μU·mL−1. We observed that those obese children who met the 2008 Guidelines for MVPA (≥60 min/day) experienced a significantly lower odds of IR compared with those not meeting the Guidelines (OR = 0.29; 95% CI: (0.10–0.92)) and these findings were independent of age, sex, pubertal stage, acculturation, fasting insulin, and 2 h glucose concentrations. Efforts to promote 60 min or more of daily MVPA among children from ethnic minority and high-risk communities should assume primary public health importance. PMID:22523665

  3. Hormones and Obesity: Changes in Insulin and Growth Hormone Secretion Following Surgically Induced Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Crockford, P. M.; Salmon, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    Ten obese patients were subjected to insulin tolerance tests (0.2 unit per kg. regular insulin intravenously) and/or treadmill exercise tolerance testing (2.6 m.p.h. at 11° angulation) before and after surgically induced weight reduction. Immunoreactive growth hormone (IRGH) responses returned to normal with weight reduction in all but one—a grossly obese woman studied relatively early in the postoperative period when still far from the ideal body weight. Five of these patients and two additional subjects had intravenous glucose tolerance tests (0.5 g. per kg.) before and after weight reduction. In all, there was a significant diminution in immunoreactive insulin (IRI) values, accompained by little or no change in the glucose disappearance rate (KG) and a significant improvement in insulin effectiveness as indicated by the calculated “insulinogenic index”. It was concluded that the abnormalities in IRGH and IRI secretion, as well as the insulin resistance in obesity, are probably secondary and not of primary importance in the etiology of this disorder. PMID:5430052

  4. Effects of calorie restriction and weight loss on glucose and insulin levels in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, R L; Kaiser, D L

    1985-01-01

    The relative contributions of weight loss vs calorie restriction in the improvement of glucose tolerance in obese subjects has not been well studied. We measured fasting and stimulated glucose and insulin levels in seven obese subjects at 4 time periods: on a regular diet before weight loss, on a very low calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) after 4 days and after 6 weeks, and after 4 days back on a regular diet. Fasting glucose and insulin levels fell significantly after only 4 days of calorie restriction and did not change after 6 weeks. With return to a regular diet, these levels rose toward baseline even through body weight remained well below baseline. Stimulated glucose and insulin levels during an insulin tolerance test, intravenous glucose tolerance test, and standard meal demonstrated a similar pattern, although the changes due to either diet or weight loss were minimal. We conclude that calorie restriction has a greater effect on glucose and insulin levels than does weight loss in obese subjects who are losing weight. PMID:3900179

  5. Is salivary gland function altered in noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and obesity-insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Ittichaicharoen, Jitjiroj; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-04-01

    Salivary gland dysfunction in several systemic diseases has been shown to decrease the quality of life in patients. In non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), inadequate salivary gland function has been evidenced to closely associate with this abnormal glycemic control condition. Although several studies demonstrated that NIDDM has a positive correlation with impaired salivary gland function, including decreased salivary flow rate, some studies demonstrated contradictory findings. Moreover, the changes of the salivary gland function in pre-diabetic stage known as insulin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this review is to comprehensively summarize the current evidence from in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies regarding the relationship between NIDDM and salivary gland function, as well as the correlation between obesity and salivary gland function. Consistent findings as well as controversial reports and the mechanistic insights regarding the effect of NIDDM and obesity-insulin resistance on salivary gland function are also presented and discussed. PMID:26774185

  6. Insulin resistance in obesity and polycystic ovary syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Behboudi-Gandevani, Samira; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Rostami Dovom, Marzieh; Farahmand, Maryam; Bahri Khomami, Mahnaz; Noroozzadeh, Mahsa; Kabir, Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2016-05-01

    We aimed at investigating whether insulin resistance (IR)/sensitivity are impaired in obese/non-obese polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and obese/non-obese healthy controls. A comprehensive literature search was performed for observational, English language studies. Meta-analysis was performed with the random effects model according to the heterogeneity. Eligible studies, involving 3037 women in four groups of: 1-obese, PCOS; 2-non-obese, PCOS, 3-obese, non-PCOS and 4-Non-obese, non-PCOS were included. Based on the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) analysis, the pooled mean (95% Conf. Interval) of HOMA IR in groups 1-4 were 4.38 (3.84, 4.92), 2.68 (2.16, 3.20), 2.44 (2.06, 2.82) and 1.34 (1.06, 1.63), respectively. Meta-analysis showed that group 1 (obese, PCOS patients) statistically have the highest IR and group 4 (non-obese, non-PCOS women) have the highest insulin sensitivity. Group 2 (non-obese, PCOS patients) and group 3 (obese, non-PCOS women) were between this range and they had lower IR than group 1 (obese, PCOS) and lower insulin sensitivity than group 4 (non-obese, non-PCOS). So, there were statistical differences between all groups except between groups 2 and 3. Insulin sensitivity indexes (quickie and ISI), also confirm the IR index (HOMA-IR) results. Based on different IR/sensitivity indexes, we found no evidence of any different effects of BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2) on IR/sensitivity. In conclusion, PCOS status intensifies the adverse effects of obesity on IR, it has to be appropriately addressed in primary and secondary preventive cares and treatments provided for these women. PMID:27052492

  7. The Effects of Combined Exercise on Health-Related Fitness, Endotoxin, and Immune Function of Postmenopausal Women with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Mo; Kwak, Yi-Sub; Ji, Jin-Goo

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of combined exercise on health-related fitness, endotoxin concentrations, and immune functions of postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity. 20 voluntary participants were recruited and they were randomly allocated to the combined exercise group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 10). Visceral obesity was defined as a visceral-to-subcutaneous fat ratio ≥0.4 based on computed tomography (CT) results. Body composition, exercise stress testing, fitness measurement, CT scan, and blood variables were analyzed to elucidate the effects of combined exercise. The SPSS Statistics 18.0 program was used to calculate means and standard deviations for all variables. Significant differences between the exercise group and control group were determined with 2-way ANOVA and paired t-tests. The exercise group's abdominal obesity was mitigated due to visceral fat reduction; grip strength, push-ups, and oxygen uptake per weight improved; and HDL-C and IgA level also increased, while TNF-α, CD14, and endotoxin levels decreased. Lowered TNF-α after exercise might have an important role in the obesity reduction. Therefore, we can conclude that combined exercise is effective in mitigating abdominal obesity, preventing metabolic diseases, and enhancing immune function. PMID:26075288

  8. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance With Reduced Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Mira; Choe, Sung Sik; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Choi, Goun; Kim, Ji-Won; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Je-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, plays important roles in redox regulation and de novo lipogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that aberrant upregulation of G6PD in obese adipose tissue mediates insulin resistance as a result of imbalanced energy metabolism and oxidative stress. It remains elusive, however, whether inhibition of G6PD in vivo may relieve obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this study we showed that a hematopoietic G6PD defect alleviates insulin resistance in obesity, accompanied by reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Compared with wild-type littermates, G6PD-deficient mutant (G6PD(mut)) mice were glucose tolerant upon high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding. Intriguingly, the expression of NADPH oxidase genes to produce reactive oxygen species was alleviated, whereas that of antioxidant genes was enhanced in the adipose tissue of HFD-fed G6PD(mut) mice. In diet-induced obesity (DIO), the adipose tissue of G6PD(mut) mice decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines, accompanied by downregulated proinflammatory macrophages. Accordingly, macrophages from G6PD(mut) mice greatly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory signaling cascades, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and hepatocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of G6PD(mut) bone marrow to wild-type mice attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance in DIO. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of macrophage G6PD would ameliorate insulin resistance in obesity through suppression of proinflammatory responses. PMID:27284106

  9. Diet and exercise interventions reduce intrahepatic fat content and improve insulin sensitivity in obese older adults.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Stufflebam, Abby; Hilton, Tiffany N; Sinacore, David R; Klein, Samuel; Villareal, Dennis T

    2009-12-01

    Both obesity and aging increase intrahepatic fat (IHF) content, which leads to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance. We evaluated the effects of diet and diet in conjunction with exercise on IHF content and associated metabolic abnormalities in obese older adults. Eighteen obese (BMI >or=30 kg/m(2)) older (>or=65 years old) adults completed a 6-month clinical trial. Participants were randomized to diet (D group; n = 9) or diet + exercise (D+E group; n = 9). Primary outcome was IHF quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Secondary outcomes included insulin sensitivity (assessed by oral glucose tolerance), body composition (assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), physical function (VO(2 peak) and strength), glucose, lipids, and blood pressure (BP). Body weight (D: -9 +/- 1%, D+E: -10 +/- 2%, both P < 0.05) and fat mass (D: -13 +/- 3%, D+E -16 +/- 3%, both P < 0.05) decreased in both groups but there was no difference between groups. IHF decreased to a similar extent in both groups (D: -46 +/- 11%, D+E: -45 +/- 8%, both P < 0.05), which was accompanied by comparable improvements in insulin sensitivity (D: 66 +/- 25%, D+E: 68 +/- 28%, both P < 0.05). The relative decreases in IHF correlated directly with relative increases in insulin sensitivity index (ISI) (r = -0.52; P < 0.05). Improvements in VO(2 peak), strength, plasma triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentration, and diastolic BP occurred in the D+E group (all P < 0.05) but not in the D group. Diet with or without exercise results in significant decreases in IHF content accompanied by considerable improvements in insulin sensitivity in obese older adults. The addition of exercise to diet therapy improves physical function and other obesity- and aging-related metabolic abnormalities. PMID:19390517

  10. Anti-obesity and anti-insulin resistance effects of tomato vinegar beverage in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon-Il; Lee, Jin; Choi, Ra-Yeong; Lee, Hae-In; Lee, Ju-Hye; Jeong, Yong-Ki; Kim, Myung-Joo; Lee, Mi-Kyung

    2014-07-25

    This study investigated the mechanism of processed tomato vinegar beverage (TVB)-mediated anti-obesity and anti-insulin resistance effects in high-fat diet (HF)-induced obese mice. Oral administration of TVB (14 mL kg(-1) body weight) to HF-fed mice for 6 weeks effectively reduced the body and visceral fat weight and significantly lowered plasma free fatty acid, triglyceride and hepatic triglyceride levels. TVB significantly increased fecal triglyceride excretion, both phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α protein levels in the liver, which were associated with increased fatty acid β-oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase activities in HF-fed mice. TVB improved glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia and HOMA-IR levels in the HF + TVB group compared to the HF group. Additionally, TVB significantly increased glucokinase activity and decreased glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the liver, which enhanced glucose metabolism in obese mice. These results suggest that TVB prevents visceral obesity and insulin resistance via AMPK/PPARα-mediated fatty acid and glucose oxidation. PMID:24867606

  11. Association Between Duration of Overall and Abdominal Obesity Beginning in Young Adulthood and Coronary Artery Calcification in Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Jared P.; Loria, Catherine M.; Lewis, Cora E.; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Wei, Gina S.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Terry, James G.; Liu, Kiang

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Younger individuals are experiencing a greater cumulative exposure to excess adiposity over their lifetime. However, few studies have determined the consequences of long-term obesity. OBJECTIVE To examine whether the duration of overall and abdominal obesity was associated with the presence and 10-year progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC), a subclinical predictor of coronary heart disease. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective study of 3275 white and black adults aged 18 to 30 years at baseline in 1985–1986 who did not initially have overall obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30) or abdominal obesity (men: waist circumference [WC] >102 cm; women: >88 cm) in the multicenter, community-based Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Participants completed computed tomography scanning for the presence of CAC during the 15-, 20-, or 25-year follow-up examinations. Duration of overall and abdominal obesity was calculated using repeat measurements of BMI and WC, respectively, performed 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, and 25 years after baseline. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Presence of CAC was measured by computed tomography at the year 15 (2000–2001), year 20 (2005–2006), or year 25 (2010–2011) follow-up examinations. Ten-year progression of CAC (2000–2001 to 2010–2011) was defined as incident CAC in 2010–2011 or an increase in CAC score of 20 Agatston units or greater. RESULTS During follow-up, 40.4% and 41.0% developed overall and abdominal obesity, respectively. Rates of CAC per 1000 person-years were higher for those who experienced more than 20 years vs 0 years of overall obesity (16.0 vs 11.0, respectively) and abdominal obesity (16.7 vs 11.0). Approximately 25.2% and 27.7% of those with more than 20 years of overall and abdominal obesity, respectively, experienced progression of CAC vs 20.2% and 19.5% of those with 0 years. After adjustment for BMI or WC and potential confounders, the hazard ratios for CAC

  12. Evidence for threshold effects of 25-hydroxyvitamin D on glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in black and white obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, John D; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone-related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose-insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  13. Evidence for Threshold Effects of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D on Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Resistance in Black and White Obese Postmenopausal Women12

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, John D.; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; Streeten, Elizabeth; Ryan, Alice S.; Goldberg, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    We identified normal vs. abnormal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations by examining the relation of 25(OH)D to non-bone–related measures (plasma glucose, insulin resistance, lipids, blood pressure, fitness, obesity, and regional adiposity) and asking whether there is a 25(OH)D concentration above and below which the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome changes. We examined the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome by race to see whether race-specific normal ranges are needed, and we examined the role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in modulating the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome. In a cross-sectional study of 239 overweight and obese, sedentary postmenopausal women without diabetes (83 black, 156 white), outcome measures included plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), IGF-1, parathyroid hormone (PTH), aerobic fitness, body composition, subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat, and blood pressure. We identified threshold effects in the association between 25(OH)D and these variables using piecewise linear regressions. We found that 25(OH)D was inversely related to fasting glucose, fasting and 2-h insulin, HOMA-IR, visceral abdominal fat, percentage fat, PTH, and triglycerides. Evidence for a threshold effect of 25(OH)D was found for 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. There was no evidence suggesting the need for race-specific normal 25(OH)D concentrations. IGF-1 modulated the relation between 25(OH)D and outcome but only below, and not above, a threshold 25(OH)D concentration. Our findings suggest a threshold effect of 25(OH)D on glucose–insulin metabolism such that 25(OH)D ≥ ∼26 μg/L (65.0 pmol/L) supports normal glucose homeostasis and that the same cut point defining normal 25(OH)D concentration can be used in black and white women. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01798030. PMID:24717362

  14. Imbalance Between Postprandial Ghrelin and Insulin Responses to an Ad Libitum Meal in Obese Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Japur, Camila Cremonezi; Diez-Garcia, Rosa Wanda; de Oliveira Penaforte, Fernanda Rodrigues; de Sá, Marcos Felipe Silva

    2014-02-11

    Obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may have impairment in the regulation of food intake associated with ghrelin and insulin. In order to compare postprandial ghrelin and insulin responses to an ad libitum meal, we assessed 30 obese women with PCOS and 23 obese women without PCOS (control group). Blood samples were taken under fasting conditions, preprandially, and 15, 45, 75, and 135 minutes after the beginning of an ad libitum meal and ghrelin and insulin concentrations were analyzed. Insulin resistance (IR) was classified using basal insulin, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, and homeostasis model assessment index. Mean ad libitum food intake was similar between the groups (468 ± 150 vs 444 ± 165 g, P = .60). The IR was found in 56.6% in PCOS group compared with 30.4% in the control group (P < .01). The postprandial ghrelin response was similar in both the groups but the insulin area under the curve (AUC) tend to be greater in the PCOS group (12807 ± 8149.4 vs 8654.4 ± 7232.3 μIU/mL/min; P = .057). The ghrelin AUC was negatively correlated with the insulin AUC (r = -.5138; P = .01) only in the control group. The imbalance in the feedback mechanisms between insulin and ghrelin, present in obese women, especially those with IR, may affect food intake throughout the day and that could be a mechanism for the development of obesity in PCOS. PMID:24520086

  15. Acute physical exercise reverses S-nitrosation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1 and protein kinase B/Akt in diet-induced obese Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, José R; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Cintra, Dennys E; Carvalho-Filho, Marco A; Moraes, Juliana C; De Souza, Cláudio T; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Saad, Mario J A

    2008-01-01

    Early evidence demonstrates that exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and the NO produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) can induce insulin resistance. Here, we investigated whether this insulin resistance, mediated by S-nitrosation of proteins involved in early steps of the insulin signal transduction pathway, could be reversed by acute physical exercise. Rats on a high-fat diet were subjected to swimming for two 3 h-long bouts, separated by a 45 min rest period. Two or 16 h after the exercise protocol the rats were killed and proteins from the insulin signalling pathway were analysed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. We demonstrated that a high-fat diet led to an increase in the iNOS protein level and S-nitrosation of insulin receptor β (IRβ), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and Akt. Interestingly, an acute bout of exercise reduced iNOS expression and S-nitrosation of proteins involved in the early steps of insulin action, and improved insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity rats. Furthermore, administration of GSNO (NO donor) prevents this improvement in insulin action and the use of an inhibitor of iNOS (l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine; l-NIL) simulates the effects of exercise on insulin action, insulin signalling and S-nitrosation of IRβ, IRS1 and Akt. In summary, a single bout of exercise reverses insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese rats by improving the insulin signalling pathway, in parallel with a decrease in iNOS expression and in the S-nitrosation of IR/IRS1/Akt. The decrease in iNOS protein expression in the muscle of diet-induced obese rats after an acute bout of exercise was accompanied by an increase in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. These results provide new insights into the mechanism by which exercise restores insulin sensitivity. PMID:17974582

  16. Serum Autotaxin/ENPP2 Correlates with Insulin Resistance in Older Humans with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Valerie L.; Trybula, Joy S.; Wills, Rachel C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Dubé, John J.; Kienesberger, Petra C.; Kershaw, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autotaxin (ATX) is an adipocyte-derived lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The ATX/LPA pathway in adipose tissue has recently been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance in animal models, but the role of circulating ATX in humans remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between serum ATX and insulin resistance. Methods In this retrospective study, older (60–75 years), non-diabetic human participants with overweight or obesity (BMI 25–37 kg/m2), were characterized for metabolic phenotype including measures of energy, glucose, and lipid homeostasis. The relationship between serum ATX and metabolic parameters was then determined using correlative and predictive statistics. Results Serum ATX was higher in females than in males. After controlling for sex, serum ATX correlated with multiple measures of adiposity and glucose homeostasis/insulin action. Serum ATX and BMI also independently predicted glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance after controlling for sex and medication use. Conclusion Serum ATX correlates with and predicts measures of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in older humans, suggesting that it may be a potential pathogenic factor and/or diagnostic/therapeutic target for insulin resistance in this population. PMID:26727116

  17. Hepatic mTORC1 Opposes Impaired Insulin Action to Control Mitochondrial Metabolism in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao; Satapati, Santhosh; Fu, Xiaorong; Ilkayeva, Olga; Newgard, Christopher B; Brugarolas, James; Burgess, Shawn C

    2016-07-12

    Dysregulated mitochondrial metabolism during hepatic insulin resistance may contribute to pathophysiologies ranging from elevated glucose production to hepatocellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Given that obesity impairs insulin action but paradoxically activates mTORC1, we tested whether insulin action and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) contribute to altered in vivo hepatic mitochondrial metabolism. Loss of hepatic insulin action for 2 weeks caused increased gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial anaplerosis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle oxidation, and ketogenesis. However, activation of mTORC1, induced by the loss of hepatic Tsc1, suppressed these fluxes. Only glycogen synthesis was impaired by both loss of insulin receptor and mTORC1 activation. Mice with a double knockout of the insulin receptor and Tsc1 had larger livers, hyperglycemia, severely impaired glycogen storage, and suppressed ketogenesis, as compared to those with loss of the liver insulin receptor alone. Thus, activation of hepatic mTORC1 opposes the catabolic effects of impaired insulin action under some nutritional states. PMID:27346353

  18. Pharyngeal collapsibility during sleep is elevated in insulin-resistant females with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Oscar L; Galiatsatos, Panagis; Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Patil, Susheel P; Smith, Philip L; Magnuson, Thomas; Schweitzer, Michael; Steele, Kimberley; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Schwartz, Alan R

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with sleep apnoea, leading us to hypothesise that it is also associated with elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility, even in the absence of sleep apnoea.90 bariatric patients were characterised for sleep apnoea, pharyngeal collapsibility and insulin resistance. Patients with a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) >10 events·h(-1), diabetes mellitus, tonsillar hypertrophy and pulmonary disease were excluded. The remaining 14 females underwent collapsibility measurements (passive critical pressure, Pcritp ) during non-rapid eye movement sleep. The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, a measure of insulin resistance, was derived from measurements of fasting glucose and insulin levels, and compared to Pcritp Groups with high Pcritp compared to low Pcritp did not differ in age, body mass index or RDI. HOMA and insulin were elevated in the high Pcritp group compared to the low Pcritp group (p<0.02). Pcritp correlated with HOMA (Spearman's ρ=0.565, 95% CI 0.104-0.862; p=0.035) and insulin (Spearman's ρ=0.609 95% CI 0.196-0.835; p=0.021).Obese insulin-resistant subjects without frank diabetes or sleep apnoea demonstrate preclinical elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility, which may increase their susceptibility to sleep apnoea. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance could play a significant role in sleep apnoea pathogenesis by generating requisite elevations in pharyngeal collapsibility. PMID:27103392

  19. Lifestyle Risk Factors of General and Abdominal Obesity in Students of the School of Medicine and Health Science of the University of Development Studies, Tamale, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Aleyira, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity among students of the University for Development Studies, School of Medicine and Health Sciences (UDS-SMHS), Tamale, Ghana. Also, lifestyle risk factors for the two obesity indices were investigated. This study was conducted among a sample of 646 students. Anthropometric measures of weight, height, and waist circumference were appropriately assessed. The prevalence of general and abdominal obesity was 1.9% and 4.2%, respectively. Risk factors of general obesity were being female (crude OR = 6.9, 95% CI = 1.85–25.80, P = 0.0021), engaging in light PA (OR = 12.45, 95% CI = 2.96–52.41, P = 0.0006), being aged 28–37 years (OR = 5.37, 95% CI = 1.39–20.68, P = 0.0329), nonintake of coffee (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.10–15.28, P = 0.0357), being married (OR = 5.7, 95% CI = 1.48–22.02, P = 0.0286), and being abdominally obese (OR = 02.7, 95% CI = 25.61–11.60, P < 0.0001). Risk factors for abdominal obesity were being female, being married, having general obesity, and nonintake of coffee. Abdominal obesity was more prevalent than general obesity. Risk factors included being female, married, and generally obese and nonintake of coffee. PMID:24649393

  20. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption and Risk of General and Abdominal Obesity in Iranian Adults: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    MIRMIRAN, Parvin; EJTAHED, Hanieh-Sadat; BAHADORAN, Zahra; BASTAN, Sara; AZIZI, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: General and abdominal obesity are major global health problems. This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the association between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and body mass index and waist circumference status in 5852 Iranian adults within the framework of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). Methods: Intakes of SSBs including carbonated drinks and synthetic fruit juices were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. The association between body mass index, waist circumference and body adiposity index in each quartile category of SSB consumption were determined using the multivariable linear regression models. The odds ratio (OR) of general and abdominal obesity in each quartile of SSB consumption was also determined using the multivariable logistic regression models. Results: Mean dietary intake of SSBs was 48.9 g/d or 0.25 servings/d. After adjustment for all potential confounding variables, significant associations were observed between SSB consumption and BMI (β: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.13–0.86), and waist circumference (β: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.40–2.16) in the fourth quartile. There was no significant association between SSB consumption and body adiposity index. Participants who consumed > 57.1 g/d of SSBs had 22% higher risk of general obesity (OR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.00–1.48) and 35% higher risk of abdominal obesity (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.12–1.61), compared with those in the lowest quartile of SSB consumption. Conclusion: Higher intakes of SSBs were associated with the higher risk of general and abdominal obesity in adults suggesting that limiting the consumption of SSBs may be a practical approach to prevent and manage obesity. PMID:26744712

  1. The AMPK activator R419 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Marcinko, Katarina; Bujak, Adam L.; Lally, James S.V.; Ford, Rebecca J.; Wong, Tammy H.; Smith, Brennan K.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Jenkins, Yonchu; Li, Wei; Kinsella, Todd M.; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is important for regulating glucose homeostasis, mitochondrial content and exercise capacity. R419 is a mitochondrial complex-I inhibitor that has recently been shown to acutely activate AMPK in myotubes. Our main objective was to examine whether R419 treatment improves insulin sensitivity and exercise capacity in obese insulin resistant mice and whether skeletal muscle AMPK was important for mediating potential effects. Methods Glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, exercise capacity, and electron transport chain content/activity were examined in wildtype (WT) and AMPK β1β2 muscle-specific null (AMPK-MKO) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without R419 supplementation. Results There was no change in weight gain, adiposity, glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity between HFD-fed WT and AMPK-MKO mice. In both HFD-fed WT and AMPK-MKO mice, R419 enhanced insulin tolerance, insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, skeletal muscle 2-deoxyglucose uptake, Akt phosphorylation and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) content independently of alterations in body mass. In WT, but not AMPK-MKO mice, R419 improved treadmill running capacity. Treatment with R419 increased muscle electron transport chain content and activity in WT mice; effects which were blunted in AMPK-MKO mice. Conclusions Treatment of obese mice with R419 improved skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through a mechanism that is independent of skeletal muscle AMPK. R419 also increases exercise capacity and improves mitochondrial function in obese WT mice; effects that are diminished in the absence of skeletal muscle AMPK. These findings suggest that R419 may be a promising therapy for improving whole-body glucose homeostasis and exercise capacity. PMID:26413470

  2. Dissociation of in vitro sensitivities of glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Kubo, K.; Zawadzki, J.; Lillioja, S.; Young, A.; Abbott, W.; Foley, J.E.

    1987-09-01

    It is unclear from previous studies whether qualitative or only quantitative differences exist in insulin action in adipocytes obtained from obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) when compared with equally obese nondiabetic subjects. In addition, the role of changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in NIDDM is still controversial. The authors compared the sensitivities of (/sup 14/C)-glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin and measured (/sup 125/I)-insulin binding in abdominal adipocytes obtained from 45 obese nondiabetic, obese diabetic, and 15 nonobese female southwestern American Indians. Compared with the nonobese group, the sensitivities of glucose transport antilipolysis were reduced in both the obese nondiabetic and obese diabetic groups. Compared with the obese nondiabetic subjects, the ED/sub 50/ for stimulation of glucose transport was higher in the obese patients with NIDDM. In contrast, the ED/sub 50/S for antilipolysis were similar in obese diabetic patients and obese nondiabetic subjects. No differences was found in insulin binding in patients with NIDDM when compared with the equally obese nondiabetic subjects. These data indicate 1) the mechanism of insulin resistance differs in NIDDM and obesity, and 2) the selective loss of insulin sensitivity in NIDDM precludes changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in this disorder.

  3. Impact of a mass media campaign linking abdominal obesity and cancer: a natural exposure evaluation.

    PubMed

    Morley, Belinda; Wakefield, Melanie; Dunlop, Sally; Hill, David

    2009-12-01

    A mass media campaign aired in the Australian state of Victoria aimed to increase awareness and encourage identification of the abdominal circumference for men and women that placed them at increased risk of cancer. The evaluation assessed the extent to which ad exposure was associated with improvement in awareness, intentions and behaviours with respect to weight and cancer. Respondents were overweight or obese adults aged 30-69 years and exposure to the advertisement occurred via commercial television programmes in a natural setting. Questionnaire assessment occurred before, immediately after and 2 weeks following exposure to the advertising, and a comparison group who did not recall the ad completed the same interviews. For the main analyses, the exposure group was those who recalled the advertisement at post-exposure and follow-up (n = 101). Those who did not recall it at either stage comprised the unexposed group (n = 81). The campaign achieved its primary objective of increased awareness of the link between obesity and cancer and the specific waist sizes indicative of risk, as well as increased behavioural intentions with respect to weight and cancer. However, it did not have an effect on self-awareness of weight status, perceived personal risk of cancer or weight loss behaviour. PMID:19570919

  4. The Interactions of Obesity, Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David P.; Gracheck, Peter J.; Vona-Davis, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have an increased breast cancer risk, the principal mechanism for which is elevated estrogen production by adipose tissue; also, regardless of menstrual status and tumor estrogen dependence, obesity is associated with biologically aggressive breast cancers. Type 2 diabetes has a complex relationship with breast cancer risk and outcome; coexisting obesity may be a major factor, but insulin itself induces adipose aromatase activity and estrogen production and also directly stimulates breast cancer cell growth and invasion. Adipose tissue inflammation occurs frequently in obesity and type 2 diabetes, and proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2 produced by cyclooxygenase-2 in the associated infiltrating macrophages also induce elevated aromatase expression. In animal models, the same proinflammatory mediators, and the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, also stimulate tumor cell proliferation and invasion directly and promote tumor-related angiogenesis. We postulate that chronic adipose tissue inflammation, rather than body mass index-defined obesity per se, is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and postmenopausal estrogen-dependent breast cancer. Also, notably before the menopause, obesity and type 2 diabetes, or perhaps the associated inflammation, promote estrogen-independent, notably triple-negative, breast cancer development, invasion and metastasis by mechanisms that may involve macrophage-secreted cytokines, adipokines and insulin. PMID:26516917

  5. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  6. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  7. Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Changes in a Group of Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pires, António; Martins, Paula; Pereira, Ana Margarida; Silva, Patricia Vaz; Marinho, Joana; Marques, Margarida; Castela, Eduardo; Sena, Cristina; Seiça, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity-related comorbidities are present in young obese children, providing a platform for early adult cardiovascular disorders. Objectives To compare and correlate markers of adiposity to metabolic disturbances, vascular and cardiac morphology in a European pediatric obese cohort. Methods We carried out an observational and transversal analysis in a cohort consisting of 121 obese children of both sexes, between the ages of 6 and 17 years. The control group consisted of 40 children with normal body mass index within the same age range. Markers of adiposity, plasma lipids and lipoproteins, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, common carotid artery intima-media thickness and left ventricular diameters were analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences between the control and obese groups for the variables analyzed, all higher in the obese group, except for age, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and adiponectin, higher in the control group. In the obese group, body mass index was directly correlated to left ventricular mass (r=0.542; p=0.001), the homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (r=0.378; p=<0.001) and mean common carotid artery intima-media thickness (r=0.378; p=<0.001). In that same group, insulin resistance was present in 38.1%, 12.5% had a combined dyslipidemic pattern, and eccentric hypertrophy was the most common left ventricular geometric pattern. Conclusions These results suggest that these markers may be used in clinical practice to stratify cardiovascular risk, as well as to assess the impact of weight control programs. PMID:25993589

  8. Establishing abdominal height cut-offs and their association with conventional indices of obesity among Arab children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser; Alokail, Majed; Al-Attas, Omar; Sabico, Shaun; Kumar, Sudhesh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Obesity, particularly childhood obesity is common in the Middle East, but no studies have examined the relationship of sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) or abdominal height to conventional markers of obesity in this region. This is the first study to document the association of SAD with measures of obesity among Arab children and adolescents. METHODS: Nine hundred sixty-four Saudi children aged 5-17 years (365 prepubertal, including 146 boys and 219 girls; 249 pubertal, including 125 boys and 124 girls; and 350 postpubertal, including 198 boys and 152 girls) were included in this cross-sectional study. RESULTS: SAD was significantly correlated with indices of obesity regardless of gender, but was strongest among pubertal boys. The cut-off values were as follows: for prepubertal children, 14 cm (equivalent to 50th percentile among girls and 60th percentile among boys); for pubertal children, 15 cm for girls (30th percentile) and 16 cm for boys (50th percentile), and for postpubertal, 21.5 cm for girls (70th percentile) and 22 cm for boys (80th percentile). CONCLUSION: SAD is a reliable indicator of visceral obesity among Arab children and adolescents in particular. Prospective studies should be done to determine whether such an association translates to a promising risk factor for hard endpoints such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease. PMID:20427937

  9. [Insulin, glucose, proteins and amylase in the saliva of obese children].

