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Sample records for abdominal pain headache

  1. [The 452th case: rash, hypotension, abdominal pain and headache].

    PubMed

    Bian, S N; Yang, H H; Wang, Q; Xu, D; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized with multiple organ involvements. Acute acalculous cholecystitis(AAC) is an extremely rare manifestation of digestive system involvement in SLE. We reported a case of 32-year-old woman who complained skin rashes for two weeks and stomachache and oliguria for one day. She had rashes at onset, and developed fever, stomachache, hypotension and headache. Physical examination at admission indicated blood pressure 76/47 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), heart rate 107 beats/min, warm acra. Murphy's sign was positive. Ultrasound suggested the enlarged gallbladder with surrounding hypoecho band yet no biliary calculi were found. A diagnosis of SLE was made, characteristic with distributive shock at the onset and AAC, complicated with neuropsychiatric lupus and lupus nephritis. She had an acute and severe course of disease, which had been relieved after treatment of high dose glucocorticoid and immunosuppressants. This case arouses clinicians to pay more attention to AAC as a rare form of disease flare in SLE. Early diagnosis of AAC is crucial to a favorable prognosis and in avoid of abdominal surgery. PMID:27586989

  2. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is ...

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  4. Pain. Part 10: Headaches.

    PubMed

    Chong, M S; Renton, Tara

    2016-06-01

    This last in a series of 10 papers aims to provide the dental and medical teams with an update in headache conditions relevant to dentistry and medicine. Headache is the most common presenting symptom for patients presenting to A&E departments. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Most of the dental team take for granted their knowledge and ability to manage acute dental pain. However, the education and preparation in managing patients with headache conditions remains poor. Dentists are in a privileged position to be able to advise their patients about common conditions including headaches. PMID:27529913

  5. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache (not caused by another medical condition) is migraine. Migraine headaches are usually characterized by severe pain on ... Women are more likely than men to have migraine headaches. Is there any treatment? When headaches occur ...

  6. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  7. Pain sensitivity and headache: an examination of the central theory.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, N I

    1992-01-01

    The central theory of headache was investigated by examining pain sensitivity in headache sufferers and headache-free controls. Headache subjects had lower pain threshold and tolerance levels than controls for electrical stimulation of the finger. Headache subjects also had a lesser tolerance for pain induced by the application of ice to the temporal region, but there was no significant difference between groups on temporal ice pain threshold. Sensitivity to finger pain was not affected by the presence or absence of headache at the time of testing. No significant differences between tension and migraine subjects were observed; neither were headache subjects, reporting unilateral headaches, significantly more sensitive to temporal ice pain on the side affected by headache. It was concluded that headache sufferers may be more sensitive to pain than headache-free persons but, that this heightened sensitivity is not specific to the head, and in itself, seems unable to account for the locus of headache. PMID:1538347

  8. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe ... kinds of pain: Generalized pain or pain over more than half ...

  9. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  10. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  11. Recurrent abdominal pain during childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint among children. A thorough history and physical examination and limited laboratory investigation should enable a physician to make a positive diagnosis of "functional" recurrent abdominal pain in 90% to 95% of cases; an organic cause is identified in only 5% to 10%. The care and thoroughness of the history and physical examination establish the physician's credibility; explaining the clinical basis for the diagnosis and educating the child and parents on what is known about the condition reassures the parents. PMID:8199511

  12. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... hours How much you slept What you were doing and where you were right before the pain started How long the headache lasted and what made it stop Review your diary with your health care provider to identify ...

  13. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  14. Cluster headache-like pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leandri, M; Cruccu, G; Gottlieb, A

    1999-10-01

    We describe a case with simultaneous occurrence of cluster headache-like pain and multiple sclerosis. Both neuroimaging and neurophysiology (trigeminal evoked potentials) revealed a demyelination plaque in the pons, at the trigeminal root entry zone, on the side of pain. Although that type of lesion is usually associated with trigeminal neuralgia pain, we hypothesize that in this case it may be linked with the concomitant cluster headache, possibly by activation of trigemino-vascular mechanisms.

  15. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016). PMID:27349540

  16. Current Understanding on Pain Mechanism in Migraine and Cluster Headache

    PubMed Central

    Buture, Alina; Gooriah, Rubesh; Nimeri, Randa; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2016-01-01

    Context Migraine and cluster headache are undoubtedly painful conditions. The respective pathogenesis of these two conditions is incompletely understood. In both cases, the treatments used have largely been empirical and have relied to a much lesser extent on our understanding of the mechanisms causing pain. We hereby review the pain mechanisms in migraine and cluster headache, two of the commonest primary headache disorders. Evidence Acquisition A review of the English literature was conducted by searching PubMed for studies on pain mechanism in migraine and cluster headache. We entered [migraine] and [pain mechanism] in Pubmed and 488 articles were obtained. Articles were then included according to their relevance to the topic. Similarly, [cluster headache] and [pain mechanism] revealed 79 search results. Results There is evidence that the trigeminovascular system and neurogenic inflammation play important roles, together with certain areas of the brain, leading to these conditions being termed ‘neurovascular headaches’. Functional imaging findings suggest a possible role of the dorsolateral pons in generating migraine attacks while the role of the hypothalamus in cluster headache is more firmly established. Conclusions Migraine and cluster headache have complex pathophysiologies. The exact mechanism causing pain in both conditions is incompletely understood and more research needs to be undertaken in this area. PMID:27642579

  17. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016).

  18. Headache.

    PubMed

    Lance, J W

    1981-07-01

    Present views on the cause and treatment of temporal arteritis, trigeminal neuralgia, pain arising from the neck, benign intracranial hypertension, and other headaches of intracranial origin are summarized. The clinical components of migraine are correlated with recent studies of cerebral blood flow, monoamine changes, and the platelet release reaction. Psychological, physiological, and pharmacological management is based on the holistic concept of migraine as an uninhibited protective reaction. Cluster headache is subdivided into three varieties which respond preferentially to different medication. Tension headache may depend more on vascular mechanisms than excessive muscle contraction, but treatment is still directed at behavioral management and relaxation training with the aid of antidepressant therapy. PMID:7023351

  19. Gum-Chewing and Headache: An Underestimated Trigger of Headache Pain in Migraineurs?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Tension-type headache and migraine are currently considered the second and third most frequent human diseases. Since a variety of conditions that involve the temporomandibular joint and chewing muscles are frequent causes of orofacial pain, the aim of this article was to review current published evidence about the potential relationship between gum-chewing and headache. A systematic electronic search performed on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science using the keywords "headache" or "migraine" and "chewing" allowed to finally identify 1 cross-sectional, 1 observational and 3 randomized studies, along with 3 case reports about the potential association between gum-chewing and headache. Despite the limited evidence, it seems reasonable to suggest that headache attacks may be triggered by gum-chewing in migraineurs and in patients with tension-type headache. Opposite results were obtained in non-migraineurs, since in none of these studies an increased prevalence of headache pain was reported after gum-chewing. Although larger randomized studies will be necessary to definitely establish the relationship between gum-chewing and headache across different populations, it seems cautionary to suggest that subjects with migraine or tension-type headache should avoid or limit gum-chewing in their lifestyle. PMID:25714969

  20. Prevalence of medication overuse headache in an interdisciplinary pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medication overuse headache (MOH) has been recognized as an important problem in headache patients although the pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The diagnosis of MOH is based on clinical characteristics defined by the International Headache Society. The aim was the evaluation of the diagnostic criteria of MOH in a mixed population of chronic pain patients to gain information about the prevalence and possible associations with MOH. Methods Data of all patients referred to the interdisciplinary pain clinic at the University Hospital of Zurich between September 2005 and December 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data (age, sex, history of migration), as well as data about duration of pain disease, category of pain disease (neurological, psychiatric, rheumatologic, other), use of medication, history of trauma, and comorbidity of depression and anxiety have been collected. Results Totally 178 of 187 consecutive chronic pain patients were included in the study. A total of 138 patients (78%) used analgesics on 15 or more days per month. Chronic headache was more prevalent among patients with analgesic overuse (39.8%) than without analgesic overuse (18%). The prevalence of MOH was 29%. The odds ratio (OR) for a patient with medication overuse to have chronic headache was 13.1 if he had a history of primary headache, compared to a patient without a primary headache syndrome. Furthermore, history of headache (OR 2.5, CI [1.13;5.44]), history of migration (OR 2.9, CI [1.31;6.32]) and comorbid depression (OR 3.5, CI [1.46;8.52]) were associated with overuse of acute medication, in general. Conclusions Primary headaches have a high risk for chronification in patients overusing analgesics for other pain disorders. Whereas history of headache, history of migration and comorbidity of depression are independentely associated with analgesic overuse in this group of patients. PMID:23565761

  1. Headache and facial pain in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2004-08-01

    Headache occasionally occurs during or after scuba diving. Although its significance often is benign, headache may signal a serious neurological disorder in some circumstances. In addition to the usual causes of headache, the diagnostic evaluation should consider otic and paranasal sinus barotrauma, arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, carbon dioxide retention, carbon monoxide toxicity, hyperbaric-triggered migraine, cervical and temporomandibular joint strain, supraorbital neuralgia, carotid artery dissection, and exertional and cold stimulus headache syndromes. Focal neurologic symptoms, even in the migraineur, should not be ignored, but rather treated with 100% oxygen acutely and referred without delay to a facility with a hyperbaric chamber.

  2. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  3. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  4. Influence of headache frequency on clinical signs and symptoms of TMD in subjects with temple headache and TMD pain

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Gary C.; John, Mike T.; Ohrbach, Richard; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Schiffman, Eric L.; Truelove, Edmond S.; List, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of the frequency of temple headache to signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) was investigated in a subset of a larger convenience sample of community TMD cases. The study sample included: 86 painful TMD, non-headache subjects; 309 painful TMD subjects with varied frequency of temple headaches; and 149 subjects without painful TMD or headache for descriptive comparison. Painful TMD included Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) diagnoses of myofascial pain, TMJ arthralgia and TMJ osteoarthritis. Mild to moderate intensity temple headaches were classified by frequency using criteria based on the ICHD-II classification of TTH. Outcomes included TMD signs and symptoms (pain duration, pain intensity, number of painful masticatory sites on palpation, mandibular range of motion), PPTs and temple headache resulting from masticatory provocation tests. Trend analyses across the painful TMD groups showed a substantial trend for aggravation of all of the TMD signs and symptoms associated with increased frequency of the temple headaches. In addition, increased headache frequency showed significant trends associated with reduced PPTs and reported temple headache with masticatory provocation tests. In conclusion, these findings suggest that these headaches may be TMD-related, as well as a possible role for peripheral and central sensitization in TMD patients. PMID:21196079

  5. Acupuncture laser in treating headache pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smesny, Dunja B.

    1990-09-01

    Cervicoocipital headache observed in 112 patient were treated, half of them with acupuncture, and other 50% with He-e laser (con tinuous emission- lo mW, 633nm: IEC). With this treatment was also combined an exercise program ne cesary for the mobilisation of functionaly blocked vertebral segment.

  6. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  7. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    PubMed

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood. PMID:26046716

  8. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due to tight muscles in your ... or anxiety. You are more likely to get tension headaches if you work too much, don't ...

  9. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  10. Locus of control patterns in headaches and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Cano-García, Francisco Javier; Rodríguez-Franco, Luis; López-Jiménez, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Locus of control (LOC) is related to the impact of headaches and chronic pain; however, literature evidence regarding LOC is not always consistent. Several authors consider this to be due, in part, to the separate interpretation of LOC factors, during which the interaction among them is ignored. In 1982, Wallston and Wallston proposed eight possible LOC health patterns depending on whether the individual scored high or low in each of three dimensions. OBJECTIVE: To identify these LOC patterns in patients with headaches and chronic pain, and to validate them in terms of their association with a selection of the main pain indicators. METHODS: A total of 228 individuals were recruited at three public centres in Seville, Spain. Participants completed a semistructured clinical interview and several questionnaires assessing psychological variables related to pain. The main statistical analyses used were two-step cluster analysis and ANCOVA. RESULTS: The six-cluster solution was optimal. The patterns observed coincided with: the believer in control; the yea-sayer; the pure chance; the pure internal; the pure professional; and the nay-sayer clusters. The double external or type VI clusters were not observed. Clusters could be classified from the best to the worst adjustment to chronic pain. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the empirical validity of the theoretical model of LOC patterns proposed in 1982 by Wallston and Wallston among a chronic pain population. The analysis of patterns provides more accurate information regarding the adjustment to pain compared with analysis of the LOC factors separately. PMID:23936894

  11. Psychosocial factors and childhood recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Boey, Christopher Chiong-Meng; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2002-12-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain in children is not a single condition but a description of a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, some of which fit into a definite pattern, such as the irritable bowel syndrome, while others do not. Organic disorders may be present, but in the majority of children they cannot be detected. Although children with recurrent abdominal pain do not generally have psychological or psychiatric illness, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that psychosocial stress plays an important role in this condition. This review will look into some of this evidence. The precise pathophysiology that results in abdominal pain is still not clearly understood, but the current belief is that visceral hypersensitivity or hyperalgesia and changes in the brain-gut axis linking the central and enteric nervous systems are important mechanisms. PMID:12423267

  12. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. PMID:25666642

  13. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  14. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  15. Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cerminara, Caterina; El Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain is an unusual partial epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal episodes of abdominal or visceral pain, disturbance of awareness and electroencephalographic abnormalities. We describe a new case of ictal abdominal pain in which gastrointestinal complaints were the only manifestation of seizures and review the previously described pediatric patients. In our patient clinical findings, ictal EEG abnormalities, and a good response to antiepileptic drugs allowed us to make a diagnosis of focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain. This is a rare epileptic phenomenon that should be suspected in patients with unexplained paroxysmal abdominal pain and migraine-like symptoms. We suggest that, after the exclusion of more common etiologies, focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain should be considered in patients with paroxysmal abdominal pain and ictal EEG abnormalities. PMID:24321431

  16. Memory of pain and affect associated with migraine and non-migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Bąbel, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The main aims of this study were to assess memory of pain and pain-related affect in headache sufferers and to compare the pain memories of individuals who suffer from migraines and those who experience non-migraine headaches. A total of 313 women participated in the study, 86 of whom had a diagnosis of migraine headache. The women rated their state anxiety about having a headache, the intensity and unpleasantness of headache pain, and their emotions while actually experiencing a headache. Either three or six months later, the participants were asked to recall their state anxiety, the intensity and unpleasantness of pain, and the emotions they had felt. Regardless of the length of recall delay or migraine diagnosis, participants accurately remembered both pain intensity and unpleasantness. Together, recalled anxiety, experienced pain and recalled positive affect were the most important predictors of memories for headache, accounting for 41% and 37% of the total variance in recalled pain intensity and unpleasantness, respectively. However, participants overestimated recalled positive and negative affect. The effect of recalled affect on memory of headache, together with the overestimation of recalled affect, suggests that although memory of headache is accurate, it is influenced by distorted memories of affect.

  17. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-03-01

    Headache is an alarm sympton, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Funstional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2.Vascular algi originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migraine-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias preciously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease).3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, from, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examination which would only delay treatement and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at lenght and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychlogical examination and a relaxation

  18. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-01-01

    Headache is an alarm symptom, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Functional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2. Vascular algia originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migrain-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias previously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease). 3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, form, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examinations which would only delay treatment and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at length and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychological examination and a relaxation

  19. Chronic migraine and chronic tension-type headache are associated with concomitant low back pain: results of the German Headache Consortium study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Min-Suk; Manack, Aubrey; Schramm, Sara; Fritsche, Guenther; Obermann, Mark; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Moebus, Susanne; Katsarava, Zaza

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between low and frequent low back pain and chronic migraine (CM) and chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) in a large, German population-based sample. Headaches were diagnosed according to International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria and categorized according to frequency (episodic 1-14 days/month or chronic ≤15 days/month) and headache type (migraine or TTH). We defined frequent low back pain as self-reported low back pain on ≥15 days/month. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression analyses, adjusting for sociodemographic covariates. There were 5605 respondents who reported headache in the previous year, of whom 255 (4.5%) had Chronic Headache. Migraine was diagnosed in 2933 respondents, of whom 182 (6.2%) had CM. TTH was diagnosed in 1253 respondents, of whom 50 (4.0%) had CTTH. Among 9944 respondents, 6030 reported low back pain, of whom 1267 (21.0%) reported frequent low back pain. In adjusted models, the odds of having frequent low back pain were between 2.1 (95% CI 1.7-2.6) and 2.7 (95% CI 2.3-3.2) times higher in all episodic headache subtypes when compared to No Headache. The odds of having frequent low back pain were between 13.7 (95% CI 7.4-25.3) and 18.3 (95% CI 11.9-28.0) times higher in all chronic headache subtypes when compared to No Headache. Low and frequent low back pain was associated with CM and CTTH. Multiple explanations may contribute to the association of headache and back pain, including the notion that the neurobiology of chronic headache, independent of primary headache type, not only involves the trigeminal pain pathway, but is also a part of abnormal general pain processing.

  20. [Abdominal pain and gastritis in children].

    PubMed

    Gottrand, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    Gastritis, as gastric and duodenal ulcer, is associated with epigastric abdominal pain, influenced by meals, associated with nausea and vomiting and weight loss. Diagnosis s based upon upper gastrointestinal fibre endoscopy that allows direct visualisation of gastric lesions and realization of antral and fundic biopsies for anatomopathology and culture. Main etiologies are drug induced, stress and H. pylori infection. Looking for H. pylori is only justified in those children presenting with digestive symptoms requiring upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Therefore non invasive test are only indicated for control of eradication. Treatment of H. pylori infection associates proton pump inhibitors and two antibiotics for 7 to 10 days.

  1. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep in mind that children should not take aspirin. Aspirin can ... herbal health product for headache relief, keep in mind that these products aren't tested to be ...

  2. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress, changes in sleep patterns, or even the weather. Getting Relief Most headaches will go away if ... or she will probably want to do a physical examination and get your medical history to help figure out what might ... Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  3. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  4. Effect of Preoperative Nerve Block on Postthyroidectomy Headache and Cervical Pain: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Sunil Malla Bujar; Kishore, Kamal; Mishra, Saroj Kanta; Agarwal, Gaurav; Agarwal, Amit; Verma, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of greater occipital nerve (GON) block and bilateral superficial cervical plexuses (BSCP) blocks in alleviating postoperative occipital headache and posterior neck pain after thyroidectomy. This randomized prospective study consisted of 75 women undergoing total thyroidectomy. Patients were randomized into three groups: Group I (n = 25): patients receiving GON, Group II (n = 25): patients receiving bilateral (BSCP) blocks, and Group III (n = 25): patients receiving no block. Assessment of occipital headache, posterior neck, and incision site pains was made at 12 hours and 24 hours after extubation by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). In comparison to Group III significantly fewer patients in Groups I and II experienced occipital headache at 12 (p = 0.006) and 24 hours (p = 0.005) and also posterior neck pain at 24 hours (p = 0.003). Mean VAS scores at 12 and 24 hours for occipital headache (p = 0.003 and p = 0.041) and posterior neck pain (p = 0.015 and p = 0.008) were significantly lower in Group I. The differences between Groups II and III were not significant except for the occipital headache at 12 hours. The efficacy of GON block is superior to BSCP blocks in alleviating postthyroidectomy occipital headache and posterior cervical pain. PMID:27034886

  5. Dextromethorphan and pain after total abdominal hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    McConaghy, P M; McSorley, P; McCaughey, W; Campbell, W I

    1998-11-01

    Dextromethorphan is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist which has been shown to inhibit the development of cutaneous secondary hyperalgesia after tissue trauma. We studied 60 ASA I-II patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients received either dextromethorphan 27 mg capsules, two doses before operation and three doses in the first 24 h after operation, or placebo. Visual analogue pain scores (VAS) at 24 and 48 h were assessed at rest, on coughing and on sitting up, and were not significantly different between groups. Morphine consumption from a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) device was also not significantly different between groups. Evidence of secondary hyperalgesia was assessed with von Frey hairs 10 cm above the Pfannenstiel incision. Both groups of patients exhibited evidence of secondary hyperalgesia after 24 and 48 h but there were no significant differences between groups. There was also no difference between groups in VAS scores at 1 month.

  6. Common Functional Gastroenterological Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia and depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in various peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation and luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. PMID:27492916

  7. Functional abdominal pain causing Scurvy, Pellagra, and Hypovitaminosis A.

    PubMed

    Ho, Edith Y; Mathy, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Severe vitamin deficiency disease is rarely seen in developed countries. We present an atypical case of a young man with scurvy, pellagra, and hypovitaminosis A, caused by longstanding functional abdominal pain that severely limited his ability to eat. PMID:24715978

  8. Orofacial pain and headache: a review and look at the commonalities.

    PubMed

    Bender, Steven D

    2014-03-01

    Headache and facial pain - in particular, temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) - are very prevalent conditions in the general population. TMDs are defined as a collection of symptoms and signs involving masticatory muscles, the temporomandibular joints (TMJs), or both. The pain reported by TMD patients is typically located in the muscles of mastication, in the preauricular area, or in the TMJs. In many cases, headaches and facial pain will occur in the same patient. Much of the research relative to the relationship of these disorders focuses on statistics of association and prevalence data. This review will provide a brief description of the types and classifications of orofacial pains (OFPs), as well as point to relevant research describing the commonalities and potential comorbid nature of these maladies. Finally, several recent papers describing morphologic changes to the brain in headache and TMD individuals will be discussed in an effort to stimulate further research into the potential common pathophysiologic mechanism that may explain the comorbid nature of these disorders.

  9. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with preceding abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Toshihiko, Kakiuchi; Tomonobu, Aoki

    2015-06-01

    Diagnosing HSP can be difficult, especially when abdominal symptoms precede the onset of characteristic palpable purpura (Chen MJ et al. 2005, World Gastroenterol., 11, 2354). Therefore, it is necessary to consider the possibility of HSP in patients with prolonged strong abdominal pain, even in cases without purpura.

  10. Henoch–Schönlein purpura with preceding abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Toshihiko, Kakiuchi; Tomonobu, Aoki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Diagnosing HSP can be difficult, especially when abdominal symptoms precede the onset of characteristic palpable purpura (Chen MJ et al. 2005, World Gastroenterol., 11, 2354). Therefore, it is necessary to consider the possibility of HSP in patients with prolonged strong abdominal pain, even in cases without purpura. PMID:26185663

  11. Henoch-Schönlein purpura with preceding abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Toshihiko, Kakiuchi; Tomonobu, Aoki

    2015-06-01

    Diagnosing HSP can be difficult, especially when abdominal symptoms precede the onset of characteristic palpable purpura (Chen MJ et al. 2005, World Gastroenterol., 11, 2354). Therefore, it is necessary to consider the possibility of HSP in patients with prolonged strong abdominal pain, even in cases without purpura. PMID:26185663

  12. Influence of Temple Headache Frequency on Physical Functioning and Emotional Functioning in Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorder Pain

    PubMed Central

    List, Thomas; John, Mike T.; Ohrbach, Richard; Schiffman, Eric L.; Truelove, Edmond L.; Anderson, Gary C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate the relationship of headache frequency with patient-reported physical functioning and emotional functioning in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) subjects with concurrent temple headache. Methods The Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) Validation Project identified, as a subset of 614 TMD cases and 91 controls (n = 705), 309 subjects with concurrent TMD pain diagnoses (RDC/TMD) and temple headache. The temple headaches were subdivided into infrequent, frequent, and chronic headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD–II). Study variables included self-report measures of physical functioning (Jaw Function Limitation Scale [JFLS], Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS], Short Form–12 [SF–12]) and emotional functioning (depression and anxiety as measured by the Symptom Checklist–90R/SCL–90R). Differences among the three headache subgroups were characterized by increasing headache frequency. The relationship between ordered headache frequency and physical as well as emotional functioning was analyzed using linear regression and trend tests for proportions. Results Physical functioning, as assessed with the JFLS (P < .001), SF-12 (P < .001), and GCPS (P < .001), was significantly associated with increased headache frequency. Emotional functioning, reflected in depression and anxiety, was also associated with increased frequency of headache (both P < .001). Conclusion Headache frequency was substantially correlated with reduced physical functioning and emotional functioning in subjects with TMD and concurrent temple headaches. A secondary finding was that headache was precipitated by jaw activities more often in subjects with more frequent temple headaches. PMID:22558607

  13. [Abdominal migraine as a cause of chronic recurrent abdominal pain in a 9-years-old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Jarosław; Piasecki, Leszek; Kasner, Jacek; Karczewska, Krystyna

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal migraine is a rarely recognized functional intestinal disorder, manifesting as recurrent paroxysmal abdominal pain of neurogenic origin. The authors describe the 9-years old girl referred to the hospital because of chronic paroxysmal abdominal pain. She did not improve after medication used commonly in functional abdominal disorders (drotaverine, mebeverine, trimebutine). On the ground of various investigations organic causes of abdominal pain were excluded. Carefully completed anamnesis, as well as precise description of the clinical picture of abdominal pain attacks, has lead to the diagnosis of abdominal migraine. According to advice of neurologist the treatment with amitriptyline was introduced. Thereafter a significant improvement was observed. Abdominal migraine has to be taken in to account when diagnosing chronic abdominal pain in children. PMID:16245431

  14. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:27800536

  15. Painful languages of the body: experiences of headache among women in two Peruvian communities.

    PubMed

    Darghouth, Sarah; Pedersen, Duncan; Bibeau, Gilles; Rousseau, Cecile

    2006-09-01

    This exploratory study focuses on the understandings of and experiences with headache in two settings in Peru: the Quechua-speaking district of Ayacucho, in southern Peru, and a poor urban district of Lima Metropolitana. More specifically, it explores the personal and collective meanings constructed around women's headache experiences. Structured and open-ended interviews were administered to patients suffering headache to elicit interpretations of headache episodes. An analysis of the collected narratives suggests that headache is often comprehended in a polysemic framework, where meanings ascribed in bodily, emotional, family, and social terms articulate individual and shared notions of suffering within larger contexts of social dislocation. Often woven into experiences of solitude, headache accounts are lived and told in dynamic temporal spaces, and narrate dissolution of family ties and tensions associated with women's roles. The results underscore the significance of patients' subjective interpretations of painful experiences and underscore the connections between bodily and emotional pain and distress experienced at family, community, and larger social levels.

  16. Physical Exam and Self-Reported Pain Outcomes from a Randomized Trial on Chronic Cervicogenic Headache

    PubMed Central

    Vavrek, Darcy; Haas, Mitchell; Peterson, Dave

    2010-01-01

    Objective Objective clinical measures for use as surrogate markers of cervicogenic headache (CGH) pain have not been established. In this analysis, we investigate relationships between objective physical exam (PE) measures with self-reported CGH outcomes. Methods This is an exploratory analysis of data generated by attention control PE from an open-label randomized clinical trial. Forty of 80 subjects were randomized to 8 treatments (spinal manipulative therapy or light massage control) and 8 PE over 8 weeks. The remaining subjects received no PE. PE included motion palpation of the cervical and upper thoracic regions, active cervical range of motion (ROM) and associated pain, and algometric pain threshold evaluated over articular pillars. Self-reported outcomes included CGH and neck pain and disability, number of CGH headaches, and related disability days. Associations between PE and self-reported outcomes were evaluated using generalized linear models, adjusting for socio-demographic differences and study group. Results At baseline, number of CGH and disability days were strongly associated with cervical active ROM (p <.001 to .037). Neck pain and disability were strongly associated with ROM-elicited pain (p <.001 to .035) but not later in the study. After the final treatment, pain thresholds were strongly associated with week 12 neck pain and disability and CGH disability and disability days (p =<.001 to .048). Conclusions Cervical ROM was most associated with the baseline headache experience. However, 4 weeks after treatment, algometric pain thresholds were most associated. No one PE measure remained associated with the self-reported headache outcomes over time. PMID:20605552

  17. Tension-type headache as the unique pain experience of a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Danziger, N; Willer, J-C

    2005-10-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare clinical syndrome characterized by dramatic impairment of pain perception since birth and is generally caused by a hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) with loss of the small-calibre, nociceptive nerve fibres. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with CIP and a presumptive diagnosis of HSAN type V, who experienced physical pain for the first and unique time in her life shortly after the sudden loss of her brother. This patient had sustained innumerable painless injuries during childhood, including bone fractures and severe burns. The only pain she ever felt consisted in an intense headache, which took place in a context of strong emotional overload and anxiety, 3 weeks after her younger brother died suddenly in a car accident. The description of this inaugural episode of headache fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of episodic tension-type headache. This case strongly suggests that the transcription of the grief of bereavement into physical pain may sometimes occur independently of the peripheral mechanisms of nociception and despite the lack of previous pain experience. In the light of recent experimental data showing that the same neural mechanisms that regulate physical pain may also control the expression of separation distress and the feeling of social exclusion, this unique case helps to better understand why some patients may feel physically hurt after the loss of someone they love. PMID:16154693

  18. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  19. [Chronic low back pain and abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga Cedó, E; Vico Besó, L

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm has a population prevalence of 2-5% and mortality in case of rupture of 80%. Up to 91% of cases is accompanied with low back pain, so it is important to include aortic aneurysm in the differential diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Low back pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consultions in Services Emergency Hospital Emergency and Primary Care Services, with an estimated 80% of population having spinal pain at some point in their lives, with 90% of them having a benign course.

  20. Abdominal pain and hyperamylasaemia--not always pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Slack, Sally; Abbey, Ianthe; Smith, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    A raised serum amylase concentration, at least four times the upper limit of normal (ULN), is used to support the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis in a patient presenting with abdominal pain. The authors report a case of toxic shock syndrome complicated by a raised serum amylase concentration that peaked at 50 times the ULN in a patient with recurrent abdominal pain. The commonest cause of hyperamylasaemia is pancreatic; however, further investigation of serum lipase and amylase isoenzyme studies found this to be of salivary origin and attributable to soft tissue inflammation of the salivary gland. This case highlights the need to consider non-pancreatic causes of hyperamylasaemia. PMID:22767564

  1. The interplay of pain-related self-efficacy and fear on functional outcomes among youth with headache

    PubMed Central

    Carpino, Elizabeth; Segal, Sharon; Logan, Deirdre; Lebel, Alyssa; Simons, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Pain-related self-efficacy and pain-related fear have been proposed as opposing predictors of pain-related functional outcomes in youth with chronic pain. Self-efficacy is a potential resiliency factor that can mitigate the influence pain-related fear has on outcomes in youth with chronic pain. Drawing from theoretical assertions tested among adults with chronic pain, this study aimed to determine whether pain-related self-efficacy mediates the adverse influence of pain-related fear on functional outcomes in a sample of youth with chronic headache. In a cross-sectional design of 199 youth with headache, self-efficacy was strongly associated with fear, disability, school impairment, and depressive symptoms. Pain intensity and self-efficacy were only modestly related, indicating level of pain has less influence on one’s confidence functioning with pain. Self-efficacy partially mediated relationships between pain-related fear and both functional disability and school functioning but did not mediate the relationship between pain-related fear and depressive symptoms. These results suggest that one’s confidence in the ability to function despite pain and fear avoidance both uniquely contribute to pain-related outcomes in youth with chronic headache. These results further suggest that treatment for chronic headache in youth must focus on not only decreasing pain-related fear but also on enhancing a patient’s pain-related self-efficacy. Perspective Pain-related self-efficacy is an important resiliency factor impacting the influence of pain-related fear on functional disability and school functioning in youth with headache. Enhancing self-efficacy may be a key mechanism for improving behavioral outcomes. Clinicians can reduce pain-related fear and enhance pain-related self-efficacy through interventions that encourage accomplishment and self-confidence. PMID:24462790

  2. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el angioedema hereditario es un trastorno inflamatorio episódico, que se hereda de manera autosómica dominante y se caracteriza por episodios de edema periférico. Los pacientes pueden tener edema de la pared de cualquier víscera hueca, incluido el intestino. Caso clínico: se comunica el caso de un paciente masculino de 33 años de edad, sin antecedentes de importancia, con dolor abdominal, localizado en el epigastrio, irradiado al cuadrante inferior derecho, acompañado de 5 vómitos. La tomografía abdominal mostró engrosamiento de la pared de la segunda y tercera porción del duodeno, con infiltración de grasa y líquido libre. Los exámenes de laboratorio mostraron: concentraciones bajas del complemento C4 (5.5 mg/dL) y actividad del inhibidor de C1 del complemento de 30%. Conclusiones: el angioedema hereditario es consecuencia de la deficiencia (tipo I) o disfunción (tipo II) del inhibidor C1 del complemento. El dolor abdominal asociado con angioedema es de inicio súbito, como dolor cólico, recurrente y de intensidad moderada. En la actualidad existen dos medicamentos aprobados por la Food and Drug Administration para el tratamiento de pacientes con esta afección.

  3. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  4. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  5. Recurrent Macroscopic Hematuria and Abdominal Pain: Questions and Answers.

    PubMed

    Nickavar, Azar

    2015-08-01

    A 6.5 yr old girl was admitted with a category of clinical signs and symptoms including recurrent gross hematuria, abdominal pain, and fever. After different examinations including genetic analysis, the disease was diagnosed as Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). It is suggested to consider FMF as a rare cause of recurrent gross hematuria, which is responsive to colchicine treatment. PMID:26587479

  6. Recurrent Macroscopic Hematuria and Abdominal Pain: Questions and Answers

    PubMed Central

    NICKAVAR, Azar

    2015-01-01

    A 6.5 yr old girl was admitted with a category of clinical signs and symptoms including recurrent gross hematuria, abdominal pain, and fever. After different examinations including genetic analysis, the disease was diagnosed as Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). It is suggested to consider FMF as a rare cause of recurrent gross hematuria, which is responsive to colchicine treatment. PMID:26587479

  7. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage in evaluating acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barbee, C L; Gilsdorf, R B

    1975-06-01

    A study was performed to determine the value of peritoneal lavage in the acute abdomen not related to trauma. Lavage was performed in 33 patients in the evaluation of abdominal pain of sufficient degree to warrant consideration for surgical intervention. Peritoneal lavage was truly positive or truly negative in 64% of the cases. It showed false negative results in 28% and false positive results in 8%. The lavage was most accurate in the evaluation of appendicitis, colonic disease, and intra abdominal bleeding. It was highly inaccurate in the evaluation of cholecystitis and peptic ulcer disease. It was concluded that the peritoneal lavage can be a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with abdominal pain and should be considered in difficult diagnostic problems but not routinely employed.

  8. Practical management of functional abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K; Beattie, R M; Tighe, M P

    2016-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is common in childhood, but is not often caused by disease. It is often the impact of the pain rather than the pain itself that results in referral to the clinician. In this review, we will summarise the currently available evidence and discuss the functional dimensions of the presentation, within the framework of commonly expressed parental questions. Using the Rome III criteria, we discuss how to classify the functional symptoms, investigate appropriately, provide reassurance regarding parental worries of chronic disease. We outline how to explain the functional symptoms to parents and an individualised strategy to help restore function. PMID:26699533

  9. Abdominal pain of spinal origin. Value of intercostal block.

    PubMed

    Ashby, E C

    1977-05-01

    A prospective study was made of 73 patients presenting in one year with abdominal pain provisionally diagnosed as of spinal origin. The criteria for audit of diagnosis and treatment are defined. The diagnosis was confirmed in 53 patients, 49 of whom had been treated with a lignocaine intercostal block in the relevant segment. Thirty-three of these (67.3%) had both complete and prolonged relief. It is suggested that the block causes interruption of a vicious circle of pain and muscle spasm in a 'spinal reflex pain syndrome'. PMID:860866

  10. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  11. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  12. Use of orthopedic manual physical therapy to manage chronic orofacial pain and tension-type headache in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Stuhr, Sarah H; Earnshaw, Darren H; Duncombe, Alison M

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is frequently associated with multiple headache types. While the efficacy of orthopedic manual physical therapy (OMPT) intervention for TMD with/without headache symptoms has been investigated, it has received less attention than other musculoskeletal conditions. This case describes the OMPT treatment and outcome of a 14 year-old female with a 2-year history of facial pain surrounding the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and bilateral occipital and temporal tension-type headaches (TTHs). Intervention included manual mobilization of the TMJ and surrounding cervical/facial soft tissue structures, postural re-education, and patient/family education on prevention, self-treatment, and postural adaptations. Outcomes included pain free and maximal mouth opening (MMO), pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the masseter muscle belly, fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire-physical activity subscale (FABQ-PA), jaw pain and function questionnaire (JPFQ), visual analog pain scale (VAS) for facial pain, and headache frequency, duration, and intensity on a VAS. Results included increased pain free and MMO by 22 mm, improved PPT bilaterally by 403.05 kPa on the affected, and 360.88 kPa on the unaffected side, and decreased reported headache frequency, duration, and intensity. Score decreases of 5 points on VAS with MMO, 8 points on FABQ-PA, and 5 points on JPFQ were also noted. Further research is warranted to investigate the effects of OMPT on pain processing and functional outcomes in patients with TMD and headache. PMID:24976748

  13. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: An Adolescent Female Student with Severe Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a common chief complaint encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of abdominal pain in children and adolescents, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening conditions associated with severe abdominal pain that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the student to a local emergency department. PMID:27470683

  14. Chronic abdominal pain due to periostitis pubis. A new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, N H

    1992-01-01

    Periostitis pubis is a clinical syndrome previously undescribed in the literature. It is characterized by lower abdominal pain that may have persisted for several weeks to several years. Physical findings are limited to tenderness in one of the lower abdominal quadrants and over the os pubis on the affected side. The diagnosis can be confirmed by injecting lidocaine hydrochloride into the area of point tenderness over the os pubis, which should relieve tenderness in both sites. An elaborate laboratory workup is not necessary. The condition can be cured with an injection of prednisolone tebutate at the site of tenderness over the os pubis.

  15. [Urgent abdominal pain: constipation differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    García García, J I; Ventura Pérez, M; Peña Forcada, E; Domingo Regany, E

    2014-04-01

    Constipation is a common health problem in our clinics. At first, we think that a physical examination and additional tests are not necessary. This condition may be considered unimportant initially, but it can give rise to ongoing pain, discomfort, for the many who suffer from it, and sometimes can present with severe clinical symptoms. We present a case of a patient presented with this condition, and after conducting a brief anamnesis and a complete and rapid physical examination, the patient was finally treated as a surgical emergency. PMID:23618721

  16. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  17. Linear headache: a recurrent unilateral head pain circumscribed in a line-shaped area

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A headache circumscribed in a line-shaped area but not confined to the territory of one particular nerve had ever been described in Epicrania Fugax (EF) of which the head pain is moving and ultrashort. In a 25-month period from Feb 2012 to Mar 2014, we encountered 12 patients with a paroxysmal motionless head pain restricted in a linear trajectory. The head pain trajectory was similar to that of EF, but its all other features obviously different from those of EF. We named this distinctive but undescribed type of headache linear headache (LH). Methods A detailed clinical feature of the headache was obtained in all cases to differentiate with EF, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and cranial neuralgia. Similarities and differences in clinical features were compared between LH and migraine. Results The twelve LH patients (mean age 43.9 ± 12.2) complained of a recurrent, moderate to severe, distending (n = 9), pressure-like (n = 3) or pulsating (n = 3) pain within a strictly unilateral line-shaped area. The painful line is distributed from occipital or occipitocervical region to the ipsilateral eye (n = 5), forehead (n = 6) or parietal region (n = 1). The pain line has a trajecory similar to that of EF but no characteristics of moving. The headache duration would be ranged from five minutes to three days, but usually from half day to one day in most cases (n = 8). Six patients had the accompaniment of nausea with or without vomiting, and two patients had the accompaniment of ipsilateral dizziness. The attacks could be either spontaneous (n = 10) or triggered by noise, depression and resting after physical activity (n = 1), or by stress and staying up late (n = 1). The frequency of attacks was variable. The patients had well response to flunarizine, sodium valproate and amitriptyline but not to carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine. LH is different from EF, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and cranial neuralgia, but it had couple of features similar

  18. Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Romano, Joan M.; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Van Tilburg, Miranda; Feld, Lauren D.; Christie, Dennis L.; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive-behavioral interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to one week post-treatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Methods Two-hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a 3-session social learning and cognitive-behavioral treatment (SLCBT) (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6 and 12 month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Results Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the SLCBT condition on child GI symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents’ solicitous responses to their child’s pain symptoms. Reductions in parents’ perceived threat regarding their child’s pain mediated reductions in both parent- and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children’s catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Discussion Results suggest that reductions in reports of children’s pain and GI symptoms following a social learning and cognitive-behavioral intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions. PMID:24469611

  19. Tension-type headache: pain, fatigue, tension, and EMG responses to mental activation.

    PubMed

    Bansevicius, D; Westgaard, R H; Sjaastad, O M

    1999-06-01

    Twenty patients with tension-type headache (14 chronic and 6 episodic) and 20 group-matched controls were selected for this study. They participated in a 1-hour, complex, two-choice, reaction-time test, as well as 5-minute pretest and 20-minute posttest periods. Subjects reported any pain in the forehead, temples, neck, and shoulders, as well as any feelings of fatigue and tension during the pretest, and every 10 minutes during the test and posttest by visual analog scales. Superficial electromyography was recorded simultaneously from positions representing the frontal and temporal muscles, neck (mostly splenius), and trapezius muscles. The location of pain corresponded to the position of the electrodes, but extended over a larger area. The test provoked pain in the forehead, neck, and shoulders of patients, i.e., pain scores from these regions increased significantly during the test. The pain scores continued to increase posttest. In patients, the EMG response of the trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test) was elevated relative to pretest. In controls, only the frontal muscles showed an EMG test response. Patients showed significantly higher EMG responses than controls in the neck (whole test period) and trapezius (first 10 minutes of the test period). There were significant differences in pain and fatigue scoring between patients and controls in all three periods and in tension scoring posttest. Fatigue correlated with pain, with increasing significance for all locations examined, while tension was mainly associated with the neck pain. The meaning of the variables "tension" and "fatigue" in headache, and their association with recorded muscle activity in various regions is discussed. The EMG response of the trapezius muscle to the test is discussed in comparison with similar responses observed in patients with other pain syndromes.

  20. Presentation of Osteitis and Osteomyelitis Pubis as Acute Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Diane V; Scott, Kendall G

    2007-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is the most common inflammatory condition of the pubic symphysis and may present as acute abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain. Osteomyelitis pubis can occur concurrently and spontaneously with osteitis pubis. Primary care physicians should consider these conditions in patients presenting with abdominal and pelvic pain. A thorough history, including type of physical activity, and a focused physical examination will be useful, and imaging modalities may be helpful. A biopsy and culture of the pubic symphysis will usually confirm the diagnosis. Treatment for osteitis pubis generally involves rest and anti-inflammatory medications. Failure with this conservative treatment should alert the physician to the possibility of osteomyelitis, which needs treatment with antibiotics. Prognosis for recovery is excellent with definitive diagnosis and treatment. PMID:21461096

  1. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  2. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  3. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain.

  4. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate. PMID:21796592

  5. [Cultural and migration aspects in functional abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Buri, Caroline; Laederach, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    Compared to Europe's mean immigrant contingent of 7.3 to 8.6 % Switzerland holds the highest contingent of foreign population with 23.5 %. Therefore it is of utmost importance that physicians have a knowledge of the specific characteristics of immigrant patients. The influence of personality factors (experience, behavior) is not independent from the influence of culturally-related environmental factors (regional differences in diet, pollutants, meanings, etc.). In addition, different cultural groups rate their quality of life differently. Psychological reasons for recurrent abdominal pain are stress (life events), effects of self-medication (laxatives, cocaine) and sexual abuse but also rare infectious diseases are more common among immigrants (e.g. tuberculosis, histoplasmosis, etc.). Migration-specific characteristics are mainly to find in the semiotics of the symptoms: not every abdominal pain is real pain in the abdomen. Finally, it is crucial to make the distinction between organic, functional and psychological-related pain. This can, however, usually only be accomplished in the context of the entire situation of a patient and, depending on the situation, with the support of a colleague from the appropriate cultural group or an experienced interpreter. In this review we limit ourselves to the presentation of the working population of the migrants, because these represent the largest group of all migrants. The specific situation of asylum seekers will also be refrained to where appropriate.

  6. Laparoscopy in the Management of Children with Chronic Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Berezin, Stuart H.; Bostwick, Howard E.; Halata, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the results of diagnostic laparoscopy in children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Patients and Methods: Thirteen children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain were subjected to diagnostic laparoscopy. Ages varied from 10 to 17 years. There were six males and seven females. Abdominal pain was present from 3 weeks to 12 months (mean, 2 months). Extensive laboratory and imaging studies did not contribute to the diagnosis. In all patients, the pain was disabling and severe enough to warrant repeated visits to the pediatrician, emergency room visits, or hospital admissions, as well as absence from school. Results: All children recovered uneventfully. Laparoscopic findings that identified the cause of abdominal pain were obtained in 12 of 13 patients. Laparoscopic appendectomy was done in all patients. There were no operative complications. One child presented three months later with incomplete small bowel obstruction, which resolved with conservative management. There were no other postoperative complications. Follow-up varied from six months to three years. Abdominal pain resolved in ten patients. One patient presented eight months later with biliary dyskinesia. She improved following laparoscopic cholecystectomy and later on sphincterotomy, but her pain has not yet completely resolved. One patient presented six months later with abdominal pain secondary to intestinal adhesions. Her pain completely resolved after laparoscopic lysis of adhesions. A third patient who developed lower abdominal pain six months after laparoscopy improved with conservative management and antibiotics for pelvic inflammatory disease. Conclusions: Diagnostic laparoscopy is a valuable procedure in the management of children with chronic recurrent abdominal pain. In the present study, laparoscopic examination revealed the cause of abdominal pain in most patients, and this pain resolved in most cases. Based on our

  7. Unilateral fronto-temporal headache with ocular pain caused by lens subluxation due to spontaneous zonulysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Taejin; Choi, Gyuman

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old man presented to the emergency department (ED) for left frontotemporal headache and left eye pain. In the ED, visual exam with extra-ocular movement was performed to rule out ocular pathology and brain imaging to rule out cerebral pathology. No abnormal finding was noted after evaluation of ED. Initial exam by an ophthalmologist was also negative with normal intraocular pressure. Left lens dislocation was found only after brain imaging. In subsequent second exam by an ophthalmologist with iridodilator, lens dislocation due to spontaneous zonulysis was finally confirmed. Hence, ED physicians should carefully review ocular as well as brain anatomy in such cases.

  8. Diphyllobothrium latum infection in a child with recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium latum infection in humans is not common in Republic of Korea. We report a case of fish tapeworm infection in a 10-year-old boy after ingestion of raw perch about 8 months ago. The patient complained of recurrent abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. A tapeworm, 85 cm in length, without scolex and neck, was spontaneously discharged in the feces of the patient. The patient was treated with 15-mg/kg single dose praziquantel, and follow-up stool examination was negative after one month. There was no evidence of relapse during the next six months. PMID:26692882

  9. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S

    2016-09-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  10. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology.

  11. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  12. Acute renal infarction: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Muhammad M; Butt, Mohammed A; Syed, Yadullah; Carr, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal infarction is an uncommon and under-diagnosed disease. Its clinical presentation is nonspecific and often mimics other more common disease entities. The diagnosis is usually missed or delayed, which frequently results in irreversible renal parenchyma damage. High index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis, as timely intervention may prevent loss of kidney function. We report a case of acute renal infarction following coronary angiography in a patient with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who initially presented with acute abdominal pain mimicking appendicitis.

  13. Abdominal wall pain in obese women: frequently missed and easily treated

    PubMed Central

    Mishriki, Yehia Yousri

    2009-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom with an extensive differential diagnosis. The work-up is frequently costly, yet many patients elude definitive diagnosis. We describe 12 obese women with long-standing abdominal pain, many of whom eluded diagnosis but who met criteria for abdominal wall pain. Each patient underwent a focused history and physical examination which included checking for Carnett’s sign and performing a “pinch test”. All patients had positive Carnett’s sign and pinch tests. An injection of local anaesthetic, with or without corticosteroid, completely relieved the pain within 10 min. Of the six patients seen in follow-up, four remained pain free and two responded to a second injection of local anaesthetic. Abdominal wall pain is an under-appreciated cause of chronic abdominal pain. Diagnosis is often straightforward and treatment with a local injection of anaesthetic is both diagnostic and curative. PMID:21686788

  14. Headaches - danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... KB. Headaches and other head pain. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 398. Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff ...

  15. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN.

    PubMed

    Omran, Eman Kh; Mohammad, Asmaa N

    2015-08-01

    Information about intestinal parasites in Sohag (Upper Egypt) in patients with chronic abdominal pain is scarce. This study determined the intestinal parasites symptoms in 130 patients with chronic abdominal pain and cross-matched 20 healthy persons. Parasitic infection was confirmed by stool analysis.The most commonest clinical data with stool analysis was as following: 1-Entamoeba histolytica associated with nausea 20 (3 7.74%) followed by anorexia 19 (35.85%), 2-Entamoeba coli associated with diarrhea 3 (100%) followed by nausea 2 (66.67%) and vomiting 2 (66.67%), 3-Enetrobius vermicularis associated with nausea 2 (66.67%), diarrhea 2 (66.67%) followed by flatulence 1(33.33%), 4-Giardia lamblia associated with anorexia 3 (42.86%), vomiting 3 (42.86%) followed by diarrhea 2 (28.57%)., 6-Hymenolepis nana associated with anorexia 10 (40.00%) followed by flatulence 9 (36.00%), 7-Taenia saginata associated with dyspepsia 3 (60.00%) followed by flatulence 2 (40.00%), and 8-Ancylostoma duodenal associated with anorexia 2 (66.67%) and diarrhea 2 (66.67%). PMID:26485858

  16. Experiences of Indonesian mother managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chiu-Lien; Huang, Chu-Yu; Park, Jeong-Hwan; Lin, Hung-Ru; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Cheng, Su-Fen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the Indonesian mothers' experiences of managing preschool children's acute abdominal pain. The descriptive qualitative research design comprises semi-structured interviews with 11 Indonesian mothers. The qualitative content analysis revealed three themes, including (1) insight of abdominal pain, (2) "inheritance of the strategies for assessment of management for abdominal pain from the family of origin", (3) "obstacles and insights related to cultural differences". The results presented that pain management was affected by family, environment, cultural background and religious beliefs. Healthcare providers should provide culturally competent pain management care for the patients of difference nationalities.

  17. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  18. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  19. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relationship between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Natoshia Raishevich; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors in response to their child’s pain (overprotection, minimizing and/or encouragement) interact with child coping characteristics (e.g., catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relationship between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children’s level of maladaptive coping (i.e., pain catastrophizing). Methods Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: protection, minimizing, and encouragement/monitoring subscales). Results Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relationship between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relationship between parent protectiveness and disability. Conclusions The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined in part by the child’s coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP. PMID:25121521

  20. Clinical Case Of the Month: A 35 Year Old Woman with Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Spera, Melissa; Thelin, Camille; Gandolfi, Abby; Clayton, Nicholas; Nettles, Karl M; Hagensee, Michael E; Hutchings, John J; Lopez, Fred

    2016-01-01

    A 35 year old woman with past medical history of hypertension presented to the emergency department with chief complaint of severe abdominal pain for one week. The abdominal pain was located in the epigastrium and described as "cramping" and "intermittent". The pain intensity was quantified initially as 6 out of 10 on the pain scale. As the week progressed the pain became constant and radiated to the back. The intensity of the abdominal pain increased to 10 out of 10. The patient reported some relief from her pain while lying in the prone position. Initially the pain was associated with loose stools for several days. The loose stools resolved spontaneously and then the patient began to experience nausea and vomiting. Her medications included lisinopril-hydrochlorothiazide which she had been taking for the past five months. She had no history of alcohol, tobacco or illicit drug use. PMID:27389384

  1. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache.

  2. Abdominal Pain-Predominant Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Jordanian School Children

    PubMed Central

    Altamimi, Eyad M.; Al-Safadi, Mohammad H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) is a common complaint in children. Significant portion of them are of functional origin. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) and its types in Jordanian school children. Methods This is a school-based survey at south Jordan. Information using the self-reporting form of the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III Version (QPGS-RIII) - the official Arabic translation - was collected. Classes from academic years (grades) 6 - 8 were selected. SPSS Statistical Package Version 17 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA) was used. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher’s exact test, and continuous data were analyzed using t-test. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Five hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 454 returned answered (91%). Two hundred twenty-nine (50.8%) were males. The average age of participants was 12.7 years (11 - 15 years). One hundred sixteen (25.7%) had abdominal pain-predominant FGID. Seventy-nine (68%) of them were females. Forty-seven (10.6%) had irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Thirty-six (8%), 17 (3.8%), 11 (2.4%) and five (1.1%) had abdominal migraine, functional abdominal pain, functional abdominal pain syndrome and functional dyspepsia, respectively. Conclusion Abdominal pain-predominant FGID has become a major health issue in Jordanian children. One of four children between the ages of 11 and 15 years exhibits at least one abdominal pain-predominant FGID. The most common form of abdominal pain-predominant FGID in our children was IBS. Females are affected more often than males. Intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms are seen regularly with abdominal pain-predominant FGIDs.

  3. Intractable Headache - The Pain in Your Head that Just Won't Quit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  4. Anaemia and abdominal pain due to occupational lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Rodolfo; Agosti, Antonio; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2007-02-01

    We describe a 47-year-old patient with chronic anaemia with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes, recurrent abdominal colics, discoloration of gums, sensitive polyneuropathy to the four limbs, hyperuricaemia, hepatosteatosis with raised transaminases, and a long ignored history of lead exposure in a battery recycling plant. The diagnosis of poisoning was confirmed by high lead levels in the blood and urine, decreased erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D), raised erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZP), and elevated urinary excretion of porphyrins. Chelation with EDTA resulted in increased urinary lead excretion, gradual improvement of the clinical picture, and progressive normalization of lead biomarkers. The case highlights the importance of occupational anamnesis for the diagnosis of lead poisoning, an uncommon condition which may mimic a variety of internal and surgical diseases. Since antiquity, lead has been extensively mined, produced, and utilized in a variety of industrial settings, such as metallurgy, construction, production of plastics, ceramics, paints and pigments. Lead and its compounds are systemic toxicants, and a wide range of adverse health effects (including haematological, gastrointestinal, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, and reproductive disorders) has been observed in exposed workers. The general population (particularly children) may also be exposed to toxic lead levels due to air, soil, food and water contamination. Thanks to the improvement of workplace hygienic conditions, the pathological picture of occupational lead poisoning (plumbism, saturnism) has gradually become less serious, at least in the most industrialized countries, and has progressively changed into aspecific, subclinical manifestations. We describe here an unusual case (nowadays) of anaemia and recurrent abdominal pain due to lead poisoning from battery recycling. PMID:17405745

  5. Functional abdominal pain in childhood: Background studies and recent research trends

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rona L; van Tilburg, Miranda AL

    2012-01-01

    The present review summarizes many of the major research trends investigated in the past five years regarding pediatric functional abdominal pain, and also summarizes the primary related findings from the authors’ research program. Specific areas discussed based on work within the authors’ group include familial illness patterns, genetics, traits, and mechanisms or processes related to abdominal pain. Topics covered from research published in the past five years include prevalence and cost, longitudinal follow-up, overlap with other disorders, etiology and mechanisms behind functional abdominal pain and treatment studies. It is hoped that findings from this work in abdominal pain will be interpreted as a framework for understanding the processes by which other pain phenomena and, more broadly, reactions to any physical state, can be developed and maintained in children. The present article concludes with recommendations for clinical practice and research. PMID:23248815

  6. Characteristics of upper abdominal pain in those with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas R; Koch, Kenneth

    2003-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis has many causes. Symptoms include upper abdominal pain. To allow for a better understanding of this pain we compare HCV patients with other liver diseases and normal controls on their reporting of pain over one month and describe associations. A cross-sectional, case control study was performed. Three groups are studied: (1) normal individuals (NC) (N = 64), (2) patients with chronic liver diseases other than HCV (LD) (N = 53), and (3) HCV infection (N = 64). A dyspepsia questionnaire was utilized, which inquired about a one-month symptom presence of upper abdominal pain and associated symptoms. There was a one-month period prevalence of upper abdominal pain of 45.3% in the HCV group vs 32% in the LD and 20.3% in the NC groups (P = 0.01). The LD (22.6%) and HCV (26.6%) groups had markedly more pain that was worsened by eating compared with NC (1.6%) (P = .003). On univariate analysis, when comparing those with upper abdominal pain to those without, there was a lower age (41.3 vs 44.5), a higher BMI (30.3 vs 26), and more symptoms of fatigue, bloating, and pain worsened by eating and early satiety. On multivariate analysis, age < 50 (OR 5.1; CI 1.5-17), BMI > 30 (OR 4.1; CI 1.5-10.9), nausea (OR 4.1; CI 1.6-10.4), and pain with eating (OR 30: CI 6.7-133) predicted upper abdominal pain. In conclusion, upper abdominal pain is more commonly reported over one month in those with chronic liver diseases. That the abdominal pain worsened after meals in liver patients but not in the normal subjects was a surprise. Possible explanations for this finding are offered. PMID:14627332

  7. Cervicogenic headache: a real headache.

    PubMed

    Antonaci, Fabio; Sjaastad, Ottar

    2011-04-01

    Although theories regarding headache originating in the neck have existed for more than 150 years, the term "cervicogenic headache" originated in 1983. Early descriptions pinpoint the characteristic symptoms as dizziness, visual disturbances, tinnitus, and "posterior" headache, conceivably as a consequence of arthrosis, infliction upon the vertebral artery, or with a "migrainous" background and occurring in "advanced age." Cervicogenic headache (mean age of onset, 33 years) displays a somewhat different picture: unilateral headache, starting posteriorly, but advancing to the frontal area, most frequently the main site of pain; usually accompanied by ipsilateral arm discomfort, reduced range of motion in the neck, and mechanical precipitation of exacerbations (eg, through external pressure upon hypersensitive, occipital tendon insertions). Treatment options in treatment-resistant cases include cervical stabilization operations and extracranial electrical stimulation. In a personal, population-based study of 1,838 individuals (88.6% of the population), a prevalence of 2.2% "core" cases was found.

  8. FACTORS RELATED TO ABDOMINAL PAIN IN GASTROPARESIS: CONTRAST TO PATIENTS WITH PREDOMINANT NAUSEA AND VOMITING

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Factors associated with abdominal pain in gastroparesis are incompletely evaluated and comparisons of pain versus other symptoms are limited. This study related pain to clinical factors in gastroparesis and contrasted pain/discomfort- with nausea/vomiting-predominant disease. Methods Clinical and scintigraphy data were compared in 393 patients from 7 centers of the NIDDK Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium with moderate-severe (Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders Symptoms [PAGI-SYM] score ≥3) vs. none-mild (PAGI-SYM <3) upper abdominal pain and predominant pain/discomfort vs. nausea/vomiting. Key Results Upper abdominal pain was moderate-severe in 261 (66%). Pain/discomfort was predominant in 81 (21%); nausea/vomiting was predominant in 172 (44%). Moderate-severe pain was more prevalent with idiopathic gastroparesis and with lack of infectious prodrome (P≤0.05) and correlated with scores for nausea/vomiting, bloating, lower abdominal pain/discomfort, bowel disturbances, and opiate and antiemetic use (P<0.05) but not gastric emptying or diabetic neuropathy or control. Gastroparesis severity, quality of life, and depression and anxiety were worse with moderate-severe pain (P≤0.008). Factors associated with moderate-severe pain were similar in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis. Compared to predominant nausea/vomiting, predominant pain/discomfort was associated with impaired quality of life, greater opiate, and less antiemetic use (P<0.01), but similar severity and gastric retention. Conclusions & Inferences Moderate-severe abdominal pain is prevalent in gastroparesis, impairs quality of life, and is associated with idiopathic etiology, lack of infectious prodrome, and opiate use. Pain is predominant in one fifth of gastroparetics. Predominant pain has at least as great an impact on disease severity and quality of life as predominant nausea/vomiting. PMID:23414452

  9. Predictors of Abdominal Pain in Depressed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Zimmerman, Lori A.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; McCarthy, F. Nicole; Keljo, David; Binion, David; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R.; Youk, Ada; Szigethy, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have high rates of abdominal pain. The study aims were to (1) Evaluate biological and psychological correlates of abdominal pain in depressed youth with IBD, (2) Determine predictors of abdominal pain in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods 765 patients ages 9–17 with IBD seen over 3 years at two sites were screened for depression. Depressed youth completed comprehensive assessments for abdominal pain, psychological (depression and anxiety), and biological (IBD-related, through disease activity indices and laboratory values) realms. Results 217 patients with IBD (161 CD, 56 UC) were depressed. 163 (120 CD, 43 UC) patients had complete API scores. In CD, abdominal pain was associated with depression (r=0.33; p<0.001), diarrhea (r=0.34; p=0.001), ESR (r=0.22; p=0.02), low albumin (r=0.24; p=.01), weight loss (r=0.33; p=0.001), and abdominal tenderness (r=0.38, p=0.002). A multivariate model with these significant correlates represented 32% of the variance in pain. Only depression (p=0.03), weight loss (p=0.04), and abdominal tenderness (p=0.01) predicted pain for CD patients. In UC, pain was associated with depression (r=0.46; p=0.002) and nocturnal stools (r=.32; p=.046). In the multivariate model with these significant correlates 23% of the variance was explained, and only depression (p=0.02) predicted pain. Conclusions The psychological state of pediatric patients with IBD may increase the sensitivity to abdominal pain. Thus, screening for and treating comorbid depression may prevent excessive medical testing and unnecessary escalation of IBD medications. PMID:24983975

  10. Idiopathic ovarian vein thrombosis: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Khishfe, Basem F; Sankovsky, Anna; Nasr, Isam

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare but potentially serious condition that affects mostly postpartum women. It has also been associated with other conditions, such as pelvic inflammatory disease, malignancy, sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease, and recent pelvic or abdominal surgery. It is critical to recognize and treat this condition as early as possible to avoid the potential complications of the thrombosis and adverse sequelae such as infection and sepsis. We report a case of idiopathic OVT in a previously healthy premenopausal woman presenting with sudden onset groin pain. Nephrolithiasis was high on the differential, so a computed tomography abdomen/pelvis was done, which showed OVT. Patient was admitted to the gynecology service for intravenous antibiotics and for anticoagulation. Patient did well and was discharged after 2 days on Coumadin and oral antibiotics. Ovarian vein thrombosis is a rare condition with a number of serious and life-threatening complications. Therefore, not only is a high level of scrutiny required, but also an increased index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis of OVT and prevention of these dangerous outcomes. PMID:26475360

  11. Headache and Migraine in Children with Sickle Cell Disease are Associated with Lower Hemoglobin and Higher Pain Event Rates but not Silent Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Michael M; Noetzel, Michael J; Rodeghier, Mark J; Quinn, Charles T; Hirtz, Deborah G; Ichord, Rebecca N; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Roach, E Steven; Kirkham, Fenella J; Casella, James F; DeBaun, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for headache and migraine and test the hypothesis that either or both are independently associated with silent cerebral infarcts. Study design In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the history, laboratory values, and brain MRI of participants with SCD (HbSS or HbSβ°-thalassemia) without history of overt stroke, or seizures. Participants described headache severity and quality. Migraine was defined by International Headache Society criteria modified for increased sensitivity in children. Neuroradiology and neurology committees adjudicated the presence of silent cerebral infarction by review of MRI and standardized examination by pediatric neurologists. Results Of 872 children, 51.1% were male, ages 5-15 (mean 9.1) years, 317 (36.4%) reported recurrent headaches and 132 (15.1%) reported migraine. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, both were associated with lower steady state hemoglobin (p=0.01 for headache, p<0.01 for migraine) and higher pain rate (p<0.01, p<0.01), defined as the number of admissions requiring opioids in the past three years. The presence of silent cerebral infarction was not associated with recurrent headache or migraine. Only 1.9% (6 of 317) of children with recurrent headaches received medications for headache prophylaxis. Conclusions Recurrent headaches and migraine are common and undertreated in SCD. Low hemoglobin levels and high pain rates are associated with recurrent headaches and migraine, and silent cerebral infarction are not. PMID:24529619

  12. Comparative clinical study using laser and LED-therapy for orofacial pain relief: dentin hypersensitivity and cervicogenic headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Pizzo, Renata C. A.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Grecco, Clovis; Speciali, Jose G.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Considering several clinical situations, low intensity laser therapy has been widely applied in pain relief or analgesia mechanism. With the advent of new LED-based (light emitting diode) light sources, the need of further clinical experiments aiming to compare the effectiveness among them is paramount. The LED system therapeutic use can be denominated as LEDT - Light Emitting Diode Therapy. This study proposed two clinical evaluations of pain relief effect: to dentin hypersensitivity and to cervicogenic headache using different sources of lasers (low and high intensity) and light emitting diodes (LEDs), one emitting at the spectral band of red (630+/- 5nm) and the other one at infrared band (880+/- 5nm). Two different clinical studies were performed and presented interesting results. Considering dentin hypersensitivity, red and infrared led were so effective than the control group (high intensity laser system); by the other side, considering cervicogenic headache, control group (infrared laser) was the best treatment in comparison to red and infrared led system.

  13. Epidemiology of Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Korterink, Judith J.; Diederen, Kay; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to review the literature regarding epidemiology of functional abdominal pain disorders in children and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution including associated risk factors of developing functional abdominal pain. Methods The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychInfo databases were systematically searched up to February 2014. Study selection criteria included: (1) studies of birth cohort, school based or general population samples (2) containing data concerning epidemiology, prevalence or incidence (3) of children aged 4-18 years (4) suffering from functional abdominal pain. Quality of studies was rated by a self-made assessment tool. A random-effect meta-analysis model was used to estimate the prevalence of functional abdominal pain in childhood. Results A total of 58 articles, including 196,472 children were included. Worldwide pooled prevalence for functional abdominal pain disorders was 13.5% (95% CI 11.8-15.3), of which irritable bowel syndrome was reported most frequently (8.8%, 95% CI 6.2-11.9). The prevalence across studies ranged widely from 1.6% to 41.2%. Higher pooled prevalence rates were reported in South America (16.8%) and Asia (16.5%) compared to Europe (10.5%). And a higher pooled prevalence was reported when using the Rome III criteria (16.4%, 95% CI 13.5-19.4). Functional abdominal pain disorders are shown to occur significantly more in girls (15.9% vs. 11.5%, pooled OR 1.5) and is associated with the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders, stress and traumatic life events. Conclusion Functional abdominal pain disorders are a common problem worldwide with irritable bowel syndrome as most encountered abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. Female gender, psychological disorders, stress and traumatic life events affect prevalence. PMID:25992621

  14. The effects of aging on the onset and persistence of unexplained abdominal pain: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Locke, G. Richard; Schleck, Cathy D.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The population ≥65 years is rapidly increasing but remarkably little is known about the natural history of abdominal pain with aging. Aim To prospectively evaluate the natural history of abdominal pain (severity and frequency) in a US population, and evaluate potential risk factors (including somatization) for the onset and disappearance of abdominal pain with increasing age. Methods Between 1988 and 2004, valid self-report questionnaires that recorded gastrointestinal symptoms including severity and frequency of abdominal pain were mailed to randomly selected cohorts of community residents followed over time. This study identified all respondents who answered abdominal pain questions at an initial and follow-up survey. Results 1913 subjects were included (mean age in years at first survey: 48±12 (SD), mean age at second survey: 59±13 (SD); 53% female). The onset and disappearance rate of abdominal pain over the follow up were 14% (95% CI, 13,16) and 47% (43,50), respectively. The rates of increasing vs. decreasing abdominal pain score were 18% (16,20) vs. 22% (20,23), respectively. While younger age at initial survey was associated with onset of abdominal pain (vs. subjects without abdominal pain, [OR 0.9 (0.7,1.0)], older age at initial survey and times between surveys were associated with the disappearance of abdominal pain (vs. subjects with abdominal pain, [OR 1.2 (1.0,1.5)]. Female gender [OR 1.4 (1.0,2.1)], higher somatization scores and larger changes in somatization score [OR 5.3 (3.2,8.7)] were positively associated with the onset of abdominal pain. Conclusions Increasing age is associated with the disappearance of abdominal pain in the community. PMID:24304163

  15. Chronic Pain: The Impact on Academic, Social, and Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkins, Jason M.; Gfroerer, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain is persistent and recurrent pain that tends to fluctuate in severity, quality, regularity, and predictability. It can occur in a single or multiple body regions or organ systems. Some of the most frequently reported types of chronic pain include headaches, recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and musculoskeletal pain. In contrast to acute…

  16. Diet-induced changes in n-3 and n-6 derived endocannabinoids and reductions in headache pain and psychological distress

    PubMed Central

    Ramsden, Christopher E.; Zamora, Daisy; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Wood, JodiAnne T.; Mann, J. Douglas; Faurot, Keturah R.; MacIntosh, Beth A.; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F.; Gross, Jacklyn R.; Courville, Amber B.; Davis, John M.; Hibbeln, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are biosynthetic precursors to endocannabinoids with antinociceptive, anxiolytic, and neurogenic properties. We recently reported that targeted dietary manipulation—increasing omega-3 fatty acids while reducing omega-6 linoleic acid (the H3-L6 intervention)—reduced headache pain and psychological distress among chronic headache patients. It is not yet known whether these clinical improvements were due to changes in endocannabinoids and related mediators derived from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. We therefore used data from this trial (n=55) to investigate (1) whether the H3-L6 intervention altered omega-3 and omega-6 derived endocannabinoids in plasma, and (2) whether diet-induced changes in these bioactive lipids were associated with clinical improvements. The H3-L6 intervention significantly increased the omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid derivatives 2-docosahexaenoylglycerol (+65%, p<0.001) and docosahexaenoylethanolamine (+99%, p<0.001), and reduced the omega-6 arachidonic acid derivative 2-arachidonoylglycerol (-25%, p=0.001). Diet-induced changes in these endocannabinoid derivatives of omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid, but not omega-6 arachidonic acid, correlated with reductions in physical pain and psychological distress. These findings demonstrate that targeted dietary manipulation can alter endocannabinoids derived from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in humans, and suggest that 2-docosahexaenoylglycerol and docosahexaenoylethanolamine could have physical and/or psychological pain modulating properties. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01157208) Perspective This article demonstrates that targeted dietary manipulation can alter endocannabinoids derived from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and that these changes are related to reductions in headache pain and psychological distress. These findings suggest that dietary interventions could provide an effective, complementary approach for managing chronic pain and related

  17. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  18. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  19. The overlap of functional abdominal pain in pediatric Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lori A.; Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Bousvaros, Athos; Ducharme, Peter; Szigethy, Eva; Nurko, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with Crohn’s disease (CD) may report abdominal pain despite clinical remission, suggesting that functional abdominal pain (FAP) may be playing a role. Aim This study aims to explore the presence and impact of FAP in children with CD in remission. Methods Children, aged 9–17, with CD were enrolled. Demographic information, the Pediatric Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (PCDAI), and the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI) were obtained. Disease remission was defined by physician global assessment, normal labs, and absence of 3 or more stools a day, nocturnal stooling, bloody diarrhea, concurrent steroid therapy, strictures, or disease flare within 6 months. FAP was defined as patients with abdominal pain and CD remission. Rates of depression (CDI >9) were compared. Results 139/307 children reported abdominal pain. Of this group, 18/139 (13%) met criteria for FAP. Despite clinical remission, 8/18 CD FAP patients were classified with active disease by PCDAI. CD FAP patients had a higher rate of depression than CD patients in remission with no abdominal pain (55.6% vs. 29.9%; p=0.03), similar to patients with abdominal pain from active CD (55.6% vs. 44.8%; p=0.62). Conclusions A proportion of children with CD in remission have FAP. These children are at significant risk for depression. Future studies are needed to determine whether depression contributes to functional pain development or if pain itself leads to depression. Especially given that functional pain may exaggerate disease activity, clinicians caring for children with CD and FAP should consider evaluating for depressive disorders before escalating therapy. PMID:23407043

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group.

  1. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  2. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Thirumazhisai; Prabhakar, Gautham; Schwartz, Alan; Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep; Berman, James

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  3. Effect of systematic relaxation techniques on anxiety and pain in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jasper, Melanie

    2013-10-01

    Inadequate pain control in older patients who have undergone abdominal surgery can lead to many complications. This study investigates the effect of systematic relaxation techniques on pain and anxiety in older patients undergoing abdominal surgery. One hundred twenty-four patients were randomly assigned into the experimental and control groups. The systematic relaxation techniques consisted of older patients in the experimental group slowly reading relaxing sentences during recovery in ambulation after the surgery. Patients' satisfaction with pain and anxiety relief was recorded, as was their use of opioid analgesia. Statistically significant differences in pain and anxiety, and in analgesic use, were reported between the patients in experimental and control groups after the intervention. These relaxation techniques can be incorporated into the care plan to reduce pain and anxiety after surgery as well as offering a measure for increasing the patients' independence in pain management control.

  4. Timing of neuraxial pain interventions following blood patch for post dural puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Shaparin, Naum; Gritsenko, Karina; Shapiro, David; Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Kaye, Alan D; Smith, Howard S

    2014-01-01

    Post dural puncture headache (PDPH) is a common complication of interventional neuraxial procedures. Larger needle gauge, younger patients, low body mass index, women (especially pregnant women), and "traumatic" needle types are all associated with a higher incidence of PDPH. Currently, an epidural blood patch is the gold-standard treatment for this complication. However, despite the high PDPH cure rate through the use of this therapy, little is known about the physiology behind the success of the epidural blood patch, specifically, the time course of patch formation within the epidural space or how long it takes for the blood patch volume to be resorbed by the body. Of the many unanswered and debated topics related to PDPH and epidural blood patches, one additional specific question that may alter clinical management is when it is safe for patients who have experienced a disruption of the thecal space and have undergone this procedure to have a subsequent epidural or spinal procedure, such as a neuraxial anesthetic (i.e. a spinal anesthetic for an elective outpatient procedure) or an interventional pain procedure for chronic pain management. This question becomes more unclear if the new procedure includes a steroid medication. As an example, an older patient presents with a history of lumbar disc disease and during lumbar epidural steroid injection, an inadvertent wet tap occurs leading to PDPH. Following management with fluids, caffeine, medications, and a successful epidural blood patch, it remains unclear as to when would be the best time frame to consider a second lumbar epidural steroid injection. We identified the 3 main risk factors of subsequent interventional neuraxial procedures as (1) disruption of the epidural blood patch and ongoing reparative processes, (2) epidural procedure failure, and (3) infection. We looked at the literature, and summarized the existing literature in order to enable health care professionals to understand the time course of

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation, atrophy, fibrosis with progressive ductal changes, and functional changes that include variable exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and multiple patterns of pain. We investigated whether abdominal imaging features accurately predict patterns of pain. Methods We collected data from participants in North American Pancreatitis Study 2 Continuation and Validation, a prospective multicenter study of patients with chronic pancreatitis performed at 13 expert centers in the United States from July 2008 through March 2012. Chronic pancreatitis was defined based on detection of characteristic changes by cross-sectional abdominal imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, or histology analyses. Patients were asked by a physician or trained clinical research coordinator if they had any abdominal pain in the year before enrollment; those that responded “yes” were asked to select from a list of 5 pain patterns. Using these patterns, we classified patients’ pain based on timing and severity. Abnormal pancreatitis-associated features on abdominal imaging were recorded using standardized case report forms. Results Data were collected from 518 patients (mean age, 52±14.6 years; 55% male; and 87.6% white). The most common physician-identified etiologies were alcohol (45.8%) and idiopathic (24.3%); 15.6% of patients reported no abdominal pain in the year before enrollment. The most common individual pain pattern was described as constant mild pain with episodes of severe pain, reported in 45% of patients. The most common imaging findings included pancreatic ductal dilatation (68%), atrophy (57%), and calcifications (55%). Imaging findings were categorized as obstructive for 20% and inflammatory for 25% of cases. The distribution of individual imaging findings was similar among patients with different patterns of pain. The distribution of pain patterns did not

  6. Treatment outcome expectancies and hypnotic susceptibility as moderators of pain reduction in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Spinhoven, P; ter Kuile, M M

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hypnotic susceptibility (a) predicts pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and mode of treatment and (b) predicts persistence of pain reduction during the follow-up period. In 169 patients with chronic tension-type headaches randomly allocated to either self-hypnosis or autogenic training, pain reduction posttreatment and at follow-up was significantly associated with hypnotic susceptibility independent of generic expectations of treatment outcome and treatment condition. Moreover, it was found that early responders obtained significantly higher hypnotic susceptibility scores than nonresponders, although there were no significant differences in hypnotic susceptibility between late responders in comparison to early and nonresponders. However, almost one fourth of those who were nonresponders posttreatment did respond at follow-up.

  7. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  8. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain. PMID:26169928

  9. Preliminary results, methodological considerations and recruitment difficulties of a randomised clinical trial comparing two treatment regimens for patients with headache and neck pain

    PubMed Central

    De Hertogh, Willem; Vaes, Peter; Devroey, Dirk; Louis, Paul; Carpay, Hans; Truijen, Steven; Duquet, William; Oostendorp, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Headache is a highly prevalent disorder. Irrespective of the headache diagnosis it is often accompanied with neck pain and -stiffness. Due to this common combination of headache and neck pain, physical treatments of the cervical spine are often considered. The additional value of these treatments to standard medical care or usual care (UC) is insufficiently documented. We therefore wanted to compare the treatment effects of UC alone and in combination with manual therapy (MT) in patients with a combination of headache and neck pain. UC consisted of a stepped treatment approach according to the Dutch General Practitioners Guideline for headache, the additional MT consisted of articular mobilisations and low load exercises. Due to insufficient enrolment the study was terminated prematurely. We aim to report not only our preliminary clinical findings but also to discuss the encountered difficulties and to formulate recommendations for future research. Methods A randomised clinical trial was conducted. Thirty-seven patients were included and randomly allocated to one of both treatment groups. The treatment period was 6 weeks, with follow-up measurements at weeks 7, 12 and 26. Primary outcome measures were global perceived effect (GPE) and the impact of the headache using the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6). Reduction in headache frequency, pain intensity, medication intake, absenteeism and the use of additional professional help were secondary outcome measures Results Significant improvements on primary and secondary outcome measures were recorded in both treatment groups. No significant differences between both treatment groups were found. The number of recruited patients remained low despite various strategies. Conclusion It appears that both treatment strategies can have equivalent positive influences on headache complaints. Additional studies with larger study populations are needed to draw firm conclusions. Recommendations to increase patient inflow in

  10. A rare case of Guillain-Barré syndrome presenting with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Michas, G; Nikolopoulou, A; Varytimiadi, E; Xydia, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a heterogeneous condition that encompasses acute immune-mediated polyneuropathies. GBS is the most frequent cause of acute neuromuscular paralysis worldwide and constitutes one of the most serious emergencies in neurology. Description of case: As it presents extremely rarely with the first symptom being abdominal pain, herein we report the case of a 48-year-old man who presented with acute abdominal pain and diagnosed with GBS. The patient required mechanical ventilation for two weeks and was discharged one month later, after having had a tracheostomy and developed tetraplegia. Conclusion: GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain when other medical or surgical causes have been excluded. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 374-375.

  11. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  12. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  13. Thoracic Disk Herniation, a not Infrequent Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lara, F.J. Pérez; Berges, A. Ferrer; Quesada, J. Quintero; Ramiro, J.A. Moreno; Toledo, R. Bustamante; Muñoz, H. Oliva

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the proportion of patients presenting with nonvisceral chronic abdominal pain who have thoracic disk herniation as a possible cause. We designed a descriptive transversal study of patients attending our offices between February 2009 and October 2010, with a complaint of chronic abdominal pain of suspected abdominal wall source (positive Carnett sign). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the spinal column was performed on all patients. When the NMR showed thoracic disk herniation the patients were treated according to their etiology. We also evaluated the symptoms in patients with thoracic disk herniation and their response to the applied treatment. Twenty-seven patients with chronic abdominal pain were evaluated. The NMR results in 18 of these 27 patients (66.66%) showed evidence of disk herniation. We report on the results of these 18 patients, emphasizing that the symptoms are florid and varied. Many patients had been previously diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. Thoracic disk herniation may account for chronic abdominal pain in many patients who remain undiagnosed or are diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. Thus, this possibility needs to be taken into account to achieve a correct diagnosis and a suitable mode of treatment. PMID:23101998

  14. [Intra-abdominal pressure as a surgery predictor in patients with acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Campos-Muñoz, Manuel Alejandro; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique; Chimal-Torres, Mariano; Pozas-Medina, Josué Atila

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la presión intraabdominal es el estado de equilibrio de la presión de la cavidad abdominal en reposo y puede presentar cambios durante la ventilación mecánica o espontánea. El objetivo fue determinar la presión intraabdominal como predictor de cirugía en el paciente con dolor abdominal agudo. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio de casos y controles anidado en una cohorte de pacientes con dolor abdominal agudo en el servicio de urgencias de un hospital de segundo nivel, en el periodo comprendido entre abril y diciembre de 2013. Se incluyeron 37 pacientes, todos fueron intervenidos quirúrgicamente con previa toma de la presión intraabdominal. Se formaron los grupos con el resultado del estudio anatomopatológico: con evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 28) y sin evidencia de proceso inflamatorio abdominal agudo (n = 9). Resultados: en los casos el 100 % presentó presión intraabdominal alta con una p = 0.01, RM: 5 (IC 95 %: 2.578-9.699). En los casos la media de la presión intraabdominal fue de 11.46 y en los controles de 9.2 (p = 0.183). Conclusiones: el dolor abdominal que requiere cirugía para su resolución tiene relación directa con una presión intraabdominal > 5 mmHg.

  15. [Idiopathic headache in childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Karwautz, A; Wöber-Bingöl, C; Wöber, C

    1993-12-01

    This review of the literature covers classification, epidemiology and clinical aspects of idiopathic headache in childhood and adolescence. In addition, pathogenetic models taking into account the complex involvement of organic, psychological and psychosocial factors are critically reviewed. A general pathogenetic model of migraine may be characterized by a given predisposition, various co-factors which enhance the tendency, and finally, trigger mechanisms which induce an attack. No generally accepted model exists for tension-type headache. In assessing the importance of various factors thought to be related to idiopathic headache, it is necessary to differentiate between causal relation, unspecific association, and coincidence. The aim of this review is to present potential factors influencing headache in childhood and adolescence and to discuss these factors critically with regard to their etiopathogenetic importance. Organic factors seem to be most important in migraine, whereas psychological and (psycho)social factors may influence any type of headache. Briefly, migraine in childhood and adolescence seems to be definitively associated with vegetative dysfunction, abdominal symptoms and hormonal factors and possibly with allergic reactions, whereas a relation to epilepsy can be excluded. There is absolutely no evidence for a typical personality of migraine patients. Various psychic reactions, however, are important in all types of headache. Depression and anxiety in young headache patients seem to be related generally to pain, but not specifically to headache. However, school problems, learning disabilities and stress coping behaviour seem to be related directly to recurrent headache. Additionally, there is evidence that the prevalence of headache is associated with low economic status. PMID:8114976

  16. Can palpation-induced muscle pain pattern contribute to the differential diagnosis among temporomandibular disorders, primary headaches phenotypes and possible bruxism?

    PubMed Central

    Porporatti, André-Luís; Calderon, Patrícia-dos-Santos; Conti, Paulo-César-Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo-Rigoldi

    2016-01-01

    Background The evaluation of possible differences in the distribution or characteristics of palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles could be valuable in terms of diagnostic assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of different combinations of anterior temporalis (AT) and masseter palpation-induced pain in the diagnostic of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), primary headaches and bruxism. Material and Methods A total of 1200 dental records of orofacial pain adult patients were analyzed. The outcomes were dichotomously classified (presence/absence) as following: a) AT and/or masseter palpation-induced pain; b) myogenous TMD; c) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia (arthrogenous TMD); d) migraine; e) tension-type headache (TTH); f) self-reported bruxism. Binomial logistic regression model (α = 5%) was applied to the data considering the palpation-induced muscle pain as the dependent variable. Results Mean age (SD) were 35.7 years (13.4) for 635 included dental records (83% females). Myogenous and arthrogenous TMD, migraine, TTH and bruxism were mainly associated with, respectively, masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=5.77, 95%CI 3.86-8.62), AT or masseter palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.39, 95%CI 1.57-3.63), bilateral AT palpation-induced pain (p<0.001 - OR=2.67, 95%CI 1.64-4.32), masseter and AT palpation-induced pain (p=0.009 - OR=1.62, 95%CI 1.12-2.33) and bilateral masseter palpation-induced pain (p=0.01 - OR=1.74, 95%CI 1.13-2.69). Conclusions Palpation-induced pain in the masticatory muscles may play a role in the differential diagnosis among painful TMD, primary headaches and bruxism. Key words:Diagnosis, temporomandibular joint disorders, migraine, tension-type headache, bruxism. PMID:26615507

  17. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  18. Heat pain thresholds and cerebral event-related potentials following painful CO2 laser stimulation in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Losito, Luciana; Puca, Francomichele

    2003-07-01

    Current opinion concerning the pathophysiology of tension-type headache (TTH) and its related pericranial muscle tenderness proposes a primary role of central sensitization at the level of dorsalhorn/trigeminal nucleus as well as the supraspinal level. Investigation of these phenomena can be conducted using laser-evoked potentials (LEPs), which are objective and quantitative neurophysiological tools for the assessment of pain perception. In the present study we examined features of LEPs, as well as cutaneous heat-pain thresholds to laser stimulation, in relation to the tenderness of pericranial muscles in chronic TTH resulting from pericranial muscle disorder, during a pain-free phase. Twelve patients with TTH and 11 healthy controls were examined using the Total Tenderness Scoring (TTS) system. The stimulus was a laser pulse generated by a CO(2) laser. The dorsum of the hand and the cutaneous zones corresponding to pericranial muscles were stimulated. Subjective perception of stimulus intensity was assessed by a visual analogue scale. Two responses, the earlier named N2a and the last named P2, were considered; the absolute latency was measured at the highest peak of each response. The N2a-P2 components' peak-to-peak amplitude was detected. The heat pain threshold was similar in TTH patients and controls at the level of both the hand and pericranial skin. The TTS scores at almost all pericranial sites were higher in TTH patients than in normal controls. The amplitude of the N2a-P2 complex elicited by stimulation of the pericranial zone was greater in TTH patients than in controls; the amplitude increase was significantly associated with the TTS score. Our findings suggest that pericranial tenderness may be a primary phenomenon that precedes headache, and is mediated by a greater pain-specific hypervigilance at the cortical level. PMID:12855320

  19. Heat pain thresholds and cerebral event-related potentials following painful CO2 laser stimulation in chronic tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Losito, Luciana; Puca, Francomichele

    2003-07-01

    Current opinion concerning the pathophysiology of tension-type headache (TTH) and its related pericranial muscle tenderness proposes a primary role of central sensitization at the level of dorsalhorn/trigeminal nucleus as well as the supraspinal level. Investigation of these phenomena can be conducted using laser-evoked potentials (LEPs), which are objective and quantitative neurophysiological tools for the assessment of pain perception. In the present study we examined features of LEPs, as well as cutaneous heat-pain thresholds to laser stimulation, in relation to the tenderness of pericranial muscles in chronic TTH resulting from pericranial muscle disorder, during a pain-free phase. Twelve patients with TTH and 11 healthy controls were examined using the Total Tenderness Scoring (TTS) system. The stimulus was a laser pulse generated by a CO(2) laser. The dorsum of the hand and the cutaneous zones corresponding to pericranial muscles were stimulated. Subjective perception of stimulus intensity was assessed by a visual analogue scale. Two responses, the earlier named N2a and the last named P2, were considered; the absolute latency was measured at the highest peak of each response. The N2a-P2 components' peak-to-peak amplitude was detected. The heat pain threshold was similar in TTH patients and controls at the level of both the hand and pericranial skin. The TTS scores at almost all pericranial sites were higher in TTH patients than in normal controls. The amplitude of the N2a-P2 complex elicited by stimulation of the pericranial zone was greater in TTH patients than in controls; the amplitude increase was significantly associated with the TTS score. Our findings suggest that pericranial tenderness may be a primary phenomenon that precedes headache, and is mediated by a greater pain-specific hypervigilance at the cortical level.

  20. Assessment and Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain: Guidelines for the School Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Colleen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Notes that somatic complaints without clear organic origin are also primary indicators for both anxiety and depression in childhood and adolescence. Review of literature provides school psychologists with basic information regarding prevalence, assessment, and treatment of one of most common types of somatic complaints: recurrent abdominal pain.…

  1. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  2. Pulmonary Embolism with Abdominal Pain and ST Elevation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Mohammad Javad; Masoompour, Seyed Masoom; Mirzaee, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism is considered as a great masquerader due to its frequent nonspecific signs and symptoms. Typically pulmonary embolism is under-diagnosed or over-diagnosed. In this study a patient with pulmonary embolism is reported in which the patient exhibited two unusual manifestations namely; right upper quadrant abdominal pain and ST-T elevation in anterior precordial leads. Due to the fact that the patient did not display typical pulmonary embolism symptoms and its major risk factors, extensive workup to discern the cause was carried out. The examination included abdominal sonography, kidney ureter and bladder Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan) and coronary angiography. Eventually after a six-day delay, pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by spiral chest CT scan. This case and several other similar reports underlines the fact that while various other common causes may exist for right upper abdominal pain, one should always consider pulmonary embolism as a possible cause especially when backed up with ECG finding.

  3. Diver with acute abdominal pain, right leg paresthesias and weakness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Corson, K; Minky, K; Mader, J

    2002-01-01

    A 29-year-old man was brought to an emergency department by the United States Coast Guard with chief complaints of severe abdominal pain, right leg paresthesia and weakness following four deep air dives. Physical examination before recompression treatment was remarkable for diffuse abdominal tenderness and right leg weakness. The patient was diagnosed in the emergency room with type II decompression sickness (DCS) and underwent standard recompression therapy. He experienced complete resolution of weakness after hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, but his abdominal pain was persistent. Further investigation led to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with perforation. The patient underwent appendectomy and intravenous antibiotic therapy and was discharged to his home on hospital day five without complications. This case reinforces the importance of careful clinical assessment of divers and illustrates the potentially wide differential diagnosis of DCS. This is the first reported case of recompression treatment of a diver with acute appendicitis and type II DCS.

  4. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  5. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  6. Validity and reliability of a pain location tool for pediatric abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Hamill, James K; Cole, Alana M; Liley, Andrew; Hill, Andrew G

    2015-06-01

    For children with surgical problems, pain location conveys important clinical information. We developed a Location and Level of Intensity of Postoperative Pain (Lolipops) tool consisting of a body outline with a seven-sector abdominal grid, the International Association for the Study of Pain Revised Faces Pain Scale, and a recording chart. The aim of the study was to assess the validity and reliability of Lolipops. Children aged 5-14 years who had undergone laparoscopic appendectomy took both nurse- and investigator-administered Lolipops, and an investigator administered Varni Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaires, within 24 hours of surgery. The average age of the 42 participants was 10.7 years; 64% were boys; 24 (57.1%) had acute appendicitis, 13 (31%) had perforated appendicitis, and 5 (11.9%) were uninflamed. Pain scores were higher at the laparoscopic port incision sites than in upper abdominal sites distant from incisions or expected inflammation, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.3) and 1.1 (1.8), respectively (p < .0001). In children with acute appendicitis, pain scores were higher in the right iliac fossa than in upper abdominal sites, mean (SD) 3.3 (2.5) and 0.4 (0.7), respectively (p = .001). In children with perforated appendicitis, Lolipops demonstrated a more widespread pain pattern. Correlations between nurse and investigator were fair to moderate with an overall intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.597. This study presents a new tool to measure the location of pain in pediatric surgical patients and shows it to be valid and reliable.