    PubMed

    Kamarýt, J; Stejskal, J; Mrskos, A; Lavický, P

    1989-09-01

    The authors examined the insulin, glucose, total protein concentrations and amylase activity in the saliva of normal (n = 7) and obese subjects (n = 14) before and after a meal. The variability of the values of the investigated parameters in different subjects is considerable. During repeated examinations of the same normal subjects after a prolonged time interval the responses under similar condition in saliva is 17.7 +/- 13.8 microU/ml, when the mean maximum in the 120th minute is 24.7 +/- +13.9 microU/ml. The glucose concentration is on average 2.1 +/- 1.3 mg/dl, total protein 279.5 +/- 53.2 mg/dl and the amylase activity 226 +/- 133 thousand U/l. In the dynamics of the investigated parameters in obese subjects the concentration of insulin and the other parameters are on average higher than the maximum insulin level in normal children, and in three obese children they were more than four or five times higher. The gradual progressive hypersecretion of insulin may thus imply a disposition for type II diabetes mellitus at a later age. PMID:2478304

  10. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27050305

  11. Tyrosine Is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Longitudinal Metabolomic Profiling of Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Hellmuth, Christian; Kirchberg, Franca Fabiana; Lass, Nina; Harder, Ulrike; Peissner, Wolfgang; Koletzko, Berthold; Reinehr, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In obese children, hyperinsulinaemia induces adverse metabolic consequences related to the risk of cardiovascular and other disorders. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and acylcarnitines (Carn), involved in amino acid (AA) degradation, were linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance, but these associations yet have not been studied longitudinally in obese children. We studied 80 obese children before and after a one-year lifestyle intervention programme inducing substantial weight loss >0.5 BMI standard deviation scores in 40 children and no weight loss in another 40 children. At baseline and after the 1-year intervention, we assessed insulin resistance (HOMA index), fasting glucose, HbA1c, 2 h glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test, AA, and Carn. BMI adjusted metabolite levels were associated with clinical markers at baseline and after intervention, and changes with the intervention period were evaluated. Only tyrosine was significantly associated with HOMA (p < 0.05) at baseline and end and with change during the intervention (p < 0.05). In contrast, ratios depicting BCAA metabolism were negatively associated with HOMA at baseline (p < 0.05), but not in the longitudinal profiling. Stratified analysis revealed that the children with substantial weight loss drove this association. We conclude that tyrosine alterations in association with insulin resistance precede alteration in BCAA metabolism. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00435734. PMID:26881241

  12. The effect of acute exercise on undercarboxylated osteocalcin and insulin sensitivity in obese men.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Itamar; Jerums, George; Stepto, Nigel K; Parker, Lewan; Serpiello, Fabio R; McConell, Glenn K; Anderson, Mitchell; Hare, David L; Byrnes, Elizabeth; Ebeling, Peter R; Seeman, Ego

    2014-12-01

    Acute exercise improves insulin sensitivity for hours after the exercise is ceased. The skeleton contributes to glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity via osteocalcin (OC) in its undercarboxylated (ucOC) form in mice. We tested the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity over the hours after exercise is associated with circulating levels of ucOC. Eleven middle-aged (58.1 ± 2.2 years mean ± SEM), obese (body mass index [BMI] = 33.1 ± 1.4 kg/m(2) ) nondiabetic men completed a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp at rest (rest-control) and at 60 minutes after exercise (4 × 4 minutes of cycling at 95% of HRpeak ). Insulin sensitivity was determined by glucose infusion rate relative to body mass (GIR, mL/kg/min) as well as GIR per unit of insulin (M-value). Blood samples and five muscle biopsies were obtained; two at the resting-control session, one before and one after clamping, and three in the exercise session, at rest, 60 minutes after exercise, and after the clamp. Exercise increased serum ucOC (6.4 ± 2.1%, p = 0.013) but not total OC (p > 0.05). Blood glucose was ∼6% lower and insulin sensitivity was ∼35% higher after exercise compared with control (both p < 0.05). Phosphorylated (P)-AKT (Ak thymoma) was higher after exercise and insulin compared with exercise alone (no insulin) and insulin alone (no exercise, all p < 0.05). In a multiple-linear regression including BMI, age, and aerobic fitness, ucOC was associated with whole-body insulin sensitivity at rest (β = 0.59, p = 0.023) and after exercise (β = 0.66, p = 0.005). Insulin sensitivity, after acute exercise, is associated with circulating levels of ucOC in obese men. Whether ucOC has a direct effect on skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity after exercise is yet to be determined. PMID:24861730

  13. Circulating leptin and osteoprotegerin levels affect insulin resistance in healthy premenopausal obese women.

    PubMed

    Ugur-Altun, Betul; Altun, Armagan

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between circulating leptin and osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels and insulin resistance assessed by HOMA-IR in premenopausal obese and normal weight women. Thirty four obese women (age 31 +/- 8 years) (BMI 35 +/- 4 kg/m(2)) with 19 healthy controls (age 31 +/- 7 years) (BMI <25 kg/m(2)) (BMI 21 +/- 2 kg/m(2)) were included in the study. Women were healthy and had no osteoporosis. Circulating leptin levels were significantly higher in obese women (17.11 +/- 2.05 ng/mL vs. 8.38 +/- 4.71 ng/mL, p <0.0001) and decreased OPG levels were found (14.7 +/- 7.15 pg/mL vs. 19.17 +/- 6.37 pg/mL, p = 0.03). Leptin showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.851, p <0.0001), waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.692, p <0.0001), fasting insulin (r = 0.441, p <0.001), HOMA-IR (r = 0.412, p = 0.002), fibrinogen (r = 0.387, p = 0.004), uric acid (r = 0.293, p = 0.033), hematocrit (r = 0.394, p = 0.003), systolic (r = 0.504, p <0.0001), and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.363, p = 0.008). OPG showed a negative correlation with insulin (r = -0.341, p = 0.013) and HOMA-IR (r = -0.324, p = 0.018). In obese women group, the regression equation of HOMA-IR was (HOMA-IR = [0.095 x leptin]-[0.051 x OPG] + 1.71). However, there was no relation between leptin and OPG levels. In conclusion, circulating leptin and OPG levels were related to insulin resistance in premenopausal obese women. However, leptin had no interference in OPG in premenopausal women. PMID:17923273

  14. Obesity does not aggravate osteoporosis or osteoblastic insulin resistance in orchiectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Potikanond, Saranyapin; Rattanachote, Pinyada; Pintana, Hiranya; Suntornsaratoon, Panan; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that testosterone deprivation impairs osteoblastic insulin signaling, decreases osteoblast survival, reduces bone density, and that obesity aggravates those deleterious effects in testosterone-deprived rats. Twenty four male Wistar rats underwent either a bilateral orchiectomy (O, n=12) or a sham operation (S, n=12). Then the rats in each group were further divided into two subgroups fed with either a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HF) for 12 weeks. At the end of the protocol, blood samples were collected to determine metabolic parameters and osteocalcin ratios. The tibiae were collected to determine bone mass using microcomputed tomography and for osteoblast isolation. The results showed that rats fed with HF (sham-operated HF-fed rats (HFS) and ORX HF-fed rats (HFO)) developed peripheral insulin resistance and had decreased trabecular bone density. In ND-fed rats, only the ORX ND-fed rats (NDO) group had decreased trabecular bone density. In addition, osteoblastic insulin resistance, as indicated by a decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and Akt, were observed in all groups except the sham-operated ND-fed rats (NDS) rats. Those groups, again with the exception of the NDS rats, also had decreased osteoblastic survival. No differences in the levels of osteoblastic insulin resistance and osteoblastic survival were found among the NDO, HFS, and HFO groups. These findings suggest that either testosterone deprivation or obesity alone can impair osteoblastic insulin signaling and decrease osteoblastic survival leading to the development of osteoporosis. However, obesity does not aggravate those deleterious effects in the bone of testosterone-deprived rats. PMID:26675491

  15. Excessive Refined Carbohydrates and Scarce Micronutrients Intakes Increase Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Prepubertal and Pubertal Obese Children Independently of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    López-Alarcón, Mardia; Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Armenta-Álvarez, Andrea; Bram-Falcón, María Teresa; Mayorga-Ochoa, Marielle

    2014-01-01

    Background. Low-grade inflammation is the link between obesity and insulin resistance. Because physiologic insulin resistance occurs at puberty, obese pubertal children are at higher risk for insulin resistance. Excessive diets in refined carbohydrates and saturated fats are risk factors for insulin resistance, but calcium, magnesium, vitamin-D, and the omega-3 fatty acids likely protect against inflammation and insulin resistance. Objective. To analyze interactions among dietary saturated fat, refined carbohydrates, calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of inflammation and insulin resistance in a sample of prepubertal and pubertal children. Methods. A sample of 229 children from Mexico City was analyzed in a cross-sectional design. Anthropometric measurements, 24 h recall questionnaires, and blood samples were obtained. Serum insulin, glucose, calcium, magnesium, 25-OHD3, C-reactive protein, leptin, adiponectin, and erythrocytes fatty acids were measured. Parametric and nonparametric statistics were used for analysis. Results. While mean macronutrients intake was excessive, micronutrients intake was deficient (P < 0.01). Inflammation determinants were central obesity and magnesium-deficient diets. Determinants of insulin resistance were carbohydrates intake and circulating magnesium and adiponectin. Conclusions. Magnesium-deficient diets are determinants of inflammation, while high intake of refined carbohydrates is a risk factor for insulin resistance, independently of central adiposity. PMID:25477716

  16. Programming of Fetal Insulin Resistance in Pregnancies with Maternal Obesity by ER Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Pablo J.; Villalobos-Labra, Roberto; Farías-Jofré, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    The global epidemics of obesity during pregnancy and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) are major public health problems worldwide. Obesity and excessive GWG are related to several maternal and fetal complications, including diabetes (pregestational and gestational diabetes) and intrauterine programming of insulin resistance (IR). Maternal obesity (MO) and neonatal IR are associated with long-term development of obesity, diabetes mellitus, and increased global cardiovascular risk in the offspring. Multiple mechanisms of insulin signaling pathway impairment have been described in obese individuals, involving complex interactions of chronically elevated inflammatory mediators, adipokines, and the critical role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-dependent unfolded protein response (UPR). However, the underlying cellular processes linking MO and IR in the offspring have not been fully elucidated. Here, we summarize the state-of-the-art evidence supporting the possibility that adverse metabolic postnatal outcomes such as IR in the offspring of pregnancies with MO and/or excessive GWG may be related to intrauterine activation of ER stress response. PMID:25093191

  17. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  18. Socio-Demographic and Dietary Factors Associated with Excess Body Weight and Abdominal Obesity among Resettled Bhutanese Refugee Women in Northeast Ohio, United States

    PubMed Central

    Bhatta, Madhav P.; Assad, Lori; Shakya, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Studies of obesity and related health conditions among the Bhutanese, one of the largest refugee groups resettled in the United States in the past five years, are limited. This study examined the factors associated with excess body weight (body mass index ≥ 23 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference > 80 cm) in a community-based sample of 18–65 year old Bhutanese refugee women in Northeast Ohio. A Nepali-language questionnaire was used to measure socio-demographic and dietary factors. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured to define excess body weight and abdominal obesity. The mean (±standard deviation) age of the 108 participants was 36.5 (±12.2) years and length of time in the U.S. was 19.4 (±11.9) months. Overall, 64.8% and 69.4% of the women had excess body weight and abdominal obesity, respectively. Age was significantly associated with both excess body weight (odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.05–1.16) and abdominal obesity (1.09; 1.04–1.14). Consuming meat (4.01; 1.14–14.60) was significantly associated with excess body weight but not abdominal obesity. These findings suggest the need for lifestyle and dietary change education programs among this new and vulnerable group to reduce the prevalence of excess body weight and abdominal obesity and their health consequences. PMID:24968209

  19. Socio-demographic and dietary factors associated with excess body weight and abdominal obesity among resettled Bhutanese refugee women in Northeast Ohio, United States.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Madhav P; Assad, Lori; Shakya, Sunita

    2014-07-01

    Studies of obesity and related health conditions among the Bhutanese, one of the largest refugee groups resettled in the United States in the past five years, are limited. This study examined the factors associated with excess body weight (body mass index ≥ 23 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference > 80 cm) in a community-based sample of 18-65 year old Bhutanese refugee women in Northeast Ohio. A Nepali-language questionnaire was used to measure socio-demographic and dietary factors. Height, weight, and waist circumference were measured to define excess body weight and abdominal obesity. The mean (±standard deviation) age of the 108 participants was 36.5 (±12.2) years and length of time in the U.S. was 19.4 (±11.9) months. Overall, 64.8% and 69.4% of the women had excess body weight and abdominal obesity, respectively. Age was significantly associated with both excess body weight (odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.05-1.16) and abdominal obesity (1.09; 1.04-1.14). Consuming meat (4.01; 1.14-14.60) was significantly associated with excess body weight but not abdominal obesity. These findings suggest the need for lifestyle and dietary change education programs among this new and vulnerable group to reduce the prevalence of excess body weight and abdominal obesity and their health consequences. PMID:24968209

  20. Skeletal muscle salt inducible kinase 1 promotes insulin resistance in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Mark; Stewart-Fitzgibbon, Randi; Fu, Jingqi; Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.; Rivera-Molina, Yisel A.; Gibson, Micah; Berglund, Eric D.; Justice, Nicholas J.; Berdeaux, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Insulin resistance causes type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia due to excessive hepatic glucose production and inadequate peripheral glucose uptake. Our objectives were to test the hypothesis that the proposed CREB/CRTC2 inhibitor salt inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) contributes to whole body glucose homeostasis in vivo by regulating hepatic transcription of gluconeogenic genes and also to identify novel SIK1 actions on glucose metabolism. Methods We created conditional (floxed) SIK1-knockout mice and studied glucose metabolism in animals with global, liver, adipose or skeletal muscle Sik1 deletion. We examined cAMP-dependent regulation of SIK1 and the consequences of SIK1 depletion on primary mouse hepatocytes. We probed metabolic phenotypes in tissue-specific SIK1 knockout mice fed high fat diet through hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and biochemical analysis of insulin signaling. Results SIK1 knockout mice are viable and largely normoglycemic on chow diet. On high fat diet, global SIK1 knockout animals are strikingly protected from glucose intolerance, with both increased plasma insulin and enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity. Surprisingly, liver SIK1 is not required for regulation of CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis, despite contributions of SIK1 to hepatocyte CRTC2 and gluconeogenesis regulation ex vivo. Sik1 mRNA accumulates in skeletal muscle of obese high fat diet-fed mice, and knockout of SIK1 in skeletal muscle, but not liver or adipose tissue, improves insulin sensitivity and muscle glucose uptake on high fat diet. Conclusions SIK1 is dispensable for glycemic control on chow diet. SIK1 promotes insulin resistance on high fat diet by a cell-autonomous mechanism in skeletal muscle. Our study establishes SIK1 as a promising therapeutic target to improve skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese individuals without deleterious effects on hepatic glucose production. PMID:26844205

  1. Association of obesity risk SNPs in PCSK1 with insulin sensitivity and proinsulin conversion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prohormone convertase 1 is involved in maturation of peptides. Rare mutations in gene PCSK1, encoding this enzyme, cause childhood obesity and abnormal glucose homeostasis with elevated proinsulin concentrations. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within this gene, rs6232 and rs6235, are associated with obesity. We studied whether these SNPs influence the prediabetic traits insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, or glucose intolerance. Methods We genotyped 1498 German subjects for SNPs rs6232 and rs6235 within PCSK1. The subjects were metabolically characterized by oral glucose tolerance test with glucose, insulin, proinsulin, and C-peptide measurements. A subgroup of 512 subjects underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Results The minor allele frequencies were 25.8% for SNP rs6235 and 6.0% for rs6232. After adjustment for sex and age, we found no association of SNPs rs6235 and rs6232 with BMI or other weight-related traits (all p ≥ 0.07). Both minor alleles, adjusted for sex, age, BMI and insulin sensitivity were associated with elevated AUCproinsulin and AUCproinsulin/AUCinsulin (rs6235: padditive model ≤ 0.009, effect sizes 8/8%, rs6232: pdominant model ≤ 0.01, effect sizes 10/21%). Insulin secretion was not affected by the variants (different secretion parameters, all p ≥ 0.08). The minor allele of SNP rs6232 was additionally associated with 15% higher OGTT-derived and 19% higher clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (pdom ≤ 0.0047), 4.5% lower HOMAIR (pdom = 0.02) and 3.5% lower 120-min glucose (pdom = 0.0003) independently of BMI and proinsulin conversion. SNP rs6235 was not associated with parameters of glucose metabolism. Conclusions Like rare mutations in PCSK1, the more common variants tested determine glucose-stimulated proinsulin conversion, but not insulin secretion. In addition, rs6232, encoding the amino acid exchange N221D, influences insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. PMID:20534142

  2. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study.

    PubMed

    López-Sobaler, Ana M; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Ortega, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18-64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW) was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB) was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415-2.104; p = 0.000) and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045-1.064; p = 0.000). The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5) was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), WHtR < 0.5), whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2), WHtR ≥ 0.5). Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future. PMID:27382572

  3. Body composition and -174G/C interleukin-6 promoter gene polymorphism: association with progression of insulin resistance in normal weight obese syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, L; Bertoli, A; Bigioni, M; Del Gobbo, V; Premrov, M G; Calabrese, V; Di Daniele, N; De Lorenzo, A

    2008-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are intimately related to a chronic low grade systemic inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) may influence the pathogenesis of obesity-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of body's fat mass on the relationships between -174G/C IL-6 promoter gene polymorphism, IL-6 circulating level and insulin resistance. A population of 150 Caucasian women was studied, subdivided according to their body composition in non-obese (NW), Normal Weight Obese (NWO) and preobese-obese (OB). The NWO subjects were found in an intermediate position between the NW and OB subjects in terms of body weight, fat mass percentage (FM%), abdominal FAT%, hs-CRP and plasma triglyceride level. Fasting plasma IL-6 concentration was positively correlated with the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in all subjects analyzed (P=0.0014). In NWO and OB women a significantly increased IL-6 mean value was observed compared with NW subjects. In G/G population, the IL-6 plasma level of NWO and OB was significantly higher with respect to NW. No significant differences of IL-6 concentrations were observed in the three groups carrying G/C genotype. NWO and OB women homozygous for the allele C have significantly lower value of IL-6 with respect to NW subjects. IL-6 concentration was positively correlated with FM% in G/G (R(2)=0.397, P<0.001) and was negatively correlated in C/C (R(2)=0.459, P=0.002). No significant correlation was observed in G/C genotype (R(2)=0.041, P=0.173). In conclusion our study confirms that, at least in Italian Caucasian females, the FM% is a major determinant of an increase in IL-6 production and insulin resistance. -174 G/C IL-6 promoter polymorphism represents a marker which could help to identify, time in advance, "vulnerable" individuals at risk of age and obesity related diseases. PMID:18991689

  4. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity. PMID:27000941

  5. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity. PMID:27000941

  6. Obesity increases the odds of acquiring and incarcerating noninguinal abdominal wall hernias.

    PubMed

    Lau, Briana; Kim, Hanjoo; Haigh, Philip I; Tejirian, Talar

    2012-10-01

    The current data available describing the relationship of obesity and abdominal wall hernias is sparse. The objective of this study was to investigate the current prevalence of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias and their correlation with body mass index (BMI) and other demographic risk factors. Patients with umbilical, incisional, ventral, epigastric, or Spigelian hernias with or without incarceration were identified using the regional database for 14 hospitals over a 3-year period. Patients were stratified based on their BMI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish other significant risk factors associated with the hernias. Of 2,807,414 patients, 26,268 (0.9%) had one of the specified diagnoses. Average age of the patients was 52 years and 61 per cent were male. The majority of patients had nonincarcerated umbilical hernias (74%). Average BMI was 32 kg/m2. Compared with patients with a normal BMI, the odds of having a hernia increased with BMI: BMI of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 odds ratio (OR) 1.63, BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m2 OR 2.62, BMI 40 to 49.9 kg/m2 OR 3.91, BMI 50 to 59.9 kg/m2 OR 4.85, and BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 OR 5.17 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years was associated with a higher risk for having a hernia (OR, 2.12; 95% [CI], 2.07 to 2.17), whereas female gender was associated with a lower risk (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.55). Those with incarcerated hernias had a higher average BMI (32 kg/m2 vs 35 kg/m2; P<0.0001). Overall, BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 showed an increased chance of incarceration, and a BMI greater than 60 kg/m2 had the highest chance of incarceration, OR 12.7 (P<0.0001). Age older than 50 years and female gender were also associated with a higher risk of incarceration (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.59 and OR, 1.80; CI, 1.45 to 2.24). Increasing BMI and increasing age are associated with a higher prevalence and an increased risk of incarceration of noninguinal abdominal wall hernias. PMID:23025954

  7. Association of Rotating Night Shift Work with BMI and Abdominal Obesity among Nurses and Midwives

    PubMed Central

    Peplonska, Beata; Bukowska, Agnieszka; Sobala, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Background Mounting epidemiological evidence suggests that night shift work may contribute to the etiology of increased body weight. The present study aimed to examine association between rotating night shift work and body mass index (BMI), and abdominal adiposity respectively among nurses and midwives. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 724 female nurses and midwives, aged 40-60 years (354 rotating night shift and 370 daytime workers) in Łódź, Poland, between 2008 and 2011. Information about occupational history and potential confounders was collected during personal interviews. Anthropometric measurements of body weight, height, waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumference were made, and body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. GLM regression models and multinomial logit regression models were fitted to explore the association between night shift work and anthropometric parameters, with adjustment for age, body silhouette at age 20, current smoking status, packyears, marital status, and menopausal hormone therapy use. Results Cumulative night shift work showed significant associations with BMI, WC, HC and WHtR, with BMI increasing by 0.477 kg/m2 per 1000 night duties and by 0.432 kg/m2 per 10000 night shift hours, WC increasing respectively by 1.089 cm and 0.99 cm, and HC by 0.72 cm and WHtR by 0.007 cm for both metrics. Both current and cumulative night work was associated with obesity (BMI≥30kg/m2), with OR=3.9 (95%CI:1.5-9.9), in women reporting eight or more night shifts per month. Conclusion The results of the study support the previously reported relations between night shift work and development of obesity. PMID:26196859

  8. Effect of obesity and type 2 diabetes on protein anabolic response to insulin in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jessica; Chevalier, Stéphanie; Gougeon, Réjeanne; Goulet, Éric D B; Morais, José A

    2015-09-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have been shown to alter the insulin sensitivity of glucose and protein metabolism in middle-aged women. We aimed to determine whether these findings translate to the elderly who are at increased risk of muscle loss. We assessed whole-body protein (1-(13)C-leucine) and glucose (3-(3)H-glucose) kinetics in 10 healthy (age: 71.6±1.8years; BMI: 23.2±0.8kg/m(2)), 8 obese (age: 72.9±1.3; BMI: 33.1±1.0) and 8 obese well-controlled type 2 diabetic (age: 69.8±1.6; BMI: 34.4±1.5) elderly women in the postabsorptive state and during a hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic, isoaminoacidemic clamp. All subjects followed an isoenergetic, protein-controlled diet for 6days preceding the clamp. The net protein anabolic response to hyperinsulinemia was similarly blunted in obese (0.08±0.06) and obese type 2 diabetic women (0.06±0.04) compared to healthy women (0.24±0.05μmol·kg fat free mass(-1)·min(-1); ANOVA p=0.018). In contrast, the insulin-mediated glucose disposal (healthy: 9.72±0.67) was decreased with obesity (6.96±0.86) and further with diabetes (5.23±0.27mg·kg fat free mass(-1)·min(-1); ANOVA p<0.001). Endogenous glucose production was not completely suppressed during the clamp only in diabetic women. Thus, the glucose infusion rate was the lowest in this group. Obese elderly women with and without type 2 diabetes have a similar degree of insulin resistance of protein anabolism, despite worse glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. Similar to previous findings in middle-aged women, obesity exerted a blunting effect on protein anabolism, which may contribute to the development of sarcopenic obesity. Our results suggest that the presence of type 2 diabetes at an advancing age does not further aggravate this effect. PMID:26068615

  9. Association Between Thyrotropin Levels and Insulin Sensitivity in Euthyroid Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Asma; Balagopal, P. Babu; Vella, Adrian; Fischer, Philip R.; Piccinini, Francesca; Dalla Man, Chiara; Cobelli, Claudio; Giesler, Paula D.; Laugen, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyrotropin (TSH) levels display a positive association with body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of isolated hyperthyrotropinemia is higher in obese adolescents compared to their normal weight controls. However, the metabolic significance of the higher TSH in obese adolescents is less clear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between TSH concentrations and insulin sensitivity, lipids, and adipokines in euthyroid, non-diabetic, obese adolescents. Methods: Thirty-six euthyroid, non-diabetic, obese adolescents between the ages of 12 and 18 years underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Insulin sensitivity (Si) and pancreatic β-cell function as assessed by disposition index (DI) were measured using the oral glucose minimal model approach. Cholesterol (total, low-density lipoprotein [LDL-C], and high-density lipoprotein [HDL-C]), triglycerides (TG), interleukin-6 (IL-6), total and high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were also determined. Associations between measures of thyroid function and Si, DI, lipids, and adipokines were computed using Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 14.3±1.88 years, and the mean BMI was 32.5±4.65 kg/m2; 97% were non-Hispanic white and 47% were male. The mean TSH was 2.7±1.2 mIU/L. Increasing serum TSH was correlated with decreasing Si (log Si) in the entire cohort (p=0.03), but this relationship persisted only in males (p=0.02). The correlation between TSH and Si in males remained significant after adjusting for BMI (p=0.02). There was no correlation between TSH and pancreatic β-cell function as assessed by DI (p=0.48). TSH correlated positively with LDL-C (p=0.04) and IL-6 (p=0.03), but these associations vanished or weakened after adjusting for BMI (LDL-C p-value=0.44; IL-6 p-value=0.07). Conclusions: This study suggests a sex-specific association between TSH and insulin

  10. Chromium picolinate improves insulin sensitivity in obese subjects with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lydic, Michael L; McNurlan, Margaret; Bembo, Shirley; Mitchell, Lina; Komaroff, Eugene; Gelato, Marie

    2006-07-01

    Trivalent chromium (1000 microg), as chromium picolinate, given without change in diet or activity level, caused a 38% mean improvement in glucose disposal rate in five obese subjects with polycystic ovary syndrome who were tested with a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. This suggests that chromium picolinate, an over-the-counter dietary product, may be useful as an insulin sensitizer in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:16730719

  11. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: The Molecular Connectivity between Insulin Resistance, Obesity, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Keane, Kevin N.; Cruzat, Vinicius F.; Medic, Sandra; Sabale, Miheer; Rowles, Joanne; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Martins, Ralph N.; Fraser, Paul E.; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and insulin resistance are age-related conditions and increased prevalence is of public concern. Recent research has provided evidence that insulin resistance and impaired insulin signalling may be a contributory factor to the progression of diabetes, dementia, and other neurological disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common subtype of dementia. Reduced release (for T2DM) and decreased action of insulin are central to the development and progression of both T2DM and AD. A literature search was conducted to identify molecular commonalities between obesity, diabetes, and AD. Insulin resistance affects many tissues and organs, either through impaired insulin signalling or through aberrant changes in both glucose and lipid (cholesterol and triacylglycerol) metabolism and concentrations in the blood. Although epidemiological and biological evidence has highlighted an increased incidence of cognitive decline and AD in patients with T2DM, the common molecular basis of cell and tissue dysfunction is rapidly gaining recognition. As a cause or consequence, the chronic inflammatory response and oxidative stress associated with T2DM, amyloid-β (Aβ) protein accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction link T2DM and AD. PMID:26693205

  12. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: The Molecular Connectivity between Insulin Resistance, Obesity, and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Keane, Kevin N; Cruzat, Vinicius F; Medic, Sandra; Sabale, Miheer; Rowles, Joanne; Wijesekara, Nadeeja; Martins, Ralph N; Fraser, Paul E; Newsholme, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and insulin resistance are age-related conditions and increased prevalence is of public concern. Recent research has provided evidence that insulin resistance and impaired insulin signalling may be a contributory factor to the progression of diabetes, dementia, and other neurological disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common subtype of dementia. Reduced release (for T2DM) and decreased action of insulin are central to the development and progression of both T2DM and AD. A literature search was conducted to identify molecular commonalities between obesity, diabetes, and AD. Insulin resistance affects many tissues and organs, either through impaired insulin signalling or through aberrant changes in both glucose and lipid (cholesterol and triacylglycerol) metabolism and concentrations in the blood. Although epidemiological and biological evidence has highlighted an increased incidence of cognitive decline and AD in patients with T2DM, the common molecular basis of cell and tissue dysfunction is rapidly gaining recognition. As a cause or consequence, the chronic inflammatory response and oxidative stress associated with T2DM, amyloid-β (Aβ) protein accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction link T2DM and AD. PMID:26693205

  13. Influence of elevated liver fat on circulating adipocytokines and insulin resistance in obese Hispanic adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. S.; Lê, K.-A.; Mahurkar, S.; Davis, J. N.; Goran, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective We performed this study to examine the metabolic differences arising from higher liver fat accumulation in obese Hispanic adolescents, with a particular focus on circulating levels of adipocytokines and insulin resistance. Methods Forty-one obese Hispanic adolescents (15.3 ± 1.0 years, body mass index percentile: 97.0 ± 3.9) were assessed for: visceral adipose tissue (VAT), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and hepatic fat fraction (HFF) by magnetic resonance imaging; fasting measures of serum glucose, insulin and adipocytokines; homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR); and insulin sensitivity (SI) and the acute insulin response to glucose (AIR) by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Subjects with normal levels of HFF (below 5%; n = 25) were compared to those with HFF > 5% (n = 16). Results The two groups differing in HFF were similar for total body fat, VAT and SAT. The group with HFF > 5% had significantly (P < 0.05) higher interleukin-8 (IL-8) (6.1 ± 1.6 vs. 3.2 ± 0.4 pg mL−1), NGF (30.2 ± 9.9 vs. 13.9 ± 1.6 pg mL−1), HOMA-IR (8.8 ± 1.1 vs. 5.5 ± 0.5), AIR (1869 ± 206 vs. 1092 ± 165) and a tendency for lower SI (1.2 ± 0.4 vs. 2.1 ± 0.3; P = 0.06), with no significant differences in any of other factors measured. Conclusions These data suggest that elevated liver fat is most closely associated with elevated serum IL-8 and NGF levels as well as increased AIR and HOMA-IR. These elevated factors may play significant roles in the metabolic abnormalities associated with elevated liver fat in obese Hispanics. PMID:22434756

  14. ATF7 ablation prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Maekawa, Toshio; Yoshida, Keisuke; Furuse, Tamio; Kaneda, Hideki; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2016-09-16

    The activating transcription factor (ATF)2 family of transcription factors regulates a variety of metabolic processes, including adipogenesis and adaptive thermogenesis. ATF7 is a member of the ATF2 family, and mediates epigenetic changes induced by environmental stresses, such as social isolation and pathogen infection. However, the metabolic role of ATF7 remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the role of ATF7 in metabolism using ATF7-dificeint mice. Atf7(-/-) mice exhibited lower body weight and resisted diet-induced obesity. Serum triglycerides, resistin, and adipose tissue mass were all significantly lower in ATF7-deficient mice. Fasting glucose levels and glucose tolerance were unaltered, but systemic insulin sensitivity was increased, by ablation of ATF7. Indirect calorimetry revealed that oxygen consumption by Atf7(-/-) mice was comparable to that of wild-type littermates on a standard chow diet, but increased energy expenditure was observed in Atf7(-/-) mice on a high-fat diet. Hence, ATF7 ablation may impair the development and function of adipose tissue and result in elevated energy expenditure in response to high-fat-feeding obesity and insulin resistance, indicating that ATF7 is a potential therapeutic target for diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27498002

  15. A Study of Physicochemical Properties of Subcutaneous Fat of the Abdomen and its Implication in Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pramod; Kodavoor, Srinivas Aithal; Kotian, Sushma Rama; Yathdaka, Sudhakar Narahari; Nayak, Dayanand; Souza, Anne D; Souza, Antony Sylvan D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The lower abdominal obesity is more resistant to absorption as compared to that of upper abdomen. Differences in the physicochemical properties of the subcutaneous fat of the upper and lower abdomen may be responsible for this variation. There is paucity of the scientific literature on the physicochemical properties of the subcutaneous fat of abdomen. Aim The present study was undertaken to create a database of physicochemical properties of abdominal subcutaneous fat. Materials and Methods The samples of subcutaneous fat from upper and lower abdomen were collected from 40 fresh autopsied bodies (males 33, females 7). The samples were prepared for physicochemical analysis using organic and inorganic solvents. Various physicochemical properties of the fat samples analysed were surface tension, viscosity, specific gravity, specific conductivity, iodine value and thermal properties. Data was analysed by paired and independent sample t-tests. Results There was a statistically significant difference in all the physicochemical parameters between males and females except surface tension (organic) and surface tension (inorganic) of upper abdominal fat, and surface tension (organic) of lower abdominal fat. In males, viscosity of upper abdominal fat was more compared to that of lower abdomen (both organic and inorganic) unlike the specific conductivity that was higher for the lower abdominal fat as compared to that of the upper abdomen. In females there were statistically significant higher values of surface tension (inorganic) and specific gravity (organic) of the upper abdomen fat as compared to that of lower abdomen. The initial and final weight loss of the lower abdominal fat as indicated by Thermo Gravimetric Analysis was significantly more in males than in female Conclusion The difference in the physicochemical properties of subcutaneous fat between upper and lower abdomen and between males and females could be responsible for the variant behaviour of

  16. Supplemental arginine above the requirement during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats.

    PubMed

    Otani, Lila; Mori, Tomomi; Koyama, Ayaka; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Nutrition in early life is important in determining susceptibility to adult obesity, and arginine may promote growth acceleration in infants. We hypothesized that maternal arginine supplementation may promote growth in their pups and contribute to obesity and alteration of the metabolic system in later life. Dams and pups of Wistar rats were given a normal diet (15% protein) as a control (CN) or a normal diet with 2% arginine (ARG). Altered profiles of free amino acids in breast milk were observed in that the concentrations of threonine and glycine were lower in the ARG dams compared with the CN dams. The offspring of the CN and ARG dams were further subdivided into normal-diet (CN-CN and ARG-CN) groups and a high fat-diet groups (CN-HF and ARG-HF). In response to the high fat-diet feeding, the visceral fat deposits were significantly increased in the ARG-HF group (although not compared with the CN-HF group); no difference was observed between the CN-CN and ARG-CN groups. The blood glucose and insulin levels after glucose loading were significantly higher in the ARG-HF group compared with the CN-HF group. The results suggest that the offspring of dams supplemented with arginine during lactation acquired increased susceptibility to a high-fat diet, resulting in visceral obesity and insulin resistance. The lower supply of threonine and glycine to pups may be one of the contributing causes to the programming of lifelong obesity risk in offspring. Our findings also indicated that maternal arginine supplementation during suckling causes obesity and insulin resistance in rats. PMID:27188903

  17. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Ayumi; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Masuda, Katsuhisa; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki; Seino, Susumu; Ogawa, Wataru; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-03-13

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets.

  18. Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome in Morbidly Obese Patients Following Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eidy, Mohammad; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Raygan, Fahimeh; Ariyazand, Yazdan; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Jesmi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGBP) is one of the most common bariatric surgeries, which is being performed using various techniques like gastrojejunostomy by hand swen, linear or circular stapler. Abdominal pain is a common complaint following laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure (LGBP), which has different aetiologies, such as overeating, adhesion, internal herniation, bile reflux and many more. In this study LGBP was performed in an ante-colic ante-gastric pattern in a double loop manner and the prevalence and distribution of pain in morbidly obese patients undergoing LGBP was assessed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and frequency of post LGBP pain in morbidly obese patients. Patients and Methods: This study was performed on 190 morbidly obese patients referred to Hazrat Rasoul Hospital in Tehran. After LGBP, pain was measured in the following intervals: 24 hours, one week and one month after the operation. Before the operation onset, 2 mg Keflin and 5000 IU subcutaneous heparin were administered as prophylaxis. LGBP was performed using five ports including: one 11 mm port was placed 15-20 cm far from the xiphoid, one 12-mm port in mid-clavicular line at the level of camera port, one 5-mm port in subcostal area in ante-axillary region in the left, another 5-mm port in the right mid-clavicular area and a 5-mm port in sub-xyphoid. All operations were done by the same team. Staple was used for all anastomoses and hand sewn technique to close the staple insertion site. The mesenteric defect was left open and no effort was made to repair it. Results: The results of this study showed that 99.94 % of the patients had complains of pain in the first 24 hours of post operation, about 60% after one week and 29.5 % still had pain after one month. In addition, left upper quadrant (LUQ) was found to be the most prevalent site for the pain in 53.7% of the patients in the first 24 hours, 59.6% after one week and 16.8% after

  19. The Frequency and Risk Factors of Colorectal Adenoma in Health-Check-up Subjects in South Korea: Relationship to Abdominal Obesity and Age

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Seong; Moon, Hong Ju; Baek, Eun Kyung; Lee, Seung Young; Cha, Bong Ki; Lee, Hyun Woong; Kim, Hyung Joon; Do, Jae Hyuk; Chang, Sae Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Obesity is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. However, there is a lack of information about the relationship between obesity and colorectal adenoma. We investigated whether general and abdominal obesity are risk factors for colorectal adenoma. Methods Subjects who received health check-ups, including colonoscopy, from April 2006 to September 2007 in Chung-Ang University Hospital were included (n=1,316). The frequency and characteristics of colorectal adenomas were analyzed according to demographic features, past history, blood tests, body mass index, and components of metabolic syndrome. Abdominal obesity was defined as a waist circumference of ≥80 cm in women and ≥90 cm in men. Results The sex ratio of the subjects was 1.9:1 (male:female) and their age was 47.7±10.0 years (mean±SD). In univariate analysis, abdominal obesity was significantly associated with the frequency of colorectal adenoma (26.5% "yes" vs 16.9% "no"; p<0.001). The frequency of colorectal adenoma was significantly higher among males, older patients, current smokers, and subjects with fasting hyperglycemia (≥100 mg/dL) or fatty liver (p<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified that male sex (odds ratio [OR], 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.2), old age (age ≥60 years; OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 3.5-12.5), and abdominal obesity (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.2) were independent risk factors for colorectal adenoma (p<0.05). The frequency of multiple adenomas (more than two sites) was also significantly higher in subjects with abdominal obesity. However, the effect of abdominal obesity on the development of colorectal adenoma decreased in elderly people. Conclusions Abdominal obesity is an independent risk factor for colorectal adenoma and its multiplicity, especially in younger people in South Korea. PMID:20479911

  20. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E (VE) and vitamin C (VC) blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial (MT) function and induces insulin resistance ...

  1. Effects of a multidisciplinary body weight reduction program on static and dynamic thoraco-abdominal volumes in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    LoMauro, Antonella; Cesareo, Ambra; Agosti, Fiorenza; Tringali, Gabriella; Salvadego, Desy; Grassi, Bruno; Sartorio, Alessandro; Aliverti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize static and dynamic thoraco-abdominal volumes in obese adolescents and to test the effects of a 3-week multidisciplinary body weight reduction program (MBWRP), entailing an energy-restricted diet, psychological and nutritional counseling, aerobic physical activity, and respiratory muscle endurance training (RMET), on these parameters. Total chest wall (VCW), pulmonary rib cage (VRC,p), abdominal rib cage (VRC,a), and abdominal (VAB) volumes were measured on 11 male adolescents (Tanner stage: 3-5; BMI standard deviation score: >2; age: 15.9 ± 1.3 years; percent body fat: 38.4%) during rest, inspiratory capacity (IC) maneuver, and incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer at baseline and after 3 weeks of MBWRP. At baseline, the progressive increase in tidal volume was achieved by an increase in end-inspiratory VCW (p < 0.05) due to increases in VRC,p and VRC,a with constant VAB. End-expiratory VCW decreased with late increasing VRC,p, dynamically hyperinflating VRC,a (p < 0.05), and progressively decreasing VAB (p < 0.05). After MBWRP, weight loss was concentrated in the abdomen and total IC decreased. During exercise, abdominal rib cage hyperinflation was delayed and associated with 15% increased performance and reduced dyspnea at high workloads (p < 0.05) without ventilatory and metabolic changes. We conclude that otherwise healthy obese adolescents adopt a thoraco-abdominal operational pattern characterized by abdominal rib cage hyperinflation as a form of lung recruitment during incremental cycle exercise. Additionally, a short period of MBWRP including RMET is associated with improved exercise performance, lung and chest wall volume recruitment, unloading of respiratory muscles, and reduced dyspnea. PMID:27175804

  2. General and abdominal obesity and risk of esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Annika; Huerta, José-Maria; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; May, Anne M; Siersema, Peter D; Kaaks, Rudolf; Neamat-Allah, Jasmine; Pala, Valeria; Panico, Salvatore; Saieva, Calogero; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Ardanaz, Eva; Quirós, J Ramón; Ohlsson, Bodil; Johansson, Mattias; Wallner, Bengt; Overvad, Kim; Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Fagherazzi, Guy; Racine, Antoine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Key, Tim J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ferrari, Pietro; Freisling, Heinz; Lu, Yunxia; Riboli, Elio; Cross, Amanda J; Gonzalez, Carlos A; Boeing, Heiner

    2015-08-01

    General obesity, as reflected by BMI, is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a suspected risk factor for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCC) and appears unrelated to gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCC). How abdominal obesity, as commonly measured by waist circumference (WC), relates to these cancers remains largely unexplored. Using measured anthropometric data from 391,456 individuals from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study and 11 years of follow-up, we comprehensively assessed the association of anthropometric measures with risk of EAC, GCC and GNCC using multivariable proportional hazards regression. One hundred twenty-four incident EAC, 193 GCC and 224 GNCC were accrued. After mutual adjustment, BMI was unrelated to EAC, while WC showed a strong positive association (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.19; 95% CI, 0.63-2.22 and HR = 3.76; 1.72-8.22, respectively). Hip circumference (HC) was inversely related to EAC after controlling for WC, while WC remained positively associated (HR = 0.35; 0.18-0.68, and HR=4.10; 1.94-8.63, respectively). BMI was not associated with GCC or GNCC. WC was related to higher risks of GCC after adjustment for BMI and more strongly after adjustment for HC (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 1.91; 1.09-3.37, and HR = 2.23; 1.28-3.90, respectively). Our study demonstrates that abdominal, rather than general, obesity is an indisputable risk factor for EAC and also provides evidence for a protective effect of gluteofemoral (subcutaneous) adipose tissue in EAC. Our study further shows that general obesity is not a risk factor for GCC and GNCC, while the role of abdominal obesity in GCC needs further investigation. PMID:25598323

  3. Artemisia extracts activate PPARγ, promote adipogenesis, and enhance insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue of obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Allison J.; Burris, Thomas P.; Sanchez-Infantes, David; Wang, Yongjun; Ribnicky, David M.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Studies have shown that the inability of adipose tissue to properly expand during the obese state or respond to insulin can lead to metabolic dysfunction. Artemisia is a diverse group of plants that has a history of medicinal use. This study examines the ability of ethanolic extracts of Artemisia scoparia (SCO) and Artemisia santolinifolia (SAN) to modulate adipocyte development in cultured adipocytes and white adipose tissue (WAT) function in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Research Design & Procedures Adipogenesis was assessed using Oil Red O staining and immunoblotting. A nuclear receptor specificity assay was used to examine the specificity of SCO- and SAN-induced PPARγ activation. C57BL/6J mice, fed a high-fat diet, were gavaged with saline, SCO, or SAN for 2 weeks. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was examined using insulin tolerance tests. WAT depots were assessed via immunoblotting for markers of insulin action and adipokine production. Results We established that SCO and SAN were highly specific activators of PPARγ and did not activate other nuclear receptors. After a one-week daily gavage, SCO- and SAN-treated mice had lower insulin-induced glucose disposal rates than control mice. At the end of the 2-week treatment period, SCO- and SAN-treated mice had enhanced insulin-responsive Akt serine-473 phosphorylation and significantly decreased MCP-1 levels in visceral WAT relative to control mice; these differences were depot specific. Moreover, plasma adiponectin levels were increased following SCO treatment. Conclusion Overall, these studies demonstrate that extracts from two Artemisia species can have metabolically favorable effects on adipocytes and WAT. PMID:24985103

  4. Fluctuations in the affinity and concentration of insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients: effects of starvation, refeeding, and dieting.