  7. Emergency Department Diagnosis of Dietl Crisis in a 7-Year-Old Girl With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Burhop, James; Clingenpeel, Joel M; Poirier, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Children with Dietl crisis often experience a delay in diagnosis, with the clinical entity being underdiagnosed. Pain is caused by compression of an aberrant artery crossing dilated kidney. Pain is often worsened after the consumption of liquids and resolves after fluid reabsorption. There are no clear criteria for evaluating ureter obstruction in childhood abdominal pain in the emergency department setting; however, it has been suggested that ultrasound may aid in the diagnosis. As renal parenchyma is typically preserved, and there is a paucity of associated urological complaints, once properly diagnosed, most patients are well served by a pyeloplasty. PMID:25626638

  8. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  9. Serum amylase and lipase in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Chase, C W; Barker, D E; Russell, W L; Burns, R P

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine 1) the incidence and magnitude of elevation in admission serum amylase and lipase levels in extrapancreatic etiologies of acute abdominal pain, and 2) the test most closely associated with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase levels were obtained in 306 patients admitted for evaluation of acute abdominal pain. Patients were categorized by anatomic location of identified pathology. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare the enzyme levels between patient groups and to determine the correlation between elevation in serum amylase and lipase. Twenty-seven (13%) of 208 patients with an extrapancreatic etiology of acute abdominal pain demonstrated an elevated admission serum amylase level with a maximum value of 385 units (U)/L (normal range 30-110 U/L). Twenty-six (12.5%) of these 208 patients had an elevated admission serum lipase value with a maximum of 3685 U/L (normal range 5-208 U/L). Of 48 patients with abdominal pain resulting from acute pancreatitis, admission serum amylase ranged from 30 to 7680 U/L and lipase ranged from 5 to 90,654 U/L. Both serum amylase and lipase elevations were positively associated with a correct diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (P < 0.001) with diagnostic efficiencies of 91 and 94 per cent, respectively. A close correlation between elevation of admission serum amylase and lipase was observed (r = 0.87) in both extrapancreatic and pancreatic disease processes. Serum amylase and lipase levels may be elevated in nonpancreatic disease processes of the abdomen. Significant elevations (greater than three times upper limit of normal) in either enzyme are uncommon in these disorders. The strong correlation between elevations in the two serum enzymes in both pancreatic and extrapancreatic etiologies of abdominal pain makes them redundant measures. Serum lipase is a better test than serum amylase either to exclude or to support a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Chronic postsurgical pain and neuropathic symptoms after abdominal hysterectomy: A silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Palabyk, Onur; Tuna, Ayça Taş; Kaya, Burak; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Akdemir, Nermin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is an important clinic problem. It is assessed that prevalence of chronic pain extends to 30% but it is contended that there are various risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of chronic pain after hysterectomy, risk factors of chronicity, neuropathic features of pain, and sensorial alterations at surgery area.Between years 2012 and 2015, 16 to 65 ages old patients that electively undergone total abdominal hysterectomy bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and passed minimum 3 months after surgery were included to study. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4-questionnaire (DN-4) surveys were used to evaluate pain symptoms, algometry device was used for evaluating abdominal pressure threshold and Von Frey Filament was used for sensorial alterations.Ninety-three of 165 eligible patients were included to study. As the groups were compared by demographic data, no difference was obtained (P > 0.05). There was no difference between groups regarding patient and surgery attributes (P > 0.05). Most frequently performed incision type was Pfannenstiel. Neuropathic symptoms were observed in 90 patients (96.8%). Sensorial alterations as hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia were detected around abdominal scar in 18 patients (19.4%) with pinprick test.Neuropathic symptoms should not be ignored in studies evaluating CPSP and a standard methodology should be designed for studies in this topic. PMID:27537570

  11. Extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower abdominal pain: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Dollard, Denis J; Fobia, John B

    2011-03-01

    Lower quadrant abdominal pain is a common complaint evaluated in emergency departments (EDs). The number of differential diagnoses is lowered when the pain in a male patient is associated with a palpable tender mass. These diagnoses include inguinal hernia, inflamed inguinal lymph node, rectus sheath hematoma, cryptorchidism, mass derived from the spermatic cord, and polyorchidism. We report a case of extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower quadrant abdominal pain that was misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia on several ED visits. Lower quadrant mass and pain caused by a spermatocele are unusual conditions. Upon the patient's third (ED) visit, the painful mass remained located in his right lower quadrant. The lower quadrant mass was movable on palpation and with pressure could be delivered into the superior aspect of the scrotum. The patient had an abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scan and lower quadrant ultrasound. The imaging studies revealed the mass to be a cystic structure. Surgical excision confirmed that the mass was a spermatocele. Differential diagnoses, diagnostic approaches, and treatment are discussed. PMID:20674226

  12. Association of Painful Musculoskeletal Conditions and Migraine Headache With Mental and Sleep Disorders Among Adults With Disabilities, Spain, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, María; Ojeda, Begoña; Failde, Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine headache or any other headache in a sample of Spanish adults with disabilities and their association with anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Spanish national disability and dependence survey (2007–2008) of 16,932 adults aged 18 or older who have disabilities. The prevalence (95% confidence interval [CI]) of painful musculoskeletal conditions was determined according to a diagnosis of arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, muscular dystrophy, and neck or back pain. The prevalence of migraine or other headache was also calculated. Factors associated with these painful conditions were analyzed separately for men and women by using a logistic regression model. Results The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions was 66.9% (95% CI, 66.2%–67.6%) and that of migraine or other headache was 23.4% (95% CI, 22.8%–24.1%), both of which were higher in women than in men. Factors associated with these conditions in both men and women included older age, a sleep disorder, and concomitant chronic anxiety and/or depression. Conclusion The prevalence of painful musculoskeletal conditions and migraine or other headache is high in people with disability in Spain, especially in women, and these conditions often coexist with depression, anxiety, and/or a sleep disorder. To design programs for rehabilitating and improving the quality of life of adults with disability and painful conditions, treatments for mental and/or sleep disorders should be considered in addition to conventional treatments. PMID:24576397

  13. Present state and future challenges in pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics research: Looking beyond the forest

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, it is nearly impossible to treat pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with pain in an evidence based fashion. This is due to the overall lack of controlled studies and, even more importantly, the complexity of the contributors to disease phenotype which are not controlled or accounted for in most therapeutic trials. In this manuscript, we review the challenges of defining entry criteria, controlling for the large number of biopsychosocial factors which may effect outcomes, and understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors when designing therapeutic trials for abdominal pain in children. We also review the current state of pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics and discuss trial design considerations as we move forward. PMID:26558142

  14. Pain relief after transversus abdominis plane block for abdominal surgery in children: a service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bergmans, Elonka; Jacobs, Alet; Desai, Rachel; Masters, Oliver W; Thies, Karl C

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a prospective service evaluation of the quality of pain control after preoperative transverse abdominis plane (TAP) block in 100 children undergoing abdominal surgery. Data were collected on type of procedure, age, weight, level of the block, local anesthetic used, additional analgesia, and hourly pain scores. Of the 100 patients, 87 were included in the evaluation, 77% of who were less than 1 year old. Adequate pain relief was achieved in 93% of all patients. Almost half (47%) of our patients did not require intravenous (IV) opioids in the postoperative period and 27% did not need any IV opioids at all. Our results confirm the good quality of perioperative analgesia achieved with a TAP block as part of a multimodal approach in children undergoing abdominal surgery. Depending on the patient’s age and the type of procedure, a TAP block may eliminate the need for IV opioids. PMID:25897261

  15. An 86-year-old man with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Paul M E L; Posthouwer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    An 86-year-old man presented with severe pain in the upper abdomen along with fever. On physical examination, we found an arterial blood pressure of 84/43 mm Hg, a heart rate of 80 bpm and a temperature of 38.3°C. The abdomen was painful and peristalsis was absent. Empiric antibiotic therapy for sepsis was started with amoxicillin/clavulanate and gentamicin. CT scan of the abdomen revealed an emphysematous cholecystitis. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystostomy was applied. Bile cultures revealed Clostridium perfringens. Emphysematous cholecystitis is a life-threatening form of acute cholecystitis that occurs as a consequence of ischaemic injury to the gallbladder, followed by translocation of gas-forming bacteria (ie, C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Streptococci). The mortality associated with emphysematous cholecystitis is higher than in non-emphysematous cholecystitis (15% vs 4%). Therefore, early diagnosis with radiological imaging is of vital importance. PMID:26869625

  16. Gastric Electrical Stimulation for Abdominal Pain in Patients with Symptoms of Gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Christopher J.; Griffith, James; Subramony, Charu; Halley, Lindsey; Adams, Kristen; Paine, Elizabeth R.; Schmieg, Robert; Islam, Saleem; Salameh, Jay; Spree, Danielle; Kothari, Truptesh; Kedar, Archana; Nikitina, Yana; Abell, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal pain physiology may be better understood studying electrophysiology, histology, and symptom scores in patients with the symptoms of gastroparesis (Gp) treated with gastric electrical stimulation (GES). Ninety-five Gp patients’ symptoms were recorded at baseline and during temporary and permanent GES. Gastric-emptying times and cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal electrogastrograms were obtained. S100-stained, full-thickness gastric biopsies were compared with autopsy controls. Sixty-eight patients reported severe pain at baseline. Severe pain patients’ mean pain scores decreased with temporary GES from 3.62 to 1.29 (P < 0.001) and nonsevere pain from 1.26 to 0.67 (P = 0.01). With permanent GES, severe mean pain scores fell to 2.30 (P < 0.001); nonsevere pain changed to 1.60 (P = 0.221). Mean follow-up was 275 days. Mean cutaneous, mucosal, and serosal frequencies and frequency-to-amplitude ratios were markedly higher than literature controls. For patients with Gp overall and subdivided by etiology and severity of pain, S-100 neuronal fibers were significantly reduced in both muscularis propria layers. GES improved severe pain associated with symptoms of Gp. This severe pain is associated with abnormal electrogastrographic activity and loss of S100 neuronal fibers in the stomach’s inner and outer muscularis propria and, therefore, could be the result of gastric neuropathy. PMID:23635579

  17. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  18. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  19. Cluster headache after orbital exenteration.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Sörös, P; Brilla, R; Gerding, H; Husstedt, I W

    1997-10-01

    A 37-year-old man developed an ipsilateral headache which fulfilled the criteria for cluster headache after orbital extenteration because of a traumatic lesion of the bulb. The headache could be treated successfully by drugs usually applied in the therapy of cluster headache. Six similar cases of cluster headache after orbital exenteration could be identified in the literature suggesting that the eye itself is not necessarily part of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. We hypothesize that orbital exenteration can cause cluster headache by lesions of sympathetic structures. Possibly, these mechanisms are similar to those of sympathetic reflex dystrophy (Sudeck-Leriche syndrome) causing pain of the limbs. PMID:9350391

  20. [Ovarian tumour in a girl with chronic abdominal pain and distension].

    PubMed

    Loeffen, J L C M; Wijnen, M; Schijf, C P T; van Wieringen, P

    2006-03-25

    A 12-year-old girl presented with chronic abdominal pain and distension that had persisted for 6 and 3 months, respectively. The cause was a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour originating in the left ovary. The cyst and ovary were resected. The patient recovered and was asymptomatic 2 years after the operation. Ovarian tumours are rarely seen in children. The sex cordstromal tumours constitute a heterogeneous subgroup. Two of the most frequently observed sex cord-stromal tumours are the juvenile granulosa cell tumour and the Sertoli-Leydig cell tumour. Even though these tumours may contain histologically malignant characteristics, their behaviour is usually benign. Clinical characteristics are endocrine symptoms, fatigue, chronic abdominal pain and abdominal distension. In addition, pressure from the tumour mass may result in symptoms in adjacent organ systems. Surgical excision is usually curative. Patients with advanced disease may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Chronic abdominal pain is frequently observed in children and, in some rare cases, may be caused by ovarian tumours.

  1. Pulmonary Embolism Presenting as Abdominal Pain: An Atypical Presentation of a Common Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Hasan; John, Elizabeth; Parikh, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent diagnosis made in the emergency department and can present in many different ways. Abdominal pain is an unusual presenting symptom for PE. It is essential to maintain a high degree of suspicion in these patients, as a delay in diagnosis can be devastating for the patient and confers a high risk of mortality if left untreated. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with worsening right upper quadrant abdominal pain with fevers. Initial imaging was benign, although lab work showed worsening leukocytosis and bilirubin. Abdominal pathology seemed most likely, but the team kept PE on the differential. Further imaging revealed acute pulmonary embolus in the segmental branch of the right lower lobe extending distally into subsegmental branches. The patient was started on anticoagulation and improved drastically. This case highlights the necessity of keeping a broad differential and maintaining a systematic approach when dealing with nonspecific complaints. Furthermore, a discussion on the pathophysiology on why PE can present atypically as abdominal pain, as well as fevers, is reviewed. Using this information can hopefully lead to a subtle diagnosis of PE in the future and lead to a life-saving diagnosis. PMID:27642528

  2. Pulmonary Embolism Presenting as Abdominal Pain: An Atypical Presentation of a Common Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth; Parikh, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent diagnosis made in the emergency department and can present in many different ways. Abdominal pain is an unusual presenting symptom for PE. It is essential to maintain a high degree of suspicion in these patients, as a delay in diagnosis can be devastating for the patient and confers a high risk of mortality if left untreated. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with worsening right upper quadrant abdominal pain with fevers. Initial imaging was benign, although lab work showed worsening leukocytosis and bilirubin. Abdominal pathology seemed most likely, but the team kept PE on the differential. Further imaging revealed acute pulmonary embolus in the segmental branch of the right lower lobe extending distally into subsegmental branches. The patient was started on anticoagulation and improved drastically. This case highlights the necessity of keeping a broad differential and maintaining a systematic approach when dealing with nonspecific complaints. Furthermore, a discussion on the pathophysiology on why PE can present atypically as abdominal pain, as well as fevers, is reviewed. Using this information can hopefully lead to a subtle diagnosis of PE in the future and lead to a life-saving diagnosis. PMID:27642528

  3. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  4. Pulmonary Embolism Presenting as Abdominal Pain: An Atypical Presentation of a Common Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    John, Elizabeth; Parikh, Payal

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent diagnosis made in the emergency department and can present in many different ways. Abdominal pain is an unusual presenting symptom for PE. It is essential to maintain a high degree of suspicion in these patients, as a delay in diagnosis can be devastating for the patient and confers a high risk of mortality if left untreated. Here, we report the case of a 53-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with worsening right upper quadrant abdominal pain with fevers. Initial imaging was benign, although lab work showed worsening leukocytosis and bilirubin. Abdominal pathology seemed most likely, but the team kept PE on the differential. Further imaging revealed acute pulmonary embolus in the segmental branch of the right lower lobe extending distally into subsegmental branches. The patient was started on anticoagulation and improved drastically. This case highlights the necessity of keeping a broad differential and maintaining a systematic approach when dealing with nonspecific complaints. Furthermore, a discussion on the pathophysiology on why PE can present atypically as abdominal pain, as well as fevers, is reviewed. Using this information can hopefully lead to a subtle diagnosis of PE in the future and lead to a life-saving diagnosis.

  5. [Ketoprofen in the prevention of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery. A multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Avila, G; Balbo, G; Biasiato, R; Brighenti, F M; Conte, R; Donini, I; Landi, E; Marzocca, G; Mazzi, U; Morino, F

    1991-01-01

    Two-hundred-forty-eight patients undergoing abdominal surgery were admitted to a multicentric clinical trial. The patients were randomly assigned to a single i.v. dose of ketoprofen or acetylsalicylic acid, 15 minutes after the end of operation. Ketoprofen showed a better analgesic activity with a statistically significant difference at 2 and 4 hours after administration. Two patients treated with ketoprofen reported vomiting and skin rash respectively. The results of this study confirm the efficacy of ketoprofen for the prophylaxis of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery. PMID:1751342

  6. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Perceived Pain Intensity and Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Headache

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshani, Nour-Mohammad; Amirani, Ahmadreza; Amirifard, Hamed; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress reduction (MBSR) on perceived pain intensity and quality of life in patients with chronic headache. Thus, forty patients based on the diagnosis of a neurologist and diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (IHS) for migraine and chronic tension-type headache were selected and randomly assigned to the intervention group and control group, respectively. The participants completed the Pain and quality of life (SF-36) questionnaire. The intervention group enrolled in an eight-week MBSR program that incorporated meditation and daily home practice, per week, session of 90-minutes. Results of covariance analysis with the elimination of the pre-test showed significantly improvement of pain and quality of life in the intervention group compared with the control group. The findings from this study revealed that MBSR can be used non-pharmacological intervention for improvement the quality of life and development of strategies to cope with pain in patients with chronic headache. And can be used in combination with other therapies such as pharmacotherapy. PMID:26573025

  7. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on Perceived Pain Intensity and Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Headache.

    PubMed

    Bakhshani, Nour Mohammad; Amirani, Ahmadreza; Amirifard, Hamed; Shahrakipoor, Mahnaz

    2015-08-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Stress reduction (MBSR) on perceived pain intensity and quality of life in patients with chronic headache. Thus, forty patients based on the diagnosis of a neurologist and diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (IHS) for migraine and chronic tension-type headache were selected and randomly assigned to the intervention group and control group, respectively. The participants completed the Pain and quality of life (SF-36) questionnaire. The intervention group enrolled in an eight-week MBSR program that incorporated meditation and daily home practice, per week, session of 90-minutes. Results of covariance analysis with the elimination of the pre-test showed significantly improvement of pain and quality of life in the intervention group compared with the control group. The findings from this study revealed that MBSR can be used non-pharmacological intervention for improvement the quality of life and development of strategies to cope with pain in patients with chronic headache. And can be used in combination with other therapies such as pharmacotherapy.

  8. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The revised International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for cluster headache are: attacks of severe or very severe, strictly unilateral pain, which is orbital, supraorbital, or temporal pain, lasting 15 to 180 minutes and occurring from once every other day to eight times daily. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of interventions to abort cluster headache? What are the effects of interventions to prevent cluster headache? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 23 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: baclofen (oral); botulinum toxin (intramuscular); capsaicin (intranasal); chlorpromazine; civamide (intranasal); clonidine (transdermal); corticosteroids; ergotamine and dihydroergotamine (oral or intranasal); gabapentin (oral); greater occipital nerve injections (betamethasone plus xylocaine); high-dose and high-flow-rate oxygen; hyperbaric oxygen; leuprolide; lidocaine (intranasal); lithium (oral); melatonin; methysergide (oral); octreotide (subcutaneous); pizotifen (oral); sodium valproate (oral); sumatriptan (oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal); topiramate (oral); tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs); verapamil; and zolmitriptan (oral and intranasal). PMID:21718584

  9. Ultrasound in newborns and children suffering from non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: imaging with clinical and surgical correlation.

    PubMed

    di Giacomo, Vincenza; Trinci, Margherita; van der Byl, Giulia; Catania, Vincenzo Davide; Calisti, Alessandro; Miele, Vittorio

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to review ultrasonographic appearance of the most common causes of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain in pediatric patients and to understand the applications and limitations of this technique giving a practical approach showing different clinical cases. A pictorial review of cases was made presenting the most common causes of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; sonographic features are discussed. Ultrasound in conjunction with Color Doppler imaging is a valuable tool in the evaluation of neonatal and pediatric non-traumatic acute abdominal pain; causes of acute abdomen in children could vary depending on the ages of the children.

  10. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  11. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  12. Duodenal duplication manifested by abdominal pain and bowl obstruction in an adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Fan, Ying; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Song, Yanglin

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal duplication (DD) is a rare congenital anomaly reported mainly in infancy and childhood, but seldom in adolescent and adults. Symptoms, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or dyspepsia may present depending on the location and type of the lesion. DD can result in several complications, including pancreatitis, bowl obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation and jaundice. Surgery is still the optimal method for treatment, although endoscopic fenestration has been described recently. Here, we report a case of a DD on the second portion of the duodenum in a 17-year-old adolescent complaining of transient epigastric pain and vomiting after meal. We suspected the diagnosis of DD by abdominal computerized tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography. We treated her by subtotal excision and internal derivation. Eventually, we confirmed our diagnosis with histopathological result. PMID:26885132

  13. [Acute and chronic progressive abdominal pain: what is the role of radiogical imaging?].

    PubMed

    Antes, G

    2005-06-01

    There are many causes for acute or chronic progressive abdominal pain. Although only about one percent of these patients suffer from acute mesenteric ischemia (MI), an efficient diagnostic work-up is mandatory to reduce the high mortality. An overview about the possibilities of conventional and modern imaging modalities is given. Plain films and ultrasonography are still important in the basic work-up, however, its sensitivity is limited. Angiography has a high sensitivity and specitivity. However, angiography is not always available. Modern spiral-CT is widely available and its sensitivity is already similar to angiography. An other advantage of CT is the possibility to detect the most other frequent causes of abdominal pain. Therefore CT should be performed as fast as possible.

  14. Lead Poisoning From a Ceramic Jug Presenting as Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Groshaus, Horacio; Rioux, Kevin; Yarema, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lead poisoning may present with non-specific symptoms that may result in unnecessary investigations. We report a case of acute lead poisoning in a previously healthy 28-year-old man who presented with recurrent abdominal pain, jaundice, constipation, and weight loss. An extensive diagnostic work-up was completed with inconclusive results. A detailed history revealed an unusual source of lead exposure. Chelation therapy resulted in substantial clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:26958573

  15. Pain pressure threshold algometry of the abdominal wall in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M.L.L.S.; Braz, C.A.; Mateus-Vasconcelos, E.L.; Rosa-e-Silva, J.C.; Candido-dos-Reis, F.J.; Nogueira, A.A.; Poli-Neto, O.B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-examiner reliability of pain pressure threshold algometry at various points of the abdominal wall of healthy women. Twenty-one healthy women in menacme with a mean age of 28 ± 5.4 years (range: 19-39 years) were included. All volunteers had regular menstrual cycles (27-33 days) and were right-handed and, to the best of our knowledge, none were taking medications at the time of testing. Women with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or other mood disturbances were excluded. Women with previous abdominal surgery, any pain condition or any evidence of inflammation, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, or inflammatory disease were also excluded. Pain perception thresholds were assessed with a pressure algometer with digital traction and compression and a measuring capacity for 5 kg. All points were localized by palpation and marked with a felt-tipped pen and each individual was evaluated over a period of 2 days in two consecutive sessions, each session consisting of a set of 14 point measurements repeated twice by two examiners in random sequence. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean pain threshold obtained by the two examiners on 2 diferent days (examiner A: P = 1.00; examiner B: P = 0.75; Wilcoxon matched pairs test). There was excellent/good agreement between examiners for all days and all points. Our results have established baseline values to which future researchers will be able to refer. They show that pressure algometry is a reliable measure for pain perception in the abdominal wall of healthy women. PMID:22527127

  16. Pain-related bias in the classification of emotionally ambiguous facial expressions in mothers of children with chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Liossi, Christina; White, Paul; Croome, Natasha; Hatira, Popi

    2012-03-01

    This study sought to determine whether mothers of young people with chronic abdominal pain (CAP) compared to mothers of pain-free children show a pain recognition bias when they classify facial emotional expressions. One hundred demographically matched mothers of children with CAP (n=50) and control mothers (n=50) were asked to identify different emotions expressed by adults in 2 experiments. In experiment 1, participants were required to identify the emotion in a series of facial images that depicted 100% intensity of the following emotions: Pain, Sadness, Anger, Fear, Happiness, and Neutral. In experiment 2, mothers were required to identify the predominant emotion in a series of computer-interpolated ("morphed") facial images. In this experiment, pain was combined with Sad, Angry, Fearful, Happy, and Neutral facial expressions in different proportions-that is, 90%:10%, 70%:30%, 50%:50%, 30%:70%, 10%:90%. All participants completed measures of state and trait anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity. In experiment 1, there was no difference in the performance of the 2 groups of mothers. In experiment 2, it was found that overall mothers of children with CAP were classifying ambiguous emotional expressions predominantly as pain. Mean response times for CAP and control groups did not differ significantly. Mothers of children with CAP did not report more anxiety, depression, and anxiety sensitivity compared to control mothers. It is concluded that mothers of children with CAP show a pain bias when interpreting ambiguous emotional expressions, which possibly contributes to the maintenance of this condition in children via specific parenting behaviours.

  17. Attentional bias to pain and social threat in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and pain-free youth before and after performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joy E; Lipani, Tricia A; Baber, Kari F; Dufton, Lynette; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated attentional biases for pain and social threat versus neutral stimuli in 54 youth with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 53 healthy control subjects (ages 10 to 16 years). We assessed attentional bias using a visual probe detection task (PDT) that presented pain and social threat words in comparison to neutral words at conscious (1250 ms) and preconscious (20 ms) presentation rates. We administered the PDT before and after random assignment of participants to a laboratory stressor--failure versus success feedback regarding their performance on a challenging computer game. All analyses controlled for trait anxiety. At the conscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients exhibited preferential attention toward pain compared with neutral stimuli and compared with the control group. FAP patients maintained preferential attention toward conscious pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. At the preconscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients' attention was neutral at baseline but increased significantly toward pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. FAP patients' somatic symptoms increased in both failure and success conditions; control youth's somatic symptoms only increased after failure. Regarding social threat, neither FAP nor control youth exhibited attentional bias toward social threat compared with neutral stimuli at baseline, but both FAP and control youth in the failure condition significantly increased attention away from social threat after failure feedback. Results suggest that FAP patients preferentially attend to pain stimuli in conscious awareness. Moreover, performance evaluation may activate their preconscious attention to pain stimuli. PMID:21420789

  18. Choledochal Cyst Mimicking Gallbladder with Stones in a Six-Year-Old with Right-sided Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Subramony, Rachna; Kittisarapong, Nat; Barata, Isabel; Nelson, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Choledochal cysts are rare but serious bile duct abnormalities are found in young children, usually during the first year of life.1 They require urgent surgical intervention due to the risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma.2 Clinicians should consider this diagnosis and perform a point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) when a child presents to the emergency department (ED) with findings of jaundice, abdominal pain, and the presence of an abdominal mass. We present the case of a six-year-old child presenting only with abdominal pain upon arrival to our ED and was ultimately diagnosed by POCUS to have a choledochal cyst. PMID:26265970

  19. Case Studies of Uncommon and Rare Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2016-08-01

    The following 6 case studies are presented: a 12-day migraine with recurring aura?; a migraineur with a new constant headache for 1 month; an orthostatic headache; a unilateral headache; migraine with aura and limb pain without headache; and nocturnal headaches. These cases illustrate the fascinating diversity and challenges of primary and secondary headaches that neurologists commonly encounter.

  20. Case Studies of Uncommon and Rare Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2016-08-01

    The following 6 case studies are presented: a 12-day migraine with recurring aura?; a migraineur with a new constant headache for 1 month; an orthostatic headache; a unilateral headache; migraine with aura and limb pain without headache; and nocturnal headaches. These cases illustrate the fascinating diversity and challenges of primary and secondary headaches that neurologists commonly encounter. PMID:27445245

  1. INCREASED GASTROINTESTINAL PERMEABILITY AND GUT INFLAMMATION IN CHILDREN WITH FUNCTIONAL ABDOMINAL PAIN AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Robert J.; Eakin, Michelle N.; Czyzewski, Danita I.; Jarrett, Monica; Ou, Ching-Nan

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine GI permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7–10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) vs Controls and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling. Study design GI permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration were measured. Children kept a two-week diary of pain episodes and stooling pattern. Results Proximal GI permeability was greater in the FAP/IBS group (n = 93) compared with controls (n = 52) (0.59 ± 0.50 vs. 0.36 ± 0.26, respectively; mean ± SD; P < 0.001) as was colonic permeability (1.01 ± 0.67 vs. 0.81 ± 0.43, respectively; P < 0.05). Gastric and small intestinal permeability were similar. Fecal calprotectin concentration was greater in children with FAP/IBS compared with control children (65.5 ± 75.4 µg/g stool vs. 43.2 ± 39.4, respectively; P < 0.01). Fecal calprotectin concentration correlated with pain interference with activities (P = 0.01, r2 = 0.36). There was no correlation between GI permeability and pain related symptoms. Neither permeability nor fecal calprotectin correlated with stool form. Conclusions Children with FAP/IBS have evidence of increased GI permeability and low grade GI inflammation with the latter relating to the degree to which pain interferes with activities. PMID:18538790

  2. Pulmonary Embolism with Abdominal Pain and ST Elevation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Mohammad Javad; Masoompour, Seyed Masoom; Mirzaee, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is considered as a great masquerader due to its frequent nonspecific signs and symptoms. Typically pulmonary embolism is under-diagnosed or over-diagnosed. In this study a patient with pulmonary embolism is reported in which the patient exhibited two unusual manifestations namely; right upper quadrant abdominal pain and ST-T elevation in anterior precordial leads. Due to the fact that the patient did not display typical pulmonary embolism symptoms and its major risk factors, extensive workup to discern the cause was carried out. The examination included abdominal sonography, kidney ureter and bladder Computed Tomography scan (CT-scan) and coronary angiography. Eventually after a six-day delay, pulmonary embolism was diagnosed by spiral chest CT scan. This case and several other similar reports underlines the fact that while various other common causes may exist for right upper abdominal pain, one should always consider pulmonary embolism as a possible cause especially when backed up with ECG finding. PMID:25031494

  3. Association of Race and Ethnicity With Management of Abdominal Pain in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Matthew D.; Borrero, Sonya; Davis, Esa M.; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Zuckerbraun, Noel S.; Kraemer, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if race/ethnicity-based differences exist in the management of pediatric abdominal pain in emergency departments (EDs). METHODS: Secondary analysis of data from the 2006–2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey regarding 2298 visits by patients ≤21 years old who presented to EDs with abdominal pain. Main outcomes were documentation of pain score and receipt of any analgesics, analgesics for severe pain (defined as ≥7 on a 10-point scale), and narcotic analgesics. Secondary outcomes included diagnostic tests obtained, length of stay (LOS), 72-hour return visits, and admission. RESULTS: Of patient visits, 70.1% were female, 52.6% were from non-Hispanic white, 23.5% were from non-Hispanic black, 20.6% were from Hispanic, and 3.3% were from “other” racial/ethnic groups; patients’ mean age was 14.5 years. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for confounders revealed that non-Hispanic black patients were less likely to receive any analgesic (odds ratio [OR]: 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43–0.87) or a narcotic analgesic (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18–0.81) than non-Hispanic white patients (referent group). This finding was also true for non-Hispanic black and “other” race/ethnicity patients with severe pain (ORs [95% CI]: 0.43 [0.22–0.87] and 0.02 [0.00–0.19], respectively). Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic patients were more likely to have a prolonged LOS than non-Hispanic white patients (ORs [95% CI]: 1.68 [1.13–2.51] and 1.64 [1.09–2.47], respectively). No significant race/ethnicity-based disparities were identified in documentation of pain score, use of diagnostic procedures, 72-hour return visits, or hospital admissions. CONCLUSIONS: Race/ethnicity-based disparities exist in ED analgesic use and LOS for pediatric abdominal pain. Recognizing these disparities may help investigators eliminate inequalities in care. PMID:24062370

  4. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Lactobacillus reuteri for Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Kambiz; Vahedi, Zahra; Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Noemi Diaz, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is one of the most common diseases, and large percentages of children suffer from it. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri in treatment of children with functional abdominal pain. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Children aged 4 to 16 years with chronic functional abdominal pain (based on Rome III criteria) were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups, one receiving probiotic and the other placebo. Results: Forty children received probiotic and forty others placebo. There were no significant differences in age, weight, sex, location of pain, associated symptoms, frequency and intensity of pain between the groups. The severity and frequency of abdominal pain in the first month compared to baseline was significantly less and at the end of the second month, there was no significant difference between both groups compared to the end of the first month. Conclusions: This study showed that the severity of pain was significantly reduced in both groups. There was no significant difference in pain scores between them. The effect of probiotic and placebo can probably be attributed to psychological effect of the drugs. PMID:26635937

  5. Diagnostic Laparoscopy and Adhesiolysis: Does It Help with Complex Abdominal and Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CAPPS) in General Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Gregory D.; McCarus, Steven D.; Caceres, Aileen; Kim, John

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal pains secondary to adhesions are a common complaint, but most surgeons do not perform surgery for this complaint unless the patient suffers from a bowel obstruction. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine if lysis of bowel adhesions has a role in the surgical management of adhesions for helping treat abdominal pain. The database of our patients with complex abdominal and pelvic pain syndrome (CAPPS) was reviewed to identify patients who underwent a laparoscopic lysis of adhesion without any organ removal and observe if they had a decrease in the amount of abdominal pain after this procedure. Thirty-one patients completed follow-up at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. At 6, 9, and 12 months postoperation, there were statistically significant decreases in patients' analog pain scores. We concluded that laparoscopic lysis of adhesions can help decrease adhesion-related pain. The pain from adhesions may involve a more complex pathway toward pain resolution than a simple cutting of scar tissue, such as “phantom pain” following amputation, which takes time to resolve after this type of surgery. PMID:21902933

  6. Psychological Risk Factors in Headache

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Robert A.; Houle, Timothy T.; Rhudy, Jamie L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Headache is a chronic disease that occurs with varying frequency and results in varying levels of disability. To date, the majority of research and clinical focus has been on the role of biological factors in headache and headache-related disability. However, reliance on a purely biomedical model of headache does not account for all aspects of headache and associated disability. Using a biopsychosocial framework, the current manuscript expands the view of what factors influence headache by considering the role psychological (i.e., cognitive and affective) factors have in the development, course, and consequences of headache. The manuscript initially reviews evidence showing that neural circuits responsible for cognitive–affective phenomena are highly interconnected with the circuitry responsible for headache pain. The manuscript then reviews the influence cognitions (locus of control and self-efficacy) and negative affect (depression, anxiety, and anger) have on the development of headache attacks, perception of headache pain, adherence to prescribed treatment, headache treatment outcome, and headache-related disability. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of considering psychological factors when treating headache. PMID:17371358

  7. Predictors of pain response in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided neurolysis for abdominal pain caused by pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Miyata, Takeshi; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Naoshi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures such as EUS-guided celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) and EUS-guided broad plexus neurolysis (EUS-BPN) were developed to treat abdominal cancer-associated pain; however, these procedures are not always effective. The aim of this study was to explore predictors of pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-associated pain. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 112 consecutive patients who underwent EUS-BPN in our institution. EUS-CGN was added in cases of visible celiac ganglia. The neurolytic-spread area was divided into six sections and evaluated by post-procedural computed tomography scanning. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), and a decrease in VAS scores by ⩾3 points after neurolysis was considered a good pain response. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to explore predictors of pain response at 1 and 4 weeks, and complications. Results: A good pain response was obtained in 77.7% and 67.9% of patients at 1 and 4 weeks, respectively. In the multivariable analysis of these patients, the combination method (EUS-BPN plus CGN) was a significant positive predictive factor at 1 week (odds ratio = 3.69, p = 0.017) and 4 weeks (odds ratio = 6.37, p = 0.043). The numbers of neurolytic/contrast spread areas (mean ± SD) were 4.98 ± 1.08 and 4.15 ± 1.12 in patients treated with the combination method and single method, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no significant predictor of complications. Conclusions: EUS-BPN in combination with EUS-CGN was a predictor of a good pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-related pain. The larger number of neurolytic/contrast spread areas may lead to better outcomes in patients receiving combination treatment. PMID:27366217

  8. Psychological Aspects of Headache

    PubMed Central

    Sloane, R. Bruce

    1964-01-01

    Headache is considered as a non-specific syndrome illustrating the concept of pain as an emotion. Viewed in this way, its meaning looms larger than its site. Pain indicates dis-ease of the patient, sometimes with his body, but more often with his life. No pain is “imaginary”, nor can some pain be assigned to physiological and some to psychological pathways. Such a decision is often merely a judgmental one. Just as the “brain” cannot easily be separated from the “mind”, so to believe that some pain is “physical” and some “emotional” is a distortion. All painful syndromes are mixed and the problem is to decipher the meaning of the pain. Only rarely will headache respond to physical measures alone. PMID:14199822

  9. Acute abdominal pain in childhood, with special reference to cases not due to acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Jones, P F

    1969-02-01

    Appendicitis is not the only common cause of acute abdominal pain in childhood. Almost equally common is an acute episode which in its early stages resembles acute appendicitis but which subsides without treatment in 24 to 48 hours. The clinical features of this syndrome are contrasted with those of appendicitis. The two conditions cannot always be distinguished on clinical grounds, leading to admission to hospital for observation and the finding of a normal appendix in 14% of operations for suspected appendicitis. Reasons are given for abandoning attempts to diagnose acute mesenteric adenitis at the bedside.

  10. [Emergency ultrasound in patients with abdominal pain - where should we "look"].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tanja; Heinz, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is without doubt the imaging technique of choice in patients with acute abdominal pain. Point-of-care ultrasound examinations can help to reduce the number of possible differential diagnoses by exclusion or - as a best case scenario - show us directly the correct diagnosis. Hence patients can benefit from a very early appropriate therapeutic approach. This article illustrates where and how we should "look". After focusing on basic technical settings, typical pathological sonomorphologic changes in patients with some of the most important illnesses are characterized (e. g. acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, acute diverticulitis, acute pancreatitis and urinary tract occlusion). Ultrasound beginners are the target group of this survey.

  11. A case of abdominal pain with dyslipidemia: difficulties diagnosing cholesterol ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, S J; Daimee, U; Block, R C

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol ester storage disease is an exceptionally rare dyslipidemia with less than 150 cases reported in the medical literature. The diagnosis of Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease is often missed by virtue of the fact that the symptoms mimic both inborn metabolic defects and hepatic steatosis. Patients with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease usually present with atypical complaints including abdominal pain from altered gut motility. Blood analysis typically reveals abnormal liver function tests with coincident dyslipidemia. We present a case of a young woman with Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease who was followed over two decades. We discuss issues common to her initial protracted diagnosis with management options over time.

  12. 73-year-old woman with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.R.

    1987-03-20

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a six-day history of abdominal pain that had started in the epigastrium, but recently had become more intense in the right lower quadrant. Peptic ulcer had been diagnosed three years prior to presentation and had been managed medically. On physical examination, epigastric tenderness as well as guarding and rebound tenderness in the right lower quandrant were present. Mild leukocytosis was reported. Computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm retrocecal mass with low attenuation (fluid content) surrounded by an irregularly thickened uncalcified wall. Multiple areas of tissue debris were seen extending into the mass, but no true separation was present.

  13. A 23-year-old Man with Leptospirosis and Acute Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Momal; Kao, Janet J

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis caused by the spirochete Leptospira interrogans. Most cases of leptospirosis are mild to moderate, and self-limited. The course of disease, however, may be complicated by multiorgan dysfunction such as in Weil's disease. We present a case of Weil's disease with pancreatitis in a young Caucasian man residing in Hawai‘i. Although leptospirosis is common in Hawai‘i, few patients present with pancreatitis. This report of leptospirosis-induced pancreatitis should help raise awareness of clinicians to assess for pancreatitis when evaluating a patient with leptospirosis and acute abdominal pain. PMID:27738562

  14. [Retroperitoneal benign cyst with osseous metaplasia as the cause of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali; Clausen, Marianne Engell; Achiam, Michael

    2014-12-15

    A 27-year-old female patient with no previous medical history, presented a computed tomography displaying a calcified retroperitoneal cyst. The patient had experienced occasional abdominal pain in her right side. The tumour was found in the retroperitoneum, was non-adherent to neighbouring organs and was excised laparoscopically without postoperative complications. Histology revealed a benign, cystic mass, with calcification and osseous metaplasia in the cyst wall, and no epithelia. The material of the cyst was amorphic and necrotic. No other retroperitoneal masses alike has been described in the literature.

  15. Psychological factors in childhood headaches.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Kathleen; Dunn, David; Scott, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Recurrent headaches in children are most often migraines and are based in a genetic predisposition with a low headache threshold. As with any pain experience, there is a large emotional component associated with an attack of migraines that grows in amplitude as the headaches become more frequent and resistant to medicine, sleep, or other agents that used to work. Childhood headaches are especially complicated for 3 reasons: (1) the parents' fear (communicated to the child that serious medical pathology underlies the head pain), (2) the lack of evidence-based pharmacologic treatment, and (3) the belief that these headaches are largely psychological. This article addresses the mystery surrounding childhood headaches by delving into the influence of school, friends, and family; the impact of divorce; the coping skills required for a child to manage a migrainous nervous system; the potential secondary gain from headaches; psychiatric comorbidities and how to treat them; and the role of psychological intervention.

  16. The Management of Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Most patients who complain of recurrent headaches have migraine, muscle contraction headache, or both. At a patient's first office visit for headache, the family physician should carry out a physical and neurological examination. The type of headache and factors that can precipitate it may then be explained, and the patient should be advised to take only simple analgesics for pain, as soon as he recognizes the first symptom of headache. A daily diary can help reveal specific factors that precipitate the patient's headaches. He can also benefit from educational material, and be taught relaxation techniques to ease headache pain. At least one follow up office visit is necessary in order to emphasize and review instructions from the previous assessment, and to give the patient an opportunity to consider the explanation and problems and voice any remaining concerns or questions. PMID:21278963

  17. Exercise related transient abdominal pain: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) is more commonly known to athletes as a runner’s stitch. Many athletes also report shoulder tip pain (STP) associated with the ETAP. Although widely known, ETAP remains under analyzed and under reported in the medical literature. Often thought of as benign and self-limiting, ETAP has been shown to be very detrimental to the performance of many athletes from novice to elite. This case report of an elite triathlete with ETAP and subsequent review of literature, outlines the various theories about the etiology of ETAP, the epidemiology associated with it, some differentials to consider, and how chiropractic care may benefit those suffering from ETAP. PMID:20037690

  18. Management of postoperative pain in abdominal surgery in Spain. A multicentre drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Vallano, Antonio; Aguilera, Cristina; Arnau, Josep Maria; Baños, Josep-Eladi; Laporte, Joan-Ramon

    1999-01-01

    Participating centres: Hospital Universitario San Juan, Alicante: Maria Jesús Olaso, Javier Agulló, Clara Faura. Hospital Torrecárdenas, Almería: Carmen Fernández Sánchez, Miguel Lorenzo Campos, Juan Manuel Rodríguez Alonso. Hospital Quirúrgic Adriano, Barcelona: Carmen Alerany Pardo, Paquita Alvarez González, Teresa Martín Benito. Hospital Universitari del Mar-IMIM, Barcelona: Magí Farré, Maite Terán. Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí, Sabadell: Montserrat Cañellas, Sergio Zavala, Josep Planell. Hospital Universitari de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau: Gonzalo Calvo, Rosa Morros, Silvia Mateo. Hospital General Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona: Carmen Bosch, María José Martínez. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga: Maribel Lucena, José Antonio González, Gabriel Carranque. Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid: Emilio Vargas, Amparo Gil López-Oliva, Míriam García Mateos. Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander: Mario González, Antonio Cuadrado. Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla: Juan Antonio Durán, Pilar Máyquez, María Isabel Serrano. Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla: Jaume Torelló, Juan Ramón Castillo, María de las Nieves Merino. Aims Postoperative pain is common in hospital-admitted patients. Its management is determined by different therapeutic traditions and by the attitudes of health professionals in each hospital. The aim of this study was to describe the patterns of prescription and administration of analgesic drugs used for postoperative pain after abdominal surgery in Spanish hospitals, to know the prevalence and the severity of postoperative pain, and to determine the extent of variability in the management of postoperative pain among the participating centres. Methods The study was a multicentre descriptive cross-sectional drug utilization study in 12 Spanish hospitals. The subjects were an unselected sample of consecutive patients undergoing abdominal

  19. Nocturnal hydration--an effective modality to reduce recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Obideen, Kamil; Wehbi, Mohammad; Hoteit, Maarouf; Cai, Qiang

    2006-10-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis are common problems associated with some patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). There is no known effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent pancreatitis in such patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether nocturnal hydration (NH) prevents recurrent abdominal pain and recurrent acute pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF. Adult CF patients who were referred to our Pancreatic Diseases Clinic for recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis were enrolled in the study. Each patient was encouraged to drink plenty of water during the night and established a 6-month diary (3 months before and 3 months after NH was initiated), recording the frequency and severity of their abdominal pain, the amount of pain medication taken, and the volume of their water intake. We also reviewed the number of doctor's clinic visits, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations for about 1 year before and 1 year after the initiation of the NH. The frequency and the severity of abdominal pain in this group of patients were significantly reduced. The amount of pain medication and the number of emergency room visits and hospitalizations for abdominal pain and acute pancreatitis were reduced. NH is a simple and cost-effective method to prevent recurrent abdominal pain and pancreatitis in patients with adult-onset CF.

  20. Bilateral simultaneous femoral neck fracture mimicking abdominal pain in a cerebral palsy patient.

    PubMed

    Mariani, P; Buttaro, M; Comba, F; Zanotti, E; Ali, P; Piccaluga, F

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are unusual lesions, generally associated with an underlying condition which causes impaired bone mineralization, triggered by an increased bone stress. We present a 24-year-old cerebral palsy patient, who was previously evaluated in another institution due to inability to walk, interpreted as abdominal pain. No alteration in blood analysis or abdominal X-rays was found. As no response to treatment was observed, a new abdominal X-ray was taken, which incidentally depicted bilateral medial femoral neck fracture. He was referred to our practice after a resection arthroplasty was offered in another institution. After admission, bilateral one-stage THA was performed. Several reports emphasize bone disease as a major precipitating factor, and there is an increased incidence of hip fractures in chronic epilepsy, renal osteodystrophy, and chronic steroid use. Femoral head resection has been proven to be effective in immobilized patients, whereas this was not a reasonable option in this patient who presented walking ability. Despite the treatment election, primary care physicians should be aware of and alert to the possibility of fractures in patients with neurological disorders and calcium metabolism alterations. Late diagnosis of orthopedic injuries in this type of patients may lead to permanent disability. PMID:25506016

  1. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain: Utility of computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Eugene Mun Wai; Venkatesh, Sudhakar Kundapur

    2009-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is a common surgical condition that is usually managed with early surgery, and is associated with low morbidity and mortality. However, some patients may have atypical symptoms and physical findings that may lead to a delay in diagnosis and increased complications. Atypical presentation may be related to the position of the appendix. Ascending retrocecal appendicitis presenting with right upper abdominal pain may be clinically indistinguishable from acute pathology in the gallbladder, liver, biliary tree, right kidney and right urinary tract. We report a series of four patients with retrocecal appendicitis who presented with acute right upper abdominal pain. The clinical diagnoses at presentation were acute cholecystitis in two patients, pyelonephritis in one, and ureteric colic in one. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen at presentation showed subhepatic collections in two patients and normal findings in the other two. Computed tomography (CT) identified correctly retrocecal appendicitis and inflammation in the retroperitoneum in all cases. In addition, abscesses in the retrocecal space (n = 2) and subhepatic collections (n = 2) were also demonstrated. Emergency appendectomy was performed in two patients, interval appendectomy in one, and hemicolectomy in another. Surgical findings confirmed the presence of appendicitis and its retroperitoneal extensions. Our case series illustrates the usefulness of CT in diagnosing ascending retrocecal appendicitis and its extension, and excluding other inflammatory conditions that mimic appendicitis. PMID:19630119

  2. Tongue piercing and chronic abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting--two cases.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung Kyu; Chung, Danielle; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of unclear etiology are frustrating to patients and physicians alike. The integrative medicine procedures of acupuncture and neural therapy may provide treatment options. Tongue piercing, which is prevalent in 5.6% of the adolescent population, may be a contributing factor in upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To demonstrate the usefulness of an integrative medicine treatment approach in two cases of patients with chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting of unclear etiology who had failed standard medical management. (2) To identify scars from tongue piercings as a possible contributing factor in chronic upper GI symptoms of unclear etiology. Two retrospective case studies are presented of young adult females who were seen in a private multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the US. The patients were treated with neural therapy and acupuncture. The desired outcome was the cessation or reduction of the frequency of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Both patients had resolution of their symptoms. From this study, we have concluded the following: (1) Tongue scars from tongue rings may be causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal symptoms. (2) Neural therapy and acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of chronic upper GI symptoms related to tongue scars.

  3. Acute right lower abdominal pain in women of reproductive age: Clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoglu, Sinan; Hatipoglu, Filiz; Abdullayev, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study possible gynecological organ pathologies in the differential diagnosis of acute right lower abdominal pain in patients of reproductive age. METHODS: Following Clinical Trials Ethical Committee approval, the retrospective data consisting of physical examination and laboratory findings in 290 patients with sudden onset right lower abdominal pain who used the emergency surgery service between April 2009 and September 2013, and underwent surgery and general anesthesia with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis were collated. RESULTS: Total data on 290 patients were obtained. Two hundred and twenty-four (77.2%) patients had acute appendicitis, whereas 29 (10%) had perforated appendicitis and 37 (12.8%) had gynecological organ pathologies. Of the latter, 21 (7.2%) had ovarian cyst rupture, 12 (4.2%) had corpus hemorrhagicum cyst rupture and 4 (1.4%) had adnexal torsion. Defense, Rovsing’s sign, increased body temperature and increased leukocyte count were found to be statistically significant in the differential diagnosis of acute appendicitis and gynecological organ pathologies. CONCLUSION: Gynecological pathologies in women of reproductive age are misleading in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:24744594

  4. Pseudoappendicitis: abdominal pain arising from thoracic spine dysfunction-a forgotten entity and a reminder of an important clinical lesson.

    PubMed

    Garo-Falides, Basil; Wainwright, Thomas William

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic abdominal pain can be mimicked by thoracic spine dysfunction. However, it is comparatively rare and there is frequently a delay in its diagnosis that may lead to unnecessary surgery, or the patient's symptoms being undiagnosed or labelled psychosomatic. The failure to associate thoracic spine dysfunction with abdominal pain persists, despite it being first recognised over 80 years ago. 2 recent such cases are presented. The clinical presentation and diagnostic tests are described, with clear explanation of the treatment and outcome. The case for including the thoracic spine examination in the assessment of patients presenting with acute abdominal or postappendectomy pain that is of unexplained origin is made. PMID:27651405

  5. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  6. Medical diagnosis aboard submarines. Use of a computer-based Bayesian method of analysis in an abdominal pain diagnostic program.

    PubMed

    Osborne, S F

    1984-02-01

    The medical issues that arise in the isolated environment of a submarine can occasionally be grave. While crewmembers are carefully screened for health problems, they are still susceptible to serious acute illness. Currently, the submarine medical department representative, the hospital corpsman, utilizes a history and physical examination, clinical acumen, and limited laboratory testing in diagnosis. The application of a Bayesian method of analysis to an abdominal pain diagnostic system utilizing an onboard microcomputer is described herein. Early results from sea trials show an appropriate diagnosis in eight of 10 cases of abdominal pain, but the program should still be viewed as an extended "laboratory test" until proved effective at sea.

  7. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePlus

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  8. Mebeverine for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pourmoghaddas, Zahra; Saneian, Hossein; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Gholamrezaei, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an antispasmodic, mebeverine, in the treatment of childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP). Children with FAP (n = 115, aged 6-18 years) received mebeverine (135 mg, twice daily) or placebo for 4 weeks. Response was defined as ≥ 2 point reduction in the 6-point pain scale or "no pain." Physician-rated global severity was also evaluated. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the trial (44 with mebeverine). Per-protocol and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses were conducted. Treatment response rate in the mebeverine and placebo groups based on per-protocol [ITT] analysis was 54.5% [40.6%] and 39.5% [30.3%] at week 4 (P = 0.117 [0.469]) and 72.7% [54.2%] and 53.4% [41.0] at week 12, respectively (P = 0.0503 [0.416]). There was no significant difference between the two groups in change of the physician-rated global severity score after 4 weeks (P = 0.723) or after 12 weeks (P = 0.870) in per-protocol analysis; the same results were obtained in ITT analysis. Mebeverine seems to be effective in the treatment of childhood FAP, but our study was not able to show its statistically significant effect over placebo. Further trials with larger sample of patients are warranted. PMID:25089264

  9. Severe Abdominal Pain Caused by Lead Toxicity without Response to Oral Chelators: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vossoughinia, Hassan; Pourakbar, Ali; Esfandiari, Samaneh; Sharifianrazavi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman was referred to the Emergency Surgery Department with severe abdominal pain, icterus, and anemia. The patient’s clinical and paraclinical findings in addition to her occupational and social history, convinced us to assay blood lead level (BLL), which was 41/5 μg/dL. Therefore toxicology consult was performed to treat lead toxicity. Recheck of the BLL showed the level as 53/7 μg/dL. So oral chelator with succimer was started. Despite consumption of oral chelator, there was no response and the pain continued. Because our repeated evaluations were negative, we decided to re-treat lead poisoning by intravenous and intramuscular chelators. Dimercaprol (BAL) + calcium EDTA was started, and after 5 days, the pain relieved dramatically and the patient was discharged. We recommend more liberal lead poisoning therapy in symptomatic patients, and also suggest parenteral chelator therapy, which is more potent, instead of oral chelators in patients with severe symptoms. PMID:26933485

  10. Mebeverine for Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saneian, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an antispasmodic, mebeverine, in the treatment of childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP). Children with FAP (n = 115, aged 6–18 years) received mebeverine (135 mg, twice daily) or placebo for 4 weeks. Response was defined as ≥2 point reduction in the 6-point pain scale or “no pain.” Physician-rated global severity was also evaluated. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the trial (44 with mebeverine). Per-protocol and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses were conducted. Treatment response rate in the mebeverine and placebo groups based on per-protocol [ITT] analysis was 54.5% [40.6%] and 39.5% [30.3%] at week 4 (P = 0.117 [0.469]) and 72.7% [54.2%] and 53.4% [41.0] at week 12, respectively (P = 0.0503 [0.416]). There was no significant difference between the two groups in change of the physician-rated global severity score after 4 weeks (P = 0.723) or after 12 weeks (P = 0.870) in per-protocol analysis; the same results were obtained in ITT analysis. Mebeverine seems to be effective in the treatment of childhood FAP, but our study was not able to show its statistically significant effect over placebo. Further trials with larger sample of patients are warranted. PMID:25089264

  11. [Lead poisoning. A surprising cause of constipation, abdominal pain and anemia].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Kačírková, Petra; Kučerová, Irena; Ševčík, Rudolf; Sánchez, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on patient that has been presented with sudden onset of constipation, abdominal pain and normocytic anemia. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy ruled out an organic diseases. In peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirates mears, coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte (and erythroblasts) point out a possibility of heavy metal poisoning. The level of plumbemia exceeded 8.4 times the maximal permitted value for common (non-professional) population. A source of poisoning was indentified from a glaze on a ceramic jug, from which the patient had drank tea with lemon for three months. A lead concentration in the tea extract was 227 mg/kg. In developed countries, lead poisoning is a rare diagnosis. As the symptoms are nonspecific, missed diagnoses could occur, especially in sporadic, non-occupational exposure. However, a microscopic evaluation of the peripheral bloods mear with finding of predominantly coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte mayle ad to suspicion of lead poisoning. PMID:27172444

  12. Water Load Test in Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: No Relation to Food Intake and Nutritional Status.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Roberto Koity Fujihara; Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; Speridião, Patricia da Graça Leite; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the relations between the water load test in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders with food intake and nutritional status. Patients with functional dyspepsia required a lower maximum water intake to produce fullness (n = 11, median = 380 mL) than patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n = 10, median = 695 mL) or functional abdominal pain (n = 10, median = 670 mL) (P < 0.05). Among patients who ingested ≤560 mL (n = 17) or >560 mL (n = 14) in the water load test, there was no relation between the maximum drinking capacity and food intake, body mass index, or height. PMID:26317680

  13. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Arash; Afsharfard, Abolfazl; Atqiaee, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. PMID:27563479

  14. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass

    PubMed Central

    Afsharfard, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. PMID:27563479

  15. [Lead poisoning. A surprising cause of constipation, abdominal pain and anemia].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Kačírková, Petra; Kučerová, Irena; Ševčík, Rudolf; Sánchez, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on patient that has been presented with sudden onset of constipation, abdominal pain and normocytic anemia. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy ruled out an organic diseases. In peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirates mears, coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte (and erythroblasts) point out a possibility of heavy metal poisoning. The level of plumbemia exceeded 8.4 times the maximal permitted value for common (non-professional) population. A source of poisoning was indentified from a glaze on a ceramic jug, from which the patient had drank tea with lemon for three months. A lead concentration in the tea extract was 227 mg/kg. In developed countries, lead poisoning is a rare diagnosis. As the symptoms are nonspecific, missed diagnoses could occur, especially in sporadic, non-occupational exposure. However, a microscopic evaluation of the peripheral bloods mear with finding of predominantly coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte mayle ad to suspicion of lead poisoning.

  16. Spontaneous superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Watring, Nicole J; Smith, Corbett M; Stokes, Gordon K; Counselman, Francis L

    2010-11-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department with a 4-day history of severe, sharp left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting. She had been seen 3 days prior at another Emergency Department, and had a negative work-up including a normal non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis for possible kidney stone. Vital signs were: temperature 36.3°C (97.3°F), pulse 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure 141/80 mm Hg. Physical examination was remarkable for marked tenderness in the left upper and middle quadrants and voluntary guarding. Bowel sounds were normal. Although laboratory studies were normal, a CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast suggested a superior mesenteric artery dissection. This was confirmed with arteriography. The clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of superior mesenteric artery dissection are reviewed.

  17. Abdominal pain and hematuria: duodenal perforation from ingested foreign body causing ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Nina; Sisson, Kathleen; Albaran, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) ingestion is a relatively common reason for visits to the emergency room. If the FB is symptomatic or damaging to the patient, either endoscopic or surgical intervention should ensue. We present a case of abdominal pain and hematuria beginning ∼24 h after an incidental FB ingestion. Initial CT imaging defined a linear opacity perforating through the posterior duodenal wall abutting the ureter causing inflammation and hydronephrosis. After two unsuccessful endoscopic attempts at retrieval, we were able to identify the object with the aid of intraoperative fluoroscopy and surgically remove the FB. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged home. Posterior duodenal perforation by an FB may not manifest with obvious localized or systemic symptoms unless the perforation involves surrounding structures such as the aorta, vena cava or ureter. In such cases, surgical intervention is required for FB removal. PMID:26903557

  18. Abdominal pain and hematuria: duodenal perforation from ingested foreign body causing ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kolbe, Nina; Sisson, Kathleen; Albaran, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) ingestion is a relatively common reason for visits to the emergency room. If the FB is symptomatic or damaging to the patient, either endoscopic or surgical intervention should ensue. We present a case of abdominal pain and hematuria beginning ∼24 h after an incidental FB ingestion. Initial CT imaging defined a linear opacity perforating through the posterior duodenal wall abutting the ureter causing inflammation and hydronephrosis. After two unsuccessful endoscopic attempts at retrieval, we were able to identify the object with the aid of intraoperative fluoroscopy and surgically remove the FB. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged home. Posterior duodenal perforation by an FB may not manifest with obvious localized or systemic symptoms unless the perforation involves surrounding structures such as the aorta, vena cava or ureter. In such cases, surgical intervention is required for FB removal. PMID:26903557

  19. Management of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. Symptom-based Rome III criteria for FAP and IBS have been validated and help the clinician in making a positive diagnosis. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Over the years, a wide range of therapies have been proposed and studied. The lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors probably involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS, and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article reviews the current literature on the efficacy of pharmacologic, dietary and psychosocial interventions for FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:20528117

  20. Understanding and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in pediatric primary care.

    PubMed

    Schurman, Jennifer Verrill; Kessler, Emily D; Friesen, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the practices used by primary care pediatricians to assess and treat chronic abdominal pain (CAP), as an initial step in guiding clinical practice guideline (CPG) development. A survey was mailed to a random sample of office-based pediatrician members (primary care pediatricians [PCPs]) of the American Medical Association. PCPs (n = 470) provided information about the typical presentation of CAP, assessment/treatment approaches used in their own practice, their definition of a functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID), and their familiarity with the Rome Criteria for diagnosing FGIDs. Substantial variability among PCPs was noted across all these areas. Results suggest that perceptions and practices of pediatric CAP vary widely among PCPs; no single standard of care emerged to guide development of a CPG for this population. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of specific strategies currently in use to identify potential opportunities for improving assessment and treatment of CAP in pediatric primary care.

  1. Carbohydrate digestion in congenital sucrase isomaltase deficient and recurrent abdominal pain children assesed by 13C- starch breath test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starches contribute about half of the food energy needs to the weaned child's diet. Malabsorption of sucrose is associated with abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea. A genetic disorder called Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) is suspected when these symptoms follow sugar ingestion and...

  2. Early Parental and Child Predictors of Recurrent Abdominal Pain at School Age: Results of a Large Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Paul G.; Stein, Alan; Hotopf, Matthew; Wiles, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether parental psychological and physical factors and child factors measured in the first year of life were associated with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children at age 6 3/4 years. Method: A longitudinal cohort study (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), followed 8,272 children from pregnancy to age 6…

  3. Trajectories of Symptoms and Impairment for Pediatric Patients with Functional Abdominal Pain: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Shelagh; Lambert, E. Warren; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study characterizes trajectories of symptoms and impairment in pediatric patients with abdominal pain not associated with identifiable organic disease. Method: The Children's Somatization Inventory and the Functional Disability Inventory were administered four times over 5 years to 132 patients (6-18 years old) seen in…

  4. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  5. The effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise on abdominal muscle thickness and Oswestry disability index in subjects with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Doo; Yu, Seong-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise with 4 weeks using the musculoskeletal ultrasonography on muscle thickness and disability in subjects with low back pain. Twenty patients with nonspecific back pain (abdominal draw-in maneuver group: n= 10, core exercise group: n= 10) were recruited in the study. Both group received exercise intervention 3 times a week for 4weeks. The test were based on muscle thickness (transversus abdominis; Tra, internal oblique; IO and external oblique; EO), disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured immediately before and after intervention. The data was measured by SPSS program 12.0 version and analyzed by Paired t-test and Independent t-test. The following results were obtained. The thickness of IO, EO for both group significantly improved except for muscle thickness of Tra. The ODI were significant difference for both groups. As the results of this study, we suggest that it may be effective method to apply to increase for the thickness of Tra, EO using abdominal draw-in maneuver and thickness of IO using core exercise. PMID:24278873

  6. Comparison between Transdermal Buprenorphine and Transdermal Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief after Major Abdominal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Zia; Gautam, Shefali; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Opioid is generally regarded as an important part of multimodal, perioperative analgesia, especially for moderate to severe pain. Amongst the various modes of delivery transdermal route has several potential benefits over oral and parentral administration. These include noninvasive dosing, better absorption and lack of first-pass metabolism. A transdermal drug delivery system provides steady and continuous drug delivery resulting in steady plasma concentration. Bolus dosing of systemic analgesic results in supra and sub therapeutic plasma resulting in toxic and sub analgesic plasma drug concentration. It also improves patient compliance. Materials and Methods Sixty patients undergoing major abdominal surgery under GA were randomly divided in two groups (n=30). Group A received buprenorphine 10 mcg/h TDS and group B received 25 mcg/h fentanyl TDS, 6 hours prior to surgery. Patients were followed for three days for postoperative pain relief and adverse effects. Results Baseline and demographic variables are comparable in both groups. The mean level of VAS was significantly lower in group B as compared to group A at Day 1, 2 and 3. The mean level of sedation score was significantly lower in Group B than Group A. Haemodynamic variables in both groups (SBP, DBP and HR), shows comparable values in both groups and no significant difference was observed. Five out of 30 (16.7%) patients in group A required single dose of rescue analgesic while 0 out of 30 patients (0.00%) in group B required rescue analgesic. This difference in rescue analgesic requirement in not quiet statistically significant (p-value 0.0522). Twenty percent patient in fentanyl group and 16.7% patients in buprenorphine group experienced some adverse effects. Nausea and vomiting were main side effects of the drugs. The incidence of nausea and vomiting were 6.7% and 10% in buprenorphine and fentanyl group respectively. Conclusion Fentanyl and buprenorphine TDS were effective and safe in

  7. [Use of new elastomeric pumps and PCA in postoperative pain control in thoraco-abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Testa, G; Borzomati, V; Costantini, D; De Chiara, A; Picarazzi, A; Capelli, O

    1996-01-01

    36 patients submitted to interventions for thoraco-abdominal surgery has been submitted to antalgic post-operatory therapy with elastomeric pump at a continuous intravenous infusion and patient controlled analgesia (PCA). The patients have been randomized in three groups. The patients of the 1 degree group received 30 minutes before of the end of the surgical intervention 30 mg of Ketorolac. At the end of the anesthesia came started an infusion of 150 mg of Ketorolac (5 vials) in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution at the rate of 0.5 ml/h. The pump had besides the capability of disperse a maximum of 4 bolus/ h, everyone of 0.5 ml, on demand of the patient. The 2 degrees group received a solution containing 60 ml of Morphine in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution with the same formality of administration. The 3 degrees group (placebo) received 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution in pumps from infusion and Ketorolac intramuscular on demand. To the times T0 (awakening), T1 (3 h), T2 (6h), T3 (12 h), T4 (24 h), T5 (30 h, was collected algometrical consequences according to VAS (Visual Analogous Scale of Sc modification of the PA increase, FC, FR, SatO2.. The obtained results have highlighted like in the 1 degree group, to the 1 degree algometric consequence (T0), there is a good sedative effect on the pain (intensity of the middle low pain 3.70 +/- 1.64); this antalgic effect has also continued in the other consequences effected in the post-operatory. In the 2 degree group to the awakening (T0), the pain was middle-tall (5.50 +/- 2.32) and an expressive reduction appeared at the time T2 (3.60 +/- 1.35 P < 0.005). In the 3 degrees group have not recorded a diminution of the pain if not after 24 hours from the end of the intervention deposit the intramuscular antalgic therapy. In conclusion, the system infusion + PCA represents an indubitable advantage in comparison with the traditional antalgic therapy as for concern the entity of the reduction of the pain as

  8. Recognition of Spontaneous Vertebral Artery Dissection Preempting Spinal Manipulative Therapy: A Patient Presenting With Neck Pain and Headache for Chiropractic Care

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Ross; Smith, Linda W.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented to a chiropractic physician for evaluation and treatment of neck pain and headache. Clinical features A 45-year-old otherwise healthy female presented for evaluation and treatment of neck pain and headache. Within minutes, non-specific musculoskeletal symptoms progressed to neurological deficits, including limb ataxia and cognitive disturbances. Suspicion was raised for cerebrovascular ischemia and emergent referral was initiated. Intervention and outcome Paramedics were immediately summoned and the patient was transported to a local hospital with a working diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular ischemia. Multiplanar computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast revealed vertebral artery dissection of the V2 segment in the right vertebral artery. Anticoagulation therapy was administered and the patient was discharged without complications after 5 days in the hospital. Conclusion This case highlights the potential for patients with vertebral artery dissection to present with nonspecific musculoskeletal complaints. Neurological symptoms may not manifest initially, but their sudden onset indicates the possibility of an ischemic cerebrovascular event. We suggest that early recognition and emergent referral for this patient avoided potential exacerbation of an evolving pre-existing condition and resulted in timely anticoagulation treatment. PMID:25685116

  9. Lycopene, Lutein and Zeaxanthin May Reduce Faecal Blood, Mucus and Pus but not Abdominal Pain in Individuals with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Głąbska, Dominika; Guzek, Dominika; Zakrzewska, Paulina; Włodarek, Dariusz; Lech, Gustaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: The main symptom of ulcerative colitis is diarrhoea, which is often accompanied by painful tenesmus and faecal blood and mucus. It sometimes co-occurs with abdominal pain, fever, feeling of fatigue, loss of appetite and weight loss. Some dietary factors have been indicated as important in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the association between retinoid intake (total vitamin A, retinol, β-carotene, α-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin) and ulcerative colitis symptoms (abdominal pain, faecal blood, faecal mucus, faecal pus) in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission. Methods: Assessment of diet was based on self-reported data from each patient’s dietary records taken over a period of three typical, random days (2 weekdays and 1 day of the weekend). Results: A total of 56 individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission (19 males and 37 females) were recruited for the study. One in every four individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission was characterised as having inadequate vitamin A intake. Higher lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin intakes in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission were associated with lower faecal blood, mucus and pus but not with lower incidence of abdominal pain. Higher carotene intake in individuals with ulcerative colitis in remission may contribute to higher incidence of faecal mucus. Conclusions: Optimising intake of specific retinoids may enhance disease control in individuals with ulcerative colitis. Prospective studies, including patient reported and objective outcomes, are required to confirm this. PMID:27706028

  10. The Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Family Intervention and Standard Pediatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Conducted controlled clinical trial involving 44 children with recurrent abdominal pain randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral family intervention (CBFI) or standard pediatric care (SPC). Both treatments resulted in significant improvements on measures of pain intensity and pain behavior. CBFI group had higher rate of complete elimination of…

  11. Reduction of chronic abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel disease through transcranial direct current stimulation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Volz, Magdalena S; Farmer, Annabelle; Siegmund, Britta

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently associated with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proven to reduce chronic pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS in patients with CAP due to IBD. This randomized, sham-controlled, double blind, parallel-designed study included 20 patients with either Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis with CAP (≥3/10 on the visual analog scale (VAS) in 3/6 months). Anodal or sham tDCS was applied over the primary motor cortex for 5 consecutive days (2 mA, 20 minutes). Assessments included VAS, pressure pain threshold, inflammatory markers, and questionnaires on quality of life, functional and disease specific symptoms (Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Severity Scoring System [IBS-SSS]), disease activity, and pain catastrophizing. Follow-up data were collected 1 week after the end of the stimulation. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance and t tests. There was a significant reduction of abdominal pain in the anodal tDCS group compared with sham tDCS. This effect was evident in changes in VAS and pressure pain threshold on the left and right sides of the abdomen. In addition, 1 week after stimulation, pain reduction remained significantly decreased in the right side of the abdomen. There was also a significant reduction in scores on pain catastrophizing and on IBS-SSS when comparing both groups. Inflammatory markers and disease activity did not differ significantly between groups throughout the experiment. Transcranial direct current stimulation proved to be an effective and clinically relevant therapeutic strategy for CAP in IBD. The analgesic effects observed are unrelated to inflammation and disease activity, which emphasizes central pain mechanisms in CAP.

  12. Surgery for Abdominal Wall Pain Caused by Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment in Children-A Single Institution Experience in the Last 5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Žganjer, Mirko; Bojić, Davor; Bumči, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) is a serious medical condition which needs to be approached with great attention. Chronic abdominal pain may be caused by entrapment of cutaneous branches of intercostal nerves (ACNES). Objectives The aim of this study is the surgery for abdominal wall pain which caused by cutaneous nerve entrapment in children during last 5 years. Materials and Methods In all children with ACNES, we tried conservative treatment with anesthetic and steroid injections. In children who were refractory to conservative treatment, we received surgical procedure like sectioning the entrapped nerve to obtain relief. Results In 12 pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain, we diagnosed ACNES. Each presented with abdominal pain and a positive Carnett sign. Local nerve blocks using anesthetic and steroid injections are the treatment. In all patients, we tried with local nerve block. In 3 patients, pain improvement occurs in the few minutes, and they were without pain after 5 days. In other 4 patients required a reinjection for pain recurrence. In one patients pain was gone. The maximum reinjection was 3. In other 5 patients, we did operative treatment like sectioning the entrapped nerve. Conclusions Some children with CAP have ACNES. In all children with ACNES, we recommended local nerve blocks. If the local block in 3 times is not helping, neurectomy of the peripheral nerve is method of choice. PMID:23682329

  13. Splenic infarction – A rare cause of acute abdominal pain following gastric surgery: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Pinar; Kaya, Cemal; Isil, Gurhan; Bozkurt, Emre; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes in gastric cancer surgery is indispensable for treating gastric cancers located in the proximal third of the stomach. Splenic vascular injury is a matter of debate resulting on time or delayed splenectomy. We aimed to share our experience and plausible mechanisms causing this complication in two case reports. Case presentations Two male patients with gastric cancer were diagnosed with acute splenic infarction following gastric surgery in the early postoperative period. Both underwent emergent exploratory laparotomy. Splenectomy was performed due to splenic infarction. Discussion Because we observed this rare complication in recent patients whose surgery was performed using vessel-sealing device for splenic hilar dissection, we suggested that extensive mobilization of the surrounding tissues of splenic vascular structures hilum using the vessel sealer could be the reason. Conclusion In case of acute abdominal pain radiating to left shoulder, splenic complications should be taken into consideration in gastric cancer patients performed radical gastrectomy. Meticulous dissection of splenic hilar lymph nodes should be carried out to avoid any splenic vascular injury. PMID:25818369

  14. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Li; Zhong, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS. PMID:27366194

  15. Selenoether oxytocin analogues have analgesic properties in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Aline Dantas; Mobli, Mehdi; Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Vetter, Irina; Dekan, Zoltan; Muttenthaler, Markus; Wan, JingJing; Lewis, Richard J; King, Glenn F; Brierley, Stuart M; Alewood, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Poor oral availability and susceptibility to reduction and protease degradation is a major hurdle in peptide drug development. However, drugable receptors in the gut present an attractive niche for peptide therapeutics. Here we demonstrate, in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain, that oxytocin receptors are significantly upregulated in nociceptors innervating the colon. Correspondingly, we develop chemical strategies to engineer non-reducible and therefore more stable oxytocin analogues. Chemoselective selenide macrocyclization yields stabilized analogues equipotent to native oxytocin. Ultra-high-field nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of native oxytocin and the seleno-oxytocin derivatives reveals that oxytocin has a pre-organized structure in solution, in marked contrast to earlier X-ray crystallography studies. Finally, we show that these seleno-oxytocin analogues potently inhibit colonic nociceptors both in vitro and in vivo in mice with chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Our findings have potentially important implications for clinical use of oxytocin analogues and disulphide-rich peptides in general. PMID:24476666

  16. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of renal pelvis presenting with iterative hematuria and abdominal pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WU, SHUIQING; XU, RAN; ZHAO, HUASHENG; ZHU, XUAN; ZHANG, LEI; ZHAO, XIAOKUN

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a rare type of mesenchymal tumor, which may affect various organs. The preferential site for IMT in the genitourinary system is the urinary bladder, while the presence of IMT in the kidney, and particularly in the renal pelvis, is rare. In the present report, the case of a 43-year-old man who was admitted to the Department of Urology of The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University (Changsha, China) in July 2012, with complaints of iterative gross hematuria and abdominal pain unresponsive to antibiotics is described. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated a slightly enhanced mass in the left renal pelvis of 1.5 cm in diameter. On request of the patient, a left nephrectomy was then performed, based on a suspected diagnosis of renal pelvic carcinoma. However, analysis of the intraoperative fast-frozen section exhibited proliferation of compact spindle cells, suggesting IMT. Therefore, further ureterectomy was avoided, and the patient remained in healthy condition thereafter. PMID:26788220

  17. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS. PMID:27366194

  18. Restoration of vagal tone: a possible mechanism for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Sowder, Erik; Gevirtz, Richard; Shapiro, Warren; Ebert, Crystal

    2010-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) causes disruption of daily activities/missed school days, over utilization of healthcare, unnecessary surgeries, and anxiety in 10-15% of children. Its etiology is not clearly understood, however the success of several clinical protocols suggests that autonomic dysregulation is a factor. In this study autonomic activity, including heart rate variability (HRV), was compared between children with FAP and a comparison group. Twenty children with FAP and 10 children without FAP between the ages of 5 and 17 years old were compared on autonomic regulation using an ambulatory system at baseline and 8 weeks later. Children with FAP participated in 6 sessions of HRV biofeedback aimed at normalizing autonomic balance. At baseline, children with FAP appear to have more autonomic dysregulation than children without FAP. After completing HRV biofeedback, the FAP group was able to significantly reduce their symptoms in relation to significantly increasing their autonomic balance. In a sample of children with FAP, it appears that HRV biofeedback treatment improved their symptoms and that a change in vagal tone was a potential mediator for this improvement. The present study appears to point to excessive vagal withdrawal as an underlying mechanism of FAP. PMID:20229150

  19. Anchitrema sanguineum (Digenea: Anchitrematidae) Accidentally Found during Colonoscopy of a Patient with Chronic Abdominal Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kusolsuk, Teera; Paiboon, Nantana; Pubampen, Somchit; Maipanich, Wanna; Dekumyoy, Paron

    2009-01-01

    In November 2007, a 46-year-old male Thai patient presented with chronic abdominal pain for over 3 years. Colonoscopy revealed a small parasite of about 2 × 1 mm in size attached to the cecum mucosa. The worm was removed endoscopically, fixed, and stained for morphological observations. The specimen was identified as Anchitrema sanguineum (Digenea: Anchitrematidae), a trematode first reported in a reptile, Chamaeleo vulgaris, from Egypt, and then sporadically found in the intestines of insectivorous bats and other mammals. The patient was treated with praziquantel but no more worms were found in his stool. His symptoms improved slightly but not cured completely. It remains unclear whether the chronic abdominal pain of the patient was caused by this trematode infection. Whatever is the pathogenicity of this trematode, this is the first human case of A. sanguineum infection in the literature. PMID:19488424

  20. Renal infarction due to spontaneous dissection of the renal artery: an unusual cause of non-visceral type abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kang, James H-E; Kang, Jin-Yong; Morgan, Robert

    2013-09-18

    A 44-year-old man presented with very severe right upper quadrant pain of sudden onset. This was exacerbated by movement but unaffected by food or defaecation. It was continuous-day and night -but resolved over a 1-week period. The physical examination was normal at presentation, by which time the pain had resolved. His white cell count, alanine transaminase and C reactive protein were elevated but normalised after 10 days. An abdominal CT showed low density lesions in the right kidney consistent with segmental infarcts. CT angiogram showed a dissection of the right renal artery. The patient remained asymptomatic and normotensive when reviewed 1 month later.

  1. Cases in Space Medicine: Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain in a Female Crewmember on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Scheuring, Richard; Jones, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    A case study of a medical emergency aboard the International Space Station is reviewed. The case involves a female crewmember who is experiencing acute abdominal pain. The interplay of the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) and the NASA Flight Surgeon is given. Possible diagnoses, and advised medical actions are reviewed. Along the case study questions are posed to the reader, and at the end answers are given.

  2. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  3. Clinical Case of the Month: A 48-Year-Old Man With Fever and Abdominal Pain of One Day Duration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mary; Tadin, David; Conrad, Erich J; Lopez, Fred A

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man residing in a mental health department inpatient program with a history of schizoaffective disorder presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of fever and intense abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated he initially fell in the shower and afterwards experienced back pain. He was transferred to an acute care unit within the facility for further evaluation. The facility physician noted that the patient had a mild temperature elevation and abdominal rigidity on exam. At that time, he was given two doses of benztropine intramuscularly, and transferred to our hospital for further evaluation. The patient exhibited fever, diffuse abdominal pain and a nonproductive cough, but denied chills, dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, weakness, diarrhea, melena or hematochezia. He did have a one-week history of constipation for which he was given sodium phosphate enemas, magnesium citrate and docusate sodium, eventually resulting in a bowel movement. He also complained of new onset dysphagia. There were no recent changes to his medications, which included clonazepam, divalproex sodium extended release, olanzapine and risperidone. He denied use of tobacco, alcohol or illicit drugs. PMID:27159603

  4. Changes in muscle strength and pain in response to surgical repair of posterior abdominal wall disruption followed by rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, A; Herrington, L; Blower, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Posterior abdominal wall deficiency (PAWD) is a tear in the external oblique aponeurosis or the conjoint tendon causing a posterior wall defect at the medial end of the inguinal canal. It is often known as sportsman's hernia and is believed to be caused by repetitive stress. Objective: To assess lower limb and abdominal muscle strength of patients with PAWD before intervention compared with matched controls; to evaluate any changes following surgical repair and rehabilitation. Methods: Sixteen subjects were assessed using a questionnaire, isokinetic testing of the lower limb strength, and pressure biofeedback testing of the abdominals. After surgery and a six week rehabilitation programme, the subjects were re-evaluated. A control group were assessed using the same procedure. Results: Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was not affected by this condition. A deficit hip muscle strength was found on the affected limb before surgery, which was significant for the hip flexors (p = 0.05). Before surgery, 87% of the patients compared with 20% of the controls failed the abdominal obliques test. Both the injured and non-injured sides had improved significantly in strength after surgery and rehabilitation. The strength of the abdominal obliques showed the most significant improvement over the course of the rehabilitation programme. Conclusions: Lower limb muscle strength may have been reduced as the result of disuse atrophy or pain inhibition. Abdominal oblique strength was deficient in the injured patients and this compromises rotational control of the pelvis. More sensitive investigations (such as electromyography) are needed to assess the link between abdominal oblique function and groin injury. PMID:12547744

  5. Acupuncture in primary headache treatment.

    PubMed

    Schiapparelli, Paola; Allais, Gianni; Rolando, Sara; Airola, Gisella; Borgogno, Paola; Terzi, Maria Grazia; Benedetto, Chiara

    2011-05-01

    Acupuncture has a long tradition of use for the treatment of many pain conditions, including headache. Its effectiveness has been studied mainly for primary headaches, particularly for migraine and tension-type headache (TTH). Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has two diagnostic frameworks for headaches: meridian diagnoses, based on the location of the pain and on the meridians (or channels) that pass through it; syndrome diagnoses, dependent on external or internal factors and on the characteristics of the pain. The four meridians involved in headache are Shaoyang (TE-GB channels, on the temporal sides of the head); Taiyang (SI-BL channels, occiput); Yangming (LI-ST channels, forehead) and Jueyin (PC-LR channels, vertex). The syndromes may be due to excess or deficit. Very generally, the excess syndromes correspond in the majority of cases to migraine and the deficit syndromes to TTH. Acupuncture is a complex intervention, which is also characterized by a close interaction between patient and therapist. The complicated system of TCM classification of headaches has frequently generated great diversity among the various therapeutic approaches used in the different studies on acupuncture in headache treatment. Despite these differences, the recent Cochrane systematic reviews on acupuncture in migraine and in TTH suggest that acupuncture is an effective and valuable option for patients suffering from migraine or frequent TTH. Moreover, acupuncture seems to be a cost-effective treatment.

  6. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Psychological Therapies for Children With Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Lauren; Palermo, Tonya M.; de C Williams, Amanda C; Lau, Jennifer; Eccleston, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the effects of psychological therapies for management of chronic pain in children. Methods Randomized controlled trials of psychological interventions treating children (<18 years) with chronic pain conditions including headache, abdominal, musculoskeletal, or neuropathic pain were searched for. Pain symptoms, disability, depression, anxiety, and sleep outcomes were extracted. Risk of bias was assessed and quality of the evidence was rated using GRADE. Results 35 included studies revealed that across all chronic pain conditions, psychological interventions reduced pain symptoms and disability posttreatment. Individual pain conditions were analyzed separately. Sleep outcomes were not reported in any trials. Optimal dose of treatment was explored. For headache pain, higher treatment dose led to greater reductions in pain. No effect of dosage was found for other chronic pain conditions. Conclusions Evidence for psychological therapies treating chronic pain is promising. Recommendations for clinical practice and research are presented. PMID:24602890

  7. Headache (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Headaches are usually caused by either muscle tension, vascular problems, or both. Migraines are vascular in origin, and may be preceded by visual disturbances, loss of peripheral vision, and fatigue. ...

  8. A Rare Cause of Postoperative Abdominal Pain in a Spinal Fusion Patient.

    PubMed

    Horn, Pamela L; Beeb, Allan C; King, Denis R

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a 12-year-old girl who underwent an uncomplicated posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation for scoliosis and who later developed nausea, emesis, and abdominal pain. We discuss the epidemiology, prevalence, anatomic findings, symptoms, diagnostic tests, and clinical management, including nonsurgical and surgical therapies, of superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS), a rare condition. Over a 2-week period, the patient developed an uncommon type of bowel obstruction likely related to her initial thin body habitus, correction of her deformity, and weight loss after surgery. The patient returned to the operating room for placement of a Stamm gastrostomy feeding tube with insertion of a transgastric-jejunal (G-J) feeding tube. The patient had the G-J feeding tube in place for approximately 6 weeks to augment her enteral nutrition. As she gained weight, her duodenal emptying improved, and she gradually transitioned to normal oral intake. She has done well since the G-J feeding tube was removed. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a relatively common procedure, and SMAS is a rare condition. However, in the case of an asthenic adolescent with postoperative weight loss, intestinal obstruction can develop. When planning operative spinal correction in scoliosis patients who have a low body mass index at the time of surgery and who have increased thoracic stiffness, be alert for signs and symptoms of SMAS. This rare complication can develop, and timely diagnosis and medical management will decrease morbidity and shorten the length of time needed for nutritional rehabilitation. PMID:26372764

  9. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  10. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  11. Tension headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... OTC) pain medicines, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen Narcotic pain relievers Muscle relaxers Be aware that: ... to overuse of pain medicine. Taking too much acetaminophen can damage your liver. Too much ibuprofen or ...

  12. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  13. Indomethacin-responsive headaches.

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin-responsive headaches are a heterogeneous group of primary headache disorders distinguished by their swift and often absolute response to indomethacin. The epidemiology of these conditions is incompletely defined. Traditionally, indomethacin-responsive headaches include a subset of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua), Valsalva-induced headaches (cough headache, exercise headache, and sex headache), primary stabbing headache, and hypnic headache. These headache syndromes differ in extent of response to indomethacin, clinical features, and differential diagnoses. Neuroimaging is recommended to investigate for various organic causes that may mimic these headaches. Case reports of other primary headache disorders that also respond to indomethacin, such as cluster headache, nummular headache, and ophthalmoplegic migraine, have been described. These "novel" indomethacin-responsive headaches beg the question of what headache characteristics are required to qualify a headache as an indomethacin-responsive headache. Furthermore, they challenge the concept of using a therapeutic intervention as a diagnostic criterion.

  14. Psychological distress and stressful life events in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Julia; Brehmer, Hannah; Hirschfeld, Gerrit; Zernikow, Boris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little knowledge regarding the association between psychological factors and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in children. Specifically, it is not known which factors precipitate CRPS and which result from the ongoing painful disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as the experience of stressful life events in children with CRPS compared with children with chronic primary headaches and functional abdominal pain. METHODS: A retrospective chart study examined children with CRPS (n=37) who received intensive inpatient pain treatment between 2004 and 2010. They were compared with two control groups (chronic primary headaches and functional abdominal pain; each n=37), who also received intensive inpatient pain treatment. Control groups were matched with the CRPS group with regard to admission date, age and sex. Groups were compared on symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as stressful life events. RESULTS: Children with CRPS reported lower anxiety and depression scores compared with children with abdominal pain. A higher number of stressful life events before and after the onset of the pain condition was observed for children with CRPS. CONCLUSIONS: Children with CRPS are not particularly prone to symptoms of anxiety or depression. Importantly, children with CRPS experienced more stressful life events than children with chronic headaches or abdominal pain. Prospective long-term studies are needed to further explore the potential role of stressful life events in the etiology of CRPS. PMID:26035287

  15. Familial limb pain and migraine: 8-year follow-up of four generations

    PubMed Central

    Angus-Leppan, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background Migraine limb pain may be under-recognized in adults and children. There is little information about familial forms of this disorder. Objectives To describe the clinical and inheritance patterns of familial migraine limb pain over four generations and to review the evidence for limb pain as a manifestation of migraine. Methods Prospective clinical and pedigree analysis with an 8-year follow-up of 27 family members. Results Eight members of the family had benign recurrent limb pain associated with headache in a dominant inheritance pattern. Limb pain occurred before, during or after the headache, with probable or definite migraine with aura, migraine without aura and lower-half headache. The limb pain fulfilled the International Headache Society criteria for aura in six patients and also occurred without headache in three. Four members of the family had recurrent abdominal pain and/or motion sickness in childhood. Conclusions This is the first report of dominant familial limb pain temporally associated with migraine headache, starting in adulthood or starting in childhood and continuing into adulthood. A search for a genetic marker is indicated. Limb pain should be included as a childhood periodic syndrome linked to migraine and recognized as part of the migraine spectrum in adults. PMID:26646786

  16. Serum, Saliva, and Urine Irisin with and Without Acute Appendicitis and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Aydin, Suleyman; Sarac, Mehmet; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kalayci, Mehmet; Artas, Gokhan; Yardim, Meltem; Kazez, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A 112-amino-acid protein irisin (IRI) is widely expressed in many organs, but we currently do not know whether appendix tissue and blood cells express it. If appendix tissue and neutrophil cells express IRI, measuring its concentration in biological fluids might be helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), since neutrophil cells are the currently gold-standard laboratory parameters for the diagnosis of AA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based measurements of the proposed myokine IRI for the discrimination of patients with AA from those with acute abdominal pain (AP) and healthy controls. Moreover, immunoreactivity to IRI was investigated in appendix tissues and blood cells. Samples were collected on admission (T1), 24 hours (T2), and 72 hours (T3) postoperatively from patients with suspected AA and from patients with AP corresponding to T1–T3, whereas control subject blood was once corresponding to T1. IRI was measured in serum, saliva, and urine by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas in appendix tissue and blood cells, IRI was detected by immunohistohcemistry. Appendix tissue and blood cells (except for erythrocytes) are new sources of IRI. Basal saliva, urine, and serum levels were higher in children with AA compared with postoperative levels (T2) that start to decline after surgery. This is in line with the finding that IRI levels are higher in children with AA when compared with those with AP or control subject levels, most likely due to a large infiltration of neutrophil cells in AA that release its IRI into body fluids. Measurement of IRI in children with AA parallels the increase or decrease in the neutrophil count. This new finding shows that the measurement of IRI and neutrophil count can together improve the diagnosis of AA, and it can distinguish it from AP. IRI can be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of AA and offers an additional parameter to

  17. Neural Plasticity in Common Forms of Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Protsenko, Ekaterina; Cheng, Yu-Chen; Loggia, Marco L.; Coppola, Gianluca; Chen, Wei-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Headaches are universal experiences and among the most common disorders. While headache may be physiological in the acute setting, it can become a pathological and persistent condition. The mechanisms underlying the transition from episodic to chronic pain have been the subject of intense study. Using physiological and imaging methods, researchers have identified a number of different forms of neural plasticity associated with migraine and other headaches, including peripheral and central sensitization, and alterations in the endogenous mechanisms of pain modulation. While these changes have been proposed to contribute to headache and pain chronification, some findings are likely the results of repetitive noxious stimulation, such as atrophy of brain areas involved in pain perception and modulation. In this review, we provide a narrative overview of recent advances on the neuroimaging, electrophysiological and genetic aspects of neural plasticity associated with the most common forms of chronic headaches, including migraine, cluster headache, tension-type headache, and medication overuse headache. PMID:26366304

  18. Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of great clinical significance in several areas of medicine. In many cases no organic cause can be established resulting in the classification as functional gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common of these conditions and is considered an important public health problem because it can be disabling and constitutes a major social and economic burden given the lack of effective treatments. IBS aetiology is most likely multi-factorial involving biological, psychological and social factors. Visceral hyperalgesia (or hypersensitivity) and visceral hypervigilance, which could be mediated by peripheral, spinal, and/or central pathways, constitute key concepts in current research on pathophysiological mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. The role of central nervous system mechanisms along the "brain-gut axis" is increasingly appreciated, owing to accumulating evidence from brain imaging studies that neural processing of visceral stimuli is altered in IBS together with long-standing knowledge regarding the contribution of stress and negative emotions to symptom frequency and severity. At the same time, there is also growing evidence suggesting that peripheral immune mechanisms and disturbed neuro-immune communication could play a role in the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia. This review presents recent advances in research on the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia in IBS, with a focus on the role of stress and anxiety in central and peripheral response to visceral pain stimuli. Together, these findings support that in addition to lower pain thresholds displayed by a significant proportion of patients, the evaluation of pain appears to be altered in IBS. This may be attributable to affective disturbances, negative emotions in anticipation of or during visceral stimulation, and altered pain-related expectations and learning processes. Disturbed "top-down" emotional and cognitive pain

  19. Reliability of ultrasound measurement of automatic activity of the abdominal muscle in participants with and without chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) imaging has been considered as a non-invasive technique to measure thickness and estimate relative abdominal muscle activity. Although some studies have assessed the reliability of US imaging, no study has assessed the reliability of US measurement of automatic activity of abdominal muscles in positions with different levels of stability in participants with chronic low back pain (cLBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate within-day and between-days reliability of US thickness measurements of automatic activity of the abdominal muscles in asymptomatic participants and within-day reliability in those with cLBP. Methods A total of 20 participants (10 with cLBP, 10 healthy) participated in the study. The reliability of US thickness measurements at supine lying and sitting positions (sitting on a chair, sitting on a gym ball with both feet on the ground or lifting one foot off the floor) were assessed. We evaluated within-day reliability in all participants and between-days reliability in asymptomatic participants. Results We found high ICC scores (0.85-0.95) and also small SEM and MDC scores in both groups. The reliability of the measurements was comparable between participants with and without LBP in each position but the SEMs and MDCs was slightly higher in patient group compared with healthy group. It indicates high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all positions. Conclusion US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of automatic activity of abdominal muscles in positions with low levels of stability in participants with and without LBP. PMID:24479859

  20. Allergies and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... vasoactive or neuroactive amino acids such as tyramine , dopamine, phenylethylamine or monosodium glutamate that can trigger a ... Headache Fact Sheets Tags: allergy , allergy and headache , dopamine , headache , migraine , sinus headache , tyramine More Posts ← Tension- ...

  1. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve pain due to: Cancer Carpal tunnel syndrome Fibromyalgia Childbirth (labor) Musculoskeletal injuries (such as the neck, ... pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine headache Tension headache Both ...

  2. Comparison of the Effects of pH-Dependent Peppermint Oil and Synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + Fructooligosaccharides) on Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Asgarshirazi, Masoumeh; Shariat, Mamak; Dalili, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Still there is no consensus on the best treatment for abdominal pain-related functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (FGIDs). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharide (FOS)), peppermint oil (Colpermin) and placebo (folic acid) on abdominal pain-related FGIDs except for abdominal migraine. Patients and Methods: This placebo-controlled study was conducted on 120 children aged 4 - 13 years to compare the efficacy of pH-dependent peppermint oil (Colpermin) versus synbiotic Lactol (Bacillus coagulans + fructooligosaccharids (FOS)) in decreasing duration, severity and frequency of functional abdominal pain. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups (n = 40 in each group) and each group received Colpermin or Lactol or placebo. Results: Eighty-eight out of 120 enrolled patients completed a one-month protocol and analyses were performed on 88 patients’ data. Analyses showed that improvement in pain duration, frequency and severity in the Colpermin group was better than the placebo group (P = 0.0001, P = 0.0001 and P = 0.001, respectively). Moreover, pain duration and frequency were decreased in the Lactol group more than the placebo (P = 0.012 and P = 0.0001, respectively), but changes in pain severity were not significant (P = 0.373). Colpermin was superior to Lactol in decreasing pain duration and severity (P = 0.040 and P = 0.013, respectively). No known side effects or intolerance were seen with Colpermin or Lactol. Conclusions: The pH-dependent peppermint oil capsule and Lactol tablet (Bacillus coagulans+ FOS) as synbiotics seem to be superior to placebo in decreasing the severity, duration and frequency of pain in abdominal pain-related functional GI disorders. PMID:26023339

  3. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  4. Stress and sleep duration predict headache severity in chronic headache sufferers.

    PubMed

    Houle, Timothy T; Butschek, Ross A; Turner, Dana P; Smitherman, Todd A; Rains, Jeanetta C; Penzien, Donald B

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the time-series relationships between stress, sleep duration, and headache pain among patients with chronic headaches. Sleep and stress have long been recognized as potential triggers of episodic headache (<15 headache days/month), though prospective evidence is inconsistent and absent in patients diagnosed with chronic headaches (≥15 days/month). We reanalyzed data from a 28-day observational study of chronic migraine (n=33) and chronic tension-type headache (n=22) sufferers. Patients completed the Daily Stress Inventory and recorded headache and sleep variables using a daily sleep/headache diary. Stress ratings, duration of previous nights' sleep, and headache severity were modeled using a series of linear mixed models with random effects to account for individual differences in observed associations. Models were displayed using contour plots. Two consecutive days of either high stress or low sleep were strongly predictive of headache, whereas 2 days of low stress or adequate sleep were protective. When patterns of stress or sleep were divergent across days, headache risk was increased only when the earlier day was characterized by high stress or poor sleep. As predicted, headache activity in the combined model was highest when high stress and low sleep occurred concurrently during the prior 2 days, denoting an additive effect. Future research is needed to expand on current findings among chronic headache patients and to develop individualized models that account for multiple simultaneous influences of headache trigger factors.

  5. The effect of aromatherapy abdominal massage on alleviating menstrual pain in nursing students: a prospective randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Tyseer M F; El-Nemer, Amina M R; Baraka, Hany N

    2013-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a common cause of sickness absenteeism from both classes and work. This study investigated the effect of aromatherapy massage on a group of nursing students who are suffering of primary dysmenorrhea. A randomized blind clinical trial of crossover design was used. In the first treatment phase, group 1 (n = 48) received aromatherapy abdominal massage once daily for seven days prior to menstruation using the essential oils (cinnamon, clove, rose, and lavender in a base of almond oil). Group 2 (n = 47) received the same intervention but with placebo oil (almond oil). In the second treatment phase, the two groups switched to alternate regimen. Level and duration of pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were evaluated at the baseline and after each treatment phase. During both treatment phases, the level and duration of menstrual pain and the amount of menstrual bleeding were significantly lower in the aromatherapy group than in the placebo group. These results suggests that aromatherapy is effective in alleviating menstrual pain, its duration and excessive menstrual bleeding. Aromatherapy can be provided as a nonpharmacological pain relief measure and as a part of nursing care given to girls suffering of dysmenorrhea, or excessive menstrual bleeding.