    PubMed Central

    Bar, R S; Gorden, P; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; De Meyts, P

    1976-01-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients and normal volunteers has been determined under various dietary states. In the basal, fed state the monocytes of obese patients with clinical insulin resistance (n= 6) bound less insulin than normals (n =10) because of a decrease in insulin receptor concentration (obese = 6,000-13,000 sites per monocyte versus normals 15,000-28,000 sites per monocyte). The single obese patient without evidence of clinical insulin resistance demonstrated normal binding of insulin with 16,000 sites per monocyte. In all patients, the total receptor concentration was inversely related to the circulating levels of insulin measured at rest after an overnight fast. For the obese patients with basally depressed insulin binding, a 48-72-h fast lowered circulating insulin and increased binding to normal levels but only at low hormone concentrations; this limited normalization of 125I-insulin binding was associated with increased receptor affinity for insulin without change in receptor concentration. Refeeding after the acute fasting periods resulted in return to the elevated plasma insulin levels, the basal receptor affinity, and the depressed insulin binding observed in the basal, fed state. Chronic diet restored plasma insulin levels, insulin binding, and receptor concentration to normal without change in affinity. When the data from this study are coupled with previous in vivo and in vitro findings they suggest that the insulin receptor of human monocytes is more sensitive to regulation by ambient insulin than the receptors of obese mice and cultured human lymphocytes. The results further indicate than an insulin receptor undergoes in vivo modulation of its interaction with insulin by changing receptor concentration and by altering the affinity of existing receptors. Images PMID:993336

  5. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  6. Obesity, insulin resistance, adipocytokines and breast cancer: New biomarkers and attractive therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Dalamaga, Maria

    2013-08-20

    Worldwide, breast cancer (BC) represents the most common type of non-skin human malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths amid women in Western countries. Obesity and its metabolic complications have rapidly become major global health issues and are associated with increased risk for cancer, especially BC in postmenopausal women. Adipose tissue is considered as a genuine endocrine organ secreting a variety of bioactive adipokines, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin and nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase/visfatin. Recent evidence has indicated that the constellation of obesity, insulin resistance and adipokines is associated with the risk and prognosis of postmenopausal BC. Direct evidence is growing rapidly supporting the stimulating and/or inhibiting role of adipokines in the process of development and progression of BC. Adipokines could exert their effects on the normal and neoplastic mammary tissue by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine mechanisms. Recent studies support a role of adipokines as novel risk factors and potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in BC. This editorial aims at providing important insights into the potential pathophysiological mechanisms linking adipokines to the etiopathogenesis of BC in the context of a dysfunctional adipose tissue and insulin resistance in obesity. A better understanding of these mechanisms may be important for the development of attractive preventive and therapeutic strategies against obesity-related breast malignancy. PMID:24520544

  7. Islet adaptation to obesity and insulin resistance in WNIN/GR-Ob rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Himadri; Ganneru, Sireesha; Malakapalli, Venkata; Chalasani, Maniprabha; Nappanveettil, Giridharan; Bhonde, Ramesh R; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    WNIN/GR-Ob mutant rat is a novel animal model to study metabolic syndrome (obesity, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular diseases). We have investigated the islet characteristics of obese mutants at different age groups (1, 6 and 12 months) to assess the islet changes in response to early and chronic metabolic stress. Our data demonstrates altered islet cell morphology and function (hypertrophy, fibrotic lesions, vacuolation, decreased stimulation index, increased TNFα, ROS and TBARS levels) in mutants as compared to controls. Furthermore, network analysis (gene-gene interaction) studied in pancreas demonstrated increased inflammation as a key factor underlying obesity/metabolic syndrome in mutants. These observations pave way to explore this model to understand islet adaptation in response to metabolic syndrome. PMID:25833252

  8. KSR2 Mutations Are Associated with Obesity, Insulin Resistance, and Impaired Cellular Fuel Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Laura R.; Atanassova, Neli; Banton, Matthew C.; Bottomley, Bill; van der Klaauw, Agatha A.; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Hendricks, Audrey; Keogh, Julia M.; Henning, Elana; Doree, Deon; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Garg, Sumedha; Bochukova, Elena G.; Bounds, Rebecca; Ashford, Sofie; Gayton, Emma; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Shield, Julian P.H.; Crowne, Elizabeth; Barford, David; Wareham, Nick J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Murphy, Michael P.; Powell, David R.; Barroso, Ines; Farooqi, I. Sadaf

    2013-01-01

    Summary Kinase suppressor of Ras 2 (KSR2) is an intracellular scaffolding protein involved in multiple signaling pathways. Targeted deletion of Ksr2 leads to obesity in mice, suggesting a role in energy homeostasis. We explored the role of KSR2 in humans by sequencing 2,101 individuals with severe early-onset obesity and 1,536 controls. We identified multiple rare variants in KSR2 that disrupt signaling through the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and impair cellular fatty acid oxidation and glucose oxidation in transfected cells; effects that can be ameliorated by the commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug, metformin. Mutation carriers exhibit hyperphagia in childhood, low heart rate, reduced basal metabolic rate and severe insulin resistance. These data establish KSR2 as an important regulator of energy intake, energy expenditure, and substrate utilization in humans. Modulation of KSR2-mediated effects may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for obesity and type 2 diabetes. PaperFlick PMID:24209692

  9. Evaluation of Nerve Conduction Studies in Obese Children With Insulin Resistance or Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Aydin, Murat; Ozyürek, Hamit; Tilki, Hacer Erdem

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate nerve conduction studies in terms of neuropathic characteristics in obese patients who were in prediabetes stage and also to determine the abnormal findings. The study included 69 obese adolescent patients between April 2009 and December 2010. All patients and control group underwent motor (median, ulnar, tibial, and peroneal) and sensory (median, ulnar, sural, and medial plantar) nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. Sensory response amplitude of the medial plantar nerve was significantly lower in the patients with impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. To our knowledge, the present study is the first study demonstrating the development of sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to metabolic complications of obesity in adolescent children even in the period without development of diabetes mellitus. We recommend that routine electrophysiological examinations be performed, using medial plantar nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. PMID:25342307

  10. Correlates of Adverse Outcomes in Abdominally Obese Individuals: Findings from the Five-Year Followup of the Population-Based Study of Health in Pomerania

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nele; Schneider, Harald J.; John, Ulrich; Dörr, Marcus; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Völker, Uwe; Wallaschofski, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Background. Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and premature death. However, it has not been resolved which factors predispose for the development of these adverse obesity-related outcomes in otherwise healthy individuals with abdominal obesity. Methods. We studied 1,506 abdominal obese individuals (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥ 0.5) free of CVD or T2DM from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania and assessed the incidence of CVD or T2DM after a five-year followup. Logistic regression models were adjusted for major cardiovascular risk factors and liver, kidney diseases, and sociodemographic status. Results. During follow-up time, we observed 114 and 136 new T2DM and CVD cases, respectively. Regression models identified age, waist circumference, serum glucose, and liver disease as predictors of T2DM. Regarding CVD, only age, unemployment, and a divorced or widowed marital status were significantly associated with incident CVD. In this subgroup of obese individuals blood pressure, serum glucose, or lipids did not influence incidence of T2DM or CVD. Conclusion. We identified various factors associated with an increased risk of incident T2DM and CVD among abdominally obese individuals. These findings may improve the detection of high-risk individuals and help to advance prevention strategies in abdominal obesity. PMID:24191195

  11. Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Mancuso, Jordan E.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633 PMID:27258098

  12. Evaluation of neck circumference as a predictor of central obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuhong; Zhang, Ning; Yu, Caiguo; Ji, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate whether neck circumference (NC) could be used as a valid and effective method for identifying obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in Chinese adults. Methods: A total of 3307 adults aged 20-65 years were randomly recruited from two communities of Tongzhou, Beijing. Height, weight, waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), neck circumference (NC), blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), total cholesterol (TC), serum triglyceride (TG), High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and Urinary albumin (UAlb) were measured. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to explore the relationship between NC and other measurements. Furthermore, the best cutoff values of NC for central obesity identification were determined by applying the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: NC correlated positively with BMI, SBP and WC In both sexes. Both WC and NC correlated significantly positively with IR. A positive correlation between NC and FPG as well as a negative correlation between NC and HDL were found in obese men. NC≥38.5 cm for men and ≥34.5 cm for women were determined to be the best cutoff levels for identifying subjects with central obesity, with 82.9% accuracy for men and 79.9% accuracy for women. Conclusions: NC correlated positively with BMI and WC in both genders, indicating that NC could be used as a valid marker for both overall obesity and central obesity. In addition, measuring NC was shown to be a useful test for IR identification. Large number of NC is suggested to be associated with high risk of developing metabolic disorders, such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:26770540

  13. Decline in Physical Fitness From Childhood to Adulthood Associated With Increased Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Terence; Magnussen, Costan G.; Schmidt, Michael D.; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Raitakari, Olli T.; Zimmet, Paul Z.; Blair, Steven N.; Thomson, Russell; Cleland, Verity J.; Venn, Alison

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine how fitness in both childhood and adulthood is associated with adult obesity and insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A prospective cohort study set in Australia in 2004–2006 followed up a cohort of 647 adults who had participated in the Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey in 1985 and who had undergone anthropometry and cardiorespiratory fitness assessment during the survey. Outcome measures were insulin resistance and obesity, defined as a homeostasis model assessment index above the 75th sex-specific percentile and BMI ≥30 kg/m2, respectively. RESULTS Lower levels of child cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with increased odds of adult obesity (adjusted odds ratio [OR] per unit decrease 3.0 [95% CI 1.6–5.6]) and insulin resistance (1.7 [1.1–2.6]). A decline in fitness level between childhood and adulthood was associated with increased obesity (4.5 [2.6–7.7]) and insulin resistance (2.1 [1.5–2.9]) per unit decline. CONCLUSIONS A decline in fitness from childhood to adulthood, and by inference a decline in physical activity, is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in adulthood. Programs aimed at maintaining high childhood physical activity levels into adulthood may have potential for reducing the burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes in adults. PMID:19106381

  14. Long-term ingestion of monosodium L-glutamate did not induce obesity, dyslipidemia or insulin resistance: a two-generation study in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Smriga, Miro; Sakai, Ryosei

    2013-01-01

    The use of monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a flavor enhancer spans more than 100 y and there are many studies indicating the safety of general use of MSG. Recently, however, Collison et al. (2010) reported a two-generation study with a low dose of MSG that caused abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. Due to public health concerns over metabolic syndrome, their report merits careful analysis. The present study attempted to repeat the Collison et al. findings. Groups of male or female C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet or one supplemented with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) at a level of 20%. Drinking water control was provided or treatment groups were given 0.064% MSG solution (w/v). Diets and MSG administration continued throughout mating and during gestation and lactation periods. To further investigate the effects of ingestion of MSG, the offspring were continued on the same dosing conditions until they reached 32 wk of age. MSG administration in mice fed a normal or a HFCS diet throughout gestation and for 32 wk after birth, did not affect growth, girth size, abdominal fat weight or body composition. This study reports that MSG did not trigger insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or hepatic steatosis, regardless of the diet, not reproducing the results of the above-mentioned study (Collison et al., 2010). PMID:23727643

  15. Obese gene expression: reduction by fasting and stimulation by insulin and glucose in lean mice, and persistent elevation in acquired (diet-induced) and genetic (yellow agouti) obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, T M; Bergen, H; Funabashi, T; Kleopoulos, S P; Zhong, Y G; Bauman, W A; Mobbs, C V

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in the obese (ob) gene lead to obesity. This gene has been recently cloned, but the factors regulating its expression have not been elucidated. To address the regulation of the ob gene with regard to body weight and nutritional factors, Northern blot analysis was used to assess ob mRNA in adipose tissue from mice [lean, obese due to diet, or genetically (yellow agouti) obese] under different nutritional conditions. ob mRNA was elevated in both forms of obesity, compared to lean controls, correlated with elevations in plasma insulin and body weight, but not plasma glucose. In lean C57BL/6J mice, but not in mice with diet-induced obesity, ob mRNA decreased after a 48-hr fast. Similarly, in lean C57BL/6J controls, but not in obese yellow mice, i.p. glucose injection significantly increased ob mRNA. For up to 30 min after glucose injection, ob mRNA in lean mice significantly correlated with plasma glucose, but not with plasma insulin. In a separate study with only lean mice, ob mRNA was inhibited >90% by fasting, and elevated approximately 2-fold 30 min after i.p. injection of either glucose or insulin. These results suggest that in lean animals glucose and insulin enhance ob gene expression. In contrast to our results in lean mice, in obese animals ob mRNA is elevated and relatively insensitive to nutritional state, possibly due to chronic exposure to elevated plasma insulin and/or glucose. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8622953

  16. Snacking is associated with reduced risk of overweight and reduced abdominal obesity in adolescents: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Snacking is common in adolescents; however, it is unclear if there is an association between snacking and overweight or obesity within the context of the overall diet. This study examined the associations of snacking with weight status and abdominal obesity in adolescents 12–18 y of age (n = 5811). ...

  17. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase in adipocyte is Cys-specific and affected by obesity.

    PubMed

    Alponti, Rafaela Fadoni; Viana, Luciana Godoy; Yamanouye, Norma; Silveira, Paulo Flavio

    2015-08-01

    Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP, EC 3.4.11.3) in adipocytes is well known to traffic between high (HDM) and low (LDM) density microsomal fractions toward the plasma membrane (MF) under stimulation by insulin. However, its catalytic preference for aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Leu or Cys is controversial. Furthermore, possible changes in its traffic under metabolic challenges are unknown. The present study investigated the catalytic activity attributable to EC 3.4.11.3 in HDM, LDM and MF from isolated adipocytes of healthy (C), food deprived (FD) and monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats on aminoacyl substrates with N-terminal Cys or Leu, in absence or presence of insulin. Efficacy and reproducibility of subcellular adipocyte fractionation procedure were demonstrated. Comparison among HDM vs LDM vs MF intragroup revealed that hydrolytic activity trafficking from LDM to MF under influence of insulin in C, MSG and FD is only on N-terminal Cys. In MSG the same pattern of anterograde traffic and aminoacyl preference occurred independently of insulin stimulation. The pathophysiological significance of IRAP in adipocytes seems to be linked to comprehensive energy metabolism related roles of endogenous substrates with N-terminal cysteine pair such as vasopressin and oxytocin. PMID:25999180

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein plasma levels as a biomarker of obesity-related insulin resistance in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Eun; Cho, Young Sun; Baek, Kyung Suk; Li, Lan; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is a 65-kDa acute phase protein, derived from the liver, which is present in high concentrations in plasma. Data regarding the association between circulating plasma LBP levels and obesity-related biomarkers in the pediatric population are scarce. We aimed to determine whether there was a difference in plasma LBP levels between overweight/obese and normal-weight adolescents and to assess the correlation of circulating LBP levels with anthropometric measures and obesity-related biomarkers, including insulin resistance, liver enzyme levels, and lipid profiles. Methods The study included 87 adolescents aged 12–13 years; 44 were overweight/obese and 43 were of normal-weight. We assessed anthropometric and laboratory measures, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, insulin resistance, liver enzyme levels, and lipid profiles. Plasma LBP levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The mean age of the participants was 12.9±0.3 years. Circulating plasma LBP levels were significantly increased in overweight/obese participants compared with those in normal-weight participants (7.8±1.9 µg/mL vs. 6.0±1.6 µg/mL, P<0.001). LBP levels were significantly and positively associated with BMI, systolic blood pressure, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance as indicated by the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (all P<0.05). In multivariate linear regression analysis, BMI and HOMA-IR were independently and positively associated with plasma LBP levels. Conclusion LBP is an inflammatory biomarker associated with BMI and obesity-related insulin resistance in adolescents. The positive correlation between these parameters suggests a potentially relevant pathophysiological mechanism linking LBP to obesity-related insulin resistance in adolescents. PMID

  19. Topiramate treatment improves hypothalamic insulin and leptin signaling and action and reduces obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Caricilli, Andrea M; Penteado, Erica; de Abreu, Lélia L; Quaresma, Paula G F; Santos, Andressa C; Guadagnini, Dioze; Razolli, Daniella; Mittestainer, Francine C; Carvalheira, Jose B; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario J A; Prada, Patricia O

    2012-09-01

    Topiramate (TPM) treatment has been shown to reduce adiposity in humans and rodents. The reduction in adiposity is related to decreased food intake and increased energy expenditure. However, the molecular mechanisms through which TPM induces weight loss are contradictory and remain to be clarified. Whether TPM treatment alters hypothalamic insulin, or leptin signaling and action, is not well established. Thus, we investigate herein whether short-term TPM treatment alters energy balance by affecting insulin and leptin signaling, action, or neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus of mice fed with a high-fat diet. As expected, short-term treatment with TPM diminished adiposity in obese mice mainly due to reduced food intake. TPM increased anorexigenic signaling by enhancing the leptin-induced leptin receptor/Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway and the insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate/Akt/forkhead box O1 pathway in parallel to reduced phosphatase protein expression in the hypothalamus of obese mice. These effects were independent of body weight. TPM also raised anorexigenic neuropeptides such as POMC, TRH, and CRH mRNA levels in obese mice. In addition, TPM increased the activation of the hypothalamic MAPK/ERK pathway induced by leptin, accompanied by an increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-coactivator α and uncoupling protein 1 protein levels in brown adipose tissue. Furthermore, TPM increased AMP-activated protein kinase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation in peripheral tissues, which may help improve energy metabolism in these tissues. Together, these results provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms through which TPM treatment reduces adiposity. PMID:22822160

  20. Insulin response in individual tissues of control and gold thioglucose-obese mice in vivo with (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, G.J.; Astbury, L.D.; Williams, P.F.; Caterson, I.D.

    1987-02-01

    The dose-response characteristics of several glucose-utilizing tissues (brain, heart, white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and quadriceps muscle) to a single injection of insulin have been compared in control mice and mice made obese with a single injection of gold thioglucose (GTG). Tissue content of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate and blood disappearance rate of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) were measured at nine different insulin doses and used to calculate rates of 2-DG uptake and phosphorylation in tissues from control and obese mice. The insulin sensitivity of tissues reflected in the ED50 of insulin response varied widely, and brown adipose tissue was the most insulin-sensitive tissue studied. In GTG-obese mice, heart, quadriceps, and brown adipose tissue were insulin resistant (demonstrated by increased ED50), whereas in white adipose tissue, 2-DG phosphorylation was more sensitive to insulin. Brain 2-DG phosphorylation was insulin independent in control and obese animals. The largest decrease in insulin sensitivity in GTG-obese mice was observed in brown adipose tissue. The loss of diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue as a result of the hypothalamic lesion in GTG-obese mice could be a major cause of insulin resistance in brown adipose tissue. Because brown adipose tissue can make a major contribution to whole-body glucose utilization, insulin resistance in this tissue may have a significant effect on whole-animal glucose homeostasis in GTG-obese mice.

  1. Insulin, Central Dopamine D2 Receptors, and Monetary Reward Discounting in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Gredysa, Danuta M.; Antenor–Dorsey, Jo Ann; Green, Leonard; Arbeláez, Ana Maria; Koller, Jonathan M.; Black, Kevin J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Hershey, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Animal research finds that insulin regulates dopamine signaling and reward behavior, but similar research in humans is lacking. We investigated whether individual differences in body mass index, percent body fat, pancreatic β-cell function, and dopamine D2 receptor binding were related to reward discounting in obese and non-obese adult men and women. Obese (n = 27; body mass index>30) and non-obese (n = 20; body mass index<30) adults were assessed for percent body fat with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and for β-cell function using disposition index. Choice of larger, but delayed or less certain, monetary rewards relative to immediate, certain smaller monetary rewards was measured using delayed and probabilistic reward discounting tasks. Positron emission tomography using a non-displaceable D2-specific radioligand, [11C](N-methyl)benperidol quantified striatal D2 receptor binding. Groups differed in body mass index, percent body fat, and disposition index, but not in striatal D2 receptor specific binding or reward discounting. Higher percent body fat in non-obese women related to preference for a smaller, certain reward over a larger, less likely one (greater probabilistic discounting). Lower β-cell function in the total sample and lower insulin sensitivity in obese related to stronger preference for an immediate and smaller monetary reward over delayed receipt of a larger one (greater delay discounting). In obese adults, higher striatal D2 receptor binding related to greater delay discounting. Interestingly, striatal D2 receptor binding was not significantly related to body mass index, percent body fat, or β-cell function in either group. Our findings indicate that individual differences in percent body fat, β-cell function, and striatal D2 receptor binding may each contribute to altered reward discounting behavior in non-obese and obese individuals. These results raise interesting questions about whether and how striatal D2 receptor binding and metabolic

  2. Morin attenuates hepatic insulin resistance in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Wannasiri, Supaporn; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-06-01

    Morin is a natural bioflavonoid that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of morin on insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation in a high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Obesity was induced in ICR mice by feeding a HFD (60 % kcal from fat) for 12 weeks. After the first 6 weeks, obese mice were treated with morin (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) once daily for further 6 weeks. Blood glucose, lipid profile, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation were then measured. Liver was excised, subjected to histopathology, glycogen determination, and gene and protein expression analysis. Morin administration reduced blood glucose, serum insulin, leptin, malondialdehyde, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels and increased serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, there was a reduction in serum lipid and liver triglyceride levels. Liver histology indicated that morin limited accumulation of lipid droplets. Interestingly, morin reduced expression of hepatic sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and up-regulated hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) expression. Morin also stimulated glycogen storage and suppressed phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) protein expression. Furthermore, hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) expression were increased after morin treatment. These findings indicate that morin has a positive effect in the HFD-induced obesity condition by suppressing lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress activities. PMID:26976296

  3. Smad3 deficiency protects mice from obesity-induced podocyte injury that precedes insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu B Y; Qu, Xinli; Howard, Victor; Dai, Lie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Yi; Fu, Ping; Puelles, Victor G; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Caruana, Georgina; Bertram, John F; Sleeman, Mark W; Li, Jinhua

    2015-08-01

    Signaling by TGF-β/Smad3 plays a key role in renal fibrosis. As obesity is one of the major risk factors of chronic and end-stage renal disease, we studied the role of Smad3 signaling in the pathogenesis of obesity-related renal disease. After switching to a high fat diet, the onset of Smad3 C-terminal phosphorylation, increase in albuminuria, and the early stages of peripheral and renal insulin resistance occurred at 1 day, and 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, in C57BL/6 mice. The loss of synaptopodin, a functional marker of podocytes, and phosphorylation of the Smad3 linker region (T179 and S213) appeared after 4 weeks of the high fat diet. This suggests a temporal pattern of Smad3 signaling activation leading to kidney injury and subsequent insulin resistance in the development of obesity-related renal disease. In vivo, Smad3 knockout attenuated the high fat diet-induced proteinuria, renal fibrosis, overall podocyte injury, and mitochondrial dysfunction in podocytes. In vitro palmitate caused a rapid activation of Smad3 in 30 min, loss of synaptopodin in 2 days, and impaired insulin signaling in 3 days in isolated mouse podocytes. Blockade of either Smad3 phosphorylation by SIS3 (a Smad3 inhibitor) or T179 phosphorylation by flavopiridol (a CDK9 inhibitor) prevented the palmitate-induced loss of synaptopodin and mitochondrial function in podocytes. Thus, Smad3 signaling plays essential roles in obesity-related renal disease and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25945408

  4. Endogenous epinephrine protects against obesity induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Michael G; Milic, Milos; Sun, Ping; Tang, Chih-Min; Elayan, Hamzeh; Bao, Xuping; Cheung, Wai Wilson; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2011-07-01

    Epinephrine (E) is a hormone released from the adrenal medulla in response to low blood sugar and other stresses. E and related β2-adrenergic agonists are used to treat asthma, but a side effect is high blood sugar. C57BL/6 mice prone to overfeeding induced type II diabetes had the PNMT gene knocked out to prevent E synthesis. These E deficient mice were very similar to control animals on a 14% fat diet. On a 40.6% fat diet they gained 20 to 33% more weight than control animals and increased their blood glucose response to a glucose tolerance test because they became resistant to insulin. Although the short term effect of β2-agonists such as E is to raise blood glucose, some long acting β2-agonists improve muscle glucose uptake. Endogenous E protects against overfeeding induced diabetes. Since adrenal E release can be impaired with aging and diabetes, endogenous E may help prevent adult onset diabetes. PMID:21354376

  5. The relation of leptin and insulin with obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors in US adults.

    PubMed

    Reis, Jared P; Macera, Caroline A; Wingard, Deborah L; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Lindsay, Suzanne P; Marshall, Simon J

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies of leptin with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors have been limited by clinical samples or lack of representation of the general population. This cross-sectional study, designed to examine whether leptin or insulin may mediate the endogenous relation of obesity with metabolic, inflammatory, and thrombogenic cardiovascular risk factors, included 522 men and 514 women aged >or=40 years who completed a physical examination during the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Participants were free of existing CVD, cancer (except non-melanoma skin cancer), diabetes, or respiratory disease. In multivariable analyses adjusted for race/ethnicity and lifestyle factors, waist circumference (WC) was positively associated with blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol:HDL ratio, apolipoprotein B, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen concentrations, and negatively associated with HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A1 levels. The associations of WC with the metabolic CVD risk factors were largely attenuated after adjustment for insulin levels, while the associations of WC with the inflammatory and thrombogenic factors (CRP and fibrinogen, respectively) were largely explained by adjustment for leptin concentrations. However, leptin levels were not independently associated with CRP and fibrinogen in men and CRP in women when adjusted for WC. Positive associations of leptin and insulin with fibrinogen in women, independent of WC, were noted. These results suggest that insulin may be an important mediator of the association of obesity with metabolic but not inflammatory or thrombogenic CVD risk factors, while leptin does not appear to influence cardiovascular risk through a shared association with these risk factors. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that leptin and insulin influence cardiovascular risk in women through independent effects on fibrinogen concentrations. PMID:18160070

  6. Nonerythropoietic Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Suppresses Adipogenesis, Inflammation, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuqi; Luo, Bangwei; Shi, Rongchen; Wang, Jinsong; Liu, Zongwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Shufeng; Zhang, Zhiren

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been identified as being crucial for obesity modulation; however, its erythropoietic activity may limit its clinical application. EPO-derived Helix B-surface peptide (pHBSP) is nonerythrogenic but has been reported to retain other functions of EPO. The current study aimed to evaluate the effects and potential mechanisms of pHBSP in obesity modulation. We found that pHBSP suppressed adipogenesis, adipokine expression and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) levels during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte maturation through the EPO receptor (EPOR). In addition, also through EPOR, pHBSP attenuated macrophage inflammatory activation and promoted PPARγ expression. Furthermore, PPARγ deficiency partly ablated the anti-inflammatory activity of pHBSP in macrophages. Correspondingly, pHBSP administration to high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice significantly improved obesity, insulin resistance (IR) and adipose tissue inflammation without stimulating hematopoiesis. Therefore, pHBSP can significantly protect against obesity and IR partly by inhibiting adipogenesis and inflammation. These findings have therapeutic implications for metabolic disorders, such as obesity and diabetes. PMID:26459940

  7. Obesity-induced DNA hypermethylation of the adiponectin gene mediates insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, A. Young; Park, Yoon Jeong; Pan, Xuebo; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Kwak, Soo-Heon; Bassas, Abdulelah F.; Sallam, Reem M.; Park, Kyong Soo; Alfadda, Assim A.; Xu, Aimin; Kim, Jae Bum

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin plays a key role in the regulation of the whole-body energy homeostasis by modulating glucose and lipid metabolism. Although obesity-induced reduction of adiponectin expression is primarily ascribed to a transcriptional regulation failure, the underlying mechanisms are largely undefined. Here we show that DNA hypermethylation of a particular region of the adiponectin promoter suppresses adiponectin expression through epigenetic control and, in turn, exacerbates metabolic diseases in obesity. Obesity-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokines promote DNMT1 expression and its enzymatic activity. Activated DNMT1 selectively methylates and stimulates compact chromatin structure in the adiponectin promoter, impeding adiponectin expression. Suppressing DNMT1 activity with a DNMT inhibitor resulted in the amelioration of obesity-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in an adiponectin-dependent manner. These findings suggest a critical role of adiponectin gene epigenetic control by DNMT1 in governing energy homeostasis, implying that modulating DNMT1 activity represents a new strategy for the treatment of obesity-related diseases. PMID:26139044

  8. Early cardiovascular changes occurring in diet-induced, obese insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Huisamen, Barbara; Dietrich, Daneel; Bezuidenhout, Nicole; Lopes, John; Flepisi, Brian; Blackhurst, Dee; Lochner, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is recognized as a cluster of disturbances associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Over the past two decades, the number of people with the metabolic syndrome has increased at an alarming rate. This increase is associated with the global epidemic of both obesity and diabetes. Cardiovascular mortality is increased among diabetics and obesity-related insulin-resistant patients, and obesity is currently recognized as independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to establish the effects of a short period of an altered diet on the heart using a rat model of hyperphagia-induced obesity (diet supplemented with sucrose and condensed milk for 8 weeks = DIO) compared to age-matched controls. Isolated, perfused hearts were subjected to global or regional ischaemia/reperfusion. Function on reperfusion was recorded and infarct size determined. A plasma lipid profile was established via HPLC-based methods and proteins involved in metabolic signalling determined either by western blotting or RT-PCR. 8 weeks of diet resulted in whole-body but not myocardial insulin resistance, increased plasma triglyceride and phospholipid levels as well as increased lipid peroxidation. Despite the similar baseline function, hearts from DIO animals showed significantly poorer postischaemic recovery than controls (41.9 % RPP recovery vs 57.9 %, P < 0.05, n = 7-11/group) but surprisingly, smaller infarct size (24.95 ± 1.97 vs 47.26 ± 4.05 % of the area at risk, P < 0.005, n = 8/group). Basal phosphorylation of PKB/Akt was elevated but IRS-1 and SERCA-2 expression severely downregulated. In conclusion, after only 8 weeks of a slight change in diet, the rat heart shows signs of metabolic remodelling. Some of these changes may be protective but others may be detrimental and eventually lead to maladaptation. PMID:22638648

  9. Serum Resistin Levels Are Associated with Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Hispanic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nieva-Vazquez, Adriana; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; López-López, José G.; Romero, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Resistin is involved in the development of obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in mice and may play a similar role in humans through mechanisms that remain unresolved. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between resistin levels in obese subjects with and without IR among Hispanic subjects. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 117 nondiabetic Hispanic subjects of both genders that were allocated into three study groups: A control group (n=47) of otherwise healthy individuals in metabolic balance, a group with obesity (OB) (n=36), and a group with obesity and IR (OB-IR) (n=34). Anthropometric and clinical characterization was carried out, and resistin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: We found that resistin levels were higher in OB and OB-IR groups when compared to the control group (1331.79±142.15 pg/mL, 1266.28±165.97 pg/mL vs. 959.21±171.43 pg/mL; P<0.05), an effect that was not confounded by age (control, 34.04±10.00 years; OB, 37.30±10.78 years; and OB-IR, 35.67±10.15 years). In addition, we observed a significant correlation (P<0.001) between resistin levels and higher adiposity and insulin sensitivity (IS) in our cohort. Conclusions: Our results suggest that higher resistin levels are associated with higher adiposity and lower IS among obese Hispanic subjects. PMID:24266722

  10. Abdominal obesity modifies the risk of hypertriglyceridemia for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Postorino, Maurizio; Marino, Carmen; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2011-04-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is the most prevalent lipid alteration in end-stage renal disease, and we studied the relationship between serum triglycerides and all-cause and cardiovascular death in these patients. Since abdominal fat modifies the effect of lipids on atherosclerosis, we analyzed the interaction between serum lipids and waist circumference (WC) as a metric of abdominal obesity. In a cohort of 537 hemodialysis patients, 182 died, 113 from cardiovascular causes, over an average follow-up of 29 months. In Cox models that included traditional and nontraditional risk factors, there were significant strong interactions between triglycerides and WC to both all-cause and cardiovascular death. A fixed (50 mg/dl) excess in triglycerides was associated with a progressive lower risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in patients with threshold WC <95 cm but with a progressive increased risk in those above this threshold. A significant interaction between cholesterol and WC with all-cause and cardiovascular death emerged only in models excluding the triglycerides-WC interaction. Neither high-density lipoprotein (HDL) nor non-HDL cholesterol or their interaction terms with WC were associated with study outcomes. Thus, the predictive value of triglycerides and cholesterol for survival and atherosclerotic complications in hemodialysis patients is critically dependent on WC. Hence, intervention studies in end-stage renal disease should specifically target patients with abdominal obesity and hyperlipidemia. PMID:21178980

  11. Moderate Weight Reduction in an Outpatient Obesity Intervention Program Significantly Reduces Insulin Resistance and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Severely Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Grulich-Henn, J.; Lichtenstein, S.; Hörster, F.; Hoffmann, G. F.; Nawroth, P. P.; Hamann, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Metabolic risk factors like insulin resistance and dyslipidemia are frequently observed in severly obese children. We investigated the hypothesis that moderate weight reduction by a low-threshold intervention is already able to reduce insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese children. Methods. A group of 58 severely obese children and adolescents between 8 and 17 years participating in a six-month-long outpatient program was studied before and after treatment. The program included behavioral treatment, dietary education and specific physical training. Metabolic parameters were measured in the fasting state, insulin resistance was evaluated in an oral glucose tolerance test. Results. Mean standard deviation score of the body mass index (SDS-BMI) in the study group dropped significantly from +2.5 ± 0.5 to 2.3 ± 0.6 (P < 0.0001) after participation in the program. A significant decrease was observed in HOMA (6.3 ± 4.2 versus 4.9 ± 2.4, P < 0.03, and in peak insulin levels (232.7 ± 132.4 versus 179.2 ± 73.3 μU/mL, P < 0.006). Significant reductions were also observed in mean levels of hemoglobin A1c, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that already moderate weight reduction is able to decrease insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in severely obese children and adolescents. PMID:21904547

  12. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel regulates diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and leptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunjung; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Lee, Yongjin; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Wang, Hsun-Fan; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent studies have shown a metabolic role of capsaicin that may be mediated via the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel. In this study, TRPV1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (as controls) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and metabolic studies were performed to measure insulin and leptin action. The TRPV1 KO mice became more obese than the WT mice after HFD, partly attributed to altered energy balance and leptin resistance in the KO mice. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment showed that the TRPV1 KO mice were more insulin resistant after HFD because of the ∼40% reduction in glucose metabolism in the white and brown adipose tissue, compared with that in the WT mice. Leptin treatment failed to suppress food intake, and leptin-mediated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activity was blunted in the TRPV1 KO mice. We also found that the TRPV1 KO mice were more obese and insulin resistant than the WT mice at 9 mo of age. Taken together, these results indicate that lacking TRPV1 exacerbates the obesity and insulin resistance associated with an HFD and aging, and our findings further suggest that TRPV1 has a major role in regulating glucose metabolism and hypothalamic leptin's effects in obesity. PMID:25888600

  13. Overweight and General and Abdominal Obesity in a Representative Sample of Spanish Adults: Findings from the ANIBES Study

    PubMed Central

    López-Sobaler, Ana M.; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Ortega, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the anthropometric parameters from a representative sample of Spanish adults participating in ANIBES study and the prevalence of general and abdominal obesity. Methods. This cross-sectional study focused on 1655 adults aged 18–64 years. Weight, height, and waist circumference (WC) were evaluated, and body mass index (BMI) and waist to height ratio (WHtR) were calculated. A composite index combining BMI and WHtR was designed to establish five groups with different anthropometric status. Results. The prevalence of overweight (OW) was 35.8% and that of obesity was 19.9%. Obesity (OB) was higher among men (OR 1.725, 1.415–2.104; p = 0.000) and each year of age increased the risk of obesity (OR 1.054, 1.045–1.064; p = 0.000). The prevalence of abdominal obesity (WHtR ≥ 0.5) was 58.4%. Only 36.1% of the population had an optimal anthropometric situation (BMI < 25 kg/m2, WHtR < 0.5), whereas 50.1% had weight excess and high WHtR (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2, WHtR ≥ 0.5). Conclusions. More than half of Spanish population has weight excess and cardiometabolic risk. The results of this study provide an understanding of the current anthropometric situation in the Spanish population, as a first step toward planning interventions and assessing their effectiveness in the future. PMID:27382572

  14. Hepatocyte DACH1 Is Increased in Obesity via Nuclear Exclusion of HDAC4 and Promotes Hepatic Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Lale; Ghorpade, Devram S; Zheng, Ze; de Souza, Jane Cristina; Chen, Ke; Bessler, Marc; Bagloo, Melissa; Schrope, Beth; Pestell, Richard; Tabas, Ira

    2016-06-01

    Defective insulin signaling in hepatocytes is a key factor in type 2 diabetes. In obesity, activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in hepatocytes suppresses ATF6, which triggers a PERK-ATF4-TRB3 pathway that disrupts insulin signaling. Elucidating how CaMKII suppresses ATF6 is therefore essential to understanding this insulin resistance pathway. We show that CaMKII phosphorylates and blocks nuclear translocation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). As a result, HDAC4-mediated SUMOylation of the corepressor DACH1 is decreased, which protects DACH1 from proteasomal degradation. DACH1, together with nuclear receptor corepressor (NCOR), represses Atf6 transcription, leading to activation of the PERK-TRB3 pathway and defective insulin signaling. DACH1 is increased in the livers of obese mice and humans, and treatment of obese mice with liver-targeted constitutively nuclear HDAC4 or DACH1 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) increases ATF6, improves hepatocyte insulin signaling, and protects against hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. Thus, DACH1-mediated corepression in hepatocytes emerges as an important link between obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27239042

  15. The relationship of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed with overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity, other cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in young adults. NHANES 1999-2006

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to examine the association between breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed with overweight /obesity, abdominal obesity, other cardiometabolic risk factors and the metabolic syndrome. Three breakfast groups were identified (breakfast skippers, ready-to-eat-cereal ...