  6. A case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation identified by investigating the cause of upper abdominal pain associated with acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohei; Monden, Kazuteru; Ueki, Toru; Tatsukawa, Masashi; Sadamori, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Kousaku; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-07-01

    A man in his 60s with epigastric pain was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and subsequently recovered following conservative treatment. However, because of repeated upper abdominal pain and the formation of a pancreatic pseudocyst, he was transferred to our institution for evaluation. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanning confirmed abnormal vessels in the tail of the pancreas and early venous return to the splenic vein in the early arterial phase. Abdominal angiography revealed a racemose vascular network in the tail of the pancreas, confirming the presence of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in this region. This AVM was thought to be the cause of the acute pancreatitis, so a distal pancreatectomy was performed. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and there has been no recurrence at the 7-month postoperative follow-up. Surgical resection has a low recurrence rate and good outcome;thus, if a pancreatic AVM appears difficult to treat with conservative medical therapy, surgical resection appears to be the definitive treatment. PMID:27383106

  7. [Acute abdominal pain due to splenic infarction in a patient with heterozygous sickle cell disease exposed to high altitude].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Semba, Edgar; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Jiménez Bustamante, Jorge; Arteaga Caro, Ronal; García Del Aguila, José Luis; Chávez Gil, Vannya

    2006-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathy S, Depranocytosis or Sickle Cell Disease is the most common hemoglobinopathy in the world. In its heterozygous form (Sickle Cell Trait), it affects 8% of the black population in the U.S. and 25% of the black population in Africa, and is found less frequently in the Mediterranean area, India, Middle East and Latin America. The basic alteration is a substitution of glutamic acid by valin in the sixth position of the beta globin chain, which causes polymerization at low oxygen tension thereby distorting the structure of erythrocytes and increasing blood viscosity, which, in turn, generates obstructions of the capillary arterial blood flow to different areas of the body thus causing microinfarctions. Although Splenic Infarction is rare, it is recognized as a serious complication of Heterozygous Sickle Cell Disease (Sickle Cell Trait). We present the case of a 21 year-old mestizo male patient who came in with an acute case of abdominal pain after arriving to work in the Casapalca mining city (located in the Peruvian Andes at 4200 m.a.s.l.) and was referred to our Hospital in Lima for exams. We present the case because it is an unusual cause of acute abdominal pain, and because this condition is rare in Peru and there are few publications about it. PMID:17211489

  8. A case of familial Mediterranean fever who complained of periodic fever and abdominal pain diagnosed by MEFV gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Chie; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Kisida, Dai; Kakudou, Mariko; Yazaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Akinori; Azuma, Kouta; Tsuboi, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takeo; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tetsuya; Maruoka, Momo; Tamura, Masao; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Saito, Atsushi; Nishioka, Aki; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Kitano, Masayasu; Tsunoda, Shinichiro; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Sano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

      Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease caused by Mediterranean FeVergene (MEFV) mutations on Chromosome 16, and characterized by periodic fever of and serositis. FMF is the result of gain-of-function mutations in pyrin that lead to interleukin-1β activation. FMF can be classified as "typical" and "atypical" types based on clinical finding and genetic screening. Although MEFV genotyping has enabled FMF to be confirmed in some cases, the diagnosis remains predominantly clinical since genotyping has shown that the disease is characterized by variable manifestations in Japanese. In 1976, the first report performed on the case of Japanese FMF with periodic fever of and serositis. Since 2002, genetic analyses are performed on Japanese FMF patients by K. Shiozaki et al. and N. Tomiyama et al. In our case, she was a 25-year-old Japanese woman with at periodic fever and abdominal pain. MEFV gene analysis demonstrated a heterozygous mutation of variant M694I, leading to a diagnosis of FMF. After the increase dose (up to 3 mg/day) of colchicine, periodic fever and abdominal pain disappeared. It is the important candidate of FMF for differential diagnosis with unexplained periodic fever and serositis, such as our case. PMID:27181238

  9. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  10. Induction of prolonged tenderness in patients with tension-type headache by means of a new experimental model of myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Mørk, H; Ashina, M; Bendtsen, L; Olesen, J; Jensen, R

    2003-05-01

    Tenderness is the most prominent abnormal finding in patients with tension-type headache (TTH). Recently we developed a model of myofascial tenderness using intramuscular infusion of a combination of bradykinin, serotonin, histamine and prostaglandin E2. We aimed to examine tenderness after this combination in patients with episodic TTH (ETTH). Fifteen patients and 15 healthy controls completed the study. Participants received the combination into the non-dominant trapezius muscle in a randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled design. Local tenderness and stimulus-response functions, mechanical pain thresholds (PPDT) in the temporal region and on the finger, and total tenderness score (TTS) were recorded. A local, prolonged, and mild to moderate tenderness was reported both in patients (P = 0.001) and in controls (P = 0.001) after the combination compared with the placebo. The response to the combination tended to be increased in patients. The stimulus-response function was leftward shifted after the combination, compared with baseline in both groups. No changes in PPDT or TTS were found after the infusions, whereas baseline PPDTs were decreased in ETTH compared with controls (PPDTfinger: P = 0.033; PPDTtemporal: P = 0.015). Intramuscular infusion of a combination of endogenous substances induced prolonged tenderness in both patients with episodic TTH and healthy subjects. The present results suggest an increased excitability of peripheral muscle afferents in TTH.

  11. Evaluation of Transient Pin-Stress Requirements for Spacecraft Launching in Lightning Environments. Pain Free Analysis to Alleviate Those Pin Stress Headaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul; Terseck, Alex; Trout, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft are generally protected from direct lightning attachment by encapsulation within the payload fairing of a launch vehicle and the ground structures that exist at the launch site. Regardless of where lightning strikes, potentially damaging indirect effects prevail from the coupling of electromagnetic fields into a loop created by outer shield of the payload umbilical. The energy coupled into individual spacecraft circuits is dependent on the umbilical current drive, the cable transfer impedance and the source/ load circuitry, and the reference potential used. Lightning induced transient susceptibility of the spacecraft avionics needs to be fully understood in order to define realistic re-test criteria in the event of a lightning occurrence during the launch campaign. Use of standards such as RTCA/DO-160 & SAE 5412 has some applicability but do not represent the indirect environment adequately. This paper evaluates the launch pad environments, the measurement data available, and computer simulations to provide pain-free analysis to alleviate the transient pin-stress headaches for spacecraft launching in Lightning environments.

  12. Headache during airplane travel ("airplane headache"): first case in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kararizou, Evangelia; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Paraskevas, George P; Vassilopoulou, Sofia D; Naoumis, Dimitrios; Kararizos, Grigoris; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2011-08-01

    Headache related to airplane flights is rare. We describe a 37-year-old female patient with multiple intense, jabbing headache episodes over the last 3 years that occur exclusively during airplane flights. The pain manifests during take-off and landing, and is located always in the left retro-orbital and frontotemporal area. It is occasionally accompanied by dizziness, but no additional symptoms occur. Pain intensity diminishes and disappears after 15-20 min. Apart from occasional dizziness, no other symptoms occur. The patient has a history of tension-type headache and polycystic ovaries. Blood tests and imaging revealed no abnormalities. Here, we present the first case in Greece. We review the current literature on this rare syndrome and discuss on possible pathophysiology and the investigation of possible co-factors such as anxiety and depression.

  13. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  14. [The effect of combination epidural anesthesia techniques in upper abdominal surgery on the stress reaction, pain control and respiratory mechanics].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, B; Leibe, S; Kätzel, R; Grube, U; Landgraf, R; Bierwolf, B

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-eight patients undergoing upper abdominal operations (mainly selective proximal vagotomy [SPV]) were referred for assessment of the hormonal metabolic reaction (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], arginine vasopressin [AVP], cortisol, and glucose), the postoperative pain reaction, and respiration according to the method of anesthesia (group 1: neuroleptanesthesia [NLA], group 2: NLA in combination with epidural opiate analgesia, group 3: NLA in combination with local anesthesia). To alleviate postoperative pain piritramide was systematically administered in group 1, whereas in groups 2 and 3 a thoracic epidural catheter was injected with morphine or bupivacaine. Postoperative analgesia was better in patients with epidural administration than in those with systemic application. On the 1st and 2nd postoperative days the vital capacity was statistically significantly higher by 10%-15% in groups 2 and 3 than in group 1. As expected, the neurohormonal and metabolic stress response was highest in all patients in the intraoperative and immediate postoperative phases: ACTH, AVP, and glucose levels were in most cases significantly higher compared with the initial values. However, cortisol levels decreased intraoperatively, probably as a result of the generally used induction agent etomidate. Comparison of the three methods of anesthesia revealed that all mean hormone levels analyzed in group 2 patients were lower both intraoperatively and 2 h postoperatively, which implies that epidurally administered morphine reduces the stress reaction, probably indirectly through additional selective alleviation of pain at the spinal cord level. The various differences in hormonal reactions of patients in groups 1 and 3 gave no clear evidence, however, of possible mitigation of the stress reaction by epidural local anesthetics in upper abdominal operations.

  15. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  16. Abdominal pain and swelling as an initial presentation of spinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Elgendy, Akram Y; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (Pott's disease) is one of the common extra-pulmonary presentations of tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis commonly presents with back pain, fever and night sweats. In this report, we present a case of spinal tuberculosis complicated by bilateral large psoas abscesses. The patient presented with bilateral flank pain and swellings rather than the classic presentation of back pain. The aim of this report is to draw the attention of physicians to this uncommon presentation of spinal tuberculosis, as an early recognition of such condition may expedite diagnosis and treatment, thereby preventing future complications of the disease. PMID:24554681

  17. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  18. Headaches prior to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, L. L.

    1988-06-01

    In two surveys of headaches it was noted that their incidence had increased significantly within 48 h prior to earthquakes from an incidence of 17% to 58% in the first survey using correlated samples and from 20.4% to 44% in the second survey using independent samples. It is suggested that an increase in positive air ions from rock compression may trigger head pain via a decrease in brain levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The findings are presented as preliminary, with the hope of generating further research efforts in areas more prone to earthquakes.

  19. Tension Type Headache.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fernández-de-Las-Penas, César

    2016-01-01

    Tension type headache (TTH) is the most common headache and it has been discussed for years without reaching consensus on its pathophysiology, or proper rationale management. This primary headache remains a challenge into its management for clinicians. This review aims to provide an updated and critical discussion on what is currently known and supported by scientific evidence about TTH and which gaps there still may be in our understanding of this condition. Clinical features of TTH resemble common manifestations of muscle referred pain. Episodic TTH may evolve into the chronic form by different aspects and several triggers may be involved at the same time. Both peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms seem to be clearly involved in this process. Individuals with episodic TTH exhibit higher levels of peripheral excitability whereas chronic TTH clearly show central sensitization manifestations. The role of associated muscle hyperalgesia seems to be important factors in TTH. Therapeutic management of individuals with TTH should be multimodal including appropriate use of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to reduce the nociceptive peripheral drive to the central nervous system. If properly applied, treatment may not only reduce the number of TTH attacks but may also prevent or delay the transition from episodic to chronic TTH. Scientific evidence of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment is discussed in this review. PMID:26717946

  20. Prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients in adult age-group undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery and correlation of intensity of pain and satisfaction with analgesic management: A cross-sectional single institute-based study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Saikia, Priyam; Lahakar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Considering the paucity of regional data, this study was designed to investigate the prevalence of post-operative pain and determine if there exists any correlation between the intensity of post-operative pain and patient's level of satisfaction with their pain management after inpatient abdominal surgery at an academic tertiary care government centre. Methods: Pain intensity was measured in 120 patients with numeric rating scale at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day. A questionnaire was used to measure the level of satisfaction with nurse's and doctor's response to their pain and overall pain management. Results: The prevalence of post-operative pain was 84.17%, 92.5% and 96.66% at the fifth post-operative hour, second and third post-operative day, respectively. Less number of patients experienced severe intensity pain on the third post-operative day (P = 0.00046), whereas the number of patients experiencing mild pain increased (P < 0.000) compared to the fifth post-operative hour. The number of patients with complete analgesia decreased on the third post-operative day (P = 0.001 compared to fifth post-operative day). The Spearman correlation coefficient between pain score on the third post-operative day and level of satisfaction with nurse's response, doctor's response to pain and the overall pain management was − 0.0218 (P = 0.8107), 0.1307 (P = 0.1553) and 0.0743 (P = 0.4195), respectively. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of acute post-operative pain in patients undergoing inpatient abdominal surgery at our institute. There is a weak correlation between the intensity of pain and level of satisfaction with pain management. PMID:27761037

  1. Just another abdominal pain? Psoas abscess-like metastasis in large cell lung cancer with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Vera; Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Dias, João Lopes; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 69-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and previous pulmonary tuberculosis, who presented to the emergency department with abdominal and low back pain, anorexia and weight loss, rapidly evolving into shock. An initial CT scan revealed pulmonary condensation with associated cavitation and an iliopsoas mass suggestive of a psoas abscess. He was admitted in an intensive care unit unit; after a careful examination and laboratory assessment, the aetiology was yet undisclosed. MRI showed multiple retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies, bulky nodular adrenal lesions and bilateral iliac lytic lesions. Hypocortisolism was detected and treated with steroids. A CT-guided biopsy to the psoas mass and lytic lesions identified infiltration of non-small lung carcinoma. The patient died within days. Psoas metastases and adrenal insufficiency as initial manifestations of malignancy are rare and can be misdiagnosed, particularly in the absence of a known primary tumour. PMID:26063108

  2. Parasitic Infection of the Gallbladder: Cystoisospora belli Infection as a Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain and Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Matthew G; Lee, Johnathan Y

    2016-06-01

    Herein we describe two cases of Cystoisospora belli infection of the gallbladder in patients with chronic abdominal pain and review the published literature to date. C. belli is an intracellular protozoan parasite that typically infects the small bowel of immunocompromised hosts. Little is known of the significance of C. belli infection of the gallbladder at this point as only four cases have been reported as yet, only one of which occurred in an immunocompetent patient. It is often treatable with antibiotics, and the patient's immune status, including HIV testing, should be investigated. Neither of the patients at our institution was found to be immunocompromised, and HIV-1/2 antibody testing was non-reactive in both. PMID:27526491

  3. Altered response of the anterolateral abdominal muscles to simulated weight-bearing in subjects with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Cassar, Lana; Williams, Michelle; Wilson, Stephen J.; Richardson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    An important aspect of neuromuscular control at the lumbo-pelvic region is stabilization. Subjects with low back pain (LBP) have been shown to exhibit impairments in motor control of key muscles which contribute to stabilization of the lumbo-pelvic region. However, a test of automatic recruitment that relates to function has been lacking. A previous study used ultrasound imaging to show that healthy subjects automatically recruited the transversus abdominis (TrA) and internal oblique (IO) muscles in response to a simulated weight-bearing task. This task has not been investigated in subjects with LBP. The aim of this study was to compare the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles among subjects with and without LBP in response to the simulated weight-bearing task. Twenty subjects with and without LBP were tested. Real-time ultrasound imaging was used to assess changes in thickness of the TrA and internal oblique IO muscles as well as lateral movement (“slide”) of the anterior fascial insertion of the TrA muscle. Results showed that subjects with LBP showed significantly less shortening of the TrA muscle (P < 0.0001) and greater increases in thickness of the IO muscle (P = 0.002) with the simulated weight-bearing task. There was no significant difference between groups for changes in TrA muscle thickness (P = 0.055). This study provides evidence of changes in motor control of the abdominal muscles in subjects with LBP. This test may provide a functionally relevant and non-invasive method to investigate the automatic recruitment of the abdominal muscles in people with and without LBP. PMID:19015895

  4. Vomiting and Hyponatremia Are Risk Factors for Worse Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Hospitalized Due to Nonsurgical Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Goren, Idan; Israel, Ariel; Carmel-neiderman, Narin n.; Kliers, Iris; Gringauz, Irina; Dagan, Amir; Lavi, Bruno; Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After initial evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), many patients complaining of abdominal pain are classified as suffering from nonsurgical abdominal pain (NSAP). Clinical characteristics and risk factors for worse prognosis were not published elsewhere. Characterizing the clinical profile of patients hospitalized due to NSAP and identifying predictor variables for worse clinical outcomes. We made a retrospective cohort analysis of patients hospitalized due to NSAP compared to matched control patients (for age, gender, and Charlson comorbidity index) hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons in a ratio of 1 to 10. We further performed in-group analysis of patients admitted due to NSAP in order to appreciate variables (clinical and laboratory parameters) potentially associated with worse clinical outcomes. Overall 23,584 patients were included, of which 2144 were admitted due to NSAP and 21,440 were matched controls. Patients admitted due to NSAP had overall better clinical outcomes: they had lower rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality (2.8% vs 5.5% and 7.9% vs 10.4% respectively, P < 0.001 for both comparisons). They also had a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (3.9 vs 6.2 days, P < 0.001). Rates of re-hospitalization within 30-days were not significantly different between study groups. Among patients hospitalized due to NSAP, we found that vomiting or hyponatremia at presentation or during hospital stay were associated with worse clinical outcomes. Compared to patients hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons, the overall prognosis of patients admitted due to NSAP is favorable. The combination of NSAP with vomiting and hyponatremia is associated with worse clinical outcomes. PMID:27057886

  5. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly. PMID:25714438

  6. Analysis of Gastric and Duodenal Eosinophils in Children with Abdominal Pain Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders According to Rome III Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) is common in children and adults. However, the mechanism of AP-FGID is not clearly known. Recently, micro-inflammation, especially eosinophilia in the gastrointestinal tract, was suggested in the pathophysiology of AP-FGID in adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of gastric and duodenal eosinophilia with pediatric AP-FGID. Methods In total, 105 pediatric patients with AP-FGID were recruited and classified into 4 subgroups based on the Rome III criteria. Eosinophil counts in the gastric and duodenal tissues of children with AP-FGID were compared to those from normal pathology references or those of children with Helicobacter pylori infection. Tissue eosinophil counts were also compared among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Results Eosinophil counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with AP-FGID than normal reference values. Duodenal eosinophil counts were higher in children with AP-FGID, but not significantly when compared with normal reference values. There were no significant differences in eosinophil counts of the stomach or duodenum among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Eosinophils counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with H. pylori infection than in those with AP-FGID. Duodenal eosinophilia was prominent in cases of H. pylori infection, but not statistically significant when compared with AP-FGID. Conclusions Our study revealed that gastric eosinophilia is associated with AP-FGID in children, regardless of the subtype of functional abdominal pain. This suggests some contribution of gastrointestinal eosinophils in the development of pediatric AP-FGID. PMID:27053514

  7. Uterine perforation and migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device in a 24-year-old patient seeking care for abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Michelle; Chalifour, Daryl S.; Anderson, Maria R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the case of a 24-year-old woman complaining of diffuse abdominal pain following insertion of an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUC). Methods A 24-year-old woman, 8 weeks postpartum, sought chiropractic care for intermittent stabbing pain in her left upper quadrant that had been present for a week. She returned 1 week later with no resolution of her complaint. She then recalled that, at her 6-week gynecological examination, she had undergone insertion of an IUC and that the abdominal pain had begun a week later. She was advised to return to her gynecologist. Subsequent evaluation by the gynecologist revealed that the IUC had perforated her uterus and had migrated to the upper left quadrant of her abdomen, where it was found anterior to the L1-2 vertebral bodies, lying in contact with the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta. To our knowledge, this is the only report of this type of presentation in a chiropractic office. Results The initial intervention with this patient included chiropractic adjustment and myofascial release. At her subsequent visit, with no resolution of her complaint, she was referred back to her gynecologist for additional evaluation. Because the IUC had perforated her uterus, she underwent emergency laparoscopic surgery. The surgery was successful, and she recovered fully. Conclusion Chiropractic physicians should consider uterine perforation by IUC in the differential diagnosis of a female patient of childbearing age seeking care for abdominal pain. PMID:22014868

  8. Young children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) followed in pediatric gastroenterology (PED-GI) vs primary pediatric care (PED): Differences in outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children with recurrent abdominal pain without alarm signs be managed in pediatric rather than specialty care. However, many of these children are seen in tertiary care. In a longitudinal examination of physical and psychological symptoms, we hypothes...

  9. Discriminative Validity of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Parent Rating Scales in Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Paul M.; Schoff, Kristin M.; Glutting, Joseph J.; Abelkop, A. Shayne

    2003-01-01

    Examined discriminative validity of the Parent Rating Scale (PRS) of the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992, Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Services). Two groups were compared: a cohort with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) (n = 49) and children from the BASC-PRS standardization sample (n = 49) matched on…

  10. Postprandial abdominal pain owing to isolated enteric duplication cyst in the superior mesenteric artery root: sonographic and magnetic resonance imaging features.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Ng, Shu-Hang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Sung, Ming-Tse; Hsieh, Chie-Song

    2011-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with postprandial abdominal pain. An abdominal sonogram revealed a retroperitoneal septated cystic lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a septated cystic lesion in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) root with a vessel originating from the proximal SMA supplying the cyst wall and a deformed adjacent aortic contour. A laparotomy was performed and confirmed the presence of an isolated enteric duplication cyst with its own blood supply from the SMA and marked perilesional adhesions to the duodenal loop and aorta. Histopathologic study was consistent with a duplication. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolated enteric duplication cyst in the superior mesenteric root with perilesional adhesion leading to postprandial abdominal pain, which was successfully relieved after surgery.

  11. Acupuncture as analgesia for non-emergent acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain and primary headache in an emergency department setting: a protocol for a parallel group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Hyung; Ryu, Ji Ho; Park, Maeng Real; Kim, Yong In; Min, Mun Ki; Park, Yong Myeon; Kim, Yu Ri; Noh, Seung Hee; Kang, Min Joo; Kim, Young Jun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Lee, Byung Ryul; Choi, Jun Yong; Yang, Gi Young

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the feasibility of acupuncture as an add-on intervention for patients with non-emergent acute musculoskeletal pain and primary headache in an emergency department (ED) setting. Methods and analysis A total of 40 patients who present to the ED and are diagnosed to have acute non-specific neck pain, ankle sprain or primary headache will be recruited by ED physicians. An intravenous or intramuscular injection of analgesics will be provided as the initial standard pain control intervention for all patients. Patients who still have moderate to severe pain after the 30 min of initial standard ED management will be considered eligible. These patients will be allocated in equal proportions to acupuncture plus standard ED management or to standard ED management alone based on computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. A 30 min session of acupuncture treatment with manual and/or electrical stimulation will be provided by qualified Korean medicine doctors. All patients will receive additional ED management at the ED physician's discretion and based on each patient's response to the allocated intervention. The primary outcome will be pain reduction measured at discharge from the ED by an unblinded assessor. Adverse events in both groups will be documented. Other outcomes will include the patient-reported overall improvement, disability due to neck pain (only for neck-pain patients), the treatment response rate, the use of other healthcare resources and the patients’ perceived effectiveness of the acupuncture treatment. A follow-up telephone interview will be conducted by a blinded assessor 72±12 h after ED discharge. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). The results of this study will guide a full-scale randomised trial of acupuncture in an ED context

  12. Headaches (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... migraines. Migraines Often triggered by things like stress, sleep deprivation, and menstruation, migraine headaches can cause the following ... your child headache following a head injury or loss of consciousness headache accompanied by seizures visual changes ...

  13. Postsurgical pain outcome of vertical and transverse abdominal incision: Design of a randomized controlled equivalence trial [ISRCTN60734227

    PubMed Central

    Reidel, Margot A; Knaebel, Hanns-Peter; Seiler, Christoph M; Knauer, Christine; Motsch, Johann; Victor, Norbert; Büchler, Markus W

    2003-01-01

    Background There are two ways to open the abdominal cavity in elective general surgery: vertically or transversely. Various clinical studies and a meta-analysis have postulated that the transverse approach is superior to other approaches as regards complications. However, in a recent survey it was shown that 90 % of all abdominal incisions in visceral surgery are still vertical incisions. This discrepancy between existing recommendations of clinical trials and clinical practice could be explained by the lack of acceptance of these results due to a number of deficits in the study design and analysis, subsequent low internal validity, and therefore limited external generalisability. The objective of this study is to address the issue from the patient's perspective. Methods This is an intraoperatively randomized controlled observer and patient-blinded two-group parallel equivalence trial. The study setting is the Department of General-, Visceral-, Trauma Surgery and Outpatient Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, Medical School. A total of 172 patients of both genders, aged over 18 years who are scheduled for an elective abdominal operation and are eligible for either a transverse or vertical incision. To show equivalence of the two approaches or the superiority of one of them from the perspective of the patient, a primary endpoint is defined: the pain experienced by the patient (VAS 0–100) on day two after surgery and the amount of analgesic required (piritramide [mg/h]). A confidence interval approach will be used for analysis. A global α-Level of 0.05 and a power of 0.8 is guaranteed, resulting in a size of 86 patients for each group. Secondary endpoints are: time interval to open and close the abdomen, early-onset complications (frequency of burst abdomen, postoperative pulmonary complications, and wound infection) and late complications (frequency of incisional hernias). Different outcome variables will be ranked by patients and surgeons to assess the

  14. Medical evaluation of children with chronic abdominal pain: impact of diagnosis, physician practice orientation, and maternal trait anxiety on mothers' responses to the evaluation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sara E; Smith, Craig A; Bruehl, Stephen P; Gigante, Joseph; Walker, Lynn S

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effects of diagnosis (functional versus organic), physician practice orientation (biomedical versus biopsychosocial), and maternal trait anxiety (high versus low) on mothers' responses to a child's medical evaluation for chronic abdominal pain. Mothers selected for high (n=80) and low (n=80) trait anxiety imagined that they were the mother of a child with chronic abdominal pain described in a vignette. They completed questionnaires assessing their negative affect and pain catastrophizing. Next, mothers were randomly assigned to view one of four video vignettes of a physician-actor reporting results of the child's medical evaluation. Vignettes varied by diagnosis (functional versus organic) and physician practice orientation (biomedical versus biopsychosocial). Following presentation of the vignettes, baseline questionnaires were re-administered and mothers rated their satisfaction with the physician. Results indicated that mothers in all conditions reported reduced distress pre- to post-vignette; however, the degree of the reduction differed as a function of diagnosis, presentation, and anxiety. Mothers reported more post-vignette negative affect, pain catastrophizing, and dissatisfaction with the physician when the physician presented a functional rather than an organic diagnosis. These effects were significantly greater for mothers with high trait anxiety who received a functional diagnosis presented by a physician with a biomedical orientation than for mothers in any other condition. Anxious mothers of children evaluated for chronic abdominal pain may be less distressed and more satisfied when a functional diagnosis is delivered by a physician with a biopsychosocial rather than a biomedical orientation.

  15. Does mechanical massage of the abdominal wall after colectomy reduce postoperative pain and shorten the duration of ileus? Results of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc-Louvry, Isabelle; Costaglioli, Bruno; Boulon, Catherine; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of mechanical abdominal massage on postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. We hypothesized that parietal abdominal stimulation could counteract induced pain and postoperative ileus, through common spinal-sensitive pathways, with nociceptive visceral messages. After preoperative randomization, 25 patients (age 52 +/- 5 years) underwent active mechanical massage by intermittent negative pressure on the abdominal wall resulting in aspiration (Cellu M50 device, LPG, Valence, France), and 25 patients (age 60 +/- 6 years) did not receive active mechanical massage (placebo group). Massage sessions began the first day after colectomy and were performed daily until the seventh postoperative day. In the active-massage group, amplitude and frequency were used, which have been shown to be effective in reducing muscular pain, whereas in the placebo group, ineffective parameters were used. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, doses of analgesics (propacetamol), and delay between surgery and the time to first passage of flatus were assessed. Types and dosages of the anesthetic drugs and the duration of the surgical procedure did not differ between groups. From the second and third postoperative days, respectively, VAS pain scores (P < 0.001) and doses of analgesics (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in patients receiving active massage compared to the placebo group. Time to first passage of flatus was also significantly shorter in the active-massage group (1.8 +/- 0.3 days vs. 3.6 +/- 0.4 days, P < 0.01). No adverse effects were observed. These results suggest that mechanical massage of the abdominal wall may decrease postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. PMID:11986017

  16. Hypoalgesia Related to Elevated Resting Blood Pressure is Absent in Adolescents and Young Adults with a History of Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bruehl, Stephen; Dengler-Crish, Christine M.; Smith, Craig A.; Walker, Lynn S.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated resting blood pressure (BP) is hypoalgesic in healthy individuals, but this effect is absent in adults with chronic somatic pain. This study tested whether BP-related hypoalgesia is similarly altered in individuals with a history of chronic visceral pain in childhood. Resting BP was assessed in 94 adolescents and young adults with a known history of childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 55 comparable healthy controls. Responses to an acute heat pain stimulus were then evaluated following exposure to two laboratory stressors. A significant Participant Type X Systolic BP (SBP) interaction (p<.005) revealed that elevated resting SBP was associated with significantly higher heat pain threshold (p<.001) in healthy controls, but was unrelated to pain threshold in the FAP group. A similar pattern was observed for heat pain tolerance, with elevated SBP linked to significantly higher pain tolerance (p<.05) in healthy controls, but unrelated to tolerance in the FAP group. Dysfunction in BP-related hypoalgesia associated with FAP was evident regardless of whether childhood FAP had resolved or still persisted at the time of laboratory testing. Subgroup analyses indicated that BP-related hypoalgesia (in healthy controls) and FAP-linked absence of this hypoalgesia was observed only among females. Result suggest that childhood visceral chronic pain may be associated with relatively long-lasting dysfunction in overlapping systems modulating pain and BP that persists even after FAP resolves. Potential implications for later hypertension risk are discussed. PMID:20122805

  17. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder.

    PubMed

    DuPen, Melissa M; van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Langer, Shelby L; Murphy, Tasha B; Romano, Joan M; Levy, Rona L

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child's pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7-12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child's pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child's ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  18. Exposure-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Children with Abdominal Pain: A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olén, Ola; Bonnert, Marianne; Hedman, Erik; Serlachius, Eva; Ljótsson, Brjánn

    2016-01-01

    Background Children with pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (P-FGIDs) have an increased risk for school absenteeism, depression, anxiety and low quality of life. Exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has shown large treatment effects in adults with irritable bowel syndrome, but has not been tested for children 8–12 years with P-FGIDs. Aim The aim of this trial was to test the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a newly developed exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs. Method The children (n = 20) with a P-FGID, were referred by their treating physicians. The participants received 10 weekly sessions of exposure-based CBT and were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. Results Children improved significantly on the primary outcome measure pain intensity at post (Cohen’s d = 0.40, p = 0.049) and at 6-month follow-up (Cohen’s d = 0.85, p = 0.004). Improvements were also seen in pain frequency, gastrointestinal symptoms, quality of life, depression, anxiety, school absenteeism and somatic symptoms. Improvements were maintained or further increased at 6-month follow-up. The children engaged in the exposures and were satisfied with the treatment. Conclusions Exposure-based CBT for children with P-FGIDs is feasible, acceptable and potentially efficacious. PMID:27736943

  19. Crystal-Associated Colitis with Ulceration Leading to Hematochezia and Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Meeta; Reiprich, Aaron; Khov, Nancy; Yang, Zhaohai; Mathew, Abraham; Levenick, John

    2016-01-01

    Lower GI bleeding is a common cause for hospitalization in adults. Medication-associated mucosal injury is an important clinical entity that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 3-month history of intermittent abdominal cramping and rectal bleeding. Her medical history was extensive and included end-stage renal disease and a remote history of endometrial carcinoma that was treated with radiation. Initial workup was concerning for ischemic and radiation colitis, however, histology was most consistent with acute inflammation and ulceration associated with crystal fragments. Sevelamer and cholestyramine are commonly used ion-exchange resins that have been associated with mucosal damage. Both medications were discontinued and her symptoms resolved. Our case highlights an underrecognized but important cause of hematochezia. PMID:27482192

  20. Crystal-Associated Colitis with Ulceration Leading to Hematochezia and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Meeta; Reiprich, Aaron; Khov, Nancy; Yang, Zhaohai; Mathew, Abraham; Levenick, John

    2016-01-01

    Lower GI bleeding is a common cause for hospitalization in adults. Medication-associated mucosal injury is an important clinical entity that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 3-month history of intermittent abdominal cramping and rectal bleeding. Her medical history was extensive and included end-stage renal disease and a remote history of endometrial carcinoma that was treated with radiation. Initial workup was concerning for ischemic and radiation colitis, however, histology was most consistent with acute inflammation and ulceration associated with crystal fragments. Sevelamer and cholestyramine are commonly used ion-exchange resins that have been associated with mucosal damage. Both medications were discontinued and her symptoms resolved. Our case highlights an underrecognized but important cause of hematochezia. PMID:27482192

  1. Headache in divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, W P; Ott, M C

    2001-03-01

    The increasing popularity of scuba diving has added a new category to the differential diagnosis of headache. Headache in divers, while uncommon and generally benign, can occasionally signify serious consequences of hyperbaric exposure such as arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, and otic or paranasal sinus barotrauma. Inadequate ventilation of compressed gases can lead to carbon dioxide accumulation, cerebral vasodilatation, and headache. Other types of headache encountered in divers include exertional headache, cold stimulus headache, migraine, tension-type headache, acute traumatic headache, cervicogenic headache, carbon monoxide poisoning headache, and headache associated with envenomation. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment require a careful history and neurologic examination as well as an understanding of the unique physiologic stresses of the subaquatic environment.

  2. Frontal headache induced by osteoma of frontal recess.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Soo

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of osteoma involving the frontal recess, which presented as frontal headache and reviewed literatures. Also, this case highlights that sinunasal osteomas can cause pain by local mass effects, referred pain, or prostaglandin E2-mediated mechanisms.

  3. Unilateral headache with features of hemicrania continua and cervicogenic headache--a case report.

    PubMed

    Rothbart, P

    1992-10-01

    A case is presented which has features of Cervicogenic Headache and of Hemicrania Continua. A sudden maneuver of the neck and later a greater occipital nerve block, both resulted in relief of the pain. A cervical cause is suggested.

  4. Psychological therapies for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Eccleston, Christopher; Palermo, Tonya M; de C Williams, Amanda C; Lewandowski, Amy; Morley, Stephen; Fisher, Emma; Law, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain affects many children, who report severe pain, distressed mood, and disability. Psychological therapies are emerging as effective interventions to treat children with chronic or recurrent pain. This update adds recently published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to the review published in 2009. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of psychological therapies, principally cognitive behavioural therapy and behavioural therapy, for reducing pain, disability, and improving mood in children and adolescents with recurrent, episodic, or persistent pain. We also assessed the risk of bias and methodological quality of the included studies. Search methods Searches were undertaken of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycLIT. We searched for RCTs in references of all identified studies, meta-analyses and reviews. Date of most recent search: March 2012. Selection criteria RCTs with at least 10 participants in each arm post-treatment comparing psychological therapies with active treatment were eligible for inclusion (waiting list or standard medical care) for children or adolescents with episodic, recurrent or persistent pain. Data collection and analysis All included studies were analysed and the quality of the studies recorded. All treatments were combined into one class: psychological treatments; headache and non-headache outcomes were separately analysed on three outcomes: pain, disability, and mood. Data were extracted at two time points; post-treatment (immediately or the earliest data available following end of treatment) and at follow-up (at least three months after the post-treatment assessment point, but not more than 12 months). Main results Eight studies were added in this update of the review, giving a total of 37 studies. The total number of participants completing treatments was 1938. Twenty-one studies addressed treatments for headache (including migraine); seven for abdominal pain; four included mixed pain conditions including headache pain, two

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  6. Headaches and exercise.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-related headache is one of the most common medical problems affecting the modern-day athlete. Despite the high prevalence of headache in community populations, the epidemiology of sports-related headache is unclear. In certain collision sports, up to 50% of athletes report regular headaches as a consequence of their athletic participation. The classification of the different types of sport-related headache by the International Headache Society (IHS) and in previously published articles does not adequately encompass the clinical problem faced by team physicians. Confusion exists where terms such as 'effort headache' and 'exertional headache' may be used to describe similar entities. In this review, the specific headache entities discussed include benign exertional headache, effort headache, acute post-traumatic headache and cervicogenic headache. For the sports physician, an understanding of the variety of specific headache syndromes that occur with particular sports is necessary for everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the common exercise-related headache syndromes and attempts to provide a framework for their overall management. Team physicians also need to be cognisant that many of the standard preparations used to treat headaches may be banned drugs under International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules. PMID:10999425

  7. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  8. Effect of leuprolide acetate in treatment of abdominal pain and nausea in premenopausal women with functional bowel disease: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mathias, J R; Clench, M H; Abell, T L; Koch, K L; Lehman, G; Robinson, M; Rothstein, R; Snape, W J

    1998-06-01

    We have previously reported impressive results in using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog, leuprolide acetate (Lupron), in the treatment of moderate to severe symptoms (especially abdominal pain and nausea) in patients with functional bowel disease (FBD). Pain is the hallmark of patients with FBD, and there is no consistent therapy for the treatment of these patients. The purpose of the present study was to expand the investigation to study similar patients (menstruating females) in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study using Lupron Depot (which delivers a continuous dose of drug for one month), 3.75 mg (N = 32) or 7.5 mg (N = 33), or placebo (N = 35) given intramuscularly every four weeks for 16 weeks. Symptoms were assessed using daily diary cards to record abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, anorexia, bloating, and altered bowel habits. Additional assessment tools were quality of life questionnaires, psychological profile, oral-to-cecal transit using the hydrogen breath test, antroduodenal manometry, reproductive hormone levels, and global evaluations by both patient and investigator. Patients in both Lupron Depot-treated groups showed consistent improvement in symptoms; however, only the Lupron Depot 7.5 mg group showed a significant improvement for abdominal pain and nausea compared to placebo (P < 0.001). Patient quality of life assessments and global evaluations completed by both patient and investigators were highly significant compared to placebo (P < 0.001). All reproductive hormone levels significantly decreased for both Lupron Depot-treated groups by week 4 and were significantly different compared to placebo at week 16 (P < 0.001). This study shows that leuprolide acetate is effective in controlling the debilitating symptoms of abdominal pain and nausea in patients with FBD.

  9. Modular headache theory.

    PubMed

    Young, W B; Peres, M F; Rozen, T D

    2001-10-01

    Many people experience headaches that do not fulfil the International Headache Society's criteria for a specific headache disorder yet behave biologically like that disorder. Others fulfil criteria for one headache disorder and yet have features of another disorder. To explain these observations, we propose that groups of neurones called modules become activated to produce each symptom of a primary headache disorder, and that each module is linked to other modules that together produce an individual's headache. This theory has implications for the classification, research and treatment of primary and secondary headache patients.

  10. Hemodialysis-related headache.

    PubMed

    Sav, Murat Yusuf; Sav, Tansu; Senocak, Elif; Sav, Nadide Melike

    2014-10-01

    Headache is one of the most frequently encountered neurological symptoms during hemodialysis. According to International Classification of Headache criteria dialysis-related headache was defined as the headache occurring during hemodialysis with no specific characteristic. It resolves spontaneously within 72 hours after the hemodialysis session ends. There are few studies in the literature investigating the clinical features of dialysis headache. The pathophysiology of hemodialysis-related headache is not known, but various triggering factors have been identified, including changes in blood pressure, serum sodium and magnesium levels during hemodialysis sessions, caffeine deprivation and stress. The aim of this article is to evaluate and analyze features of headache in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  11. Patients Presenting to the Emergency Unit with Gynaecological Lower Abdominal Pain, with and without Pathological Clinical Findings – Service Utilisation, Pain History, Implications

    PubMed Central

    Siedentopf, F.; Wowro, E.; Möckel, M.; Kentenich, H.; David, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the utilisation of emergency gynaecological services, although lower abdominal pain (LAP) is one of the most common symptoms prompting emergency presentation. Although such pain may be caused by potentially life-threatening gynaecological diseases, very often no clinical cause is found. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of emergency presentations in order to enable quicker identification of real emergencies in routine clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Standardised, so-called first aid cards of 1066 consecutive patients with LAP presenting acutely to one emergency unit were analysed in this retrospective, cross-sectional study. Results: Over one third of cases did not constitute actual medical emergencies on objective criteria, with investigations yielding “no pathological findings”. Parameters were identified that more often lead to hospital admission, e.g. palpation of a mass/resistance or at least one pathological ultrasound finding. In addition, it was found that symptoms of longer duration (average 8 days), and not only acute LAP, were also often experienced by patients as emergencies. Conclusion: A diagnosis of “no pathological findings”, which was common in our study, suggests a subjective experience of an emergency from the patientʼs point of view, although the possibility of unrecognised pathology has to be borne in mind. Apart from functional disorders, the origins of symptoms may include psychosomatic causes and psychosocial problems, which cannot be further defined in the emergency care setting. Also, the phenomenon of increased utilisation of emergency services parallel to the assumed opening hours of routine outpatient care facilities must be seen in a critical light. PMID:27681519

  12. Patients Presenting to the Emergency Unit with Gynaecological Lower Abdominal Pain, with and without Pathological Clinical Findings – Service Utilisation, Pain History, Implications

    PubMed Central

    Siedentopf, F.; Wowro, E.; Möckel, M.; Kentenich, H.; David, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the utilisation of emergency gynaecological services, although lower abdominal pain (LAP) is one of the most common symptoms prompting emergency presentation. Although such pain may be caused by potentially life-threatening gynaecological diseases, very often no clinical cause is found. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of emergency presentations in order to enable quicker identification of real emergencies in routine clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Standardised, so-called first aid cards of 1066 consecutive patients with LAP presenting acutely to one emergency unit were analysed in this retrospective, cross-sectional study. Results: Over one third of cases did not constitute actual medical emergencies on objective criteria, with investigations yielding “no pathological findings”. Parameters were identified that more often lead to hospital admission, e.g. palpation of a mass/resistance or at least one pathological ultrasound finding. In addition, it was found that symptoms of longer duration (average 8 days), and not only acute LAP, were also often experienced by patients as emergencies. Conclusion: A diagnosis of “no pathological findings”, which was common in our study, suggests a subjective experience of an emergency from the patientʼs point of view, although the possibility of unrecognised pathology has to be borne in mind. Apart from functional disorders, the origins of symptoms may include psychosomatic causes and psychosocial problems, which cannot be further defined in the emergency care setting. Also, the phenomenon of increased utilisation of emergency services parallel to the assumed opening hours of routine outpatient care facilities must be seen in a critical light.

  13. Primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-07-01

    Primary headache disorders include migraine, tension-type headaches, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs). "Primary" refers to a lack of clear underlying causative pathology, trauma, or systemic disease. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing; hemicrania continua, although classified separately by the International Headache Society, shares many features of both migraine and the TACs. This article describes the features and treatment of these disorders.

  14. [Parental perception of their child's pain tolerance and abdominal postoperative analgesic requirements].

    PubMed

    Larragoiti-Correa, Eugenio; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: determinar si la tolerabilidad al dolor percibida por los padres de un menor pudiera predecir la dificultad para su control. Métodos: estudio de cohorte de niños (de 3 a 16 años) percibidos por sus padres como tolerantes (TD) y no tolerantes al dolor (NoTD), sometidos a una cirugía abdominal. El plan analgésico fue decidido por sus cirujanos tratantes. Se analizó el nivel de dolor (escala facial de Wong-Baker) y los requerimientos analgésicos (medicamento, dosis y modificaciones) a la recuperación anestésica, 24 y 48 horas después. Resultados: fueron evaluados 62 pacientes (34 percibidos como TD y 28 como NoTD). Desde la recuperación, los niños NoTD solicitaron más analgésicos (42.9 % frente a 2.9 %, p < 0.001), y en dosis altas. A las 24 horas, aunque el 87 % recibía analgesia, los NoTD requirieron más dosis extras (50 % frente a 23.5 % TD, p = 0.03). A las 48 horas, el 83 % (TD) y el 72 % (NoTD) recibían analgesia (p = 0.36), pero los NoTD aún solicitaron más dosis de rescate (46.7 % frente a 14.7 %, p = 0.01). Conclusiones: es importante detectar a los niños percibidos como NoTD antes de un procedimiento doloroso, a fin de planear una estrategia eficiente de control.

  15. [Hemicrania: primary headache].

    PubMed

    Nattero, G; Allais, G; De Lorenzo, C

    1992-01-01

    Migraine is the commonest form among the so-called primary headaches and the description of its clinical picture is lost in the mists of time. On the contrary, headaches of organic origin have only recently received a proper nosological individuation thanks to the modern technological progress achieved in the field of medicine. The migraine crisis, both with and without aura, is so typical in its clinical features that it does not require subtle instrumental methodologies to be diagnosed. In most cases a careful anamnesis provides all the elements necessary to formulate a precise diagnosis: the positive family history, the time and mode of onset of crises, the nature of head pain, the chronological stages are quite constant whatever the trigger factor may be. Some other considerations add further evidence to the primitivity of migraine. First of all, migraine can be relieved by quite structurally different drugs with different mechanisms of action. In addition, no significant relationship has ever been found between migraine and other pathologies.

  16. Radiofrequency treatment of cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha, Miguel; Peñarrocha, Maria; Calvo, Ana; Jiménez, Alejandro; March, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In the clinical management of facial pain, a possible cervical origin must be considered. A clinical exploration is therefore essential. The disorder originates in the intimate connections between the cranial portion of the spinal cord and the trigeminal system. Although solid evidence supporting the use of radiofrequency (RF) treatment is lacking, it remains one of the management options to be taken into account. The present study evaluates the efficacy of RF in application to cervicogenic headache. Study design: We present three cases of severe facial pain arising from different cervical structures. Results: In two cases the pain originated in cervical roots C2 and C3, while in the third patient the trigger point was located at the level of the atlantoaxial joint. Pulsed RF was applied for 4 minutes at the dorsal ganglion of C2 and C3 in the first two cases, and for 8 minutes at intraarticular level in the third patient. The pain gradually subsided during the first month in all cases. The first two patients reported 70% improvement after one month, 60% improvement after 6 months, and 30-50% after one year, versus baseline. The third patient reported complete pain resolution lasting approximately 5 months, after which the pain reappeared with the same intensity as before. Conclusions: Radiofrequency is a satisfactory treatment option, affording adequate analgesia, though the effects are sometimes temporary. Key words:Cervicogenic headache, pulsed radiofrequency, analgesia. PMID:23229235

  17. An Unusual Cause of Headache in a Medical Tourist

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Soaham Dilip; Mehta, Manan M.

    2015-01-01

    With booming medical tourism, Indian doctors are seeing a lot of patients from other countries for varied medical conditions. A citizen of Nairobi presented for treatment of his complaints consisting of severe episodic headache, with abdominal pain, spermatorrhea, decreased libido, constipation, and impotence. On detailed evaluation, he was found to have developed dependence to khat chewing; a social habit in his native country and his symptoms were attributed to effects of khat withdrawal. He improved after treatment with topiramate and escitalopram and lifestyle modification. Physicians need to be aware about various cultural habits of addiction in different parts of the world and their common presentations in view of globalization of health care. PMID:25811009

  18. [Integrated headache care network. Kiel Migraine and Headache Center and German National Headache Treatment Network].

    PubMed

    Göbel, H; Heinze-Kuhn, K; Petersen, I; Göbel, A; Heinze, A

    2013-04-01

    Migraine and other headaches affect 54 million people in Germany. They rank among the ten most severely disabling complaints and the three most expensive neurological disorders. Nevertheless, they are not adequately recognized in the healthcare system with sketchy diagnoses and inadequate treatment. This inadequate care is not primarily due to a lack of medical and scientific knowledge on the development and treatment of headaches but is predominantly due to organizational deficits in the healthcare system and in the implementation of current knowledge. To overcome the organizational barriers the national headache treatment network was initiated in Germany. For the first time it allows national cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary links between inpatient and outpatient care. A hand in hand treatment programme, better education, better information exchange between all partners and combined efforts using clearly defined treatment pathways and goals are the basis for state of the art and efficient treatment results. The treatment network is geared towards the specialized treatment of severely affected patients with chronic headache disorders. A national network of outpatient and inpatient pain therapists in both practices and hospitals works hand in hand to optimally alleviate pain in a comprehensive cross-sectoral and multidisciplinary manner. For therapy refractive disorders, a high-intensive supraregional fully inpatient treatment can be arranged. This concept offers for the first time a nationwide coordinated treatment without limitation by specialization and bureaucratic remuneration sectors.

  19. Teleconsultation in children with abdominal pain: a comparison of physician triage recommendations and an established paediatric telephone triage protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality assessment and continuous quality feedback to the staff is crucial for safety and efficiency of teleconsultation and triage. This study evaluates whether it is feasible to use an already existing telephone triage protocol to assess the appropriateness of point-of-care and time-to-treat recommendations after teleconsultations. Methods Based on electronic patient records, we retrospectively compared the point-of-care and time-to-treat recommendations of the paediatric telephone triage protocol with the actual recommendations of trained physicians for children with abdominal pain, following a teleconsultation. Results In 59 of 96 cases (61%) these recommendations were congruent with the paediatric telephone protocol. Discrepancies were either of organizational nature, due to factors such as local referral policies or gatekeeping insurance models, or of medical origin, such as milder than usual symptoms or clear diagnosis of a minor ailment. Conclusions A paediatric telephone triage protocol may be applicable in healthcare systems other than the one in which it has been developed, if triage rules are adapted to match the organisational aspects of the local healthcare system. PMID:24079719

  20. The significance of life-events as contributing factors in childhood recurrent abdominal pain in an urban community in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Boey, C C; Goh, K L

    2001-10-01

    This study aimed to look at the link between childhood recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and the presence of recent life-events in an urban community in Malaysia. School children aged from 9 to 15 years in the city of Petaling Jaya were randomly selected to fill in a questionnaire and to be interviewed. The prevalence of RAP among 1488 school children studied was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 8.18-11.25). Higher prevalences of RAP were found in children who had experienced the following life-events in the previous year: loss of a family member through death (P<.001), hospitalisation of a family member (P<.001), the child's own hospitalisation (P=.001), change of address (P<.001), change in occupation of an immediate family member (P<.001), failure in a major school examination (P<.001), bullying at school (P=.001). Following logistic regression analysis, five life-events remain significant: hospitalisation of a family member (P=.038), the child's own hospitalisation (P=.034), change in occupation of an immediate family member (P=.049), examination failure (P=.001) and bullying at school (P=.028). This study strongly suggests that recent stressful life-events are important risk-factors for RAP. PMID:11595243

  1. Cryptogenia multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis: an entity on its own as a cause of abdominal pain, iron deficiency anemia and protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guisado Vasco, P; Fraile Rodríguez, G

    2014-01-01

    We studied a patient with edema secondary to protein losing enteropathy, and recurrent bouts of bloating and abdominal pain secondary to intestinal subocclusion episodes. After the clinical study, the patient was diagnosed of cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), that is a rare disease, probably caused by mutations in the gene PLA2G4A, and characterized by multiple short stenosis of the small bowel with superficial ulcers, which do not exceed the submucosa layer. Inflammatory bowel disease (Chron's disease), intestinal tuberculosis and intestinal ulcers secondary to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the main differential diagnosis. To sum up, physicians should included CMUSE in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain, iron deficiency anaemia, occult intestinal bleeding, edema and protein losing enteropathy.

  2. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    PubMed

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. PMID:27191928

  3. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    PubMed

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment.

  4. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and

  5. Endorphin patterns within the headache spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Nappi, G; Facchinetti, F; Martignoni, E; Petraglia, F; Manzoni, G C; Sances, G; Sandrini, G; Genazzani, A R

    1985-05-01

    The role of opioid peptides in modulating the nervous system adaptability has been demonstrated recently; proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-related peptides, in particular, serve in pain perception, in adaptation to stress, and in modulating higher brain functions. Primary headaches, besides pain, involve neuroendocrine/autonomic/adaptive processes as well as mood and personality factors. The view that primary headaches can be taken as a possible model of POMC-related peptides dysfunction led us to evaluate the resting plasma and CSF peptide levels and their plasma changes in response to various stimuli affecting their release. The data obtained from basal and dynamic studies agree with the concept that primary headaches are sustained by opioid system disturbance. In particular the reduced release of endogenous opioids by anterior pituitary in response to physical, endocrine or pharmacological stimuli agrees with a weak adaptive ability of headache sufferers. This impairment of endorphin responsiveness could play a key role in headache susceptibility to environmental stimuli. Primary headaches constitute a wide, intriguing field, including several subgroups bordering on "ischemic" and behavioral/affective disorders. The development of neuroendocrine techniques could be a useful means for supporting the clinical criteria identifying subpopulations of headache sufferers.

  6. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  7. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20-50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  8. Resolution of New Daily Persistent Headache After Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    New daily persistent headache is a refractory headache with an elusive cause and treatment. Limited available data suggest that abnormalities in the musculoskeletal system may increase vulnerability to this type of headache. Osteopathic manipulative treatment has been used successfully to manage primary headache disorders. In this case report, a patient with new daily persistent headache and severe somatic dysfunction had resolution of her pain after osteopathic manipulative treatment. This case suggests that osteopathic manipulative treatment may be useful in patients with this typically treatment-resistant disorder.

  9. Multivariate morphological brain signatures predict chronic abdominal pain patients from healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Labus, Jennifer S.; Van Horn, John D.; Gupta, Arpana; Alaverdyan, Mher; Torgerson, Carinna; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Irimia, Andrei; Hong, Jui-Yang; Naliboff, Bruce; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common chronic visceral pain disorder. The pathophysiology of IBS is incompletely understood, however evidence strongly suggests dysregulation of the brain-gut axis. The aim of this study was to apply multivariate pattern analysis to identify an IBS-related morphometric brain signature which could serve as a central biological marker and provide new mechanistic insights into the pathophysiology of IBS. Parcellation of 165 cortical and subcortical regions was performed using Freesurfer and the Destrieux and Harvard-Oxford atlases. Volume, mean curvature, surface area and cortical thickness were calculated for each region. Sparse partial least squares-discriminant analysis was applied to develop a diagnostic model using a training set of 160 females (80 healthy controls, 80 IBS). Predictive accuracy was assessed in an age matched holdout test set of 52 females (26 health controls, 26 IBS). A two-component classification algorithm comprised of the morphometry of 1) primary somato-sensory and motor regions, and 2) multimodal network regions, explained 36% of the variance. Overall predictive accuracy of the classification algorithm was 70%. Small effect size associations were observed between the somatosensory and motor signature and non-gastrointestinal somatic symptoms. The findings demonstrate the predictive accuracy of a classification algorithm based solely on regional brain morphometry is not sufficient but they do provide support for the utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. Perspective This article presents the development, optimization, and testing of a classification algorithm for discriminating female IBS patients from healthy controls using only brain morphometry data. The results provide support for utility of multivariate pattern analysis for identifying meaningful neurobiological markers in IBS. PMID:25906347

  10. Headaches and hormones.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, Ann; Gladstein, Jack

    2010-06-01

    It is clear that hormones play an important role in modulating and exacerbating headaches. From an epidemiologic standpoint, we know that before puberty, incidence of new headache is similar for boys and girls. By age 18, however, most new cases of migraine occur in young women. The role of sex hormones in headache is described in the context of pubertal development. Obesity and Pseudotumor also impact headache through hormonal influences. Menstrual migraine will often present in the teenage years. Oral contraceptives may worsen or ameliorate headache. This article will introduce these concepts and help the reader become familiar with the role of hormones in headache.

  11. Headache care in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengyuan; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhou, Jiying; Liu, Ruozhuo; Wan, Qi; Li, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Headache disorders are problematic worldwide. China is no different. A population-based door-to-door survey revealed that the 1-year prevalence of primary headache disorders in China was 23.8%, constituting a major societal burden. Many headache centers and clinics have been established in China, and headache disorders (and associated stress) are receiving an increased level of expert attention. This review summarizes the outcomes of the epidemiological survey and the progress of clinical and basic research in China, describes the present situation in terms of headache diagnosis and treatment, and discusses the future of headache care in China.

  12. [Headache and sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Headache and sleep problems are both some of the most commonly reported symptoms in clinical practice. There is a clear association between chronic headache and sleep disorders, especially headaches occurring during the night or early morning. Identification of sleep problems in chronic headache patients is worthwhile because treatment of sleep disorders among chronic headache patients may be followed by improve of the headache. Morning headache has been recognised as an obstructive sleep apnoea related symptom. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure usually reduced headache, however, we often encounter obstructive sleep apnoea patients who present various characteristics of morning headache that often do not fulfil the criteria for "sleep apnoea headache" according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders: 2nd edition (ICHD-2) criteria. The pathophysiologic background for a relation between obstructive sleep apnoea and morning headache is multifactorial. We should also be noted that tension-type headache and migraine might be coexisted in obstructive sleep apnoea patients. In addition, we review the relationship between migraine and sleep disorders such as restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy and parasomnia (dream enacting behaviour) including our studies. PMID:25672689

  13. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    DuPen, Melissa M.; van Tilburg, Miranda A. L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Romano, Joan M.; Levy, Rona L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child’s pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7–12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child’s pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child’s ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  14. Chewing gum headaches.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, H J; Vance, D A

    1997-01-01

    Aspartame, a popular dietetic sweetener, may provoke headache in some susceptible individuals. Herein, we describe three cases of young women with migraine who reported their headaches could be provoked by chewing sugarless gum containing aspartame.

  15. Headache Sufferers' Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sensitivities (for example, people who find red wine to be a headache trigger often find chocolate ... headaches from alcohol . Others react mostly to red wine (especially Chianti), which is a sensitivity to chemicals, ...

  16. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  17. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, a Plant Virus Associated with Specific Immune Responses, Fever, Abdominal Pains, and Pruritus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Richet, Hervé; Desnues, Christelle; Balique, Fanny; Moal, Valérie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Berbis, Philippe; Lecoq, Hervé; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Berland, Yvon; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, metagenomic studies have identified viable Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a plant virus, in the stool of healthy subjects. However, its source and role as pathogen have not been determined. Methods and Findings 21 commercialized food products containing peppers, 357 stool samples from 304 adults and 208 stool samples from 137 children were tested for PMMoV using real-time PCR, sequencing, and electron microscopy. Anti-PMMoV IgM antibody testing was concurrently performed. A case-control study tested the association of biological and clinical symptoms with the presence of PMMoV in the stool. Twelve (57%) food products were positive for PMMoV RNA sequencing. Stool samples from twenty-two (7.2%) adults and one child (0.7%) were positive for PMMoV by real-time PCR. Positive cases were significantly more likely to have been sampled in Dermatology Units (p<10−6), to be seropositive for anti-PMMoV IgM antibodies (p = 0.026) and to be patients who exhibited fever, abdominal pains, and pruritus (p = 0.045, 0.038 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a local source of PMMoV and linked the presence of PMMoV RNA in stool with a specific immune response and clinical symptoms. Although clinical symptoms may be imputable to another cofactor, including spicy food, our data suggest the possibility of a direct or indirect pathogenic role of plant viruses in humans. PMID:20386604

  18. The role of coping with symptoms in depression and disability: Comparison between Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    van Tilburg, Miranda A.L.; Claar, Robyn; Romano, Joan M.; Langer, Shelby L.; Walker, Lynn S.; Whitehead, William E; Abdullah, Bisher; Christie, Dennis L.; Levy, Rona L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and abdominal pain of functional origin (AP) are common gastrointestinal disorders in children that are associated with increased risk for depression and disability. Both symptom severity and coping with symptoms may contribute to these outcomes. We hypothesized that children with AP use different coping strategies compared to those with IBD for a number of reasons, including the fact that fewer treatment options are available to them. We also examined if coping was related to depression and functional disability beyond the contributions of symptom severity. Methods Secondary data analysis of two existing datasets including 200 children with AP (73% girls; mean age 11.2) and 189 children with IBD (49% girls; mean age 13.8). Results Compared to IBD patients, AP patients reported more use of coping strategies of self-isolation, behavioral disengagement, and catastrophizing as well as problem-solving and seeking social support. Multivariate analyses revealed that, in both samples, one or more coping strategies were associated with depression and functional disability, independent of symptom severity, and controlling for age and gender. In IBD, symptoms were not a significant predictor of depression, but coping was. Catastrophizing predicted depression and disability in both samples. Conclusion AP patients report more frequent use of several of the coping strategies we measured compared to IBD patients. Certain types of coping, particularly catastrophizing, were associated with greater depression and functional disability in both groups. Clinicians should be aware of maladaptive coping, which may be a risk factor for poor psychosocial and functional outcomes in both patient groups. PMID:25944213

  19. Migraine and tension-type headache triggers in a Greek population.

    PubMed

    Constantinides, Vasilios; Anagnostou, Evangelos; Bougea, Anastasia; Paraskevas, George; Kapaki, Elisavet; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Kararizou, Evangelia

    2015-08-01

    Migraine and tension type headache are the two most common primary headaches. The purpose of this study was to detect differences in clinical characteristics and headache triggers and in a Greek cohort of 51 migraineurs and 12 patients with tension-type headache. (TTH) Migraine patients had a significantly lower age at headache onset and frequency, higher mean visual analogue scale (VAS) and greater maximum duration of headache episodes compared to TTH patients. They did not differ from (TTH) patients in quality of headache, laterality of pain, way of headache installation and progression and temporal pattern of headaches. Nausea, vomiting and phonophobia were more frequent in migraine. Triggering of headaches by dietary factors was associated with migraine, whereas there was no difference between the two groups in any of the other headache triggers. Stress, both physical and psychological, were particularly common in both patient groups.

  20. Managing Chronic Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Forde, Grace; Duarte, Robert A; Rosen, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Headaches are a very common disorder, more common than asthma and diabetes combined. Migraine is the most common headache disorder, but it remains underdiagnosed and therefore undertreated. The treatment of migraines is divided into acute and prophylaxis. Patients who are experiencing 8 or more headaches a month or those who experience disability with their headaches as determined by the Migraine Disability Assistance Score or MIDAS should be placed on prophylaxis. PMID:26614723

  1. Headache management: pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Alex J; Sturrock, Aaron; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2015-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common conditions presenting to the neurology clinic, yet a significant proportion of these patients are unsatisfied by their clinic experience. Headache can be extremely disabling; effective treatment is not only essential for patients but is rewarding for the physician. In this first of two parts review of headache, we provide an overview of headache management, emerging therapeutic strategies and an accessible interpretation of clinical guidelines to assist the busy neurologist. PMID:26141299

  2. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  3. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used.

  4. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used. PMID:24664098

  5. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  6. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  7. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  8. Oral contrast for CT in patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal and pelvic pain: what should be its current role?

    PubMed

    Kielar, Ania Z; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Positive oral contrast agents, including barium suspensions and water-soluble iodinated solutions, have traditionally been used in conjunction with the CT evaluation of patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Due to continued advancements in CT technology, and due to increasing obesity and correspondingly a general increase in the intra-abdominal and intra-pelvic fat separating bowel loops in North American patients and in patients in other parts of the world over the past few decades, the ability of radiologists to accurately evaluate the cause of acute symptoms has substantially improved. Recent research and evolving imaging society guidelines/systematic reviews increasingly support performing CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis without the need for positive oral contrast in these types of adult patient populations, in most clinical situations. Increased patient throughput, patient preference, patient safety, and most importantly, retention of high diagnostic accuracy, are reasons for this recent change in practice to routinely omit the use of enteric contrast agents for the majority of patients presenting with acute abdominal and pelvic pain whom are undergoing emergency CT. PMID:27166963

  9. Sleep problems and pain: a longitudinal cohort study in emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Bonvanie, Irma J; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rosmalen, Judith G M; Janssens, Karin A M

    2016-04-01

    Sleep and pain are thought to be bidirectional related on a daily basis in adolescents with chronic pain complaints. In addition, sleep problems have been shown to predict the long-term onset of musculoskeletal pain in middle-aged adults. Yet, the long-term effects of sleep problems on pain duration and different types of pain severity in emerging adults (age: 18-25) are unknown. This study investigated the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between sleep problems and chronic pain, and musculoskeletal pain, headache, and abdominal pain severity in a general population of emerging adults. We studied whether these relationships were moderated by sex and whether symptoms of anxiety and depression, fatigue, or physical inactivity mediated these effects. Data of participants from the longitudinal Dutch TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey were used. Follow-up data were collected in 1753 participants who participated in the fourth (N = 1668, mean age: 19.0 years [SD = 0.6]) and/or fifth (N = 1501, mean age: 22.3 years [SD = 0.6]) assessment wave. Autoregressive cross-lagged models were used for analyses. Sleep problems were associated with chronic pain, musculoskeletal pain, headache and abdominal pain severity, and predicted chronic pain and an increase in musculoskeletal pain severity at 3 years of follow-up. This prospective effect was stronger in females than in males and was mediated by fatigue but not by symptoms of anxiety and depression or physical inactivity. Only abdominal pain had a small long-term effect on sleep problems. Our results suggest that sleep problems may be an additional target for treatment in female emerging adults with musculoskeletal pain complaints.

  10. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  11. Headaches in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Might Imply an Inflammatorial Process

    PubMed Central

    Zettl, Uwe K.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on Multiple Sclerosis (MS) pathology mention the involvement of “tertiary B cell follicles” in MS pathogenesis. This inflammatory process, which occurs with interindividually great variance, might be a link between MS pathology and headaches. The aim of this study was to detect the prevalence of headaches and of subtypes of headaches (migraine, cluster, tension-type headache [TTH]) in an unselected MS collective and to compile possibly influencing factors. Unselected MS patients (n = 180) with and without headache were examined by a semi-structured interview using a questionnaire about headache, depression and the health status. Additionally clinical MS data (expanded disability state score [EDSS], MS course, medication, disease duration) were gathered. N = 98 MS patients (55.4%) reported headaches in the previous 4 weeks. We subsequently grouped headache patients according to the IHS criteria and detected 16 (16.3%) MS patients suffering from migraine (migraine with aura: 2 [2%]; migraine without aura: 14 [14.3%]), 23 (23.5%) suffering from TTH and none with a cluster headache. Thus, headaches of 59 (60.2%) MS patients remained unclassified. When comparing MS patients with and without headaches significant differences in age, gender, MS course, physical functioning, pain and social functioning occurred. MS patients with headaches were significantly younger of age (p = 0.001), female (p = 0.001) and reported more often of a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and relapsing/remitting MS (RRMS) instead of secondary chronic progressive MS (SCP). EDSS was significantly lower in MS patients suffering from headaches compared to the MS patients without headaches (p = 0.001). In conclusion headache in MS patients is a relevant symptom, especially in early stages of the MS disease. Especially unclassified headache seems to represent an important symptom in MS course and requires increased attention. PMID:23940524

  12. Psychosocial factors associated with chronic pain in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Merlijn, Vivian P B M; Hunfeld, Joke A M; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Hazebroek-Kampschreur, Alice A J M; Koes, Bart W; Passchier, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A number of psychosocial factors have been associated with the onset, exacerbation and/or maintenance of chronic pain in adolescents. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relative importance of vulnerability, reinforcement, and modeling. We compared 222 adolescents with chronic pain and no documented physiological etiology (headache, back, limb and abdominal pain) with 148 controls and their (respectively 183 vs. 127) parents. Analyses showed that adolescents with chronic pain are more vulnerable in terms of neuroticism, negative fear of failure, and (less) experienced social acceptance. Contrary to our expectations, the chronic pain group experienced less reinforcement for their pain behavior by both parents and peers than the control group. While the number of pain models was higher in the chronic pain group, no differences were found between their parents and those of the adolescents without chronic pain in pain experience, pain parameters, and pain coping. Regression analyses on the contribution of psychosocial factors to chronic pain and its parameters sustained the positive relation between vulnerability, (less) pain reinforcement, pain models and coping with pain. Furthermore, we also found evidence that gender differences have to be taken into account.

  13. Psychosocial factors associated with chronic pain in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Merlijn, Vivian P B M; Hunfeld, Joke A M; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Hazebroek-Kampschreur, Alice A J M; Koes, Bart W; Passchier, Jan

    2003-01-01

    A number of psychosocial factors have been associated with the onset, exacerbation and/or maintenance of chronic pain in adolescents. The present study was conducted to evaluate the relative importance of vulnerability, reinforcement, and modeling. We compared 222 adolescents with chronic pain and no documented physiological etiology (headache, back, limb and abdominal pain) with 148 controls and their (respectively 183 vs. 127) parents. Analyses showed that adolescents with chronic pain are more vulnerable in terms of neuroticism, negative fear of failure, and (less) experienced social acceptance. Contrary to our expectations, the chronic pain group experienced less reinforcement for their pain behavior by both parents and peers than the control group. While the number of pain models was higher in the chronic pain group, no differences were found between their parents and those of the adolescents without chronic pain in pain experience, pain parameters, and pain coping. Regression analyses on the contribution of psychosocial factors to chronic pain and its parameters sustained the positive relation between vulnerability, (less) pain reinforcement, pain models and coping with pain. Furthermore, we also found evidence that gender differences have to be taken into account. PMID:12507698

  14. Habituation and sensitization in primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Gianluca; Di Lorenzo, Cherubino; Schoenen, Jean; Pierelli, Francesco

    2013-07-30

    The phenomena of habituation and sensitization are considered most useful for studying the neuronal substrates of information processing in the CNS. Both were studied in primary headaches, that are functional disorders of the brain characterized by an abnormal responsivity to any kind of incoming innocuous or painful stimuli and it's cycling pattern over time (interictal, pre-ictal, ictal). The present review summarizes available data on stimulus responsivity in primary headaches obtained with clinical neurophysiology. In migraine, the majority of electrophysiological studies between attacks have shown that, for a number of different sensory modalities, the brain is characterised by a lack of habituation of evoked responses to repeated stimuli. This abnormal processing of the incoming information reaches its maximum a few days before the beginning of an attack, and normalizes during the attack, at a time when sensitization may also manifest itself. An abnormal rhythmic activity between thalamus and cortex, namely thalamocortical dysrhythmia, may be the pathophysiological mechanism subtending abnormal information processing in migraine. In tension-type headache (TTH), only few signs of deficient habituation were observed only in subgroups of patients. By contrast, using grand-average responses indirect evidence for sensitization has been found in chronic TTH with increased nociceptive specific reflexes and evoked potentials. Generalized increased sensitivity to pain (lower thresholds and increased pain rating) and a dysfunction in supraspinal descending pain control systems may contribute to the development and/or maintenance of central sensitization in chronic TTH. Cluster headache patients are characterized during the bout and on the headache side by a pronounced lack of habituation of the brainstem blink reflex and a general sensitization of pain processing. A better insight into the nature of these ictal/interictal electrophysiological dysfunctions in primary

  15. History of headache research in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, P

    2001-09-01

    Headache research in Denmark started with the description in 1949 by Dalsgaard-Nielsen of the percutaneous nitroglycerin test. In 1976 Jes Olesen started The Copenhagen Acute Headache Clinic and from that time modern headache research began in Denmark. Specific changes in regional cerebral blood flow during attacks of migraine with aura, spreading oligaemia, were described for the first time in 1980. The first headache classification with operational diagnostic criteria was published in 1988 and used in a Danish population study from 1989. The lifetime prevalence of migraine was 8% in men and 25% in women. An intravenous nitroglycerin test was introduced in 1989 and has been developed as an experimental headache model. In 1993 it was suggested by Jes Olesen et al. that NO supersensitivity could be a possible molecular mechanism of migraine pain. Recent genetic studies have supported the distinction between migraine with aura and migraine without aura. From the middle of the 1980s the pathophysiology of tension-type headache has been investigated and recent results indicate central sensitization in patients with chronic tension-type headache.

  16. Acupuncture for tension-type headache

    PubMed Central

    Linde, Klaus; Allais, Gianni; Brinkhaus, Benno; Manheimer, Eric; Vickers, Andrew; White, Adrian R

    2011-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is often used for tension-type headache prophylaxis but its effectiveness is still controversial. This review (along with a companion review on ‘Acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis’) represents an updated version of a Cochrane review originally published in Issue 1, 2001, of The Cochrane Library. Objectives To investigate whether acupuncture is a) more effective than no prophylactic treatment/routine care only; b) more effective than ‘sham’ (placebo) acupuncture; and c) as effective as other interventions in reducing headache frequency in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Search strategy The Cochrane Pain, Palliative & Supportive Care Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field Trials Register were searched to January 2008. Selection criteria We included randomized trials with a post-randomization observation period of at least 8 weeks that compared the clinical effects of an acupuncture intervention with a control (treatment of acute headaches only or routine care), a sham acupuncture intervention or another intervention in patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headache. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers checked eligibility; extracted information on patients, interventions, methods and results; and assessed risk of bias and quality of the acupuncture intervention. Outcomes extracted included response (at least 50% reduction of headache frequency; outcome of primary interest), headache days, pain intensity and analgesic use. Main results Eleven trials with 2317 participants (median 62, range 10 to 1265) met the inclusion criteria. Two large trials compared acupuncture to treatment of acute headaches or routine care only. Both found statistically significant and clinically relevant short-term (up to 3 months) benefits of acupuncture over control for response, number of headache days and pain intensity. Long-term effects (beyond 3 months) were not

  17. Intravenous acetaminophen is superior to ketamine for postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Behzadi, Behzad; Ghodraty, Mohammad Reza; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, intravenously (IV) administered acetaminophen has become one of the most common perioperative analgesics. Despite its now-routine use, IV acetaminophen’s analgesic comparative efficacy has never been compared with that of ketamine, a decades-old analgesic familiar to obstetricians, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists alike. This doubleblind clinical trial aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of ketamine and IV acetaminophen on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods Eighty women aged 25–70 years old and meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups of 40 to receive either IV acetaminophen or ketamine intraoperatively. Postoperatively, each patient had patient-controlled analgesia. Pain and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale) were documented based on the visual analog scale in the recovery room and at 4 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after the surgery. Hemodynamic changes, adverse medication effects, and the need for breakthrough meperidine were also recorded for both groups. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the IV acetaminophen group at each time point (P<0.05), and this group required significantly fewer doses of breakthrough analgesics compared with the ketamine group (P=0.039). The two groups had no significant differences in terms of adverse effects. Conclusion Compared with ketamine, IV acetaminophen significantly improved postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:24465135

  18. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ... GI Symptoms Gastroparesis See All Topics (A-Z) GI Procedures Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer Screening See All Procedures ( ...

  19. Abdominal Pain or Cramping

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by hormones that slow your digestion, the pressure of your growing uterus, constipation and ... may be caused by hormones that slow your digestion, the pressure of your growing uterus, constipation and ...

  20. Characteristics of Elderly-Onset (≥65 years) Headache Diagnosed Using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Yong-Jae; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kim, Byung-Su; Kim, Jae-Moon; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Moon, Heui-Soo; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Chu, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose New-onset headache in elderly patients is generally suggestive of a high probability of secondary headache, and the subtypes of primary headache diagnoses are still unclear in the elderly. This study investigated the characteristics of headache with an older age at onset (≥65 years) and compared the characteristics between younger and older age groups. Methods We prospectively collected demographic and clinical data of 1,627 patients who first visited 11 tertiary hospitals in Korea due to headache between August 2014 and February 2015. Headache subtype was categorized according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, Third Edition Beta Version. Results In total, 152 patients (9.3%, 106 women and 46 men) experienced headache that began from 65 years of age [elderly-onset group (EOG)], while the remaining 1,475 patients who first experienced headache before the age of 65 years were classified as the younger-age-at-onset group (YOG). Among the primary headache types, tension-type headache (55.6% vs. 28.8%) and other primary headache disorders (OPH, 31.0% vs. 17.3%) were more common in the EOG than in the YOG, while migraine was less frequent (13.5% vs. 52.2%) (p=0.001) in the EOG. Among OPH, primary stabbing headache (87.2%) was more frequent in the EOG than in the YOG (p=0.032). The pain was significantly less severe (p=0.026) and the frequency of medication overuse headache was higher in EOG than in YOG (23.5% vs. 7.6%, p=0.040). Conclusions Tension-type headache and OPH headaches, primarily stabbing headache, were more common in EOG patients than in YOG patients. The pain intensity, distribution of headache diagnoses, and frequency of medication overuse differed according to the age at headache onset.

  1. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  2. Symptomatic cervicogenic headache.

    PubMed

    Delfini, R; Salvati, M; Passacantilli, E; Pacciani, E

    2000-01-01

    Cervicogenic headache is a little-known clinical condition whose true importance has only recently been recognized. A number of causes may lie at the basis of the onset of headache (symptomatic cervicogenic headache). However, despite exhaustive attempts, sometimes it is not possible to identify a clear cause responsible for the onset of the syndrome (primitive cervicogenic headache). The genesis of symptomatic cervicogenic headaches sometimes may be easy to identify as a result of a close, pre-existing, cause-effect relationship (i.e. trauma). On other occasions it may be much more laborious to pinpoint the pathology responsible for headache (some cranio-cervical anomalies, etc.). Clinically, it is necessary to perform a thorough preliminary clinical and anamnestic evaluation which can orient subsequent investigations to achieve a diagnosis in the least time possible with the minimum discomfort to the patient and his relatives, not to mention lower costs for society. PMID:10824284

  3. [Electrotherapy for headaches].

    PubMed

    Lutters, B; Koehler, P J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulation is being applied increasingly for the treatment of drug resistant headache. Although these techniques are often considered high-tech, electrotherapy for headache has a long history; electric fish have been used for headache treatment since the first century CE. During the eighteenth and nineteenth century, static electricity was a treatment for a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including headache. The efficacy of electrotherapy, however, has been disputed continuously, since opponents were of the opinion that the positive results could be attributed to suggestion. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the electric treatment of headache gradually disappeared. In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the use of electrotherapy, along with the efficacy debate. With this historical review we wish to emphasize the importance of placebo-controlled studies, not only in terms of electrotherapy of headache, but also for the evaluation of neuromodulation for other disorders. PMID:27353158

  4. Heredity, genes, and headache.

    PubMed

    Barbas, Nancy R; Schuyler, Erica A

    2006-11-01

    It is well recognized that headache, and especially migraine, runs in families. Recent studies into the heritability of primary headache subtypes, migraine, cluster and tension headache, and conditions in which headache is a prominent feature, such as the mitochondrial disease, mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes, and the arteriopathy, cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarctions and leukoencephalopathy, are improving our understanding of the genetic contribution to headache. Studies of the rare familial hemiplegic migraine are leading to advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of the more common migraine types. Current knowledge of hereditary and genetic features of headache subtypes is reviewed and the implications for understanding the pathophysiology of migraine are discussed.

  5. High-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Hernandez, Pablo Bandres

    2015-05-01

    High-altitude headache is one of many neurological symptoms associated with the ascent to high altitudes. Cellular hypoxia due to decreased barometric pressure seems to be the common final pathway for headache as altitude increases. Susceptibility to high-altitude headache depends on genetic factors, history of migraine, and acclimatization, but symptoms of acute mountain sickness are universal at very high altitudes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude headache as well as the evidence for treatment and prevention with different drugs and devices which may be useful for regular and novice mountaineers. This includes an examination of other headache disorders which may mimic high-altitude headache. PMID:25795155

  6. Behavioral Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrasik, Frank; Schwartz, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Headaches are quite common in children and adolescents, and they appear to persist into adulthood in a sizable number of individuals. Assessment approaches (interview, pain diaries, and general and specific questionnaires) and behavioral treatment interventions (contingency management, relaxation, biofeedback, and cognitive behavior therapy) are…

  7. Recurrent Pediatric Headaches: Behavioral Concepts and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Keith D.

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent pediatric headaches are increasingly understood to be a function of both respondent and operant processes. In particular, the environment is thought to elicit internal autonomic instability and to evoke external maladaptive pain behavior. While medical interventions often provide an appropriate first line treatment, behavioral…

  8. Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin; Pélerin, Fanny; Maudet, Corinne; Housez, Béatrice; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Jüsten, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort. Probiotics have been reported to benefit IBS symptoms but the level of benefit remains quite unclear. Objective This study was designed to assess the benefit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms. Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial has been performed in 379 subjects with diagnosed IBS. Subjects were randomly supplemented with the probiotics (1000 mg) or placebo for 12 weeks. Questionnaires (gastrointestinal symptoms, stools, wellbeing, and quality of life) were completed. Primary endpoint was percentage of responders defined as having a 50% decrease in the weekly average “intestinal pain/discomfort score” for at least 4 out of the last 8 weeks of the study. Results There was no overall benefit of S. cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms and wellbeing in the study population. Moreover, S. cerevisiae I-3856 was not statistically significant predictor of the responder status of the subjects (p > 0.05). Planned subgroup analyses showed significant effect in the IBS-C subjects: improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher in active group, compared to placebo, on abdominal pain/discomfort and bloating throughout the study and at the end of the supplementation. Conclusions In this study, S. cerevisiae I-3856 at the dose of 1000 mg per day does not improve intestinal pain and discomfort in general IBS patients. However, it seems to have an effect in the subgroup with constipation which needs further studies to confirm (NCT01613456 in ClinicalTrials.gov registry). PMID:27403301

  9. Headaches and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Freedom, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Headaches and sleep disorders are associated in a complex manner. Both the disorders are common in the general population, but the relationship between the two is more than coincidental. Sleep disorders can exacerbate headache sand the converse is also true. Treatment of sleep disorders can have a positive impact on the treatment of headaches. Screening for sleep disorders should be considered in all patients with headaches. This can be accomplished with brief screening tools. Those who screen positively can be further evaluated or referred to asleep specialist.

  10. High prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in women in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and direct association with abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Gonçalves da Silva, Gabriela Pagano; do Nascimento, Anderson Luís; Michelazzo, Daniela; Junior, Fernando Filardi Alves; Rocha, Marcelo Gondim; Rosa-e-Silva, Júlio César; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco José; Nogueira, Antonio Alberto; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic pelvic pain is a disease that directly affects the social and professional lives of women. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of this clinical condition and to identify independent factors associated with it in women living in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. METHODS: A one-year cross-sectional study was conducted in a population sample of 1,278 women over the age of 14 years. The target population was predominantly composed of women who are treated by the public health system. The questionnaire was administered by interviewers who were not linked to the city health care programs. The prevalence of the morbidity was estimated. First, we identified the significant variables associated with pelvic pain (p<0.10) and then we attributed values of 0 or 1 to the absence or presence of these variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify and estimate the simultaneous impact of the independent variables. The results were expressed by odds ratio and their 95% confidence interval with p<0.05. RESULTS: The disease was found in 11.5% (147/1,278) of the sample. The independent predictors were dyspareunia, previous abdominal surgery, depression, dysmenorrhea, anxiety, current sexual activity, low back pain, constipation, urinary symptoms, and low educational level. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in Ribeirão Preto is high and is associated with conditions that can usually be prevented, controlled, or resolved by improvement of public health policies and public education. PMID:21915476

  11. Disseminated herpes zoster infection initially presenting with abdominal pain in patients with lymphoma undergoing conventional chemotherapy: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hitomi Sumiyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Makita, Shinichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Dai; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral disseminated varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease has a high mortality rate, and occurs in immunocompromised hosts, mostly subsequent to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Only a few cases of this disease that onset during conventional chemotherapy in patients with lymphoma have been reported. The present study reports the cases of 3 patients with disseminated and visceral VZV infection undergoing treatment for follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. All 3 patients presented with initial symptoms of abdominal pain, and 2 patients demonstrated syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone and hepatitis. All patients developed widespread cutaneous dissemination, and all had a low cluster of differentiation 4 cell count or lymphocyte count at the time of VZV diagnosis and at least 4 month prior. With intravenous systemic acyclovir therapy (Cases 1 and 3, 1500 mg/day; Case 2, 750 mg/day), the patients achieved complete recovery by day 14 of therapy. Visceral disseminated VZV infection is not limited to patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, and may present with abdominal pain with or without skin eruption. Visceral infection may take a poor clinical course, therefore, in patients with prolonged duration of low lymphocyte count and/or long-term use of steroids, the prophylactic use of acyclovir may be considered. PMID:27446355

  12. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring ... of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and Other Vascular Headaches—Symptoms and Diagnosis Migraine: ...

  13. [Validity of graphic headache diary for children having primary headaches].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Mitsue; Fujiwara, Junko

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether the graphic headache diary is useful for diagnosing headache types in children, especially suffering from chronic daily headaches. Our study involved 109 children who completed the diaries for more than 3 weeks. The headache diary was a modified version of that used in the study by Sakai et al. Of 109, 84 had migraine, 15 had tension-type headache and 10 had both tension-type headache and migraine from the questionnaire and the first interview. The diary disclosed that 20 children, initially diagnosed as having migraine, had co-existing chronic tension-type headache with a variety of psychosocial problems. The graphic headache diary seems to be helpful for headache diagnosis and awareness of stress in children who suffered from strong and persistent headaches. Our study suggested that the graphic headache diary is useful not only for diagnosing headache types in children but also for finding out problems in school and/or family.

  14. Diagnosis and management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth C

    2004-11-01

    Migraine headaches afflict approximately 6% of men and 18% of women in the United States, and cost billions of dollars each year in lost productivity, absenteeism, and direct medical expendi tures. Despite its prevalence and the availability of therapeutic op tions, many patients do not seek treatment, and among those who do, a significant portion are misdiagnosed. Correct diagnosis can be made by identifying the historic and physical examination finding that distinguish primary headache disorders from secondary head ache disorders, as well as the key clinical features that distinguis migraine headaches from other types. Once diagnosis is made, im proper or inadequate management of headache pain, related symp toms such as nausea, and the possible aggravating side-effects of pharmacologic therapies represent further obstacles to effective ther apy. Dissatisfaction with migraine therapy on the basis of these factors is common. Among abortive therapy options there are de livery methods available which may avoid aggravating symptom such as nausea. Recommended pharmacologic agents include non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intranasal butorphanol, ergota mine and its derivatives, and the triptans. Indications for prophylac tic in addition to abortive therapy include the occurrence o headaches that require abortive therapy more than twice a week, tha do not respond well to abortive therapy, and which are particularly severe. Research is ongoing in the pathophysiology of migraines evaluation of nonpharmacologic treatment modalities, assessment of new drug therapies, and validation of headache guidelines. PMID:15586597

  15. Chronic Daily Headache: Mechanisms and Principles of Management.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Amy W; Gould, Harry J

    2016-02-01

    Primary headache is a common malady that is often under-recognized and frequently inadequately managed in spite of the fact that it affects up to 95 % of the population in a lifetime. Many forms of headache, including episodic tension and migraine headaches, if properly diagnosed, are reasonably amenable to treatment, but a smaller, though not insignificant, percent of the population suffer daily from a chronic, intractable form of headache that destroys one's productivity and quality of life. These patients are frequently seen in neurological practices at a point when treatment options are limited and largely ineffective. In the following review, we will discuss mechanisms drawn from recent studies that address the transition from acute to chronic pain that may apply to the transformation from episodic to chronic daily headaches which may offer opportunities for preempting headache transformation.

  16. Postoperative Pain After Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Tramadol and Gabapentin as Premedication

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Farnoush; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Mirmansouri, Ali; Fakoor, Fereshteh; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Biazar, Gelareh; Zarei, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncontrolled postoperative pain, characteristic to abdominal hysterectomy, results in multiple complications. One of the methods for controlling postoperative pain is preemptive analgesia. Gabapentin and tramadol are both used for this purpose. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effects of tramadol and gabapentin, as premedication, in decreasing the pain after hysterectomy. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 120 eligible elective abdominal hysterectomy patients, divided in three groups of 40, receiving tramadol, gabapentin and placebo, respectively. Two hours before the surgery, the first group was given 300 mg gabapentin, the second one was given 100 mg tramadol, while the other group was given placebo, with 50 ml water. After the surgery, in case of visual analog pain scale (VAS) > 3, up to 3 mg of diclofenac suppository would be used. Pain score, nausea, vomiting, sedation, patient’s satisfaction and the number of meperidine administered during 24 hours (1 - 4 - 8 - 12 - 16 - 20 - 24 hours) were recorded. If patients had VAS > 3, despite using diclofenac, intravenous meperidine (0.25 mg/kg) would be prescribed. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software, chi-square test, general linear model and repeated measurement. Results: The three groups were similar regarding age and length of surgery (up to 2 hours). The average VAS, in the placebo group, was higher than in the other two groups (P = 0.0001) and the average received doses of meperidine during 24-hour time were considerably higher in placebo group, compared to the other two groups (55.62 mg in placebo, 18.75 mg in gabapentin and 17.5 mg in tramadol groups, P = 0.0001). Nausea, vomiting and sedation, in the tramadol group, were higher than in the other two groups, although they were not significant. Patients’ dissatisfaction, in the placebo group, during initial hours, especially in the fourth hour, was higher (P = 0.0001). In the gabapentin and tramadol groups

  17. Sleep features and central sensitization symptoms in primary headache patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Association between sleep disorders and headache is largely known. The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep quality and quantity in a large cohort of primary headache patients, in order to correlate these scores with symptoms of central sensitization as allodynia, pericranial tenderness and comorbidity with diffuse muscle-skeletal pain. Methods One thousand six hundreds and seventy primary headache out patients were submitted to the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) within a clinical assessment, consisting of evaluation of frequency of headache, pericranial tenderness, allodynia and coexistence of fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). Results Ten groups of primary headache patients were individuated, including patients with episodic and chronic migraine and tension type headache, mixed forms, cluster headache and other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Duration but not sleep disturbances score was correlated with symptoms of central sensitization as allodynia and pericranial tenderness in primary headache patients. The association among allodynia, pericranial tenderness and short sleep characterized chronic migraine more than any other primary headache form. Patients presenting with FM comorbidity suffered from sleep disturbances in addition to reduction of sleep duration. Conclusion Self reported duration of sleep seems a useful index to be correlated with allodynia, pericranial tenderness and chronic headache as a therapeutic target to be assessed in forthcoming studies aiming to prevent central sensitization symptoms development. PMID:25260261

  18. Treatment of headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G

    1989-01-01

    Headache is the most common complaint encountered in clinical practice. Approximately 45 million people in the United States experience chronic headaches. The management of migraine headache involves both pharmacologic and nondrug therapy. Drug therapy for migraine involves the use of abortive and prophylactic agents. Abortive agents, such as ergotamine tartrate and ketoprofen, may be used to relieve the acute attack. Prophylactic therapy is focused on reducing the frequency and severity of the attacks. beta-Adrenergic blocking agents, such as propranolol, remain the primary agents for many migraine patients, although other drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ketoprofen, or calcium-channel blocking agents, such as verapamil, may be beneficial for many patients. For cluster headache and its variants, methysergide and corticosteroids are usually the drugs of choice. Patients with chronic cluster headache may achieve good results from long-term treatment with other therapies, including lithium carbonate, verapamil, and ketoprofen. PMID:2520442

  19. [Treatment of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Fabre, N

    2005-07-01

    Remarkable therapeutic improvements have come forward recently for trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias. Attack treatment in cluster headache is based on sumatriptan and oxygen. Non-vasoconstrictive treatments are opening a new post-triptan era but are not yet applicable. Prophylactic treatment of cluster headache is based on verapamil and lithium. The efficacy of anti-epileptic drugs in cluster headache remains to be demonstrated. Surgical treatment aimed at the parasympathetic pathways and at the trigeminal nerve demonstrates a high rate of recurrence and adverse events and questions about the relevance of a "peripheral" target in cluster headache. The efficacy of continuous hypothalamic stimulation in patients with intractable headache constitutes a breakthrough, but must be demonstrated at a larger scale and the benefice/risk ratio must be carefully evaluated. Indomethacin still remains the gold standard in paroxysmal hemicrania treatment. Until recently SUNCT was considered an intractable condition. However there are some reports of complete relief with lamotrigine, topiramate and gabapentin.

  20. Oral habits in common between tension headache and non-headache populations.

    PubMed

    Moss, R A; Lombardo, T W; Hodgson, J M; O'Carroll, K

    1989-01-01

    Previous research has suggested a relationship between migraine pain and oral habits. The present study was designed as a replication of a prior study that found self-reported higher frequencies of certain oral habits in migraine as opposed to tension headache and non-headache groups. Three groups of subjects (common migraine, tension headache and non-headache) were given a single questionnaire in which five oral habits (i.e. teeth clenching, jaw jutting, cupping the chin in the hand, and resting the right and left side of the face on the hand) were rated on a 0 (not at all) to 10 (almost always) scale. Significant main effects were obtained for groups and oral habits in a 3 (groups) X5 (oral habits) ANOVA. Post hoc Tukey tests revealed the common migraine group reported significantly more frequent oral habits than did the tension headache group. The non-headache control group did not differ significantly from either headache group. Discussion focuses on the need for continued research in this area.

  1. Headache yesterday in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results Participation rates varied between 11% and 59% (mean 27%). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2% (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17%, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56% of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6%. Among those who worked despite headache, 20% reported productivity reduced by >50%. Social activities were lost by 24%. Women (21%) were more likely than men (12%) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7% of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache. PMID:24884765

  2. Abdominal tap

    MedlinePlus

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... abdominal cavity ( most often cancer of the ovaries ) Cirrhosis of the liver Damaged bowel Heart disease Infection ...

  3. The effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on reduction of pain after abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Harati, Sina Taghizadeh; Babaeizadeh, Hamideh; Yasaei, Elahe; Bashar, Farshid Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is a physiological response to tissue trauma that produces unpleasant physiological effects with manifestations on various organic systems. Objective According to the effect of magnesium sulfate on the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, this study examined the effect of magnesium sulfate on the reduction of pain and the mean amount of narcotics consumed by patients after abdominal hysterectomies. Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was performed on 60 patients who had undergone abdominal hysterectomies in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, from 2013 to 2015. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 30 members each. All of the patients received 2 mg of Midazolam and 2 mcg/kg of Fentanyl as the induction of anesthesia with propofol (2–2.5 mg/kg) and Atracurium 0.5 mg/kg was conducted. All of the patients received 5 mg of intravenous morphine 30 min after induction of anesthesia. Afterwards, the study group received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum during the 20 minutes, and 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum was administered to the members of the placebo group. Visual analogue scale VAS scores were evaluated to reach the minimum difference of 0.8 in mean pain score Results The results of this study indicated that the mean pain scores immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hr after surgery were lower in the study group than in the placebo group. The mean value of narcotic consumption at all measured time points was higher in the placebo group. No significant differences were found between two groups concerning drug complications. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that the intravenous injection of magnesium sulfate can reduce pain, reduce morphine consumption, and reduce the side effects of morphine in patients after surgery. Funding This study was funded by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Clinical trial registration The trial was

  4. The effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate infusion on reduction of pain after abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jarahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Harati, Sina Taghizadeh; Babaeizadeh, Hamideh; Yasaei, Elahe; Bashar, Farshid Rahimi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical pain is a physiological response to tissue trauma that produces unpleasant physiological effects with manifestations on various organic systems. Objective According to the effect of magnesium sulfate on the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, this study examined the effect of magnesium sulfate on the reduction of pain and the mean amount of narcotics consumed by patients after abdominal hysterectomies. Methods This double-blind clinical trial study was performed on 60 patients who had undergone abdominal hysterectomies in Shahid Sadoughi Hospital in Yazd, Iran, from 2013 to 2015. The patients were divided randomly into two groups of 30 members each. All of the patients received 2 mg of Midazolam and 2 mcg/kg of Fentanyl as the induction of anesthesia with propofol (2–2.5 mg/kg) and Atracurium 0.5 mg/kg was conducted. All of the patients received 5 mg of intravenous morphine 30 min after induction of anesthesia. Afterwards, the study group received 50 mg/kg of magnesium sulfate in 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum during the 20 minutes, and 500 cm3 of Ringer’s serum was administered to the members of the placebo group. Visual analogue scale VAS scores were evaluated to reach the minimum difference of 0.8 in mean pain score Results The results of this study indicated that the mean pain scores immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 hr after surgery were lower in the study group than in the placebo group. The mean value of narcotic consumption at all measured time points was higher in the placebo group. No significant differences were found between two groups concerning drug complications. Conclusion The results of this study indicated that the intravenous injection of magnesium sulfate can reduce pain, reduce morphine consumption, and reduce the side effects of morphine in patients after surgery. Funding This study was funded by Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran Clinical trial registration The trial was

  5. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery.

  6. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery. PMID:27601741

  7. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... about headaches; Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster ... is dangerous? What are the symptoms of a tension-type headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? ...