  16. Selective PPARγ modulator INT131 normalizes insulin signaling defects and improves bone mass in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Ho; Huang, Hu; Choi, Kangduk; Mantzoros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    INT131 is a potent non-thiazolidinedione (TZD)-selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ modulator being developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial, INT131 has been shown to lower glucose levels and ameliorate insulin resistance without typical TZD side effects. To determine whether the insulin-sensitizing action of INT131 is mediated by effects on insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) insulin-resistant mice treated with INT131 were studied. INT131's effects on bone density were also investigated. Treatment with INT131 enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity, as revealed by lower insulin levels in the fasted state and an increase in the area above the curve during an insulin tolerance test. These effects were independent of changes in adiposity. Insulin-stimulated PI3K activity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of DIO mice was significantly reduced ∼50–65%, but this was restored completely by INT131 therapy. The INT131 effects on PI3K activity are most likely due to increased IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Concurrently, insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation also increased after INT131 treatment in DIO mice. Importantly, INT131 therapy caused a significant increase in bone mineral density without alteration in circulating osteocalcin in these mice. These data suggest that a newly developed insulin-sensitizing agent, INT131, normalizes obesity-related defects in insulin action on PI3K signaling in insulin target tissues by a mechanism involved in glycemic control. If these data are confirmed in humans, INT131 could be used for treating type 2 diabetes without loss in bone mass. PMID:22215652

  17. Decreased basal insulin secretion from pancreatic islets of pups in a rat model of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Elena; Sosa-Larios, Tonantzin; Calzada, Lizbeth; Ibáñez, Carlos A; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Carmen A; Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko

    2016-10-01

    Maternal obesity (MO) is a deleterious condition that enhances susceptibility of adult offspring to metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. The objective is to study the effect of MO on in vitro insulin secretion and pancreatic cellular population in offspring. We hypothesize that a harmful antenatal metabolic environment due to MO diminishes the basal glucose-responsive secretory function of pancreatic beta cells in offspring. Mothers were fed a control (C) or high-fat diet from weaning through pregnancy (120 days) and lactation. At postnatal days (PNDs) 36 and 110, pups were killed, peripheral blood was collected and pancreatic islets were isolated. Basal insulin secretion was measured in vitro in islets for 60 min. It was found that blood insulin, glucose and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index were unaffected by maternal diet and age in females. However, male MO offspring at PND 110 showed hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance compared with C. Body weight was not modified by MO, but fat content was higher in MO pups compared with C pups. Triglycerides and leptin concentrations were higher in MO than in C offspring in all groups except in females at PND 36. Pancreatic islet cytoarchitecture was unaffected by MO. At PND 36, islets of male and female C and MO offspring responded similarly to glucose, but at PND 110, male and female MO offspring islets showed a 50% decrease in insulin secretion. It was concluded that MO impairs basal insulin secretion of offspring with a greater impact on males than females, and this effect mainly manifests in adulthood. PMID:27496224

  18. Recombinant Human Growth Hormone and Rosiglitazone for Abdominal Fat Accumulation in HIV-Infected Patients with Insulin Resistance: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Factorial Trial

    PubMed Central

    Glesby, Marshall J.; Albu, Jeanine; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Ham, Kirsis; Engelson, Ellen; He, Qing; Muthukrishnan, Varalakshmi; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Donovan, Daniel; Ernst, Jerry; Lesser, Martin; Kotler, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) reduces visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume in HIV-infected patients but can worsen glucose homeostasis and lipoatrophy. We aimed to determine if adding rosiglitazone to rhGH would abrogate the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity (SI) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) volume. Methodology/Principal Findings Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial using a 2×2 factorial design in which HIV-infected subjects with abdominal obesity and insulin resistance were randomized to rhGH 3 mg daily, rosiglitazone 4 mg twice daily, combination rhGH + rosiglitazone, or double placebo (control) for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in SI by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test from entry to week 12. Body composition was assessed by whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dual Xray absorptiometry (DEXA). Seventy-seven subjects were randomized of whom 72 initiated study drugs. Change in SI from entry to week 12 differed across the 4 arms by 1-way ANCOVA (P = 0.02); by pair-wise comparisons, only rhGH (decreasing SI; P = 0.03) differed significantly from control. Changes from entry to week 12 in fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve on 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test differed across arms (1-way ANCOVA P = 0.004), increasing in the rhGH arm relative to control. VAT decreased significantly in the rhGH arms (−17.5% in rhGH/rosiglitazone and −22.7% in rhGH) but not in the rosiglitazone alone (−2.5%) or control arms (−1.9%). SAT did not change significantly in any arm. DEXA results were consistent with the MRI data. There was no significant rhGH x rosiglitazone interaction for any body composition parameter. Conclusions/Significance The addition of rosiglitazone abrogated the adverse effects of rhGH on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance while not significantly modifying the lowering effect of rhGH on VAT. Trial Registration

  19. Alterations of Mitochondrial Function and Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Roden, Michael

    2016-07-17

    Mitochondrial function refers to a broad spectrum of features such as resting mitochondrial activity, (sub)maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), and mitochondrial dynamics, turnover, and plasticity. The interaction between mitochondria and insulin sensitivity is bidirectional and varies depending on tissue, experimental model, methodological approach, and features of mitochondrial function tested. In human skeletal muscle, mitochondrial abnormalities may be inherited (e.g., lower mitochondrial content) or acquired (e.g., impaired OXPHOS capacity and plasticity). Abnormalities ultimately lead to lower mitochondrial functionality due to or resulting in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Similar mechanisms can also operate in adipose tissue and heart muscle. In contrast, mitochondrial oxidative capacity is transiently upregulated in the liver of obese insulin-resistant humans with or without fatty liver, giving rise to oxidative stress and declines in advanced fatty liver disease. These data suggest a highly tissue-specific interaction between insulin sensitivity and oxidative metabolism during the course of metabolic diseases in humans. PMID:27146012

  20. The Obesity-Linked Gene Nudt3 Drosophila Homolog Aps Is Associated With Insulin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael J; Eriksson, Anders; Shaik, Muksheed; Voisin, Sarah; Yamskova, Olga; Paulsson, Johan; Thombare, Ketan; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-09-01

    Several genome-wide association studies have linked the Nudix hydrolase family member nucleoside diphosphate-linked moiety X motif 3 (NUDT3) to obesity. However, the manner of NUDT3 involvement in obesity is unknown, and NUDT3 expression, regulation, and signaling in the central nervous system has not been studied. We performed an extensive expression analysis in mice, as well as knocked down the Drosophila NUDT3 homolog Aps in the nervous system, to determine its effect on metabolism. Detailed in situ hybridization studies in the mouse brain revealed abundant Nudt3 mRNA and protein expression throughout the brain, including reward- and feeding-related regions of the hypothalamus and amygdala, whereas Nudt3 mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in the hypothalamus and brainstem of food-deprived mice. Knocking down Aps in the Drosophila central nervous system, or a subset of median neurosecretory cells, known as the insulin-producing cells (IPCs), induces hyperinsulinemia-like phenotypes, including a decrease in circulating trehalose levels as well as significantly decreasing all carbohydrate levels under starvation conditions. Moreover, lowering Aps IPC expression leads to a decreased ability to recruit these lipids during starvation. Also, loss of neuronal Aps expression caused a starvation susceptibility phenotype while inducing hyperphagia. Finally, the loss of IPC Aps lowered the expression of Akh, Ilp6, and Ilp3, genes known to be inhibited by insulin signaling. These results point toward a role for this gene in the regulation of insulin signaling, which could explain the robust association with obesity in humans. PMID:26168034

  1. Oral insulin (human, murine, or porcine) does not prevent diabetes in the non-obese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh N; Gibson, Claire; Rydén, Anna K E; Perdue, Nikole; Boursalian, Tamar E; Pagni, Philippe P; Coppieters, Ken; Skonberg, Christian; Porsgaard, Trine; von Herrath, Matthias; Vela, Jose Luis

    2016-03-01

    Studies have shown oral insulin prevents type 1 diabetes (T1D) in mouse models, however human trials were inconclusive. We tested the ability of different insulins to prevent T1D in non-obese diabetic mice. Mice received oral insulin or PBS twice weekly and disease was monitored. Contrary to previous studies, no insulin tested showed significant ability to prevent T1D, nor did testing of linked suppression in a delayed type hypersensitivity model have reproducible effect. To investigate delivery of antigen within the GI tract, blue dye was fed to mice. Dye traveled 5-8 cm from stomach to small intestine within 10s, suggesting orally administered antigen may not get digested in the stomach in mice. Insulin incubated with jejunum extracts was instantly digested. Thus, in humans large doses of insulin may be required to achieve tolerance as antigen may be more vulnerable to digestion in the stomach even before reaching the small intestine. PMID:26821303

  2. CEACAM1 loss links inflammation to Insulin Resistance in obesity and Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Sonia M.; Russo, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Mounting epidemiological evidence points to an association between metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an increasingly recognized new epidemic. NASH pathologies include hepatocellular ballooning, lobular inflammation, hepatocellular injury, apoptosis and hepatic fibrosis. We will review the relationship between insulin resistance and inflammation in visceral obesity and NASH in an attempt to shed more light on the pathogenesis of these major metabolic diseases. Moreover, we will identify loss of the Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 as a unifying mechanism linking the immunological and metabolic abnormalities in NASH. PMID:24258517

  3. Vitamin D status and insulin resistance among young obese Saudi females

    PubMed Central

    Abdelkarem, Hala M.; El-Sherif, Mervat A.; Gomaa, Sahar B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the association of vitamin D level with insulin resistance, among healthy student’s obese women, and to identify factors that may elucidate this association. Methods: One hundred and forty-seven female students between the age group of 18 and 25 years were included in this cross-sectional study, and the related socio-demographic and anthropometric data were obtained. They were selected randomly from Aljouf University, Sakaka, Saudi Arabia between November 2013 and June 2014. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D), glucose, insulin was measured and insulin resistance was calculated using the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR). Results: The results showed the percentage of 25[OH]D concentration in female students was 21.3% sufficient, 59.6% mild deficiency, and 19.3% moderate deficiency. The percentage of waist circumferences (WC) were 41.3% (>88 cm) and 58.7% (<88 cm), body mass index (BMI) was 13.6% (obese) and 31.8% (over weight), blood pressure (BP) was 65.7% (<130/85 mm Hg), and 33.2% (>130/85 mm Hg). Based on the cut-off point of 25[OH]D, 17.4% of females had 25[OH]D deficiency, 27.3% insufficient, and 55.3% sufficient. When the females were classified according to the BMI category, the serum 25[OH]D concentrations for obese was the lowest value (54.6%) when compared with the overweight (31.8%) and normal weight (0.9%). 25[OH]D was inversely associated with BMI, fat%, and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Our results suggest that vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in women of Saudi who are university students especially in those who are obese. Preventive interventions in order to reduce the tendency of deficiency among college students should focus on the awareness of the essentiality of vitamin D promotion of direct exposure to sunlight (vitamin D3) and consumption of vitamin D fortified food as a part of Saudi diets. PMID:27146620

  4. Long-Term Consumption of Platycodi Radix Ameliorates Obesity and Insulin Resistance via the Activation of AMPK Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Eun; Hur, Haeng Jeon; Hwang, Jin-Taek; Sung, Mi Jeong; Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jae Ho; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Myung-Sunny

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects and mechanism of Platycodi radix, having white balloon flower (Platycodon grandiflorum for. albiflorum (Honda) H. Hara) on obesity and insulin resistance. The extracts of Platycodi radix with white balloon flower were tested in cultured cells and administered into mice on a high-fat diet. The Platycodi radix activated the AMPK/ACC phosphorylation in C2C12 myotubes and also suppressed adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. In experimental animal, it suppressed the weight gain of obese mice and ameliorated obesity-induced insulin resistance. It also reduced the elevated circulating mediators, including triglyceride (TG), T-CHO, leptin, resistin, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 in obesity. As shown in C2C12 myotubes, the administration of Platycodi radix extracts also recovered the AMPK/ACC phosphorylation in the muscle of obese mice. These results suggest that Platycodi radix with white balloon flower ameliorates obesity and insulin resistance in obese mice via the activation of AMPK/ACC pathways and reductions of adipocyte differentiation. PMID:22829857

  5. Unacylated Ghrelin is associated with the isolated low HDL-cholesterol obese phenotype independently of insulin resistance and CRP level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) level is commonly present in obesity and represents an independent cardiovascular risk factor. However, obese patients are a very heterogeneous population and the factors and mechanisms that contribute to low HDL-c remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma HDL-c levels and plasma hormonal profiles (insulin, adiponectin, resistin, leptin and ghrelin) in subsets of class II and III obese patients. Methods Fasting plasma levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-c, HDL-c, triglycerides, free fatty acids, apoproteins A-I, B-100, B-48, C-II, C-III, insulin, hs-CRP, adipocytokines (adiponectin, resistin, leptin), unacylated ghrelin, body composition (DXA) and resting energy expenditure were measured in three subsets of obese patients: 17 metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) with metabolic syndrome and the typical metabolic dyslipidaemia, 21 metabolically healthy obese (MHO) without metabolic syndrome and with a normal lipid profile, and 21 isolated low HDL-c obese patients (LHO) without metabolic syndrome, compared to 21 healthy lean control subjects. Results Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased gradually from MHO to LHO and from LHO to MAO patients (p < 0.05 between MHO and MAO and between LHO and MAO). In multiple regression analysis, serum unacylated ghrelin levels were only positively and independently associated with HDL-c levels in the LHO group (p = 0.032). Conclusions These results suggest that, in class II and III obese patients with an isolated low HDL-c phenotype, unacylated ghrelin is positively associated with HDL-c level independently of insulin resistance and CRP levels, and may contribute to the highly prevalent low HDL-c level seen in obesity. PMID:22413940

  6. The Mechanism by Which Safflower Yellow Decreases Body Fat Mass and Improves Insulin Sensitivity in HFD-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huijuan; Wang, Xiangqing; Pan, Hui; Dai, Yufei; Li, Naishi; Wang, Linjie; Yang, Hongbo; Gong, Fengying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Safflower yellow (SY) is the main effective ingredient of Carthamus tinctorius L. It has been reported that SY plays an important role in anti-inflammation, anti-platelet aggregation, and inhibiting thrombus formation. In present study, we try to investigate the effects of SY on body weight, body fat mass, insulin sensitivity in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Methods: HFD-induced obese male ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with SY (120 mg kg−1) daily. Eight weeks later, intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test (IPITT), and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) were performed, and body weight, body fat mass, serum insulin levels were measured. The expression of glucose and lipid metabolic related genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) were determined by RT-qPCR and western blot technologies. Results: The administration obese mice with SY significantly reduced the body fat mass of HFD-induced obese mice (P < 0.05). IPITT test showed that the insulin sensitivity of SY treated obese mice were evidently improved. The mRNA levels of insulin signaling pathway related genes including insulin receptor substrate 1(IRS1), PKB protein kinase (AKT), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and forkhead box protein O1(FOXO1) in mesenteric WAT of SY treated mice were significantly increased to 1.9- , 2.8- , 3.3- , and 5.9-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice, respectively (P < 0.05). The protein levels of AKT and GSK3β were also significantly increased to 3.0 and 5.2-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice, respectively (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, both the mRNA and protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorgamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α) in inguinal subcutaneous WAT of SY group were notably increased to 2.5 and 3.0-folds of that in HFD-induced control obese mice (P < 0.05). Conclusions: SY significantly reduce the body fat mass, fasting blood glucose and increase insulin sensitivity of HFD-induced obese mice. The

  7. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  8. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Castro-Albarran, Jorge; Sandoval-García, Flavio; Flores-Alvarado, Luis-Javier; Martín-Marquez, Beatriz-Teresita

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old) and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines). We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1) by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less). On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity. PMID:27525284

  9. Association of Smoking in Adolescence With Abdominal Obesity in Adulthood: A Follow-Up Study of 5 Birth Cohorts of Finnish Twins

    PubMed Central

    Pietiläinen, Kirsi; Kantonen, Suvi; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We studied the association of adolescent smoking with overweight and abdominal obesity in adulthood. Methods. We used the FinnTwin16, a prospective, population-based questionnaire study of 5 consecutive and complete birth cohorts of Finnish twins born between 1975 and 1979 (N = 4296) and studied at four points between the ages of 16 and 27 years to analyze the effect of adolescent smoking on abdominal obesity and overweight in early adulthood. Results. Smoking at least 10 cigarettes daily when aged 16 to 18 years increased the risk of adult abdominal obesity (odds ratio [OR]=1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39, 2.26). After we adjusted for confounders, the OR was 1.44 (95% CI = 1.11, 1.88), and after further adjustment for current body mass index (BMI), the OR was 1.34 (95% CI = 0.95, 1.88). Adolescent smoking significantly increased the risk of becoming overweight among women even after adjustment for possible confounders, including baseline BMI (OR = 1.74; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.88). Conclusions. Smoking is a risk factor for abdominal obesity among both genders and for overweight in women. The prevention of smoking during adolescence may play an important role in promoting healthy weight and in decreasing the morbidity related to abdominal obesity. PMID:19059868

  10. Using Metabolomic Profiles as Biomarkers for Insulin Resistance in Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue; Gang, Xiaokun; Liu, Yujia; Sun, Chenglin; Han, Qing; Wang, Guixia

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown the intimate relationship between metabolomic profiles and insulin resistance (IR) in obese adults, while little is known about childhood obesity. In this review, we searched available papers addressing metabolomic profiles and IR in obese children from inception to February 2016 on MEDLINE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and EMASE. HOMA-IR was applied as surrogate markers of IR and related metabolic disorders at both baseline and follow-up. To minimize selection bias, two investigators independently completed this work. After critical selection, 10 studies (including 2,673 participants) were eligible and evaluated by using QUADOMICS for quality assessment. Six of the 10 studies were classified as "high quality." Then we generated all the metabolites identified in each study and found amino acid metabolism and lipid metabolism were the main affected metabolic pathways in obese children. Among identified metabolites, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), aromatic amino acids (AAAs), and acylcarnitines were reported to be associated with IR as biomarkers most frequently. Additionally, BCAAs and tyrosine seemed to be relevant to future metabolic risk in the long-term follow-up cohorts, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and prevention strategy. Because of limited scale and design heterogeneity of existing studies, future studies might focus on validating above findings in more large-scale and longitudinal studies with elaborate design. PMID:27517054

  11. Using Metabolomic Profiles as Biomarkers for Insulin Resistance in Childhood Obesity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown the intimate relationship between metabolomic profiles and insulin resistance (IR) in obese adults, while little is known about childhood obesity. In this review, we searched available papers addressing metabolomic profiles and IR in obese children from inception to February 2016 on MEDLINE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, and EMASE. HOMA-IR was applied as surrogate markers of IR and related metabolic disorders at both baseline and follow-up. To minimize selection bias, two investigators independently completed this work. After critical selection, 10 studies (including 2,673 participants) were eligible and evaluated by using QUADOMICS for quality assessment. Six of the 10 studies were classified as “high quality.” Then we generated all the metabolites identified in each study and found amino acid metabolism and lipid metabolism were the main affected metabolic pathways in obese children. Among identified metabolites, branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), aromatic amino acids (AAAs), and acylcarnitines were reported to be associated with IR as biomarkers most frequently. Additionally, BCAAs and tyrosine seemed to be relevant to future metabolic risk in the long-term follow-up cohorts, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and prevention strategy. Because of limited scale and design heterogeneity of existing studies, future studies might focus on validating above findings in more large-scale and longitudinal studies with elaborate design. PMID:27517054

  12. Takeaway food consumption and its associations with diet quality and abdominal obesity: a cross-sectional study of young adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kylie J; McNaughton, Sarah A; Gall, Seana L; Blizzard, Leigh; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison J

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the associations of takeaway food consumption with overall diet quality and abdominal obesity. Young adults are high consumers of takeaway food so we aimed to examine these associations in a national study of young Australian adults. Methods A national sample of 1,277 men and 1,585 women aged 26–36 completed a self-administered questionnaire on demographic and lifestyle factors, a 127 item food frequency questionnaire, usual daily frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption and usual weekly frequency of takeaway food consumption. Dietary intake was compared with the dietary recommendations from the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. Waist circumference was measured for 1,065 men and 1,129 women. Moderate abdominal obesity was defined as ≥ 94 cm for men and ≥ 80 cm for women. Prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated using log binomial regression. Takeaway food consumption was dichotomised, with once a week or less as the reference group. Results Consumption of takeaway food twice a week or more was reported by more men (37.9%) than women (17.7%, P < 0.001). Compared with those eating takeaway once a week or less, men eating takeaway twice a week or more were significantly more likely to be single, younger, current smokers and spend more time watching TV and sitting, whereas women were more likely to be in the workforce and spend more time watching TV and sitting. Participants eating takeaway food at least twice a week were less likely (P < 0.05) to meet the dietary recommendation for vegetables, fruit, dairy, extra foods, breads and cereals (men only), lean meat and alternatives (women only) and overall met significantly fewer dietary recommendations (P < 0.001). After adjusting for confounding variables (age, leisure time physical activity, TV viewing and employment status), consuming takeaway food twice a week or more was associated with a 31% higher prevalence of moderate abdominal obesity in men (PR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1

  13. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Exerts the Neuroprotective Effects in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats, Leading to the Improvement of Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Chunchai, Titikorn; Samniang, Bencharunan; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; KenKnight, Bruce H; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy was shown to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity. However, the effects of chronic VNS therapy on brain insulin sensitivity, dendritic spine density, brain mitochondrial function, apoptosis and cognition in obese-insulin resistant subjects have never been investigated. Male Wistar rats (n = 24) were fed with either a normal diet (n = 8) or a HFD (n = 16) for 12 weeks. At week 13, HFD-fed rats were divided into 2 groups (n = 8/group). Each group was received either sham therapy or VNS therapy for an additional 12 weeks. At the end of treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, brain apoptosis, and dendritic spines were determined in each rat. The HFD-fed with Sham therapy developed brain insulin resistance, brain oxidative stress, brain inflammation, and brain apoptosis, resulting in the cognitive decline. The VNS group showed an improvement in peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity. VNS treatment attenuated brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. In addition, VNS therapy increased dendritic spine density and improved cognitive function. These findings suggest that VNS attenuates cognitive decline in obese-insulin resistant rats by attenuating brain mitochondrial dysfunction, improving brain insulin sensitivity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and increasing dendritic spine density. PMID:27226157

  14. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Exerts the Neuroprotective Effects in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats, Leading to the Improvement of Cognitive Function.

    PubMed

    Chunchai, Titikorn; Samniang, Bencharunan; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; KenKnight, Bruce H; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy was shown to improve peripheral insulin sensitivity. However, the effects of chronic VNS therapy on brain insulin sensitivity, dendritic spine density, brain mitochondrial function, apoptosis and cognition in obese-insulin resistant subjects have never been investigated. Male Wistar rats (n = 24) were fed with either a normal diet (n = 8) or a HFD (n = 16) for 12 weeks. At week 13, HFD-fed rats were divided into 2 groups (n = 8/group). Each group was received either sham therapy or VNS therapy for an additional 12 weeks. At the end of treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, brain apoptosis, and dendritic spines were determined in each rat. The HFD-fed with Sham therapy developed brain insulin resistance, brain oxidative stress, brain inflammation, and brain apoptosis, resulting in the cognitive decline. The VNS group showed an improvement in peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity. VNS treatment attenuated brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. In addition, VNS therapy increased dendritic spine density and improved cognitive function. These findings suggest that VNS attenuates cognitive decline in obese-insulin resistant rats by attenuating brain mitochondrial dysfunction, improving brain insulin sensitivity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and increasing dendritic spine density. PMID:27226157

  15. Assessment of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11-βHSD1) 4478T>G and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-308G>A polymorphisms with obesity and insulin resistance in Asian Indians in North India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukti; Vikram, Naval Kishore; Misra, Anoop; Bhatt, SuryaPrakash; Tarique, Mohammed; Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan; Luthra, Kalpana

    2013-11-01

    11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11-βHSD1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and their role in obesity, regional adiposity and insulin resistance has been sparsely evaluated. We determined the polymorphic status of 11-βHSD1 4478T>G and TNF-α-308G>A in Asian Indians in north India. In this cross-sectional study (n = 498; 258 males, 240 females), association of genotypes (PCR–RFLP) of 11-βHSD1 and TNF-α were analyzed with obesity [BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2), percentage body fat (%BF by DEXA); subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat area (L(2-3) level by single slice MRI) in a sub sample] and insulin resistance. 46 percent subjects had generalized obesity, 55 % abdominal obesity and 23.8 % were insulin resistant. Frequencies (%) of [T/T] and [T/G] genotypes of 11-βHSD1 were 89.57 and 10.43 respectively. Homozygosity for 11-βHSD1 4478G/G was absent with no association with parameters of obesity and insulin resistance. Frequencies (%) of TNF-α [G] and [A] alleles were 88 and 12 respectively. Higher frequency of variant -308[A/A] was observed in females versus males (p = 0.01). Females with at least one single A allele of TNF-α-308G>A had significantly high %BF and total skinfold, whereas higher values of waist hip ratio, total cholesterol, triglycerides and VLDL were observed in males. Subjects with even a single A allele in TNF-α genotype showed higher subscapular skinfold predisposing them to truncal subcutaneous adiposity (p = 0.02). Our findings of association of TNF-α-308G>A variant in females with obesity indices suggests a gender-specific role of this polymorphism in obesity. High truncal subcutaneous adiposity is associated with A allele of TNF-α-308G>A in this population. PMID:24078163

  16. The Combined Effects of Obesity, Abdominal Obesity and Major Depression/Anxiety on Health-Related Quality of Life: the LifeLines Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nigatu, Yeshambel T.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; de Jonge, Peter; van Rossum, Elisabeth; Bültmann, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and major depressive disorder (MDD)/anxiety disorders often co-occur and aggravate each other resulting in adverse health-related outcomes. As little is known about the potential effects of interaction between obesity and MDD and/or anxiety disorders on health-related quality of life (HR-QoL), this study was aimed at examining these combined effects. Methods We collected data among N = 89,332 participants from the LifeLines cohort study. We categorized body weight using body mass index (kg/m2) as normal weight (18.5–24.99), overweight (25–29.9), mild obesity (30–34.9) and moderate/severe obesity (≥ 35); we measured abdominal obesity using a waist circumference of ≥102 and ≥ 88 cm for males and females, respectively. MDD and anxiety disorders were diagnosed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. HR-QoL was assessed using the RAND-36 questionnaire to compute physical and mental quality of life scores. We used binary logistic and linear regression analyses. Results The combined effect of obesity and MDD and/or anxiety disorders on physical QoL was larger than the sum of their separate effects; regression coefficients, B (95%-confidence interval, 95%-CI) were: - 1.32 (-1.75; -0.90). However, the combined effect of obesity and major depression alone on mental QoL was less than the additive effect. With increasing body weight participants report poorer physical QoL; when they also have MDD and/or anxiety disorders participants report even poorer physical QoL. In persons without MDD and/or anxiety disorders, obesity was associated with a better mental QoL. Conclusions Obesity and MDD and/or anxiety disorders act synergistically on physical and mental QoL. The management of MDD and/or anxiety disorders and weight loss may be important routes to improve HR-QoL. PMID:26866920

  17. Activation of placental insulin and mTOR signaling in a mouse model of maternal obesity associated with fetal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fetal overgrowth is common in obese women and is associated with perinatal complications and increased risk for the child to develop metabolic syndrome later in life. Placental nutrient transport capacity has been reported to be increased in obese women giving birth to large infants; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Obesity in pregnancy is characterized by elevated maternal serum insulin and leptin, hormones that stimulate placental amino acid transporters in vitro. We hypothesized that maternal obesity activates placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy that is associated with fetal overgrowth. C57BL/6J female mice were fed a control (C) or a high-fat/high-sugar (HF/HS) pelleted diet supplemented by ad libitum access to sucrose (20%) solution. Placentas were collected at embryonic day 18.5. Using Western blot analysis, placental mTOR activity was determined along with energy, inflammatory, leptin, and insulin signaling pathways (upstream modulators of mTOR). Phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S-235/236), 4E-BP1 (T-37/46), Insulin receptor substrate 1 (Y-608), Akt (T-308), and STAT-3 (Y-705) was increased in obese dams. In contrast, expression of placental caspase-1, IкBα, IL-1β, and phosphorylated-JNK(p46/54-T183/Y185) was unaltered. Fetal amino acid availability is a key determinant of fetal growth. We propose that activation of placental insulin/IGF-I/mTOR and leptin signaling pathways in obese mice stimulates placental amino acid transport and contributes to increased fetal growth. PMID:26491103

  18. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Randall H; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L; Kim, Jason K

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26644351

  19. Adipose tissue overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ivet; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Tafuro, Sabrina; Muñoz, Sergio; Roca, Carles; Ramos, David; Pujol, Anna; Riu, Efren; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2012-07-01

    During the expansion of fat mass in obesity, vascularization of adipose tissue is insufficient to maintain tissue normoxia. Local hypoxia develops and may result in altered adipokine expression, proinflammatory macrophage recruitment, and insulin resistance. We investigated whether an increase in adipose tissue angiogenesis could protect against obesity-induced hypoxia and, consequently, insulin resistance. Transgenic mice overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were generated. Vessel formation, metabolism, and inflammation were studied in VEGF transgenic mice and wild-type littermates fed chow or a high-fat diet. Overexpression of VEGF resulted in increased blood vessel number and size in both WAT and BAT and protection against high-fat diet-induced hypoxia and obesity, with no differences in food intake. This was associated with increased thermogenesis and energy expenditure. Moreover, whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were improved. Transgenic mice presented increased macrophage infiltration, with a higher number of M2 anti-inflammatory and fewer M1 proinflammatory macrophages than wild-type littermates, thus maintaining an anti-inflammatory milieu that could avoid insulin resistance. These studies suggest that overexpression of VEGF in adipose tissue is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:22522611

  20. Adipose Tissue Overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Protects Against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ivet; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Tafuro, Sabrina; Muñoz, Sergio; Roca, Carles; Ramos, David; Pujol, Anna; Riu, Efren; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    During the expansion of fat mass in obesity, vascularization of adipose tissue is insufficient to maintain tissue normoxia. Local hypoxia develops and may result in altered adipokine expression, proinflammatory macrophage recruitment, and insulin resistance. We investigated whether an increase in adipose tissue angiogenesis could protect against obesity-induced hypoxia and, consequently, insulin resistance. Transgenic mice overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were generated. Vessel formation, metabolism, and inflammation were studied in VEGF transgenic mice and wild-type littermates fed chow or a high-fat diet. Overexpression of VEGF resulted in increased blood vessel number and size in both WAT and BAT and protection against high-fat diet–induced hypoxia and obesity, with no differences in food intake. This was associated with increased thermogenesis and energy expenditure. Moreover, whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were improved. Transgenic mice presented increased macrophage infiltration, with a higher number of M2 anti-inflammatory and fewer M1 proinflammatory macrophages than wild-type littermates, thus maintaining an anti-inflammatory milieu that could avoid insulin resistance. These studies suggest that overexpression of VEGF in adipose tissue is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:22522611

  1. GLP-1 responses are heritable and blunted in acquired obesity with high liver fat and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina; Bogl, Leonie H; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesper; Lundbom, Nina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Holst, Jens J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired incretin response represents an early and uniform defect in type 2 diabetes, but the contributions of genes and the environment are poorly characterized. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 35 monozygotic (MZ) and 75 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (discordant and concordant for obesity) to determine the heritability of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) responses to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and the influence of acquired obesity to GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), and peptide YY (PYY) during OGTT or meal test. RESULTS The heritability of GLP-1 area under the curve was 67% (95% CI 45-80). Cotwins from weight-concordant MZ and DZ pairs and weight-discordant MZ pairs but concordant for liver fat content demonstrated similar glucose, insulin, and incretin profiles after the OGTT and meal tests. In contrast, higher insulin responses and blunted 60-min GLP-1 responses during the OGTT were observed in the heavier as compared with leaner MZ cotwins discordant for BMI, liver fat, and insulin sensitivity. Blunted GLP-1 response to OGTT was observed in heavier as compared with leaner DZ cotwins discordant for obesity and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS Whereas the GLP-1 response to the OGTT is heritable, an acquired unhealthy pattern of obesity characterized by liver fat accumulation and insulin resistance is closely related to impaired GLP-1 response in young adults. PMID:23990519

  2. Disruption of the gastroesophageal junction by central obesity and waist belt: role of raised intra-abdominal pressure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y Y; McColl, K E L

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major reason for the recent increase in incidence of reflux disease and cancers at the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction (GOJ) and is mediated through a rise in the intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) but the exact mechanisms are unclear. Raised IAP from obesity and with application of waist belt produces mechanical distortion of the GOJ through formation of partial hiatus hernia. Even though there is no trans-sphincteric acid reflux, there is increased ingress of acid into the lower sphincter (intra-sphincteric reflux) as a consequence of raised IAP. In addition, short segment acid reflux is more evident in obese subjects with a belt on. Acid pocket is also enlarged in hiatus hernia, and acts as a reservoir of acid available to reflux whenever the sphincter fails. Above mechanisms may explain the common occurrence of cardiac lengthening and inflammation found in asymptomatic obese subjects. The inflamed cardia is also immunohistochemically similar to non-intestinal Barrett's mucosa, which is of etiological importance for cancers at the GOJ. Interventions that can reduce the mechanical distortion and acid exposure at the GOJ, including diet, exercise, drugs, sphincter augmentation therapy, and surgery, are clinically relevant in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease but more data are needed whether if these strategies are also effective in preventing cancer. As a conclusion, raised IAP produces silent mechanical disruption of the GOJ, which may explain the high occurrence of cancers in this region and it is potentially reversible with early interventions. PMID:24575877