  8. A 15-year-old boy with abdominal pain, growth retardation, and anemia secondary to Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Andrianov, Melissa; Rivera, Edgardo; Azzam, Ruba

    2015-03-01

    A 15-year-old boy with abdominal pain, growth retardation, and symptomatic anemia requiring blood transfusion was seen by a gastroenterologist and found to have a large ulcerated, fungating, and actively bleeding mass in his stomach. Initially, the patient was screened for Helicobacter pylori and found to be negative, so there was concern for malignancy after multiple endoscopic procedures. The patient did not respond to initial ulcer treatment and immediately prior to scheduled partial gastrectomy, additional tissue sections from the initial biopsy were stained for H. pylori and rare positive staining organisms were found. The test was positive, and the patient was started empirically on treatment to which he responded and ultimately recovered fully. Gastrectomy was not performed, and following treatment, the ulcer, anemia, and poor growth resolved.

  9. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  10. National Headache Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been to further awareness of headache and migraine as legitimate neurobiological diseases. Much has changed during this time, and with aid from advanced technology and clinical innovation, there are more treatment options than ever before. However, we understand that ...

  11. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info for Residents & Fellows Int. Headache Academy Medical Student Resources New Investigators & Trainees Resources AHMA – For Patients ... pm #CMEP afternoon w @ranicholson & @SmithermanTodd talking patient engagement, communication & behavioral tools for managing #migraine h J ...

  12. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  13. Association of CTRC and SPINK1 gene variants with recurrent hospitalizations for pancreatitis or acute abdominal pain in lipoprotein lipase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Karine; Dubois-Bouchard, Camélia; Brisson, Diane; Gaudet, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are important inter-individual variations in the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Several genes involved in triglyceride-rich lipoprotein metabolism or serine proteases pathways are known to influence the risk of pancreatitis. Aim: To evaluate the association between genes regulating serine proteases, chymotrypsin C (CTRC) and serine peptidase inhibitor kazal type1 (SPINK1), and recurrence of hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis or severe abdominal pain in patients with Lipoprotein Lipase Deficiency (LPLD), a rare and extreme monogenic model of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. Method: The CTRC and SPINK1 genes promoter and coding regions sequencing has been performed in a sample of 38 LPLD adults (22 men and 16 women) and 100 controls (53 men and 47 women). Estimation of the association of CTRC and SPINK1 gene variants or combinations of variants with history of hospitalizations for pancreatitis or acute abdominal pain in LPLD was investigated using non-parametric analyses with correction for multiple testing and logistic regression models controlling for age, gender, family history, and life habits. Results: Gene sequencing followed by genotype-stratified analyses of the CTRC and SPINK1 genes in LPLD and controls revealed a positive association between recurrence of hospitalizations and the rs545634 (CTRC)—rs11319 (SPINK1) combination [OR = 41.4 (CI: 2.0–848.0); p = 0.016]. In all models, a positive family history of pancreatitis was a significant predictor of recurrent hospitalizations independently of the contribution of SPINK1 or CTRC (p < 0.001). Conclusion: These results suggest that a positive family history of pancreatitis and genetic markers in the serine protease pathways could be associated with a risk of recurrent hospitalization for acute pancreatitis in severe hypertriglyceridemia due to LPLD. PMID:24795752

  14. Diagnosis and clinical features of trigemino-autonomic headaches.

    PubMed

    May, Arne

    2013-10-01

    Although severe short-lasting headaches are rare, they can be considered disabling conditions with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. These headaches can divided broadly in to those associated with autonomic symptoms, so called trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs), and those with few or no autonomic symptoms. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicranias, hemicrania continua, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with cranial autonomic symptoms as well as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing syndrome. In all of these syndromes, half-sided head pain and ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms such as lacrimation or rhinorrhea are prominent. The paroxysmal hemicranias have, unlike cluster headaches, a very robust response to indomethacin, leading to a notion of indomethacin-sensitive headaches. The diagnosis of TACs is exclusively a clinical task. Because of the fact that cluster headache is strictly half-sided, typically involves the region around the eye and temple and often starts in the upper jaw, most patients first consult a dentist or ophthalmologist. No single instrumental examination has yet been able to define, or ensure, the correct diagnosis, or differentiate idiopathic headache syndromes. It is crucial that a trained neurologist sees these patients early so that management can be optimized and unnecessary procedures can be avoided. Although TACS are, in comparison to migraine, quite rare, they are nevertheless clinically very important for the neurologist to consider as they are easy to diagnose and the treatment is very effective in most patients.

  15. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    PubMed

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (<4 h/day) are usually not included in CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  16. Managing Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Landry, Bradford W; Fischer, Philip R; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Koch, Krista M; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia; Mack, Kenneth J; Wilder, Robert T; Bauer, Brent A; Brandenburg, Joline E

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents can be difficult for a single provider to manage in a busy clinical setting. Part of this difficulty is that pediatric chronic pain not only impacts the child but also the families of these children. In this review article, we discuss etiology and pathophysiology of chronic pain, along with variables that impact the severity of chronic pain and functional loss. We review diagnosis and management of selected chronic pain conditions in pediatric patients, including headache, low back pain, hypermobility, chronic fatigue, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, and complex regional pain syndrome. For each condition, we create a road map that contains therapy prescriptions, exercise recommendations, and variables that may influence pain severity. Potential medications for these pain conditions and associated symptoms are reviewed. A multidisciplinary approach for managing children with these conditions, including pediatric pain rehabilitation programs, is emphasized. Lastly, we discuss psychological factors and interventions for pediatric chronic pain and potential complementary and alternative natural products and interventions. PMID:26568508

  17. Headache following parturition.

    PubMed

    Adinma, J I; Agbai, A O

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of headache following childbirth in 226 Nigerian women is 24.3% (n=55) or one in four births. Headache was more prevalent among women aged between 21 and 30 years (n=44); those of social class 3-5 (n=50); and also increased incidence with increasing parity, although these relationships did not reach significance. There is a highly significant association between the incidence of postparturition headache and evidence of stress (P=0.004), but not with a history of migraine (p=0.102). A highly significant association also exists between the incidence of postparturition headache and anaemia (Hb value less than 10 g/dl (68%), (p=0.004). Headache started on the day of delivery in the majority of cases (36.4%; n=20) although the median number of days of onset after delivery was 2 days. Post-natal headache may be associated with some underlying sociomedical factors which may be influenced by the fall in pregnancy hormones following parturition.

  18. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  19. Mindfulness meditation in the control of severe headache.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tzan-Fu; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Chiu, Nien-Mu

    2002-08-01

    In the West, the use of the methods of alternative medicine, including meditation, has been on the rise. In the US, Kabat-Zinn and associates have pioneered the extensive use of mindfulness meditation (MM) for the treatment of people facing pain and illness. Among the essentials of MM is the observation of bodily sensations, including pain. In Taiwan, despite the deep cultural roots of meditation, its therapeutic use has received little attention from institutionalized medicine. We report on the case of a man who was prone to developing severe headaches due to activities requiring extreme concentration. He learned to control his pain and discomfort through mindfulness meditation, although this practice in fact induced headaches initially. It is suggested that training in MM may be a medically superior and cost-effective alternative to pain medication for the control of headaches with no underlying organic causes in highly motivated patients.

  20. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  1. Causes and Associated Factors of Headaches among 5 to 15-year-old Children Referred to a Neurology Clinic in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; SOLTANI, Babak; HAJI REZAEI, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Headaches are common neurologic problems for children and adolescents. They are divided into two types: primary and secondary. Primary headaches include migraines and tension-type as well as comprise the majority of headaches. We detect the causes of headaches and their associations with demographic variables among children and adolescents. Materials & Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 5–15 year-old children with headaches from March 2010 to April 2012 who presented at a pediatric neurology clinic in Kashan, Iran. Diagnosis of headaches was done in accordance with the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Data regarding the type of headache, age, gender, pain severity, aura, family history, and sleep disorder were collected. Results One hundred fourteen children (44 male and 70 female) with headaches were enrolled in the study. The types of headaches were comprised as follows: 67 cases of migraines, 38 cases of tension-type headaches, 2 cases of cluster headaches, and 7 cases of secondary headaches. Pulsating headaches, family history of headaches, insomnia, and pain severity had higher prevalence in migrainous patients. Conclusion Physicians should extend their information gathering about primary and secondary headaches. Sleep disturbances and a family history of headaches were the most important factors associated with migraine headaches. PMID:25767542

  2. Coping and Quality of Life in relation to headache in Dutch schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Bandell-Hoekstra, Inez E N G; Abu-Saad, Huda Hujier; Passchier, Jan; Frederiks, Carla M A; Feron, Frans J M; Knipschild, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the Quality of Life and pain coping strategies of school children in relation to headache severity. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 2815 children between the age of 9 and 17 years, who filled out Waters' Headache Questionnaire (WHQ), the Paediatric Pain Assessment Tool (PPAT), the Quality of Life Headache in Youth (QLH-Y) questionnaire and the Pain Coping Questionnaire (PCQ) in the class-room setting. Weekly headaches were reported by 22% of the sample. Low, medium, and high headache severity groups were constructed, based on headache frequency, duration and intensity criteria. Results show that children with the highest headache severity report the lowest Quality of Life in general and the lowest Quality of Health, as well as the most problems with regard to physical functioning, impact of headache on daily and leisure activities, physical symptoms other than headache, and social functioning at home. With regard to using pain coping strategies, children with the most severe headaches seek more social support, they internalize and externalize more, they use less behavioural and cognitive distraction techniques, and seek information less. PMID:12161097

  3. Systematic review of family functioning in families of children and adolescents with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Amy S.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Stinson, Jennifer; Handley, Susannah; Chambers, Christine T.

    2010-01-01

    Disturbances in family functioning have been identified in youth with chronic pain and are associated with worse child physical and psychological functioning. Assessment measures of family functioning used in research and clinical settings vary. This systematic review summarizes studies investigating relationships among family functioning, pain and pain-related disability in youth with chronic pain. Sixteen articles were reviewed. All studies were cross-sectional, seven utilized between-group comparisons (chronic pain versus healthy/control) and twelve examined within-group associations among family functioning, pain and/or pain-related disability. Studies represented youth with various pain conditions (e.g., headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia) aged 6 – 20 years. Findings revealed group differences in family functioning between children with chronic pain and healthy controls in five of seven studies. Significant associations emerged among family variables and pain-related disability in six of nine studies with worse family functioning associated with greater child disability; relationships between family functioning and children’s pain were less consistent. Different patterns of results emerged depending on family functioning measure used. Overall, findings showed that families of children with chronic pain generally have poorer family functioning than healthy populations, and that pain-related disability is more consistently related to family functioning than pain intensity. PMID:21055709

  4. Behaviour during a cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Blau, J N

    1993-09-18

    Because cluster headache is short-lasting and tends to occur during the early morning hours, physicians rarely witness an attack. Accurate diagnosis is important because effective treatments are available. The diagnosis is made from the history of temporal pattern, reddening and tearing of the affected eye, and ipsilateral nasal congestion. An additional diagnostic aid is to invite patients to demonstrate how they respond to attacks. The pain, one of the worst known, causes extreme restlessness. 50 patients showed how they walk around, sit (or kneel) and rock, and clutch the affected side of the head. Diagnostic value apart, the patient will often be relieved to learn that bizarre behavioural responses are not a mark of insanity.

  5. Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for the treatment of cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Miguel; Garcia, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severe, debilitating disorder with pain that ranks among the most severe known to humans. Patients with cluster headaches have few therapeutic options and further, 10–20% develop drug-resistant attacks. The often brief duration of cluster attacks makes abortive therapy a challenge, and preventive medications are almost always provided to patients, but the side effects of these preventive medications can be significant. The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is believed to play a role in headache pain and cranial autonomic symptoms associated with cluster headache, which is a result of activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. For over 100 years, the SPG has been a clinical target to treat primary headache disorders using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. Radiofrequency lesioning and nerve-resection therapies, while initially beneficial, are irreversible procedures, and the use of neurostimulation provides one method of interfacing with the neural pathways without causing permanent damage to neural tissue. SPG neurostimulation is both reversible and adjustable, and has recently been tested in both proof-of-concept work and in a randomized, sham-controlled trial for the treatment of cluster headache. A randomized, sham-controlled study of 32 patients was performed to evaluate further the use of SPG stimulation for the acute treatment of chronic cluster headache. Of the 32 patients, 28 completed the randomized experimental period. Overall, 68% of patients experienced an acute response, a frequency response, or both. In this study the majority of adverse events were related to the implantation procedure, which typically resolved or remained mild in nature at 3 months following the implant procedure. This and other studies highlight the promise of using SPG stimulation to treat the pain-associated cluster headache. SPG stimulation could be a safe and effective option for chronic cluster headache. PMID:24790646

  6. [Recent new information on epidemiology of headache].

    PubMed

    Kavuk, I; Katsarava, Z; Stang, A; Agelink, M W; Diener, H C

    2004-04-01

    We reviewed the epidemiology of headache disorders for the most frequent primary headache-syndromes: migraine, tension-type headache and trigemino-autonomic headache syndromes. In the last years scientific data about headache disorders have increased. New studies investigated not only the prevalence of headaches, but also economic costs of this disorder. Epidemiologic headache research also investigates the quality of life.

  7. In search of risk factors for chronic pain in adolescents: a case–control study of childhood and parental associations

    PubMed Central

    Coenders, Alies; Chapman, Cindy; Hannaford, Patricia; Jaaniste, Tiina; Qiu, Wen; Anderson, David; Glogauer, Maline; Goodison-Farnsworth, Evelyn; McCormick, Marianne; Champion, David

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate whether an individual and parental history of functional pain syndromes (FPS) is found more often in adolescents suffering from chronic pain than in their pain-free peers. Methods Our case–control study involved 101 adolescents aged 10–18 years. Cases were 45 patients of the Chronic Pain Clinic at Sydney Children’s Hospital with diverse chronic pain disorders. Controls consisted of 56 adolescent volunteers who did not have chronic pain. Adolescents and their parents filled out questionnaires assessing demographic data as well as known and potential risk factors for chronic pain. A history of FPS was assessed by questionnaire, including restless legs syndrome (RLS). Chi-squared tests and t-tests were used to investigate univariate associations between chronic pain in adolescents and lifetime prevalence of FPS. Logistic regression was used to test multivariate associations, while controlling for possible confounders. Results Migraine, non-migraine headaches, recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and RLS were reported significantly more frequently in cases than controls (P-values of 0.01, <0.001, 0.01, and 0.03, respectively). Parental migraine, RAP, and RLS were also significantly associated with adolescent chronic pain in the multivariate analyses. Individual history of migraine, non-migraine headaches, and RAP, along with parental history of RAP and depression significantly accounted for 36%–49% of variance in chronic pain. Other associations with chronic pain were generally in accordance with previous reports. Discussion It may be helpful when assessing a child who has chronic pain or is at risk of chronic pain, to enquire about these associations. Based on the current findings, an individual history of migraine, non-migraine headaches, and RAP, as well as parental migraine, RAP, and RLS are symptoms that are of particular relevance to assess. PMID:24707186

  8. Comparative study of epidural bupivacaine with butorphanol and bupivacaine with tramadol for postoperative pain relief in abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, N.; Ashwini, N.; Shukla, Mukesh I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To compare the efficacy of combination of epidural local anesthetic with tramadol and butorphanol in major abdominal surgeries. Aims: To evaluate duration of analgesia, analgesic efficacy, and safety profile of two groups of drugs-epidural butorphanol with bupivacaine and epidural tramadol with bupivacaine. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized controlled, double-blinded study was undertaken in 50 patients scheduled for major abdominal surgeries. Group B received epidural butorphanol 2 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, butorphanol 1 mg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Group T received epidural tramadol 2 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% first dose and subsequent doses, tramadol 1 mg/kg + bupivacaine 0.125% (total volume 10 ml). Observed parameters were the quality of analgesia, sedation, and hemodynamic parameters in the intra and post-operative period. Time for request of rescue analgesia was noted in all the patients. Continuous data are analyzed by Student's t-test using IBM SPSS software version 20. P ≤0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. P ≤ 0.001 was considered to be statistically highly significant. Results: Visual analog scale better with butorphanol group than tramadol (0.12 ± 0.332 and 0.84 ± 0.746 for Group B and Group T) at 30 min after first dose. Onset of action (8.44 ± 1.158 min in Group B and 12.80 ± 1.354 min in Group T) faster with butorphanol but duration of analgesia longer with tramadol (5.92 ± 0.76 h in Group B vs. 7.68 ± 0.76 h in Group T). Sedation was seen in patients with butorphanol group. Nausea and vomiting more frequent with tramadol group. Conclusions: Epidural tramadol with antiemetic is better than butorphanol for its longer duration in ambulatory surgery, elderly patients, obese patients, and suitable high-risk patients. PMID:27746533

  9. [Semeiotics of abdominal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Guseĭnov, G K; Ramazanova, A M; Guseĭnov, A G

    1984-01-01

    Examination of 119 patients with abdominal tuberculosis permitted the description of the characteristic semiotics of the illness. Today the patients with abdominal tuberculosis are mainly women of child-bearing age with a long-term tuberculosis catamnesis and intoxication, with a history of tuberculosis of different sites, those suffering from tuberculosis or its sequels at present (64%), those with pains (94%), discomfort or swelling of the abdomen (79%), malfunction of the gastrointestinal tract (65%), weight loss (86%), malnutrition (72%), anemia (63%), not infrequently with inflammatory induration (43%) or ascites in the abdominal cavity (39%). In addition to this characteristic semiotics, the patients with abdominal tuberculosis may demonstrate the most different and unexpected symptoms up to acute abdomen (23%). To make differential diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis, one has often to resort to diagnostic laparotomy, laparoscopy, Koch's test and to trial therapy.

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Sleep and Headache.

    PubMed

    Dosi, Claudia; Figura, Mariagrazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Bruni, Oliviero

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between sleep and headache or migraine is powerful and an elevated comorbidity between these 2 disorders has been reported in either adults or children. This comobidity is linked to common neurophysiological and neuroanatomical substrates that are genetically based strongly. The first reports on this relationship were related to the prevalence of parasomnias and sleep-disordered breathing in headache but recent research has expanded the comorbidity to several other sleep disorders, such as restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movements during sleep, and narcolepsy. The assessment of children with headache should always include an accurate anamnesis for the presence of sleep problems either in the child or in the relatives; no correct approach for treating children and adolescents is possible without an integrated method of evaluation and management.

  12. Headache and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bauer, P R; Carpay, J A; Terwindt, G M; Sander, J W; Thijs, R J; Haan, J; Visser, G H

    2013-08-01

    Headache and epilepsy often co-occur. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past few years reinforce the notion of a bi-directional association between migraine and epilepsy. Data on an association between headache (in general) and epilepsy, however, are less clear. Peri-ictal headache often presents with migraine-like symptoms and can be severe. A correct diagnosis and management are paramount. It was demonstrated that cortical hyperexcitability may underlie both epilepsy and migraine. A recent study linked spreading depolarisation, the supposed underlying pathophysiological mechanism of migraine with aura, to epilepsy. Although this study was carried out in patients who had suffered a subarachnoid haemorrhage, the finding may shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms common to epilepsy and migraine.

  13. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. PMID:27017019

  14. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

  15. Cervicogenic headache alleviation after cervical coblation nucleoplasty: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    He, Liangliang; Yue, Jianning; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Cao, Guoqing; Guo, Yuna; Lai, Guanghui; Tang, Yuanzhang; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2016-09-01

    A degenerative cervical disc is a pain generator for headaches, and headaches can benefit from cervical prolapse surgery. However, as an alternative intervention for open cervical surgery, no study has reported whether headaches can benefit from cervical nucleoplasty.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cervical coblation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervicogenic headaches.In a prospective cohort study performed between December 2013 and August 2015, 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing cervical nucleoplasty for shoulder-arm pain were recruited into group C, and 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing lumbar nucleoplasty for low back pain, matched for age and sex, were recruited into group L. Cervicogenic pain was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society criteria. During the 24-month follow-up, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected as the primary outcomes, and significant pain relief rate, Neck Disability Index (NDI) headache scores, and Patients Satisfaction Index (PSI) scores were recorded as secondary outcomes to evaluate headache severity and physical function postoperatively.During the 24-month follow-up, a significant decrease in headache VAS scores was observed in group C but not in group L. NDI and PSI scores in group C were better than those in group L. In comparison with the final follow-up, no significant differences in the NDI and PSI scores were found in all observations after surgery. In comparison to group L, ≥50% pain relief was significantly better in group C. No serious complications were observed except for ≤20% of ecchymoma at the needle insertion site.This prospective study indicated that cervicogenic headaches may benefit from nucleoplasty.

  16. Cervicogenic headache alleviation after cervical coblation nucleoplasty: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    He, Liangliang; Yue, Jianning; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Cao, Guoqing; Guo, Yuna; Lai, Guanghui; Tang, Yuanzhang; Ni, Jiaxiang

    2016-09-01

    A degenerative cervical disc is a pain generator for headaches, and headaches can benefit from cervical prolapse surgery. However, as an alternative intervention for open cervical surgery, no study has reported whether headaches can benefit from cervical nucleoplasty.The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cervical coblation nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervicogenic headaches.In a prospective cohort study performed between December 2013 and August 2015, 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing cervical nucleoplasty for shoulder-arm pain were recruited into group C, and 20 patients with cervicogenic headaches undergoing lumbar nucleoplasty for low back pain, matched for age and sex, were recruited into group L. Cervicogenic pain was diagnosed according to the International Headache Society criteria. During the 24-month follow-up, pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores were collected as the primary outcomes, and significant pain relief rate, Neck Disability Index (NDI) headache scores, and Patients Satisfaction Index (PSI) scores were recorded as secondary outcomes to evaluate headache severity and physical function postoperatively.During the 24-month follow-up, a significant decrease in headache VAS scores was observed in group C but not in group L. NDI and PSI scores in group C were better than those in group L. In comparison with the final follow-up, no significant differences in the NDI and PSI scores were found in all observations after surgery. In comparison to group L, ≥50% pain relief was significantly better in group C. No serious complications were observed except for ≤20% of ecchymoma at the needle insertion site.This prospective study indicated that cervicogenic headaches may benefit from nucleoplasty. PMID:27684803

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. PMID:27475510

  18. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  19. Pain relief for infants undergoing abdominal surgery: comparison of infusions of i.v. morphine and extradural bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized double-blind study to compare extradural bupivacaine infusions with i.v. morphine infusions for postoperative analgesia in 32 infants younger than 4 yr undergoing abdominal surgery. "Sham" extradural or i.v. catheters were used to maintain the blinded nature of the study. Both techniques provided adequate analgesia for most of the 36-h postoperative period; differences in the pattern or quality of the analgesia were not detected. Patients in the i.v. morphine group were significantly more sedated; this was accompanied by slower ventilatory frequencies (26.7 (SD 1.8) b.p.m.) compared with the extradural group (33.6 (1.3) b.p.m.). Similarly, oxygen saturation was significantly less (P < 0.01) in patients receiving morphine (medians and quartiles of 94.0 (93-96)% compared with 96.0 (93-96)%). Mean systolic arterial pressure was similar in the two groups and there were no life-threatening complications. The lack of sedation was troublesome in three patients in the extradural group.

  20. Pain relief for infants undergoing abdominal surgery: comparison of infusions of i.v. morphine and extradural bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized double-blind study to compare extradural bupivacaine infusions with i.v. morphine infusions for postoperative analgesia in 32 infants younger than 4 yr undergoing abdominal surgery. "Sham" extradural or i.v. catheters were used to maintain the blinded nature of the study. Both techniques provided adequate analgesia for most of the 36-h postoperative period; differences in the pattern or quality of the analgesia were not detected. Patients in the i.v. morphine group were significantly more sedated; this was accompanied by slower ventilatory frequencies (26.7 (SD 1.8) b.p.m.) compared with the extradural group (33.6 (1.3) b.p.m.). Similarly, oxygen saturation was significantly less (P < 0.01) in patients receiving morphine (medians and quartiles of 94.0 (93-96)% compared with 96.0 (93-96)%). Mean systolic arterial pressure was similar in the two groups and there were no life-threatening complications. The lack of sedation was troublesome in three patients in the extradural group. PMID:8431313

  1. Mast cell gastritis: Children complaining of chronic abdominal pain with histologically normal gastric mucosal biopsies except for increase in mast cells, proposing a new entity

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Fatemeh E; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Pourpak, Zahra; Asefi, Hoda; Amini, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    Background Mast cells reside within the connective tissue of a variety of tissues and all vascularized organs. Since 1996, few studies have been performed on mast cell density in gastrointestinal biopsies, mainly in adult age group. We recently studied mast cell density in pediatric age group on rather larger number of cases in a referral children hospital. Mast cell density was 12.6 ± 0.87 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 0-81) in our study. Since we frequently encounter cases with rather normal gastric biopsies with no H.pylori, which mainly complain of chronic abdominal pain, we gathered those cases with mast cell density more than 30/0.25 mm2. from 895 gastric biopsies and wanted to study their clinical and endoscopic findings and propose a new entity. Methods Between April 2005 and May 2008, 895 children (< 14 years old), with gastrointestinal complaints who underwent endoscopy were selected and antral biopsies were obtained for histological examination. Among these children, those who had normal or erythematous (but not nodular or ulcerative) gastric mucosa on endoscopic view, plus pathologic report of normal mucosa or mild gastritis in addition to mast cell count more than 30/25 mm2, were chosen and a questionnaire was filled for each patient including clinical, endoscopic and pathologic findings. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 13 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Over a 3 year period of study, of 895 selected children, 86 patients fulfilled the entrance criteria. The major complaint of patients was recurrent abdominal pain. The mean mast cell density was 45.59 ± 13.81 in 0.25 mm2 (range: 30-93). Among our cases, about 67.4% (n = 58) had 30 to 49, 23.3% (n = 20) had 50 to 69, 8.1% (n = 7) had 70 to 89 and 1.2% (n = 1) had 93 mast cells/0.25 mm2 in their specimens Discussion In 29% of our cases, neither endoscopic nor pathologic change was detected and only increase in mast cell number was reported and in others endoscopic and

  2. Epidemiological, clinical and pharmacological aspects of headache in a university undergraduate population in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Sweileh, W M; Sawalha, A F; Zyoud, S H; Al-Jabi, S W; Shamseh, F F B; Khalaf, H S

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the most common complaints in clinical practice. Few studies regarding headache in university students have been conducted in the Middle East. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence, clinical characteristics, triggering factors and treatment options of headaches in university undergraduate students in Palestine/Middle East. Data were collected by interviewing a sample of 1900 students. The Headache Assessment Quiz was used to measure quality and severity of headache and to collect data on triggering factors and symptom management. A total of 1808 (95.2%) reported having at least one headache episode in the previous year. A positive family history of headache was found in 40% of students. The prevalence rate of frequent headache (tow or more episodes/month) was found in 1096 (60.9%) students; 613 women (55.9%). Of those having frequent headaches, 228 (20.8%) experienced moderate to severe episodes, 341 (31.2%) had pulsating, throbbing and pounding pain, and 274 (25%) had unilateral pain. The most common triggering factors among students with frequent headaches were: tension/stress (78.2%) and sleep deprivation (75.4%). Less than 5% of students sought medical assistance during headache episodes. Most students (79.1%) reported self-therapy with a single analgesic (53.4%), herbs (10.2%) or combination (15.5%), while 20.9% reported using no medication of any type to decrease pain. Paracetamol (48.5%) followed by ibuprofen (4.9%) were the most commonly used non-prescription analgesic drugs. Headache is a prevalent symptom in the college age population. Further research is needed to determine the prevalence of specific types of headaches. Healthcare providers are required to educate this population as well as to assist students in properly diagnosing and treating headache types. PMID:19673913

  3. Business management of headache centers.

    PubMed

    Nappi, G; Micieli, G; Cavallini, A; Rossi, G; Rossi, G; Rossi, F

    1998-02-01

    Economic evaluation of the costs and benefits of a headache center or unit has become very important for headache specialists. Many of the problems concerning this "financial" approach to headache derive from the model of organization of the Headache Unit, which is dependent on the various approaches to healthcare practiced in the country considered. So far there are two models of headache center that are generally considered: the hospital-based center and the independent center. An argument favoring hospital-based headache clinics is the lower costs, primarily because of their functional connection with the services of a general hospital, i.e., neuroradiology, neurophysiology, routine laboratory analysis, etc. Another is that the headache specialist has the possibility to visit the patients presenting to the emergency room in the acute phase of headache. Independent clinics have greater costs, but are equally as effective as hospital-based models. PMID:9533678

  4. Contraception and headache.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, E Anne

    2013-02-01

    Most women have used at least 1 method of contraception during their reproductive years, with the majority favoring combined oral contraceptives. Women are often concerned about the safety of their method of choice and also ask about likely effects on their pre-existing headache or migraine and restrictions on using their headache medication. While there should be no restriction to the use of combined hormonal contraceptives by women with migraine without aura, the balance of risks vs benefits for women with aura are debatable. Migraine with aura, but not migraine without aura, is associated with a twofold increased risk of ischemic stroke, although the absolute risk is very low in healthy, nonsmoking women. Although ethinylestradiol has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, the risk is dose-dependent. Low-dose pills currently used are considerably safer than pills containing higher doses of ethinylestradiol but they are not risk-free. This review examines the evidence available regarding the effect that different methods of contraception have on headache and migraine and identifies strategies available to minimize risk and to manage specific triggers such as estrogen "withdrawal" headache and migraine associated with combined hormonal contraceptives. The independent risks of ischemic stroke associated with migraine and with hormonal contraceptives are reviewed, and guidelines for use of contraception by women with migraine are discussed in light of the current evidence. PMID:23432442

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  6. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. PMID:27017024

  7. The pipeline in headache therapy.

    PubMed

    Vollbracht, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, neurovascular disorder characterized by episodic attacks of head pain and associated disability plus systemic autonomic and neurologic symptoms. The advent of the triptan class of medication in the 1990s revolutionized the acute treatment of migraine, but many migraineurs do not respond optimally or at all to triptans, have intolerable adverse effects, or have contraindications to their use. Preventive pharmacotherapy has advanced mostly through serendipity, with new drugs being found effective while being used for other indications. There remains a significant need for new medications and devices that can provide effective, rapid, and sustained pain relief without adverse effects or recurrence. Several new acute and preventive therapies for the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches have shown promise and are currently under investigation. This article covers innovative delivery mechanisms, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor modulators, orexin receptor antagonists, glial cell modulators, and neurostimulation. PMID:23839594

  8. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia. PMID:16684636

  9. Post-Lumbar Puncture Headache Etiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, John R.; Raymond, Patrick A.

    1988-01-01

    Headache following a lumbar puncture is a common and often debilitating syndrome. Continued leakage of cerebrospinal fluid from a puncture site decreases intracranial pressure, which leads to traction on pain-sensitive intracranial structures. The headache is characteristically postural, often associated with nausea and optic, vestibular, or otic symptoms. Although usually self-limited after a few days, severe postural pain can incapacitate the patient. Management is mainly symptomatic, but definitive treatment with the epidural blood patching technique is safe and effective when done by an expert operator. PMID:3176458

  10. Bowel perforation presenting with acute abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema in a 14-year-old girl with an abandoned distal peritoneal shunt catheter: case report.

    PubMed

    Riccardello, Gerald J; Barr, Luke K; Bassani, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    The authors report the case of 14-year-old girl with a history of myelomeningocele and previously shunt-treated hydrocephalus who presented with right-sided abdominal pain and subcutaneous emphysema that developed over a 1-week period. A CT scan of the patient's abdomen revealed a retained distal ventriculoperitoneal (VP) catheter with air tracking from the catheter to the upper chest wall. Given the high suspicion of the catheter being intraluminal, an exploratory laparotomy was performed and revealed multiple jejunal perforations. The patient required a partial small-bowel resection and reanastomosis for complete removal of the retained catheter. Six other similar cases of bowel perforation occurring in patients with abandoned VP and subdural-peritoneal shunts have been reported. The authors analyzed these cases with regard to age of presentation, symptomatic presentation, management, morbidity, and mortality. While there was 0% mortality associated with bowel perforation secondary to a retained distal VP catheter, the morbidity was significantly high and included peritonitis and small bowel resection.

  11. Wound infiltration with plain bupivacaine as compared with bupivacaine fentanyl mixture for postoperative pain relief after abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chander, Reetika; Liddle, Dootika; Kaur, Baljinder; Varghese, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of wound infiltration with Bupivacaine or Bupivacaine with fentanyl for post operative analgesia. Background: The role of Bupivacaine and fentanyl mixture as wound infiltration for post operative analgesia is less explored in human subjects. Materials and Methods: This prospective, randomized included 60 ASA grade I, II, and III patients in the age group of 20-75 years of age. The patients were randomized into two groups of 30 patients each: Group A received wound infiltration with a solution containing 0.5% bupivacaine (2 mg/kg), while, Group B received infiltration with a solution containing fentanyl 25 μg added to 0.5% bupivacaine (2 mg/kg). Results: None of the patients in both groups had unbearable incisional pain but addition of fentanyl to 0.5% bupivacaine reduced analgesic consumption in the postoperative period (P<0.05). Conclusion: Addition of opioids to local anesthetics results in better postoperative analgesia and reduced opioid requirement post operatively. PMID:25885377

  12. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Migraines: What a Pain! KidsHealth > For Kids > Migraines: What ... coming and how to avoid them. What's a Migraine? Almost everyone gets headaches . You might have one ...

  13. Tension - Type - Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi, Marzieh; Ghanbari, Ali; Rahimi Jaberi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    Tension Type Headache (T.T.H) is the most prevalent headache. Myofascial abnormalities & trigger points are important in this type of headache which can be managed by Positional Release Therapy (PRT). This is a report of a 47 years old female patient with Tension Type Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. She had a constant dull headache, which continued all the day for 9 months. A physiotherapist evaluated the patient and found active trigger points in her cervical muscles. Then, she received Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. After 3 treatment sessions, the patient's headache stopped completely. During the 8 months following the treatment she was without pain, and did not use any medication. Positional Release Therapy was effective in treating Tension Type Headache. This suggests that PRT could be an alternative treatment to medication in patients with T.T.H if the effectiveness of that can be confirmed by further studies.

  14. Tension - Type - Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mohamadi, Marzieh; Ghanbari, Ali; Rahimi Jaberi, Abbas

    2012-10-01

    Tension Type Headache (T.T.H) is the most prevalent headache. Myofascial abnormalities & trigger points are important in this type of headache which can be managed by Positional Release Therapy (PRT). This is a report of a 47 years old female patient with Tension Type Headache treated by Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. She had a constant dull headache, which continued all the day for 9 months. A physiotherapist evaluated the patient and found active trigger points in her cervical muscles. Then, she received Positional Release Therapy for her trigger points. After 3 treatment sessions, the patient's headache stopped completely. During the 8 months following the treatment she was without pain, and did not use any medication. Positional Release Therapy was effective in treating Tension Type Headache. This suggests that PRT could be an alternative treatment to medication in patients with T.T.H if the effectiveness of that can be confirmed by further studies. PMID:22561484

  15. Behavioral management of headache in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Faedda, Noemi; Cerutti, Rita; Verdecchia, Paola; Migliorini, Daniele; Arruda, Marco; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Headache is the most frequent neurological symptom and the most prevalent pain in children and adolescents, and constitutes a serious health problem that may lead to impairment in several areas. Psychosocial factors, social environment, life events, school and family stressors are all closely related to headaches. A multidisciplinary strategy is fundamental in addressing headache in children and adolescents. Applying such a strategy can lead to reductions in frequency and severity of the pain, improving significantly the quality of life of these children.It has been demonstrated that behavioral intervention is highly effective, especially in the treatment of paediatric headache, and can enhance or replace pharmacotherapy, with the advantage of eliminating dangerous side effects and or reducing costs. Behavioral interventions appear to maximize long-term therapeutic benefits and improve compliance with pharmacological treatment, which has proven a significant problem with child and adolescent with headache.The goal of this review is to examine the existing literature on behavioral therapies used to treat headache in children and adolescents, and so provide an up-to-date picture of what behavioral therapy is and what its effectiveness is. PMID:27596923

  16. Headaches in medical school students.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, J M; Matos, E; Calheiros, J M

    1994-01-01

    Medical students of the Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas 'Abel Salazar' at the University of Oporto were interviewed using a structured headache questionnaire in order to assess the prevalence and characteristics of headaches in a young adult university population. This was the first population-based study of headaches in Portugal. 491 students were questioned. The parameters evaluated included age, sex, headache characteristics (frequency, localization, severity, duration), premonitory and associated symptoms and family history. Headaches were classified using the Ad Hoc Committee (1962) and the International Headache Society (1988) criteria. There was a high prevalence of overall headaches in this young population. The results of the application of these two types of criteria to the same population showed for the most prevalent forms, migraine and tension-type headaches, a prevalence that depends on the classification adopted and the number of criteria items considered. If all (9 items) were used, the statistics obtained for migraine were 6.9% (Ad Hoc) and 6.1% (IHS), an insignificant difference, and for tension-type headache 14.3% (Ad Hoc) and 16.0% (IHS), which corresponds to a significant difference (p = 0.0129, McNemar test). It is concluded that IHS classification criteria identify less cases of migraine and more cases of tension-type headaches, which means a higher specificity for migraine and a higher sensitivity for tension-type headache.

  17. Imaging of Headache in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Skliut, Maryna; Jamieson, Dara G

    2016-10-01

    Pregnant women are most likely to have primary headaches, such as migraine and tension-type headaches, which can be diagnosed and treated without brain imaging. Primary headaches may even start de novo during pregnancy, especially in the first few months. However, when the headache occurs late in pregnancy or in the peripartum period, secondary causes of headaches need to be considered and evaluated by brain and/or vascular imaging, generally using magnetic resonance techniques. There is considerable overlap between the cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy, including preeclampsia/eclampsia, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes; although, their imaging may be distinctive. Imaging is necessary to distinguish between arterial and venous pathology causing headache in the peripartum patient, as there can be similar presenting symptoms. Mass lesions, both neoplastic and inflammatory, can enlarge and produce headaches and neurological symptoms late in pregnancy. PMID:27562782

  18. Headache and sferics.

    PubMed

    Vaitl, D; Propson, N; Stark, R; Walter, B; Schienle, A

    2001-10-01

    Many patients with migraine believe weather is a trigger for their headaches. The objective of this study was to determine if very low frequency sferics, pulse-shaped electromagnetic fields originating from atmospheric discharges (lightning), are precipitating factors. The occurrence of sferics impulses is characterized by a daily, as well as an annual, periodicity and is thought to be associated with various pathological processes. The diaries of 37 women suffering from migraine and tension-type headaches were analyzed over a period of 6 months and correlated with daily sferics activity and other weather phenomena in the area of Giessen, Germany. From October through December (autumn), sferics activity was correlated with the occurrence of migraine (r = 0.33, P<.01); however, there was no correlation in July and August (summer), when the thunderstorm activity had been very intense. In summer, tension-type headaches were associated with other weather parameters such as temperature (r = 0.36, P<.01) and vapor pressure (r = 0.27, P<.05). PMID:11703470

  19. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck.

  20. Examination of the diagnostic validity of 'headache attributed to whiplash injury': a controlled, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Schrader, H; Stovner, L J; Obelieniene, D; Surkiene, D; Mickeviciene, D; Bovim, G; Sand, T

    2006-11-01

    Acute and chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury are new diagnostic entities in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition. A main objective of the present study was to assess the validity of these nosologic entities by studying the headache pattern in an inception cohort of 210 rear-end car collision victims and in 210 matched controls. Consecutive drivers involved in rear-end collisions were identified from the daily records of the Traffic Police Department of Kaunas, Lithuania. A standard self-report questionnaire was sent to the drivers between 2 and 7 days after the collision, and their passengers were recruited as well. Headache and neck pain were evaluated within 7 days of the collision, at 2 months and 1 year after the collision. A control group of non-traumatized subjects received questionnaires at the time of the selection and 1 year later. Of the 75 collision victims who developed headache within the first 7 days of the collision, 37 had a clinical picture in accordance with the criteria for acute whiplash headache (i.e., concomitant neck pain) and 38 did not. For acute headache after collision, concomitant neck pain was of no relevance to the headache type or its course. In both these subgroups, migraine and tension-type headache could be diagnosed in similar proportions and the prognosis after 2 months and 1 year was also similar. Preexisting headache was a strong prognostic factor in both groups for both acute and chronic pain. Compared with the non-traumatized control group, the 1-year incidence of new or worsened headache, or of headache improvement, was the same. A likely interpretation of the data is that acute headaches after rear-end car collisions mainly represent episodes of a primary headache precipitated by the stress of the situation. We conclude that the nosologic validity of both acute and chronic whiplash headache is poor as the headaches, in accordance with the criteria lack distinguishing clinical

  1. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  2. [Different headache forms of chapter 4 of the International Headache Classification].

    PubMed

    Göbel, A; Heinze, A; Göbel, H

    2012-12-01

    Chapter 4 of the International Classification of Headaches contains a group of clinically very heterogeneous primary headache forms. Little is known about the pathogenesis of these headache types and therapy is usually based on isolated case reports and uncontrolled studies. The forms include primary stabbing headache, primary cough headache, primary exertional headache, primary headache associated with sexual activity, hypnic headache, primary thunderclap headache, hemicrania continua and the new daily persistent headache. Some of these headache forms may be of a symptomatic nature and require careful examination, imaging and further tests. Primary and secondary headache forms must be carefully distinguished.

  3. Medication-overuse headache: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2016-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research. MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1–2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research in MOH epidemiology, pathophysiology, and neuroimaging. Randomized and long-term follow-up studies on MOH treatment protocols are needed. Further focused research could be of major importance for global health. PMID:27493718

  4. Nummular headache: Clinico-epidemiological features in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, K.; Mundayadan, Shyma M.; Mathew, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Context: Nummular headache (NH) is a primary disorder characterized by head pain exclusively felt in a small-rounded area typically 2–6 cm in diameter. Aims: The aim of this review is to study the clinical and epidemiological features of NH in a patient population of South India and to compare this with that of described in the international literature. Settings and Design: A prospective, observational study conducted in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Patients attending the medicine and neurology outpatient departments of a tertiary referral hospital in South India diagnosed to have NH as per the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 beta (2013) criteria were studied over 30 months. All of the patients had a normal neurological examination. Neuroimaging findings were normal, except in one patient. Results: A total of 19 females and 10 males were studied. The mean age of onset was 47.62 years (range 36–60). The duration of headache varied from a minimum of 3 months to a maximum of 5 years, with a mean of 24.17 months. The site of headache was predominantly in the parietal area 15 (51.72%), followed by the occipital area 7 (24.13%). The mean diameter of the affected area was 3.23 cm. The intensity of the headache proved to be mild to moderate with a mean visual analog scale score of 5.03. The quality of pain was mainly felt as burning dysesthesia 12 (41.38%). In the majority of patients, i.e. 21 (72.41%), pain was chronic and continuous. None of the patients had any significant trophic change even though paresthesias, dysesthesias, and allodynia were reported by a significant minority of patients, i.e. 9 (31.03%). Only one (3.45%) patient gave a history of head injury. Ten (34.48%) out of 29 patients had other types of concurrent headaches; the majority of which proved to be migrainous, i.e. 7 (24.14%), 2 patients (6.89%) with tension headache, and 1 patient (3.45%) with trigeminal neuralgia. Conclusion: Our study proves the

  5. Nummular headache: Clinico-epidemiological features in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rammohan, K.; Mundayadan, Shyma M.; Mathew, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Context: Nummular headache (NH) is a primary disorder characterized by head pain exclusively felt in a small-rounded area typically 2–6 cm in diameter. Aims: The aim of this review is to study the clinical and epidemiological features of NH in a patient population of South India and to compare this with that of described in the international literature. Settings and Design: A prospective, observational study conducted in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Patients attending the medicine and neurology outpatient departments of a tertiary referral hospital in South India diagnosed to have NH as per the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3 beta (2013) criteria were studied over 30 months. All of the patients had a normal neurological examination. Neuroimaging findings were normal, except in one patient. Results: A total of 19 females and 10 males were studied. The mean age of onset was 47.62 years (range 36–60). The duration of headache varied from a minimum of 3 months to a maximum of 5 years, with a mean of 24.17 months. The site of headache was predominantly in the parietal area 15 (51.72%), followed by the occipital area 7 (24.13%). The mean diameter of the affected area was 3.23 cm. The intensity of the headache proved to be mild to moderate with a mean visual analog scale score of 5.03. The quality of pain was mainly felt as burning dysesthesia 12 (41.38%). In the majority of patients, i.e. 21 (72.41%), pain was chronic and continuous. None of the patients had any significant trophic change even though paresthesias, dysesthesias, and allodynia were reported by a significant minority of patients, i.e. 9 (31.03%). Only one (3.45%) patient gave a history of head injury. Ten (34.48%) out of 29 patients had other types of concurrent headaches; the majority of which proved to be migrainous, i.e. 7 (24.14%), 2 patients (6.89%) with tension headache, and 1 patient (3.45%) with trigeminal neuralgia. Conclusion: Our study proves the

  6. Cortical plasticity in episodic and chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Naegel, Steffen; Holle, Dagny; Desmarattes, Nathalie; Theysohn, Nina; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Katsarava, Zaza; Obermann, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciatingly painful, unilateral headache attacks typically accompanied by trigeminal autonomic symptoms. Due to its rhythm with alternating episodes of pain and no-pain, it is an excellent model to investigate whether structural brain changes detected by magnetic resonance based voxel-based-morphometry (VBM) reflect the cause of the disease, may be a consequence of the underlying disease other than pain, or may simply be caused by the sensation of pain itself. We investigated 91 patients with CH in different stages of their disease using VBM and compared them to 78 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We detected distinct regional gray matter (GM) changes in different brain regions including the temporal lobe, the hippocampus, the insular cortex and the cerebellum. The extent, location and direction of observed GM alterations depended on the state of disease and appeared dynamic in relation to pain state (i.e., pain vs. no-pain). No hypothalamic changes were detected in CH patients compared to healthy controls. The GM changes observed in this study are highly dynamic and thereby reflect the cortical plasticity of the brain in regard to pain. This observed dynamic may provide an explanation of the diverse results of previous VBM studies in pain. Regarding CH the results suggest that the disease is more likely to be caused by a network dysfunction rather than by a single malfunctioning structure. PMID:25379455

  7. Idiopathic Focal Eosinophilic Enteritis (IFEE), an Emerging Cause of Abdominal Pain in Horses: The Effect of Age, Time and Geographical Location on Risk

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Debra C.; Costain, Deborah A.; Sherlock, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic focal eosinophilic enteritis (IFEE) is an emerging cause of abdominal pain (colic) in horses that frequently requires surgical intervention to prevent death. The epidemiology of IFEE is poorly understood and it is difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. The aetiology of this condition and methods of possible prevention are currently unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate temporal and spatial heterogeneity in IFEE risk and to ascertain the effect of horse age on risk. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective, nested case-control study was undertaken using data from 85 IFEE cases and 848 randomly selected controls admitted to a UK equine hospital for exploratory laparotomy to investigate the cause of colic over a 10-year period. Generalised additive models (GAMs) were used to quantify temporal and age effects on the odds of IFEE and to provide mapped estimates of ‘residual’ risk over the study region. The relative risk of IFEE increased over the study period (p = 0.001) and a seasonal pattern was evident (p<0.01) with greatest risk of IFEE being identified between the months of July and November. IFEE risk decreased with increasing age (p<0.001) with younger (0–5 years old) horses being at greatest risk. The mapped surface estimate exhibited significantly atypical sub-regions (p<0.001) with increased IFEE risk in horses residing in the North-West of the study region. Conclusions/Significance IFEE was found to exhibit both spatial and temporal variation in risk and is more likely to occur in younger horses. This information may help to identify horses at increased risk of IFEE, provide clues about the aetiology of this condition and to identify areas that require further research. PMID:25463382

  8. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  9. Occipital neuromodulation for refractory headache in the Chiari malformation population.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Sudhakar; Bolognese, Paolo; Milhorat, Thomas H; Mogilner, Alon Y

    2011-01-01

    Chronic occipital and suboccipital headache is a common symptom in patients with Chiari I malformation (CMI). These headaches may persist despite appropriate surgical treatment of the underlying pathology via suboccipital decompression, duraplasty and related procedures. Occipital stimulation has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a variety of occipital headache/pain syndromes. We present our series of 18 patients with CMI and persistent occipital headaches who underwent occipital neurostimulator trials and, following successful trials, permanent stimulator placement. Seventy-two percent (13/18) of patients had a successful stimulator trial and proceeded to permanent implant. Of those implanted, 11/13 (85%) reported continued pain relief at a mean follow-up of 23 months. Device-related complications requiring additional surgeries occurred in 31% of patients. Occipital neuromodulation may provide significant long-term pain relief in selected CMI patients with persistent occipital pain. Larger and longer-term studies are needed to further define appropriate patient selection criteria as well as to refine the surgical technique to minimize device-related complications. PMID:21422782

  10. Comprehensive Application of the International Classification of Headache Disorders Third Edition, Beta Version

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Su; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Park, Kwang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and usefulness of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition, beta version (ICHD-3β), and compare the differences with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD-2). Consecutive first-visit patients were recruited from 11 headache clinics in Korea. Headache classification was performed in accordance with ICHD-3β. The characteristics of headaches were analyzed and the feasibility and usefulness of this version was assessed by the proportion of unclassified headache disorders compared with ICHD-2. A total of 1,627 patients were enrolled (mean age, 47.4±14.7 yr; 62.8% female). Classification by ICHD-3β was achieved in 97.8% of headache patients, whereas 90.0% could be classified by ICHD-2. Primary headaches (n=1,429, 87.8%) were classified as follows: 697 migraines, 445 tension-type headaches, 22 cluster headaches, and 265 other primary headache disorders. Secondary headache or painful cranial neuropathies/other facial pains were diagnosed in 163 patients (10.0%). Only 2.2% were not classified by ICHD-3β. The main reasons for missing classifications were insufficient information (1.6%) or absence of suitable classification (0.6%). The diagnoses differed from those using ICHD-2 in 243 patients (14.9%). Among them, 165 patients were newly classified from unclassified with ICHD-2 because of the relaxation of the previous strict criteria or the introduction of a new diagnostic category. ICHD-3β would yield a higher classification rate than its previous version, ICHD-2. ICHD-3β is applicable in clinical practice for first-visit headache patients of a referral hospital. PMID:26770045

  11. Comprehensive Application of the International Classification of Headache Disorders Third Edition, Beta Version.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Kun; Cho, Soo-Jin; Kim, Byung-Su; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Cha, Myoung-Jin; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Moon, Heui-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and usefulness of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition, beta version (ICHD-3β), and compare the differences with the International Classification of Headache Disorders, second edition (ICHD-2). Consecutive first-visit patients were recruited from 11 headache clinics in Korea. Headache classification was performed in accordance with ICHD-3β. The characteristics of headaches were analyzed and the feasibility and usefulness of this version was assessed by the proportion of unclassified headache disorders compared with ICHD-2. A total of 1,627 patients were enrolled (mean age, 47.4±14.7 yr; 62.8% female). Classification by ICHD-3β was achieved in 97.8% of headache patients, whereas 90.0% could be classified by ICHD-2. Primary headaches (n=1,429, 87.8%) were classified as follows: 697 migraines, 445 tension-type headaches, 22 cluster headaches, and 265 other primary headache disorders. Secondary headache or painful cranial neuropathies/other facial pains were diagnosed in 163 patients (10.0%). Only 2.2% were not classified by ICHD-3β. The main reasons for missing classifications were insufficient information (1.6%) or absence of suitable classification (0.6%). The diagnoses differed from those using ICHD-2 in 243 patients (14.9%). Among them, 165 patients were newly classified from unclassified with ICHD-2 because of the relaxation of the previous strict criteria or the introduction of a new diagnostic category. ICHD-3β would yield a higher classification rate than its previous version, ICHD-2. ICHD-3β is applicable in clinical practice for first-visit headache patients of a referral hospital.

  12. Identified risk factors and adolescents' beliefs about triggers for headaches: results from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Milde-Busch, Astrid; Straube, Andreas; Heinen, Florian; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2012-11-01

    Although there are few studies on adolescents' beliefs about triggers of headache, none of these compared the associations between perceived and observed triggers. This study aimed at comparing the prevalence of self-perceived and observed risk factors for headache among adolescents. Adolescents from the 10th and 11th grades of high schools answered questionnaires on their headaches and on potential risk factors regarding lifestyle, stress and muscle pain. Individuals reporting to have experienced headache in the preceding 6 months were asked to report what they believed to cause their headache (self-perceived triggers). 1,047 (83 %) of 1,260 adolescents reported headaches. Stress, lack of sleep and too much school work were the most frequently reported self-perceived triggers of headache; in contrast the statistical analysis identified alcohol and coffee consumption, smoking, neck pain, stress and physical inactivity as risk factors for headache. Among individuals with headache, 48 % believed that stress might trigger their headaches, while increased stress scores were only observed in 23 %. In contrast, while 7, 4, 0.3 and 0 % of individuals reporting headache considered consumption of too much alcohol, neck pain, physical inactivity and consumption of coffee might trigger their headache, 56, 51, 36 and 14 %, respectively, were exposed to these risk factors. The prevalence of self-perceived triggers of headache does not correspond to the prevalence of identified risk factors for headaches. While the role of stress was overestimated, the high prevalence of the other confirmed risk factors in adolescents with headache suggests potential for prevention by increasing awareness for these risk factors and appropriate interventions.

  13. Laparoscopic excision of intra-abdominal paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Young; Kang, Chang-Moo; Choi, Gi-Hong; Yang, Woo-Ick; Sim, Seo-Bo; Kwon, Ji-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Choi, Jin-Sub; Lee, Woo-Jung; Kim, Byong-Ro

    2007-12-01

    Lung fluke, Paragonimus westermani of Paragonimus species usually are accompanied by a persistent cough, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Extrapulmonary paragonimiasis caused by ectopic parasites in aberrant locations such as the abdominal wall, abdominal organs, and brain has been reported and the most commonly involved extrapulmonary organ is the brain. We present a case of 56-year-old male patient with intra-abdominal paragonimiasis who underwent laparoscopic excision of abdominal granuloma caused by parasite infection. An intra-abdominal mass associated with eosinophilia might be related to parasite infection. A laparoscopic approach is the most appropriate treatment modality in such benign abdominal pathology.

  14. Diagnosing and managing peripartum headache

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Gelpi, Brian; Wortman, Alison; Tao, Weike

    2015-01-01

    A 38-year-old gravida 7 para 5 Hispanic woman at 36 weeks and 4 days gestation presented with a postpartum headache following vaginal delivery complicated by an unintentional dural puncture for epidural analgesia. Due to the positional nature of the headache and its frontal and occipital origin, a postdural puncture headache was diagnosed. After failure of conservative treatment, an epidural blood patch was used, which offered immediate relief. However, shortly following the procedure, the parturient's neurological condition deteriorated due to an unrecognized intraparenchymal and subarachnoid hemorrhage requiring an emergent craniectomy. This case highlights the importance of diligence when evaluating and treating postpartum headache despite a classic presentation. PMID:26424942

  15. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulation have emerged. In this article the current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed. PMID:22590481

  16. Autonomic dysregulation in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Gass, Jason J; Glaros, Alan G

    2013-12-01

    To analyze autonomic nervous system activity in headache subjects, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), skin temperature, skin conductance, and respiration were compared to a matched control group. HRV data were recorded in time and frequency domains. Subjects also completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep dysfunction. Twenty-one headache and nineteen control subjects participated. In the time domain, the number of consecutive R-to-R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms and the standard deviation of the normalized R-to-R intervals, both indices of parasympathetic nervous system activity, were significantly lower in the headache group than the control group. Groups did not differ statistically on HRV measures in the frequency domain. Self-report measures showed significantly increased somatization, hostility, anxiety, symptom distress, fatigue, and sleep problems in the headache group. The results suggest headache subjects have increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic activity compared to non-headache control subjects. Headaches subjects also showed greater emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep problems. The results indicate an association between headaches and cardiovascular functioning suggestive of sympathetic nervous system activation in this sample of mixed migraine and tension-type headache sufferers. PMID:23912525

  17. Hormonal changes in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Elwan, O; Abdella, M; el Bayad, A B; Hamdy, S

    1991-11-01

    Seventy-three patients with headache underwent serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) radioimmunoassays of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), cortisol and prolactin. Serum FSH showed significant increases in all headache patients while serum LH increased only in females. Such a rise of serum FSH and LH is attributed to disturbances of the sleep-wake cycle. On the other hand, serum cortisol was significantly decreased in the male headache patients, probably due to altered circadian rhythm. Serum prolactin remained within normal limits. CSF prolactin, FSH and LH showed detectable levels in all headache sufferers compared to undetectable levels in control subjects, while CSF cortisol was significantly reduced.

  18. The pain management approach to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, A J; Kames, L D

    1987-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain remains a difficult management problem that is often refractory to traditional medical or surgical therapy. The pain management center approach used successfully for the treatment of cancer pain and headache can be adapted to the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. The results of this pilot study suggest that the multidisciplinary techniques of pain management promise to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:2439689

  19. Psychological Aspects of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Rosevelt

    1983-01-01

    Since its inception in June 1979, over 500 patients have been treated at the King/Drew Pain Center in Los Angeles. Based upon the treatment and observations of this patient group, this paper describes the psychologic aspects in patients suffering from chronic abdominal pain, low back pain, phantom limb pain, chest pain, and arthritic pain. PMID:6864816

  20. Headaches of otolaryngological interest: current status while awaiting revision of classification. Practical considerations and expectations.

    PubMed

    Farri, A; Enrico, A; Farri, F

    2012-04-01

    In 1988, diagnostic criteria for headaches were drawn up by the International Headache Society (IHS) and is divided into headaches, cranial neuralgias and facial pain. The 2(nd) edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) was produced in 2004, and still provides a dynamic and useful instrument for clinical practice. We have examined the current IHC, which comprises 14 groups. The first four cover primary headaches, with "benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood" being the forms of migraine of interest to otolaryngologists; groups 5 to 12 classify "secondary headaches"; group 11 is formed of "headache or facial pain attributed to disorder of cranium, neck, eyes, ears, nose, sinuses, teeth, mouth or other facial or cranial structures"; group 13, consisting of "cranial neuralgias and central causes of facial pain" is also of relevance to otolaryngology. Neither the current classification system nor the original one has a satisfactory collocation for migraineassociated vertigo. Another critical point of the classification concerns cranio-facial pain syndromes such as Sluder's neuralgia, previously included in the 1988 classification among cluster headaches, and now included in the section on "cranial neuralgias and central causes of facial pain", even though Sluder's neuralgia has not been adequately validated. As we have highlighted in our studies, there are considerable similarities between Sluder's syndrome and cluster headaches. The main features distinguishing the two are the trend to cluster over time, found only in cluster headaches, and the distribution of pain, with greater nasal manifestations in the case of Sluder's syndrome. We believe that it is better and clearer, particularly on the basis of our clinical experience and published studies, to include this nosological entity, which is clearly distinct from an otolaryngological point of view, as a variant of cluster headache. We agree with experts in the field of headaches, such as

  1. Paroxysmal stabbing headache in the multiple dermatomes of the head and neck: a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia?

    PubMed

    Shin, J H; Song, H K; Lee, J H; Kim, W K; Chu, M K

    2007-10-01

    A paroxysmal stabbing or icepick-like headache in the multiple nerve dermatomes, especially involving both trigeminal and cervical nerves, has not been fully explained or classified by the International Classification of Headache Disorder, 2(nd) Edition (ICHD-II). Of patients with acute-onset paroxysmal stabbing headache who had visited the Hallym University Medical Center during the last four years, 28 subjects with a repeated stabbing headache involving multiple dermatomes at the initial presentation or during the course were prospectively enrolled. All patients were neurologically and otologically symptom free. A coincidental involvement of both trigeminal and cervical nerve dermatomes included seven cases. Six cases involved initially the trigeminal and then cervical nerve dermatomes. Five cases showed an involvement of the cervical and then trigeminal nerve dermatomes. The remaining patients involved multiple cervical nerve branches (the lesser occipital, greater occipital and greater auricular). Pain lasted very shortly and a previous history of headache with the same nature was reported in 13 cases. Preceding symptom of an infection and physical and/or mental stress were manifested in seven and six subjects, respectively. All patients showed a self-limited benign course and completely recovered within a few hours to 30 days. Interestingly, a seasonal gradient in occurrence of a stabbing headache was found in this study. A paroxysmal stabbing headache manifested on multiple dermatomes can be explained by the characteristics of pain referral, and may be considered to be a variant of primary stabbing headache or occipital neuralgia. PMID:17725653

  2. Chronic post-traumatic headache: clinical findings and possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Defrin, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Chronic post-traumatic headache (CPTHA), the most frequent complaint after traumatic brain injury (TBI), dramatically affects quality of life and function. Despite its high prevalence and persistence, the mechanism of CPTHA is poorly understood. This literature review aimed to analyze the results of studies assessing the characteristics and sensory profile of CPTHA in order to shed light on its possible underlying mechanisms. The search for English language articles published between 1960 and 2013 was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PubMed. Studies assessing clinical features of headache after TBI as well as studies conducting quantitative somatosensory testing (QST) in individuals with CPTHA and in individuals suffering from other types of pain were included. Studies on animal models of pain following damage to peripheral tissues and to the peripheral and central nervous system were also included. The clinical features of CPTHA resembled those of primary headache, especially tension-type and migraine headache. Positive and negative signs were prevalent among individuals with CPTHA, in both the head and in other body regions, suggesting the presence of local (cranial) mechanical hypersensitivity, together with generalized thermal hypoesthesia and hypoalgesia. Evidence of dysfunctional pain modulation was also observed. Chronic post-traumatic headache can result from damage to intra- and pericranial tissues that caused chronic sensitization of these tissues. Alternatively, although not mutually exclusive, CPTHA might possibly be a form of central pain due to damage to brain structures involved in pain processing. These, other possibilities, as well as risk factors for CPTHA are discussed at length. PMID:24976746

  3. Childhood Adversities and Adult Headache in Poland and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reuchlein, Bettina; Henn, Lea; Brian, Tamara; Schier, Katarzyna; Hardt, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Various childhood adversities have been found to be associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, associations were moderate in most studies, i.e. odds ratios (OR) were between one and two. Method An internet survey was performed in 508 Polish and 500 German subjects. A total of 19 childhood adversities were selected and their associations with headaches explored. Age, gender and country were included as potential confounders, as well as their two-way interaction with the risk factors. Results Two strong risk factors were identified. (1) A combined score for physical and emotional neglect showed an odds ratio (OR) of 2.78 (p < .002) to the frequency of headache in adulthood as a main effect. (2) Father having had chronic pain showed an OR of 4.36 (p < .001) with headache in adulthood for women, but not for men (OR = 0.86, p < .556). The majority of the examined childhood adversities were not associated with adult headache, neither when tested individually nor as a sum score. Conclusion This study confirms results from previous ones that childhood adversities may play a role in the development of adult headache, but it is a rather minor one. Contrary to other studies, neglect turned out to be one of the strongest predictors. PMID:26859500

  4. Multimodal Physiotherapy Based on a Biobehavioral Approach as a Treatment for Chronic Tension-Type Headache: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Beltran-Alacreu, Hector; Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common primary headache affecting the general population, which is characterized by bilateral headache and mild to moderate pain. This disorder causes high levels of disability and recent scientific evidence suggests that manual therapy (MT) and therapeutic exercise are effective in reducing medication intake and decreasing the frequency and intensity of headaches in patients with TTH. Case Presentation: A 34-year-old woman was known to have chronic TTH. Initially, the patient presented moderate headaches 5 days per week, mechanical neck pain and no positive response to analgesics. A battery of self-reports was given to the patient to assess disability (using the Spanish versions of the Headache Impact Test-6 and the neck disability index), pain (visual analogue scale) and psychosocial issues (Spanish version of the pain catastrophizing scale) involved in the headaches. All measurements were taken four times during 161 days. Eleven sessions of treatment including MT, motor control therapeutic exercise (MCTE) and therapeutic patient education (TPE) were applied. Conclusions: This biobehavioral-based multimodal physical rehabilitation treatment combining MT, TPE and MCTE produced a substantial reduction in pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, disability and the impact of headaches on patient’s life. PMID:26705532

  5. Modelling headache and migraine and its pharmacological manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Erdener, S E; Dalkara, T

    2014-01-01

    Similarities between laboratory animals and humans in anatomy and physiology of the cephalic nociceptive pathways have allowed scientists to create successful models that have significantly contributed to our understanding of headache. They have also been instrumental in the development of novel anti-migraine drugs different from classical pain killers. Nevertheless, modelling the mechanisms underlying primary headache disorders like migraine has been challenging due to limitations in testing the postulated hypotheses in humans. Recent developments in imaging techniques have begun to fill this translational gap. The unambiguous demonstration of cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) during migraine aura in patients has reawakened interest in studying CSD in animals as a noxious brain event that can activate the trigeminovascular system. CSD-based models, including transgenics and optogenetics, may more realistically simulate pain generation in migraine, which is thought to originate within the brain. The realization that behavioural correlates of headache and migrainous symptoms like photophobia can be assessed quantitatively in laboratory animals, has created an opportunity to directly study the headache in intact animals without the confounding effects of anaesthetics. Headache and migraine-like episodes induced by administration of glyceryltrinitrate and CGRP to humans and parallel behavioural and biological changes observed in rodents create interesting possibilities for translational research. Not unexpectedly, species differences and model-specific observations have also led to controversies as well as disappointments in clinical trials, which, in return, has helped us improve the models and advance our understanding of headache. Here, we review commonly used headache and migraine models with an emphasis on recent developments. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this

  6. The role of the physical examination in the evaluation of headache.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Charles D

    2013-03-01

    The population of patients suffering with headaches is vast and underserved. The most critical element in headache evaluation is the history. The targeted history not only differentiates primary from secondary headaches but also provides a realistic list of conditions associated with secondary headache. Several of these conditions do present with specific physical findings, such as papilledema, Horner's syndrome, or CN palsy. The targeted physical examination of the patient with headache takes less than 3 minutes. The ability simply to recognize but a few straightforward clinical findings directs the evaluation in the proper direction. If you enjoy seeing patients, feel competent identifying but a few physical findings, and understand the basics of primary and secondary headaches and facial pain, there is urgent need of your services.

  7. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Buture, Alina; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH), one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. PMID:26635477

  8. [Acupuncture in daily practice. Headache].

    PubMed

    Senta, A Q

    1976-11-24

    The aetiopathogenesis of headache is explained in a general review of this subject. Attention is directed the various forms of reflexotherapy that can be cmployed in its treatment. Acupuncture is examined in some detail, from both the general and the symptomatic standpoint. Stress is laid on the different picture presented by headache in different patients. PMID:1004762

  9. Social problem-solving, perceived stress, depression and life-satisfaction in patients suffering from tension type and migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Eskin, Mehmet; Akyol, Ali; Çelik, Emine Yilmaz; Gültekin, Bülent Kadri

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed at investigating social problem solving, perceived stress, depression, and life-satisfaction in patients with tension type and migraine headaches. Forty-nine migraine and 42 tension type headache patients (n = 91) consenting to participate were compared to a total of 49 matched healthy control group. Participants filled in a questionnaire consisting self-report measures of problem solving, perceived stress, depression and life satisfaction. They were also asked about headache duration, frequency, pain severity, psychiatric treatment and sense of control in one's life. T-tests, chi-square, analysis of variance, logistic regression analysis and Pearson product moment correlation coefficient procedures were used to analyze the data. Tension type headache patients reported having had more frequent headaches than the migraine patients but migraine patients reported having had more intense pain than the tension type headache patients. Instances of psychiatric treatment were more common among tension type headache patients than the migraine and the control group. Compared to the healthy controls, headache patients displayed a deficiency in problem solving, higher levels of perceived stress and depression. Levels of problem solving skills in headache patients were related inversely to depression, perceived stress and the number of negative life events but problem solving skills of headache patients was related positively to life-satisfaction. The findings from this study suggested that cognitive behavioral problem solving therapy or training might be a viable option for reducing levels of stress and depression, and to increase life-satisfaction in patients suffering from primary headache.

  10. Refractory headaches treated with bilateral occipital and temporal region stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Kelly J; Trentman, Terrence L; Zimmerman, Richard S; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe use of bilateral temporal and occipital stimulator leads for a refractory headache disorder. Materials and methods A 31-year-old female had a 10-year history of chronic, severe occipital and temporal region headaches. The patient underwent permanent implant of an occipital stimulator system that resulted in sustained, compete resolution of her occipital pain. However, she continued to suffer disabling (10/10) temporal region headaches and was bedbound most days of the week. Therefore, bilateral temporal stimulator leads were implanted and tunneled to her internal pulse generator. Results At 12-month follow-up, the patient enjoyed sustained improvement in her pain scores (8/10) and marked increase in her level of functioning. Taking into account increased activity level, she rated her overall improvement at 50%. Unfortunately, infection and erosion of her right temporal lead necessitated temporal stimulator removal. Conclusion Headache disorders may require stimulation of all painful cephalic regions. However, our success in this case must be considered in light of the technical challenges and expense of placing stimulator leads subcutaneously around the head and neck, including the risk of infection, lead breakage, erosion, and migration. PMID:24707189

  11. The Sphenopalatine Ganglion: Anatomy, Pathophysiology, and Therapeutic Targeting in Headache.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Kaplan, Eugene; Ailani, Jessica; Charleston, Larry; Kuruvilla, Deena; Blumenfeld, Andrew; Berliner, Randall; Rosen, Noah L; Duarte, Robert; Vidwan, Jaskiran; Halker, Rashmi B; Gill, Nicole; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2016-02-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) has attracted the interest of practitioners treating head and face pain for over a century because of its anatomical connections and role in the trigemino-autonomic reflex. In this review, we discuss the anatomy of the SPG, as well as what is known about its role in the pathophysiology of headache disorders, including cluster headache and migraine. We then address various therapies that target the SPG, including intranasal medication delivery, new SPG blocking catheter devices, neurostimulation, chemical neurolysis, and ablation procedures.

  12. Headaches in patients with shunts.

    PubMed

    Rekate, Harold L; Kranz, Dory

    2009-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common afflictions suffered by humans. Headache in patients with a shunt triggers a series of events that includes utilization of expensive technologies and often potentially dangerous surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of headaches in patients with shunts and, hopefully, the relationship of those headache disorders to the treatment of hydrocephalus. The Hydrocephalus Association maintains a self-reporting database recorded from individuals treated for hydrocephalus and their families. This database was mined to determine the incidence of severe headaches requiring treatment and interfering with normal life in patients who have been treated for hydrocephalus. There were 1,242 responders between the ages of 19 months and 45 years of age. Of these, 1,233 answered the question, "Do you or your family member suffer from (does your child complain of) frequent or chronic headaches?" This subset forms the basis of this study. Three groups were defined by age: children (19 months-12 years), adolescents (13 years-19 years), and young adults (20 years-45 years). Most respondents were initially treated during infancy (before 18 months of age); 84% of children and 69% of both adolescents and young adults were treated very early in life. Severe headaches became a more frequent problem as the age of the population treated for hydrocephalus increased. In terms of frequency and severity of headaches, direct comparisons with epidemiologic studies of normal populations are difficult because of the limitations of data available in the database. However, it is likely that this population has a higher incidence of severe headaches than normal populations. The cost of management of headaches in this population is very high, and the patients are at risk throughout life. Early treatment decisions have a significant effect on later quality of life. Strategies that lead to normalization of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

  13. The history of craniotomy for headache treatment.

    PubMed

    Assina, Rachid; Sarris, Christina E; Mammis, Antonios

    2014-04-01

    Both the history of headache and the practice of craniotomy can be traced to antiquity. From ancient times through the present day, numerous civilizations and scholars have performed craniotomy in attempts to treat headache. Today, surgical intervention for headache management is becoming increasingly more common due to improved technology and greater understanding of headache. By tracing the evolution of the understanding of headache alongside the practice of craniotomy, investigators can better evaluate the mechanisms of headache and the therapeutic treatments used today.

  14. Modular headache theory: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Young, William B

    2002-03-01

    Many people experience headaches that do not fulfill the International Headache Society's criteria for a specific headache disorder, yet behave biologically like that disorder. Others fulfill criteria for one headache disorder but have features of another. To explain these observations, we propose that groups of neurons, called modules, become activated to produce each symptom of a primary headache disorder, and that each module is linked to other modules that together produce an individual's headache. Headaches develop phenotypic stability through a process referred to as learned stereotypy. This theory has implications for the classification, research, and treatment of primary and secondary headache patients.

  15. [Abdominal approaches and drainages of the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Hagel, C; Schilling, M

    2006-04-01

    Appropriate access to the abdominal cavity is the first and crucial step for successful abdominal surgical intervention. In planning the incision, several variables have to be considered, such as anatomy of the abdominal wall, localization of the target organ, and individual conditions (previous incisions, minimal access surgery, etc). Medial laparotomy is the preferred incision for emergency cases and ill-defined pathologies, allowing access and hence exploration to all quadrants. Transverse laparotomies give superior access to the dorsal and right aspects of the liver and cause less pain in patients unfit for regional anesthetic procedures. Draining of the abdominal cavity is used after various resective and reconstructive procedures, but there is little evidence for its use in a number of operations such as gastric, hepatic, and colorectal resections. Advantages and disadvantages of different abdominal wall incisions and drainages are discussed.

  16. Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Adolescents with Recurrent Headaches: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Toni; Holmes, Laura G.; Kennedy-Overfelt, Vicki; Kerr, Lynne M.; Giles, Lisa L.

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent headaches cause significant burden for adolescents and their families. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been shown to reduce stress and alter the experience of pain, reduce pain burden, and improve quality of life. Research indicates that MBIs can benefit adults with chronic pain conditions including headaches. A pilot nonrandomized clinical trial was conducted with 20 adolescent females with recurrent headaches. Median class attendance was 7 of 8 total sessions; average class attendance was 6.10 ± 2.6. Adherence to home practice was good, with participants reporting an average of 4.69 (SD = 1.84) of 6 practices per week. Five participants dropped out for reasons not inherent to the group (e.g., extracurricular scheduling); no adverse events were reported. Parents reported improved quality of life and physical functioning for their child. Adolescent participants reported improved depression symptoms and improved ability to accept their pain rather than trying to control it. MBIs appear safe and feasible for adolescents with recurrent headaches. Although participants did not report decreased frequency or severity of headache following treatment, the treatment had a beneficial effect for depression, quality of life, and acceptance of pain and represents a promising adjunct treatment for adolescents with recurrent headaches. PMID:26798398

  17. Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Adolescents with Recurrent Headaches: A Pilot Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Toni; Holmes, Laura G; Kennedy-Overfelt, Vicki; Kerr, Lynne M; Giles, Lisa L

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent headaches cause significant burden for adolescents and their families. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) have been shown to reduce stress and alter the experience of pain, reduce pain burden, and improve quality of life. Research indicates that MBIs can benefit adults with chronic pain conditions including headaches. A pilot nonrandomized clinical trial was conducted with 20 adolescent females with recurrent headaches. Median class attendance was 7 of 8 total sessions; average class attendance was 6.10 ± 2.6. Adherence to home practice was good, with participants reporting an average of 4.69 (SD = 1.84) of 6 practices per week. Five participants dropped out for reasons not inherent to the group (e.g., extracurricular scheduling); no adverse events were reported. Parents reported improved quality of life and physical functioning for their child. Adolescent participants reported improved depression symptoms and improved ability to accept their pain rather than trying to control it. MBIs appear safe and feasible for adolescents with recurrent headaches. Although participants did not report decreased frequency or severity of headache following treatment, the treatment had a beneficial effect for depression, quality of life, and acceptance of pain and represents a promising adjunct treatment for adolescents with recurrent headaches.

  18. Steroid hormones in cluster headaches.

    PubMed

    Stillman, Mark

    2006-04-01

    For decades, glucocorticoid therapy has been a well-recognized abortive treatment for cluster headaches. However, the role of steroid hormones, including both glucocorticoids and sex steroids, in the pathophysiology and therapy of cluster headaches has been a topic of much debate and speculation. Current research now points to the importance of cortisol and testosterone in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches, and they appear to be linked mechanistically to another hormone, melatonin. Melatonin, unlike cortisol or testosterone, is not a product of the hypothalamic pituitary axis but of the retinohypothalamic pineal axis, and is the major biomarker of circadian rhythms. The regulation of steroids and melatonin in the pathogenesis of cluster headaches in turn depends on the sympathetic nervous system. Accumulated evidence suggests sympathetic dysfunction--embodied in the Horner sign so commonly seen in the cluster headache--as a necessary ingredient in the inception of the cluster headache. Sympathetic dysfunction now is thought to be associated with the hypercortisolism, hypotestosteronism, and lower-than-normal melatonin levels in the active cluster patient. Future research may hold the key to a fuller explanation of the complex interaction of hormonal systems in the cluster headache.

  19. [Organisation of headache units from a multidisciplinary point of view].

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Del-Rio Gonzalez, M

    2015-01-01

    Headache units have come into being to respond to the need to address the treatment of patients with complex headaches in a multidisciplinary manner. Although headaches are one of the most prevalent medical pathologies, it is surprising how little is being done to foster the development of such units. Within the multidisciplinary organisation, the role of the neurologist with adequate training in this field is essential. He or she is the person responsible for receiving, directing, supervising and coordinating the treatment, together with other medical specialties. The basic core of the team should consist of a psychiatrist, psychologist and physiotherapist. Their joint coordinated action generates an objective improvement in the pain over and beyond that achieved with each isolated treatment.

  20. Analysis of Trigger Factors in Episodic Migraineurs Using a Smartphone Headache Diary Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Wook; Chu, Min Kyung; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Sang-Gue; Cho, Soo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Various stimuli can trigger migraines in susceptible individuals. We examined migraine trigger factors by using a smartphone headache diary application. Method Episodic migraineurs who agreed to participate in our study downloaded smartphone headache diary application, which was designed to capture the details regarding headache trigger factors and characteristics for 3 months. The participants were asked to access the smartphone headache diary application daily and to confirm the presence of a headache and input the types of trigger factors. Results Sixty-two participants kept diary entries until the end of the study. The diary data for 4,579 days were analyzed. In this data set, 1,099 headache days (336 migraines, 763 non-migraine headaches) were recorded; of these, 772 headache events had with trigger factors, and 327 events did not have trigger factors. The common trigger factors that were present on headache days included stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, hormonal changes, and weather changes. The likelihood of a headache trigger was 57.7% for stress, 55.1% for sleep deprivation, 48.5% for fatigue, and 46.5% for any trigger. The headaches with trigger factors were associated with greater pain intensity (p<0.001), headache-related disability (p<0.001), abortive medication use (p = 0.02), and the proportion of migraine (p < 0.001), relative to those without trigger factors. Traveling (odd ratios [OR]: 6.4), hormonal changes (OR: 3.5), noise (OR: 2.8), alcohol (OR: 2.5), overeating (OR: 2.4), and stress (OR:1.8) were significantly associated with migraines compared to non-migraine headaches. The headaches that were associated with hormonal changes or noise were more often migraines, regardless of the preventive medication. The headaches due to stress, overeating, alcohol, and traveling were more often migraines without preventive medication, but it was not evident with preventive medication. Conclusion Smartphone headache diary application is an

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  2. Evaluation of Women with Myofascial Abdominal Syndrome Based on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitidieri, Andréia; Gurian, Maria Beatriz; Silva, Ana Paula; Tawasha, Kalil; Poli-Neto, Omero; Nogueira, Antônio; Reis, Francisco; Rosa-e-Silva, Júlio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study used semiology based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to investigate vital energy (Qi) behavior in women with abdominal myofascial pain syndrome (AMPS). Methods: Fifty women diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) secondary to AMPS were evaluated by using a questionnaire based on the theories of “yin-yang,” “zang-fu”, and “five elements”. We assessed the following aspects of the illness: symptomatology; specific location of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs); onset, cause, duration and frequency of symptoms; and patient and family history. The patients tongues, lips, skin colors, and tones of speech were examined. Patients were questioned on various aspects related to breathing, sweating, sleep quality, emotions, and preferences related to color, food, flavors, and weather or seasons. Thirst, gastrointestinal dysfunction, excreta (feces and urine), menstrual cycle, the five senses, and characteristic pain symptoms related to headache, musculoskeletal pain, abdomen, and chest were also investigated. Results: Patients were between 22 and 56 years old, and most were married (78%), possessed a elementary school (66%), and had one or two children (76%). The mean body mass index and body fat were 26.86 kg/ cm2 (range: 17.7 — 39.0) and 32.4% (range: 10.7 — 45.7), respectively. A large majority of women (96%) exhibited alterations in the kidney meridian, and 98% had an altered gallbladder meridian. We observed major changes in the kidney and the gallbladder Qi meridians in 76% and 62% of patients, respectively. Five of the twelve meridians analyzed exhibited Qi patterns similar to pelvic innervation Qi and meridians, indicating that the paths of some of these meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic floor and abdominal region. Conclusion: The women in this study showed changes in the behavior of the energy meridians, and the paths of some of the meridians were directly related to innervation of the pelvic

  3. Prevalence of headache and its interference in the activities of daily living in female adolescent students

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Alaine Souza; de Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato; Gomes, Mayra Ruana de A.; de Almeida, Ludmila Remígio; de Souza, Gabriely Feitosa F.; Cunha, Samara Barreto; Pitangui, Ana Carolina R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of headache and its interference in the activities of daily living (ADL) in female adolescent students. METHODS: This descriptive cross-sectional study enrolled 228 female adolescents from a public school in the city of Petrolina, Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil, aged ten to 19 years. A self-administered structured questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics, occurrence of headache and its characteristics was employed. Headaches were classified according to the International Headache Society criteria. The chi-square test was used to verify possible associations, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: After the exclusion of 24 questionnaires that did not met the inclusion criteria, 204 questionnaires were analyzed. The mean age of the adolescents was 14.0±1.4 years. The prevalence of headache was 87.7%. Of the adolescents with headache, 0.5% presented migraine without pure menstrual aura; 6.7%, migraine without aura related to menstruation; 1.6%, non-menstrual migraine without aura; 11.7%, tension-type headache and 79.3%, other headaches. Significant associations were found between pain intensity and the following variables: absenteeism (p=0.001); interference in ADL (p<0.001); medication use (p<0.001); age (p=0.045) and seek for medical care (p<0.022). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of headache in female adolescents observed in this study was high, with a negative impact in ADL and school attendance. PMID:25119759

  4. [Cluster headache and brain imagery].

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierric; Demarquay, Geneviève

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is defined on clinical international criteria developed by International Headache Society (IHS, 2013). The realization of a brain MRI with arterial angio-MRI is required according to the French recommendations (Donnet et al., 2014) based on recent the literature. Numerous causes or diseases can mimic typical or atypical AVF (Edvardsson, 2014). Identification of these causes allows an appropriate treatment in addition with symptomatic treatment. PMID:26585270

  5. Postoperative headache after the lateral suboccipital approach: craniotomy versus craniectomy.

    PubMed

    Koperer, H; Deinsberger, W; Jödicke, A; Böker, D K

    1999-12-01

    The lateral suboccipital approach to the cerebellopontine angle is typically performed as a small craniectomy. Incisional pain and headache following cerebellopontine angle surgery have been reported. Adherence of the cervical muscles to the dura, which is richly innervated, with consequent traction has been suggested to be responsible for postoperative headache. Therefore, postoperative headache probably could be reduced by replacing the bone flap between the muscles and the dura. In a prospective non-randomized study this hypothesis was tested by comparing craniectomy and craniotomy. 40 patients underwent removal of an acoustic neuroma via the retrosigmoid approach. Patients with a history of migraine, with additional intracerebral tumors or recurrencies as well as patients who developed a CSF fistula postoperatively were excluded. 29 patients were eligible for further evaluation. 13 patients underwent a craniotomy, 16 patients a craniectomy. All patients were subject to a standardized telephone interview three months and one year after surgery. Comparing the craniotomy group to the craniectomy group no difference was observed regarding age, sex, tumor size and duration of operation. 3 months as well as 12 months postoperatively headache was significantly (p < 0.05) less frequent in the craniotomy group as compared to the craniectomy group. In conclusion, an osteoplastic craniotomy significantly reduces postoperative headache and is therefore highly recommended. PMID:10667820

  6. Galeata: chronic migraine independently considered in a medieval headache classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a quite recent concept. However, there are descriptions suggestive of episodic migraine since the beginning of scientific medicine. We aim to review main headache classifications during Classical antiquity and compared them with that proposed in the 11th century by Constantine the African in his Liber Pantegni, one of the most influential texts in medieval medicine. Method We have carried out a descriptive review of Henricum Petrum's Latin edition, year 1539. Results Headache classifications proposed by Aretaeus of Cappadocia, Galen of Pergamun and Alexander of Tralles, all of them classifying headaches into three main types, considered an entity (called Heterocrania or Hemicrania), comparable to contemporary episodic migraine. In ninth book of Liber Pantegni, headaches were also classified into three types and one of them, Galeata, consisted on a chronic pain of mild intensity with occasional superimposed exacerbations. Conclusion In Liber Pantegni we have firstly identified, as a separate entity, a headache comparable to that we currently define as chronic migraine: Galeata. PMID:24655582

  7. Aspartame and susceptibility to headache.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Buckley, C E; Sampson, H A; Massey, E W; Baraniuk, J N; Follett, J V; Warwick, Z S

    1987-11-01

    We performed a double-blind crossover trial of challenges with 30 mg of aspartame per kilogram of body weight or placebo in 40 subjects who reported having headaches repeatedly after consuming products containing aspartame. The incidence rate of headache after aspartame (35 percent) was not significantly different from that after placebo (45 percent) (P less than 0.50). No serious reactions were observed, and the incidence of symptoms other than headache following aspartame was also equivalent to that after placebo. No treatment-related effects were detected in vital signs, blood pressure, or plasma concentrations of cortisol, insulin, glucagon, histamine, epinephrine, or norepinephrine. Most of the subjects were well educated and overweight and had a family or personal history of allergic reactions. The subjects who had headaches had lower plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (P less than 0.0002) and epinephrine (P less than 0.02) just before the development of headache. We conclude that in this population, aspartame is no more likely to produce headache than placebo.

  8. [Headache from the neurological point of view].

    PubMed

    Krämer, G

    1984-08-01

    After a short review of the most important clinical signs of headaches including history and dynamic course as well as diagnostic management a systematic presentation of the most common neurological headache forms is given with the aid of tabular surveys. Considered are: psychogenic headache, tension headache, migraine including its special forms, cluster headache, headache associated with giant cell arteritis, meningeal irritation or space occupying cerebral lesions, trigeminal neuralgia and posttraumatic headache. Some less common special forms like the low spinal fluid pressure syndrome or the Tolosa Hunt syndrome are briefly discussed. PMID:6385099

  9. Fibrous myopathy as a complication of repeated intramuscular injections for chronic headache

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, R; McNeil, S; Hegedus, C; Gray, DS

    2006-01-01

    Two cases of fibrous myopathy associated with repeated, long-term intramuscular injections for treatment of chronic temporomandibular joint pain and chronic headache, respectively, are described. Both patients developed severe, function-limiting contractures in upper and lower extremity muscles used as injection sites. In one of the cases, the contractures were painful. Electrophysiological testing, magnetic resonance imaging and muscle biopsy results were all consistent with myopathy and replacement of skeletal muscle with noncontractile fibrous tissue. These cases are presented to increase awareness of fibrous myopathy and to promote surveillance for this serious potential complication of long-term intramuscular injections in chronic headache and other pain patients. PMID:17149458

  10. [Botulinum toxin type A in headache treatment : Established and experimental indications].

    PubMed

    Gaul, C; Holle-Lee, D; Straube, A

    2016-08-01

    In recent years botulinum toxin type A has been used increasingly more in the treatment of specific headache disorders. Especially regarding chronic migraine with and without combined medication overuse, convincing randomized studies have proven the efficacy of this treatment option and have led to approval for this indication. Regarding other headache entities, such as episodic migraine, tension-type headache, trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TAC), neuralgic, neuropathic and myofascial pain, currently available scientific data on the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A are scarce and often ambiguous. The exact underlying mechanisms of the influence of botulinum toxin type A on the pathophysiology of headache are not completely clear but an influence on the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) seems to play a crucial role. This article summarizes the most important studies as well as experiences of treatment with botulinum toxin type A regarding different headache entities. PMID:27300190

  11. Transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache: an open study.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Grazzi, L; Libro, G; D'Amico, D; Moschiano, F; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    Transdermal clonidine has recently been reported to be efficacious in the prophylaxis of cluster headache. A 2-week course of transdermal clonidine (5 mg the first week, 7.5 mg the second week) preceded by a 5-day run-in period, was administered to 16 patients with episodic cluster headache in an active cluster period. In 5 patients, the painful attacks disappeared after the seventh day of treatment. For the group as a whole, no significant variations in headache frequency, pain intensity, or attack duration were observed between the run-in period and the first and second weeks of treatment (ANOVA). Further studies are necessary to clarify the effectiveness of transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache. PMID:9385753

  12. Transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache: an open study.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Grazzi, L; Libro, G; D'Amico, D; Moschiano, F; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    Transdermal clonidine has recently been reported to be efficacious in the prophylaxis of cluster headache. A 2-week course of transdermal clonidine (5 mg the first week, 7.5 mg the second week) preceded by a 5-day run-in period, was administered to 16 patients with episodic cluster headache in an active cluster period. In 5 patients, the painful attacks disappeared after the seventh day of treatment. For the group as a whole, no significant variations in headache frequency, pain intensity, or attack duration were observed between the run-in period and the first and second weeks of treatment (ANOVA). Further studies are necessary to clarify the effectiveness of transdermal clonidine in the prophylaxis of episodic cluster headache.

  13. Abdominal actinomycosis mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Robert Joseph; Riela, Steven; Patel, Ravi; Misra, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A 52-year-old Hispanic woman presented to the emergency department, reporting worsening sharp lower right quadrant abdominal pain for 3 days. CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of inflammation in the peritoneal soft tissues adjacent to an enlarged and thick-walled appendix, an appendicolith, no abscess formation and a slightly thickened caecum consistent with acute appendicitis. During laparoscopic appendectomy, the caecum was noted to be firm, raising suspicion of malignancy. Surgical oncology team was consulted and open laparotomy with right hemicolectomy was performed. Pathology reported that the ileocaecal mass was not a malignancy but was, rather, actinomycosis. The patient was discharged after 10 days of intravenous antibiotics in the hospital, with the diagnosis of abdominal actinomycosis. Although the original clinical and radiological findings in this case were highly suggestive of acute appendicitis, abdominal actinomycosis should be in the differential for right lower quadrant pain as it may be treated non-operatively.

  14. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    PubMed Central

    PORPORATTI, André Luís; COSTA, Yuri Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n=64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n=48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management. PMID:25004051

  15. Cluster headache with trigeminal neuralgia. An uncommon association that may be more than coincidental.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G; Cohen, J S

    1984-02-01

    Cluster headache and trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux) share a common pattern of exacerbation and remission of pain that is described in similar terms by patients. Although the treatment of these conditions is markedly different, the results of adequate prophylaxis can be extremely impressive in both. The physician who treats headache patients should be aware of the common characteristics of each condition and of the possibility of their concomitant occurrence. PMID:6420783

  16. Clinical reasoning for manual therapy management of tension type and cervicogenic headache

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing knowledge in the pathogenesis and better management of chronic headaches. Current scientific evidence supports the role of manual therapies in the management of tension type and cervicogenic headache, but the results are still conflicting. These inconsistent results can be related to the fact that maybe not all manual therapies are appropriate for all types of headaches; or maybe not all patients with headache will benefit from manual therapies. There are preliminary data suggesting that patients with a lower degree of sensitization will benefit to a greater extent from manual therapies, although more studies are needed. In fact, there is evidence demonstrating the presence of peripheral and central sensitization in chronic headaches, particularly in tension type. Clinical management of patients with headache needs to extend beyond local tissue-based pathology, to incorporate strategies directed at normalizing central nervous system sensitivity. In such a scenario, this paper exposes some examples of manual therapies for tension type and cervicogenic headache, based on a nociceptive pain rationale, for modulating central nervous system hypersensitivity: trigger point therapy, joint mobilization, joint manipulation, exercise, and cognitive pain approaches. PMID:24976747

  17. Clinical reasoning for manual therapy management of tension type and cervicogenic headache.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing knowledge in the pathogenesis and better management of chronic headaches. Current scientific evidence supports the role of manual therapies in the management of tension type and cervicogenic headache, but the results are still conflicting. These inconsistent results can be related to the fact that maybe not all manual therapies are appropriate for all types of headaches; or maybe not all patients with headache will benefit from manual therapies. There are preliminary data suggesting that patients with a lower degree of sensitization will benefit to a greater extent from manual therapies, although more studies are needed. In fact, there is evidence demonstrating the presence of peripheral and central sensitization in chronic headaches, particularly in tension type. Clinical management of patients with headache needs to extend beyond local tissue-based pathology, to incorporate strategies directed at normalizing central nervous system sensitivity. In such a scenario, this paper exposes some examples of manual therapies for tension type and cervicogenic headache, based on a nociceptive pain rationale, for modulating central nervous system hypersensitivity: trigger point therapy, joint mobilization, joint manipulation, exercise, and cognitive pain approaches.

  18. Postoperative Severe Headache Following Cervical Posterior Surgical Fixation from C2 Distally

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Yong-Chan; Peters, Colleen; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Buchowski, Jacob; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To identify the prevalence of severe headache occurring after cervical posterior surgical fixation (PSF) and to evaluate the clinical and radiological findings associated with severe headache after surgery. Overview of Literature Several studies have reported on the axial pain after cervical surgery. However, to our knowledge, the incidence of severe headache after cervical PSF has not been elucidated. Methods The medical records and radiological assessment of patients who underwent surgical treatment from August 2002 to May 2012 were reviewed to identify the prevalence and risk factors for severe headaches occurring following PSF from C2 distally. Neck disability index scores (NDI) (the item for neck pain), the type of C2 screw, number of cervical fused levels (1–6), and smoking habit were calculated preoperatively and postoperatively. In addition, radiological parameters (T1 slope angle, C1/2 angle, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 sagittal vertical axis and C1-implant distance) were assessed for all patients. Severe headache was defined as a high NDI headache score (>4 out of 5). Results Eighty-two patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 59.2 years (range, 21–78 years), and the mean number of fused levels was 5.1. The mean follow-up period was 2.9 years (range, 1–10.9 years). While only one severe headache occurred de novo postoperatively in a patient in the C3 or C4 distally group (total 30 patients, average age of 50.2 years), 11 patients in the C2 distally group (p=0.04) had severe headache occur postoperatively. The radiological parameters were not significantly different between the postoperative milder headache and severe headache (SH) groups. The SH group had a significantly higher preoperative NDI score (neck pain) (p<0.01). Conclusions Newly occurring severe headaches can occur in 18% of patients after PSF from C2 distally. The patients with newly occurring severe headaches had significantly higher

  19. Nummular headache in a patient with ipsilateral occipital neuralgia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, Piotr; Kozubski, Wojciech; Losy, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Nummular headache (NH) is a rarely recognized primary headache, the diagnostic criteria of which are contained in the appendix to the 2nd edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (code A13.7.1). We present the case of a 61-year-old female who suffers, regardless of NH, from right-sided occipital neuralgia. The applied treatment - gabapentin and mianserin - had no effect. Injection of bupivacaine twice to the right occipital region resulted in neuralgia resolution up to three months, with no effect on NH. This confirms the independence of two above mentioned head pain conditions.

  20. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829