  3. Blunted Suppression of Acyl-Ghrelin in Response to Fructose Ingestion in Obese Adolescents: the Role of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Van Name, Michelle; Giannini, Cosimo; Santoro, Nicola; Jastreboff, Ania; Kubat, Jessica; Li, Fangyong; Kursawe, Romy; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira; Dziura, James; Sinha, Rajita; Sherwin, Robert; Cline, Gary; Caprio, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Fructose consumption has risen alongside obesity and diabetes. Gut hormones involved in hunger and satiety (ghrelin and PYY) may respond differently to fructose compared to glucose ingestion. We evaluated the effects of glucose and fructose ingestion on ghrelin and PYY in lean and obese adolescents with differing insulin sensitivity. Methods Adolescents were divided into lean (n=14), obese insulin sensitive (n=12) (OIS), and obese insulin resistant (n=15) (OIR). In a double-blind, cross-over design, subjects drank 75g of glucose or fructose in random order, serum was obtained every 10 minutes for 60 minutes. Results Baseline acyl-ghrelin was highest in lean and lowest in OIR (p=0.02). After glucose ingestion acyl-ghrelin decreased similarly in lean and OIS, but appeared lower in OIR (vs lean p=0.03). Suppression differences were more pronounced after fructose (lean vs. OIS p=0.008, lean vs. OIR p<0.001). OIS became significantly hungrier after fructose (p=0.015). PYY was not significantly different at baseline, varied minimally after glucose, and rose after fructose. Conclusion Compared to lean, OIS adolescents have impaired acyl-ghrelin responses to fructose but not glucose, whereas OIR adolescents have blunted responses to both. Diminished suppression of acyl-ghrelin in childhood obesity, particularly if accompanied by insulin resistance, may promote hunger and overeating. PMID:25645909

  4. Suppression of Adaptive Immune Cell Activation Does Not Alter Innate Immune Adipose Inflammation or Insulin Resistance in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Ozcan, Lale; Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Tabas, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a major contributor to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whereas innate immune cells, notably macrophages, contribute to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation and insulin resistance, the role of adaptive immunity is less well defined. To address this critical gap, we used a model in which endogenous activation of T cells was suppressed in obese mice by blocking MyD88-mediated maturation of CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. VAT CD11c+ cells from Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control Myd88fl/fl mice were defective in activating T cells in vitro, and VAT T and B cell activation was markedly reduced in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl obese mice. However, neither macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation nor systemic inflammation were altered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl mice, thereby enabling a focused analysis on adaptive immunity. Unexpectedly, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and the glucose response to glucose and insulin were completely unaltered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control obese mice. Thus, CD11c+ cells activate VAT T and B cells in obese mice, but suppression of this process does not have a discernible effect on macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation or systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26317499

  5. Nesfatin-1 in childhood and adolescent obesity and its association with food intake, body composition and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Ghada M; Yamamah, Gamal; Ibrahim, Amani; El-Lebedy, Dalia; Farid, Tarek M; Mahmoud, Rasha

    2014-01-10

    Nesfatin-1 is an anorexigenic peptide that controls feeding behavior and glucose homeostasis. However, there is little data that exists regarding nesfatin-1 secretion in obese children and young adolescents. The aim of this study is to investigate serum nesfatin-1 in childhood and adolescent obesity and to study potential correlations with food intake, anthropometric indices, body composition and insulin resistance. Forty obese children and adolescents and 40 healthy control subjects were studied. Anthropometric measurements were assessed, dietary food intake was evaluated based on 3-days food record and body composition indices were evaluated using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were measured. Fasting serum nesfatin-1 was quantitatively assayed by ELISA. Serum nesfatin-1 was significantly higher in obese group (2.49±1.96 ng/ml) than in control group (0.70±0.81 ng/ml), P=0.001. Positive correlations with serum insulin (P=0.001), HOMA-IR (P=0.000), BMI-SDS (P=0.04), body fat % (P=0.000), fat mass (P=0.000), fat free mass (P=0.03), CHO % (P=0.000), and saturated fat % (P=0.01) were found. While significant negative correlation with protein % (P=0.000) was observed. In conclusion, our results denote that nesfatin-1 might have an important role in regulation of food intake and pathogenesis of insulin resistance in obese children and young adolescents. PMID:24333832

  6. Circulating Zonulin, a Marker of Intestinal Permeability, Is Increased in Association with Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Sabater, Mònica; Ortega, Francisco; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Zonulin is the only physiological mediator known to regulate intestinal permeability reversibly by modulating intercellular tight junctions. To investigate the relationship between intestinal permeability and obesity-associated metabolic disturbances in humans, we aimed to study circulating zonulin according to obesity and insulin resistance. Circulating zonulin (ELISA) was measured in 123 caucasian men in association with inflammatory and metabolic parameters (including minimal model-measured insulin sensitivity). Circulating zonulin increased with body mass index (BMI), waist to hip ratio (WHR), fasting insulin, fasting triglycerides, uric acid and IL-6, and negatively correlated with HDL-cholesterol and insulin sensitivity. In multiple regression analysis, insulin sensitivity (p = 0.002) contributed independently to circulating zonulin variance, after controlling for the effects of BMI, fasting triglycerides and age. When circulating IL-6 was added to this model, only BMI (p = 0.01) contributed independently to circulating zonulin variance. In conclusion, the relationship between insulin sensitivity and circulating zonulin might be mediated through the obesity-related circulating IL-6 increase. PMID:22629362

  7. Low Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Level in Obesity Nephropathy: A New Risk Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Ioana; Navarro Díaz, Maruja; Serra, Assumpta; Granada, Marisa; Lopez, Dolores; Romero, Ramon; Bonet, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) is a hormone involved in cell growth and other important processes. In the kidney, IGF-1 has a stimulating effect, increasing the blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Although many experimental animal studies regarding the role of IGF-1 in the kidney have been conducted, few human studies are available in the literature. Obesity is a cause of renal failure, and several glomerular lesions associated with obesity have been described. However, no studies regarding the levels of IGF-1 in morbidly obese patients with renal injury associated with obesity have been conducted. Aim To determine the serum IGF-1 concentrations in morbidly obese patients with normal renal function but with different types of early obesity-related glomerular lesions and to evaluate the possible relationship between IGF-1 and the presence of renal lesions. Methods Eighty morbidly obese patients with renal biopsy, including 11 patients with no evidence of renal lesion, 17 patients with single glomerulomegaly, 21 patients with single podocyte hypertrophy, 10 patients with glomerulomegaly and podocyte hypertrophy, 5 patients with focal segmental hyalinosis, and 16 patients with increased mesangial matrix and/or mesangial proliferation, participated in this study. Biological parameters, including serum IGF-1 concentrations with the standard deviation score for age (SDS-IGF-1), were determined for all patients. Results Eighty patients (50 women and 30 men) with a mean BMI of 52.63 ± 8.71 and a mean age of 42.40 ± 9.45 years were included in this study. IGF-1, IGF-1 SDS and IGF-1BP3 levels according to the renal injury were compared (normal glomeruli: IGF-1 = 190.17 ± 72.46; glomerulomegaly: IGF-1 = 122.3 ± 50.05; podocyte hypertrophy: IGF-1 = 119.81 ± 60.34; focal segmental hyalinosis: IGF-1 170.98 ± 100.83, increased mesangial matrix and/or mesangial proliferation: IGF-1 117.73 ± 63.87). Statistically significant differences were

  8. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yasui, Mika; Tamura, Yukinori; Minami, Manabu; Higuchi, Sei; Fujikawa, Risako; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Arai, Hidenori; Murayama, Toshinori; Yokode, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist–treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle–treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator–activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator–activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation

  9. Inverse Relationship of the CMKLR1 Relative Expression and Chemerin Serum Levels in Obesity with Dysmetabolic Phenotype and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Castro-Albarrán, Jorge; Chavarría-Ávila, Efraín; Guzmán-Ornelas, Milton-Omar; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Petri, Marcelo-Herón; Ramírez-Cedano, Joel-Isidro; Aguilar-Aldrete, María-Elena; Ríos-Ibarra, Clara; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background. In obesity there is a subclinical chronic low-grade inflammatory response where insulin resistance (IR) may develop. Chemerin is secreted in white adipose tissue and promotes low-grade inflammatory process, where it expressed CMKLR1 receptor. The role of chemerin and CMKLR1 in inflammatory process secondary to obesity is not defined yet. Methods. Cross-sectional study with 134 individuals classified as with and without obesity by body mass index (BMI) and IR. Body fat storage measurements and metabolic and inflammatory markers were measured by routine methods. Soluble chemerin and basal levels of insulin by ELISA and relative expression of CMKLR1 were evaluated with qPCR and 2−ΔΔCT method. Results. Differences (P < 0.05) were observed between obesity and lean individuals in body fat storage measurements and metabolic-inflammatory markers. Both CMKLR1 expression and chemerin levels were increased in obesity without IR. Soluble chemerin levels correlate with adiposity and metabolic markers (r = 8.8% to 38.5%), P < 0.05. Conclusion. The increment of CMKLR1 expression was associated with insulin production. Increased serum levels of chemerin in obesity were observed, favoring a dysmetabolic response. The results observed in this study suggest that both chemerin and CMKLR1 have opposite expression in the context of low-grade inflammatory response manifested in the development of IR. PMID:27239101

  10. Lemon balm extract causes potent antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects in insulin-resistant obese mice.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christopher; Wowro, Sylvia J; Freiwald, Anja; Kodelja, Vitam; Abdel-Aziz, Heba; Kelber, Olaf; Sauer, Sascha

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decades polyetiological metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes have emerged as a global epidemic. Efficient strategies for prevention and treatment include dietary intervention and the development of validated nutraceuticals. Safe extracts of edible plants provide a resource of structurally diverse molecules that can effectively interfere with multifactorial diseases. In this study, we describe the application of ethanolic lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) leaves extract for the treatment of insulin-resistance and dyslipidemia in mice. We show that lemon balm extract (LBE) activates the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which have key roles in the regulation of whole body glucose and lipid metabolism. Application of LBE (0.6 mg/mL) to human primary adipocytes resulted in specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor target gene expression. LBE treatment of insulin-resistant high-fat diet-fed C57BL/6 mice (200 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks considerably reduced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, plasma triacylglycerol, nonesterified fatty acids and LDL/VLDL cholesterol levels. Taken together, ethanolic lemon balm extract can potentially be used to prevent or concomitantly treat type 2 diabetes and associated disorders such as dyslipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24272914

  11. Functional in vivo interactions between JNK1 and JNK2 isoforms in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tuncman, Gürol; Hirosumi, Jiro; Solinas, Giovanni; Chang, Lufen; Karin, Michael; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2006-07-11

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are key regulators of inflammation and interfere with insulin action in cultured cells and whole animals. Obesity increases total JNK activity, and JNK1, but not JNK2, deficiency results in reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, a higher-than-normal level of JNK activation is observed in Jnk2(-/-) mice, particularly in the liver, indicating an interaction between the isoforms that might have masked the metabolic activity of JNK2 in isolated mutant mice. To address the role of the JNK2 isoform in metabolic homeostasis, we intercrossed Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk2(-/-) mice and examined body weight and glucose metabolism in the resulting mutant allele combinations. Among all of the viable genotypes examined, we observed only reduced body weight and increased insulin sensitivity in Jnk1(-/-) and Jnk1(+/-)Jnk2(-/-) mice. These two groups of mice also exhibited reduced total JNK activity and cytokine expression in liver tissue compared with all other genotypes examined. These data indicate that the JNK2 isoform is also involved in metabolic regulation, but its function is not obvious when JNK1 is fully expressed because of regulatory crosstalk between the two isoforms. PMID:16818881

  12. Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract attenuates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  13. Decaffeinated Green Coffee Bean Extract Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue. PMID:24817902

  14. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Obesity: Navigating the Pathophysiologic Labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez, Mervin; Olivar, Luis; Rojas, Milagros; Morillo, Jessenia; Mejías, José; Calvo, María; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a highly prevalent endocrine-metabolic disorder that implies various severe consequences to female health, including alarming rates of infertility. Although its exact etiology remains elusive, it is known to feature several hormonal disturbances, including hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance (IR), and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin appears to disrupt all components of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-ovary axis, and ovarian tissue insulin resistance results in impaired metabolic signaling but intact mitogenic and steroidogenic activity, favoring hyperandrogenemia, which appears to be the main culprit of the clinical picture in PCOS. In turn, androgens may lead back to IR by increasing levels of free fatty acids and modifying muscle tissue composition and functionality, perpetuating this IR-hyperinsulinemia-hyperandrogenemia cycle. Nonobese women with PCOS showcase several differential features, with unique biochemical and hormonal profiles. Nevertheless, lean and obese patients have chronic inflammation mediating the long term cardiometabolic complications and comorbidities observed in women with PCOS, including dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. Given these severe implications, it is important to thoroughly understand the pathophysiologic interconnections underlying PCOS, in order to provide superior therapeutic strategies and warrant improved quality of life to women with this syndrome. PMID:25763405

  15. [A preliminary study on the mechanism of impaired beta cell function in monosodium glutamate obese rat with insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai-Nan; Liu, Quan; Shen, Zhu-Fang

    2008-11-01

    This study is to evaluate beta cell function and investigate the mechanism of impaired pancreatic islet beta cell function in monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rat with insulin resistance, an animal model of metabolic syndrome. Insulin tolerance test was used to screen MSG obese rats with insulin resistance. Blood concentrations of glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol and insulin were determined. Beta cell function was assessed with hyperglycemic clamp technique. The morphological alterations in pancreas and changes of islet beta cell mass were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Gomori aldehyde fuchsin staining. Lipid, oxidative stress relevant factors, nitric oxide (NO) level and activity of ATPase in pancreas and pancreatic mitochondrial were tested. The MSG obese rats with insulin resistance could be validated as a typical metabolic syndrome animal model possessing increased fasting plasma triglycerides and insulin (P < 0. 001), markedly decreased weight indices of pancreas and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Gomori aldehyde fuchsin staining showed increased adipocytes and fibroplasia deposition in pancreas and reduced beta cell mass. The increased contents of triglyceride and NO level, the decreased SOD levels and activities of total ATPase (P < 0.001), Na+-K+-ATPase (P < 0.001) and Ca2+-Mg2+-ATPase (P < 0.01) were observed in pancreas and its mitochondria versus normal rat. The study demonstrates that accumulation of lipids in pancreas could lead to increased systemic indicators of inflammation, such as NO, which may influence the activities of several kinds of ATPase in cell membranes and interfere the ion transport, substance metabolism and energy production in pancreas. Finally the MSG obese rats characterized with metabolic syndrome displayed an impairment of beta cell function. PMID:19239028

  16. Bif-1 deficiency impairs lipid homeostasis and causes obesity accompanied by insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Desai, Neelam; Zhang, Jun; Serfass, Jacob M.; Shi, Yu-Guang; Lynch, Christopher J.; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Bif-1 is a membrane-curvature inducing protein that is implicated in the regulation of autophagy and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that Bif-1 plays a critical role in regulating lipid catabolism to control the size of lipid droplets and prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance upon aging or dietary challenge. Our data show that Bif-1 deficiency promotes the expansion of adipose tissue mass without altering food intake or physical activities. While Bif-1 is dispensable for adipose tissue development, its deficiency reduces the basal rate of adipose tissue lipolysis and results in adipocyte hypertrophy upon aging. The importance of Bif-1 in lipid turnover is not limited to adipose tissue since fasting and refeeding-induced lipid droplet clearance is also attenuated by Bif-1 loss in the liver. Interestingly, obesity induced by a high fat-diet or Bif-1 deficiency downregulates the expression of proteins involved in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, including Atg9a and Lamp1 in the adipose tissue. These findings thus identify Bif-1 as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis to prevent the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated metabolic complications. PMID:26857140

  17. Bif-1 deficiency impairs lipid homeostasis and causes obesity accompanied by insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Desai, Neelam; Zhang, Jun; Serfass, Jacob M; Shi, Yu-Guang; Lynch, Christopher J; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Bif-1 is a membrane-curvature inducing protein that is implicated in the regulation of autophagy and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that Bif-1 plays a critical role in regulating lipid catabolism to control the size of lipid droplets and prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance upon aging or dietary challenge. Our data show that Bif-1 deficiency promotes the expansion of adipose tissue mass without altering food intake or physical activities. While Bif-1 is dispensable for adipose tissue development, its deficiency reduces the basal rate of adipose tissue lipolysis and results in adipocyte hypertrophy upon aging. The importance of Bif-1 in lipid turnover is not limited to adipose tissue since fasting and refeeding-induced lipid droplet clearance is also attenuated by Bif-1 loss in the liver. Interestingly, obesity induced by a high fat-diet or Bif-1 deficiency downregulates the expression of proteins involved in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, including Atg9a and Lamp1 in the adipose tissue. These findings thus identify Bif-1 as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis to prevent the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated metabolic complications. PMID:26857140

  18. Adipose-Resident Group 1 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Timothy E; Rapp, Moritz; Fan, Xiying; Weizman, Orr-El; Bhardwaj, Priya; Adams, Nicholas M; Walzer, Thierry; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-08-16

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) function to protect epithelial barriers against pathogens and maintain tissue homeostasis in both barrier and non-barrier tissues. Here, utilizing Eomes reporter mice, we identify a subset of adipose group 1 ILC (ILC1) and demonstrate a role for these cells in metabolic disease. Adipose ILC1s were dependent on the transcription factors Nfil3 and T-bet but phenotypically and functionally distinct from adipose mature natural killer (NK) and immature NK cells. Analysis of parabiotic mice revealed that adipose ILC1s maintained long-term tissue residency. Diet-induced obesity drove early production of interleukin (IL)-12 in adipose tissue depots and led to the selective proliferation and accumulation of adipose-resident ILC1s in a manner dependent on the IL-12 receptor and STAT4. ILC1-derived interferon-γ was necessary and sufficient to drive proinflammatory macrophage polarization to promote obesity-associated insulin resistance. Thus, adipose-resident ILC1s contribute to obesity-related pathology in response to dysregulated local proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:27496734

  19. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Picklo, Matthew J.; Thyfault, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  20. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats.

    PubMed

    Picklo, Matthew J; Thyfault, John P

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E and vitamin C blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial function and induces insulin resistance (IR), no data exist as to whether supplementation with vitamin E and vitamin C modify responses to exercise in pre-existing obesity. We tested the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with vitamin E (0.4 g α-tocopherol acetate/kg) and vitamin C (0.5 g/kg) blocks exercise-induced improvements on IR and mitochondrial content in obese rats maintained on a high-fat (45% fat energy (en)) diet. Diet-induced obese, sedentary rats had a 2-fold higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and larger insulin area under the curve following glucose tolerances test than rats fed a low-fat (10% fat en) diet. Exercising (12 weeks at 5 times per week in a motorized wheel) of obese rats normalized IR indices, an effect not modified by vitamin E and vitamin C. Vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation with exercise elevated mtDNA content in adipose and skeletal muscle to a greater extent (20%) than exercise alone in a depot-specific manner. On the other hand, vitamin C and vitamin E decreased exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial protein content for complex I (40%) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (35%) in a muscle-dependent manner. These data indicate that vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation in obese rodents does not modify exercise-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity but that changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial protein expression may be modified by antioxidant supplementation. PMID:25761734

  1. Intermuscular and perimuscular fat expansion in obesity correlates with skeletal muscle T cell and macrophage infiltration and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilvira M.; Dai Perrard, Xiao-Yuan; Brunner, Gerd; Lui, Hua; Sparks, Lauren M.; Smith, Steven R.; Wang, Xukui; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Wu, Huaizhu; Ballantyne, Christie M.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Limited numbers of studies demonstrated obesity-induced macrophage infiltration in skeletal muscle (SM), but dynamics of immune cell accumulation and contribution of T cells to SM insulin resistance are understudied. Subjects/Methods T cells and macrophage markers were examined in SM of obese humans by RT-PCR. Mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 2–24 weeks, and time course of macrophage and T cell accumulation was assessed by flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR. Extramyocellular adipose tissue (EMAT) was quantified by high-resolution micro-CT, and correlation to T cell number in SM was examined. CD11a−/− mice and C57BL/6 mice were treated with CD11a-neutralizing antibody to determine the role of CD11a in T cell accumulation in SM. To investigate the involvement JAK/STAT, the major pathway for T helper I (TH1) cytokine IFNγ? in SM and adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance, mice were treated with a JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor, baricitinib. Results Macrophage and T cells markers were upregulated in SM of obese compared with lean humans. SM of obese mice had higher expression of inflammatory cytokines, with macrophages increasing by 2 weeks on HFD and T cells increasing by 8 weeks. The immune cells were localized in EMAT. Micro-CT revealed that EMAT expansion in obese mice correlated with T cell infiltration and insulin resistance. Deficiency or neutralization of CD11a reduced T cell accumulation in SM of obese mice. T cells polarized into a proinflammatory TH1 phenotype, with increased STAT1 phosphorylation in SM of obese mice. In vivo inhibition of JAK/STAT pathway with baricitinib reduced T cell numbers and activation markers in SM and adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance in obese mice. Conclusions Obesity-induced expansion of EMAT in SM was associated with accumulation and proinflammatory polarization of T cells, which may regulate SM metabolic functions through paracrine mechanisms. Obesity-associated SM

  2. Common genetic variants highlight the role of insulin resistance and body fat distribution in type 2 diabetes, independent of obesity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Fall, Tove; Pasko, Dorota; Barker, Adam; Sharp, Stephen J; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Barroso, Inês; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Crowe, Francesca L; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Fagherazzi, Guy; Ferrannini, Ele; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Grioni, Sara; Groop, Leif C; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Kühn, Tilman; Lotta, Luca A; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Roswall, Nina; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sala, Núria; Sánchez, María-José; Schulze, Matthias B; Siddiq, Afshan; Slimani, Nadia; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke M W; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; McCarthy, Mark I; Semple, Robert K; Riboli, Elio; Walker, Mark; Ingelsson, Erik; Frayling, Tim M; Savage, David B; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to validate genetic variants as instruments for insulin resistance and secretion, to characterize their association with intermediate phenotypes, and to investigate their role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk among normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals. We investigated the association of genetic scores with euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp- and oral glucose tolerance test-based measures of insulin resistance and secretion and a range of metabolic measures in up to 18,565 individuals. We also studied their association with T2D risk among normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals in up to 8,124 incident T2D cases. The insulin resistance score was associated with lower insulin sensitivity measured by M/I value (β in SDs per allele [95% CI], -0.03 [-0.04, -0.01]; P = 0.004). This score was associated with lower BMI (-0.01 [-0.01, -0.0]; P = 0.02) and gluteofemoral fat mass (-0.03 [-0.05, -0.02; P = 1.4 × 10(-6)) and with higher alanine transaminase (0.02 [0.01, 0.03]; P = 0.002) and γ-glutamyl transferase (0.02 [0.01, 0.03]; P = 0.001). While the secretion score had a stronger association with T2D in leaner individuals (Pinteraction = 0.001), we saw no difference in the association of the insulin resistance score with T2D among BMI or waist strata (Pinteraction > 0.31). While insulin resistance is often considered secondary to obesity, the association of the insulin resistance score with lower BMI and adiposity and with incident T2D even among individuals of normal weight highlights the role of insulin resistance and ectopic fat distribution in T2D, independently of body size. PMID:24947364

  3. Skeletal effects of obesity are prevented by a diet containing soy protein isolate via preservation of insulin signaling in bone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In both rodents and humans, excessive consumption of diets high in saturated fat and cholesterol during postnatal life is known to result in global energy imbalance, obesity, and insulin resistance. However, the effects of such a "Western diet" (WD) on bone development and remodeling is poorly under...

  4. Soy protein isolates prevent loss of bone quantity associated with obesity in rats through regulation of insulin signaling in osteoblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In both rodents and humans, excessive consumption of a typical Western diet high in saturated fats and cholesterol is known to result in disruption of energy metabolism and development of obesity and insulin resistance. However, how these high-fat, energy-dense diets affect bone development, morphol...

  5. BODY COMPOSITION AND PLASMA ADIPOCYTOKINS, GHRELIN AND INSULIN BEFORE AND AFTER WEIGHT LOSS IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determine the relationships between changes in body composition, and plasma concentrations of hormones (acylation stimulating protein (ASP), adiponectin, leptin, insulin, and ghrelin), complement C3 and C-reactive protein (CRP). 35 overweight/obese (BMI 28-39 kg/m2), hyperlipidemic women aged 35-60 ...

  6. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  7. Soy protein isolates prevent loss of bone quantity associated with obesity in rats through regulation of insulin signaling in osteoblasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In both rodents and humans, excessive consumption of a typical Western diet high in saturated fats and cholesterol during postnatal life is known to result in disruption of energy metabolism, development of obesity and of insulin resistance. However, how these high fat, energy dense diets affect bon...

  8. Swim training of monosodium L-glutamate-obese mice improves the impaired insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Rosiane Aparecida; Branco, Renato Chaves Souto; Gravena, Clarice; Barella, Luiz Felipe; da Silva Franco, Claudinéia Conationi; Andreazzi, Ana Eliza; de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Picinato, Maria Cecília; de Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cezar

    2013-06-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate changes on glucose homoeostasis and of the insulin receptor (IR) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) signalling in pancreatic islets from MSG-obese mice submitted to or not submitted to swim training. Swim training of 90-day-old MSG mice was used to evaluate whether signalling pathways of the IR and IRS-1 in islets are involved with the insulin resistance and glucose intolerance observed in this obese animal model. The results showed that IR tyrosine phosphorylation (pIR) was reduced by 42 % in MSG-obese mice (MSG, 6.7 ± 0.2 arbitrary units (a.u.); control, 11.5 ± 0.4 a.u.); on the other hand, exercise training increased pIR by 76 % in MSG mice without affecting control mice (MSG, 11.8 ± 0.3; control, 12.8 ± 0.2 a.u.). Although the treatment with MSG increased IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation (pIRS-1) by 96 % (MSG, 17.02 ± 0.6; control, 8.7 ± 0.2 a.u.), exercise training also increased it in both groups (control, 13.6 ± 0.1; MSG, 22.2 ± 1.1 a.u.). Current research shows that the practice of swim training increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 which can modulate the effect caused by obesity in insulin receptors. PMID:22983867

  9. A 12-week aerobic exercise program reduces hepatic fat accumulation and insulin resistance in obese, Hispanic adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rise in obesity-related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Currently, only limited data are available on the effects of exercise programs on insulin resistance, and visceral, hepatic, and intramyocellular fat accumulation. We hypothesized t...

  10. Prevalence of generalized & abdominal obesity in urban & rural India- the ICMR - INDIAB Study (Phase-I) [ICMR - INDIAB-3

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Rajendra; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Joshi, Shashank R.; Bhansali, Anil; Deepa, Mohan; Joshi, Prashant P.; Dhandania, Vinay K.; Madhu, Sri Venkata; Rao, Paturi Vishnupriya; Geetha, Loganathan; Subashini, Radhakrishnan; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Shukla, Deepak Kumar; Kaur, Tanvir; Mohan, Viswanathan; Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Overweight and obesity are rapidly increasing in countries like India. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of generalized, abdominal and combined obesity in urban and rural India. Methods: Phase I of the ICMR-INDIAB study was conducted in a representative population of three States [Tamil Nadu (TN), Maharashtra (MH) and Jharkhand (JH)] and one Union Territory (UT)[Chandigarh (CH)] of India. A stratified multi-stage sampling design was adopted and individuals ≥20 yr of age were included. WHO Asia Pacific guidelines were used to define overweight [body mass index (BMI) ≥23 kg/m2 but <25 kg/m2), generalized obesity (GO, BMI≥25kg/m2), abdominal obesity (AO, waist circumference ≥90 cm for men and ≥80cm for women) and combined obesity (CO, GO plus AO). Of the 14,277 participants, 13,800 subjects (response rate, 96.7%) were included for the analysis (urban: n=4,063; rural: n=9737). Results: The prevalence of GO was 24.6, 16.6, 11.8 and 31.3 per cent among residents of TN, MH, JH and CH, while the prevalence of AO was 26.6, 18.7, 16.9 and 36.1 per cent, respectively. CO was present in 19.3, 13.0, 9.8 and 26.6 per cent of the TN, MH, JH and CH population. The prevalence of GO, AO and CO were significantly higher among urban residents compared to rural residents in all the four regions studied. The prevalence of overweight was 15.2, 11.3, 7.8 and 15.9 per cent among residents of TN, MH, JH and CH, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female gender, hypertension, diabetes, higher socio-economic status, physical inactivity and urban residence were significantly associated with GO, AO and CO in all the four regions studied. Age was significantly associated with AO and CO, but not with GO. Interpretation & conclusions: Prevalence of AO as well as of GO were high in India. Extrapolated to the whole country, 135, 153 and 107 million individuals will have GO, AO and CO, respectively. However, these figures

  11. Association Between Obesity, Abdominal Obesity, and Adiposity and the Prevalence of Atopic Dermatitis in Young Korean Adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Kyung Do; Jung, Han mi; Youn, Young Hoon; Lee, Jun Young; Park, Yong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Whether obesity is a risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between obesity and AD in Korean young adults. Methods We included nationally representative data of 5,202 Korean adults aged 19-40 years, obtained from the cross-sectional Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010. Results Single (unmarried) status was more frequently observed in AD patients (male, [P=0.0002] and female, [P<0.0001]). AD prevalence exhibited a U-shape trend in relation to body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and total body fat (BF) percentage, especially in young adult women. Women with BMI ≥25 kg/m2, WC ≥80 cm, and highest quartile (Q4) of total BF percentage had the highest prevalence of AD. The odds ratio (OR) for participants with both BMI ≥25 kg/m2 and WC ≥80 cm was 3.29 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.71-3.55); therefore, having both general and abdominal obesity was considered a prominent risk factor for AD in young women. After adjustment for confounding factors, including age, smoking, alcohol drinking, exercise, vitamin D, income level, and single status, high BMI (≥30 kg/m2) (OR=4.08, 95% CI: 1.53-10.93), high WC (≥80 cm) (OR=2.05, 95% CI: 1.07-3.94), and high BF percentage (Q4) (OR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.24-3.57) were shown to be significantly associated with AD in young adult women. Conclusions In this large-scale nation-wide study of Korean adults, obesity was positively related to the presence of AD in women. Our findings suggest that weight management may help prevent AD. PMID:26739403

  12. Insulin Receptor Signaling in the GnRH Neuron Plays a Role in the Abnormal GnRH Pulsatility of Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Sara A.; Herrera, Danny; Sklar, Bonnie; Wu, Sheng; Wondisford, Fredric; Radovick, Sally; Wolfe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Infertility associated with obesity is characterized by abnormal hormone release from reproductive tissues in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary. These tissues maintain insulin sensitivity upon peripheral insulin resistance. Insulin receptor signaling may play a role in the dysregulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion in obesity, but the interdependence of hormone secretion in the reproductive axis and the multi-hormone and tissue dysfunction in obesity hinders investigations of putative contributing factors to the disrupted GnRH secretion. To determine the role of GnRH insulin receptor signaling in the dysregulation of GnRH secretion in obesity, we created murine models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) with and without intact insulin signaling in the GnRH neuron. Obese control female mice were infertile with higher luteinizing hormone levels and higher GnRH pulse amplitude and total pulsatile secretion compared to lean control mice. In contrast, DIO mice with a GnRH specific knockout of insulin receptor had improved fertility, luteinizing hormone levels approaching lean mice, and GnRH pulse amplitude and total secretion similar to lean mice. Pituitary responsiveness was similar between genotypes. These results suggest that in the obese state, insulin receptor signaling in GnRH neurons increases GnRH pulsatile secretion and consequent LH secretion, contributing to reproductive dysfunction. PMID:25780937

  13. Adrenomedullin 2 Improves Early Obesity-Induced Adipose Insulin Resistance by Inhibiting the Class II MHC in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Yang; Lv, Ying; Zhang, Heng; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Xian; Jiang, Changtao

    2016-08-01

    MHC class II (MHCII) antigen presentation in adipocytes was reported to trigger early adipose inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the benefits of MHCII inhibition in adipocytes remain largely unknown. Here, we showed that human plasma polypeptide adrenomedullin 2 (ADM2) levels were negatively correlated with HOMA of insulin resistance in obese human. Adipose-specific human ADM2 transgenic (aADM2-tg) mice were generated. The aADM2-tg mice displayed improvements in high-fat diet-induced early adipose insulin resistance. This was associated with increased insulin signaling and decreased systemic inflammation. ADM2 dose-dependently inhibited CIITA-induced MHCII expression by increasing Blimp1 expression in a CRLR/RAMP1-cAMP-dependent manner in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, ADM2 treatment restored the high-fat diet-induced early insulin resistance in adipose tissue, mainly via inhibition of adipocyte MHCII antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. This study demonstrates that ADM2 is a promising candidate for the treatment of early obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:27207558

  14. Early-onset obesity dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces asthma-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Dinger, Katharina; Kasper, Philipp; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Vohlen, Christina; Jobst, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg; Alejandre Alcázar, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but the molecular mechanisms linking both remain elusive. Since obesity leads to chronic low-grade inflammation and affects metabolic signaling we hypothesized that postnatal hyperalimentation (pHA) induced by maternal high-fat-diet during lactation leads to early-onset obesity and dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling, resulting in metabolic programming of asthma-like disease in adult mice. Offspring with pHA showed at postnatal day 21 (P21): (1) early-onset obesity, greater fat-mass, increased expression of IL-1β, IL-23, and Tnf-α, greater serum leptin and reduced glucose tolerance than Control (Ctrl); (2) less STAT3/AMPKα-activation, greater SOCS3 expression and reduced AKT/GSK3β-activation in the lung, indicative of leptin resistance and insulin signaling, respectively; (3) increased lung mRNA of IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and Tnf-α. At P70 body weight, fat-mass, and cytokine mRNA expression were similar in the pHA and Ctrl, but serum leptin and IL-6 were greater, and insulin signaling and glucose tolerance impaired. Peribronchial elastic fiber content, bronchial smooth muscle layer, and deposition of connective tissue were not different after pHA. Despite unaltered bronchial structure mice after pHA exhibited significantly increased airway reactivity. Our study does not only demonstrate that early-onset obesity transiently activates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces airway hyperreactivity in mice, but also provides new insights into metabolic programming of childhood obesity-related asthma. PMID:27087690

  15. Early-onset obesity dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces asthma-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinger, Katharina; Kasper, Philipp; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Vohlen, Christina; Jobst, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg; Alejandre Alcázar, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but the molecular mechanisms linking both remain elusive. Since obesity leads to chronic low-grade inflammation and affects metabolic signaling we hypothesized that postnatal hyperalimentation (pHA) induced by maternal high-fat-diet during lactation leads to early-onset obesity and dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling, resulting in metabolic programming of asthma-like disease in adult mice. Offspring with pHA showed at postnatal day 21 (P21): (1) early-onset obesity, greater fat-mass, increased expression of IL-1β, IL-23, and Tnf-α, greater serum leptin and reduced glucose tolerance than Control (Ctrl); (2) less STAT3/AMPKα-activation, greater SOCS3 expression and reduced AKT/GSK3β-activation in the lung, indicative of leptin resistance and insulin signaling, respectively; (3) increased lung mRNA of IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and Tnf-α. At P70 body weight, fat-mass, and cytokine mRNA expression were similar in the pHA and Ctrl, but serum leptin and IL-6 were greater, and insulin signaling and glucose tolerance impaired. Peribronchial elastic fiber content, bronchial smooth muscle layer, and deposition of connective tissue were not different after pHA. Despite unaltered bronchial structure mice after pHA exhibited significantly increased airway reactivity. Our study does not only demonstrate that early-onset obesity transiently activates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces airway hyperreactivity in mice, but also provides new insights into metabolic programming of childhood obesity-related asthma. PMID:27087690

  16. CTLA-4Ig immunotherapy of obesity-induced insulin resistance by manipulation of macrophage polarization in adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Masakazu; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Batchuluun, Battsetseg; Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •CTLA-4Ig completely alleviates HFD-induced insulin resistance. •CTLA-4Ig reduces epididymal and subcutaneous fat tissue weight and adipocyte size. •CTLA-4Ig alters ATM polarization from inflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2. •CTLA-4Ig may lead to a novel anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent. •We identified the mechanism of the novel favorable effects of CTLA-4lg. -- Abstract: It has been established that obesity alters the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue and, together with accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have reported that shifting the polarization of macrophages from M1 to M2 can alleviate adipose tissue inflammation, manipulation of macrophage polarization has not been considered as a specific therapy. Here, we determined whether cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4IgG1 (CTLA-4Ig) can ameliorate insulin resistance by induction of macrophages from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 polarization in the adipose tissues of high fat diet-induced insulin-resistant mice. CTLA4-Ig treatment prevented insulin resistance by changing gene expression to M2 polarization, which increased the levels of arginase 1. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirmed the alteration of polarization from CD11c (M1)- to CD206 (M2)-positive cells. Concomitantly, CTLA-4Ig treatment resulted in weight reductions of epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissues, which may be closely related to overexpression of apoptosis inhibitors in macrophages. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels decreased significantly. In contrast, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and adiponectin expression increased significantly in subcutaneous adipose tissue. This novel mechanism of CTLA-4lg immunotherapy may lead to an ideal anti-obesity/inflammation/insulin resistance agent.

  17. CB1 antagonism restores hepatic insulin sensitivity without normalization of adiposity in diet-induced obese dogs

    PubMed Central

    Woolcott, Orison O.; Hsu, Isabel R.; Stefanoski, Darko; Harrison, L. Nicole; Zheng, Dan; Lottati, Maya; Kolka, Cathryn; Catalano, Karyn J.; Chiu, Jenny D.; Kabir, Morvarid; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.; Richey, Joyce M.

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is highly implicated in the development of insulin resistance associated with obesity. It has been shown that antagonism of the CB1 receptor improves insulin sensitivity (SI). However, it is unknown whether this improvement is due to the direct effect of CB1 blockade on peripheral tissues or secondary to decreased fat mass. Here, we examine in the canine dog model the longitudinal changes in SI and fat deposition when obesity was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD) and animals were treated with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. SI was assessed (n = 20) in animals fed a HFD for 6 wk to establish obesity. Thereafter, while HFD was continued for 16 additional weeks, animals were divided into two groups: rimonabant (1.25 mg·kg−1·day−1 RIM; n = 11) and placebo (n = 9). Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were performed to evaluate changes in insulin resistance and glucose turnover before HFD (week −6) after HFD but before treatment (week 0) and at weeks 2, 6, 12, and 16 of treatment (or placebo) + HFD. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to determine adiposity- related changes in SI. Animals developed significant insulin resistance and increased visceral and subcutaneous adiposity after 6 wk of HFD. Treatment with RIM resulted in a modest decrease in total trunk fat with relatively little change in peripheral glucose uptake. However, there was significant improvement in hepatic insulin resistance after only 2 wk of RIM treatment with a concomitant increase in plasma adiponectin levels; both were maintained for the duration of the RIM treatment. CB1 receptor antagonism appears to have a direct effect on hepatic insulin sensitivity that may be mediated by adiponectin and independent of pronounced reductions in body fat. However, the relatively modest effect on peripheral insulin sensitivity suggests that significant improvements may be secondary to reduced fat mass. PMID:22374758

  18. Snacking is associated with reduced risk for overweight and reduced abdominal obesity in adolescents aged 12-18 years: NHANES, 1999-2004

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to examine associations of snacking with weight status and abdominal obesity in adolescents aged 12-18 years (n = 5,811). Snacks/drinks were combined when eating occasions were named in the 24-h recall, but analysis separated snacks from snacks/drinks that were only drinks....

  19. Ginkgo biloba extract improves insulin signaling and attenuates inflammation in retroperitoneal adipose tissue depot of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Bruna Kelly Sousa; Banin, Renata Mancini; Dornellas, Ana Paula Segantine; de Andrade, Iracema Senna; Zemdegs, Juliane Costa Silva; Caperuto, Luciana Chagas; Oyama, Lila Missae; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Telles, Monica Marques

    2015-01-01

    Due to the high incidence and severity of obesity and its related disorders, it is highly desirable to develop new strategies to treat or even to prevent its development. We have previously described that Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) improved insulin resistance and reduced body weight gain of obese rats. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effect of GbE on both inflammatory cascade and insulin signaling in retroperitoneal fat depot of diet-induced obese rats. Rats were fed with high fat diet for 2 months and thereafter treated for 14 days with 500 mg/kg of GbE. Rats were then euthanized and samples from retroperitoneal fat depot were used for western blotting, RT-PCR, and ELISA experiments. The GbE treatment promoted a significant reduction on both food/energy intake and body weight gain in comparison to the nontreated obese rats. In addition, a significant increase of both Adipo R1 and IL-10 gene expressions and IR and Akt phosphorylation was also observed, while NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and TNF-α levels were significantly reduced. Our data suggest that GbE might have potential as a therapy to treat obesity-related metabolic diseases, with special interest to treat obese subjects resistant to adhere to a nutritional education program. PMID:25960614

  20. Diminished anabolic signaling response to insulin induced by intramuscular lipid accumulation is associated with inflammation in aging but not obesity.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Donato A; McDonald, Devin J; Rice, Nicholas P; Haran, Prashanth H; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Fielding, Roger A

    2016-04-01

    The loss of skeletal muscle mass is observed in many pathophysiological conditions, including aging and obesity. The loss of muscle mass and function with aging is defined as sarcopenia and is characterized by a mismatch between skeletal muscle protein synthesis and breakdown. Characteristic metabolic features of both aging and obesity are increases in intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content in muscle. IMCL accumulation may play a mechanistic role in the development of anabolic resistance and the progression of muscle atrophy in aging and obesity. In the present study, aged and high-fat fed mice were used to determine mechanisms leading to muscle loss. We hypothesized the accumulation of bioactive lipids in skeletal muscle, such as ceramide or diacylglycerols, leads to insulin resistance with aging and obesity and the inability to activate protein synthesis, contributing to skeletal muscle loss. We report a positive association between bioactive lipid accumulation and the loss of lean mass and muscle strength. Obese and aged animals had significantly higher storage of ceramide and diacylglycerol compared with young. Furthermore, there was an attenuated insulin response in components of the mTOR anabolic signaling pathway. We also observed differential increases in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the phosphorylation of IκBα with aging and obesity. These data challenge the accepted role of increased inflammation in obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, we have now established IκBα with a novel function in aging-associated muscle loss that may be independent of its previously understood role as an NF-κB inhibitor. PMID:26764052

  1. Anorexigenic lipopeptides ameliorate central insulin signaling and attenuate tau phosphorylation in hippocampi of mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Špolcová, Andrea; Mikulášková, Barbora; Holubová, Martina; Nagelová, Veronika; Pirnik, Zdenko; Zemenová, Jana; Haluzík, Martin; Železná, Blanka; Galas, Marie-Christine; Maletínská, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated that patients who suffer from metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or obesity, have higher risks of cognitive dysfunction and of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Impaired insulin signaling in the brain could contribute to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, which contain an abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein. This study aimed to determine whether potential tau hyperphosphorylation could be detected in an obesity-induced pre-diabetes state and whether anorexigenic agents could affect this state. We demonstrated that 6-month-old mice with monosodium glutamate (MSG) obesity, which represent a model of obesity-induced pre-diabetes, had increased tau phosphorylation at Ser396 and Thr231 in the hippocampus compared with the controls, as determined by western blots. Two weeks of subcutaneous treatment with a lipidized analog of prolactin-releasing peptide (palm-PrRP31) or with the T2DM drug liraglutide, which both had a central anorexigenic effect, resulted in increased phosphorylation of the insulin cascade kinases PDK1 (Ser241), Akt (Thr308), and GSK-3β (Ser9). Furthermore, these drugs attenuated phosphorylation at Ser396, Thr231, and Thr212 of tau and of the primary tau kinases in the hippocampi of 6-month-old MSG-obese mice. We identified tau hyperphosphorylation in the obesity-induced pre-diabetes state in MSG-obese mice and demonstrated the beneficial effects of palm-PrRP31 and liraglutide, both of known central anorexigenic effects, on hippocampal insulin signaling and on tau phosphorylation. PMID:25624414

  2. Cellular and molecular players in adipose tissue inflammation in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Jongsoon

    2014-03-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident immune cells play a major role in the regulation of this obesity-induced inflammation. The roles that adipose tissue (AT)-resident immune cells play have been particularly extensively studied. AT contains most types of immune cells and obesity increases their numbers and activation levels, particularly in AT macrophages (ATMs). Other pro-inflammatory cells found in AT include neutrophils, Th1 CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, DCs, and mast cells. However, AT also contains anti-inflammatory cells that counter the pro-inflammatory immune cells that are responsible for the obesity-induced inflammation in this tissue. These anti-inflammatory cells include regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs), Th2 CD4 T cells, and eosinophils. Hence, AT inflammation is shaped by the regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cell homeostasis, and obesity skews this balance towards a more pro-inflammatory status. Recent genetic studies revealed several molecules that participate in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. In this review, the cellular and molecular players that participate in the regulation of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance are discussed, with particular attention being placed on the roles of the cellular players in these pathogeneses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Modulation of Adipose Tissue in Health and Disease. PMID:23707515

  3. Neurogenin 3-Specific Dipeptidyl Peptidase-2 Deficiency Causes Impaired Glucose Tolerance, Insulin Resistance, and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Danilova, Olga V.; Tai, Albert K.; Mele, Deanna A.; Beinborn, Martin; Leiter, Andrew B.; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Perfield, James W.; DeFuria, Jason; Singru, Praful S.; Lechan, Ronald M.; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2009-01-01

    The control of glucose metabolism is a complex process, and dysregulation at any level can cause impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. These two defects are well-known characteristics associated with obesity and onset of type 2 diabetes. Here we introduce the N-terminal dipeptidase, DPP2, as a novel regulator of the glucose metabolism. We generated mice with a neurogenin 3 (NGN3)-specific DPP2 knockdown (kd) to explore a possible role of DPP2 in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. These mice spontaneously developed hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance by 4 months of age. In addition, we observed an increase in food intake in DPP2 kd mice, which was associated with a significant increase in adipose tissue mass and enhanced liver steatosis but no difference in body weight. In accordance with these findings, the mutant mice had a higher rate of respiratory exchange than the control littermates. This phenotype was exacerbated with age and when challenged with a high-fat diet. We report, for the first time, that DPP2 enzyme activity is essential for preventing hyperinsulinemia and maintaining glucose homeostasis. Interestingly, the phenotype of NGN3-DPP2 kd mice is opposite that of DPP4 knockout mice with regard to glucose metabolism, namely the former have normal glucagon-like peptide 1 levels but present with glucose intolerance, whereas the latter have increased glucagon-like peptide 1, which is accompanied by augmented glucose tolerance. PMID:19819973

  4. Obesity and Insulin Resistance Are the Central Issues in Prevention of and Care for Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Govers, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    For a long time the assumption has been that, although weight reduction was necessary and desirable, comorbidities were far more important and needed treatment even if weight loss was not a treatment goal, preferably with medication. This controversy leads to postponement of treatment, and later on causes very intensive medical treatment, thus, raising the health care costs to unacceptable levels, leading to the medicalization of individuals, and a declining of the responsibility of patients for their health, leaving the question of when to regard their own weight as a problem that should be dealt with up to individuals. The central problem is insulin resistance, which leads to a cascade of health problems. This condition should be diagnosed in primary practice and obesity clinics to ensure a better, tailor-made treatment for patients. Treatment should start at the earliest stage possible, when comorbidities are still reversible and includes a personalized dietary advice and counseling, preferably by a dietitian, to tackle insulin resistance. An exercise program is part of the treatment.

  5. PRAS40 prevents development of diabetic cardiomyopathy and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Völkers, Mirko; Doroudgar, Shirin; Nguyen, Nathalie; Konstandin, Mathias H; Quijada, Pearl; Din, Shabana; Ornelas, Luis; Thuerauf, Donna J; Gude, Natalie; Friedrich, Kilian; Herzig, Stephan; Glembotski, Christopher C; Sussman, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a multi-organ disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy can result in heart failure, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. In the liver, insulin resistance contributes to hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia, which further worsens the metabolic profile. Defects in mTOR signalling are believed to contribute to metabolic dysfunctions in diabetic liver and hearts, but evidence is missing that mTOR activation is causal to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study shows that specific mTORC1 inhibition by PRAS40 prevents the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. This phenotype was associated with improved metabolic function, blunted hypertrophic growth and preserved cardiac function. In addition PRAS40 treatment improves hepatic insulin sensitivity and reduces systemic hyperglycaemia in obese mice. Thus, unlike rapamycin, mTORC1 inhibition with PRAS40 improves metabolic profile in diabetic mice. These findings may open novel avenues for therapeutic strategies using PRAS40 directed against diabetic-related diseases. PMID:24408966

  6. Insulin Resistance and Obesity Affect Lipid Profile in the Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Matczuk, Jan; Zalewska, Anna; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Knaś, Małgorzata; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Garbowska, Marta; Ziembicka, Dominika M; Waszkiel, Danuta; Chabowski, Adrian; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Kurek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    In today's world wrong nutritional habits together with a low level of physical activity have given rise to the development of obesity and its comorbidity, insulin resistance. More specifically, many researches indicate that lipids are vitally involved in the onset of a peripheral tissue (e.g., skeletal muscle, heart, and liver) insulin resistance. Moreover, it seems that diabetes can also induce changes in respect of lipid composition of both the salivary glands and saliva. However, judging by the number of research articles, the salivary glands lipid profile still has not been sufficiently explored. In the current study we aim to assess the changes in the main lipid fractions, namely, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerols, in the parotid and the submandibular salivary glands of rats exposed to a 5-week high fat diet regimen. We observed that the high caloric fat diet caused a significant change in the salivary glands lipid composition, especially with respect to PH and TG, but not DAG or FFAs, classes. The observed reduction in PH concentration is an interesting phenomenon frequently signifying the atrophy and malfunctions in the saliva secreting organs. On the other hand, the increased accumulation of TG in the glands may be an important clinical manifestation of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27471733

  7. Insulin Resistance and Obesity Affect Lipid Profile in the Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Matczuk, Jan; Zalewska, Anna; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Knaś, Małgorzata; Maciejczyk, Mateusz; Garbowska, Marta; Ziembicka, Dominika M.; Waszkiel, Danuta; Chabowski, Adrian; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In today's world wrong nutritional habits together with a low level of physical activity have given rise to the development of obesity and its comorbidity, insulin resistance. More specifically, many researches indicate that lipids are vitally involved in the onset of a peripheral tissue (e.g., skeletal muscle, heart, and liver) insulin resistance. Moreover, it seems that diabetes can also induce changes in respect of lipid composition of both the salivary glands and saliva. However, judging by the number of research articles, the salivary glands lipid profile still has not been sufficiently explored. In the current study we aim to assess the changes in the main lipid fractions, namely, triacylglycerols, phospholipids, free fatty acids, and diacylglycerols, in the parotid and the submandibular salivary glands of rats exposed to a 5-week high fat diet regimen. We observed that the high caloric fat diet caused a significant change in the salivary glands lipid composition, especially with respect to PH and TG, but not DAG or FFAs, classes. The observed reduction in PH concentration is an interesting phenomenon frequently signifying the atrophy and malfunctions in the saliva secreting organs. On the other hand, the increased accumulation of TG in the glands may be an important clinical manifestation of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27471733

  8. Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with Cardiovascular Disease and its Risk Factors in Elderly and very Elderly Community-dwelling Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huimin; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Liang; Chen, Xiaoli; lan, Qin; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zhang, Yuzhen; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is usually considered to predispose to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) but milder degrees of obesity or overweight may be protective in some elderly populations. We examined the relationships between general and abdominal obesity indices with ASCVD and its risk factors in elderly (aged ≥65 years) Shanghai community residents Among the 3950 participants, 21.5% had ASCVD, 56.2% had body mass index (BMI) ≥24 kg/m2, 50.1% had high waist circumference (WC) and 77.1% had waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥0.50. WHtR increased with age in both men and women whereas WC increased with age only in women and BMI decreased with age only in men. The optimal WHtR cut-off value to predict the risk of ASCVD determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis was WHtR ≥0.53 with a prevalence of 55.8%. Having abdominal obesity was significantly associated with prevalent ASCVD with WHtR ≥0.53 having a higher value for the odds ratio than high WC, whereas high BMI was not associated. All three indices predicted high glucose, triglycerides and hsCRP levels but only the WHtR ≥0.53 showed a significant association with physical activity. Abdominal obesity indices, but not BMI, predicted prevalent ASCVD and its risk factors in this elderly Chinese population. PMID:26882876

  9. Brown adipose tissue activity as a target for the treatment of obesity/insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Poher, Anne-Laure; Altirriba, Jordi; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT), characterized by the expression of the thermogenic uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), has recently been described in adult humans. UCP1 is expressed in classical brown adipocytes, as well as in “beige cells” in white adipose tissue (WAT). The thermogenic activity of BAT is mainly controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. Endocrine factors, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and bone morphogenic protein factor-9 (BMP-9), predominantly produced in the liver, were shown to lead to activation of BAT thermogenesis, as well as to “browning” of WAT. This was also observed in response to irisin, a hormone secreted by skeletal muscles. Different approaches were used to delineate the impact of UCP1 on insulin sensitivity. When studied under thermoneutral conditions, UCP1 knockout mice exhibited markedly increased metabolic efficiency due to impaired thermogenesis. The impact of UCP1 deletion on insulin sensitivity in these mice was not reported. Conversely, several studies in both rodents and humans have shown that BAT activation (by cold exposure, β3-agonist treatment, transplantation and others) improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, similar results were obtained by adipose tissue-specific overexpression of PR-domain-containing 16 (PRDM16) or BMP4 in mice. The mediators of such beneficial effects seem to include FGF21, interleukin-6, BMP8B and prostaglandin D2 synthase. Interestingly, some of these molecules can be secreted by BAT itself, indicating the occurrence of autocrine effects. Stimulation of BAT activity and/or recruitment of UCP1-positive cells are therefore relevant targets for the treatment of obesity/type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:25688211

  10. Zingiber mioga reduces weight gain, insulin resistance and hepatic gluconeogenesis in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    LEE, DA-HYE; AHN, JIYUN; JANG, YOUNG JIN; HA, TAE-YOUL; JUNG, CHANG HWA

    2016-01-01

    Zingiber mioga is a perennial herb belonging to the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) that is used medicinally to treat cough and rheumatism in China and consumed throughout Japan. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga following extraction with distilled water or 70% ethanol. In 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells, Z. mioga water extract (ZMW) markedly inhibited adipogenesis, whereas the ethanol extract had no effect. In addition, we conducted ZMW feeding experiments (0.25 or 0.5% ZMW) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice to examine the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga in vivo. Body weight and serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels significantly decreased in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Notably, ZMW decreased liver weight but not adipose tissue weight. Furthermore, insulin resistance and hepatic mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and G6Pase, were improved in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Furthermore, ZMW treatment decreased hepatic lipogenic gene expression; however, it did not alter adipogenesis in fat tissue, suggesting that ZMW inhibits hepatosteatosis through the suppression of lipogenesis. ZMW improved HFD-induced hepatic inflammation. Collectively, the present findings suggest that ZMW may serve as a new and promising strategy for the treatment of hepatosteatosis. PMID:27347064

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor improves brain insulin sensitivity, but fails to prevent cognitive impairment in orchiectomy obese rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-08-01

    It is unclear whether the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor can counteract brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived obese rats. We hypothesized that DPP4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats received either a sham-operated (S, n=6) or bilateral orchiectomy (ORX, n=24). ORX rats were divided into two groups and fed with either a normal diet (ND (NDO)) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n=6/subgroup) to receive either a vehicle or vildagliptin (3 mg/kg per day, p.o.) for 4 weeks. After treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity and brain mitochondrial function were determined in each rat. We found that HFO rats exhibited peripheral and brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline. NDO rats did not develop peripheral and brain insulin resistance. However, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline occurred. Vildagliptin significantly improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, restored brain insulin sensitivity and decreased brain mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in HFO rats. However, vildagliptin did not restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in both NDO and HFO rats. These findings suggest that vildagliptin could not counteract the impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived subjects, despite its effects on improved peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity as well as brain mitochondrial function. PMID:26016746

  12. A study of abdominal ultrasound therapy combined with complex exercise for effective obesity management among shift work employees

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of abdominal ultrasound accompanied by complex exercise in shift work employees working in industry. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty shift work employees were randomly assigned to either a complex exercise group (control group) or a complex exercise and ultrasound treatment group (experimental group). The control group carried out complex exercise five times per week for 4 weeks, while the experimental group performed complex exercise twice per week and received deep ultrasound three times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] The results showed that there were no significant differences in body composition between the two groups. There were significant changes in weight, lean body mass, body fat mass, and body mass index in the control group; meanwhile, significant changes in weight and body fat mass were observed in the experimental group. There were no significant differences in blood lipids between the two groups. There was a significant decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the control group; furthermore, a significant decrease in total cholesterol was observed in the experimental group, along with significant increases in HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study concerning short-term obesity management programs, complex exercise was effective for improving of body composition and weight loss, while complex exercise combined with abdominal ultrasound had a good effect on blood lipids and secondary complication prevention. PMID:25642080

  13. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β-Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. PMID:26064984

  14. Diets Containing α-Linolenic (ω3) or Oleic (ω9) Fatty Acids Rescues Obese Mice From Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, V; Marinho, R; Vitorino, D; Santos, G A; Moraes, J C; Dragano, N; Sartori-Cintra, A; Pereira, L; Catharino, R R; da Silva, A S R; Ropelle, E R; Pauli, J R; De Souza, C T; Velloso, L A; Cintra, D E

    2015-11-01

    Subclinical systemic inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and insulin resistance. The results obtained from a number of experimental studies suggest that targeting different components of the inflammatory machinery may result in the improvement of the metabolic phenotype. Unsaturated fatty acids exert antiinflammatory activity through several distinct mechanisms. Here, we tested the capacity of ω3 and ω9 fatty acids, directly from their food matrix, to exert antiinflammatory activity through the G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)120 and GPR40 pathways. GPR120 was activated in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissues, reverting inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice. Part of this action was also mediated by GPR40 on muscle, as a novel mechanism described. Pair-feeding and immunoneutralization experiments reinforced the pivotal role of GPR120 as a mediator in the response to the nutrients. The improvement in insulin sensitivity in the high-fat substituted diets was associated with a marked reduction in tissue inflammation, decreased macrophage infiltration, and increased IL-10 levels. Furthermore, improved glucose homeostasis was accompanied by the reduced expression of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes and reduced body mass. Thus, our data indicate that GPR120 and GPR40 play a critical role as mediators of the beneficial effects of dietary unsaturated fatty acids in the context of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:26280128

  15. Coffee intake mitigated inflammation and obesity-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huijuan; Aw, Wanping; Egashira, Kenji; Takahashi, Shoko; Aoyama, Shinya; Saito, Kenji; Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic findings offer the promise that coffee or its many constituents may be useful as a dietary intervention in type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevention. We aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the ameliorative effects of caffeinated coffee (CC), decaffeinated coffee (DC) and unroasted caffeinated green coffee (GC) on skeletal muscle gene expression profiles and their relationships in an obesity animal model. Eight-week-old male C57BL6 mice were raised for 9 weeks ad libitum on a normal diet, a high-fat diet, or high-fat diet containing 2 % freeze-dried CC, or DC, or GC. Total RNA and protein were extracted from skeletal muscle and subjected to microarray (Mouse Genome 430 2.0, Affymetrix) and western blotting analyses, respectively. Coffee intake mitigated the insulin resistance by decreasing plasma glucose levels during an insulin tolerance test and by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), p85/IRS-1 complex and pAkt/PKB (protein kinase B). In addition, coffee intake down-regulated the anti-inflammatory genes activating transcription factor 3, FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene, heat shock protein 1A, heat shock protein 1B and synuclein, gamma and the inflammation-associated insulin signaling genes stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 and secreted phosphoprotein 1. These results provide scientific insight on the probable positive effects of coffee intake on impaired insulin signaling, inflammation and obesity, thereby providing a new perspective on the prevention of obesity and T2D. PMID:24599575

  16. Palmitoleic acid reduces intramuscular lipid and restores insulin sensitivity in obese sheep

    PubMed Central

    Duckett, Susan K; Volpi-Lagreca, Gabriela; Alende, Mariano; Long, Nathan M

    2014-01-01

    Obese sheep were used to assess the effects of palmitoleic (C16:1 cis-9) acid infusion on lipogenesis and circulating insulin levels. Infusion of 10 mg/kg body weight (BW)/day C16:1 intravenously in obese sheep reduced (P<0.01) weight gain by 77%. Serum palmitoleic levels increased (P<0.05) in a linear manner with increasing levels of C16:1 infusion. Cis-11 vaccenic (C18:1 cis-11) acid, a known elongation product of palmitoleic acid, was also elevated (P<0.05) in serum after 14 days and 21 days of infusion. Plasma insulin levels were lower (P<0.05) (10 mg/kg BW/day C16:1) than controls (0 mg/kg BW/day C16:1) at 14 days and 28 days of infusion. Infusion of C16:1 resulted in linear increases in tissue concentrations of palmitoleic, cis-11 vaccenic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosapentaenoic acids in a dose-dependent manner. Total lipid content of the semitendinosus (ST) muscle and mesenteric adipose tissue was reduced (P<0.01) in both 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg BW C16:1 dose levels. Total lipid content and mean adipocyte size in the longissimus muscle was reduced (P<0.05) in the 10 mg/kg BW C16:1 dose level only, whereas total lipid content and adipocyte size of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was not altered. Total lipid content of the liver was also unchanged with C16:1 infusion. Palmitoleic acid infusion upregulated (P<0.05) acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid elongase-6 (ELOVL6), and Protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit, transcript variant 1 (AMPK) mRNA expressions in liver, subcutaneous adipose, and ST muscle compared to the controls. However, mRNA expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1B) differed between tissues. In the subcutaneous adipose and liver, C16:1 infusion upregulated (P<0.05) GLUT4 and CPT1B, whereas these genes were downregulated (P<0.05) in ST muscle with C16:1 infusion. These results show that C16:1 infusion for 28 days reduced weight gain, intramuscular adipocyte size and total

  17. Curcumin rescues high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin sensitivity in mice through regulating SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lili; Li, Jinmei; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Zhang, Binfeng; Qi, Meng; Huang, Wendong; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Obesity and its major co-morbidity, type 2 diabetes, have reached an alarming epidemic prevalence without an effective treatment available. It has been demonstrated that inhibition of SREBP pathway may be a useful strategy to treat obesity with type 2 diabetes. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are major transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of cholesterol, fatty acid and triglyceride. In current study, we identified a small molecule, curcumin, inhibited the SREBP expression in vitro. The inhibition of SREBP by curcumin decreased the biosynthesis of cholesterol and fatty acid. In vivo, curcumin ameliorated HFD-induced body weight gain and fat accumulation in liver or adipose tissues, and improved serum lipid levels and insulin sensitivity in HFD-induced obese mice. Consistently, curcumin regulates SREBPs target genes and metabolism associated genes in liver or adipose tissues, which may directly contribute to the lower lipid level and improvement of insulin resistance. Take together, curcumin, a major active component of Curcuma longa could be a potential leading compound for development of drugs for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:27208389

  18. Importance of Lean Muscle Maintenance to Improve Insulin Resistance by Body Weight Reduction in Female Patients with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kurose, Satoshi; Shinno, Hiromi; Cao Thu, Ha; Takao, Nana; Tsutsumi, Hiromi; Kimura, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background It has recently been suggested that skeletal muscle has an important role in insulin resistance in obesity, in addition to exercise tolerance and the fat index. The aim of this study was to identify body composition factors that contribute to improvement of insulin resistance in female patients with obesity who reduce body weight. Methods We studied 92 female obese patients (age 40.9±10.4 years, body mass index 33.2±4.6 kg/m2) who reduced body weight by ≥5% after an intervention program including diet, exercise therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. Before and after the intervention, body composition was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to examine changes in skeletal muscle mass. Homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was measured as an index of insulin resistance. Cardiopulmonary exercise was also performed by all patients. Results There were significant improvements in body weight (–10.3%±4.5%), exercise tolerance (anaerobic threshold oxygen uptake 9.1%±18.4%, peak oxygen uptake 11.0%±14.2%), and HOMA-IR (–20.2%±38.3%). Regarding body composition, there were significant decreases in total body fat (–19.3%±9.6%), total fat-free mass (–2.7%±4.3%), and % body fat (–10.1%±7.5%), whereas % skeletal muscle significantly increased (8.9%±7.2%). In stepwise multiple linear regression analysis with change in HOMA-IR as the dependent variable, the change in % skeletal muscle was identified as an independent predictor (β=–0.280, R2=0.068, P<0.01). Conclusion Improvement of insulin resistance in female obese patients requires maintenance of skeletal muscle mass. PMID:27126885

  19. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance but not skeletal muscle dysfunction or all-cause mortality.

    PubMed

    Loenneke, Jeremy P; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-02-01

    Recent work has found that older adults with obesity and systemic inflammation have associated metabolic dysfunction but do not have associated lower lean mass or strength. However, this lean mass estimate may be inflated with obesity, given that 15 % of adipose tissue is composed of fat-free tissue. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate, in a nationally representative sample of adults, whether obese adults with chronic systemic inflammation (unhealthy) have differences in lean mass, muscle strength, and insulin resistance when compared to normal weight individuals without elevated levels of systemic inflammation (healthy). A secondary objective was to determine whether these potential differences were moderated by physical activity and to determine if these groups had a differential risk for all-cause mortality. Our findings suggests that the unhealthy group was associated with higher upper body lean mass (β = 823; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 637-1010; P < 0.001), lower body lean mass (β = 2724; 95 % CI 2291-3158; P < 0.001), and strength (β = 34.6; 95 % CI 13.5-55.7; P = 0.003) compared to the healthy group despite having systemic inflammation and correcting for fat-free adipose tissue. However, the unhealthy group was associated with insulin resistance (odds ratio (OR) = 16.1; 95 % CI 2.7-96.1; P = 0.005) although this finding was attenuated in those physically active (OR = 8.5; 95 % CI 2.43-30.15; P = 0.003). Despite this metabolic dysfunction, there was no difference in all-cause mortality risk between groups (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.16 (95 % CI 0.69-1.96; P = 0.54)) suggesting that higher amounts of lean mass and strength may be protective of premature mortality. PMID:26698153

  20. The apelinergic system: sexual dimorphism and tissue-specific modulations by obesity and insulin resistance in female mice.

    PubMed

    Butruille, Laura; Drougard, Anne; Knauf, Claude; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Valet, Philippe; Storme, Laurent; Deruelle, Philippe; Lesage, Jean

    2013-08-01

    It has been proposed that the apelinergic system (apelin and its receptor APJ) may be a promising therapeutic target in obesity-associated insulin resistance syndrome. However, due to the extended tissue-distribution of this system, the therapeutic use of specific ligands for APJ may target numerous tissues resulting putatively to collateral deleterious effects. To unravel specific tissular dysfunctions of this system under obesity and insulin-resistance conditions, we measured the apelinemia and gene-expression level of both apelin (APL) and APJ in 12-selected tissues of insulin-resistant obese female mice fed with a high fat (HF) diet. In a preliminary study, we compared between adult male and female mice, the circadian plasma apelin variation and the effect of fasting on apelinemia. No significant differences were found for these parameters suggesting that the apelinemia is not affected by the sex. Moreover, plasma apelin level was not modulated during the four days of the estrous cycle in females. In obese and insulin-resistant HF female mice, plasma apelin concentration after fasting was not modified but, the gene-expression level of the APL/APJ system was augmented in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and reduced in the brown adipose tissue (BAT), the liver and in kidneys. BAT apelin content was reduced in HF female mice. Our data suggest that the apelinergic system may be implicated into specific dysfunctions of these tissues under obesity and diabetes and that, pharmacologic modulations of this system may be of interest particularly in the treatment of adipose, liver and renal dysfunctions that occur during these pathologies. PMID:23747606

  1. Association of cardiorespiratory fitness with insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese postmenopausal women: a Montreal Ottawa New Emerging Team study.

    PubMed

    Messier, Virginie; Malita, Florin M; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Brochu, Martin; Karelis, Antony D

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between insulin sensitivity and cardiorespiratory fitness in overweight and obese postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 127 overweight and obese postmenopausal women (age, 57.7 +/- 4.8 years; body mass index, 32.7 +/- 4.7 kg/m(2)). Subjects were classified by dividing the entire cohort into tertiles (T) based on insulin sensitivity expressed per kilograms of lean body mass (LBM) (T1, <10.9; T2, 10.9-12.9, T3, >12.9 mg/min per kilogram of LBM, respectively). Outcome measures were body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry), visceral adipose tissue (computed tomography), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp), cardiorespiratory fitness (indirect calorimetry), lower-body muscle strength (1 maximal repetition), physical activity energy expenditure (doubly labeled water), fasting lipids, and inflammatory profile. We found a significant positive relationship between insulin sensitivity and cardiorespiratory fitness (r = 0.25, P = .005). Moreover, cardiorespiratory fitness was higher in the T3 group compared to the T1 group (36.2 +/- 6.1 vs 33.1 +/- 5.0 mL/kg LBM per minute, respectively; P = .028). However, the difference was no longer significant after controlling for visceral adipose tissue or muscle strength. Finally, cardiorespiratory fitness was an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity. High levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with higher levels of insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese postmenopausal women. Moreover, visceral adipose tissue accumulation or muscle strength may be potential mediators of this relationship. PMID:18702957

  2. Weight-loss changes PPAR expression, reduces atherosclerosis and improves cardiovascular function in obese insulin-resistant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Verreth, Wim; Verhamme, Peter; Pelat, Michael; Ganame, Javier; Bielicki, John K.; Mertens, Ann; Quarck, Rozenn; Benhabiles, Nora; Marguerie, Gerard; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike; Ninio, Ewa; Herregods, Marie-Christine; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Holvoet, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Weight-loss in obese insulin-resistant, but not in insulin-sensitive, persons reduces CHD risk. It is not known to what extent changes in the adipose gene expression profile are important for reducing CHD risk. We studied the effect of diet restriction-induced weight-loss on gene expression in adipose tissue, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular function in mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency. Obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin-resistance are associated with hypertension, impaired left ventricle function and accelerated atherosclerosis in those mice. Diet restriction during 12 weeks caused a 45% weight-loss and changes in the gene expression in adipose tissue of PPARa and PPAR? and of key genes regulating glucose transport and insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation, most of which are under the transcriptional control of PPARs. These changes were associated with increased insulin-sensitivity, decreased hypertriglyceridemia, reduced mean 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate, restored circadian variations of blood pressure and heart rate, increased ejection fraction, and reduced atherosclerosis. Thus, induction of PPARa and PPAR? in adipose tissue is a key mechanism for reducing atherosclerosis and improving cardiovascular function resulting from weight-loss. Our observations point to the critical role of PPARs in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular features of the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... pump is connected to your body by a flexible tube that has a tip that sticks under your skin. A cartridge of insulin is put in the pump. The insulin flows through the tube into your body. The pump controls how much insulin goes into your body. The ...

  4. The association between abdominal obesity and characteristics of migraine attacks in Iranian adults

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Omid; Askari, Gholamreza; Maghsoudi, Zahra; Ghiasvand, Reza; Khorvash, Fariborz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a primary headache disorder that affects the neurovascular system. Recent studies have shown that migraine patients with general obesity have higher characteristics of migraine attacks compared with normal weight patients, but data on central obesity are scarce. This study was done to assess the relationship between central obesity and the characteristics of migraine attacks in migraine patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 129 migraine patients (28 men and 101 women), aged 15–67 years, in Isfahan, Iran. Anthropometric measurements such as waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), waist–hip ratio (WHR) and waist–height ratio (WHtR), as well as characteristics of migraine attacks such as severity, frequency, duration, and headache diary result (HDR) was determined for each participant. Linear regression was used to examine the association between anthropometric measurements and characteristics of migraine attacks. P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: WC, WHR, and WHtR were positively associated with the severity (P-value: WC: 0.002, WHR: 0.002, WHtR: 0.001) and frequency (P-value: WC: 0.006, WHR: 0.01, WHtR: 0.002) of migraine attacks. Moreover, we found a significant association between WC (P = 0.001), WHR (P = 0.004), and WHtR (P < 0.001) with HDR. No significant relationship was observed between central obesity indicators and duration of migraine attacks. Conclusions: Central obesity indicators were positively associated with the severity and frequency of migraine attacks as well as HDR, but not with duration of attacks. Based on our findings, it can be concluded that weight loss may decrease the characteristics of migraine attacks. PMID:27186204

  5. Obesity and Its Metabolic Complications: The Role of Adipokines and the Relationship between Obesity, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that obesity is closely associated with an increased risk of metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Obesity results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure, which leads to an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is now recognized not only as a main site of storage of excess energy derived from food intake but also as an endocrine organ. The expansion of adipose tissue produces a number of bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines or adipokines, which trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and interact with a range of processes in many different organs. Although the precise mechanisms are still unclear, dysregulated production or secretion of these adipokines caused by excess adipose tissue and adipose tissue dysfunction can contribute to the development of obesity-related metabolic diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of several adipokines associated with obesity and the potential impact on obesity-related metabolic diseases. Multiple lines evidence provides valuable insights into the roles of adipokines in the development of obesity and its metabolic complications. Further research is still required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the metabolic actions of a few newly identified adipokines. PMID:24733068

  6. Optimal Waist Circumference Cutoff Value Based on Insulin Resistance and Visceral Obesity in Koreans with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung Soo; Choi, Young Ju; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Huh, Byoung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral obesity is the most powerful contributor to the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular diseases. In light of visceral obesity, however, there is a paucity of data on the appropriate cutoff point of waist circumference (WC) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal cutoff value for WC that signals insulin resistance (IR) and visceral obesity in Koreans with type 2 diabetes. Methods We evaluated 4,252 patients with type 2 diabetes (male 2,220, female 2,032, mean age 57.24 years) who visited our clinic between January 2003 and June 2009. WC was measured at the midpoint between the lower rib and the iliac crest, and insulin sensitivity was assessed by the rate constant of plasma glucose disappearance (Kitt %/min) using an insulin tolerance test. Visceral fat thickness was measured using ultrasonography. Statistical analysis was performed using receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The optimal cutoff points for WC for identifying the presence of IR and visceral obesity, as well as two or more metabolic components, were 87 cm for men and 81 cm for women. Moreover, these cutoff points had the highest predictive powers for the presence of visceral obesity. The MetS defined by new criteria correlated with the increased carotid intima-media thickness in female subjects. Conclusion Our results suggest that the optimal cutoff values for WC in Koreans with type 2 diabetes should be reestablished based on IR and visceral obesity. PMID:26124996

  7. HPA axis and vagus nervous function are involved in impaired insulin secretion of MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Rosiane A; Torrezan, Rosana; de Oliveira, Júlio C; Barella, Luiz F; da Silva Franco, Claudinéia C; Lisboa, Patrícia C; Moura, Egberto G; Mathias, Paulo C F

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine dysfunctions such as the hyperactivity of the vagus nerve and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis greatly contribute to obesity and hyperinsulinemia; however, little is known about these dysfunctions in the pancreatic β-cells of obese individuals. We used a hypothalamic-obesity model obtained by neonatal treatment with monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) to induce obesity. To assess the role of the HPA axis and vagal tonus in the genesis of hypercorticosteronemia and hyperinsulinemia in an adult MSG-obese rat model, bilateral adrenalectomy (ADX) and subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VAG) alone or combined surgeries (ADX-VAG) were performed. To study glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS) and the cholinergic insulinotropic process, pancreatic islets were incubated with different glucose concentrations with or without oxotremorine-M, a selective agonist of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3AChR) subtype. Protein expression of M3AChR in pancreatic islets, corticosteronemia, and vagus nerve activity was also evaluated. Surgeries reduced 80% of the body weight gain. Fasting glucose and insulin were reduced both by ADX and ADX-VAG, whereas VAG was only associated with hyperglycemia. The serum insulin post-glucose stimulation was lower in all animals that underwent an operation. Vagal activity was decreased by 50% in ADX rats. In the highest glucose concentration, both surgeries reduced GIIS by 50%, whereas ADX-VAG decreased by 70%. Additionally, M3AChR activity was recovered by the individual surgeries. M3AChR protein expression was reduced by ADX. Both the adrenal gland and vagus nerve contribute to the hyperinsulinemia in the MSG model, although adrenal is more crucial as it appears to modulate parasympathetic activity and M3AChR expression in obesity. PMID:27113853

  8. Infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity in Malaysian school-aged adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Huybrechts, Inge; Foo, Leng Huat

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2%) fell in the normal body mass index (BMI) ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50%) were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA) showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF) compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth. PMID:23520556

  9. Infrequent Breakfast Consumption Is Associated with Higher Body Adiposity and Abdominal Obesity in Malaysian School-Aged Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Nurul-Fadhilah, Abdullah; Teo, Pey Sze; Huybrechts, Inge; Foo, Leng Huat

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary pattern increases the risk of obesity and metabolic disorders in growing children and adolescents. However, the way the habitual pattern of breakfast consumption influences body composition and risk of obesity in adolescents is not well defined. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess any associations between breakfast consumption practices and body composition profiles in 236 apparently healthy adolescents aged 12 to 19 years. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary behaviour and lifestyle practices and a dietary food frequency questionnaire were used. Body composition and adiposity indices were determined using standard anthropometric measurement protocols and dual energy χ-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Mean age of the participants was 15.3±1.9 years. The majority of participants (71.2%) fell in the normal body mass index (BMI) ranges. Breakfast consumption patterns showed that only half of the participants (50%) were consuming breakfast daily. Gender-specific multivariate analyses (ANCOVA) showed that in both boys and girls, those eating breakfast at least 5 times a week had significantly lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI z-scores, waist circumference, body fat mass and percent body fat (%BF) compared to infrequent breakfast eaters, after adjustment for age, household income, pubertal status, eating-out and snacking practices, daily energy intakes, and daily physical activity levels. The present findings indicate that infrequent breakfast consumption is associated with higher body adiposity and abdominal obesity. Therefore, daily breakfast consumption with healthy food choices should be encouraged in growing children and adolescents to prevent adiposity during these critical years of growth. PMID:23520556

  10. Increased 4E-BP1 Expression Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shih-Yin; Rodriguez, Ariana A; Dastidar, Somasish G; Del Greco, Elizabeth; Carr, Kaili Lia; Sitzmann, Joanna M; Academia, Emmeline C; Viray, Christian Michael; Martinez, Lizbeth Leon; Kaplowitz, Brian Stephen; Ashe, Travis D; La Spada, Albert R; Kennedy, Brian K

    2016-08-16

    Obesity is a major risk factor driving the global type II diabetes pandemic. However, the molecular factors linking obesity to disease remain to be elucidated. Gender differences are apparent in humans and are also observed in murine models. Here, we link these differences to expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), which, upon HFD feeding, becomes significantly reduced in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of male but not female mice. Strikingly, restoring 4E-BP1 expression in male mice protects them against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Male 4E-BP1 transgenic mice also exhibit reduced white adipose tissue accumulation accompanied by decreased circulating levels of leptin and triglycerides. Importantly, transgenic 4E-BP1 male mice are also protected from aging-induced obesity and metabolic decline on a normal diet. These results demonstrate that 4E-BP1 is a gender-specific suppressor of obesity that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism. PMID:27498874

  11. AMPK Activation by Metformin Suppresses Abnormal Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Adipose Tissue and Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Nocon, Allison; Fry, Jessica; Sherban, Alex; Rui, Xianliang; Jiang, Bingbing; Xu, X Julia; Han, Jingyan; Yan, Yun; Yang, Qin; Li, Qifu; Zang, Mengwei

    2016-08-01

    Fibrosis is emerging as a hallmark of metabolically dysregulated white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity. Although adipose tissue fibrosis impairs adipocyte plasticity, little is known about how aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of WAT is initiated during the development of obesity. Here we show that treatment with the antidiabetic drug metformin inhibits excessive ECM deposition in WAT of ob/ob mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, as evidenced by decreased collagen deposition surrounding adipocytes and expression of fibrotic genes including the collagen cross-linking regulator LOX Inhibition of interstitial fibrosis by metformin is likely attributable to the activation of AMPK and the suppression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad3 signaling, leading to enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity. The ability of metformin to repress TGF-β1-induced fibrogenesis is abolished by the dominant negative AMPK in primary cells from the stromal vascular fraction. TGF-β1-induced insulin resistance is suppressed by AMPK agonists and the constitutively active AMPK in 3T3L1 adipocytes. In omental fat depots of obese humans, interstitial fibrosis is also associated with AMPK inactivation, TGF-β1/Smad3 induction, aberrant ECM production, myofibroblast activation, and adipocyte apoptosis. Collectively, integrated AMPK activation and TGF-β1/Smad3 inhibition may provide a potential therapeutic approach to maintain ECM flexibility and combat chronically uncontrolled adipose tissue expansion in obesity. PMID:27207538

  12. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A.; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Changes in Abdominal Compartments in Obese Diabetics during a Low-Calorie Weight-Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lena J.; Steveling, Antje; Meffert, Peter J.; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Kessler, Rebecca; Hosten, Norbert; Krüger, Janine; Gärtner, Simone; Aghdassi, Ali A.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate changes in the fat content of abdominal compartments and muscle area during weight loss using confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overweight diabetics. Methods Twenty-nine obese diabetics (10/19 men/women, median age: 59.0 years, median body mass index (BMI): 34.0 kg/m2) prospectively joined a standardized 15-week weight-loss program (six weeks of formula diet exclusively, followed by reintroduction of regular food with gradually increasing energy content over nine weeks) over 15 weeks. All subjects underwent a standardized MRI protocol including a confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded MR sequence with water/fat separation before the program as well at the end of the six weeks of formula diet and at the end of the program at 15 weeks. Fat fractions of abdominal organs and vertebral bone marrow as well as volumes of visceral and subcutaneous fat were determined. Furthermore, muscle area was evaluated using the L4/L5 method. Data were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for paired samples. Results Median BMI decreased significantly from 34.0 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (p < 0.001) at 15 weeks. Liver fat content was normalized (14.2% to 4.1%, p < 0.001) and vertebral bone marrow fat (57.5% to 53.6%, p = 0.018) decreased significantly throughout the program, while fat content of pancreas (9.0%), spleen (0.0%), and psoas muscle (0.0%) did not (p > 0.15). Visceral fat volume (3.2 L to 1.6 L, p < 0.001) and subcutaneous fat diameter (3.0 cm to 2.2 cm, p < 0.001) also decreased significantly. Muscle area declined by 6.8% from 243.9 cm2 to 226.8 cm2. Conclusion MRI allows noninvasive monitoring of changes in abdominal compartments during weight loss. In overweight diabetics, weight loss leads to fat reduction in abdominal compartments, such as visceral fat, as well as liver fat and vertebral bone marrow fat while pancreas fat remains unchanged. PMID:27110719

  14. Uncoupling of Obesity from Insulin Resistance Through a Targeted Mutation in aP2, the Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Johnson, Randall S.; Distel, Robert J.; Ellis, Ramsey; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1996-11-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytoplasmic proteins that are expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and bind to fatty acids such as oleic and retinoic acid. Mice with a null mutation in aP2, the gene encoding the adipocyte FABP, were developmentally and metabolically normal. The aP2-deficient mice developed dietary obesity but, unlike control mice, they did not develop insulin resistance or diabetes. Also unlike their obese wild-type counterparts, obese aP2-/- animals failed to express in adipose tissue tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a molecule implicated in obesity-related insulin resistance. These results indicate that aP2 is central to the pathway that links obesity to insulin resistance, possibly by linking fatty acid metabolism to expression of TNF-α.

  15. [The polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Kreze, A; Hrnciar, J; Dobáková, M; Pekarová, E

    1997-10-01

    The insulin resistance syndrome and the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) appear to have some following coincidences: the existence of subclinical acanthosis nigricans in PCOS hyperinsulinemic women, correlation of insulin levels and free testosterone, insulin-like growth factor I binding protein (IGFIBP), and sex-hormone binding globulin. Insulin and IGFI act synergically with luteinizing hormone increasing the activity of cytochrome P450c17 and its enzymatic activity in the adrenals. The decrease in IGFI level and IGFI receptors in the ovarian granulosa cells reduce the steroids aromatisation. The increased expression of IGFI receptors in the theca cells favours the androgens' synthesis. Long-term insulin therapy results in an increase in ovary volume and the blood androgens levels. The deterioration of insulin resistance in PSOC women progresses also by the reduction of type I of skeletal muscle fibres which are sensitive to insulin, and the increase of type II fibres which are resistant to insulin in hyperandrogenemia. Testosterone deteriorates the skeletal as well as hepatic insulin sensitivity by both its facilitating effect on lipolysis and the increase of free fatty acids. Abdominal obesity seen in PCOS and insulin resistance is composed by adipocytes with glucocorticoid receptors, which after cortisol stimulation activate the lipoprotein lipase and fat accumulation. Gynoid obesity with the preferential aromatisation of steroids is not evolved because of the low estrogens and progesterone levels in PCOS. Low progesterone levels (with anticortisol effect) support the development of abdominal obesity. Ultimately, the early peak of insulin secretion (4-8 min) in PCOS is higher. This fact should testify a certain diabetic disposition. (Ref. 37.) PMID:9490171

  16. Hepatic adenylate cyclase 3 is upregulated by Liraglutide and subsequently plays a protective role in insulin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Li, Z; Liang, S; Li, Y; Yang, L; Lu, M; Gu, H F; Xia, N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies have demonstrated that adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) has a protective role in obesity. This gene resides at the pathway with glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1. Liraglutide is a GLP-1 analog and has independent glucose and body weight (BW)-reducing effects. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether hepatic AC3 activity was regulated by Liraglutide and to further understand the effect of AC3 in reduction of BW and insulin resistance. Subjects: The diabesity and obese mice were induced from db/db and C57BL/6 J mice, respectively, by high-fat diet. Liraglutide (0.1 mg kg−1 per 12 h) was given to the mice twice daily for 12 weeks. C57BL/6 J mice fed with chow diet and obese or diabesity mice treated with saline were used as the controls. Hepatic AC3 gene expression at mRNA and protein levels was analyzed with real-time reverse transcription-PCR and western blot. Fasting blood glucose and serum insulin levels were measured and followed insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) was evaluated according to the homeostasis model assessment. Results: After administration of Liraglutide, BW and HOMA-IR in obese and diabesity mice were decreased, whereas hepatic AC3 mRNA and protein expression levels were upregulated. The AC3 gene expression was negatively correlated with BW, HOMA-IR and the area ratio of hepatic fat deposition in the liver. Conclusions: The present study thus provides the evidence that hepatic AC3 gene expression is upregulated by Liraglutide. The reduction of BW and improvement of insulin resistance with Liraglutide may be partially explained by AC3 activation. PMID:26807509

  17. Endurance exercise training ameliorates insulin resistance and reticulum stress in adipose and hepatic tissue in obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Luz, Gabrielle; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Silva, Sabrina; Vitto, Marcelo F; Cesconetto, Patricia A; de Pinho, Ricardo A; Pauli, José R; Silva, Adelino S R; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2011-09-01

    Obesity-induced endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress has been demonstrated to underlie the induction of obesity-induced JNK and NF-κB activation inflammatory responses, and generation of peripheral insulin resistance. On the other hand, exercise has been used as a crucial tool in obese and diabetic patients, and may reduce inflammatory pathway stimulation. However, the ability of exercise training to reverse endoplasmatic reticulum stress in adipose and hepatic tissue in obesity has not been investigated in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that exercise training ameliorates ER stress and insulin resistance in DIO-induced rats. Rats were fed with standard rodent chow (3,948 kcal kg(-1)) or high-fat diet (5,358 kcal kg(-1)) for 2 months. After that rats were submitted to swimming training (1 h per day, 5 days for week with 5% overload of the body weight for 8 weeks). Samples from epididymal fat and liver were obtained and western blot analysis was performed. Our results showed that swimming protocol reduces pro-inflammatory molecules (JNK, IκB and NF-κB) in adipose and hepatic tissues. In addition, exercise leads to reduction in ER stress, by reducing PERK and eIF2α phosphorylation in these tissues. In parallel, an increase in insulin pathway signaling was observed, as confirmed by increases in IR, IRSs and Akt phosphorylation following exercise training in DIO rats. Thus, results suggest that exercise can reduce ER stress, improving insulin resistance in adipose and hepatic tissue. PMID:21249392

  18. A 12 WEEKS EXERCISE PROGRAM RESULTED IN REDUCED VISCERAL FAT AND FASTING INSULIN BUT NOT TOTAL AND INTRAMYOCELLULAR FAT IN HISPANIC OBESE ADOLESCENTS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The high prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is a serious public health concern. Weight loss is known to improve insulin sensitivity but is difficult to achieve. The independent effects of exercise on body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity in the absence of overall w...

  19. Postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis in obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Bruce, C R; Lee, J S; Hawley, J A

    2001-10-01

    We determined the effect of an acute bout of swimming (8 x 30 min) followed by either carbohydrate administration (0.5 mg/g glucose ip and ad libitum access to chow; CHO) or fasting (Fast) on postexercise glycogen resynthesis in soleus muscle and liver from female lean (ZL) and obese insulin-resistant (ZO) Zucker rats. Resting soleus muscle glycogen concentration ([glycogen]) was similar between genotypes and was reduced by 73 (ZL) and 63% (ZO) after exercise (P < 0.05). Liver [glycogen] at rest was greater in ZO than ZL (334 +/- 31 vs. 247 +/- 16 micromol/g wet wt; P < 0.01) and fell by 44 and 94% after exercise (P < 0.05). The fractional activity of glycogen synthase (active/total) increased immediately after exercise (from 0.22 +/- 0.05 and 0.32 +/- 0.04 to 0.63 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.57 +/- 0.05; P < 0.01 for ZL and ZO rats, respectively) and remained elevated above resting values after 30 min of recovery. During this time, muscle [glycogen] in ZO increased 68% with CHO (P < 0.05) but did not change in Fast. Muscle [glycogen] was unchanged in ZL from postexercise values after both treatments. After 6 h recovery, GLUT-4 protein concentration was increased above resting levels by a similar extent for both genotypes in both fasted (approximately 45%) and CHO-supplemented (approximately 115%) rats. Accordingly, during this time CHO refeeding resulted in supercompensation in both genotypes (68% vs. 44% for ZL and ZO). With CHO, liver [glycogen] was restored to resting levels in ZL but remained at postexercise values for ZO after both treatments. We conclude that the increased glucose availability with carbohydrate refeeding after glycogen-depleting exercise resulted in glycogen supercompensation, even in the face of muscle insulin-resistance. PMID:11568131

  20. The expression of genes involved in jejunal lipogenesis and lipoprotein synthesis is altered in morbidly obese subjects with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Arnes, Juan; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalo, Montserrat; Soriguer, Federico; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Rodriguez-Cañete, Alberto; Gallego-Perales, Jose L; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Vazquez-Pedreño, Luis; Lopez-Enriquez, Soledad; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, until now little attention has been paid to the role that the intestine might have. The aim of this research was to determine the relation between insulin resistance and intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis in morbidly obese subjects and to study the effect of insulin on these processes. Jejunal mRNA expression of the different genes involved in the intestinal de novo lipogenesis/lipoprotein synthesis was analyzed in three groups of morbidly obese subjects: Group 1 with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), group 2 with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and group 3 with T2DM and treatment with metformin (MO-metf-T2DM). In addition, intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin/glucose. In Group 2 (MO-high-IR), the jejunal mRNA expression levels of apo A-IV, ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), pyruvate dehydrogenase (lipoamide) beta (PDHB), and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were significantly higher and acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACC1) and fatty-acid synthase lower than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). In Group 3 (MO-metf-T2DM), only the ACLY and PDHB mRNA expressions were significantly higher than in Group 1 (MO-low-IR). The mRNA expression of most of the genes studied was significantly linked to insulin and glucose levels. The incubation of IEC with different doses of insulin and glucose produced a higher expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apo A-IV, SREBP-1c, and ACC1 when both, glucose and insulin, were at a high concentration. However, with only high insulin levels, there were higher apo A-IV, PDHB and SREBP-1c expressions, and a lower ACLY expression. In conclusion, the jejunum of MO-high-IR has a decreased mRNA expression of genes involved in de novo fatty-acid synthesis and an

  1. Na+-sensitive elevation in blood pressure is ENaC independent in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Nizar, Jonathan M; Dong, Wuxing; McClellan, Robert B; Labarca, Mariana; Zhou, Yuehan; Wong, Jared; Goens, Donald G; Zhao, Mingming; Velarde, Nona; Bernstein, Daniel; Pellizzon, Michael; Satlin, Lisa M; Bhalla, Vivek

    2016-05-01

    The majority of patients with obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome have hypertension, but the mechanisms of hypertension are poorly understood. In these patients, impaired sodium excretion is critical for the genesis of Na(+)-sensitive hypertension, and prior studies have proposed a role for the epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) in this syndrome. We characterized high fat-fed mice as a model in which to study the contribution of ENaC-mediated Na(+) reabsorption in obesity and insulin resistance. High fat-fed mice demonstrated impaired Na(+) excretion and elevated blood pressure, which was significantly higher on a high-Na(+) diet compared with low fat-fed control mice. However, high fat-fed mice had no increase in ENaC activity as measured by Na(+) transport across microperfused cortical collecting ducts, electrolyte excretion, or blood pressure. In addition, we found no difference in endogenous urinary aldosterone excretion between groups on a normal or high-Na(+) diet. High fat-fed mice provide a model of metabolic syndrome, recapitulating obesity, insulin resistance, impaired natriuresis, and a Na(+)-sensitive elevation in blood pressure. Surprisingly, in contrast to previous studies, our data demonstrate that high fat feeding of mice impairs natriuresis and produces elevated blood pressure that is independent of ENaC activity and likely caused by increased Na(+) reabsorption upstream of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. PMID:26841823

  2. Signaling by IL-6 promotes alternative activation of macrophages to limit endotoxemia and obesity-associated resistance to insulin.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Jan; Chaurasia, Bhagirath; Goldau, Julia; Vogt, Merly C; Ruud, Johan; Nguyen, Khoa D; Theurich, Sebastian; Hausen, A Christine; Schmitz, Joel; Brönneke, Hella S; Estevez, Emma; Allen, Tamara L; Mesaros, Andrea; Partridge, Linda; Febbraio, Mark A; Chawla, Ajay; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Brüning, Jens C

    2014-05-01

    Obesity and resistance to insulin are closely associated with the development of low-grade inflammation. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is linked to obesity-associated inflammation; however, its role in this context remains controversial. Here we found that mice with an inactivated gene encoding the IL-6Rα chain of the receptor for IL-6 in myeloid cells (Il6ra(Δmyel) mice) developed exaggerated deterioration of glucose homeostasis during diet-induced obesity, due to enhanced resistance to insulin. Tissues targeted by insulin showed increased inflammation and a shift in macrophage polarization. IL-6 induced expression of the receptor for IL-4 and augmented the response to IL-4 in macrophages in a cell-autonomous manner. Il6ra(Δmyel) mice were resistant to IL-4-mediated alternative polarization of macrophages and exhibited enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia. Our results identify signaling via IL-6 as an important determinant of the alternative activation of macrophages and assign an unexpected homeostatic role to IL-6 in limiting inflammation. PMID:24681566

  3. CD11b regulates obesity-induced insulin resistance via limiting alternative activation and proliferation of adipose tissue macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunxing; Yang, Qian; Xu, Chunliang; Cao, Jianchang; Jiang, Menghui; Chen, Qing; Cao, Gang; Han, Yanyan; Li, Fengying; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Li; Shi, Yufang; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated inflammation is accompanied by the accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs), which is believed to predispose obese individuals to insulin resistance. CD11b (integrin αM) is highly expressed on monocytes and macrophages and is critical for their migration and function. We found here that high-fat diet–induced insulin resistance was significantly reduced in CD11b-deficient mice. Interestingly, the recruitment of monocytes to adipose tissue is impaired when CD11b is deficient, although the cellularity of ATMs in CD11b-deficient mice is higher than that in wild-type mice. We further found that the increase in ATMs is caused mainly by their vigorous proliferation in the absence of CD11b. Moreover, the proliferation and alternative activation of ATMs are regulated by the IL-4/STAT6 axis, which is inhibited by CD11b through the activity of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, CD11b plays a critical role in obesity-induced insulin resistance by limiting the proliferation and alternative activation of ATMs. PMID:26669445

  4. Imbalance between neutrophil elastase and its inhibitor α1-antitrypsin in obesity alters insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Mansuy-Aubert, Virginie; Zhou, Qiong L; Xie, Xiangyang; Gong, Zhenwei; Huang, Jun-Yuan; Khan, Abdul R; Aubert, Gregory; Candelaria, Karla; Thomas, Shantele; Shin, Dong-Ju; Booth, Sarah; Baig, Shahid M; Bilal, Ahmed; Hwang, Daehee; Zhang, Hui; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Smith, Steven R; Awan, Fazli R; Jiang, Zhen Y

    2013-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and related complications remain unclear. Here, we report that obese mice and human subjects have increased activity of neutrophil elastase (NE) and decreased serum levels of the NE inhibitor α1-antitrypsin (A1AT, SerpinA1). NE null (Ela2(-/-)) mice and A1AT transgenic mice were resistant to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced body weight gain, insulin resistance, inflammation, and fatty liver. NE inhibitor GW311616A reversed insulin resistance and body weight gain in HFD-fed mice. Ela2(-/-) mice also augmented circulating high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin levels, phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the liver and brown adipose tissue (BAT) and uncoupling protein (UCP1) levels in the BAT. These data suggest that the A1AT-NE system regulates AMPK signaling, FAO, and energy expenditure. The imbalance between A1AT and NE contributes to the development of obesity and related inflammation, insulin resistance, and liver steatosis. PMID:23562077

  5. A Pilot Study to Compare Meal-Triggered Gastric Electrical Stimulation and Insulin Treatment in Chinese Obese Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Simon Kin-Hung; Kong, Alice Pik-Shan; Luk, Andrea On-Yan; Ozaki, Risa; Ng, Vanessa Wan-Sze; Lebovitz, Harold E.; Chan, Juliana Chung-Ngor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gastrointestinal electromodulation therapy is a novel alternative for achieving diabetes control without traditional bariatric surgery. We compared the efficacy of a meal-initiated implantable gastric contractility modulation (GCM) device with that of insulin therapy in obese Chinese type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients, for whom oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) had failed. Patients and Methods: Sixteen obese (body mass index, 27.5–40.0 kg/m2) T2D patients with a glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level of >7.5% on maximal doses of two or more OADs were offered either insulin therapy (n=8) or laparoscopic implantation of a GCM (n=8). We compared changes in body weight, waist circumference (WC), and HbA1c level 1 year after surgery. Results: The GCM and insulin groups had similar baseline body weight and HbA1c. At 12 months, body weight (−3.2±5.2 kg, P=0.043) and WC (−3.8±4.5 cm, P=0.021) fell in the GCM group but not in the insulin group (P<0.05 for between-group difference). At 6 and 12 months, the HbA1c level fell by 1.6±1.1% and 0.9±1.6% (P=0.011), compared with 0.6±0.3% and 0.6±0.3% (P=0.08) for the insulin group (P=0.15 for between-group difference). The mean 24-h systolic blood pressure (BP) fell by 4.5±1.0 mm Hg in the GCM group (P=0.017) but not in the insulin group. The GCM group required fewer antidiabetes medications (P<0.05) and BP-lowering drugs (P<0.05) than the insulin group. A subgroup analysis showed that patients with a triglyceride level of <1.7 mmol/L had a tendency toward a lower HbA1c level (P=0.090) compared with the controls. Conclusions: In obese T2D patients for whom OADs had failed, GCM implantation was a well-tolerated alternative to insulin therapy, with a low triglyceride level as a possible predictor for glycemic response. PMID:25710812

  6. Indomethacin Treatment Prevents High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance but Not Glucose Intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike L.; Røen, Kristin; Keenan, Alison H.; Ma, Tao; Borkowski, Kamil; Kristensen, David M.; Novotny, Guy W.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Hudson, Brian D.; Milligan, Graeme; Xi, Yannan; Newman, John W.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo and in vitro using MIN6 β-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased. Indomethacin had no effect on adipose tissue mass, glucose tolerance, or GSIS when included in a regular diet. Indomethacin administration to obese mice did not reduce adipose tissue mass, and the compensatory increase in GSIS observed in obese mice was not affected by treatment with indomethacin. We demonstrate that indomethacin did not inhibit GSIS per se, but activation of GPR40 in the presence of indomethacin inhibited glucose-dependent insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. We conclude that constitutive high hepatic glucose output combined with impaired GSIS in response to activation of GPR40-dependent signaling in the HF/HS+INDO-fed mice contributed to the impaired glucose clearance during a glucose challenge and that the resulting lower levels of plasma insulin prevented the obesogenic action of the HF/HS diet. PMID:24742673

  7. IGF-1 and Insulin Resistance Are Major Determinants of Common Carotid Artery Thickness in Morbidly Obese Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Anca; Nicolae, Horia; Martin, Sorina; Barbu, Carmen; Copaescu, Catalin; Florea, Suzana; Panea, Cristina; Fica, Simona

    2016-03-01

    We assessed the relationship between insulin resistance, serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, and common carotid intima-media thickness (CC-IMT) in morbidly obese young patients. A total of 249 patients (aged 37.9 ± 9.8 years, body mass index [BMI] 45.6 ± 8.3 kg/m(2)) were evaluated (metabolic tests, serum IGF-1 measurements, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR], and ultrasonographically assessed CC-IMT) in a research program for bariatric surgery candidates. After adjusting for age, gender, BMI, systolic blood pressure, uric acid, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic class, both HOMA-IR and IGF-1 z-score were significantly associated with CC-IMT. These results were confirmed in logistic regression analysis, in which age (β = 1.11, P = .001), gender (β = 3.19, P = .001), HOMA-IR (β = 1.221, P = .005), and IGF-1 z-score (β = 1.734, P = .009) were the only independent determinants of abnormal CC-IMT, presumably modulating the effect of the other risk factors included in the regression. Area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.841 (confidence interval: 0.776-0.907; P < .001). In conclusion, in morbidly obese young adults, insulin resistance and IGF-1 z-score are significantly associated with CC-IMT, independent of other major cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26085193

  8. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  9. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  10. Can you be large and not obese? The distinction between body weight, body fat, and abdominal fat in occupational standards.

    PubMed

    Friedl, Karl E

    2004-10-01

    Weight control is an important early intervention in diabetes, but the nature of the association between weight and disordered metabolism has been confused because fat mass and its distribution are only partly associated with increasing body size. Weight, fat, and regional fat placement, specifically in the abdominal site, may each have distinctly different associations with diabetes risk. Abdominal circumference may be the common marker of poor fitness habits and of increased risk for metabolic diseases such as diabetes. This is an important question for public health policy as well as for occupational standards such as those of the military, which are intended to promote fitness for military missions and include strength and aerobic capacity, as well as military appearance considerations. U.S. soldiers are heavier than ever before, reflecting both increased muscle and fat components. They also have better health care than ever before and are required to exercise regularly, and even the oldest soldiers are required to remain below body fat limits that are more stringent than the current median values of the U.S. population over age 40. The body fat standards assessed by circumference-based equations are 20-26% and 30-36%, for various age groups of men and women, respectively, and the upper limits align with threshold values of waist circumference recommended in national health goals. The basis and effects of the Army standards are presented in this paper. U.S. Army body fat standards may offer practical and reasonable health guidelines suitable for all active Americans that might help stem the increasing prevalence of obesity that is predicted to increase the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:15628823

  11. Adipose tissue and vascular phenotypic modulation by voluntary physical activity and dietary restriction in obese insulin-resistant OLETF rats

    PubMed Central

    Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Lansford, Kasey A.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Bayless, David S.; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J.; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue (AT)-derived cytokines are proposed to contribute to obesity-associated vascular insulin resistance. We tested the hypothesis that voluntary physical activity and diet restriction-induced maintenance of body weight would both result in decreased AT inflammation and concomitant improvements in insulin-stimulated vascular relaxation in the hyperphagic, obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rat. Rats (aged 12 wk) were randomly assigned to sedentary (SED; n = 10), wheel running (WR; n = 10), or diet restriction (DR; n = 10; fed 70% of SED) for 8 wk. WR and DR rats exhibited markedly lower adiposity (7.1 ± 0.4 and 15.7 ± 1.1% body fat, respectively) relative to SED (27 ± 1.2% body fat), as well as improved blood lipid profiles and systemic markers of insulin resistance. Reduced adiposity in both WR and DR was associated with decreased AT mRNA expression of inflammatory genes (e.g., MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6) and markers of immune cell infiltration (e.g., CD8, CD11c, and F4/80). The extent of these effects were most pronounced in visceral AT compared with subcutaneous and periaortic AT. Markers of inflammation in brown AT were upregulated with WR but not DR. In periaortic AT, WR- and DR-induced reductions in expression and secretion of cytokines were accompanied with a more atheroprotective gene expression profile in the adjacent aortic wall. WR, but not DR, resulted in greater insulin-stimulated relaxation in the aorta; an effect that was, in part, mediated by a decrease in insulin-induced endothelin-1 activation in WR aorta. Collectively, we show in OLETF rats that lower adiposity leads to less AT and aortic inflammation, as well as an exercise-specific improvement in insulin-stimulated vasorelaxation. PMID:24523340

  12. Soy protein isolates prevent loss of bone quantity associated with obesity in rats through regulation of insulin signaling in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Ran; Zhang, Jian; Lazarenko, Oxana P; Cao, Jay J; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J

    2013-09-01

    In both rodents and humans, excessive consumption of a typical Western diet high in saturated fats and cholesterol is known to result in disruption of energy metabolism and development of obesity and insulin resistance. However, how these high-fat, energy-dense diets affect bone development, morphology, and modeling is poorly understood. Here we show that male weanling rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet containing 45% fat and 0.5% cholesterol made with casein (HF-Cas) for 6 wk displayed a significant increase in bone marrow adiposity and insulin resistance. Substitution of casein with soy protein isolate (SPI) in the HF diet (HF-SPI) prevented these effects. Maintenance of bone quantity in the SPI-fed rats was associated with increased undercarboxylated osteocalcin secretion and altered JNK/IRS1/Akt insulin signaling in osteoblasts. The HF-Cas group had significantly greater serum nonesterified free fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations than controls, whereas the HF-SPI prevented this increase. In vitro treatment of osteoblasts or mesenchymal stromal ST2 cells with NEFAs significantly decreased insulin signaling. An isoflavone mixture similar to that found in serum of HF-SPI rats significantly increased in vitro osteoblast proliferation and blocked significantly reduced NEFA-induced insulin resistance. Finally, insulin/IGF1 was able to increase both osteoblast activity and differentiation in a set of in vitro studies. These results suggest that high-fat feeding may disrupt bone development and modeling; high concentrations of NEFAs and insulin resistance occurring with high fat intake are mediators of reduced osteoblast activity and differentiation; diets high in soy protein may help prevent high dietary fat-induced bone impairments; and the molecular mechanisms underlying the SPI-protective effects involve isoflavone-induced normalization of insulin signaling in bone. PMID:23776073

  13. Contribution of lipid-reactive natural killer T cells to obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lan; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a low-grade, chronic inflammation that promotes the development of a variety of diseases, most notably type 2 diabetes. A number of cell types of the innate and adaptive immune systems have been implicated in this process. Recent studies have focused on the role of natural killer T (NKT) cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that react with lipids, in the development of obesity-associated diseases. These studies have shown that invariant NKT (iNKT) cells, a population of NKT cells expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor, become rapidly activated in response to lipid excess, and that these cells influence the capacity of other leukocytes to produce cytokines during the progression of obesity. The role of NKT cells in obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance has been investigated using NKT cell-deficient animals, adoptive transfer of NKT cells and an iNKT cell agonist. While divergent results have been obtained, it is now clear that NKT cells can modulate the inflammatory milieu in obesity, suggesting that these cells could be targeted for therapeutic intervention in obesity-associated diseases. PMID:23700548

  14. Prohibitin-induced, obesity-associated insulin resistance and accompanying low-grade inflammation causes NASH and HCC.

    PubMed

    Ande, Sudharsana R; Nguyen, K Hoa; Grégoire Nyomba, B L; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in the disease process remain unclear. Recently, we have developed a transgenic obese mouse model (Mito-Ob) by prohibitin mediated mitochondrial remodeling in adipocytes. The Mito-Ob mice develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, but obesity-associated adipose inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in a male sex-specific manner. Here we report that with aging, the male Mito-Ob mice spontaneously develop obesity-linked NASH and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In contrast, the female Mito-Ob mice maintained normal glucose and insulin levels and did not develop NASH and HCC. The anti-inflammatory peptide ghrelin was significantly upregulated in the female mice and down regulated in the male mice compared with respective control mice. In addition, a reduction in the markers of mitochondrial content and function was found in the liver of male Mito-Ob mice with NASH/HCC development. We found that ERK1/2 signaling was significantly upregulated whereas STAT3 signaling was significantly down regulated in the tumors from Mito-Ob mice. These data provide a proof-of-concept that the metabolic and inflammatory status of the adipose tissue and their interplay at the systemic and hepatic level play a central role in the pathogenesis of obesity-linked NASH and HCC. PMID:27005704

  15. Prohibitin-induced, obesity-associated insulin resistance and accompanying low-grade inflammation causes NASH and HCC

    PubMed Central

    Ande, Sudharsana R.; Nguyen, K. Hoa; Grégoire Nyomba, B. L.; Mishra, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in the disease process remain unclear. Recently, we have developed a transgenic obese mouse model (Mito-Ob) by prohibitin mediated mitochondrial remodeling in adipocytes. The Mito-Ob mice develop obesity in a sex-neutral manner, but obesity-associated adipose inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in a male sex-specific manner. Here we report that with aging, the male Mito-Ob mice spontaneously develop obesity-linked NASH and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In contrast, the female Mito-Ob mice maintained normal glucose and insulin levels and did not develop NASH and HCC. The anti-inflammatory peptide ghrelin was significantly upregulated in the female mice and down regulated in the male mice compared with respective control mice. In addition, a reduction in the markers of mitochondrial content and function was found in the liver of male Mito-Ob mice with NASH/HCC development. We found that ERK1/2 signaling was significantly upregulated whereas STAT3 signaling was significantly down regulated in the tumors from Mito-Ob mice. These data provide a proof-of-concept that the metabolic and inflammatory status of the adipose tissue and their interplay at the systemic and hepatic level play a central role in the pathogenesis of obesity-linked NASH and HCC. PMID:27005704

  16. Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Inflammation, and Depression in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Biobehavioral Mechanisms and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Kristen; Antoni, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this review is to summarize physiological and psychological characteristics that are common among women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and provide evidence suggesting that addressing psychological disturbances can reduce or alleviate physical symptoms of PCOS via behavioral pathways and physiological pathways. Methods Empirical studies and expert consensuses pertaining to physiological, psychological and medical management aspects of PCOS were identified and presented in this review. Papers were identified via searching Pubmed, PsycInfo, Medline ISI, CINAHL, or a web browser (i.e., Google) using numerous combinations of terms pertaining to physiological, psychological, and medical management aspects of PCOS. A paper was chosen to be included in this review if it reported findings and/or provided information that related to and helped support the main purpose(s) of this review paper. Results Available literature on the physiological (i.e., hyperandrogenism, central obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance) and psychological (i.e., depression, anxiety, eating disorders) factors among women with PCOS provides evidence that these various aspects of PCOS are strongly inter-related. Discussion The existence of these relationships among physiological and psychological factors strongly suggests that medical management of PCOS would greatly benefit from inclusion of psychological and behavioral approaches. PMID:20471009

  17. Nucleic Acid-Targeting Pathways Promote Inflammation in Obesity-Related Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Xavier S; Ghazarian, Magar; Chng, Melissa Hui Yen; Luck, Helen; Kim, Justin H; Zeng, Kejing; Shi, Sally Y; Tsai, Sue; Lei, Helena; Kenkel, Justin; Liu, Chih Long; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Tsui, Hubert; Sima, Corneliu; Xiao, Changting; Shen, Lei; Li, Xiaoying; Jin, Tianru; Lewis, Gary F; Woo, Minna; Utz, Paul J; Glogauer, Michael; Engleman, Edgar; Winer, Shawn; Winer, Daniel A

    2016-07-19

    Obesity-related inflammation of metabolic tissues, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver, are key factors in the development of insulin resistance (IR), though many of the contributing mechanisms remain unclear. We show that nucleic-acid-targeting pathways downstream of extracellular trap (ET) formation, unmethylated CpG DNA, or ribonucleic acids drive inflammation in IR. High-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice show increased release of ETs in VAT, decreased systemic clearance of ETs, and increased autoantibodies against conserved nuclear antigens. In HFD-fed mice, this excess of nucleic acids and related protein antigens worsens metabolic parameters through a number of mechanisms, including activation of VAT macrophages and expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in the liver. Consistently, HFD-fed mice lacking critical responders of nucleic acid pathways, Toll-like receptors (TLR)7 and TLR9, show reduced metabolic inflammation and improved glucose homeostasis. Treatment of HFD-fed mice with inhibitors of ET formation or a TLR7/9 antagonist improves metabolic disease. These findings reveal a pathogenic role for nucleic acid targeting as a driver of metabolic inflammation in IR. PMID:27373163

  18. Unhealthy Phenotype as Indicated by Salivary Biomarkers: Glucose, Insulin, VEGF-A, and IL-12p70 in Obese Kuwaiti Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Goodson, J. Max; Shi, Ping; Vargas, Jorel; Yaskell, Tina; Stephens, Danielle; Cugini, Maryann; Hasturk, Hatice; Barake, Roula; Alsmadi, Osama; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Ariga, Jitendra; Soparkar, Pramod; Behbehani, Jawad; Behbehani, Kazem; Welty, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Here, we investigated the relationships between obesity and the salivary concentrations of insulin, glucose, and 20 metabolic biomarkers in Kuwaiti adolescents. Previously, we have shown that certain salivary metabolic markers can act as surrogates for blood concentrations. Methods. Salivary samples of whole saliva were collected from 8,317 adolescents. Salivary glucose concentration was measured by a high-sensitivity glucose oxidase method implemented on a robotic chemical analyzer. The concentration of salivary insulin and 20 other metabolic biomarkers was assayed in 744 randomly selected saliva samples by multiplexed bead-based immunoassay. Results. Obesity was seen in 26.5% of the adolescents. Salivary insulin predicting hyperinsulinemia occurred in 4.3% of normal-weight adolescents, 8.3% of overweight adolescents, and 25.7% of obese adolescents (p < 0.0001). Salivary glucose predicting hyperglycemia was found in only 3% of obese children and was not predictive (p = 0.89). Elevated salivary glucose and insulin occurring together was associated with elevated vascular endothelial growth factor and reduced salivary interleukin-12. Conclusion. Considering the surrogate nature of salivary insulin and glucose, this study suggests that elevated insulin may be a dominant sign of metabolic disease in adolescent populations. It also appears that a proangiogenic environment may accompany elevated glucose in obese adolescents. PMID:27069678

  19. Effect of Oral Glucose Administration on Rebound Growth Hormone Release in Normal and Obese Women: The Role of Adiposity, Insulin Sensitivity and Ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    Pena-Bello, Lara; Pertega-Diaz, Sonia; Outeiriño-Blanco, Elena; Garcia-Buela, Jesus; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Dieguez, Carlos; Cordido, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Context Metabolic substrates and nutritional status play a major role in growth hormone (GH) secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms involved in GH secretion following oral glucose (OG) administration in normal and obese patients is a pending issue. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate GH after OG in relation with adiposity, insulin secretion and action, and ghrelin secretion in obese and healthy women, to further elucidate the mechanism of GH secretion after OG and the altered GH secretion in obesity. Participants and Methods We included 64 healthy and obese women. After an overnight fast, 75 g of OG were administered; GH, glucose, insulin and ghrelin were obtained during 300 minutes. Insulin secretion and action indices and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated for GH, glucose, insulin and ghrelin. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were employed. Results The AUC of GH (μg/L•min) was lower in obese (249.8±41.8) than in healthy women (490.4±74.6), P=0.001. The AUC of total ghrelin (pg/mL•min) was lower in obese (240995.5±11094.2) than in healthy women (340797.5±37757.5), P=0.042. There were significant correlations between GH secretion and the different adiposity, insulin secretion and action, and ghrelin secretion indices. After multivariate analysis only ghrelin AUC remained a significant predictor for fasting and peak GH. PMID:25782001

  20. Abdominal Obesity and Association With Atherosclerosis Risk Factors: The Uberlândia Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Roever, Leonardo S; Resende, Elmiro S; Diniz, Angélica L D; Penha-Silva, Nilson; Veloso, Fernando C; Casella-Filho, Antonio; Dourado, Paulo M M; Chagas, Antonio C P

    2016-03-01

    Ectopic visceral fat (VF) and subcutaneous fat (SCF) are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Gender differences in the correlations of cardiovascular disease risk factors and ectopic fat in the Brazilian population still lacking. Cross-sectional study with 101 volunteers (50.49% men; mean age 56.5 ± 18, range 19-74 years) drawn from the Uberlândia Heart Study underwent ultrasonography assessment of abdominal visceral adipose tissue with convex transducer of 3.5 MHz of frequency. The thickness of VF was ultrasonographically measured by the distance between the inner face of the abdominal muscle and the posterior face of abdominal aorta, 1 cm above the umbilicus. The SCF thickness was measured with a 7.5 MHz linear transducer transversely positioned 1 cm above the umbilical scar. The exams were always performed by the same examiner. Ectopic fat volumes were examined in relation to waist circumference, blood pressure, and metabolic risk factors. The VF was significantly associated with the levels of triglycerides (P < 0.01, r = 0.10), HDL cholesterol (P < 0.005, r = 0.15), total cholesterol (P < 0.01, r = 0.10), waist circumference (P < 0.0001, r = 0.43), systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, r = 0.41), and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, r = 0.32) in women, and with the levels of triglycerides (P < 0.002, r = 0,14), HDL cholesterol (P < 0.032, r = 0.07), glucose (P < 0.001, r = 0.15), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (P < 0.008, r = 0.12), gamma-GT (P < 0.001, r = 0.30), waist circumference (P < 0.001, r = 0.52), systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, r = 0.32), and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, r = 0.26) in men. SCF was significantly associated with the levels of triglycerides (P < 0.01, r = 0.34), LDL cholesterol (P < 0.001, r = 0.36), total cholesterol (P < 0.05, r = 0.36), waist circumference (P

  1. SPARC is over-expressed in adipose tissues of diet-induced obese rats and causes insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Zhao, Yuyan; Yuan, Lizhi; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Rui; Yi, Qianru; Yong, Tongwu

    2014-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a secretory multifunctional matricellular glycoprotein. High circulating levels of SPARC have been reported to be associated with obesity and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SPARC induces insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction in adipocytes. Our results showed that feeding high fat diet to rats for 12 weeks significantly increased SPARC expression in adipose tissues at both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, SPARC overexpression in stably transfected 3T3-L1 cells induced insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction, as evidenced by inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose transport, lower ATP synthesis and mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mature adipocytes. Finally, overexpression of SPARC also modulated the expression levels of several inflammatory cytokines, which play important roles in insulin resistance, glucose and lipid metabolism during adipogenesis. In conclusion, our data suggest that SPARC is involved in obesity-induced adipose insulin resistance and may serve as a potential target in the treatment of obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance. PMID:23910024

  2. The influence of hip circumference on the relationship between abdominal obesity and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Adrian J; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Zimmet, Paul Z; Carstensen, Bendix; Alberti, K George MM; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Barr, Elizabeth L M; Pauvaday, Vassen K; Kowlessur, Sudhirsen; Söderberg, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Background Higher waist circumference and lower hip circumference are both associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, despite being directly correlated. The real effects of visceral obesity may therefore be underestimated when hip circumference is not fully taken into account. We hypothesized that adding waist and hip circumference to traditional risk factors would significantly improve CVD risk prediction. Methods In a population-based survey among South Asian and African Mauritians (n = 7978), 1241 deaths occurred during 15 years of follow-up. In a model that included variables used in previous CVD risk calculations (a Framingham-type model), the association between waist circumference and mortality was examined before and after adjustment for hip circumference. The percentage with an increase in estimated 10-year cumulative mortality of >25% and a decrease of >20% after waist and hip circumference were added to the model was calculated. Results Waist circumference was strongly related to mortality only after adjustment for hip circumference and vice versa. Adding waist and hip circumference to a Framingham-type model increased estimated 10-year cumulative CVD mortality by >25% for 23.7% of those who died and 15.7% of those censored. Cumulative mortality decreased by >20% for 4.5% of those who died and 14.8% of those censored. Conclusions The effect of central obesity on mortality risk is seriously underestimated without adjustment for hip circumference. Adding waist and hip circumference to a Framingham-type model for CVD mortality substantially increased predictive power. Both may be important inclusions in CVD risk prediction models. PMID:22266094

  3. Exercise and dietary change ameliorate high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance via mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Ju Yong; Shin, Ki Ok; Woo, Jinhee; Woo, Sang Heon; Jang, Ki Soeng; Lee, Yul Hyo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise and dietary change on obesity and insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels in skeletal muscles of obese rats. [Methods] Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into CO (Normal diet) and HF (High Fat diet) groups in order to induce obesity for 15 weeks. The rats were then subdivided into CO, COT (CO + Training), HF, HFT (HF + Training), HFND (Dietary change), and HFNDT (HFND + Training) groups (10 rats / group). The training groups underwent moderate-intensity treadmill exercise for 8 weeks, after which soleus muscles were excised and analyzed. Data was statistically analyzed by independent t-test and One-way ANOVA tests with a 0.05 significance level. [Results] Fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and HOMA-IR in the HF group were significantly higher, as compared with other groups (p <.05). Protein levels of insulin receptor subunit-1 (IRS-1), IRS-2, and p-Akt were significantly higher in the HFT, HFND, and HFNDT groups, as compared with HF group. In addition, the protein levels of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 were significantly decreased by exercise and dietary change (p <.05). However, mTORC2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were significantly increased (p <.05). [Conclusion] In summary, despite the negative impact of continuous high fat intake, regular exercise and dietary change showed a positive effect on insulin resistance and mTOR signaling protein levels. PMID:27508151

  4. High serum selenium levels are associated with increased risk for diabetes mellitus independent of central obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Lee, Long-Teng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Selenium is an essential micronutrient for human health. Although many observational and interventional studies have examined the associations between selenium and diabetes mellitus, the findings were inconclusive. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum selenium levels and prevalence of diabetes, and correlated the relationship to insulin resistance and central obesity. Research design and methods This was a hospital-based case–control study of 847 adults aged more than 40 years (diabetes: non-diabetes =1:2) in Northern Taiwan. Serum selenium was measured by an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The association between serum selenium and diabetes was examined using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results After adjusting for age, gender, current smoking, current drinking, and physical activity, the ORs (95% CI, p value) of having diabetes in the second (Q2), third (Q3), and fourth (Q4) selenium quartile groups were 1.24 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.98, p>0.05), 1.90 (95% CI 1.22 to 2.97, p<0.05), and 5.11 (95% CI 3.27 to 8.00, p<0.001), respectively, compared with the first (Q1) quartile group. Further adjustments for waist circumference and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) largely removed the association of serum selenium levels with diabetes but not in the highest quartile (compared with Q1, Q3: 1.57, 95% CI 0.91 to 2.70, Q4: 3.79, 95% CI 2.17 to 6.32). Conclusions We found that serum selenium levels were positively associated with prevalence of diabetes. This is the first human study to link insulin resistance and central obesity to the association between selenium and diabetes. Furthermore, the association between selenium and diabetes was independent of insulin resistance and central obesity at high serum selenium levels. The mechanism behind warrants further confirmation. PMID:27547419

  5. The influence of calcium supplement on body composition, weight loss and insulin resistance in obese adults receiving low calorie diet

    PubMed Central

    Shalileh, Maryam; Shidfar, Farzad; Haghani, Hamid; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity and diabetes are the most important problems of public health. Evidence from molecular animal research and epidemiologic investigations indicate that calcium intake may have an influence on body composition, weight and insulin resistance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of calcium supplementation on body composition, weight, insulin resistance and blood pressure in the face of calorie restriction in obese adults. METHODS: A double blind randomized placebo-controlled trial on 40 adults with Body Mass Index > 25kg/m2 was conducted. Subjects were maintained for 24 weeks on a balanced deficit diet (-500 kcal/d deficit) and randomly assigned into two groups with 1000 mg ca/d as calcium carbonate or placebo. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in variables at the 12th and 24th week between the two groups. The lean mass showed no significant increase in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to baseline and in placebo group at the 24th week compared to the 12th week. The insulin concentration showed a significant decrease in the calcium group at the 12th week compared to the baseline (p < 0.05). The diastolic blood pressure had a significant decrease at the 24th week compared to the 12th week in both groups (p = 0.013-0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Results from this study suggest that 24 weeks of supplementation with 1000 mg ca/d did not have any effect on weight, body composition, insulin resistance and blood pressure beyond what can be achieved in an energy restricted diet in obese adults. PMID:21526081

  6. Partial Reversal of Obesity-Induced Insulin Resistance Owing to Anti-Inflammatory Immunomodulatory Potential of Flaxseed Oil.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Samina; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Farah

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the potential of supplementation of diet with Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum, L.) oil (FXO), on obesity-related inflammation and reversal of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Swiss Albino mice, C57bl/6 mice and co-culture of 3T3-L1 adipocytes - RAW 264.7 macrophages to mimick obese adipose tissue environment were used for the study. Oral gavage of FXO at concentrations of 4, 8 or 16 mg/kg body weight (bwt) for 4 weeks or high-fat diet (HFD, 60% energy as fat) supplemented with dietary FXO (4, 8 or 16 mg/kg bwt) was given to the mice. FXO was characterised using gas chromatography - mass spectrometry. FXO supplemented HFD-fed mice (4 mg/kg bwt exhibited reduced adiposity index, serum glucose levels and triglycerides (8 and 16 mg/kg bwt) and improvement in insulin sensitisation (4, 8 and 16 mg/kg bwt) when compared with HFD mice. The co-culture showed a dose-dependent shift in cytokines towards anti-inflammatory (IL-4) state, with a decrease in pro-inflammatory TNF-α (p < 0.05). For immunomodulatory studies a dose-dependent increase (p < 0.05) was observed in antigen-specific levels of Th2 (IL-4) cytokine, serum anti-ova IgG1 and IgE levels. Suppression in anti-ova IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 and antigen-specific Th1 cytokines like TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly (p < 0.05) was observed at 16 mg/kg bwt dosage. The results indicate that FXO exhibits an anti-inflammatory immunomodulatory potential and may partially relieve symptoms of obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:26107745

  7. An Evaluation of Acylated Ghrelin and Obestatin Levels in Childhood Obesity and Their Association with Insulin Resistance, Metabolic Syndrome, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghy-Azar, Maryam; Nourbakhsh, Mitra; Pourmoteabed, Abdolreza; Nourbakhsh, Mona; Ilbeigi, Davod; Khosravi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide with an orexigenic property, which is predominantly produced by the stomach. Acylated ghrelin is the active form of this hormone. Obestatin is a 23-amino acid peptide which is produced by post-translational modification of a protein precursor that also produces ghrelin. Obestatin has the opposite effect of ghrelin on food intake. The aim of this study was to evaluate acylated ghrelin and obestatin levels and their ratio in obese and normal-weight children and adolescents, and their association with metabolic syndrome (MetS) parameters. Methods: Serum acyl-ghrelin, obestatin, leptin, insulin, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), lipid profile, and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated in 73 children and adolescents (42 obese and 31 control). Insulin resistance was calculated by a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). MetS was determined according to IDF criteria. Results: Acyl-ghrelin levels were significantly lower in obese subjects compared to the control group and lower in obese children with MetS compared to obese subjects without MetS. Obestatin was significantly higher in obese subjects compared to that of the control, but it did not differ significantly among those with or without MetS. Acyl-ghrelin to obestatin ratio was significantly lower in obese subjects compared to that in normal subjects. Acyl-ghrelin showed significant negative and obestatin showed significant positive correlations with body mass index (BMI), BMI Z-score, leptin, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Acyl-ghrelin had a significant negative correlation with MDA as an index of oxidative stress. Conclusion: Ghrelin is decreased and obestatin is elevated in obesity. Both of these hormones are associated with insulin resistance, and ghrelin is associated with oxidative stress. The balance between ghrelin and obestatin seems to be disturbed in obesity. PMID:27348010

  8. CD47 Deficiency Protects Mice From Diet-induced Obesity and Improves Whole Body Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Norman, Heather; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a transmembrane protein with several functions including self-recognition, immune cell communication, and cell signaling. Although it has been extensively studied in cancer and ischemia, CD47 function in obesity has never been explored. In this study, we utilized CD47 deficient mice in a high-fat diet induced obesity model to study for the first time whether CD47 plays a role in the development of obesity and metabolic complications. Male CD47 deficient and wild type (WT) control mice were fed with either low fat (LF) or high fat (HF) diets for 16 weeks. Interestingly, we found that CD47 deficient mice were protected from HF diet-induced obesity displaying decreased weight gain and reduced adiposity. This led to decreased MCP1/CCR2 dependent macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and reduced inflammation, resulting in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, CD47 deficiency stimulated the expression of UCP1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) levels in brown adipose tissue, leading to increased lipid utilization and heat production. This contributes to the increased energy utilization and reduced adiposity observed in these mice. Taken together, these data revealed a novel role for CD47 in the development of obesity and its related metabolic complications. PMID:25747123

  9. Quantitative variation in obesity-related traits and insulin precursors linked to the OB gene region on human chromosome 7

    SciTech Connect

    Duggirala, R.; Stern, M.P.; Reinhart, L.J.

    1996-09-01

    Despite the evidence that human obesity has strong genetic determinants, efforts at identifying specific genes that influence human obesity have largely been unsuccessful. Using the sibship data obtained from 32 low-income Mexican American pedigrees ascertained on a type II diabetic proband and a multipoint variance-components method, we tested for linkage between various obesity-related traits plus associated metabolic traits and 15 markers on human chromosome 7. We found evidence for linkage between markers in the OB gene region and various traits, as follows: D7S514 and extremity skinfolds (LOD = 3.1), human carboxypeptidase A1 (HCPA1) and 32,33-split proinsulin level (LOD = 4.2), and HCPA1 and proinsulin level (LOD = 3.2). A putative susceptibility locus linked to the marker D7S514 explained 56% of the total phenotypic variation in extremity skinfolds. Variation at the HCPA1 locus explained 64% of phenotypic variation in proinsulin level and {approximately}73% of phenotypic variation in split proinsulin concentration, respectively. Weaker evidence for linkage to several other obesity-related traits (e.g., waist circumference, body-mass index, fat mass by bioimpedance, etc.) was observed for a genetic location, which is {approximately}15 cM telomeric to OB. In conclusion, our study reveals that the OB region plays a significant role in determining the phenotypic variation of both insulin precursors and obesity-related traits, at least in Mexican Americans. 66 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. The effect of a low-calorie diet with and without fenfluramine on the glucose tolerance and insulin secretion of obese maturity-onset diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, J. Ranald W.

    1973-01-01

    Glucose tolerance and insulin secretion have been measured in twenty-three obese maturity-onset diabetics (twelve high-insulin secretors and eleven lowor normal-insulin secretors) on first presentation and after 10 weeks on a low-calorie diet. There was a significant improvement in glucose tolerance alone, when the results were compared with those from diabetics not on any form of treatment. Thereafter nine of these subjects (five high-insulin secretors and four low- or normal-insulin secretors) continued on the dietary therapy alone, and eleven of the remaining fourteen subjects (six high-insulin secretors and five low- or normal-insulin secretors) continued on the low-calorie diet with the addition of fenfluramine, and their glucose tolerance and insulin secretion were measured again after a further 10 weeks. The remaining three subjects were no longer studied. The nine subjects continuing on the diet alone showed maintenance of the improvement in glucose tolerance achieved during the first 10-week period with no significant change in insulin secretion. The eleven subjects placed on fenfluramine in addition to the diet also showed maintenance of the improvement in glucose tolerance achieved during the first 10-week period with a significant decrease in insulin secretion in the six high-insulin secreting subjects and no significant change in insulin secretion in the five lowor normal-secretors. PMID:4804456

  11. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Marquis-Gravel, Guillaume; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Guilbeault, Valérie; Latour, Élise; Gayda, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To analyze the effects of a long-term intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and Mediterranean diet (MedD) counseling on glycemic control parameters, insulin resistance and β-cell function in obese subjects. Methods The glycemic control parameters (fasting plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin), insulin resistance, and β-cell function of 72 obese subjects (54 women; mean age = 53 ± 9 years) were assessed at baseline and upon completion of a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention program conducted at the cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation center of the Montreal Heart Institute, from 2009 to 2012. The program included 2–3 weekly supervised exercise training sessions (HIIT and resistance exercise), combined to MedD counseling. Results Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (mmol/L) (before: 5.5 ± 0.9; after: 5.2 ± 0.6; P < 0.0001), fasting insulin (pmol/L) (before: 98 ± 57; after: 82 ± 43; P = 0.003), and insulin resistance, as assessed by the HOMA-IR score (before: 3.6 ± 2.5; after: 2.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.0008) significantly improved, but not HbA1c (%) (before: 5.72 ± 0.55; after: 5.69 ± 0.39; P = 0.448), nor β-cell function (HOMA-β, %) (before: 149 ± 78; after: 144 ± 75; P = 0.58). Conclusion Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects. PMID:26844086

  12. The integrative role of leptin, oestrogen and the insulin family in obesity-associated breast cancer: potential effects of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, S; Monk, J M; Robinson, L E; Mourtzakis, M

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer. The mechanisms through which obesity influences the development and progression of breast cancer are not fully elucidated; however, several factors such as increased oestrogen, concentrations of various members of the insulin family and inflammation that are associated with adiposity are purported to be important factors in this relationship. Emerging research has also begun to focus on the role of adipokines, (i.e. adipocyte secreted factors), in breast cancer. Leptin secretion is directly related to adiposity and is believed to promote breast cancer directly and independently, as well as through involvement with the oestrogen and insulin signalling pathways. As leptin is secreted from white adipose tissue, any intervention that reduces adiposity may be favourable. However, it is also important to consider that energy expenditure through exercise, independent of fat loss, may improve leptin regulation. The purpose of this narrative review was to explore the role of leptin in breast cancer development and progression, identify key interactions with oestrogen and the insulin family, and distinguish the potential effects of exercise on these interactions. PMID:25875578

  13. Roles of Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Kitade, Hironori; Ni, Yinhua; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2015-01-01

    Abundant evidence has demonstrated that obesity is a state of low-grade chronic inflammation that triggers the release of lipids, aberrant adipokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and several chemokines from adipose tissue. This low-grade inflammation underlies the development of insulin resistance and associated metabolic comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). During this development, adipose tissue macrophages accumulate through chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 and the ligand for this receptor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), is considered to be pivotal for the development of insulin resistance. To date, the chemokine system is known to be comprised of approximately 40 chemokines and 20 chemokine receptors that belong to the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family and, as a result, chemokines appear to exhibit a high degree of functional redundancy. Over the past two decades, the physiological and pathological properties of many of these chemokines and their receptors have been elucidated. The present review highlights chemokines and chemokine receptors as key contributing factors that link obesity to insulin resistance, T2DM, and NAFLD. PMID:26197341

  14. Mechanisms of Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance: Insights into the Emerging Role of Nutritional Strategies

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Maeve A.; Finucane, Orla M.; Connaughton, Ruth M.; McMorrow, Aoibheann M.; Roche, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and associated chronic inflammation initiate a state of insulin resistance (IR). The secretion of chemoattractants such as MCP-1 and MIF and of cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, draw immune cells including dendritic cells, T cells, and macrophages into adipose tissue (AT). Dysfunctional AT lipid metabolism leads to increased circulating free fatty acids, initiating inflammatory signaling cascades in the population of infiltrating cells. A feedback loop of pro-inflammatory cytokines exacerbates this pathological state, driving further immune cell infiltration and cytokine secretion and disrupts the insulin signaling cascade. Disruption of normal AT function is causative of defects in hepatic and skeletal muscle glucose homeostasis, resulting in systemic IR and ultimately the development of type 2 diabetes. Pharmaceutical strategies that target the inflammatory milieu may have some potential; however there are a number of safety concerns surrounding such pharmaceutical approaches. Nutritional anti-inflammatory interventions could offer a more suitable long-term alternative; whilst they may be less potent than some pharmaceutical anti-inflammatory agents, this may be advantageous for long-term therapy. This review will investigate obese AT biology, initiation of the inflammatory, and insulin resistant environment; and the mechanisms through which dietary anti-inflammatory components/functional nutrients may be beneficial. PMID:23675368

  15. Purified Betacyanins from Hylocereus undatus Peel Ameliorate Obesity and Insulin Resistance in High-Fat-Diet-Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Chu, Qiang; Xu, Dongdong; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-13

    Natural bioactive compounds in food have been shown to be beneficial in preventing the development of obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. Increasing evidence indicates that betacyanins possess free-radical-scavenging and antioxidant activities, suggesting their beneficial effects on metabolic disorders. The main objective of this study was to isolate and identify the betaycanins from Hylocereus undatus (white-fleshed pitaya) peel and evaluate their ability to ameliorate obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. The purified pitaya peel betacyanins (PPBNs) were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and the male C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet, HFD, or HFD supplemented with PPBNs for 14 weeks. Our results showed that the white-fleshed pitaya peel contains 14 kinds of betacyanins and dietary PPBNs reduced HFD-induced body weight gain and ameliorated adipose tissue hypertrophy, hepatosteatosis, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Moreover, the hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that PPBN supplementation increased the expression levels of lipid-metabolism-related genes (AdipoR2, Cpt1a, Cpt1b, Acox1, PPARγ, Insig1, and Insig2) and FGF21-related genes (β-Klotho and FGFR1/2) but decreased the expression level of Fads2, Fas, and FGF21, suggesting that the protective effect of PPBNs might be associated with the induced fatty acid oxidation, decreased fatty acid biosynthesis, and alleviated FGF21 resistance. PMID:26653843

  16. Adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficiency mitigates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Masashi; Hoshino, Miyuki; Fujita, Koki; Iizuka, Misao; Fujii, Satoshi; Clingan, Christopher S.; Van Kaer, Luc; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that CD1d expression and glycolipid-reactive, CD1d-restricted NKT cells exacerbate the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice. However, the relevant CD1d-expressing cells that influence the effects of NKT cells on the progression of obesity remain incompletely defined. In this study, we have demonstrated that 3T3-L1 adipocytes can present endogenous ligands to NKT cells, leading to IFN-γ production, which in turn, stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes to enhance expression of CD1d and CCL2, and decrease expression of adiponectin. Furthermore, adipocyte-specific CD1d deletion decreased the size of the visceral adipose tissue mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Accordingly, NKT cells were less activated, IFN-γ production was significantly reduced, and levels of adiponectin were increased in these animals as compared with control mice on HFD. Importantly, macrophage recruitment into the adipose tissue of adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficient mice was significantly blunted. These findings indicate that interactions between NKT cells and CD1d-expressing adipocytes producing endogenous NKT cell ligands play a critical role in the induction of inflammation and functional modulation of adipose tissue that leads to obesity. PMID:27329323

  17. Adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficiency mitigates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Masashi; Hoshino, Miyuki; Fujita, Koki; Iizuka, Misao; Fujii, Satoshi; Clingan, Christopher S; Van Kaer, Luc; Iwabuchi, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that CD1d expression and glycolipid-reactive, CD1d-restricted NKT cells exacerbate the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice. However, the relevant CD1d-expressing cells that influence the effects of NKT cells on the progression of obesity remain incompletely defined. In this study, we have demonstrated that 3T3-L1 adipocytes can present endogenous ligands to NKT cells, leading to IFN-γ production, which in turn, stimulated 3T3-L1 adipocytes to enhance expression of CD1d and CCL2, and decrease expression of adiponectin. Furthermore, adipocyte-specific CD1d deletion decreased the size of the visceral adipose tissue mass and enhanced insulin sensitivity in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Accordingly, NKT cells were less activated, IFN-γ production was significantly reduced, and levels of adiponectin were increased in these animals as compared with control mice on HFD. Importantly, macrophage recruitment into the adipose tissue of adipocyte-specific CD1d-deficient mice was significantly blunted. These findings indicate that interactions between NKT cells and CD1d-expressing adipocytes producing endogenous NKT cell ligands play a critical role in the induction of inflammation and functional modulation of adipose tissue that leads to obesity. PMID:27329323

  18. Race, childhood insulin, childhood caloric intake, and class 3 obesity at age 24: 14-year prospective study of schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Morrison, John A; Glueck, Charles J; Daniels, Stephen R; Wang, Ping

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of Class 3 obesity (BMI ≥40 kg/m(2)) has more than doubled in the past 25 years. In a 14-year prospective study from age 10 to 24 of a biracial schoolgirl cohort (293 black, 256 white), we assessed childhood correlates of Class 3 BMI at age 24. Of 42 girls with Class 3 BMI at age 24, 36 (86%) were black. By logistic regression, significant explanatory variables of Class 3 BMI at age 24 included top decile waist circumference at age 11 (odds ratio (OR) 5.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-13.9, P = 0.0002), age 10 BMI ≥ the Center for Disease Control (CDC) 2000 top 15% (OR 7.0, 95% CI 2.5-19.3, P = 0.0002), and a three-way interaction between race, childhood insulin, and average caloric intake from age 10 to age 19 (for each unit increase, OR 1.7 95% CI 1.3-2.2, P = 0.0003). Age 10 BMI, age 11 waist circumference, and interaction of race, childhood insulin, and childhood caloric intake predict Class 3 obesity in young adulthood, facilitating childhood identification of girls at high risk for developing Class 3 obesity. PMID:21593807

  19. Obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes in the sand rat exposed to a hypercaloric diet; possible protective effect for IL1-β.

    PubMed

    Khalkhal, Ali; Haddar, Aomar; Semiane, Nesrine; Mallek, Aicha; Abdelmalek, Abdelouadoud; Castex, Françoise; Gross, René; Dahmani, Yasmina

    2012-04-01

    It is well established that, upon changing their natural desert low caloric (succulent halophilic plants) to a regular laboratory high caloric diet, sand rats undergo various phenotypic changes depending on their genetic background and including obesity and various degrees of insulin resistance. Our aim was to investigate the acute effects of Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on glucose-induced insulin secretion in normal lean sand rats maintained on their natural diet and in obese insulin resistant normoglycemic or type 2 diabetic animals after a 9-month high caloric diet. Animals were fed either a low or a high caloric diet; after 9 months, pancreatic islets were isolated and incubated in the presence of increasing cytokine concentrations. At the end of the high-energy diet, animals were all over-weight, and probably due to a different genetic background, they displayed either insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and normoglycemia or a marked type-2 diabetic state. Pancreatic islets from obese insulin resistant normoglycemic animals were much more sensitive and responsive to IL-1β when compared to lean controls. The cytokine was inefficient in diabetic islets. In conclusion, the markedly increased insulinotropic effect of IL-1β in obese diabetes-resistant sand rat could participate and be involved in pancreatic β-cell hyperactivity that compensates for insulin resistance and thereby prevent the development of type 2 diabetes in these animals. PMID:22578573

  20. Nicotinic Acid Accelerates HDL Cholesteryl Ester Turnover in Obese Insulin-Resistant Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Le Bloc'h, Jérôme; Leray, Véronique; Nazih, Hassan; Gauthier, Olivier; Serisier, Samuel; Magot, Thierry; Krempf, Michel; Nguyen, Patrick; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Aim Nicotinic acid (NA) treatment decreases plasma triglycerides and increases HDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms involved in these change are not fully understood. A reduction in cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity has been advanced to explain most lipid-modulating effects of NA. However, due to the central role of CETP in reverse cholesterol transport in humans, other effects of NA may have been hidden. As dogs have no CETP activity, we conducted this study to examine the specific effects of extended-release niacin (NA) on lipids and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl ester (CE) turnover in obese Insulin-Resistant dogs with increase plasma triglycerides. Methods HDL kinetics were assessed in fasting dogs before and four weeks after NA treatment through endogenous labeling of cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI by simultaneous infusion of [1,2 13C2] acetate and [5,5,5 2H3] leucine for 8 h. Kinetic data were analyzed by compartmental modeling. In vitro cell cholesterol efflux of serum from NA-treated dogs was also measured. Results NA reduced plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and very-low-density lipoprotein TG concentrations (p < 0.05). The kinetic study also showed a higher cholesterol esterification rate (p < 0.05). HDL-CE turnover was accelerated (p < 0.05) via HDL removal through endocytosis and selective CE uptake (p < 0.05). We measured an elevated in vitro cell cholesterol efflux (p < 0.05) with NA treatment in accordance with a higher cholesterol esterification. Conclusion NA decreased HDL cholesterol but promoted cholesterol efflux and esterification, leading to improved reverse cholesterol transport. These results highlight the CETP-independent effects of NA in changes of plasma lipid profile. PMID:26366727

  1. The mitochondrial function of the cerebral vasculature in insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats.

    PubMed

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Tokes, Tunde; Sure, Venkata N L R; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about mitochondrial functioning in the cerebral vasculature during insulin resistance (IR). We examined mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries of male Zucker obese (ZO) rats and phenotypically normal Zucker lean (ZL) rats using the Seahorse XFe24 analyzer. We investigated mitochondrial morphology in cerebral blood vessels as well as mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial protein expression levels in cerebral arteries and microvessels. We also measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in cerebral microvessels. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial respiration components (nonmitochondrial respiration, basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and spare respiratory capacity) showed similar levels among the ZL and ZO groups with the exception of maximal respiration, which was higher in the ZO group. We examined the role of nitric oxide by measuring mitochondrial respiration following inhibition of nitric oxide synthase withN(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and mitochondrial activation after administration of diazoxide (DZ). Both ZL and ZO groups showed similar responses to these stimuli with minor variations.l-NAME significantly increased the proton leak, and DZ decreased nonmitochondrial respiration in the ZL group. Other components were not affected. Mitochondrial morphology and distribution within vascular smooth muscle and endothelium as well as mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the arteries and microvessels of both groups. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ROS levels were increased in cerebral microvessels of the ZO. Our study suggests that mitochondrial function is not significantly altered in the cerebral vasculature of young ZO rats, but increased ROS production might be due to increased eNOS in the cerebral microcirculation during IR. PMID:26873973

  2. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Jonas R; França, Lucas M; Chagas, Vinicyus T; Gaspar, Renato S; Dos Santos, Kayque A; Gonçalves, Luciana M; Sloboda, Deborah M; Holloway, Alison C; Dutra, Richard P; Carneiro, Everardo M; Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose into