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Sample records for abdominal pain imaging

  1. Imaging the pregnant patient with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Graham W; Davis, Melissa A; Semelka, Richard C; Fielding, Julia R

    2012-10-01

    Imaging of pregnant patients with non-obstetric abdominal pain is reviewed, with an accompanying pictorial essay of cases with concentration on magnetic resonance imaging. Non-obstetric causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy are similar to those of non-pregnant patients. The most common causes are appendicitis and cholecystitis. Other causes are myriad and include biliary, gastrointestinal, infectious, inflammatory, and malignant etiologies, among others. The approach to imaging in pregnant patient is unique, as it is imperative to minimize potentially harmful radiation exposures to the fetus. Ultrasound and MRI are the primary modalities for evaluation of the pregnant patient with abdominal pain. The use of intravenous contrast is discouraged, except in highly-selected patients where there is no other way to obtain vital diagnostic information. CT is still used as the mainstay of evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma and is commonly used for diagnosis of small bowel obstruction, stone disease, and work-up of malignancy during pregnancy. A discussion of test selection and underlying rationale is presented. PMID:22160283

  2. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  4. Efficacy of hepatobiliary imaging in acute abdominal pain: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.; Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Thrall, J.H.; Resinger, W.W.; Calderon, H.C.; Mirkes, S.H.; Shah, P.K.

    1980-10-01

    To assess prospectively the usefulness of hepatobiliary imaging in acute abdominal pain (72 hr or less), 36 patients were scintigraphed. Before the procedure, the referring physician completed Part I of a questionnaire indicating his differential diagnosis, diagnostic confidence (expressed as a percentage), and therapeutic plan. Immediately after the test, the same physician with knowledge of the results, completed Part II of the questionnaire indicating again his differential diagnosis, diagnostic confidence, and therapeutic plan. The impact of the imaging on the physician's diagnostic confidence was expressed as a log-likelihood-ratio (LLR).

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Abdominal and Pelvic Pain in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Baheti, Akshay D; Nicola, Refky; Bennett, Genevieve L; Bordia, Ritu; Moshiri, Mariam; Katz, Douglas S; Bhargava, Puneet

    2016-05-01

    The utility of MR imaging in evaluating abdominal and pelvic pain in the pregnant patient is discussed. Details regarding the indications, technical aspects, and imaging findings of various common abdominal and pelvic abnormalities in pregnancy are reviewed. PMID:27150326

  6. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  7. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  8. Pathology Image of the Month: Abdominal Pain and Peripheral Eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Reggie; Alquist, Caroline Raasch; Farris, K Barton; McGoey, Robin

    2015-01-01

    A 69 year-old man presented to his primary care physician with abdominal discomfort. Medical history was notable for diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with recent (one week prior) steroid use and hypertension. Surgical history was significant for a remote sigmoid hemicolectomy for diverticulitis with a synthetic mesh abdominal repair. He was admitted to the hospital for suspected gastroparesis. An upper GI series showed a distended stomach with delayed gastric motility. He underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and a duodenal biopsy was taken. He remained afebrile but had an elevated white blood cell count of 19.1 x 103/mcL (4.5 - 11.0 x 103/mcL) with 28.8 percent eosinophils on differential. Microscopic images of the duodenal biopsy are shown below. PMID:27159605

  9. Chronic Pancreatitis Pain Pattern and Severity are Independent of Abdominal Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, C. Mel; Yadav, Dhiraj; Tian, Ye; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Lewis, Michele D.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Cote, Gregory A.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brand, Randall E; Slivka, Adam; Sherman, Stuart; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, David C.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by inflammation, atrophy, fibrosis with progressive ductal changes, and functional changes that include variable exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and multiple patterns of pain. We investigated whether abdominal imaging features accurately predict patterns of pain. Methods We collected data from participants in North American Pancreatitis Study 2 Continuation and Validation, a prospective multicenter study of patients with chronic pancreatitis performed at 13 expert centers in the United States from July 2008 through March 2012. Chronic pancreatitis was defined based on detection of characteristic changes by cross-sectional abdominal imaging, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasonography, or histology analyses. Patients were asked by a physician or trained clinical research coordinator if they had any abdominal pain in the year before enrollment; those that responded “yes” were asked to select from a list of 5 pain patterns. Using these patterns, we classified patients’ pain based on timing and severity. Abnormal pancreatitis-associated features on abdominal imaging were recorded using standardized case report forms. Results Data were collected from 518 patients (mean age, 52±14.6 years; 55% male; and 87.6% white). The most common physician-identified etiologies were alcohol (45.8%) and idiopathic (24.3%); 15.6% of patients reported no abdominal pain in the year before enrollment. The most common individual pain pattern was described as constant mild pain with episodes of severe pain, reported in 45% of patients. The most common imaging findings included pancreatic ductal dilatation (68%), atrophy (57%), and calcifications (55%). Imaging findings were categorized as obstructive for 20% and inflammatory for 25% of cases. The distribution of individual imaging findings was similar among patients with different patterns of pain. The distribution of pain patterns did not

  10. Lower Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Carlberg, David J; Lee, Stephen D; Dubin, Jeffrey S

    2016-05-01

    Although most frequently presenting with lower abdominal pain, appendicitis, colitis, and diverticulitis can cause pain throughout the abdomen and can cause peritoneal and retroperitoneal symptoms. Evaluation and management of lower intestinal disease requires a nuanced approach by the emergency physician, sometimes requiring computed tomography, ultrasonography, MRI, layered imaging, shared decision making, serial examination, and/or close follow-up. Once a presumed or confirmed diagnosis is made, appropriate treatment is initiated, and may include surgery, antibiotics, and/or steroids. Appendicitis patients should be admitted. Diverticulitis and inflammatory bowel disease can frequently be managed on an outpatient basis, but may require admission and surgical consultation. PMID:27133242

  11. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Furey, Elizabeth A; Bailey, April A; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2014-08-01

    Evaluation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians and radiologists alike. The differential diagnosis includes obstetric and nonobstetric conditions unique to pregnancy, in addition to causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain unrelated to the pregnancy. The clinical presentation and course of disease may be altered in pregnancy, and several pathologies are exacerbated by pregnancy. Discriminating clinical features in the diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic pain are often confounded by expected anatomic and physiologic changes in pregnancy. Moreover, while diagnostic pathways may be altered in pregnancy, the necessity for a timely and accurate diagnosis must be underscored, as delay in treatment may result in an undesirable increase in morbidity and/or mortality for both the patient and fetus. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) through faster acquisition and motion-insensitive techniques, coupled with increased awareness and education regarding the value of MRI in diagnosing a wide range of pathology, have established MRI as a valuable strategy in the investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain in the pregnant patient. This review presents a practical approach to common obstetric and nonobstetric causes of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during pregnancy, as well as safety considerations for performing MRI in this patient population. PMID:25099561

  13. Imaging patterns with 99mTc-PIPIDA in evaluating abdominal pain

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, R.F.; Gordon, L.; Selby, J.B. Sr.

    1983-11-01

    A random retrospective review of hepatobiliary scans on 86 adult patients with abdominal pain revealed four distinct imaging patterns: normal, cystic duct obstruction, obstructive, and sick liver pattern. A normal pattern was found to exclude acute cholecystitis and was the pattern most frequently observed.

  14. Nontraumatic abdominal pain in pregnancy: imaging considerations for a multiorgan system problem.

    PubMed

    Mkpolulu, Chiedozie A; Ghobrial, Peter M; Catanzano, Tara M

    2012-02-01

    Nontraumatic abdominal pain in the pregnant patient can present a clinician with a variety of diagnostic possibilities. The overlap between signs and symptoms expected in normal pregnancy and these many pathologic possibilities does little to help focus the clinician's diagnostic efforts. Fear of ionizing radiation's effects on the fetus has driven efforts to refine medical imaging algorithms in such a way as to attempt to eliminate its use at all cost. In today's world, we are nearly there. In this review the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic abdominal pain in the pregnant patient will be explored. Of note is the recurring theme that much of what can be done today with regard to diagnostic imaging, both in general and with regard to this specific subset of patients, centers on the use of the non-ionizing modalities of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22264900

  15. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  16. Acute Abdominal Pain in Children.

    PubMed

    Reust, Carin E; Williams, Amy

    2016-05-15

    Acute abdominal pain accounts for approximately 9% of childhood primary care office visits. Symptoms and signs that increase the likelihood of a surgical cause for pain include fever, bilious vomiting, bloody diarrhea, absent bowel sounds, voluntary guarding, rigidity, and rebound tenderness. The age of the child can help focus the differential diagnosis. In infants and toddlers, clinicians should consider congenital anomalies and other causes, including malrotation, hernias, Meckel diverticulum, or intussusception. In school-aged children, constipation and infectious causes of pain, such as gastroenteritis, colitis, respiratory infections, and urinary tract infections, are more common. In female adolescents, clinicians should consider pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy, ruptured ovarian cysts, or ovarian torsion. Initial laboratory tests include complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or C-reactive protein, urinalysis, and a pregnancy test. Abdominal radiography can be used to diagnose constipation or obstruction. Ultrasonography is the initial choice in children for the diagnosis of cholecystitis, pancreatitis, ovarian cyst, ovarian or testicular torsion, pelvic inflammatory disease, pregnancy-related pathology, and appendicitis. Appendicitis is the most common cause of acute abdominal pain requiring surgery, with a peak incidence during adolescence. When the appendix is not clearly visible on ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging can be used to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:27175718

  17. [Differential diagnosis of abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Frei, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Despite the frequency of functional abdominal pain, potentially dangerous causes of abdominal pain need to be excluded. Medical history and clinical examination must focus on red flags and signs for imflammatory or malignant diseases. See the patient twice in the case of severe and acute abdominal pain if lab parameters or radiological examinations are normal. Avoid repeated and useless X-ray exposure whenever possible. In the case of subacute or chronic abdominal pain, lab tests such as fecal calprotectin, helicobacter stool antigen and serological tests for celiac disease are very useful. Elderly patients may show atypical or missing clinical signs. Take care of red herrings and be skeptical whether your initial diagnosis is really correct. Abdominal pain can frequently be an abdominal wall pain. PMID:26331201

  18. Hypnosis for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Gottsegen, David

    2011-07-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common pediatric condition affecting 20% of the pediatric population worldwide. Most children with this disorder are found to have no specific organic etiology and are given the diagnosis of functional abdominal pain. Well-designed clinical trials have found hypnotherapy and guided imagery to be the most efficacious treatments for this condition. Hypnotic techniques used for other somatic symptoms are easily adaptable for use with functional abdominal pain. The author discusses 2 contrasting hypnotic approaches to functional abdominal pain and provides implications for further research. These approaches may provide new insights into this common and complex disorder. PMID:21922712

  19. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... At low doses, these medicines can be excellent pain relievers for some children. A fearful, anxious, or depressed child however should be fully assessed by a psychiatrist or psychologist. Some psychological treatments that help children cope with functional abdominal pain ...

  20. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... dominalPa in inCh ildre n What is functional abdominal pain, and why does it happen? Most otherwise-healthy ... stomachaches for two months or more have functional abdominal pain. The term “functional” refers to the fact that ...

  1. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  2. Differences in regional homogeneity between patients with Crohn's disease with and without abdominal pain revealed by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chun-Hui; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hui-Rong; Wu, Lu-Yi; Jin, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Si-Yao; Shi, Yin; Zhang, Jian-Ye; Zeng, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Li-Li; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Calhoun, Vince D; Tian, Jie; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2016-05-01

    Abnormal pain processing in the central nervous system may be related to abdominal pain in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in resting-state brain activity in patients with CD in remission and its relationship with the presence of abdominal pain. Twenty-five patients with CD and with abdominal pain, 25 patients with CD and without abdominal pain, and 32 healthy subjects were scanned using a 3.0-T functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to assess resting-state brain activity. Daily pain scores were collected 1 week before functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found that patients with abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the insula, middle cingulate cortex (MCC), and supplementary motor area and higher ReHo values in the temporal pole. In contrast, patients without abdominal pain exhibited lower ReHo values in the hippocampal/parahippocampal cortex and higher ReHo values in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (all P < 0.05, corrected). The ReHo values of the insula and MCC were significantly negatively correlated with daily pain scores for patients with abdominal pain (r = -0.53, P = 0.008 and r = -0.61, P = 0.002, respectively). These findings suggest that resting-state brain activities are different between remissive patients with CD with and without abdominal pain and that abnormal activities in insula and MCC are closely related to the severity of abdominal pain. PMID:26761381

  3. Abdominal pain with a twist

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Malrotation in children is due to either an incomplete or non-rotation of the foetal mid-gut during perinatal development. Presentation is usually in the first few weeks of life, often with life-threatening volvulus and ischaemia. However, it can be a rare cause of abdominal pain in older children and young adults. We present such a case, as a reminder to emergency physicians that malrotation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent or chronic abdominal pain not only in children but also in adolescents. PMID:21635723

  4. Recurrent abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Buch, Niyaz A; Ahmad, Sheikh Mushtaq; Ahmed, S Zubair; Ali, Syed Wazid; Charoo, B A; Hassan, Masood Ul

    2002-09-01

    Eighty five children with recurrent abdominal pain(RAP) were studied. Organic cause was noticed in 70 cases and non-organic in 15 cases. Giardiasis was the commonest organic cause in 57 (67.0 percent), either alone or with other parasitic infestations. Other organic causes include gallstones (4.7 percent), urinary infections (4.7 percent), esophagitis/gastritis (3.5 percent) and abdominal tuberculosis (2.3 percent). Single parent, school phobia, sibling rivalry, RAP in other family members and nocturnal enuresis are significant factors associated with nonorganic causes PMID:12368527

  5. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePlus

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... this kind of pain when they have a stomach virus, indigestion, gas, or when they become constipated. ...

  6. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  7. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  8. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. PMID:27133248

  9. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  10. Abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Cervellin, Gianfranco; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Although traditionally regarded as a specific pediatric disease, abdominal migraine may also be observed in adults. Unfortunately, however, this condition is frequently overlooked in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in the emergency department (ED). A 30-year-old woman presented to our ED complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting, lasting for 12 hours. The pain was periumbilical, continuous, and not associated with fever or diarrhea. The physical examination and the results of conventional blood tests were normal. The patient was treated with intravenous ketoprofen, metoclopramide, and ranitidine, obtaining a prompt relief of symptoms. She had a history of similar episodes in the last 15 years, with several ED visits, blood test examinations, ultrasonography of the abdomen, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies. Celiac disease, porphyry, sickle cell disease, and inflammatory bowel disease were all excluded. In July 2012, she became pregnant, and she delivered a healthy baby on April 2013. Until November 2014, she has remained asymptomatic. Based on the clinical characteristics of the abdominal pain episodes, the exclusion of any alternative diagnosis, and the relief of symptoms during and after pregnancy, a final diagnosis of abdominal migraine could be established. A skilled emergency physician should always consider abdominal migraine in the differential diagnosis of patients admitted to the ED with abdominal pain, especially when the attacks are recurrent and no alternative diagnosis can be clearly established. PMID:25616589

  11. Abdominal Dual Energy Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, F. Graham; Brody, William R.; Cassel, Douglas M.; Macovski, Albert

    1981-11-01

    Dual energy scanned projection radiography of the abdomen has been performed using an experimental line-scanned radiographic system. Digital images simultaneously obtained at 85 and 135 kVp are combined, using photoelectric/Compton decomposition algorithms to create images from which selected materials are cancelled. Soft tissue cancellation images have proved most useful in various abdominal imaging applications, largely due to the elimination of obscuring high-contrast bowel gas shadows. These techniques have been successfully applied to intravenous pyelography, oral cholecystography, intravenous abdominal arteriog-raphy and the imaging of renal calculi.

  12. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  13. Functional Abdominal Pain: "Get" the Function, Loose the Pain.

    PubMed

    Draeger-Muenke, Reinhild

    2015-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain is a mind-body, psychosocial, and self-reinforcing experience with significant consequences for the sufferer and the surrounding support network. The occurrence of unpredictable symptoms and their severity add an element of dread and feeling out-of-control to daily life and often reduce overall functioning in a downward spiral. Two clinical presentations of functional abdominal pain are offered in this article (composites to protect confidentiality) dealing with abdominal pain syndrome and abdominal migraines. The treatment demonstrates the use of hypnotic principles for self-regulation, exploration, and meaning-making. Hypnosis treatment is conducted in combination with mindfulness-based interventions and Traditional Chinese Medicine's (TCM) teachings regarding abdominal health and illness. The clinical examples illustrate medical findings that suggest children with early life stress and an early onset of gastrointestinal somatization may not simply outgrow their functional abdominal pain but may suffer into adulthood. PMID:26046716

  14. [Pediatric Abdominal Pain – Harmless or Harmful?].

    PubMed

    Furlano, Raoul Ivano

    2016-04-27

    Abdominal pain is a very common pediatric complaint. In the majority of cases there is no life-threatening pathology behind this symptom, but a functional disease. However, all-day activities of children and adolescents are often limited, frequent absences from school, and general physician/ pediatrician office visits with often unnecessary diagnostic and therapies are registered. Once an organic etiology of the abdominal pain is excluded by a thoroughly medical history taking and physical examination, the first steps for a successful alleviation of the pain is the reassurance of the patients and their family that there is no life-threatening pathology. There is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy may be useful in improving pain and disability outcome in the short term. There is no evidence for pharmacological, dietetic, or complementary intervention in the treatment of chronic functional abdominal pain. PMID:27120211

  15. Abdominal Pain in the Geriatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Leuthauser, Amy; McVane, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain in the elderly can be a challenging and difficult condition to diagnose and treat. The geriatric population has significant comorbidities and often takes polypharmacy that can mask symptoms. The presentation of common conditions can be different than that in the younger population, often lacking the traditional indicators of disease, making it of pivotal importance for the clinician to consider a wide differential during their workup. It is also important to consider extra-abdominal abnormality that may manifest as abdominal pain. PMID:27133249

  16. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This nine-chapter book gives an overview of the integrated approach to abdominal imaging. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to the physics used in medical imaging; chapter 2 is on the selection of imaging modalities. These are followed by four chapters that deal, respectively, with plain radiography, computed tomographic scanning, sonography, and nuclear imaging, as applied to the abdomen. Two chapters then cover contrast material-enhanced studies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract: one focusing on technical considerations; the other, on radiologic study of disease processes. The final chapter is a brief account of different interventional procedures.

  17. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  18. Abdominal Pain, Short-Term

    MedlinePlus

    ... conter antacid on a regular basis. See your doctor if an antacid doesn't help or if the pain comes back quickly. No **11. Are you a woman who has a constant pain in the lower abdomen along with a vaginal discharge? Yes ... See your doctor. No 12. Do you have a mild pain, ...

  19. A Case of Right Upper Abdominal Pain Misdiagnosed on Computerized Tomography

    PubMed Central

    SINGH, Seema; JHA, Ashesh Kumar; SHARMA, Naveen; MISHRA, Tushar Subhadarshan

    2014-01-01

    Right upper abdominal pain is a common symptom in patients presenting to surgery emergency. Most of these cases can be diagnosed accurately on clinical evaluation or imaging. We report an unusual case of right upper abdominal pain, which could not be diagnosed correctly pre-operatively despite using various imaging modalities. PMID:25977626

  20. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. PMID:25666642

  1. Diagnostic yield of oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in children with abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abdominal pain is the most common indication for OGD in children. However, existing studies examining the diagnostic outcomes of OGD in children with abdominal pain are limited. We conducted the current study to examine the diagnostic yield of OGD with biopsy in the evaluation of abdominal pain and ...

  2. An unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Terneu, S; Verhelst, D; Thys, F; Ketelslegers, E; Hantson, P; Wittebole, X

    2003-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented to the Emergency Room because of abdominal pain associated with hematuria and red blood blending to stool. On admission, the physical examination revealed abdominal tenderness and diffuse cutaneous hematoma. The laboratory findings showed abnormal clotting tests with high International Normalised Ratio (INR) and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time. Hemoperitoneum and ureteral hematoma were noted on the abdomen computed tomography. The patient confessed she had ingested difenacoum for several weeks. All the symptoms resolved with fresh frozen plasma perfusion and vitamin K. PMID:14635532

  3. [Case report: strongyloidiosis with chronic abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Tamer, Gülden Sönmez; Dündar, Devrim

    2008-01-01

    The case was presented here in order to point out that an immunocompetent child might have Strongyloidiosis infection that might be misdiagnosed. A 9 year old male patient who had chronic abdominal pain with a feeling of weakness was treated several times for urinary tract infection. He had never been tested for the presence of parasites. After the patient's complaints occurred again, he presented at our hospital. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were observed in his feces by microscopy. Albendazol (400 mg/day for three days) was prescribed. After 10 days, the feces of the patient was reexamined and no Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were detected. For this reason, it is important to investigate the possibility of intestinal parasitic infections in children with chronic abdominal pain. PMID:18645954

  4. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP).

    PubMed

    Morton, Darren; Callister, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP), commonly referred to as 'stitch', is an ailment well known in many sporting activities. It is especially prevalent in activities that involve repetitive torso movement with the torso in an extended position, such as running and horse riding. Approximately 70% of runners report experiencing the pain in the past year and in a single running event approximately one in five participants can be expected to suffer the condition. ETAP is a localized pain that is most common in the lateral aspects of the mid abdomen along the costal border, although it may occur in any region of the abdomen. It may also be related to shoulder tip pain, which is the referred site from tissue innervated by the phrenic nerve. ETAP tends to be sharp or stabbing when severe, and cramping, aching, or pulling when less intense. The condition is exacerbated by the postprandial state, with hypertonic beverages being particularly provocative. ETAP is most common in the young but is unrelated to sex or body type. Well trained athletes are not immune from the condition, although they may experience it less frequently. Several theories have been presented to explain the mechanism responsible for the pain, including ischemia of the diaphragm; stress on the supportive visceral ligaments that attach the abdominal organs to the diaphragm; gastrointestinal ischemia or distension; cramping of the abdominal musculature; ischemic pain resulting from compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament; aggravation of the spinal nerves; and irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Of these theories, irritation of the parietal peritoneum best explains the features of ETAP; however, further investigations are required. Strategies for managing the pain are largely anecdotal, especially given that its etiology remains to be fully elucidated. Commonly purported prevention strategies include avoiding large volumes of food and beverages for at least 2 hours

  5. Eosinophilic jejunitis presenting as intractable abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Zeynel; Attila, Tan; Kapran, Yersu; Tokatli, Ilyas Pinar; Unal, Zeynep

    2014-09-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon disease characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical manifestations are related to the layer(s) and extent of the bowel involved. In this paper, we present a case of intractable abdominal pain caused by jejunal submucosal eosinophilic infiltration without mucosal involvement, diagnosed by deep endoscopic biopsies. The patient was successfully treated with steroids without need for surgery for diagnosis or therapy. PMID:25565932

  6. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  7. Abdominal Pain, the Adolescent and Altered Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Lino; Heinz, Nicole; Ludwick, Allison; Rasooly, Tali; Wu, Rina; Johnson, Adriana; Schechter, Neil L.; Borsook, David; Nurko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder of unknown etiology. Although relatively common in children, how this condition affects brain structure and function in a pediatric population remains unclear. Here, we investigate brain changes in adolescents with IBS and healthy controls. Imaging was performed with a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio Tim MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel head coil. A high-resolution T1-weighted anatomical scan was acquired followed by a T2-weighted functional scan. We used a surface-based morphometric approach along with a seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) analysis to determine if groups differed in cortical thickness and whether areas showing structural differences also showed abnormal RS-FC patterns. Patients completed the Abdominal Pain Index and the GI Module of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory to assess abdominal pain severity and impact of GI symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Disease duration and pain intensity were also assessed. Pediatric IBS patients, relative to controls, showed cortical thickening in the posterior cingulate (PCC), whereas cortical thinning in posterior parietal and prefrontal areas were found, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In patients, abdominal pain severity was related to cortical thickening in the intra-abdominal area of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), whereas HRQOL was associated with insular cortical thinning. Disease severity measures correlated with cortical thickness in bilateral DLPFC and orbitofrontal cortex. Patients also showed reduced anti-correlations between PCC and DLPFC compared to controls, a finding that may reflect aberrant connectivity between default mode and cognitive control networks. We are the first to demonstrate concomitant structural and functional brain changes associated with abdominal pain severity, HRQOL related to GI-specific symptoms, and disease-specific measures in

  8. Abdominal exploration - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgical exploration of the abdomen, also called an exploratory laparotomy, may be recommended when there is abdominal ... blunt trauma"). Diseases that may be discovered by exploratory laparotomy include: inflammation of the appendix (acute appendicitis) ...

  9. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  10. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. PMID:27154197

  11. Acute abdominal and pelvic pain in pregnancy: ESUR recommendations.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Derchi, Lorenzo; McHugo, Josephine; Rockall, Andrea; Vock, Peter; Weston, Michael; Spencer, John

    2013-12-01

    Acute abdominal pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the fetus from X-rays due to their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the fetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. This article reviews the evolving imaging and clinical literature on appropriate investigation of acute abdominal and pelvic pain during established intrauterine pregnancy, addressing its common causes. Guidelines based on the current literature and on the accumulated clinico-radiological experience of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) working group are proposed for imaging these suspected conditions. PMID:23990045

  12. Early Postoperative Pain After Keyless Abdominal Rope-Lifting Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hüseyınoğlu, Ürfettin; Çıçek, Melek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery is a novel, gasless, single-incision laparoscopic surgical technique. In this study we aimed to compare the postoperative pain from keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery with carbon dioxide laparoscopy performed for benign ovarian cysts. Methods: During a 20-month period, 77 women underwent surgery for a benign ovarian cyst. Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery and conventional carbon dioxide laparoscopy techniques were used for the operations in 32 women and 45 women, respectively. The 2 operative techniques were compared with regard to demographic characteristics; preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data including early postoperative pain scores; and frequency of shoulder pain and analgesic requirements. Results: Data regarding demographic characteristics, preoperative findings, cyst diameters and rupture rates, intra-abdominal adhesions, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative hospital stay did not differ between groups (P > .05). However, the mean operative and abdominal access times were significantly longer in the keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery group (P < .05). Visual analog scale pain scores at initially and at the second, fourth, and 24th hours of the postoperative period were significantly lower in the keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery group (P < .05). Similarly, keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery caused significantly less shoulder pain and additional analgesic use (P < .05). Conclusion: Keyless abdominal rope-lifting surgery seems to cause less pain in the management of benign ovarian cysts in comparison with conventional carbon dioxide laparoscopy. PMID:25848177

  13. Sonography of Abdominal Pain in Children: Appendicitis and Its Common Mimics.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Thomas Ray; Corwin, Michael T; Davoodian, Andrew; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca

    2016-03-01

    Abdominal pain is very common in the pediatric population (<18 years of age). Sonography is a safe modality that can often differentiate the frequently encountered causes of abdominal pain in children. This pictorial essay will discuss the sonographic findings of acute appendicitis, including the imaging appearance of a perforated appendicitis. It will also present the sonographic features of the relatively common mimics of appendicitis, such as mesenteric adenitis/gastroenteritis, intussusception, Meckel diverticulum, and ovarian torsion. PMID:26892821

  14. Abdominal imaging: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    This primer discusses the techniques and advantages of each of the various modalities used in gatrointestinal imaging. Topics covered include contract studies, computed tomography, ultrasound, nuclear radiology, the plain radiograph and interventional radiology. The authors have made a special effort to present the reader with a rational approach toward the proper selection of the appropriate imaging modality in most clinical situations.

  15. Multidetector CT in emergency radiology: acute and generalized non-traumatic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Paolantonio, Pasquale; Rengo, Marco; Ferrari, Riccardo; Laghi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) is an imaging technique that provides otherwise unobtainable information in the diagnostic work-up of patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A correct working diagnosis depends essentially on understanding the individual patient's clinical data and laboratory findings. In haemodynamically stable patients with acute severe and generalized abdominal pain, MDCT is now the preferred imaging test and gives invaluable diagnostic information, also in unstable patients after stabilization. In this descriptive review, we focus our attention on acute, severe and generalized or undifferentiated non-traumatic abdominal pain. The main differential diagnoses are acute pancreatitis, gastrointestinal perforation, ruptured abdominal aneurysm and acute mesenteric ischaemia. We will provide radiologist readers with a technical guide to optimize MDCT imaging protocols and list the major CT signs essential to reach a correct diagnosis and guide the best treatment. PMID:26689097

  16. Common Functional Gastroenterological Disorders Associated With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Sletten, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Although abdominal pain is a symptom of several structural gastrointestinal disorders (eg, peptic ulcer disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 4 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with abdominal pain: functional dyspepsia, constipation-predominant and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome, and functional abdominal pain syndrome. Together, these conditions affect approximately 1 in 4 people in the United States. They are associated with comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia and depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Symptoms are explained by disordered gastrointestinal motility and sensation, which are implicated in various peripheral (eg, postinfectious inflammation and luminal irritants) and/or central (eg, stress and anxiety) factors. These disorders are defined and can generally be diagnosed by symptoms alone. Often prompted by alarm features, selected testing is useful to exclude structural disease. Identifying the specific diagnosis (eg, differentiating between functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome) and establishing an effective patient-physician relationship are the cornerstones of therapy. Many patients with mild symptoms can be effectively managed with limited tests, sensible dietary modifications, and over-the-counter medications tailored to symptoms. If these measures are not sufficient, pharmacotherapy should be considered for bowel symptoms (constipation or diarrhea) and/or abdominal pain; opioids should not be used. Behavioral and psychological approaches (eg, cognitive behavioral therapy) can be helpful, particularly in patients with chronic abdominal pain who require a multidisciplinary pain management program without opioids. PMID:27492916

  17. Functional abdominal pain causing Scurvy, Pellagra, and Hypovitaminosis A.

    PubMed

    Ho, Edith Y; Mathy, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Severe vitamin deficiency disease is rarely seen in developed countries. We present an atypical case of a young man with scurvy, pellagra, and hypovitaminosis A, caused by longstanding functional abdominal pain that severely limited his ability to eat. PMID:24715978

  18. Abdominal Lymphatic Malformation Presenting as Acute Abdominal Pain: A Common Pediatric Complaint, but an Unusual Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Christopher I; Farrell, Caitlin A; Nelson, Kyle A; Levy, Jason A

    2016-05-01

    We present the clinical and radiological findings involving a mesenteric lymphatic malformation causing volvulus in a toddler presenting with acute abdominal pain, as well as its treatment options. PMID:27139293

  19. Evaluation of abdominal pain in the AIDS patient.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, D A; Danforth, D N; Macher, A M; Longo, D L; Stewart, L; Masur, H

    1984-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a recently recognized entity characterized by a deficiency in cell mediated immune response. The syndrome is manifested by the development of otherwise rare malignant neoplasms and severe life-threatening opportunistic infections. Case histories of five AIDS patients evaluated for abdominal pain are presented to demonstrate the unusual spectrum of intra-abdominal pathology that may be encountered in the AIDS patient. As the number of patients with AIDS continues to escalate, surgical evaluation and intervention will be required more frequently. An understanding of this syndrome and its complications is mandatory for the surgeon to adequately evaluate AIDS patients with abdominal pain. PMID:6322708

  20. [Abdominal migraine as a cause of chronic recurrent abdominal pain in a 9-years-old girl--case report].

    PubMed

    Kwiecień, Jarosław; Piasecki, Leszek; Kasner, Jacek; Karczewska, Krystyna

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal migraine is a rarely recognized functional intestinal disorder, manifesting as recurrent paroxysmal abdominal pain of neurogenic origin. The authors describe the 9-years old girl referred to the hospital because of chronic paroxysmal abdominal pain. She did not improve after medication used commonly in functional abdominal disorders (drotaverine, mebeverine, trimebutine). On the ground of various investigations organic causes of abdominal pain were excluded. Carefully completed anamnesis, as well as precise description of the clinical picture of abdominal pain attacks, has lead to the diagnosis of abdominal migraine. According to advice of neurologist the treatment with amitriptyline was introduced. Thereafter a significant improvement was observed. Abdominal migraine has to be taken in to account when diagnosing chronic abdominal pain in children. PMID:16245431

  1. Support Vector Machine Diagnosis of Acute Abdominal Pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnsdotter, Malin; Nalin, Kajsa; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Malmgren, Helge

    This study explores the feasibility of a decision-support system for patients seeking care for acute abdominal pain, and, specifically the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis. We used a linear support vector machine (SVM) to separate diverticulitis from all other reported cases of abdominal pain and from the important differential diagnosis non-specific abdominal pain (NSAP). On a database containing 3337 patients, the SVM obtained results comparable to those of the doctors in separating diverticulitis or NSAP from the remaining diseases. The distinction between diverticulitis and NSAP was, however, substantially improved by the SVM. For this patient group, the doctors achieved a sensitivity of 0.714 and a specificity of 0.963. When adjusted to the physicians' results, the SVM sensitivity/specificity was higher at 0.714/0.985 and 0.786/0.963 respectively. Age was found as the most important discriminative variable, closely followed by C-reactive protein level and lower left side pain.

  2. My patient has abdominal and flank pain: Identifying renal causes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Christopher; MacDonald, Scott; Henneberry, Ryan; Atkinson, Paul R

    2015-11-01

    Acute flank and abdominal pain are common presenting complaints in the emergency department. With increasing access to point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS), emergency physicians have an added tool to help identify renal problems as a cause of a patient's pain. PoCUS for hydronephrosis has a sensitivity of 72-83.3% and a varying specificity, similar to radiology-performed ultrasonography. In addition to assessment for hydronephrosis, PoCUS can help emergency physicians to exclude other serious causes of flank and abdominal pain such as the presence of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, or free fluid in the intraperitoneal space, which could represent hemorrhage. Use of PoCUS for the assessment of flank pain has resulted in more rapid diagnosis, decreased use of computed tomography, and shorter emergency department length of stay. PMID:27433264

  3. Dietary issues in recurrent abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many children and adults suffer from belly pain that comes and goes. This article reviews the scientific evidence that in some people, the type of diet they eat can cause pain. In some children, not having enough fiber in the diet can cause belly pain. Adding specific types of fiber can improve the ...

  4. Ascariasis as a cause of recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Gerly Edson; Teves, Pedro Montes; Monge, Eduardo

    2010-04-01

    Ascariasis is the most common helminthic infection in developing countries. It may cause chronic abdominal pain, tenderness and bloating. Our aim is to report a case of acute episodic abdominal pain and pancreatitis associated with ascariasis. We report a 59-year-old female patient who was admitted for acute abdominal pain, having had several previous similar events before one of them was diagnosed as acute idiopathic pancreatitis. On admission, her physical exam was normal. Laboratory results showed hemoglobin 12.2 g/dL, white blood cell count 11 900 cells/mm(3), eosinophils 420 cells/mm(3), serum amylase 84 IU/mL, lipase 22 IU/mL and normal liver function tests. Abdominal ultrasound and a plain abdominal X-ray were also normal. An upper endoscopy showed round white worms in the duodenum and the stomach, some of them with bile in their intestines. The intestinal parasites were diagnosed as Ascaris lumbricoides, and the patient was started on albendazole, with full recovery within a week. We believe that ascariasis should be considered in patients with recurrent abdominal pain and idiopathic pancreatitis. PMID:20447214

  5. A man from South Asia presenting with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiratori, Beata; Usami, Osamu; Hattori, Toshio; Ashino, Yugo

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis (TB) is challenging due to the non-specific clinical presentation and frequent failure to detect the pathogen. A young Bangladeshi man presented to the Emergency Outpatient department with constipation and burning abdominal pain that was localised primarily in the epigastrium. Although the infectious agent was not detected, findings of histological examination were helpful in guiding the treatment strategy. As a good clinical practice, it is important to consider abdominal TB as a possible diagnosis in such cases, particularly when a patient has previously been residing in a high TB burden country. Thus, appropriate diagnosis and early antituberculous therapy are essential for achieving a positive outcome. PMID:24554676

  6. An unusual cause of postpartum abdominal pain: case report.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gregory J; Fagen, Kimberly; Shepherd, Matthew; Boswell, Gilbert

    2009-08-01

    Abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in the Emergency Department. It extends to all populations regardless of age, sex, or socioeconomic status. After gathering a history and examining the patient, most Emergency Physicians form a differential diagnosis and initiate an appropriate work-up. However, in the postpartum woman, additional causes must be considered and treated accordingly, knowing that there are consequences for both mother and child. We present a case of a postpartum woman presenting with right-sided abdominal pain, the cause of which, although atypical, has potential for significant morbidity and mortality if it goes undiscovered. PMID:18572346

  7. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy R; Johnson, Philip L; Meyer, Mark C

    2002-04-15

    Given the high rate of morbidity and mortality associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), accurate diagnosis and preoperative evaluation are essential for improved patient outcomes. Ultrasonography is the standard method of screening and monitoring AAAs that have not ruptured. In the past, aortography was commonly used for preoperative planning in the repair of AAAs. More recently, computed tomography (CT) has largely replaced older, more invasive methods. Recent advances in CT imaging technology, such as helical CT and CT angiography, offer significant advantages over traditional CT. These methods allow for more rapid scans and can produce three-dimensional images of the AAA and important adjacent vascular structures. Use of endovascular stent grafts has increased recently and is less invasive for the repair of AAAs in selected cases. Aortography and CT angiography can precisely determine the size and surrounding anatomy of the AAA to identify appropriate candidates for the use of endovascular stent grafts. Helical CT and CT angiography represent an exciting future in the preoperative evaluation of AAAs. However, this technology is not the standard of care because of the lack of widespread availability, the cost associated with obtaining new equipment, and the lack of universal protocols necessary for acquisition and reconstruction of these images. PMID:11989632

  8. [13-Year old boy with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Irene; Klinkhamer, Paul J J M; van de Poll, Marcel C G

    2012-01-01

    A 13-year old boy presents with pain in the lower right abdomen, showing clinical signs of appendicitis. During McBurney' incision an appendix sana was seen. Histologic examination showed penetrating enterobiasis. This was treated with mebendazol. PMID:22551758

  9. Slipping Rib Syndrome as Persistent Abdominal and Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Vergaray, Juan Javier; de la Gala García, Francisco; Obaya Rebollar, Juan Carlos; Bové Alvarez, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an overlooked cause of persistent abdominal or chest pain. The etiology of this syndrome is not well understood, but the characteristic pain is from hypermobility of the false ribs. Although it is a diagnosis of exclusion, misdiagnosis may lead to an excessive workup. A simple clinical examination via the hooking maneuver is the most significant feature of its diagnosis. We describe the case of a 41-year-old woman with slipping rib syndrome. PMID:26528703

  10. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern. PMID:24845149

  11. EGD IN CHILDREN WITH ABDOMINAL PAIN: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review to examine the diagnostic yield (endoscopic and histologic) of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for the evaluation of abdominal pain of unclear etiology in children. We also examined the effect of EGD on change in treatment, quality of life, change in abd...

  12. Assessment of Abdominal Pain in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Polly Gerber

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric abdominal pain can be a difficult condition to accurately assess for the nurse to determine whether the child's need is for teaching, treating, or transferring. This article describes the process as well as practical tips to be used by the nurse in the school setting. Distinguishing characteristics and findings, including key physical…

  13. Recurrent abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recurrent abdominal pain continues to be one of the most ubiquitous conditions faced by the healthcare team, and has a significant emotional and economic impact. We have moved from considering it a psychological condition to recognizing the physiological and environmental contributions, and consider...

  14. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage in evaluating acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Barbee, C L; Gilsdorf, R B

    1975-06-01

    A study was performed to determine the value of peritoneal lavage in the acute abdomen not related to trauma. Lavage was performed in 33 patients in the evaluation of abdominal pain of sufficient degree to warrant consideration for surgical intervention. Peritoneal lavage was truly positive or truly negative in 64% of the cases. It showed false negative results in 28% and false positive results in 8%. The lavage was most accurate in the evaluation of appendicitis, colonic disease, and intra abdominal bleeding. It was highly inaccurate in the evaluation of cholecystitis and peptic ulcer disease. It was concluded that the peritoneal lavage can be a useful adjunct in the evaluation of patients with abdominal pain and should be considered in difficult diagnostic problems but not routinely employed. PMID:1138636

  15. Abdominal pain of spinal origin. Value of intercostal block.

    PubMed

    Ashby, E C

    1977-05-01

    A prospective study was made of 73 patients presenting in one year with abdominal pain provisionally diagnosed as of spinal origin. The criteria for audit of diagnosis and treatment are defined. The diagnosis was confirmed in 53 patients, 49 of whom had been treated with a lignocaine intercostal block in the relevant segment. Thirty-three of these (67.3%) had both complete and prolonged relief. It is suggested that the block causes interruption of a vicious circle of pain and muscle spasm in a 'spinal reflex pain syndrome'. PMID:860866

  16. Practical management of functional abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Brown, L K; Beattie, R M; Tighe, M P

    2016-07-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is common in childhood, but is not often caused by disease. It is often the impact of the pain rather than the pain itself that results in referral to the clinician. In this review, we will summarise the currently available evidence and discuss the functional dimensions of the presentation, within the framework of commonly expressed parental questions. Using the Rome III criteria, we discuss how to classify the functional symptoms, investigate appropriately, provide reassurance regarding parental worries of chronic disease. We outline how to explain the functional symptoms to parents and an individualised strategy to help restore function. PMID:26699533

  17. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: An Adolescent Female Student with Severe Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a common chief complaint encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of abdominal pain in children and adolescents, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening conditions associated with severe abdominal pain that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the student to a local emergency department. PMID:27470683

  18. A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynn S; Baber, Kari Freeman; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2008-07-15

    This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8-18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children's pain severity and coping efficacy. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on the 13 PRI subscales identified pain coping profiles in Sample 1 (n=311) that replicated in Sample 2 (n=388). Evidence was found of external validity and distinctiveness of the profiles. The findings support a typology of pain coping that reflects the quality of patients' pain mastery efforts and interpersonal relationships associated with pain coping. Results are discussed in relation to developmental processes, attachment styles, and treatment implications. PMID:17928144

  19. Long-term prognosis in children with recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M F; Mortensen, O

    1975-02-01

    The present study is a follow-up of 34 cases admitted to a paediatric department with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in 1942 and 1943. 45 persons without a history of RAP were selected at random and included as controls. Using a questionnaire, there was a higher incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms among persons with a history of RAP during childhood than among controls (P less than 0.05). 18 of the original 34 cases who still had symptoms were re-examined; 11 had a clinical picture consistent with a diagnosis of irritable colon, 5 had a picture compatible with both irritable colon and peptic ulcer/gastritis, and 2 had duodenal ulcer. Abdominal pains occurred no more frequently among children of parents who had had RAP during childhood than among children of parents without such a history. However, there was a higher incidence of abdominal pain among children of parents who were complaining of abdominal discomfort at the time of the investigation than among children whose parents were without such symptoms (P less than 0.005). PMID:1130815

  20. Diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in older patients.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Corey; Clark, Dwayne C

    2006-11-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common presenting complaint in older patients. Presentation may differ from that of the younger patient and is often complicated by coexistent disease, delays in presentation, and physical and social barriers. The physical examination can be misleadingly benign, even with catastrophic conditions such as abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture and mesenteric ischemia. Changes that occur in the biliary system because of aging make older patients vulnerable to acute cholecystitis, the most common indication for surgery in this population. In older patients with appendicitis, the initial diagnosis is correct only one half of the time, and there are increased rates of perforation and mortality when compared with younger patients. Medication use, gallstones, and alcohol use increase the risk of pancreatitis, and advanced age is an indicator of poor prognosis for this disease. Diverticulitis is a common cause of abdominal pain in the older patient; in appropriately selected patients, it may be treated on an outpatient basis with oral antibiotics. Small and large bowel obstructions, usually caused by adhesive disease or malignancy, are more common in the aged and often require surgery. Morbidity and mortality among older patients presenting with acute abdominal pain are high, and these patients often require hospitalization with prompt surgical consultation. PMID:17111893

  1. Characteristics of pain and stooling in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: To collect symptom data longitudinally from children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and control (asymptomatic) children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Children with RAP (n = 77) and controls (n = 33) 7 to 10 years of age completed daily diaries for 2 weeks tracking pain frequency and severi...

  2. Abdominal pain and two x-rays: spot the difference.

    PubMed

    Rajković, Z; Papeš, D; Altarac, S; Arslani, N

    2012-03-01

    We present two patients with air found in the right upper quadrant on standard abdominal x-ray. One was diagnosed with pneumobilia and underwent elective surgery for a bilioenteric fistula. The other was diagnosed with portal vein gas and underwent an emergency exploratory laparotomy at which a superior mesenteric artery embolism was found. The differential diagnostic criteria for pneumobilia and portal vein gas are described. If portal venous gas is found on x-ray in patients with abdominal pain, it is recommended that management is aggressive, meaning an emergency exploratory laparotomy, because mortality in such cases is approximately 75%. PMID:22391372

  3. Prevalence of abdominal migraine and recurrent abdominal pain in a Japanese clinic.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of abdominal migraine (AM) and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was evaluated in patients who visited Hikita Pediatric Clinic between May 2010 and April 2015. Patient data were collected prospectively using a questionnaire. Out of a total of 3611 cases, observed prevalence was 2.44% for repeated abdominal pain over a period of ≥3 months, 1.47% for RAP, and 0.19% for AM. Duration of abdominal pain was longer for AM than for non-AM RAP. Certain clinical features were significantly different between AM and non-AM RAP. No correlations were found among age at onset, frequency of attack, and duration of attack for various types of RAP. It was difficult to determine useful diagnostic criteria for distinguishing between AM and non-AM RAP. They did not appear to be separate disease entities but, instead, lie on a disease spectrum. The present prevalence of AM (0.19%) was lower than that in many previous studies from countries other than Japan. PMID:27460403

  4. Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Rona L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Romano, Joan M.; Labus, Jennifer; Walker, Lynn S.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Van Tilburg, Miranda; Feld, Lauren D.; Christie, Dennis L.; Whitehead, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive-behavioral interventions improve outcomes for many pediatric health conditions, but little is known about which mechanisms mediate these outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify whether changes in targeted process variables from baseline to one week post-treatment mediate improvement in outcomes in a randomized controlled trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for idiopathic childhood abdominal pain. Methods Two-hundred children with persistent functional abdominal pain and their parents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a 3-session social learning and cognitive-behavioral treatment (SLCBT) (N=100), or a 3-session educational intervention controlling for time and attention (N=100). Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6 and 12 month follow-ups. The intervention focused on altering parental responses to pain and on increasing adaptive cognitions and coping strategies related to pain in both parents and children. Results Multiple mediation analyses were applied to examine the extent to which the effects of the SLCBT condition on child GI symptom severity and pain as reported by children and their parents were mediated by changes in targeted cognitive process variables and parents’ solicitous responses to their child’s pain symptoms. Reductions in parents’ perceived threat regarding their child’s pain mediated reductions in both parent- and child-reported GI symptom severity and pain. Reductions in children’s catastrophic cognitions mediated reductions in child-reported GI symptom severity but no other outcomes. Reductions in parental solicitousness did not mediate outcomes. Discussion Results suggest that reductions in reports of children’s pain and GI symptoms following a social learning and cognitive-behavioral intervention were mediated at least in part by decreasing maladaptive parent and child cognitions. PMID:24469611

  5. Entrapped ovarian cyst. An unusual case of persistent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hederström, E; Forsberg, L

    1990-05-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain in the left fossa often mimicking attacks of subileus is described in a woman aged 48 with extensive adhesions caused by multiple surgical procedures. Repeated examinations with conventional abdominal radiography and barium meals were negative with regard to mechanical intestinal obstruction. A cystic lesion varying in size from 2 to 8 cm in diameter was seen adjacent to the left ovary on repeat US examinations and also on CT. Pain episodes were sometimes correlated to increasing size of the lesion which was finally thought to be either a peritoneal inclusion cyst (fluid trapped between pelvic adhesions) or, as was finally confirmed at surgery, a true ovarian cyst (corpus luteum cyst) similarly trapped. PMID:2201330

  6. Misdiagnosis of Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunita; Gupta, Shweta; Begum, Jasmina; Ghose, Seetesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute pancreatitis in a pregnant woman who presented to our emergency department with complaints of severe abdominal pain, was misdiagnosed as scar dehiscence and underwent emergency repeat caesarean section at 33 wks for fetal distress. The preterm baby developed severe respiratory distress and succumbed on the second postnatal day. Persistent severe pain in the postoperative period in the mother prompted further evaluation which led to a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Conservative and supportive management was instituted leading to an eventual favourable maternal outcome. PMID:25738042

  7. Acute Abdominal Pain in the Bariatric Surgery Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kyle D; Takenaka, Katrin Y; Luber, Samuel D

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is present in epidemic proportions in the United States, and bariatric surgery has become more common. Thus, emergency physicians will undoubtedly encounter many patients who have undergone one of these procedures. Knowledge of the anatomic changes specific to these procedures aids the clinician in understanding potential complications and devising an organized differential diagnosis. This article reviews common bariatric surgery procedures, their complications, and the approach to acute abdominal pain in these patients. PMID:27133251

  8. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Chilaiditi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Andrew S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Buicko, Jessica L.; Lopez-Viego, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Chilaiditi syndrome is a rare condition occurring in 0.025% to 0.28% of the population. In these patients, the colon is displaced and caught between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm. Patients' symptoms can range from asymptomatic to acute intermittent bowel obstruction. Diagnosis is best achieved with CT imaging. Identification of Chilaiditi syndrome is clinically significant as it can lead to many significant complications such as volvulus, perforation, and bowel obstruction. If the patient is symptomatic, treatment is usually conservative. Surgery is rarely indicated with indications including ischemia and failure of resolution with conservative management. PMID:23936720

  9. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  10. Extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower abdominal pain: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Dollard, Denis J; Fobia, John B

    2011-03-01

    Lower quadrant abdominal pain is a common complaint evaluated in emergency departments (EDs). The number of differential diagnoses is lowered when the pain in a male patient is associated with a palpable tender mass. These diagnoses include inguinal hernia, inflamed inguinal lymph node, rectus sheath hematoma, cryptorchidism, mass derived from the spermatic cord, and polyorchidism. We report a case of extra scrotal spermatocele causing lower quadrant abdominal pain that was misdiagnosed as an inguinal hernia on several ED visits. Lower quadrant mass and pain caused by a spermatocele are unusual conditions. Upon the patient's third (ED) visit, the painful mass remained located in his right lower quadrant. The lower quadrant mass was movable on palpation and with pressure could be delivered into the superior aspect of the scrotum. The patient had an abdominal and pelvic computed tomography scan and lower quadrant ultrasound. The imaging studies revealed the mass to be a cystic structure. Surgical excision confirmed that the mass was a spermatocele. Differential diagnoses, diagnostic approaches, and treatment are discussed. PMID:20674226

  11. Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis: an atypical abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Ghislain, L; Heylen, A; Alexis, F; Tintillier, M

    2015-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis is a rare infection mostly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, and is traditionally associated with risk factors (sports, female incontinence surgery). Typical features of pubic symphysis infection include abdominal, pelvic, or groin pain that increases upon standing and walking, causing limping to occur. Acute onset of fever is often associated. It is important to distinguish septic arthritis of the pubic symphysis from its aseptic homologue, improperly called 'osteitis pubis' in English literature. This general term is mostly used to designate a mechanical pubic pain and has several aetiological meanings (joint stress, postoperative pain, rheumatic diseases). However, some authors consider the infection of the pubic symphysis as a variant of osteitis pubis, placing the two diseases in the continuum of the same entity. This confusion in pubic pathology related to its rarity and its atypical presentation, may in some cases lead to diagnostic and therapeutic delay. In this article, we would like to make practitioners aware of this uncommon and often ignored anatomical site, so that it can recover its place in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. PMID:25227947

  12. The Brain-Gut Axis in Abdominal Pain Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Tillisch, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    The importance of bidirectional brain-gut interactions in gastrointestinal (GI) illness is increasingly recognized, most prominently in the area of functional GI syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and functional chest pain. The brain receives a constant stream of interoceptive input from the GI tract, integrates this information with other interoceptive information from the body and with contextual information from the environment, and sends an integrated response back to various target cells within the GI tract. This system is optimized to assure homeostasis of the GI tract during physiological perturbations and to adapt GI function to the overall state of the organism. In health, the great majority of interoceptive information reaching the brain is not consciously perceived but serves primarily as input to autonomic reflex pathways. In patients with functional abdominal pain syndromes, conscious perception of interoceptive information from the GI tract, or recall of interoceptive memories of such input, can occur in the form of constant or recurrent discomfort or pain. This is often associated with alterations in autonomic nervous system output and with emotional changes. A model is proposed that incorporates reported peripheral and central abnormalities in patients with IBS, extrapolates similar alterations in brain-gut interactions to patients with other chronic abdominal pain syndromes, and provides novel treatment targets. PMID:21090962

  13. [Management of adult abdominal pain in the Emergency Room].

    PubMed

    Chiche, L; Roupie, E; Delassus, P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a commonplace reason for surgical consultation in the emergency department and is the the most common symptom which the digestive surgeon on-call must evaluate. He must understand the pathophysiologic basis of visceral pain and referred pain in order to appreciate its diverse manifestations. Abdominal pain can stem from many causes intestinal and non-intestinal, medical and surgical. Evaluation and management in the emergency department must be rapid and pragmatic; clinical history and physical examination should define the gravity of the case, direct the first diagnostic procedures and complementary examinations, and guide the therapeutic direction. Ultrasonography is a quick and effective diagnostic procedure in the diagnosis of biliary, urologic, and gynecologic pathologies; it can be useful for other digestive problems as well. The new generation spiral CT scanner gives excellent definition of digestive and vascular pathologies. The initial evaluation and management of the acute abdomen may determine the prognosis of the patient; it should lead to prompt symptomatic relief and to a well-directed treatment appropriate to the diagnosis. PMID:16609646

  14. Management of severe lower abdominal or inguinal pain in high-performance athletes. PAIN (Performing Athletes with Abdominal or Inguinal Neuromuscular Pain Study Group).

    PubMed

    Meyers, W C; Foley, D P; Garrett, W E; Lohnes, J H; Mandlebaum, B R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the pathophysiologic processes of severe lower-abdominal or inguinal pain in high-performance athletes. We evaluated 276 patients; 175 underwent pelvic floor repairs. Of the 157 athletes who had not undergone previous surgery, 124 (79%) participated at a professional or other highly competitive level, and 138 patients (88%) had adductor pain that accompanied the lower-abdominal or inguinal pain. More patients underwent related adductor releases during the later operative period in the series. Evaluation revealed 38 other abnormalities, including severe hip problems and malignancies. There were 152 athletes (97%) who returned to previous levels of performance. The syndrome was uncommon in women and the results were less predictable in nonathletes. A distinct syndrome of lower-abdominal/adductor pain in male athletes appears correctable by a procedure designed to strengthen the anterior pelvic floor. The location and pattern of pain and the operative success suggest the cause to be a combination of abdominal hyperextension and thigh hyperabduction, with the pivot point being the pubic symphysis. Diagnosis of "athletic pubalgia" and surgery should be limited to a select group of high-performance athletes. The consideration of other causes of groin pain in the patient is critical. PMID:10653536

  15. Health Outcomes in US Children with Abdominal Pain at Major Emergency Departments Associated with Race and Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Methods Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children’s hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Results Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 – 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 – 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Conclusions Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery. PMID:26267816

  16. Evaluating the Patient with Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Avegno, Jennifer; Carlisle, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Right upper quadrant (RUQ) pain is among the most common complaints in the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI causes for pain. Evaluation of patients requires a combination of history, physical examination, laboratory testing, and diagnostic imaging. This article details the anatomy and physiology of the right upper abdomen and approach to the history and physical examination of the most common diseases encountered in the emergency department. "Can't miss," non-GI diagnoses are discussed. Best practices of laboratory and imaging, and treatment of most common diagnoses of RUQ pain are reviewed. PMID:27133241

  17. A Curious Case of Right Upper Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grock, Andrew; Chan, Wendy; deSouza, Ian S.

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise healthy 36-year-old man presented with sudden-onset right upper quadrant abdominal pain and vomiting. A bedside ultrasound, performed to evaluate hepatobiliary pathology, revealed a normal gallbladder but free intraperitoneal fluid. After an expedited CT and emergent explorative laparotomy, the patient was diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction with ischemia secondary to midgut volvulus. Though midgut volvulus is rare in adults, delays in definitive diagnosis and management can result in bowel necrosis. Importantly, an emergency physician must be able to recognize bedside ultrasound findings associated with acutely dangerous intrabdominal pathology. PMID:27625732

  18. Adrenal myelolipoma with abdominal pain: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Santosh Kumar; Sengupta, Sanjay; Biswas, Pranab Kumar; Sinha, Mamta G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare benign tumors. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and discovered incidentally. We are reporting a case of myelolipoma involving right adrenal cortex of a 40-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain. A short review of etiology, clinical features, and differential diagnoses of this neoplasm are also discussed. Radiologic features are often helpful in diagnosis but histology must be done to exclude other fat-containing lesions. Although uncommon, myelolipomas should be considered in differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal lesions. PMID:21584171

  19. Diphyllobothrium latum infection in a child with recurrent abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Diphyllobothrium latum infection in humans is not common in Republic of Korea. We report a case of fish tapeworm infection in a 10-year-old boy after ingestion of raw perch about 8 months ago. The patient complained of recurrent abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. A tapeworm, 85 cm in length, without scolex and neck, was spontaneously discharged in the feces of the patient. The patient was treated with 15-mg/kg single dose praziquantel, and follow-up stool examination was negative after one month. There was no evidence of relapse during the next six months. PMID:26692882

  20. My patient has got abdominal pain: identifying biliary problems

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Mark; Loubani, Osama; Bowra, Justin; Atkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Right upper quadrant and epigastric abdominal pain are common presenting complaints in the emergency department. With increasing access to point-of-care ultrasound, emergency physicians now have an added tool to help identify biliary problems as a cause of a patient’s right upper quadrant pain. Point-of-care ultrasound has a sensitivity of 89.8% (95% CI 86.4–92.5%) and specificity of 88.0% (83.7–91.4%) for cholelithiasis, very similar to radiology-performed ultrasonography. In addition to assessment for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, point-of-care ultrasound can help emergency physicians to determine whether the biliary system is the source of infection in patients with suspected sepsis. Use of point-of-care ultrasound for the assessment of the biliary system has resulted in more rapid diagnosis, decreasing costs, and shorter emergency department length of stay.

  1. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN.

    PubMed

    Omran, Eman Kh; Mohammad, Asmaa N

    2015-08-01

    Information about intestinal parasites in Sohag (Upper Egypt) in patients with chronic abdominal pain is scarce. This study determined the intestinal parasites symptoms in 130 patients with chronic abdominal pain and cross-matched 20 healthy persons. Parasitic infection was confirmed by stool analysis.The most commonest clinical data with stool analysis was as following: 1-Entamoeba histolytica associated with nausea 20 (3 7.74%) followed by anorexia 19 (35.85%), 2-Entamoeba coli associated with diarrhea 3 (100%) followed by nausea 2 (66.67%) and vomiting 2 (66.67%), 3-Enetrobius vermicularis associated with nausea 2 (66.67%), diarrhea 2 (66.67%) followed by flatulence 1(33.33%), 4-Giardia lamblia associated with anorexia 3 (42.86%), vomiting 3 (42.86%) followed by diarrhea 2 (28.57%)., 6-Hymenolepis nana associated with anorexia 10 (40.00%) followed by flatulence 9 (36.00%), 7-Taenia saginata associated with dyspepsia 3 (60.00%) followed by flatulence 2 (40.00%), and 8-Ancylostoma duodenal associated with anorexia 2 (66.67%) and diarrhea 2 (66.67%). PMID:26485858

  2. Exercise-related transient abdominal pain secondary to median arcuate ligament syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Ivy N; Harr, Jeffrey N; Brody, Fred

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain is a common entity in young athletes. An uncommon aetiology of this type of pain is median arcuate ligament syndrome. This article details an 18-year-old field hockey player who presented with a 1-year history of exercise-related transient abdominal pain. Despite a trial of preventative strategies, the patient's pain persisted, prompting surgical intervention. Following a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release, the patient's symptoms resolved. Therefore, when exercise-related transient abdominal pain persists despite precautionary measures, median arcuate ligament syndrome should be considered. PMID:26542078

  3. A rare cause of acute abdominal pain: Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ramazan; Ozdemir, Ayse Zehra; Ozturk, Bahadir; Bilgici, Meltem Ceyhan; Tosun, Migraci

    2014-01-01

    Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich (HWW) syndrome is a rare müllerian duct anomaly with uterus didelphys, unilateral obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal agenesis. Patients with this syndrome generally present after menarche with pelvic pain and mass and, rarely, primary infertility in later years. Strong suspicion and knowledge of this syndrome are mandatory for an accurate diagnosis. A 14-year-old female patient presented with acute retention of urine and abdominopelvic pain. Her condition was diagnosed with the use ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging as a case of HWW syndrome. She was treated with vaginal hemiseptal resection. The HWW syndrome should be considered among the differential diagnoses in girls with renal anomalies presenting with pelvic mass, symptoms of acute abdominal pain, and acute urinary retention. PMID:24378860

  4. A two-year old boy with recurrent bouts of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Blom, H; Bochner, A; Vervloessem, D; Desimpelaere, J; Devière, J; Veereman-Wauters, G

    2010-01-01

    In a small number of patients with pancreas divisum (with stenotic minor papilla) a relative obstruction to pancreatic exocrine secretory flow results in pancreatitis. We report a 2-year-old boy presenting with recurrent bouts of abdominal pain. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made based on blood biochemistry results. Ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed several abdominal pseudocysts, peritoneal exsudate and confirmed pancreatitis but initially failed to reveal the aetiology. Ascites and cysts contained pancreatic enzymes. After weeks of combined conservative and surgical treatment, a magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography with secretin, showed a pancreas divisum with a cyst between the ducts of Santorini and Wirsung. Based on these findings, two endoscopic papillotomies (minor and major papilla) were performed. Three years follow-up was uneventful. In a child with recurrent pancreatitis or pancreatitis with chronic recurrent abdominal pain it is crucial to search aggressively for congenital abnormalities, including pancreas divisum. Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography or diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable diagnostic tool for visualizing pancreatic duct anatomy. PMID:21299165

  5. Citalopram Treatment of Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Comorbid Internalizing Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.; Perel, James; Lucas, Amanda; Bridge, Jeff; Ehmann, Mary; Kalas, Catherine; Monk, Kelly; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Brent, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the potential efficacy, tolerability, and safety of citalopram in the treatment of functional pediatric recurrent abdominal pain and comorbid internalizing disorders. Method: Twenty-five clinically referred children and adolescents with recurrent abdominal pain aged 7 to 18 years, inclusive, participated in a 12-week,…

  6. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH. PMID:25796467

  7. Abdominal pain as initial presentation of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eisa, Naseem; Alhafez, Bishr; Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Alraies, M Chadi

    2014-01-01

    Isolated spleen metastasis (ISM) in general is very rare with a reported incidence of 2.3–7.1% for all solid cancers. Lung cancers rarely metastasise to the spleen. It is very atypical for ISM to be the initial presentation of lung cancer as well. In our case, a 55-year-old woman presented with a 3-week history of left-sided abdominal fullness and dull pain. Workup was remarkable for splenic mass that turns out to be adenocarcinoma with unknown primary tumour. Biopsy of the mass with immunohistochemistry and whole body position emission tomography scan was able to identify lung cancer as the primary tumour. The patient underwent splenectomy, wedge resection of the lung mass along with short-course of chemotherapy. She never had any recurrences since then. PMID:24835801

  8. [Meloxicam-induced colitis revealed by acute abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Seddik, H; Rabhi, M

    2013-03-01

    Whether intestinal toxicity of preferential or selective COX-2 inhibitors is reduced compared with that of standard NSAIDs is controversial. A 26-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea a few days after beginning meloxicam treatment. Endoscopic examination of the colon showed erythematous and ulcerative lesions involving 15 cm of the left colon. No aetiology has been found for colitis. Diarrhea disappeared 1 week after meloxicam was stopped. Total colonoscopy 3 months and 2 years later was normal. The role of meloxicam in the etiology of colitis was considered plausible. This report and a few other cases in the literature suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug inhibitor toxicity should be investigated in case of unexplained acute colitis. PMID:23537413

  9. Treatment of an elderly patient with acute abdominal pain with traditional Korean medicine.

    PubMed

    Son, Chang-Gue

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal pain in elderly patients leads to challenge due to diagnostic difficulty and high incidence of complications. This case report presents an elderly patient with acute and severe abdominal pain, who did not respond to Western treatments. The patient was diagnosed to have abdominal pain by Yang deficiency of spleen (脾陽虛). Acupuncture (mainly at LI4 and LR3), indirect moxibustion (CV4 and CV8), and a herbal drug [DaehwangBuja-Tang (大黃附子湯)] were given to the patient; the abdominal pain and related symptoms disappeared completely within 3 days. This study proved the potential use of traditional Korean medicine for treating abdominal pain in elderly patients. PMID:25441951

  10. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum in pediatric functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Claudio; Comito, Donatella; Famiani, Annalisa; Calamarà, Sabrina; Loddo, Italia

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effects of partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) diet supplement in pediatric chronic abdominal pain (CAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A randomized, double-blind pilot study was performed in sixty children (8-16 years) with functional bowel disorders, such as CAP or IBS, diagnosed according to Rome III criteria. All patients underwent ultrasound, blood and stool examinations to rule out any organic disease. Patients were allocated to receive PHGG at dosage of 5 g/d (n = 30) or placebo (fruit-juice n = 30) for 4 wk. The evaluation of the efficacy of fiber supplement included IBS symptom severity score (Birmingham IBS Questionnaire), severity of abdominal pain (Wong-Baker Face Pain Rating Score) and bowel habit (Bristol Stool Scale). Symptom scores were completed at 2, 4, and 8 wk. The change from baseline in the symptom severity scale at the end of treatment and at 4 wk follow-up after treatment was the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoint was to evaluate compliance to supplementation with the PHGG in the pediatric population. Differences within groups during the treatment period and follow-up were evaluated by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. RESULTS: The results of the study were assessed considering some variables, such as frequency and intensity of symptoms with modifications of the bowel habit. Both groups were balanced for baseline characteristics and all patients completed the study. Group A (PHGG group) presented a higher level of efficacy compared to group B (control group), (43% vs 5%, P = 0.025) in reducing clinical symptoms with modification of Birmingham IBS score (median 0 ± 1 vs 4 ± 1, P = 0.025), in intensity of CAP assessed with the Wong-Baker Face Pain Rating Score and in normalization of bowel habit evaluated with the Bristol Stool Scale (40% vs 13.3%, P = 0.025). In IBS subgroups, statistical analysis shown a tendency toward normalization of bowel movements, but there was no difference in the prevalence of

  11. Imperforate Hymen - a rare cause of acute abdominal pain and tenesmus: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mwenda, Aruyaru Stanley

    2013-01-01

    Imperforate hymen is a rare condition that presents with amenorrhea, cyclical abdominal pains and urine retention among pubertal girls. A 14 year old girl with imperforate hymen underwent hymenotomy for hematocolpometra, having presented with abdominal pains and tenesmus. PMID:24009804

  12. Child pain catastrophizing mediates the relationship between parent responses to pain and disability in youth with functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Natoshia Raishevich; Lynch-Jordan, Anne; Barnett, Kimberly; Peugh, James; Sil, Soumitri; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Functional abdominal pain (FAP) in youth is associated with substantial impairment in functioning and prior research has shown that overprotective parent responses can heighten impairment. Little is known about how a range of parental behaviors in response to their child’s pain (overprotection, minimizing and/or encouragement) interact with child coping characteristics (e.g., catastrophizing) to influence functioning in youth with FAP. In this study, it was hypothesized that the relationship between parenting factors and child disability would be mediated by children’s level of maladaptive coping (i.e., pain catastrophizing). Methods Seventy-five patients with FAP presenting to a pediatric pain clinic and their caregivers participated. Youth completed measures of pain intensity (Numeric Rating Scale), pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and disability (Functional Disability Inventory). Caregivers completed measures of parent pain catastrophizing (Pain Catastrophizing Scale), and parent responses to child pain behaviors (Adult Responses to Child Symptoms: protection, minimizing, and encouragement/monitoring subscales). Results Increased functional disability was significantly related to higher child pain intensity, increased child and parent pain catastrophizing, and higher levels of encouragement/monitoring and protection. Parent minimization was not related to disability. Child pain catastrophizing fully mediated the relationship between parent encouragement/monitoring and disability and partially mediated the relationship between parent protectiveness and disability. Conclusions The impact of parenting behaviors in response to FAP on child disability is determined in part by the child’s coping style. Findings highlight a more nuanced understanding of the parent-child interaction in determining pain-related disability levels, which should be taken into consideration in assessing and treating youth with FAP. PMID:25121521

  13. Varicella Zoster Infection: A Rare Cause of Abdominal Pain Mimicking Acute Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Olmez, Deniz; Boz, Alper; Erkan, Nazif

    2009-01-01

    Varicella zoster is an acute viral infection that results from reactivation of a latent varicella zoster virus. It usually occurs in adult population and immune compromised patients. It rarely occurs in healthy children. Here we present a 14 years old male with varicella zoster that had abdominal pain mimicking acute abdomen to alert others who are consulted for the differentiation of acute abdomen and others who may be consulted for pain management. Keywords Varicella zoster; Abdominal pain PMID:22461879

  14. 38-year-old woman with recurrent abdominal pain, but no fever

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Kentaro; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman presented with 2 days history of left-flank pain. She had similar episodes of abdominal pain as well as chest pain several times, but symptoms disappeared spontaneously. Each time she developed pain, there was no fever. After ruling out common causes of recurrent abdominal pain, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) was considered as a potential diagnosis. Genetic tests revealed multiple heterozygote mutations, which may be associated with FMF. Patients with Mediterranean fever mutations may present with atypical presentations without fever, like in this case. Astute clinical suspicion is required to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:22505824

  15. Anaemia and abdominal pain due to occupational lead poisoning.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Rodolfo; Agosti, Antonio; Scafa, Fabrizio; Candura, Stefano M

    2007-02-01

    We describe a 47-year-old patient with chronic anaemia with basophilic stippling of erythrocytes, recurrent abdominal colics, discoloration of gums, sensitive polyneuropathy to the four limbs, hyperuricaemia, hepatosteatosis with raised transaminases, and a long ignored history of lead exposure in a battery recycling plant. The diagnosis of poisoning was confirmed by high lead levels in the blood and urine, decreased erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D), raised erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin (ZP), and elevated urinary excretion of porphyrins. Chelation with EDTA resulted in increased urinary lead excretion, gradual improvement of the clinical picture, and progressive normalization of lead biomarkers. The case highlights the importance of occupational anamnesis for the diagnosis of lead poisoning, an uncommon condition which may mimic a variety of internal and surgical diseases. Since antiquity, lead has been extensively mined, produced, and utilized in a variety of industrial settings, such as metallurgy, construction, production of plastics, ceramics, paints and pigments. Lead and its compounds are systemic toxicants, and a wide range of adverse health effects (including haematological, gastrointestinal, neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, and reproductive disorders) has been observed in exposed workers. The general population (particularly children) may also be exposed to toxic lead levels due to air, soil, food and water contamination. Thanks to the improvement of workplace hygienic conditions, the pathological picture of occupational lead poisoning (plumbism, saturnism) has gradually become less serious, at least in the most industrialized countries, and has progressively changed into aspecific, subclinical manifestations. We describe here an unusual case (nowadays) of anaemia and recurrent abdominal pain due to lead poisoning from battery recycling. PMID:17405745

  16. Functional abdominal pain in childhood: background studies and recent research trends.

    PubMed

    Levy, Rona L; van Tilburg, Miranda A L

    2012-01-01

    The present review summarizes many of the major research trends investigated in the past five years regarding pediatric functional abdominal pain, and also summarizes the primary related findings from the authors' research program. Specific areas discussed based on work within the authors' group include familial illness patterns, genetics, traits, and mechanisms or processes related to abdominal pain. Topics covered from research published in the past five years include prevalence and cost, longitudinal follow-up, overlap with other disorders, etiology and mechanisms behind functional abdominal pain and treatment studies. It is hoped that findings from this work in abdominal pain will be interpreted as a framework for understanding the processes by which other pain phenomena and, more broadly, reactions to any physical state, can be developed and maintained in children. The present article concludes with recommendations for clinical practice and research. PMID:23248815

  17. Characteristics of upper abdominal pain in those with chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas R; Koch, Kenneth

    2003-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis has many causes. Symptoms include upper abdominal pain. To allow for a better understanding of this pain we compare HCV patients with other liver diseases and normal controls on their reporting of pain over one month and describe associations. A cross-sectional, case control study was performed. Three groups are studied: (1) normal individuals (NC) (N = 64), (2) patients with chronic liver diseases other than HCV (LD) (N = 53), and (3) HCV infection (N = 64). A dyspepsia questionnaire was utilized, which inquired about a one-month symptom presence of upper abdominal pain and associated symptoms. There was a one-month period prevalence of upper abdominal pain of 45.3% in the HCV group vs 32% in the LD and 20.3% in the NC groups (P = 0.01). The LD (22.6%) and HCV (26.6%) groups had markedly more pain that was worsened by eating compared with NC (1.6%) (P = .003). On univariate analysis, when comparing those with upper abdominal pain to those without, there was a lower age (41.3 vs 44.5), a higher BMI (30.3 vs 26), and more symptoms of fatigue, bloating, and pain worsened by eating and early satiety. On multivariate analysis, age < 50 (OR 5.1; CI 1.5-17), BMI > 30 (OR 4.1; CI 1.5-10.9), nausea (OR 4.1; CI 1.6-10.4), and pain with eating (OR 30: CI 6.7-133) predicted upper abdominal pain. In conclusion, upper abdominal pain is more commonly reported over one month in those with chronic liver diseases. That the abdominal pain worsened after meals in liver patients but not in the normal subjects was a surprise. Possible explanations for this finding are offered. PMID:14627332

  18. Intractable Abdominal Pain in a Patient With Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Kyung; Song, Dae Heon; Kim, Young Moon; Kim, Hong Geum; Kim, Soo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) may experience several types of chronic pains. Abdominal pain in patients with SCI has gained limited attention and little is yet known about its characteristics and mechanisms. It often has been regarded as visceral pain associated with constipation and distention. Neuropathic pains localized in the abdomen have rarely been reported. We experience a case of intractable abdominal pain in a patient with SCI, neither of visceral pathology nor of musculoskeletal origin. The nature of pain fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pains. The pain was therefore regarded as neuropathic and managed accordingly. The first- and second-line oral drugs available were being performed, unfortunately, adequate pain control was not achieved. We tried an intrathecal lidocaine injection as another treatment option, and the injection had considerable effects. PMID:24236262

  19. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Christopher R; McNamara, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain. PMID:23055768

  20. Predictors of Abdominal Pain in Depressed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind I.; Goyal, Alka; Zimmerman, Lori A.; Newara, Melissa C.; Kirshner, Margaret A.; McCarthy, F. Nicole; Keljo, David; Binion, David; Bousvaros, Athos; DeMaso, David R.; Youk, Ada; Szigethy, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have high rates of abdominal pain. The study aims were to (1) Evaluate biological and psychological correlates of abdominal pain in depressed youth with IBD, (2) Determine predictors of abdominal pain in Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Methods 765 patients ages 9–17 with IBD seen over 3 years at two sites were screened for depression. Depressed youth completed comprehensive assessments for abdominal pain, psychological (depression and anxiety), and biological (IBD-related, through disease activity indices and laboratory values) realms. Results 217 patients with IBD (161 CD, 56 UC) were depressed. 163 (120 CD, 43 UC) patients had complete API scores. In CD, abdominal pain was associated with depression (r=0.33; p<0.001), diarrhea (r=0.34; p=0.001), ESR (r=0.22; p=0.02), low albumin (r=0.24; p=.01), weight loss (r=0.33; p=0.001), and abdominal tenderness (r=0.38, p=0.002). A multivariate model with these significant correlates represented 32% of the variance in pain. Only depression (p=0.03), weight loss (p=0.04), and abdominal tenderness (p=0.01) predicted pain for CD patients. In UC, pain was associated with depression (r=0.46; p=0.002) and nocturnal stools (r=.32; p=.046). In the multivariate model with these significant correlates 23% of the variance was explained, and only depression (p=0.02) predicted pain. Conclusions The psychological state of pediatric patients with IBD may increase the sensitivity to abdominal pain. Thus, screening for and treating comorbid depression may prevent excessive medical testing and unnecessary escalation of IBD medications. PMID:24983975

  1. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by abnormal conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unless one of these potentially serious conditions is present, the treatment for painful periods is pain relief. If a ...

  2. An 86-year-old man with acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Paul M E L; Posthouwer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    An 86-year-old man presented with severe pain in the upper abdomen along with fever. On physical examination, we found an arterial blood pressure of 84/43 mm Hg, a heart rate of 80 bpm and a temperature of 38.3°C. The abdomen was painful and peristalsis was absent. Empiric antibiotic therapy for sepsis was started with amoxicillin/clavulanate and gentamicin. CT scan of the abdomen revealed an emphysematous cholecystitis. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystostomy was applied. Bile cultures revealed Clostridium perfringens. Emphysematous cholecystitis is a life-threatening form of acute cholecystitis that occurs as a consequence of ischaemic injury to the gallbladder, followed by translocation of gas-forming bacteria (ie, C. perfringens, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Streptococci). The mortality associated with emphysematous cholecystitis is higher than in non-emphysematous cholecystitis (15% vs 4%). Therefore, early diagnosis with radiological imaging is of vital importance. PMID:26869625

  3. A giant adrenal lipoma presenting in a woman with chronic mild postprandial abdominal pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal lipomas are rare, small, benign, non-functioning tumors, which must be histopathologically differentiated from other tumors such as myelolipomas or liposarcomas. They are usually identified incidentally during autopsy, imaging, or laparotomy. Occasionally, they may present acutely due to complications such as abdominal pain from retroperitoneal bleeding, or systemic symptoms of infection. We report a giant adrenal lipoma (to the best of our knowledge, the second largest in the literature) clinically presenting with chronic mild postprandial pain. Case presentation A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented several times over a period of 10 years to various emergency departments complaining of long-term mild postprandial abdominal pain. Although clinical examinations were unrevealing, an abdominal computed tomography scan performed at her most recent presentation led to the identification of a large lipoma of the left adrenal gland, which occupied most of the retroperitoneal space. Myelolipoma was ruled out due to the absence of megakaryocytes, immature leukocytes, or erythrocytes. Liposarcoma was ruled out due to the absence of lipoblasts. The size of the lipoma (16 × 14 × 7 cm) is, to the best of our knowledge, the second largest reported to date. After surgical resection, our patient was relieved of her symptoms and remains healthy six years postoperatively. Conclusion Physicians should be aware that differential diagnosis of mild chronic abdominal pain in patients presenting in emergency rooms may include large adrenal lipomas. When initial diagnostic investigation is not revealing, out-patient specialist evaluation should be planned to enable appropriate further investigations. PMID:21466677

  4. Molecular Imaging of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Aneesh K.; Hamilton, Mark; Joshi, Rucha V.; Kline, Benjamin P.; Li, Rui; Wang, Pu; Goergen, Craig J.

    2013-01-01

    Current laboratory research in the field of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease often utilizes small animal experimental models induced by genetic manipulation or chemical application. This has led to the use and development of multiple high-resolution molecular imaging modalities capable of tracking disease progression, quantifying the role of inflammation, and evaluating the effects of potential therapeutics. In vivo imaging reduces the number of research animals used, provides molecular and cellular information, and allows for longitudinal studies, a necessity when tracking vessel expansion in a single animal. This review outlines developments of both established and emerging molecular imaging techniques used to study AAA disease. Beyond the typical modalities used for anatomical imaging, which include ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), previous molecular imaging efforts have used magnetic resonance (MR), near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF), bioluminescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). Mouse and rat AAA models will hopefully provide insight into potential disease mechanisms, and the development of advanced molecular imaging techniques, if clinically useful, may have translational potential. These efforts could help improve the management of aneurysms and better evaluate the therapeutic potential of new treatments for human AAA disease. PMID:23737735

  5. [Treatment of pain in advanced-stage intra-abdominal neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Polati, E; Finco, G; Rigo, V; Gottin, L; Pinaroli, A M; Iacono, C; Mangiante, G; Serio, G; Ischia, S

    1993-01-01

    Different types of pain are present in far advanced intra-abdominal cancer, sometimes in the same site too. An accurate semeiological analysis of pain is important because different types of pain often differently respond to the available therapeutical tools. In this paper the results and the complications of the most important methods of pain management in far advanced intra-abdominal cancer are examined. Analysis of the data reveals that the association of more methods, pharmacological and non, should be a rule rather than the exception. PMID:7923502

  6. Celiac plexus neurolysis for the treatment of upper abdominal cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Neto, Eloy Rusafa; da Nóbrega, José Cláudio Marinho; dos Ângelos, Jairo Silva; Martin, Miguel San; de Monaco, Bernardo Assumpção; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni

    2013-01-01

    Optimal treatment of oncologic pain is a challenge to all professionals who deal with cancer and its complications. The management of upper abdominal pain is usually difficult and it is often refractory to conservative therapies. In this context, celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) appears to be an important and indispensable tool because it alleviates pain, gives comfort to patients and is a safe procedure. In this study, the importance of CPN is reviewed by a retrospective study of 74 patients with pain due to upper abdominal cancer. Almost all cases evaluated (94.6%) had an excellent result after CPN and the majority of side effects were transitory. PMID:23983470

  7. New Insights in Abdominal Pain in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH): A MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    De Cobelli, Francesco; Pezzetti, Giulio; Margari, Sergio; Esposito, Antonio; Giganti, Francesco; Agostini, Giulia; Del Maschio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Abdominal pain in PNH has never been investigated by in-vivo imaging studies. With MRI, we aimed to assess mesenteric vessels flow and small bowel wall perfusion to investigate the ischemic origin of abdominal pain. Materials and Methods Six PNH patients with (AP) and six without (NOP) abdominal pain underwent MRI. In a blinded fashion, mean flow (MF, quantity of blood moving through a vessel within a second, in mL·s-1) and stroke volume (SV, volume of blood pumped out at each heart contraction, in mL) of Superior Mesenteric Vein (SMV) and Artery (SMA), areas under the curve at 60 (AUC60) and 90 seconds (AUC90) and Ktrans were assessed by two operators. Results Mean total perfusion and flow parameters were lower in AP than in NOP group. AUC60: 84.81 ± 11.75 vs. 131.73 ± 18.89 (P < 0.001); AUC90: 102.33 ± 14.16 vs. 152.58 ± 22.70 (P < 0.001); Ktrans: 0.0346 min-1 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.0521 ± 0.0015 (P = 0.093 duodenum, 0.009 jejunum/ileum). SMV: MF 4.67 ml/s ± 0.85 vs. 8.32 ± 2.14 (P = 0.002); SV 3.85 ml ± 0.76 vs. 6.55 ± 1.57 (P = 0.02). SMA: MF 6.95 ± 2.61 vs. 11.2 ± 2.32 (P = 0.07); SV 6.52 ± 2.19 vs. 8.78 ± 1.63 (P = 0.07). We found a significant correlation between MF and SV of SMV and AUC60 (MF:ρ = 0.88, P < 0.001; SV: ρ = 0.644, P = 0.024), AUC90 (MF: ρ = 0.874, P < 0.001; SV:ρ = 0.774, P = 0.003) and Ktrans (MF:ρ = 0.734, P = 0.007; SV:ρ = 0.581, P = 0.047). Conclusions Perfusion and flow MRI findings suggest that the impairment of small bowel blood supply is significantly associated with abdominal pain in PNH. PMID:25897796

  8. Epidemiology of Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Korterink, Judith J.; Diederen, Kay; Benninga, Marc A.; Tabbers, Merit M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to review the literature regarding epidemiology of functional abdominal pain disorders in children and to assess its geographic, gender and age distribution including associated risk factors of developing functional abdominal pain. Methods The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychInfo databases were systematically searched up to February 2014. Study selection criteria included: (1) studies of birth cohort, school based or general population samples (2) containing data concerning epidemiology, prevalence or incidence (3) of children aged 4-18 years (4) suffering from functional abdominal pain. Quality of studies was rated by a self-made assessment tool. A random-effect meta-analysis model was used to estimate the prevalence of functional abdominal pain in childhood. Results A total of 58 articles, including 196,472 children were included. Worldwide pooled prevalence for functional abdominal pain disorders was 13.5% (95% CI 11.8-15.3), of which irritable bowel syndrome was reported most frequently (8.8%, 95% CI 6.2-11.9). The prevalence across studies ranged widely from 1.6% to 41.2%. Higher pooled prevalence rates were reported in South America (16.8%) and Asia (16.5%) compared to Europe (10.5%). And a higher pooled prevalence was reported when using the Rome III criteria (16.4%, 95% CI 13.5-19.4). Functional abdominal pain disorders are shown to occur significantly more in girls (15.9% vs. 11.5%, pooled OR 1.5) and is associated with the presence of anxiety and depressive disorders, stress and traumatic life events. Conclusion Functional abdominal pain disorders are a common problem worldwide with irritable bowel syndrome as most encountered abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder. Female gender, psychological disorders, stress and traumatic life events affect prevalence. PMID:25992621

  9. A case report from Nepalese community pharmacy on levofloxacin induced severe abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvan, K.C.; ALrasheedy, Alian A.; Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    A 46-year-old female patient developed severe abdominal pain shortly after taking levofloxacin, 1000 mg for acute bacterial sinusitis. The pain started after taking the first dose of levofloxacin and became worse after the second dose. The patient was unable to do daily physical activities. The pain resolved upon discontinuation of levofloxacin and symptomatic therapy. Other factors that may cause abdominal pain were ruled out. This case is of interest as it documents severe abdominal pain due to levofloxacin requiring discontinuation of therapy and describes its appropriate management. In addition, it highlights the vital role that community pharmacists could play in managing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and preventing potential Drug Related Problems (DRPs). PMID:23960849

  10. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or softening of the patella cartilage as ... knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in the ligaments, osteoarthritis of the ...

  11. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  12. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Children and Adolescents with Abdominal Pain: Comparison with EoE-Dysphagia and Functional Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Kiranmai; Gupta, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Compare EoE-AP with EoE-D for clinical, endoscopy (EGD), histology and outcomes and also with FAP-N. Method. Symptoms, physical findings, EGD, histology, symptom scores, and treatments were recorded for the three groups. Cluster analysis was done. Results. Dysphagia and abdominal pain were different in numbers but not statistically significant between EoE-AP and EoE-D. EGD, linear furrows, white exudates were more in the EoE-D and both combined were significant (p < 0.05). EoE-D, peak and mean eosinophils (p  0.06) and eosinophilic micro abscesses (p  0.001) were higher. Follow-Up. Based on single symptom, EoE-AP had 30% (p  0.25) improvement, EoE-D 86% (p < 0.001) and similar with composite score (p  0.57 and <0.001, resp.). Patients who had follow-up, EGD: 42.8% with EoE-AP and 77.8% with EoE-D, showed single symptom improvement and the eosinophil count fell from 38.5/34.6 (peak and mean) to 31.2/30.4 (p  0.70) and from 43.6/40.8 to 25.2/22.8 (p < 0.001), respectively. FAP-N patients had similar symptom improvement like EoE-D. Cluster Analysis. EoE-AP and FAP-N were similar in clinical features and response to treatment, but EoE-D was distinctly different from EoE-AP and FAP-N. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that EoE-AP and EoE-D have different histology and outcomes. In addition, EoE-AP has clinical features similar to the FAP-N group. PMID:27610357

  13. Uncommon Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain – A Pictorial Essay

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Mahesh; Balasubramaniam, Rajan; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Yadavalli, Shanthala; Ahetasham, Mohammed; Devarapalli, Sravya

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdomen is one of the most common clinical conditions requiring a radiological investigation. Ultrasound is the primary modality of choice which can diagnose some of the common causes of acute abdomen. However, sometimes the underlying cause for the pain is far more complicated than expected mandating a high degree of suspicion to suggest further investigation with contrast enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Here, we have compiled a comprehensive series of selected cases to highlight the conditions which can be easily overlooked unless carefully sought for. This article also emphasizes the importance of multimodality approach to arrive at the final diagnosis with an increased overall diagnostic accuracy which in turn improves patient management and prognosis. PMID:27014500

  14. Treatment of Abdominal Segmental Hernia, Constipation, and Pain Following Herpes Zoster with Paravertebral Block.

    PubMed

    Kim, Saeyoung; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) most commonly occurs in elderly patients and involves sensory neurons resulting in pain and sensory changes. Clinically significant motor deficits and visceral neuropathies are thought to be relatively rare. A 72-year-old man presented with abdominal segmental hernia, constipation, and pain following HZ in the left T9-10 dermatome. Sixteen days before presentation, he had developed a painful herpetic rash in the left upper abdominal quadrant. Approximately 10 days after the onset of the rash, constipation occurred and was managed with daily oral medication with bisacodyl 5 mg. In addition, 14 days after the onset of HZ, the patient noticed a protrusion of the left upper abdominal wall. Abdominal x-ray, ultrasound of the abdomen, and electrolyte analysis showed no abnormalities. General physical examination revealed a reducible bulge in his left upper quadrant and superficial abdominal reflexes were diminished in the affected region. Electromyographic testing revealed denervational changes limited to the left thoracic paraspinal muscles and supraumbilical muscles, corresponding to the affected dermatomes. He was prescribed with 500 mg of famciclovir 3 times a day for 7 days, and pregabalin 75 mg twice a day and acetaminophen 650 mg 3 times a day for 14 days. However, his pain was rated at an intensity of 5 on the numerical analogue scale from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). A paravertebral block was performed at T9-10 with a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine 3 mL and triamcinolone 40 mg. One day after the procedure, the abdominal pain disappeared. In addition, 5 days after the intervention, the abdominal protrusion and constipation were resolved. He currently remains symptom free at a 6 month follow-up. PMID:26431148

  15. A rare case of leaking abdominal aneurysm presenting as isolated right testicular pain.

    PubMed

    Sufi, P A

    2007-03-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is not usually considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated right testicular pain. We describe a patient who did present with isolated acute right testicular pain as the sentinel feature of a leaking AAA. In the patient group with right testicular pain, consideration of a leaking AAA should be added to the differential diagnosis. An adverse outcome can be avoided by timely diagnosis and intervention. PMID:17391586

  16. Abdominal pain and hematuria: duodenal perforation from ingested foreign body causing ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Nina; Sisson, Kathleen; Albaran, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) ingestion is a relatively common reason for visits to the emergency room. If the FB is symptomatic or damaging to the patient, either endoscopic or surgical intervention should ensue. We present a case of abdominal pain and hematuria beginning ∼24 h after an incidental FB ingestion. Initial CT imaging defined a linear opacity perforating through the posterior duodenal wall abutting the ureter causing inflammation and hydronephrosis. After two unsuccessful endoscopic attempts at retrieval, we were able to identify the object with the aid of intraoperative fluoroscopy and surgically remove the FB. The patient recovered uneventfully and was discharged home. Posterior duodenal perforation by an FB may not manifest with obvious localized or systemic symptoms unless the perforation involves surrounding structures such as the aorta, vena cava or ureter. In such cases, surgical intervention is required for FB removal. PMID:26903557

  17. Clinical profile of non-traumatic acute abdominal pain presenting to an adult emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chanana, Lakshay; Jegaraj, Moses A. K.; Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Yadav, Bijesh; Abilash, Kundavaram

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for presenting to the emergency depatment (ED) and the etiology is varied. Materials and Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted in a large ED of a tertiary care center in India. All patients older than 15 years and presenting with non-traumatic abdominal pain to the ED from May 2012 to October 2012 were recruited and the demographic characteristics, diagnosis and outcome were analyzed. Results: The study cohort included 264 patients over a 6 month period. More than half (55.6%) were aged between 15 and 40 years. There was a male predominance (56.8%). Majority of the patients (76.9%) presented with abdominal pain of less than 72 hour duration. The pain was sudden in onset in 54.9% of patients. Dull type was the most common character of pain (36%) followed by colicky type (22.3%). The most common site of pain was the lower abdomen (45.8%). Upper abdominal pain was seen in 26.9% and the pain was generalized in 27.3% of patients. The common causes were uretericcolic (16.3%), urinary tract infection (12.5%), acute pancreatitis (11%), acute appendicitis (10.6%) and acute gastritis (8%). More than half (51.9%) discharged from ED and 37% of cases were managed by the emergency physicians. Surgical intervention was required in 25.8% of patients. The mortality rate was 2.3%. Conclusions: Abdominal pain is a common ED symptom and clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those that require immediate intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:26288785

  18. Menarche? A Case of Abdominal Pain and Vaginal Bleeding in a Preadolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Riney, Lauren C; Reed, Jennifer L; Kruger, Laura L; Brody, Alan J; Pomerantz, Wendy J

    2015-11-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common complaints in the pediatric ED. Because of the broad range of potential diagnoses, it can pose challenges in diagnosis and therapy in the preadolescent girl. An 11-year-old previously healthy girl presented to our pediatric ED with fever, decreased appetite, vaginal bleeding, and abdominal pain. Initial evaluation yielded elevated creatinine levels, leukocytosis with bandemia, elevated inflammatory markers, and urine concerning for a urinary tract infection. She began receiving antibiotics for presumed pyelonephritis and was admitted to the hospital. After worsening respiratory status and continued abdominal pain, a computed tomography scan was obtained and a pelvic foreign body and abscess were identified. Adolescent gynecology was consulted for examination under anesthesia for abscess drainage and foreign body removal. A foreign body in the vagina or uterus can present as vaginal discharge, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, dysuria, or hematuria. Because symptoms can be diverse, an intravaginal or uterine foreign body should be considered in the preteen female patient presenting to the ED with abdominal pain. PMID:26169928

  19. Belly dancer's myoclonus and chronic abdominal pain: pain-related dysinhibition of a spinal cord central pattern generator?

    PubMed

    Tamburin, Stefano; Idone, Domenico; Zanette, Giampietro

    2007-07-01

    We report on a patient with segmental rhythmic myoclonus resembling belly dance. This patient developed the myoclonus in temporal and anatomical association with chronic abdominal pain. No structural or metabolic abnormalities were found. EMG recordings suggested the presence of a spinal cord central pattern generator (CPG). We hypothesize that pain-related spinal plasticity might have contributed to the hyperactivity of a spinal CPG, thus leading to the myoclonic jerks in our patient. PMID:17049297

  20. Influence of Hamstring and Abdominal Muscle Activation on a Positive Ober's Test in People with Lumbopelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, H. Rich; DeBord, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the immediate effect of hamstring and abdominal activation on pain levels as measured by the Numeric Pain Scale (NPS) and hip range of motion as measured by Ober's Test in people with lumbopelvic pain. Methods: Thirteen participants with lumbopelvic pain and positive Ober's Tests completed an exercise developed by the Postural Restoration Institute™ to recruit hamstrings and abdominal muscles. Results: There was a significant increase in passive hip-adduction angles (p<0.01) and decrease in pain (p<0.01) immediately after the intervention. Conclusion: Specific exercises that activate hamstrings and abdominal muscles appear to immediately improve Ober's Test measurements and reduce pain as measured by the NPS in people with lumbo-pelvic pain. Hamstring/abdominal activation, rather than iliotibial band stretching, may be an effective intervention for addressing lumbopelvic pain and a positive Ober's Test. PMID:24381375

  1. Solid organ abdominal ischemia, part I: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings, and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Oh, Sarah K; Stein, Marjorie W; Kaul, Bindu; Flusberg, Milana; Chernyak, Victoria; Rozenblit, Alla M; Mazzariol, Fernanda A

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ abdominal ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and often requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, most solid organ ischemia is due to arterial or venous occlusion and, less frequently, a low-flow state. Radiologic diagnosis is critical, as clinical presentations are often nonspecific. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice (except in adnexal torsion) with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) useful in equivocal cases or follow-up of ischemic disease. This article will provide a pictorial review of the CT and MRI features of solid abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, etiology, and management. PMID:27317217

  2. Thoracic Disk Herniation, a not Infrequent Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lara, F.J. Pérez; Berges, A. Ferrer; Quesada, J. Quintero; Ramiro, J.A. Moreno; Toledo, R. Bustamante; Muñoz, H. Oliva

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the proportion of patients presenting with nonvisceral chronic abdominal pain who have thoracic disk herniation as a possible cause. We designed a descriptive transversal study of patients attending our offices between February 2009 and October 2010, with a complaint of chronic abdominal pain of suspected abdominal wall source (positive Carnett sign). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of the spinal column was performed on all patients. When the NMR showed thoracic disk herniation the patients were treated according to their etiology. We also evaluated the symptoms in patients with thoracic disk herniation and their response to the applied treatment. Twenty-seven patients with chronic abdominal pain were evaluated. The NMR results in 18 of these 27 patients (66.66%) showed evidence of disk herniation. We report on the results of these 18 patients, emphasizing that the symptoms are florid and varied. Many patients had been previously diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. Thoracic disk herniation may account for chronic abdominal pain in many patients who remain undiagnosed or are diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome. Thus, this possibility needs to be taken into account to achieve a correct diagnosis and a suitable mode of treatment. PMID:23101998

  3. Abdominal pain related to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy syndrome may benefit from splanchnic nerve blockade.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Nalan; Sahin, Altan; Canbay, Ozgür; Uzümcügil, Filiz; Aypar, Ulkü

    2006-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with abdominal pain related to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) may benefit from splanchnic nerve blockade. MNGIE, varying in age of onset and rate of progression, is caused by loss of function mutation in thymidine phosphorylase gene. Gastrointestinal dysmotility, pseudo-obstruction and demyelinating sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy (stocking-glove sensory loss, absent tendon reflexes, distal limb weakness, and wasting) are the most prominent manifestations. Patients usually die in early adulthood (mean 37.6 years; range 26-58 years). We report a case of an 18-year-old patient with MNGIE. Our patient's abdominal pain was relieved after splanchnic nerve blockade. PMID:16972839

  4. Measuring episodic abdominal pain and disability in suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Durkalski, Valerie; Stewart, Walter; MacDougall, Paulette; Mauldin, Patrick; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Brawman-Minzter, Olga; Cotton, Peter

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the reliability of an instrument that measures disability arising from episodic abdominal pain in patients with suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). METHODS: Although several treatments have been utilized to reduce pain and associated disability, measurement tools have not been developed to reliably track outcomes. Two pilot studies were conducted to assess test-retest reliability of a newly developed instrument, the recurrent abdominal pain intensity and disability (RAPID) instrument. The RAPID score is a 90-d summation of days where productivity for various daily activities is reduced as a result of abdominal pain episodes, and is modeled after the migraine disability assessment instrument used to measure headache-related disability. RAPID was administered by telephone on 2 consecutive occasions in 2 consenting populations with suspected SOD: a pre-sphincterotomy population (Pilot I, n = 55) and a post-sphincterotomy population (Pilot II, n = 70). RESULTS: The average RAPID scores for Pilots I and II were: 82 d (median: 81.5 d, SD: 64 d) and 48 d (median: 0 d, SD: 91 d), respectively. The concordance between the 2 assessments for both populations was very good: 0.81 for the pre-sphincterotomy population and 0.95 for the post-sphincterotomy population. CONCLUSION: The described pilot studies suggest that RAPID is a reliable instrument for measuring disability resulting from abdominal pain in suspected SOD patients. PMID:20845508

  5. Novel Molecular Imaging Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Risk Stratification.

    PubMed

    Toczek, Jakub; Meadows, Judith L; Sadeghi, Mehran M

    2016-01-01

    Selection of patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is currently based on aneurysm size, growth rate, and symptoms. Molecular imaging of biological processes associated with aneurysm growth and rupture, for example, inflammation and matrix remodeling, could improve patient risk stratification and lead to a reduction in abdominal aortic aneurysm morbidity and mortality. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide magnetic resonance imaging are 2 novel approaches to abdominal aortic aneurysm imaging evaluated in clinical trials. A variety of other tracers, including those that target inflammatory cells and proteolytic enzymes (eg, integrin αvβ3 and matrix metalloproteinases), have proven effective in preclinical models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and show great potential for clinical translation. PMID:26763279

  6. Applications of dual energy computed tomography in abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lestra, T; Mulé, S; Millet, I; Carsin-Vu, A; Taourel, P; Hoeffel, C

    2016-06-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (CT) is an imaging technique based on data acquisition at two different energy settings. Recent advances in CT have allowed data acquisition and almost simultaneously analysis of two spectra of X-rays at different energy levels resulting in novel developments in the field of abdominal imaging. This technique is widely used in cardiovascular imaging, especially for pulmonary embolism work-up but is now also increasingly developed in the field of abdominal imaging. With dual-energy CT it is possible to obtain virtual unenhanced images from monochromatic reconstructions as well as attenuation maps of different elements, thereby improving detection and characterization of a variety of renal, adrenal, hepatic and pancreatic abnormalities. Also, dual-energy CT can provide information regarding urinary calculi composition. This article reviews and illustrates the different applications of dual-energy CT in routine abdominal imaging. PMID:26993967

  7. Transdermal Buprenorphine Patches for Postoperative Pain Control in Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Prithvi Kumar; Verma, Reetu; Chandra, Girish; Bhatia, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Dinesh; Bogra, Jaishri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine; its low concentration is sufficient to provide effective pain relief. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch in postoperative pain management. Materials and Methods After ethical approval and taking informed consent from the patients, they were randomized into three groups (n=30 in each group) using a computer generated random number table. Group A: placebo patch; Group B: buprenorphine (10mg) patch and Group C: buprenorphine (20mg) patch. Haemodynamic and analgesic effects were compared by using analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Turkey’s post hoc test. The proportion of side effects was compared using the Chi-square test. Results Haemodynamic changes were not statistically different in all the three groups A, B and C, whereas at the end of surgery VAS score of Group A subjects was significantly higher (4.93±0.98) as compared to Group B (1.73±0.64) and Group C (1.40±0.50). On 2nd postoperative day, no pain was reported by the Group C patients and on 4th day after surgery, no pain was reported by Group B patients. Conclusion The transdermal buprenorphine patch (20mg) was effective in attenuating postoperative pain, maintaining haemodynamic stability requiring no rescue analgesia, with fewer postoperative rescue analgesic requirements in low dose of buprenorphine patch (10mg) group. PMID:27504383

  8. Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation at Jiaji points reduce abdominal pain after colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanqing; Wu, Weilan; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyan; Qiu, Liangcheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transcutaneous electric acupoint stimulation (TEAS) at Jiaji acupuncture points has therapeutic potential for relieving viscera pain and opioid-related side effects. This prospective, randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled trial was to investigate the efficacy of TEAS on abdominal pain after colonoscopy. Methods: Consecutive outpatients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II underwent selective colonoscopy were randomly assigned into two groups for either TEAS or sham pretreatment. The primary outcomes were the incidence of abdominal pain after colonoscopy. The secondary outcomes included the incidence of abdominal distension, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), duration of PACU stay, and patient’s satisfaction and acceptance. Results: Among the 229 patients analyzed, fewer occurrence of post-procedural abdominal pain (11.4% vs 25.2%, P = 0.007) and distension (1.8% vs 7.8%, P = 0.032) were observed in TEAS group, when compared with the sham group. The duration of PACU stay was significant shortened in TEAS group (P < 0.001). Meanwhile, patients’ satisfaction score to medical service was higher (P < 0.001), and their acceptance to colonoscopy was improved (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Pretreatment with TEAS can reduce post-procedural discomfort, provide more efficient medical resources utilization, and improved patient’s satisfaction and colonoscopy acceptance. PMID:26131193

  9. Protein S deficiency present in a pregnant woman with dyspnea, abdominal pains, restlessness, agitation and hypofibrinogenemia.

    PubMed

    Umazume, Takeshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Yamada, Takahiro; Akaishi, Rina; Koyama, Takahiro; Minakami, Hisanori

    2015-04-01

    Hypofibrinogenemia is rare in pulmonary thromboembolism. A pregnant woman with dyspnea, abdominal pain, restlessness, agitation and protein S deficiency exhibited normal blood oxygenation and high D-dimer (370 μg/mL) and undetectable fibrinogen levels in the blood. The pathogenesis responsible for present findings may have some features similar to amniotic fluid embolism. PMID:25914811

  10. Assessment and Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain: Guidelines for the School Psychologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Colleen; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Notes that somatic complaints without clear organic origin are also primary indicators for both anxiety and depression in childhood and adolescence. Review of literature provides school psychologists with basic information regarding prevalence, assessment, and treatment of one of most common types of somatic complaints: recurrent abdominal pain.…

  11. Efficacy of a Brief Relaxation Training Intervention for Pediatric Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Katrina M.; Meadows, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This study is a preliminary investigation of the efficacy of a brief intervention for recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) via a multiple baseline across subjects design. The intervention consisted of a single 1-hour session including psychoeducation and coaching of breathing retraining; the length, duration, and content of the intervention were…

  12. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    PubMed

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral. PMID:20873434

  13. Covert toxocariasis--a cause of recurrent abdominal pain in childhood.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, D; Laing, R B; Currie, P F

    1992-01-01

    Toxocariasis, usually caused by Toxocara canis, is a zoonosis acquired by ingestion of worms which inhabit the gut of young canines. Domestic pets, such as dogs, become infected from soil in public parks and playgrounds which are often heavily contaminated. Although toxocariasis is often regarded as having two principal, though uncommon, manifestations--visceral larva migrans (VLM) and ocular toxocariasis (OT)--recent studies have suggested otherwise. A third, more common, condition, termed 'covert toxocariasis', describes patients in whom positive toxocara serology is associated with a number of systemic and localised symptoms and signs (notably abdominal pain) but not VLM or OT. A quarter of patients with covert toxocariasis have no eosinophilia and, although symptoms regress after treatment, they may persist for months or years. We report a 13-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain who, despite positive toxocara serology, was extensively investigated for other abdominal pathology. PMID:1290741

  14. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-05-16

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  15. Recurrent abdominal pain post appendectomy--a rare case.

    PubMed

    Cama, Jitoko K

    2010-09-01

    Right iliac fossa pain in young adults who have previously had an appendicectomy represents a diagnostic challenge. In such cases it is important to review the histology of the appendix and the previous operation notes. The appendix stump, if left long following an appendectomy, can result in chronic appendicitis of the stump, or it can rarely develop into a mucocele. This case report describes a patient with an appendix stump mucocele who presented with chronic pain under the right iliac fossa incision and was successfully treated by laparoscopic resection. PMID:21714341

  16. Low yield of routine duodenal biopsies for evaluation of abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Sterling M; Kwong, Wilson T; Kalmaz, Denise; Savides, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the yield of biopsying normal duodenal mucosa for investigation of abdominal pain. METHODS: This is a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with duodenal biopsies of normal appearing duodenal mucosa for an indication that included abdominal pain. All the patients in this study were identified from an electronic endoscopy database at a single academic medical center and had an EGD with duodenal biopsies performed over a 4-year period. New diagnoses that were made as a direct result of duodenal biopsies were identified. All duodenal pathology reports and endoscopy records were reviewed for indications to perform the examination as well as the findings; all the medical records were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included age less than 18 years, duodenal mass, nodule, or polyp, endoscopic duodenitis, duodenal scalloping, known celiac disease, positive celiac serology, Crohns disease, or history of bone marrow transplant. Information was collected in a de-identified database with pertinent demographic information including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and descriptive statistics were performed. RESULTS: About 300 patients underwent EGD with biopsies of benign appearing or normal appearing duodenal mucosa. The mean age of patients was 44.1 ± 16.8 years; 189 of 300 (63%) were female. A mean of 4.3 duodenal biopsies were performed in each patient. In the subgroup of patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss the mean age was 43.4 ± 16.3 years. Duodenal biopsies performed for an indication that included abdominal pain resulting in 4 new diagnoses (3 celiac disease and 1 giardiasis) for an overall yield of 1.3%. 183 patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss (out of the total 300 patients) underwent duodenal biopsy of duodenal mucosa resulting in three new diagnoses (two cases of celiac disease and one giardiasis) for a yield of 1

  17. Phytotherapy of chronic abdominal pain following pancreatic carcinoma surgery: a single case observation

    PubMed Central

    Wiebelitz, Karl Rüdiger; Beer, André-Michael

    2012-01-01

    A patient with pancreatic carcinoma diagnosed in 2005 suffered from chronic abdominal pain 6 years later that did not respond to conventional pain treatment according to guidelines. Furthermore, several complementary medical approaches remained ineffective. In the long run, only an Iberis amara drug combination relieved pain sufficiently. The drug is registered in Germany for the indications irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia. The multi-target approach of this combination drug may account for the effectiveness under these fundamentally different pathophysiological conditions. No serious undesired effects have been described in the use of this drug for other indications and none were observed in this case. PMID:23097614

  18. Emergency Department Diagnosis of Dietl Crisis in a 7-Year-Old Girl With Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Burhop, James; Clingenpeel, Joel M; Poirier, Michael P

    2016-06-01

    Children with Dietl crisis often experience a delay in diagnosis, with the clinical entity being underdiagnosed. Pain is caused by compression of an aberrant artery crossing dilated kidney. Pain is often worsened after the consumption of liquids and resolves after fluid reabsorption. There are no clear criteria for evaluating ureter obstruction in childhood abdominal pain in the emergency department setting; however, it has been suggested that ultrasound may aid in the diagnosis. As renal parenchyma is typically preserved, and there is a paucity of associated urological complaints, once properly diagnosed, most patients are well served by a pyeloplasty. PMID:25626638

  19. Chronic postsurgical pain and neuropathic symptoms after abdominal hysterectomy: A silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Palabyk, Onur; Tuna, Ayça Taş; Kaya, Burak; Erkorkmaz, Ünal; Akdemir, Nermin

    2016-08-01

    Chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) is an important clinic problem. It is assessed that prevalence of chronic pain extends to 30% but it is contended that there are various risk factors. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of chronic pain after hysterectomy, risk factors of chronicity, neuropathic features of pain, and sensorial alterations at surgery area.Between years 2012 and 2015, 16 to 65 ages old patients that electively undergone total abdominal hysterectomy bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and passed minimum 3 months after surgery were included to study. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Douleur Neuropathique 4-questionnaire (DN-4) surveys were used to evaluate pain symptoms, algometry device was used for evaluating abdominal pressure threshold and Von Frey Filament was used for sensorial alterations.Ninety-three of 165 eligible patients were included to study. As the groups were compared by demographic data, no difference was obtained (P > 0.05). There was no difference between groups regarding patient and surgery attributes (P > 0.05). Most frequently performed incision type was Pfannenstiel. Neuropathic symptoms were observed in 90 patients (96.8%). Sensorial alterations as hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia were detected around abdominal scar in 18 patients (19.4%) with pinprick test.Neuropathic symptoms should not be ignored in studies evaluating CPSP and a standard methodology should be designed for studies in this topic. PMID:27537570

  20. Incidental detection of ascariasis worms on USG in a protein energy malnourished (PEM) child with abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Pokhraj Prakashchandra; Doshi, Rajkumar Prakashbhai; Mehta, Chetan; Vadera, Khyati P

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old child presented with dull aching periumbilical abdominal pain for 15 days. The child was not gaining weight despite a good appetite. Physical examination of the child revealed grade-I protein energy malnourishment (PEM) according to IAP (Indian Academic of Paediatrics) classification. The rest of the systemic examination was normal. Routine blood investigation revealed anaemia with eosinophilia. Abdominal ultrasonography did not show any abnormality with curvilinear transducer (3.5-5 MHz), however, linear ultrasound transducer (7.5-12 MHz) with harmonic tissue imaging showed worms in the lumen of the small intestine with curling movement on real time scanning. Stool examination for the eggs of ascariasis was positive. The patient was treated with antihelminthic drugs. Dietary modification for the PEM was advised. After 3 months of treatment, the patient improved and stool examination for Ascaris was negative on follow-up. PMID:25766437

  1. First Clinical Judgment by Primary Care Physicians Distinguishes Well Between Nonorganic and Organic Causes of Abdominal or Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Martina, Benedict; Bucheli, Bruno; Stotz, Martin; Battegay, Edouard; Gyr, Niklaus

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the accuracy of a preliminary diagnosis based solely on patient history and physical examination in medical outpatients with abdominal or chest pain. DESIGN Prospective observational study. setting General medical outpatient clinic in a university teaching hospital. participants One hundred ninety new, consecutive patients with a mean age of 44 years (SD = 14 years, range 30–58 years) with a main complaint of abdominal or chest pain. measurements and main results The preliminary diagnosis, established on the basis of patient history and physical examination, was compared with a final diagnosis, obtained after workup at completion of the chart. A nonorganic cause was established in 66 (59%) of 112 patients with abdominal pain and in 65 (83%) of 78 with chest pain. The preliminary diagnosis of “nonorganic” versus “organic” causes was correct in 79% of patients with abdominal pain and in 88% of patients with chest pain. An “undoubted” preliminary diagnosis predicted a correct assessment in all patients with abdominal pain and in all but one patient with chest pain. Overall, only 4 patients (3%) were initially incorrectly diagnosed as having a nonorganic cause of pain rather than an organic cause. In addition, final nonorganic diagnosis (n = 131) was compared with long-term follow-up by obtaining information from patients and, if necessary, from treating physicians. Follow-up information, obtained for 71% of these patients after a mean of 29 months (range 18–56 months) identified three other patients that had been misdiagnosed as having abdominal pain of nonorganic causes. Compared with follow-up, the diagnostic accuracy for nonorganic abdominal and chest pain at chart completion was 93% and 98%, respectively. conclusions A preliminary diagnosis of nonorganic versus organic abdominal or chest pain based on patient history and physical examination proved remarkably reliable. Accuracy was almost complete in patients with an

  2. Present state and future challenges in pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics research: Looking beyond the forest

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Craig A; Schurman, Jennifer V; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    At the present time, it is nearly impossible to treat pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with pain in an evidence based fashion. This is due to the overall lack of controlled studies and, even more importantly, the complexity of the contributors to disease phenotype which are not controlled or accounted for in most therapeutic trials. In this manuscript, we review the challenges of defining entry criteria, controlling for the large number of biopsychosocial factors which may effect outcomes, and understanding pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors when designing therapeutic trials for abdominal pain in children. We also review the current state of pediatric abdominal pain therapeutics and discuss trial design considerations as we move forward. PMID:26558142

  3. Do photographic images of pain improve communication during pain consultations?

    PubMed Central

    Padfield, Deborah; Zakrzewska, Joanna M; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Visual images may facilitate the communication of pain during consultations. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether photographic images of pain enrich the content and/or process of pain consultation by comparing patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of the consultation experience. METHODS: Photographic images of pain previously co-created by patients with a photographer were provided to new patients attending pain clinic consultations. Seventeen patients selected and used images that best expressed their pain and were compared with 21 patients who were not shown images. Ten clinicians conducted assessments in each condition. After consultation, patients and clinicians completed ratings of aspects of communication and, when images were used, how they influenced the consultation. RESULTS: The majority of both patients and clinicians reported that images enhanced the consultation. Ratings of communication were generally high, with no differences between those with and without images (with the exception of confidence in treatment plan, which was rated more highly in the image group). However, patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of communication were inversely related only in consultations with images. Methodological shortcomings may underlie the present findings of no difference. It is also possible that using images raised patients’ and clinicians’ expectations and encouraged emotional disclosure, in response to which clinicians were dissatisfied with their performance. CONCLUSIONS: Using images in clinical encounters did not have a negative impact on the consultation, nor did it improve communication or satisfaction. These findings will inform future analysis of behaviour in the video-recorded consultations. PMID:25996763

  4. Acute Abdominal Pain after Intercourse: Adrenal Hemorrhage as the First Sign of Metastatic Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2014-01-01

    Although the adrenal glands are a common site of cancer metastases, they are often asymptomatic and discovered incidentally on CT scan or autopsy. Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage associated with metastatic lung cancer is an exceedingly rare phenomenon, and diagnosis can be difficult due to its nonspecific symptoms and ability to mimic other intra-abdominal pathologies. We report a case of a 65-year-old man with a history of right upper lobectomy seven months earlier for stage IB non-small cell lung cancer who presented with acute abdominal pain after intercourse. CT scan revealed a new right adrenal mass with surrounding hemorrhage, and subsequent FDG-PET scan confirmed new metabolic adrenal metastases. The patient's presentation of abdominal pain and adrenal hemorrhage immediately after sexual intercourse suggests that exertion, straining, or increased intra-abdominal pressure might be risk factors for precipitation of hemorrhage in patients with adrenal metastases. Management includes pain control and supportive treatment in mild cases, with arterial embolization or adrenalectomy being reserved for cases of severe hemorrhage. PMID:25126096

  5. Small bowel obstruction and abdominal pain after robotic versus open radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Karl-Johan; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Loeb, Stacy; Axelson, Anna Bill; Stattin, Pär; Nordin, Pär

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine whether intraperitoneal robot-assisted surgery leads to small bowel obstruction (SBO), possibly caused by the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and methods In total, 7256 men treated by intraperitoneal robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and 9787 men treated by retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP) in 2005-2012 were identified in the Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate the risk of readmission for SBO, SBO-related surgery and admissions due to abdominal pain up to 5 years postoperatively. Results During the first postoperative year, the risk of readmission for SBO was higher after RARP than after RRP [hazard ratio (HR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.25] but after 5 years there was no significant difference (HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.86-1.91), and there was no difference in the risk of SBO surgery during any period. The risk of admission for abdominal pain was significantly increased after RARP during the first year (HR 2.24, 95% CI 1.50-3.33) but not after 5 years (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.92-1.63). Conclusion Intraperitoneal RARP had an increased risk of SBO and abdominal pain in the short term during the first year, but not in the long term, compared to RRP. PMID:26936203

  6. MR imaging of the pelvis: a guide to incidental musculoskeletal findings for abdominal radiologists.

    PubMed

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Girish, Gandikota; Kaza, Ravi K; Jacobson, Jon; Fessell, David; Morag, Yoav; Jamadar, David

    2014-08-01

    Occasionally patients who undergo magnetic resonance imaging for presumed pelvic disease demonstrate unexpected musculoskeletal imaging findings in the imaged field. Such incidental findings can be challenging to the abdominal radiologist, who may not be familiar with their appearance or know the appropriate diagnostic considerations. Findings can include both normal and abnormal bone marrow, osseous abnormalities such as Paget's disease, avascular necrosis, osteomyelitis, stress and insufficiency fractures, and athletic pubalgia, benign neoplasms such as enchondroma and bone island, malignant processes such as metastasis and chondrosarcoma, soft tissue processes such as abscess, nerve-related tumors, and chordoma, joint- and bursal-related processes such as sacroiliitis, iliopsoas bursitis, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, and labral tears, and iatrogenic processes such as bone graft or bone biopsy. Though not all-encompassing, this essay will help abdominal radiologists to identify and describe this variety of pelvic musculoskeletal conditions, understand key radiologic findings, and synthesize a differential diagnosis when appropriate. PMID:24682526

  7. Forceps insertion supporting system in laparoscopic surgery: image projection onto the abdominal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koishi, Takeshi; Ushiki, Suguru; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Hayashi, Hideki; Tsumura, Norimichi; Miyake, Yoichi

    2007-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery without ventrotomy has been widely used in recent years for quick recovery and out of pain of patients. However, surgeons are required to accumulate various experiences for this surgery since the difficulty in perceiving the positions of tissues by the limited field of view (FOV) of laparoscopes and the operational difficulties of forceps. In this paper, we propose a new laparoscopic surgery supporting system using projected images. The image of the FOV of a laparoscope is projected directly onto the abdominal surface of a patient. The shape distortion of the projected images produced by the unevenness of the abdominal surface is corrected by grating projection. The distortion due to the viewing angle of the surgeon is also corrected by using an electromagnetic tracking sensor. It is shown that the proposed system is significant to laparoscopic surgery, particularly for forceps insertion, by experiments using a model of the abdomen made with a dry box.

  8. Jejunal choristoma: a very rare cause of abdominal pain in children.

    PubMed

    Olajide, T A; Agodirin, S O; Ojewola, R W; Akanbi, O O; Solaja, T O; Odesanya, Johnson Oluremi; Ariyibi, O O

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma is development of a normal tissue in an aberrant location. This report describes jejunal salivary choristoma (JSC) causing recurring episodes of abdominal discomfort in a 5-year-old girl. Exploratory laporatomy revealed a pale yellow subserosal jejunal lesion. Wedge resection of the lesion and repair of the bowel were performed. The child did well postoperatively and has since that time been free of pain at follow-up. Histopathological examination of the resected lesion revealed salivary gland choriostoma. Literature review (PUBMED search engine) revealed no previous report of this rare clinicopathologic entity. We conclude that choriostoma should be considered a possible differential when evaluating abdominal complaint in children. PMID:24511408

  9. Abdominal musculature abnormalities as a cause of groin pain in athletes. Inguinal hernias and pubalgia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D C; Meyers, W C; Moylan, J A; Lohnes, J; Bassett, F H; Garrett, W E

    1991-01-01

    There has been increasing interest within the European sports medicine community regarding the etiology and treatment of groin pain in the athlete. Groin pain is most commonly caused by musculotendinous strains of the adductors and other muscles crossing the hip joint, but may also be related to abdominal wall abnormalities. Cases may be termed "pubalgia" if physical examination does not reveal inguinal hernia and there is an absence of other etiology for groin pain. We present nine cases of patients who underwent herniorrhaphies for groin pain. Two patients had groin pain without evidence of a hernia preoperatively (pubalgia). In the remaining seven patients we determined the presence of a hernia by physical examination. At operation, eight patients were found to have inguinal hernias. One patient had no hernia but had partial avulsion of the internal oblique fibers from their insertion at the public tubercle. The average interval from operation to return to full activity was 11 weeks. All patients returned to full activity within 3 months of surgery. One patient had persistent symptoms of mild incisional tenderness, but otherwise there were no recurrences, complications, or persistence of symptoms. Abnormalities of the abdominal wall, including inguinal hernias and microscopic tears or avulsions of the internal oblique muscle, can be an overlooked source of groin pain in the athlete. Operative treatment of this condition with herniorrhaphy can return the athlete to his sport within 3 months. PMID:1831010

  10. Hyoscine butylbromide: a review of its use in the treatment of abdominal cramping and pain.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, Guido N

    2007-01-01

    Abdominal cramping and pain is a frequent problem in the adult population of Western countries, with an estimated prevalence of < or =30%. Hyoscine butylbromide (scopolamine butylbromide) [Buscopan/Buscapina] is an antispasmodic drug indicated for the treatment of abdominal pain associated with cramps induced by gastrointestinal (GI) spasms. It was first registered in Germany in 1951 and marketed in 1952, and has since become available worldwide both as a prescription drug and as an over-the-counter medicine in many countries. This article reviews the pharmacology and pharmacokinetic profile of hyoscine butylbromide, and summarises efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of this drug for abdominal cramping and pain. Pharmacological studies have revealed that hyoscine butylbromide is an anticholinergic drug with high affinity for muscarinic receptors located on the smooth-muscle cells of the GI tract. Its anticholinergic action exerts a smooth-muscle relaxing/spasmolytic effect. Blockade of the muscarinic receptors in the GI tract is the basis for its use in the treatment of abdominal pain secondary to cramping. Hyoscine butylbromide also binds to nicotinic receptors, which induces a ganglion-blocking effect. Several pharmacokinetic studies in humans have consistently demonstrated the low systemic availability of hyoscine butylbromide after oral administration, with plasma concentrations of the drug generally being below the limit of quantitation. The bioavailability of hyoscine butylbromide, estimated from renal excretion, was generally <1%. However, because of its high tissue affinity for muscarinic receptors, hyoscine butylbromide remains available at the site of action in the intestine and exerts a local spasmolytic effect.Ten placebo-controlled studies have evaluated the efficacy and safety of oral or rectal hyoscine butylbromide. Hyoscine butylbromide was considered beneficial in all of these trials, which supports its use in the treatment of abdominal

  11. [The 452th case: rash, hypotension, abdominal pain and headache].

    PubMed

    Bian, S N; Yang, H H; Wang, Q; Xu, D; Zhao, Y

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized with multiple organ involvements. Acute acalculous cholecystitis(AAC) is an extremely rare manifestation of digestive system involvement in SLE. We reported a case of 32-year-old woman who complained skin rashes for two weeks and stomachache and oliguria for one day. She had rashes at onset, and developed fever, stomachache, hypotension and headache. Physical examination at admission indicated blood pressure 76/47 mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), heart rate 107 beats/min, warm acra. Murphy's sign was positive. Ultrasound suggested the enlarged gallbladder with surrounding hypoecho band yet no biliary calculi were found. A diagnosis of SLE was made, characteristic with distributive shock at the onset and AAC, complicated with neuropsychiatric lupus and lupus nephritis. She had an acute and severe course of disease, which had been relieved after treatment of high dose glucocorticoid and immunosuppressants. This case arouses clinicians to pay more attention to AAC as a rare form of disease flare in SLE. Early diagnosis of AAC is crucial to a favorable prognosis and in avoid of abdominal surgery. PMID:27586989

  12. Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery and Therapy Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Robert L.; Herrell, S. Duke; Miga, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Image-Guided Surgery has become the standard of care in intracranial neurosurgery providing more exact resections while minimizing damage to healthy tissue. Moving that process to abdominal organs presents additional challenges in the form of image segmentation, image to physical space registration, organ motion and deformation. In this paper, we present methodologies and results for addressing these challenges in two specific organs: the liver and the kidney. PMID:25077012

  13. A 15-year-old girl with fever and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Molly; Patel DeZure, Chandani; Cordova, Jonathan; Lo, Andrea; Azzam, Ruba

    2015-03-01

    We present a case of a previously healthy 15-year-old girl with fever, right lower quadrant pain, and hip pain. Her history was notable for a recent laparoscopic appendectomy that was complicated by the development of intraabdominal abscesses. She reported normal bowel movements and good appetite on a regular diet, although she did endorse a recent 5-kg weight loss. Further investigation and examination revealed a diagnosis of Crohn's disease with recurrent psoas muscle abscess as the etiology of her pain and fevers. Psoas abscess is a rare complication of Crohn's disease, and vague presenting symptoms may complicate its diagnosis. This case demonstrates the importance of maintaining a broad differential diagnosis when treating a child presenting with abdominal pain and fever. PMID:25806729

  14. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  15. Duodenal duplication manifested by abdominal pain and bowl obstruction in an adolescent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Fan, Ying; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Song, Yanglin

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal duplication (DD) is a rare congenital anomaly reported mainly in infancy and childhood, but seldom in adolescent and adults. Symptoms, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or dyspepsia may present depending on the location and type of the lesion. DD can result in several complications, including pancreatitis, bowl obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation and jaundice. Surgery is still the optimal method for treatment, although endoscopic fenestration has been described recently. Here, we report a case of a DD on the second portion of the duodenum in a 17-year-old adolescent complaining of transient epigastric pain and vomiting after meal. We suspected the diagnosis of DD by abdominal computerized tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography. We treated her by subtotal excision and internal derivation. Eventually, we confirmed our diagnosis with histopathological result. PMID:26885132

  16. Duodenal duplication manifested by abdominal pain and bowl obstruction in an adolescent: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Fan, Ying; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Song, Yanglin

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal duplication (DD) is a rare congenital anomaly reported mainly in infancy and childhood, but seldom in adolescent and adults. Symptoms, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or dyspepsia may present depending on the location and type of the lesion. DD can result in several complications, including pancreatitis, bowl obstruction, gastrointestinal bleeding, perforation and jaundice. Surgery is still the optimal method for treatment, although endoscopic fenestration has been described recently. Here, we report a case of a DD on the second portion of the duodenum in a 17-year-old adolescent complaining of transient epigastric pain and vomiting after meal. We suspected the diagnosis of DD by abdominal computerized tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography. We treated her by subtotal excision and internal derivation. Eventually, we confirmed our diagnosis with histopathological result. PMID:26885132

  17. Acute Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Host as a Reason for Upper Right Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kai Oliver; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich; Gingert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus infections are widely distributed with a seroprevalence of up to 100%. The majority of the cases take a silent course or deal with unspecific clinical symptoms. Complications in immunocompetent patients are rare but may affect the liver and lead up to an acute organ failure. In this case report, we describe a 35-year-old immunocompetent female with an acute cytomegalovirus infection presenting as acute hepatitis with ongoing upper right abdominal pain after cholecystectomy. Upper right abdominal pain is a common symptom with a wide range of differential diagnoses. If common reasons can be excluded, we want to sensitize for cytomegalovirus infection as a minor differential diagnosis even in immunocompetent patients. PMID:27403100

  18. Spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a rare cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Salik; Sivarajah, Surendra; Fiscus, Valena; York, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease who presented to the emergency department with left lower quadrant abdominal pain, flank pain with nausea and no history of preceding trauma. The patient had finished a course of azithromycin and oral methylprednisolone 1 day prior to presentation. Abdominal and pelvic CT scan identified changes suggestive of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. The patient did not show signs of acute adrenal insufficiency but was started on steroid replacement therapy because of concerns about possible disease progression. All recognised causes of adrenal haemorrhage were excluded suggesting this was a case of spontaneous idiopathic bilateral adrenal haemorrhage, a rarely reported phenomenon in the literature. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement following 6 days in hospital, taking oral steroid replacement. PMID:27166002

  19. An Unusual Cause of Abdominal Pain: Three Lead Pellets within the Appendix Vermiformis

    PubMed Central

    Muderris, Vecdi; Yagmurkaya, Orhan; Yalkin, Omer; Celebi, Fehmi

    2015-01-01

    Most ingested foreign bodies usually pass out in the feces uneventfully. Complications such as intestinal perforation and bleeding usually occur with sharp, thin, stiff, long, and pointed objects. This case describes the management of three lead pellets within the appendix vermiformis. A 45-year-old male visited our clinic complaining of a 4-month history of abdominal pain. The patient inquiry revealed that he had eaten hunted rabbit meat on numerous occasions and had unintentionally ingested three lead pellets. Plain abdominal films and a barium enema showed foreign bodies in the right lower abdominal quadrant. Since the lead pellets were thought to have migrated extraluminally, they were removed through laparotomy under fluoroscopic guidance. An appendectomy was performed. Pathologically, three lead pellets were embedded in the appendix, which showed signs of intramucosal inflammation. Foreign bodies causing appendicitis are rare. However, if stiff or pointed objects enter the appendicular lumen, there is a high risk of appendicitis, perforation, or abdominal pain. An appendectomy was required to remove the ingested lead pellets in the appendix. PMID:26106500

  20. Lead Poisoning From a Ceramic Jug Presenting as Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mahmod; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Groshaus, Horacio; Rioux, Kevin; Yarema, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lead poisoning may present with non-specific symptoms that may result in unnecessary investigations. We report a case of acute lead poisoning in a previously healthy 28-year-old man who presented with recurrent abdominal pain, jaundice, constipation, and weight loss. An extensive diagnostic work-up was completed with inconclusive results. A detailed history revealed an unusual source of lead exposure. Chelation therapy resulted in substantial clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:26958573

  1. Lead Poisoning From a Ceramic Jug Presenting as Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Groshaus, Horacio; Rioux, Kevin; Yarema, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Lead poisoning may present with non-specific symptoms that may result in unnecessary investigations. We report a case of acute lead poisoning in a previously healthy 28-year-old man who presented with recurrent abdominal pain, jaundice, constipation, and weight loss. An extensive diagnostic work-up was completed with inconclusive results. A detailed history revealed an unusual source of lead exposure. Chelation therapy resulted in substantial clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:26958573

  2. Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by an Infected Mesenteric Cyst in a 24-Year-Old Female

    PubMed Central

    Ponten, Joep B.; Zijta, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    A mesenteric cyst is a rare cause for abdominal pain. This umbrella term includes cystic entities which reside in the mesentery. We present a case of an infected false mesenteric cyst in a 24-year-old female patient without prior surgery or known trauma. Mainstay of treatment involves surgical resection, although less invasive treatments have been described. Prognosis depends on the origin of the cyst. PMID:27190668

  3. Kaempferol, a dietary flavonoid, ameliorates acute inflammatory and nociceptive symptoms in gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Sung, Gi-Ho; Yang, Sungjae; Yang, Woo Seok; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Jun Ho; Ha, Van Thai; Kim, Han Gyung; Yi, Young-Su; Kim, Ji Hye; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Sung, Nak Yoon; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-07-01

    Kaempferol (KF) is the most abundant polyphenol in tea, fruits, vegetables, and beans. However, little is known about its in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy and mechanisms of action. To study these, several acute mouse inflammatory and nociceptive models, including gastritis, pancreatitis, and abdominal pain were employed. Kaempferol was shown to attenuate the expansion of inflammatory lesions seen in ethanol (EtOH)/HCl- and aspirin-induced gastritis, LPS/caerulein (CA) triggered pancreatitis, and acetic acid-induced writhing. PMID:25917334

  4. Can lab data be used to reduce abdominal computed tomography (CT) usage in young adults presenting to the emergency department with nontraumatic abdominal pain?

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Meir H; Mahadevia, Soham; Stein, Evan G; Freeman, Katherine; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2010-09-01

    We sought to determine whether laboratory parameters could be found, predictive of a negative abdominal CT scan in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Following institutional review board approval, we evaluated CT reports of 522 patients, aged 21-35 years old, who presented to the Emergency Department with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Bivariate analyses relating ten laboratory parameters to whether the CT detected a cause for abdominal pain were conducted. A multivariate logistic regression model was then derived, with all variables in the final model significant at p < 0.05. Variables were dichotomized to yield odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 522 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 45% had a cause for pain demonstrated by CT. Predictors of a negative CT in men were normal hematocrit and negative urine blood (p = 0.045, p = 0.016, respectively), and in women normal hematocrit, granulocyte percent, and alkaline phosphatase (p = 0.023, p = 0.039, p < 0.0001, respectively). When standard normal values were used to calculate descriptive statistics, only granulocyte percent in women had a significant confidence interval (odds ratio 2.5, confidence interval 1.6-4.0). Among the 208 women with normal granulocyte percent, the final clinical diagnosis was appendicitis, cholecystitis, and diverticulitis, in three, three, and two cases, respectively (4% combined). In summary, no laboratory test was sufficient to offer reassurance that a CT is not necessary in a young adult patient with nontraumatic abdominal pain. Alternative strategies should be considered to decrease the use of CT, and its associated radiation exposure, in young adults with nontraumatic abdominal pain. PMID:20306104

  5. Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed to test the hypothesis that FAPS would show altered visceral sensation compared to healthy controls or IBS. The present study determined the rectal perceptual threshold, intensity of sensation using visual analogue scale (VAS), and rectal compliance in response to rectal balloon distention by a barostat in FAPS, IBS, and healthy controls. Methods First, the ramp distention of 40 ml/min was induced and the thresholds of discomfort, pain, and maximum tolerance (mmHg) were measured. Next, three phasic distentions (60-sec duration separated by 30-sec intervals) of 10, 15 and 20 mmHg were randomly loaded. The subjects were asked to mark the VAS in reference to subjective intensity of sensation immediately after each distention. A pressure-volume relationship was determined by plotting corresponding pressures and volumes during ramp distention, and the compliance was calculated over the linear part of the curve by calculating from the slope of the curve using simple regression. Results Rectal thresholds were significantly reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. The VAS ratings of intensity induced by phasic distention (around the discomfort threshold of the controls) were increased in IBS but significantly decreased in FAPS. Rectal compliance was reduced in IBS but not in FAPS. Conclusion An inconsistency of visceral sensitivity between lower and higher pressure distention might be a key feature for understanding the pathogenesis of FAPS. PMID:19925683

  6. [Imaging of brain changes in chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Nuutti; Forss, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Modern methods of brain imaging have enabled objective measurements of functional and structural brain changes associated with chronic pain conditions. According to recent investigations, chronic pain is not only associated with abnormally strong or prolonged activity of regions processing acute pain, but also with activation of brain networks that are characteristic for each pain state, changes in cortical remodeling, as well as local reduction of grey matter in several regions of the brain. Brain changes associated with chronic pain facilitate the understanding of mechanisms of various chronic pain conditions. PMID:25211820

  7. Multiparametric MR Imaging in Abdominal Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Luna, Antonio; Pahwa, Shivani; Bonini, Claudio; Alcalá-Mata, Lidia; Wright, Katherine L; Gulani, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Modern MR imaging protocols can yield both anatomic and functional information for the assessment of hepatobiliary and pancreatic malignancies. Diffusion-weighted imaging is fully integrated into state-of-the-art protocols for tumor detection, characterization, and therapy monitoring. Hepatobiliary contrast agents have gained ground in the evaluation of focal liver lesions during the last years. Perfusion MR imaging is expected to have a central role for monitoring therapy in body tumors treated with antivascular drugs. Approaches such as Magnetic resonance (MR) elastography and (1)H-MR spectroscopy are still confined to research centers, but with the potential to grow in a short time frame. PMID:26613880

  8. [Acute abdominal pain in the emergency department - a clinical algorithm for adult patients].

    PubMed

    Trentzsch, H; Werner, J; Jauch, K-W

    2011-04-01

    Acute abdominal pain represents the cardinal symptom behind a vast number of possible under-lying causes including several ones that re-quire surgical treatment. It is the most common sur-gical emergency, the most common cause for a surgical consultation in the emergency department and the most common cause for non-trauma related hospital admissions. The golden mis-sion statement is to rapidly identify whether the underlying cause requires an urgent or even immediate surgical intervention. However, behind the same cardinal symptom one may encounter harmless or non-urgent problems. By employing diagnostic means cost effectively and with the aim to avoid unnecessary exposure of the patient to X-rays in mind, the challenge remains to identify patients with an indication for emergency surgery from those who suffer from a less serious condition and thus can be treated conservatively and without any pressure of time. Dealing with such a highly complex decision-making process calls for a clinical algorithm. Many publications are available that have scrutinised the different aspects of the initial assessment and the emergency management of acute abdominal pain. How-ever, the large body of evidence seems to miss articles that describe a formally correct priority- and problem-based approach. Clinical algorithms apply to complex disease states such as acute abdominal pain and translate them into one clearly laid out, logically coordinated and systematic overall process. Our intention is to devel-op such an algorithm to approach acute abdominal pain from the surgeon's point of view. Based on daily practice and with reference to available literature, it is the aim of this study to define a work flow that simply summarises all steps in-volved and defines the required decision process in order to form the intellectual basis for an evidence-based clinical algorithm. The result is illustrated as a first draft of such an evidence-based algorithm to allow emergency evaluation of

  9. Abdominal pain in an adult with Type 2 diabetes: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Panagoulias, George; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Ladas, Spiros S

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) may be a manifestation of diseases involving many intra-abdominal organs. Beside diseases affecting subjects without diabetes mellitus, diabetic patients may have CAP due to diabetes-related complications like neuritis, motor diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and autonomic dysfunction. Atherosclerosis is 2–4 times more common in patients with diabetes and affects mainly carotid, coronary, iliac and lower limb arteries as well as aorta. Another less common complication is chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI, intestinal angina), caused by atherosclerotic obstruction of the celiac artery and its branches and results in episodic or constant intestinal hypoperfusion. Case presentation We present a case of a diabetic patient with CMI in whom the diagnosis was delayed by almost 5 years. The dominant symptoms were crampy abdominal postprandial pain, anorexia, changes in bowel habits and cachexia. Conventional angiography revealed significant stenosis of the celiac artery and complete obstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery. Noteworthy, no significant stenoses in carotids or limbs' arteries were found. Revascularization resulted in clinical improvement 1 week post-intervention. Conclusion CAP in patients with diabetes may be due to CMI. The typical presentation is crampy postprandial abdominal pain in a heavy smoker male patient with long-standing diabetes, accompanied by anorexia, changes in bowel habits and mild to moderate weight loss. At least two of the three main splanchnic arteries must be significantly occluded in order CMI to be symptomatic. The diagnostic procedure of choice is conventional angiography and revascularization of the occluded arteries is the radical treatment. PMID:18798976

  10. Acute abdominal pain in patients with lassa fever: Radiological assessment and diagnostic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Kenneth C.; Salami, Taofeek A.; Kpolugbo, James U.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To highlight the problems of diagnosis and management of acute abdomen in patients with lassa fever. And to also highlight the need for high index of suspicion of lassa fever in patients presenting with acute abdominal pain in order to avoid surgical intervention with unfavourable prognosis and nosocomial transmission of infections, especially in Lassa fever-endemic regions. Materials and Methods: A review of experiences of the authors in the management of lassa fever over a 4-year period (2004-2008). Literature on lassa fever, available in the internet and other local sources, was studied in November 2010 and reviewed. Results: Normal plain chest radiographic picture can change rapidly due to pulmonary oedema, pulmonary haemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Plain abdominal radiograph may show dilated bowels with signs of paralytic ileus or dynamic intestinal obstruction due to bowel wall haemorrhage or inflamed and enlarged Peyer's patches. Ultrasound may show free intra-peritoneal fluid due to peritonitis and intra-peritoneal haemorrhage. Bleeding into the gall bladder wall may erroneously suggest infective cholecystitis. Pericardial effusion with or without pericarditis causing abdominal pain may be seen using echocardiography. High index of suspicion, antibody testing for lassa fever and viral isolation in a reference laboratory are critical for accurate diagnosis. Conclusion: Patients from lassa fever-endemic regions may present with features that suggest acute abdomen. Radiological studies may show findings that suggest acute abdomen but these should be interpreted in the light of the general clinical condition of the patient. It is necessary to know that acute abdominal pain and vomiting in lassa fever-endemic areas could be caused by lassa fever, which is a medical condition. Surgical option should be undertaken with restraint as it increases the morbidity, may worsen the prognosis and increase the risk of nosocomial transmission

  11. Pediatric Abdominal Organ Transplantation: Current Indications, Techniques, and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, A Luana; Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Chang, Patricia T; Lee, Edward Y; Phillips, Grace S

    2016-03-01

    The anatomy, normal postoperative radiological appearance, and imaging features of common postoperative complications of pediatric abdominal transplants are reviewed, including renal, liver, and intestinal transplants. Doppler ultrasound is the mainstay of imaging after transplantation. Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography, MR imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, MR cholangiopancreatography, conventional angiography, and nuclear medicine imaging may be used for problem-solving in pediatric transplant patients. Accurate and timely radiological diagnosis of transplant complications facilitates appropriate treatment and minimizes morbidity and mortality. PMID:26896225

  12. A 44-year-old man with abdominal pain, lung nodules, and hemoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Mariam; Kamangar, Nader

    2015-05-01

    A 44-year-old man presented with a 1-day history of sudden-onset abdominal pain. The pain was characterized as severe, diffuse, sharp, and nonradiating. Associated symptoms included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and subjective fevers. He was originally from El Salvador, but had not traveled in > 10 years. Review of systems was positive for 2 weeks of dry cough with associated mild, bilateral, pleuritic chest pain and subjective weight loss. His medical history was notable for gout and end-stage renal disease secondary to chronic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use, for which he attended hemodialysis sessions three times weekly. Surgical history consisted of a currently nonfunctioning left upper extremity fistula, a longstanding right internal jugular PermCath IV access for chronic hemodialysis that had been removed 2 weeks prior to presentation, and a left brachiocephalic fistula. He did not smoke, consume alcohol, or have a history of illicit drug use. PMID:25940261

  13. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Vicky; Dahan, Michael Haim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients' symptoms. PMID:26137334

  14. A Case of Chronic Abdominal Neuropathic Pain and Burning after Female Genital Cutting

    PubMed Central

    Hadid, Vicky; Dahan, Michael Haim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Female genital cutting is prevalent in the Middle Eastern and African countries. This ritual entails not only immediate complications such as infection, pain, and haemorrhage, but also chronic ones including dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. However, there is limited data on neuropathic pain secondary to female genital mutilation when searching the literature. Case. This case discusses a 38-year-old female with a history of infibulation who presented with a chronic burning abdominal and anterior vulvar pain including the related investigations and treatment. Discussion. This case brings to light the additional delayed complication of this ritual: sensory neuropathy. Our goal is to educate health professionals to be aware of these complications and to appropriately investigate and treat them in order to find a solution to relieve the patients' symptoms. PMID:26137334

  15. Attentional bias to pain and social threat in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and pain-free youth before and after performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joy E; Lipani, Tricia A; Baber, Kari F; Dufton, Lynette; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated attentional biases for pain and social threat versus neutral stimuli in 54 youth with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 53 healthy control subjects (ages 10 to 16 years). We assessed attentional bias using a visual probe detection task (PDT) that presented pain and social threat words in comparison to neutral words at conscious (1250 ms) and preconscious (20 ms) presentation rates. We administered the PDT before and after random assignment of participants to a laboratory stressor--failure versus success feedback regarding their performance on a challenging computer game. All analyses controlled for trait anxiety. At the conscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients exhibited preferential attention toward pain compared with neutral stimuli and compared with the control group. FAP patients maintained preferential attention toward conscious pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. At the preconscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients' attention was neutral at baseline but increased significantly toward pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. FAP patients' somatic symptoms increased in both failure and success conditions; control youth's somatic symptoms only increased after failure. Regarding social threat, neither FAP nor control youth exhibited attentional bias toward social threat compared with neutral stimuli at baseline, but both FAP and control youth in the failure condition significantly increased attention away from social threat after failure feedback. Results suggest that FAP patients preferentially attend to pain stimuli in conscious awareness. Moreover, performance evaluation may activate their preconscious attention to pain stimuli. PMID:21420789

  16. Associations between low back pain, urinary incontinence, and abdominal muscle recruitment as assessed via ultrasonography in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Vânia F.; Amorim, Juleimar S. C.; Pereira, Aline M.; Ferreira, Paulo H.; Pereira, Leani S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain (LBP) and urinary incontinence (UI) are highly prevalent among elderly individuals. In young adults, changes in trunk muscle recruitment, as assessed via ultrasound imaging, may be associated with lumbar spine stability. Objective: To assess the associations between LBP, UI, and the pattern of transversus abdominis (TrA), internal (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscle recruitment in the elderly as evaluated by ultrasound imaging. Method: Fifty-four elderly individuals (mean age: 72±5.2 years) who complained of LBP and/or UI as assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire, Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form, and ultrasound imaging were included in the study. The statistical analysis comprised a multiple linear regression model, and a p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results: The regression models for the TrA, IO, and EO muscle thickness levels explained 2.0% (R2=0.02; F=0.47; p=0.628), 10.6% (R2=0.106; F=3.03; p=0.057), and 10.1% (R2=0.101; F=2.70; p=0.077) of the variability, respectively. None of the regression models developed for the abdominal muscles exhibited statistical significance. A significant and negative association (p=0.018; β=-0.0343) was observed only between UI and IO recruitment. Conclusion: These results suggest that age-related factors may have interfered with the findings of the study, thus emphasizing the need to perform ultrasound imaging-based studies to measure abdominal muscle recruitment in the elderly. PMID:25714438

  17. Hollow organ abdominal ischemia, part II: clinical features, etiology, imaging findings and management.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zina J; Mazzariol, Fernanda S; Kaul, Bindu; Oh, Sarah K; Chernyak, Victoria; Flusberg, Milana; Stein, Marjorie W; Rozenblit, Alla M

    2016-01-01

    Acute hollow organ ischemia commonly presents with acute pain prompting radiologic evaluation and almost always requires urgent treatment. Despite different risk factors and anatomic differences, ischemia is commonly due to low flow states but can also be due to arterial and venous occlusion. Radiologic diagnosis is critical as many present with nonspecific symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is preferred in suspected appendicitis in pregnant patients and is superior in biliary necrosis. This article provides a pictorial review of the CT/MRI features of hollow abdominal organ ischemia while highlighting key clinical features, pathogenesis, and management. PMID:27317221

  18. Chronic pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Juhan, V

    2015-10-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is defined as disabling pain of at least six months duration. Chronic pelvic pain has often multiple causative factors. Careful analysis of clinical history and detailed clinical examination must be carried out to guide further imaging investigations. Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain, although there is no correlation between the severity of lesions and pain intensity. Pelvic ultrasonography should be the first line imaging examination to search for causative conditions that include endometriosis, adenomyosis, pelvic varices and chronic infection. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for making the positive diagnosis and assessing the spread of endometriosis. MRI is more accurate than ultrasonography for the diagnosis of tubo-ovarian abscess when an adnexal mass is identified. Duplex and color Doppler ultrasonography as well as MR angiography are the best imaging technique for the diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome. In patients with pudendal neuralgia, cross-sectional imaging help exclude nerve compression. PMID:26441020

  19. A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Lactobacillus reuteri for Chronic Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Kambiz; Vahedi, Zahra; Kamali Aghdam, Mojtaba; Noemi Diaz, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Background: Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is one of the most common diseases, and large percentages of children suffer from it. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus reuteri in treatment of children with functional abdominal pain. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Children aged 4 to 16 years with chronic functional abdominal pain (based on Rome III criteria) were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups, one receiving probiotic and the other placebo. Results: Forty children received probiotic and forty others placebo. There were no significant differences in age, weight, sex, location of pain, associated symptoms, frequency and intensity of pain between the groups. The severity and frequency of abdominal pain in the first month compared to baseline was significantly less and at the end of the second month, there was no significant difference between both groups compared to the end of the first month. Conclusions: This study showed that the severity of pain was significantly reduced in both groups. There was no significant difference in pain scores between them. The effect of probiotic and placebo can probably be attributed to psychological effect of the drugs. PMID:26635937

  20. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  1. Predictors of pain response in patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided neurolysis for abdominal pain caused by pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Miyata, Takeshi; Imai, Hajime; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Naoshi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interventional endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided procedures such as EUS-guided celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) and EUS-guided broad plexus neurolysis (EUS-BPN) were developed to treat abdominal cancer-associated pain; however, these procedures are not always effective. The aim of this study was to explore predictors of pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-associated pain. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of 112 consecutive patients who underwent EUS-BPN in our institution. EUS-CGN was added in cases of visible celiac ganglia. The neurolytic-spread area was divided into six sections and evaluated by post-procedural computed tomography scanning. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS), and a decrease in VAS scores by ⩾3 points after neurolysis was considered a good pain response. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to explore predictors of pain response at 1 and 4 weeks, and complications. Results: A good pain response was obtained in 77.7% and 67.9% of patients at 1 and 4 weeks, respectively. In the multivariable analysis of these patients, the combination method (EUS-BPN plus CGN) was a significant positive predictive factor at 1 week (odds ratio = 3.69, p = 0.017) and 4 weeks (odds ratio = 6.37, p = 0.043). The numbers of neurolytic/contrast spread areas (mean ± SD) were 4.98 ± 1.08 and 4.15 ± 1.12 in patients treated with the combination method and single method, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no significant predictor of complications. Conclusions: EUS-BPN in combination with EUS-CGN was a predictor of a good pain response in EUS-guided neurolysis for pancreatic cancer-related pain. The larger number of neurolytic/contrast spread areas may lead to better outcomes in patients receiving combination treatment. PMID:27366217

  2. Imaging of Chest and Abdominal Trauma in Children.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Susie J; Flanagan, Sean G; McDonald, Kirsteen

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is the commonest cause of death in children over a year old. The injuries sustained and management of these children differs to adults, due to differences in anatomy and physiology. Careful thought must also be given to exposing children to radiation, and CT scans should be performed only in select patients. This article reviews these important points and explains the imaging findings in chest and abdominal trauma. PMID:26219741

  3. 73-year-old woman with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.R.

    1987-03-20

    A 73-year-old woman presented with a six-day history of abdominal pain that had started in the epigastrium, but recently had become more intense in the right lower quadrant. Peptic ulcer had been diagnosed three years prior to presentation and had been managed medically. On physical examination, epigastric tenderness as well as guarding and rebound tenderness in the right lower quandrant were present. Mild leukocytosis was reported. Computed tomography demonstrated a 5-cm retrocecal mass with low attenuation (fluid content) surrounded by an irregularly thickened uncalcified wall. Multiple areas of tissue debris were seen extending into the mass, but no true separation was present.

  4. Recurrent abdominal and cervical pains. An unusual clinical presentation of acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Lahat, E; Azizi, E; Eshel, G; Mundel, G

    1986-03-01

    Most cases of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) present with arthritis, carditis or choreiform movements. However, a variety of clinical manifestations which are not included in the modified Jones criteria can be the presenting symptoms of the disease. We describe a case of a 10-year-old boy with ARF who presented with recurrent episodes of abdominal and cervical pain who later developed an active carditis which established the diagnosis of ARF. A high degree of suspicion and an awareness of the less common manifestations of ARF are necessary to make an early diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment in certain cases of ARF. PMID:3583777

  5. Abdominal Implantation of Testicles in the Management of Intractable Testicular Pain in Fournier Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cyrus C.; Shahrour, Khaled; Collier, Ronald D.; Welch, Marlene; Chang, Shiliang; Williams, Mallory

    2013-01-01

    Fournier gangrene (FG) is a necrotizing soft tissue infection involving the superficial and fascial planes of the perineum. In many cases of FG, debridement of the scrotum is necessary, leaving definitive management of the exposed testicles a significant surgical challenge. Frequent incidental trauma to the testicles can cause severe pain, especially in laborers. Practical surgical solutions are few and not well detailed. Various options exist, including creating a neoscrotum with adjacent thigh tissue, split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs), or even creating a subcutaneous thigh pocket. We describe a case of abdominal implantation of bilateral testicles for persistent testicular pain in a case where STSGs did not provide adequate protection, adjacent thigh skin was not available for creation of a neoscrotum, and significant cord contracture occurred. We detail the advantages and disadvantages of the commonly described techniques, including this approach, and how in select individuals this may be a suitable alternative. PMID:24229025

  6. Exercise related transient abdominal pain: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) is more commonly known to athletes as a runner’s stitch. Many athletes also report shoulder tip pain (STP) associated with the ETAP. Although widely known, ETAP remains under analyzed and under reported in the medical literature. Often thought of as benign and self-limiting, ETAP has been shown to be very detrimental to the performance of many athletes from novice to elite. This case report of an elite triathlete with ETAP and subsequent review of literature, outlines the various theories about the etiology of ETAP, the epidemiology associated with it, some differentials to consider, and how chiropractic care may benefit those suffering from ETAP. PMID:20037690

  7. Diagnostic imaging of blunt abdominal trauma in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vittorio; Piccolo, Claudia Lucia; Trinci, Margherita; Galluzzo, Michele; Ianniello, Stefania; Brunese, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood, and blunt trauma accounts for 80-90 % of abdominal injuries. The mechanism of trauma is quite similar to that of the adults, but there are important physiologic differences between children and adults in this field, such as the smaller blood vessels and the high vasoconstrictive response, leading to the spreading of a non-operative management. The early imaging of children undergoing a low-energy trauma can be performed by CEUS, a valuable diagnostic tool to demonstrate solid organ injuries with almost the same sensitivity of CT scans; nevertheless, as for as urinary tract injuries, MDCT remains still the technique of choice, because of its high sensitivity and accuracy, helping to discriminate between an intra-peritoneal form a retroperitoneal urinary leakage, requiring two different managements. The liver is the most common organ injured in blunt abdominal trauma followed by the spleen. Renal, pancreatic, and bowel injuries are quite rare. In this review we present various imaging findings of blunt abdominal trauma in children. PMID:27075018

  8. Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome in Morbidly Obese Patients Following Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Eidy, Mohammad; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Raygan, Fahimeh; Ariyazand, Yazdan; Pishgahroudsari, Mohadeseh; Jesmi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGBP) is one of the most common bariatric surgeries, which is being performed using various techniques like gastrojejunostomy by hand swen, linear or circular stapler. Abdominal pain is a common complaint following laparoscopic gastric bypass procedure (LGBP), which has different aetiologies, such as overeating, adhesion, internal herniation, bile reflux and many more. In this study LGBP was performed in an ante-colic ante-gastric pattern in a double loop manner and the prevalence and distribution of pain in morbidly obese patients undergoing LGBP was assessed. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution and frequency of post LGBP pain in morbidly obese patients. Patients and Methods: This study was performed on 190 morbidly obese patients referred to Hazrat Rasoul Hospital in Tehran. After LGBP, pain was measured in the following intervals: 24 hours, one week and one month after the operation. Before the operation onset, 2 mg Keflin and 5000 IU subcutaneous heparin were administered as prophylaxis. LGBP was performed using five ports including: one 11 mm port was placed 15-20 cm far from the xiphoid, one 12-mm port in mid-clavicular line at the level of camera port, one 5-mm port in subcostal area in ante-axillary region in the left, another 5-mm port in the right mid-clavicular area and a 5-mm port in sub-xyphoid. All operations were done by the same team. Staple was used for all anastomoses and hand sewn technique to close the staple insertion site. The mesenteric defect was left open and no effort was made to repair it. Results: The results of this study showed that 99.94 % of the patients had complains of pain in the first 24 hours of post operation, about 60% after one week and 29.5 % still had pain after one month. In addition, left upper quadrant (LUQ) was found to be the most prevalent site for the pain in 53.7% of the patients in the first 24 hours, 59.6% after one week and 16.8% after

  9. Two similar cases of elderly women with moderate abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum of unknown origin: a surgeon's successful conservative management.

    PubMed

    Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zumstein, Valentin; Bieg, Christian; Ackermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients presenting with abdominal pain and pneumoperitoneum in radiological examination usually require emergency explorative laparoscopy or laparotomy. Pneumoperitoneum mostly associates with gastrointestinal perforation. There are very few cases where surgery can be avoided. We present 2 cases of pneumoperitoneum with unknown origin and successful conservative treatment. Both patients were elderly women presenting to our emergency unit, with moderate abdominal pain. There was neither medical intervention nor trauma in their medical history. Physical examination revealed mild abdominal tenderness, but no clinical sign of peritonitis. Cardiopulmonary examination remained unremarkable. Blood studies showed only slight abnormalities, in particular, inflammation parameters were not significantly increased. Finally, obtained CTs showed free abdominal gas of unknown origin in both cases. We performed conservative management with nil per os, nasogastric tube, total parenteral nutrition and prophylactic antibiotics. After 2 weeks, both were discharged home. PMID:27229749

  10. Tongue piercing and chronic abdominal pain with nausea and vomiting--two cases.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung Kyu; Chung, Danielle; LaRiccia, Patrick J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of unclear etiology are frustrating to patients and physicians alike. The integrative medicine procedures of acupuncture and neural therapy may provide treatment options. Tongue piercing, which is prevalent in 5.6% of the adolescent population, may be a contributing factor in upper gastrointestinal symptoms. The objectives of the study were as follows: (1) To demonstrate the usefulness of an integrative medicine treatment approach in two cases of patients with chronic abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting of unclear etiology who had failed standard medical management. (2) To identify scars from tongue piercings as a possible contributing factor in chronic upper GI symptoms of unclear etiology. Two retrospective case studies are presented of young adult females who were seen in a private multi-physician integrative medicine practice in the US. The patients were treated with neural therapy and acupuncture. The desired outcome was the cessation or reduction of the frequency of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Both patients had resolution of their symptoms. From this study, we have concluded the following: (1) Tongue scars from tongue rings may be causes of chronic upper gastrointestinal symptoms. (2) Neural therapy and acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of chronic upper GI symptoms related to tongue scars. PMID:25457444

  11. Increased capsaicin receptor TRPV1-expressing sensory fibres in irritable bowel syndrome and their correlation with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, A; Yiangou, Y; Facer, P; Walters, J R F; Anand, P; Ghosh, S

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1) may play an important role in visceral pain and hypersensitivity states. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal pain is a common and distressing symptom where the pathophysiology is still not clearly defined. TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibres were investigated in colonic biopsies from patients with IBS, and this was related to abdominal pain. Methods: Rectosigmoid biopsies were collected from 23 IBS patients fulfilling Rome II criteria, and from 22 controls. Abdominal pain scores were recorded using a validated questionnaire. TRPV1-, substance P- and neuronal marker protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-expressing nerve fibres, mast cells (c-kit) and lymphocytes (CD3 and CD4) were quantified, following immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies. The biopsy findings were related to the abdominal pain scores. Results: A significant 3.5-fold increase in median numbers of TRPV1-immunoreactive fibres was found in biopsies from IBS patients compared with controls (p<0.0001). Substance P-immunoreactive fibres (p = 0.01), total nerve fibres (PGP9.5) (p = 0.002), mast cells (c-kit) (p = 0.02) and lymphocytes (CD3) (p = 0.03) were also significantly increased in the IBS group. In multivariate regression analysis, only TRPV1-immuno-reactive fibres (p = 0.005) and mast cells (p = 0.008) were significantly related to the abdominal pain score. Conclusions: Increased TRPV1 nerve fibres are observed in IBS, together with a low-grade inflammatory response. The increased TRPV1 nerve fibres may contribute to visceral hypersensitivity and pain in IBS, and provide a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18252749

  12. Sixteen-year-old Female With Acute Abdominal Pain: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara

    2015-12-01

    A 16-y-old girl presented with abdominal pain in the lower right quadrant, ranging in intensity from 2 to 10 on a visual analog scale (VAS) that prevented her from attending school. The pain was not associated with reflux, a fever, or blood in her stools. Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) had been previously diagnosed, but treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) was not successful. The patient's medical history was significant for allergies to fruit; trees, including birch; weeds; and pollen. She had also suffered an anaphylactic reaction to a raw apple. The treatment approach commonly used for EE is suppression of inflammation with steroid therapy with short-term removal of offending foods. However, an attempt to reduce allergic bias and inflammation and treat intestinal permeability is not a part of the standard approach and may explain the high rate of relapse with the condition. Treatment included an elimination diet paired with a supplement regimen designed to reduce inflammation, support healing of the gut and reduce type 2 helper T (Th2) bias of her allergic response. As a result of treatment, the patient's severe pain episodes abated and she was thereafter able to resume attendance at school. PMID:26807068

  13. Mebeverine for Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saneian, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an antispasmodic, mebeverine, in the treatment of childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP). Children with FAP (n = 115, aged 6–18 years) received mebeverine (135 mg, twice daily) or placebo for 4 weeks. Response was defined as ≥2 point reduction in the 6-point pain scale or “no pain.” Physician-rated global severity was also evaluated. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the trial (44 with mebeverine). Per-protocol and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses were conducted. Treatment response rate in the mebeverine and placebo groups based on per-protocol [ITT] analysis was 54.5% [40.6%] and 39.5% [30.3%] at week 4 (P = 0.117 [0.469]) and 72.7% [54.2%] and 53.4% [41.0] at week 12, respectively (P = 0.0503 [0.416]). There was no significant difference between the two groups in change of the physician-rated global severity score after 4 weeks (P = 0.723) or after 12 weeks (P = 0.870) in per-protocol analysis; the same results were obtained in ITT analysis. Mebeverine seems to be effective in the treatment of childhood FAP, but our study was not able to show its statistically significant effect over placebo. Further trials with larger sample of patients are warranted. PMID:25089264

  14. Mebeverine for pediatric functional abdominal pain: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pourmoghaddas, Zahra; Saneian, Hossein; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Gholamrezaei, Ali

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of an antispasmodic, mebeverine, in the treatment of childhood functional abdominal pain (FAP). Children with FAP (n = 115, aged 6-18 years) received mebeverine (135 mg, twice daily) or placebo for 4 weeks. Response was defined as ≥ 2 point reduction in the 6-point pain scale or "no pain." Physician-rated global severity was also evaluated. Patients were followed up for 12 weeks. Eighty-seven patients completed the trial (44 with mebeverine). Per-protocol and intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses were conducted. Treatment response rate in the mebeverine and placebo groups based on per-protocol [ITT] analysis was 54.5% [40.6%] and 39.5% [30.3%] at week 4 (P = 0.117 [0.469]) and 72.7% [54.2%] and 53.4% [41.0] at week 12, respectively (P = 0.0503 [0.416]). There was no significant difference between the two groups in change of the physician-rated global severity score after 4 weeks (P = 0.723) or after 12 weeks (P = 0.870) in per-protocol analysis; the same results were obtained in ITT analysis. Mebeverine seems to be effective in the treatment of childhood FAP, but our study was not able to show its statistically significant effect over placebo. Further trials with larger sample of patients are warranted. PMID:25089264

  15. Severe Abdominal Pain Caused by Lead Toxicity without Response to Oral Chelators: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vossoughinia, Hassan; Pourakbar, Ali; Esfandiari, Samaneh; Sharifianrazavi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old woman was referred to the Emergency Surgery Department with severe abdominal pain, icterus, and anemia. The patient’s clinical and paraclinical findings in addition to her occupational and social history, convinced us to assay blood lead level (BLL), which was 41/5 μg/dL. Therefore toxicology consult was performed to treat lead toxicity. Recheck of the BLL showed the level as 53/7 μg/dL. So oral chelator with succimer was started. Despite consumption of oral chelator, there was no response and the pain continued. Because our repeated evaluations were negative, we decided to re-treat lead poisoning by intravenous and intramuscular chelators. Dimercaprol (BAL) + calcium EDTA was started, and after 5 days, the pain relieved dramatically and the patient was discharged. We recommend more liberal lead poisoning therapy in symptomatic patients, and also suggest parenteral chelator therapy, which is more potent, instead of oral chelators in patients with severe symptoms. PMID:26933485

  16. Imaging for acute pelvic pain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Brunelli, Roberto; Monti, Riccardo; Guida, Marianna; Laghi, Francesca; Casciani, Emanuele; Polettini, Elisabetta; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2014-04-01

    Acute pelvic pain in pregnancy presents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Standard imaging techniques need to be adapted to reduce harm to the foetus from X-rays because of their teratogenic and carcinogenic potential. Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation of the pregnant abdomen. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of gynaecological and obstetric problems during pregnancy and in the setting of acute abdomen during pregnancy. MRI overcomes some of the limitations of ultrasound, mainly the size of the gravid uterus. MRI poses theoretical risks to the foetus and care must be taken to minimise these with the avoidance of contrast agents. Teaching Points • Ultrasound and MRI are the preferred investigations for acute pelvic pain during pregnancy. • Ultrasound remains the primary imaging investigation because of availability and portability. • MRI helps differentiate causes of acute pelvic pain when ultrasound is inconclusive. PMID:24535757

  17. Pain symptoms and stooling patterns do not drive diagnostic costs for children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in primary or tertiary care

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) compare the cost of medical evaluation for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome brought to a pediatric gastroenterologist versus children who remained in the care of their pediatrician, (2) compare symptom characteristics for th...

  18. Management of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. Symptom-based Rome III criteria for FAP and IBS have been validated and help the clinician in making a positive diagnosis. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Over the years, a wide range of therapies have been proposed and studied. The lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors probably involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS, and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article reviews the current literature on the efficacy of pharmacologic, dietary and psychosocial interventions for FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:20528117

  19. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Arash; Afsharfard, Abolfazl; Atqiaee, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. PMID:27563479

  20. [Lead poisoning. A surprising cause of constipation, abdominal pain and anemia].

    PubMed

    Hoffmanová, Iva; Kačírková, Petra; Kučerová, Irena; Ševčík, Rudolf; Sánchez, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on patient that has been presented with sudden onset of constipation, abdominal pain and normocytic anemia. Gastroscopy and colonoscopy ruled out an organic diseases. In peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirates mears, coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte (and erythroblasts) point out a possibility of heavy metal poisoning. The level of plumbemia exceeded 8.4 times the maximal permitted value for common (non-professional) population. A source of poisoning was indentified from a glaze on a ceramic jug, from which the patient had drank tea with lemon for three months. A lead concentration in the tea extract was 227 mg/kg. In developed countries, lead poisoning is a rare diagnosis. As the symptoms are nonspecific, missed diagnoses could occur, especially in sporadic, non-occupational exposure. However, a microscopic evaluation of the peripheral bloods mear with finding of predominantly coarse basophilic stippling of erythrocyte mayle ad to suspicion of lead poisoning. PMID:27172444

  1. MEDUSA: a fuzzy expert system for medical diagnosis of acute abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Fathi-Torbaghan, M; Meyer, D

    1994-12-01

    Even today, the diagnosis of acute abdominal pain represents a serious clinical problem. The medical knowledge in this field is characterized by uncertainty, imprecision and vagueness. This situation lends itself especially to be solved by the application of fuzzy logic. A fuzzy logic-based expert system for diagnostic decision support is presented (MEDUSA). The representation and application of uncertain and imprecise knowledge is realized by fuzzy sets and fuzzy relations. The hybrid concept of the system enables the integration of rule-based, heuristic and case-based reasoning on the basis of imprecise information. The central idea of the integration is to use case-based reasoning for the management of special cases, and rule-based reasoning for the representation of normal cases. The heuristic principle is ideally suited for making uncertain, hypothetical inferences on the basis of fuzzy data and fuzzy relations. PMID:7869951

  2. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma Presenting as Abdominal Pain with a Pulsatile Mass

    PubMed Central

    Afsharfard, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a rare tumor that mostly involves adults aged 50 to 70. The most common anatomic location is the lower extremities. MFH of the retroperitoneum usually manifests late in its course and may be initially mistaken with other more common diagnosis. Here, the authors describe a 60-year-old man that was brought to the emergency department with a chief complaint of periumbilical abdominal pain. Our patient presented with symptoms consistent with a symptomatic aortic aneurysm, but a mass was encountered during surgery. In such circumstances the diagnosis of malignant sarcoma must be kept in mind and attempts at full resection with tumor-free margins are necessary. PMID:27563479

  3. Water Load Test in Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain: No Relation to Food Intake and Nutritional Status.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Roberto Koity Fujihara; Soares, Ana Cristina Fontenele; Speridião, Patricia da Graça Leite; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-09-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the relations between the water load test in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders with food intake and nutritional status. Patients with functional dyspepsia required a lower maximum water intake to produce fullness (n = 11, median = 380 mL) than patients with irritable bowel syndrome (n = 10, median = 695 mL) or functional abdominal pain (n = 10, median = 670 mL) (P < 0.05). Among patients who ingested ≤560 mL (n = 17) or >560 mL (n = 14) in the water load test, there was no relation between the maximum drinking capacity and food intake, body mass index, or height. PMID:26317680

  4. Imaging of adductor-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Pesquer, L; Reboul, G; Silvestre, A; Poussange, N; Meyer, P; Dallaudière, B

    2015-09-01

    Groin pain is a common condition in athletes and results from various causes. Osteitis pubis, adductor dysfunction, inguinal hernia, or a combination of all three entities, generally explains the onset of symptoms. Adductor longus tendinopathy is the main cause of adductor-related groin pain. It leads to a significant reduction of sports participation and can require surgical management. Diagnosis is based on ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. Asymptomatic findings (tendinosis, calcifications, cortical erosions) are common in athletes and care should be taken when assessing groin pain. The most specific sign of tendinopathy is an intratendinous tear of the adductor longus. PMID:25823982

  5. Teaching Cost-Conscious Medicine: Impact of a Simple Educational Intervention on Appropriate Abdominal Imaging at a Community-Based Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Matthew F.; Agan, Donna L.; Liu, Yang; Johnson, John O.; Shaw, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rising costs pose a major threat to US health care. Residency programs are being asked to teach residents how to provide cost-conscious medical care. Methods An educational intervention incorporating the American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria with lectures on cost-consciousness and on the actual hospital charges for abdominal imaging was implemented for residents at Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, CA. We hypothesized that residents would order fewer abdominal imaging examinations for patients with complaints of abdominal pain after the intervention. We analyzed the type and number of abdominal imaging studies completed for patients admitted to the inpatient teaching service with primary abdominal complaints for 18 months before (738 patients) and 12 months following the intervention (632 patients). Results There was a significant reduction in mean abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans per patient (1.7–1.4 studies per patient, P < .001) and total abdominal radiology studies per patient (3.1–2.7 studies per patient, P  =  .02) following the intervention. The avoidance of charges solely due to the reduction in abdominal CT scans following the intervention was $129 per patient or $81,528 in total. Conclusions A simple educational intervention appeared to change the radiologic test-ordering behavior of internal medicine residents. Widespread adoption of similar interventions by residency programs could result in significant savings for the health care system. PMID:24404274

  6. Computer-aided kidney segmentation on abdominal CT images.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daw-Tung; Lei, Chung-Chih; Hung, Siu-Wan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an effective model-based approach for computer-aided kidney segmentation of abdominal CT images with anatomic structure consideration is presented. This automatic segmentation system is expected to assist physicians in both clinical diagnosis and educational training. The proposed method is a coarse to fine segmentation approach divided into two stages. First, the candidate kidney region is extracted according to the statistical geometric location of kidney within the abdomen. This approach is applicable to images of different sizes by using the relative distance of the kidney region to the spine. The second stage identifies the kidney by a series of image processing operations. The main elements of the proposed system are: 1) the location of the spine is used as the landmark for coordinate references; 2) elliptic candidate kidney region extraction with progressive positioning on the consecutive CT images; 3) novel directional model for a more reliable kidney region seed point identification; and 4) adaptive region growing controlled by the properties of image homogeneity. In addition, in order to provide different views for the physicians, we have implemented a visualization tool that will automatically show the renal contour through the method of second-order neighborhood edge detection. We considered segmentation of kidney regions from CT scans that contain pathologies in clinical practice. The results of a series of tests on 358 images from 30 patients indicate an average correlation coefficient of up to 88% between automatic and manual segmentation. PMID:16445250

  7. Trajectories of Symptoms and Impairment for Pediatric Patients with Functional Abdominal Pain: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Shelagh; Lambert, E. Warren; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study characterizes trajectories of symptoms and impairment in pediatric patients with abdominal pain not associated with identifiable organic disease. Method: The Children's Somatization Inventory and the Functional Disability Inventory were administered four times over 5 years to 132 patients (6-18 years old) seen in…

  8. Early Parental and Child Predictors of Recurrent Abdominal Pain at School Age: Results of a Large Population-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Paul G.; Stein, Alan; Hotopf, Matthew; Wiles, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether parental psychological and physical factors and child factors measured in the first year of life were associated with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children at age 6 3/4 years. Method: A longitudinal cohort study (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), followed 8,272 children from pregnancy to age 6…

  9. Carbohydrate digestion in congenital sucrase isomaltase deficient and recurrent abdominal pain children assesed by 13C- starch breath test

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starches contribute about half of the food energy needs to the weaned child's diet. Malabsorption of sucrose is associated with abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea. A genetic disorder called Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) is suspected when these symptoms follow sugar ingestion and...

  10. A rare but potentially lethal case of tuberculous aortic aneurysm presenting with repeated attacks of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Wang, Paul Yung-Pou; Wann, Shue-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare disease with a high mortality rate. The clinical features of this condition are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic with or without constitutional symptoms, abdominal pain to frank rupture, bleeding and shock. We herein report the case of a 56-year-old man with a large tuberculous mycotic aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with an initial presentation of repeated attacks of abdominal pain lasting for several months. Due to the vague nature of the initial symptoms, tuberculous aortic aneurysms may take several months to diagnose. This case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion and providing timely surgery for this rare but potentially lethal disease. PMID:25948366

  11. [Imaging of acute pelvic pain in women].

    PubMed

    Genevois, A; Marouteau, N; Lemercier, E; Dacher, J N; Thiebot, J

    2008-01-01

    Acute pelvic pain in women is a routine situation in any emergency unit. The radiologist should know how to explore the patient with regards to the history and clinical findings. Ultrasonography is the primary and sometimes the only necessary imaging tool in the assessment of acute pelvic pain in women. MRI is the preferred technique in pregnant or young women. CT is more valuable for assessing nongynecologic disorders or post-partum and post-operative infections. This article reviews the contribution of each imaging technique in this clinical situation. Emphasis is put on the importance of age and clinical findings in the diagnostic strategy. PMID:18288036

  12. Comparison between Transdermal Buprenorphine and Transdermal Fentanyl for Postoperative Pain Relief after Major Abdominal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Zia; Gautam, Shefali; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Opioid is generally regarded as an important part of multimodal, perioperative analgesia, especially for moderate to severe pain. Amongst the various modes of delivery transdermal route has several potential benefits over oral and parentral administration. These include noninvasive dosing, better absorption and lack of first-pass metabolism. A transdermal drug delivery system provides steady and continuous drug delivery resulting in steady plasma concentration. Bolus dosing of systemic analgesic results in supra and sub therapeutic plasma resulting in toxic and sub analgesic plasma drug concentration. It also improves patient compliance. Materials and Methods Sixty patients undergoing major abdominal surgery under GA were randomly divided in two groups (n=30). Group A received buprenorphine 10 mcg/h TDS and group B received 25 mcg/h fentanyl TDS, 6 hours prior to surgery. Patients were followed for three days for postoperative pain relief and adverse effects. Results Baseline and demographic variables are comparable in both groups. The mean level of VAS was significantly lower in group B as compared to group A at Day 1, 2 and 3. The mean level of sedation score was significantly lower in Group B than Group A. Haemodynamic variables in both groups (SBP, DBP and HR), shows comparable values in both groups and no significant difference was observed. Five out of 30 (16.7%) patients in group A required single dose of rescue analgesic while 0 out of 30 patients (0.00%) in group B required rescue analgesic. This difference in rescue analgesic requirement in not quiet statistically significant (p-value 0.0522). Twenty percent patient in fentanyl group and 16.7% patients in buprenorphine group experienced some adverse effects. Nausea and vomiting were main side effects of the drugs. The incidence of nausea and vomiting were 6.7% and 10% in buprenorphine and fentanyl group respectively. Conclusion Fentanyl and buprenorphine TDS were effective and safe in

  13. Technology Insight: imaging of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Finch, Philip

    2006-10-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common condition that has significant economic consequences for affected patients and their communities. Despite the prevailing view that an anatomic diagnosis is often impossible, an origin for the pain can frequently be found if current diagnostic techniques are fully used. Such techniques include a mixture of noninvasive and invasive imaging. Prevalence data suggest that the intervertebral disc is one of the most common sources of back pain, accounting for around 40% of cases. The pathologic basis for discogenic low back pain might be full-thickness radial tears of the annulus fibrosus. Unfortunately, only MRI can image the internal morphology of the disc, and both CT and MRI lack the necessary specificity to validate this hypothesis. Many so-called radiographic abnormalities seen on CT and MRI are commonly encountered in asymptomatic individuals. Invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and provocative discography can show the connection between an abnormal image and the source of low back pain, but do have notable related risks. The development of a noninvasive, low-risk technique that can show this connection is desirable. PMID:17016481

  14. [Use of new elastomeric pumps and PCA in postoperative pain control in thoraco-abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Testa, G; Borzomati, V; Costantini, D; De Chiara, A; Picarazzi, A; Capelli, O

    1996-01-01

    36 patients submitted to interventions for thoraco-abdominal surgery has been submitted to antalgic post-operatory therapy with elastomeric pump at a continuous intravenous infusion and patient controlled analgesia (PCA). The patients have been randomized in three groups. The patients of the 1 degree group received 30 minutes before of the end of the surgical intervention 30 mg of Ketorolac. At the end of the anesthesia came started an infusion of 150 mg of Ketorolac (5 vials) in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution at the rate of 0.5 ml/h. The pump had besides the capability of disperse a maximum of 4 bolus/ h, everyone of 0.5 ml, on demand of the patient. The 2 degrees group received a solution containing 60 ml of Morphine in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution with the same formality of administration. The 3 degrees group (placebo) received 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution in pumps from infusion and Ketorolac intramuscular on demand. To the times T0 (awakening), T1 (3 h), T2 (6h), T3 (12 h), T4 (24 h), T5 (30 h, was collected algometrical consequences according to VAS (Visual Analogous Scale of Sc modification of the PA increase, FC, FR, SatO2.. The obtained results have highlighted like in the 1 degree group, to the 1 degree algometric consequence (T0), there is a good sedative effect on the pain (intensity of the middle low pain 3.70 +/- 1.64); this antalgic effect has also continued in the other consequences effected in the post-operatory. In the 2 degree group to the awakening (T0), the pain was middle-tall (5.50 +/- 2.32) and an expressive reduction appeared at the time T2 (3.60 +/- 1.35 P < 0.005). In the 3 degrees group have not recorded a diminution of the pain if not after 24 hours from the end of the intervention deposit the intramuscular antalgic therapy. In conclusion, the system infusion + PCA represents an indubitable advantage in comparison with the traditional antalgic therapy as for concern the entity of the reduction of the pain as

  15. An Abdominal Aorta Wall Extraction for Liver Cirrhosis Classification Using Ultrasonic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Fujita, Yusuke; Mitani, Yoshihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshihiko; Segawa, Makoto; Terai, Shuji; Sakaida, Isao

    2011-06-01

    We propose a method to extract an abdominal aorta wall from an M-mode image. Furthermore, we propose the use of a Gaussian filter in order to improve image quality. The experimental results show that the Gaussian filter is effective in the abdominal aorta wall extraction.

  16. Interactive segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms in CTA images.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2004-06-01

    A model-based approach to interactive segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms from CTA data is presented. After manual delineation of the aneurysm sac in the first slice, the method automatically detects the contour in subsequent slices, using the result from the previous slice as a reference. If an obtained contour is not sufficiently accurate, the user can intervene and provide an additional manual reference contour. The method is inspired by the active shape model (ASM) segmentation scheme (), in which a statistical shape model, derived from corresponding landmark points in manually labeled training images, is fitted to the image in an iterative manner. In our method, a shape model of the contours in two adjacent image slices is progressively fitted to the entire volume. The contour obtained in one slice thus constrains the possible shapes in the next slice. The optimal fit is determined on the basis of multi-resolution gray level models constructed from gray value patches sampled around each landmark. We propose to use the similarity of adjacent image slices for this gray level model, and compare these to single-slice features that are more generally used with ASM. The performance of various image features is evaluated in leave-one-out experiments on 23 data sets. Features that use the similarity of adjacent image slices outperform measures based on single-slice features in all cases. The average number of slices in our datasets is 51, while on average eight manual initializations are required, which decreases operator segmentation time by a factor of 6. PMID:15063862

  17. The Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Family Intervention and Standard Pediatric Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Conducted controlled clinical trial involving 44 children with recurrent abdominal pain randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral family intervention (CBFI) or standard pediatric care (SPC). Both treatments resulted in significant improvements on measures of pain intensity and pain behavior. CBFI group had higher rate of complete elimination of…

  18. Caesarean Section: Could Different Transverse Abdominal Incision Techniques Influence Postpartum Pain and Subsequent Quality of Life? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Noventa, Marco; Di Gangi, Stefania; Quaranta, Michela; Cosmi, Erich; D’Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Ambrosini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The choice of the type of abdominal incision performed in caesarean delivery is made chiefly on the basis of the individual surgeon’s experience and preference. A general consensus on the most appropriate surgical technique has not yet been reached. The aim of this systematic review of the literature is to compare the two most commonly used transverse abdominal incisions for caesarean delivery, the Pfannenstiel incision and the modified Joel-Cohen incision, in terms of acute and chronic post-surgical pain and their subsequent influence in terms of quality of life. Electronic database searches formed the basis of the literature search and the following databases were searched in the time frame between January 1997 and December 2013: MEDLINE, EMBASE Sciencedirect and the Cochrane Library. Key search terms included: “acute pain”, “chronic pain”, “Pfannenstiel incision”, “Misgav-Ladach”, “Joel Cohen incision”, in combination with “Caesarean Section”, “abdominal incision”, “numbness”, “neuropathic pain” and “nerve entrapment”. Data on 4771 patients who underwent caesarean section (CS) was collected with regards to the relation between surgical techniques and postoperative outcomes defined as acute or chronic pain and future pregnancy desire. The Misgav-Ladach incision was associated with a significant advantage in terms of reduction of post-surgical acute and chronic pain. It was indicated as the optimal technique in view of its characteristic of reducing lower pelvic discomfort and pain, thus improving quality of life and future fertility desire. Further studies which are not subject to important bias like pre-existing chronic pain, non-standardized analgesia administration, variable length of skin incision and previous abdominal surgery are required. PMID:25646621

  19. [Retroperitoneal liposarcoma as etiology of abdominal pain. Case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ponce, Yisvanth; Castellanos-Alejandre, Raúl; Guerrero-Romero, J Francisco; Estrada-León, Felipe; Torres-Lobatón, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are very uncommon types of tumors, with their embryological origin in the mesoderm and in nerve structures of the neuroectodermic layer. They represent only 1.5% of cases in the National Registry of Malignant Tumors in Mexico. They can be encountered anywhere connective soft tissue is found. Because of their specialized localization, retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcomas have a propensity to remain asymptomatic for long periods of time and reach a large size before being diagnosed. The only accepted treatment is wide surgical excision with clear margins, without a clear benefit for adjuvant treatment. The very uncommon nature of these tumors and their varied histopathology, site and behavior classify them as a difficult entity in terms of treatment. We present here the case of a 66-year-old female with a left-side retroperitoneal tumor, complaining only of vague abdominal pain as the presenting symptom. A CT-guided needle biopsy reported a sarcoma and the patient was subjected to laparatomy with complete resection of the tumor (30 x 13 x 10 cm). Histopathological report demonstrated a low-grade retroperitoneal sarcoma and free macroscopic and microscopic borders, without obvious invasion except for left kidney and ureter. The patient refused adjuvant treatment, and she is disease-free 7 years after treatment. Retroperitoneal sarcomas can cause pain and reach very large sizes. The best treatment available is wide surgical resection with clear margins. The most important prognostic factors are free margins, type of resection, age of patient and tumor histology. PMID:18492425

  20. MR imaging of the painful wrist.

    PubMed

    Oneson, S R; Scales, L M; Erickson, S J; Timins, M E

    1996-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an effective method for helping determine the cause of wrist pain by demonstrating a broad spectrum of abnormalities, including those of bone, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. MR imaging is useful in the detection, characterization, and staging of osseous injury and disease, although computed tomography provides superior detail in the depiction of bone. MR imaging may demonstrate irregular cartilage loss in noninflammatory arthropathies such as osteoarthritis, and its superior soft-tissue contrast makes it the method of choice for evaluating the synovial processes. Although arthrography remains the standard of reference in the detection of perforations of the principal intrinsic ligaments of the wrist, three-dimensional MR imaging has shown promise in depicting the small interosseous ligaments. Tendinitis, tenosynovitis, ganglia, and anatomic variants can be diagnosed and accurately assessed with MR imaging. Radiologists need to be aware of the full spectrum of wrist abnormalities and the characteristic MR imaging findings that accompany them. PMID:8888387

  1. Frequent abdominal pain in childhood and youth: a systematic review of psychophysiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gulewitsch, Marco Daniel; Müller, Judith; Enck, Paul; Weimer, Katja; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Schlarb, Angelika Anita

    2014-01-01

    Background. Frequent abdominal pain (AP) in children and adolescents is often designated as functional gastrointestinal disorder. In contrast to research on psychological and social influences on the experience of AP in this population, psychophysiological features such as function of the autonomic nervous system, the central nervous system, or the endocrine system have rarely been studied. Methods. We conducted a systematic literature search for peer-reviewed journal articles referring to children with AP between 4 and 18 years. Studies on experimental baseline characteristics or reactivity of psychophysiological outcome parameters (autonomous nervous system, central nervous system, and endocrine parameters) were included. Key Results. Twelve of 18 included studies found psychophysiological differences between children with AP and healthy ones. These studies indicate a possible autonomic dysregulation and hypersensitivity of the central nervous system in children with AP following stimulation with stress or other intense stimuli. Mainly conflicting results were found regarding baseline comparisons of autonomic and endocrine parameters. Conclusions and Inferences. Frequent AP in children may be associated with an altered psychophysiological reaction on intense stimuli. It has to be considered that the current literature on psychophysiological characteristics of childhood AP is small and heterogeneous. In particular, multiparameter studies using validated experimental paradigms are lacking. PMID:24744777

  2. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Functional Abdominal Pain Syndrome: From Clinical Findings to Basic Understandings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is one of the less common functional gastrointestinal disorders. Conventional therapy has unsatisfactory response to it so people turn to Chinese medicine for help. Currently, we reviewed the whole picture of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) clinical and basic application in the treatment of FAPS, especially the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, the single herb, and Chinese medicine formulae, thus to provide a solid base to further develop evidence-based study for this common gastrointestinal complaint in the future. We developed the search strategy and set the inclusion and exclusion criteria for article search. From the included articles, we totally retrieved 586 records according to our searching criteria, of which 16 were duplicate records and 291 were excluded for reasons of irrelevance. The full text of 279 articles was retrieved for detailed assessment, of which 123 were excluded for various reasons. The number one used single herb is Radix Ginseng. The most common syndrome was liver qi depression. The most frequently used classic formula was Si-Mo-Tang. This reflected the true situation of clinical practice of Chinese medicine practitioners and could be further systematically synthesized as key points of the therapeutic research for FAPS. PMID:27366194

  3. Selenoether oxytocin analogues have analgesic properties in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Aline Dantas; Mobli, Mehdi; Castro, Joel; Harrington, Andrea M; Vetter, Irina; Dekan, Zoltan; Muttenthaler, Markus; Wan, JingJing; Lewis, Richard J; King, Glenn F; Brierley, Stuart M; Alewood, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    Poor oral availability and susceptibility to reduction and protease degradation is a major hurdle in peptide drug development. However, drugable receptors in the gut present an attractive niche for peptide therapeutics. Here we demonstrate, in a mouse model of chronic abdominal pain, that oxytocin receptors are significantly upregulated in nociceptors innervating the colon. Correspondingly, we develop chemical strategies to engineer non-reducible and therefore more stable oxytocin analogues. Chemoselective selenide macrocyclization yields stabilized analogues equipotent to native oxytocin. Ultra-high-field nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of native oxytocin and the seleno-oxytocin derivatives reveals that oxytocin has a pre-organized structure in solution, in marked contrast to earlier X-ray crystallography studies. Finally, we show that these seleno-oxytocin analogues potently inhibit colonic nociceptors both in vitro and in vivo in mice with chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Our findings have potentially important implications for clinical use of oxytocin analogues and disulphide-rich peptides in general. PMID:24476666

  4. Seasonal variations of acute appendicitis and nonspecific abdominal pain in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Ilves, Imre; Fagerström, Anne; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Juvonen, Petri; Miettinen, Pekka; Paajanen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether seasonal changes had an effect on the incidence of acute appendicitis (AA) or nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP). METHODS: We carried out a national register study of all patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of AA and acute NSAP in Finland. Data were analyzed for the whole country and correlated to seasonal and weather parameters (temperature, humidity). Moreover, additional sub-analyses were performed for five geographically different area of Finland. RESULTS: The observation period spanned 21 years, with 186558 appendectomies, of which 137528 (74%) cases were reported as AA. The incidence of AA declined for 32% over the study period. The average incidence of the NSAP was 34/10000 per year. The mean annual temperature, but not relative humidity, showed clear geographical variations. The incidence of AA decreased significantly during the cold months of the year. No correlation was detected between temperature and incidence of NSAP. Humidity had a statistically significant impact on NSAP. CONCLUSION: The incidence of acute appendicitis is declining in Finland. We detected a clear seasonality in the incidence of AA and NSAP. PMID:24833844

  5. Spontaneous superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Watring, Nicole J; Smith, Corbett M; Stokes, Gordon K; Counselman, Francis L

    2010-11-01

    A 44-year-old woman presented to our Emergency Department with a 4-day history of severe, sharp left upper quadrant abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting. She had been seen 3 days prior at another Emergency Department, and had a negative work-up including a normal non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis for possible kidney stone. Vital signs were: temperature 36.3°C (97.3°F), pulse 100 beats/min, respiratory rate 18 breaths/min, and blood pressure 141/80 mm Hg. Physical examination was remarkable for marked tenderness in the left upper and middle quadrants and voluntary guarding. Bowel sounds were normal. Although laboratory studies were normal, a CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis with intravenous contrast suggested a superior mesenteric artery dissection. This was confirmed with arteriography. The clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of superior mesenteric artery dissection are reviewed. PMID:18180132

  6. Restoration of vagal tone: a possible mechanism for functional abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Sowder, Erik; Gevirtz, Richard; Shapiro, Warren; Ebert, Crystal

    2010-09-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) causes disruption of daily activities/missed school days, over utilization of healthcare, unnecessary surgeries, and anxiety in 10-15% of children. Its etiology is not clearly understood, however the success of several clinical protocols suggests that autonomic dysregulation is a factor. In this study autonomic activity, including heart rate variability (HRV), was compared between children with FAP and a comparison group. Twenty children with FAP and 10 children without FAP between the ages of 5 and 17 years old were compared on autonomic regulation using an ambulatory system at baseline and 8 weeks later. Children with FAP participated in 6 sessions of HRV biofeedback aimed at normalizing autonomic balance. At baseline, children with FAP appear to have more autonomic dysregulation than children without FAP. After completing HRV biofeedback, the FAP group was able to significantly reduce their symptoms in relation to significantly increasing their autonomic balance. In a sample of children with FAP, it appears that HRV biofeedback treatment improved their symptoms and that a change in vagal tone was a potential mediator for this improvement. The present study appears to point to excessive vagal withdrawal as an underlying mechanism of FAP. PMID:20229150

  7. Imaging brain mechanisms in chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Emeran A; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity, and connectivity, as well as in gray and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data-driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  8. Imaging Brain Mechanisms in Chronic Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity and connectivity, as well as in grey and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  9. [INTESTINAL NON-ROTATION AS CAUSE OF RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN:REPORT OF A CASE AND LITERATURE REVIEW

    PubMed

    García Barrionuevo, Alcides; Castro De La Mata Guerra, Rodrigo; García; Rodríguez Castro, Manuel; Ganoza Arenas, Carmela

    2000-01-01

    A 32 years old male patient with recurrent abdominal pain was admitted to the hospital with the clinical picture of intestinal obstruction. An emergency laparotomy was performed and the diagnosis of intestinal non-rotation and cecum volvulus was done. Right hemicolectomy and terminoterminal ileocolic anastomosis was performed. Pathology showed ischemia and necrosis in the resected segment. Clinical presentation, diagnosis methods and therapeutic options of intestinal malrotation and non-rotation are discussed. PMID:12140578

  10. Cases in Space Medicine: Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain in a Female Crewmember on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Scheuring, Richard; Jones, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    A case study of a medical emergency aboard the International Space Station is reviewed. The case involves a female crewmember who is experiencing acute abdominal pain. The interplay of the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) and the NASA Flight Surgeon is given. Possible diagnoses, and advised medical actions are reviewed. Along the case study questions are posed to the reader, and at the end answers are given.

  11. Adrenal myelolipoma, cholelithiasis and calcified spleen: retrospective diagnosis of sickle cell anemia using a novel triad of abdominal imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Jakhere, Sandeep G; Kumbhar, Raju S; Dhongade, Harshal V

    2014-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited abnormality of the globin chain with very high prevalence in the Indian subcontinent. A significant proportion of these patients present late in life and are at a risk of complications like acute chest syndrome and painful episodes till a definitive diagnosis is reached and appropriate treatment is started . We report a novel triad of abdominal imaging findings which is not reported in literature until now and which may suggest a diagnosis of sickle cell anemia in retrospect. Patients with this triad of abdominal findings should be suspected to have an underlying hemoglobinopathy and should be referred for further hematological workup. Although in our case the patient was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia depending on the abnormal morphology of red cells and hemoglobin electrophoresis, it should be remembered that this triad of findings may be seen in other hemoglobinopathies which induce a state of chronic anemia. PMID:25053687

  12. Imaging studies in patients with spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate an a priori threshold for advanced imaging in patients with spinal pain. Design Patients with spinal pain in any region for 6 to 52 weeks were assessed to determine if radiologic studies beyond x-ray scans were indicated, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide bone scans. An a priori threshold was set before MRI, CT, or bone scans would be considered. Those who did not have MRI, CT, or bone scans ordered were followed for at least 1 year to determine if any of them went on to be diagnosed with a more serious spinal disorder (eg, infection, fracture, spondylitis, tumour, neurologic compression). Setting Four large primary care clinics in Edmonton, Alta. Participants A total of 1003 consecutively presenting patients with symptoms suspected to be related to the spine (for a duration of generally 6 to 52 weeks) who had not already undergone advanced imaging and did not have a diagnosis of nonbenign back pain. Main outcome measures Number of cases of nonbenign spinal disorder in participants who underwent advanced imaging and participants who did not undergo advanced imaging (ie, did not have any red flags). Results There were 399 women (39.8%) and 604 men (60.2%). The mean (SD) age of the group was 47.2 (14.6) years. The mean (SD) duration of symptoms was 15.1 (8.6) weeks. Of the 1003 participants, 110 met an a priori threshold for undergoing at least 1 of MRI, CT, or bone scan. In these 110 participants, there were newly diagnosed cases of radiculopathy (n = 12), including a case of cauda equina syndrome; spondyloarthropathy (n = 6); occult fracture (n = 2); solitary metastasis (n = 1); epidural lipomatosis (n = 1); osteomyelitis (n = 1), and retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1), each of which was considered likely to be the cause of the patient’s spinal symptoms. The remaining 893 participants were followed for at least 1 year and none showed evidence of a nonbenign cause of his or her

  13. Clinical Case of the Month: A 48-Year-Old Man With Fever and Abdominal Pain of One Day Duration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mary; Tadin, David; Conrad, Erich J; Lopez, Fred A

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old man residing in a mental health department inpatient program with a history of schizoaffective disorder presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of fever and intense abdominal pain for one day. The patient stated he initially fell in the shower and afterwards experienced back pain. He was transferred to an acute care unit within the facility for further evaluation. The facility physician noted that the patient had a mild temperature elevation and abdominal rigidity on exam. At that time, he was given two doses of benztropine intramuscularly, and transferred to our hospital for further evaluation. The patient exhibited fever, diffuse abdominal pain and a nonproductive cough, but denied chills, dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, weakness, diarrhea, melena or hematochezia. He did have a one-week history of constipation for which he was given sodium phosphate enemas, magnesium citrate and docusate sodium, eventually resulting in a bowel movement. He also complained of new onset dysphagia. There were no recent changes to his medications, which included clonazepam, divalproex sodium extended release, olanzapine and risperidone. He denied use of tobacco, alcohol or illicit drugs. PMID:27159603

  14. Clear Depiction of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orta Kilickesmez, Kadriye; Kilickesmez, Ozgur

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm incidentally detected clearly with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) during the examination of a patient with myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia that later converted to acute myeloid leukemia. DW-MRI revealed a hyperintense halo surrounding the abdominal aorta with aneurysmatic dilatation, establishing the diagnosis.

  15. Changes in muscle strength and pain in response to surgical repair of posterior abdominal wall disruption followed by rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, A; Herrington, L; Blower, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: Posterior abdominal wall deficiency (PAWD) is a tear in the external oblique aponeurosis or the conjoint tendon causing a posterior wall defect at the medial end of the inguinal canal. It is often known as sportsman's hernia and is believed to be caused by repetitive stress. Objective: To assess lower limb and abdominal muscle strength of patients with PAWD before intervention compared with matched controls; to evaluate any changes following surgical repair and rehabilitation. Methods: Sixteen subjects were assessed using a questionnaire, isokinetic testing of the lower limb strength, and pressure biofeedback testing of the abdominals. After surgery and a six week rehabilitation programme, the subjects were re-evaluated. A control group were assessed using the same procedure. Results: Quadriceps and hamstrings strength was not affected by this condition. A deficit hip muscle strength was found on the affected limb before surgery, which was significant for the hip flexors (p = 0.05). Before surgery, 87% of the patients compared with 20% of the controls failed the abdominal obliques test. Both the injured and non-injured sides had improved significantly in strength after surgery and rehabilitation. The strength of the abdominal obliques showed the most significant improvement over the course of the rehabilitation programme. Conclusions: Lower limb muscle strength may have been reduced as the result of disuse atrophy or pain inhibition. Abdominal oblique strength was deficient in the injured patients and this compromises rotational control of the pelvis. More sensitive investigations (such as electromyography) are needed to assess the link between abdominal oblique function and groin injury. PMID:12547744

  16. Epiploic Appendagitis: A Rare Cause of Acute Abdominal Pain in Children. Report of a Case and Review of the Pediatric Literature.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Paul; Sawaya, David E; Miller, Kristen H; Nowicki, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    A 9-year-old boy presented with acute onset of abdominal pain and vomiting. History, physical examination, and initial laboratory testing failed to provide a diagnosis. A computed tomography scan revealed the rare finding of epiploic appendagitis. We review the literature of this rare, but increasingly recognized, condition that mimics appendicitis and needs to be considered in the child with acute abdominal pain. PMID:26427946

  17. Rapid 13C Urea Breath Test to Identify Helicobacter pylori Infection in Emergency Department Patients with Upper Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Andrew C.; Pierce, Rebecca; Cummings, Derek A.T.; Pines, Jesse M.; May, Larissa; Smith, Meaghan A.; Marcotte, Joseph; McCarthy, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In emergency department (ED) patients with upper abdominal pain, management includes ruling out serious diseases and providing symptomatic relief. One of the major causes of upper abdominal pain is an ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which can be treated and cured with antibiotics. We sought to estimate the prevalence of H. pylori infection in symptomatic patients using a convenience sample at a single urban academic ED and demonstrate the feasibility of ED-based testing. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients with a chief complaint of pain or discomfort in the upper abdomen for 1 year from February 2011 until February 2012 at a single academic urban ED. Enrolled subjects were tested for H. pylori using a rapid point of care 13C Urea Breath Test (UBT) [Exalenz Bioscience]. We compared patient characteristics between those who tested positive versus negative for the disease. Results: A total of 205 patients with upper abdominal pain were tested over 12 months, and 24% (95% confidence interval: 19% to 30%) tested positive for H. pylori. Black subjects were more likely to test positive than white subjects (28% v. 6%, P < 0.001). Other factors, such as age and sex, were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: In our ED, H. pylori infection was present in 1 in 4 patients with epigastric pain, and testing with a UBT was feasible. Further study is needed to determine the risk factors associated with infection, the prevalence of H. pylori in other EDs, the effect of the test on ED length of stay and the costeffectiveness of an ED-based test-and-treat strategy. PMID:23687549

  18. Athletic injuries of the lateral abdominal wall: review of anatomy and MR imaging appearance.

    PubMed

    Stensby, J Derek; Baker, Jonathan C; Fox, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The lateral abdominal wall is comprised of three muscles, each with a different function and orientation. The transversus abdominus, internal oblique, and external oblique muscles span the abdominal cavity between the iliocostalis lumborum and quadratus lumborum posteriorly and the rectus abdominis anteriorly. The lateral abdominal wall is bound superiorly by the lower ribs and costal cartilages and inferiorly by the iliac crest and inguinal ligament. The lateral abdominal wall may be acutely or chronically injured in a variety of athletic endeavors, with occasional acute injuries in the setting of high-energy trauma such as motor vehicle collisions. Injuries to the lateral abdominal wall may result in lumbar hernia formation, unique for its high incarceration rate, and also Spigelian hernias. This article will review the anatomy, the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging approach, and the features and complications of lateral abdominal wall injuries. PMID:26450606

  19. A Rare Cause of Postoperative Abdominal Pain in a Spinal Fusion Patient.

    PubMed

    Horn, Pamela L; Beeb, Allan C; King, Denis R

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a 12-year-old girl who underwent an uncomplicated posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation for scoliosis and who later developed nausea, emesis, and abdominal pain. We discuss the epidemiology, prevalence, anatomic findings, symptoms, diagnostic tests, and clinical management, including nonsurgical and surgical therapies, of superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS), a rare condition. Over a 2-week period, the patient developed an uncommon type of bowel obstruction likely related to her initial thin body habitus, correction of her deformity, and weight loss after surgery. The patient returned to the operating room for placement of a Stamm gastrostomy feeding tube with insertion of a transgastric-jejunal (G-J) feeding tube. The patient had the G-J feeding tube in place for approximately 6 weeks to augment her enteral nutrition. As she gained weight, her duodenal emptying improved, and she gradually transitioned to normal oral intake. She has done well since the G-J feeding tube was removed. Posterior spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is a relatively common procedure, and SMAS is a rare condition. However, in the case of an asthenic adolescent with postoperative weight loss, intestinal obstruction can develop. When planning operative spinal correction in scoliosis patients who have a low body mass index at the time of surgery and who have increased thoracic stiffness, be alert for signs and symptoms of SMAS. This rare complication can develop, and timely diagnosis and medical management will decrease morbidity and shorten the length of time needed for nutritional rehabilitation. PMID:26372764

  20. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    PubMed

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p < 0.001). Among patients with surgical conditions, the difference between ultrasonography (US) and CT diagnoses was significant in groups 2 (p = 0.046) and 3 (p =  .001). The impact of the change in diagnosis in surgical patients imaged with two modalities was significant in the group as a whole and in each age group separately. Non-diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden. PMID:26453370

  1. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  2. Pelvic ultrasound immediately following MDCT in female patients with abdominal/pelvic pain: is it always necessary?

    PubMed

    Yitta, Silaja; Mausner, Elizabeth V; Kim, Alice; Kim, Danny; Babb, James S; Hecht, Elizabeth M; Bennett, Genevieve L

    2011-10-01

    To determine the added value of reimaging the female pelvis with ultrasound (US) immediately following multidetector CT (MDCT) in the emergent setting. CT and US exams of 70 patients who underwent MDCT for evaluation of abdominal/pelvic pain followed by pelvic ultrasound within 48 h were retrospectively reviewed by three readers. Initially, only the CT images were reviewed followed by evaluation of CT images in conjunction with US images. Diagnostic confidence was recorded for each reading and an exact Wilcoxon signed rank test was performed to compare the two. Changes in diagnosis based on combined CT and US readings versus CT readings alone were identified. Confidence intervals (95%) were derived for the percentage of times US reimaging can be expected to lead to a change in diagnosis relative to the diagnosis based on CT interpretation alone. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the ovaries/adnexa 8.1% of the time (three reader average); the majority being cases of a suspected CT abnormality found to be normal on US. Ultrasound changed the diagnosis for the uterus 11.9% of the time (three reader average); the majority related to the endometrial canal. The 95% confidence intervals for the ovaries/adnexa and uterus were 5-12.5% and 8-17%, respectively. Ten cases of a normal CT were followed by a normal US with 100% agreement across all three readers. Experienced readers correctly diagnosed ruptured ovarian cysts and tubo-ovarian abscesses (TOA) based on CT alone with 100% agreement. US reimaging after MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis is not helpful: (1) following a normal CT of the pelvic organs or (2) when CT findings are diagnostic and/or characteristic of certain entities such as ruptured cysts and TOA. Reimaging with ultrasound is warranted for (1) less-experienced readers to improve diagnostic confidence or when CT findings are not definitive, (2) further evaluation of suspected endometrial abnormalities. A distinction should be made between the need for

  3. Mild, moderate, and severe pain in patients recovering from major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Zalon, Margarete L

    2014-06-01

    Pain interferes with various activities, such as coughing, deep breathing, and ambulation, designed to promote recovery and prevent complications after surgery. Determining appropriate cutpoints for mild, moderate, and severe pain is important, because specific interventions may be based on this classification. The purpose of this research was to determine optimal cutpoints for postoperative patients based on their worst and average pain during hospitalization and after discharge to home, and whether the optimal cutpoints distinguished patients with mild, moderate, or severe pain regarding patient outcomes. This secondary analysis consisted of 192 postoperative patients aged ≥60 years. Multivariate analyses of variance were used to stratify the sample into mild, moderate, and severe pain groups using eight cutpoint models for worst and average pain in the last 24 hours. One-way analyses of variance were conducted to determine whether patients experiencing mild, moderate, or severe pain were different in outcome. Optimal cutpoints were similar to those previously reported, with the boundary between mild and moderate pain ranging from 3 to 4 and the boundary between moderate and severe pain ranging from 5 to 7. Worst pain cutpoints were most useful in distinguishing patients regarding fatigue, depression, pain's interference with function, and morphine equivalent administered in the previous 24 hours. A substantial proportion of patients experienced moderate to severe pain. The results suggest a narrow boundary between mild and severe pain that interferes with function. The findings indicate that clinicians should seek to aggressively manage postoperative pain ratings greater than 3. PMID:24882032

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  5. Spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hydatid cyst into the peritoneum causing only mild abdominal pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karakaya, Kemal

    2007-02-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic disease in certain areas of the world. It is located mostly in the liver. Spontaneous rupture of the hydatid cyst into the peritoneum is a rare condition, which is accompanied by serious morbidity and mortality generally. We present herein a case with a spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hidatid disease into the peritoneum without any serious symptoms. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency room with a mild abdominal pain lasting for a day. Physical examination revealed only mild abdominal tenderness. There was no history of trauma or complaints related to hydatid diseases. Ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid and a cystic lesion with irregular borders in the liver. He was operated on. Postoperative albendazol therapy was given for 2 mo. No recurrence or secondary hydatidosis was seen on CT investigation in the 3rd, 6th and 12th mo following surgery. PMID:17278209

  6. [A case of Hamman's syndrome associated with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus presenting with abdominal pain].

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Kosaku; Muro, Shinichiro; Sasaki, Kyo; Kobayashi, Sayo; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Nawa, Toru; Ueki, Toru; Yabushita, Kazuhisa; Shimoe, Toshinari

    2015-05-01

    A 21-year-old female presented at an emergency department with abdominal pain and nausea. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest and abdomen revealed a small amount of mediastinal emphysema in the precardiac area, but the underlying cause could not be identified. On admission, her plasma glucose was 371 mg/dl, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was 14.0%, and blood pH was 6.91. These findings supported a diagnosis of Hamman's syndrome associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Her diabetic ketoacidosis was managed with insulin and fluid therapy, and the mediastinal emphysema disappeared spontaneously by the time of discharge. Presence of free air of the chest and abdominal cavity must warrant a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation; however, when the free air is accompanied by diabetic ketoacidosis, it is not necessary to perform urgent endoscopy. PMID:25947021

  7. Large abdominal photopenic area on 99mTc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Jennifer; Spaulding, John; Zack, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    (99m)Tc-sestamibi myocardial perfusion imaging is frequently performed in conjunction with exercise or pharmacologic stress testing for evaluation of coronary heart disease. Interpretation of these studies includes systematic review of unprocessed rotating projectional images for evaluation of cardiac size as well as the presence of motion or attenuation artifacts. Occasionally, incidental noncardiac findings are detected on review of the projectional images. We report a case of a patient with a history of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who was found to have a large abdominal photopenic area on the projectional images. The photopenic area corresponded to the location of large intraabdominal cysts on abdominal CT and was consistent with hepatic cysts associated with the patient's known polycystic kidney disease. We review the differential diagnosis of large abdominal photopenic regions identified on myocardial projectional images and the importance of routinely analyzing these images for incidental noncardiac findings. PMID:22997275

  8. Serum, Saliva, and Urine Irisin with and Without Acute Appendicitis and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Aydin, Suleyman; Sarac, Mehmet; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Kalayci, Mehmet; Artas, Gokhan; Yardim, Meltem; Kazez, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    A 112-amino-acid protein irisin (IRI) is widely expressed in many organs, but we currently do not know whether appendix tissue and blood cells express it. If appendix tissue and neutrophil cells express IRI, measuring its concentration in biological fluids might be helpful in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA), since neutrophil cells are the currently gold-standard laboratory parameters for the diagnosis of AA. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based measurements of the proposed myokine IRI for the discrimination of patients with AA from those with acute abdominal pain (AP) and healthy controls. Moreover, immunoreactivity to IRI was investigated in appendix tissues and blood cells. Samples were collected on admission (T1), 24 hours (T2), and 72 hours (T3) postoperatively from patients with suspected AA and from patients with AP corresponding to T1–T3, whereas control subject blood was once corresponding to T1. IRI was measured in serum, saliva, and urine by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas in appendix tissue and blood cells, IRI was detected by immunohistohcemistry. Appendix tissue and blood cells (except for erythrocytes) are new sources of IRI. Basal saliva, urine, and serum levels were higher in children with AA compared with postoperative levels (T2) that start to decline after surgery. This is in line with the finding that IRI levels are higher in children with AA when compared with those with AP or control subject levels, most likely due to a large infiltration of neutrophil cells in AA that release its IRI into body fluids. Measurement of IRI in children with AA parallels the increase or decrease in the neutrophil count. This new finding shows that the measurement of IRI and neutrophil count can together improve the diagnosis of AA, and it can distinguish it from AP. IRI can be a candidate marker for the diagnosis of AA and offers an additional parameter to

  9. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for imaging blunt abdominal trauma - indications, description of the technique and imaging review.

    PubMed

    Cokkinos, D; Antypa, E; Stefanidis, K; Tserotas, P; Kostaras, V; Parlamenti, A; Tavernaraki, K; Piperopoulos, P N

    2012-02-01

    Patients with blunt abdominal trauma are initially imaged with ultrasound (US) for the evaluation of free abdominal fluid. However, lacerations of solid organs can be overlooked. Although computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard technique for abdominal trauma imaging, overutilization, ionizing radiation, need to transport the patient and potential artifacts are well known disadvantages. Contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) can be used as an imaging tool between the two methods. It can easily and reliably reveal solid abdominal organ injuries in patients with low-energy localized trauma and decrease the number of CT scans performed. It can be rapidly performed at the patient's bedside with no need for transportation. There are only very few contraindications and anaphylactoid reactions are extremely rare. Altogether, CEUS has proved to be very helpful for the initial imaging of traumatic lesions of the liver, kidney and spleen, as well as for patient follow-up. PMID:22274907

  10. Pain related inflammation analysis using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Mrinal Kanti; Bardhan, Shawli; Das, Kakali; Bhattacharjee, Debotosh; Nath, Satyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT) offers a potential non-invasive, non-contact and radiation free imaging modality for assessment of abnormal inflammation having pain in the human body. The assessment of inflammation mainly depends on the emission of heat from the skin surface. Arthritis is a disease of joint damage that generates inflammation in one or more anatomical joints of the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent appearing form of arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most threatening form of them. In this study, the inflammatory analysis has been performed on the infrared images of patients suffering from RA and OA. For the analysis, a dataset of 30 bilateral knee thermograms has been captured from the patient of RA and OA by following a thermogram acquisition standard. The thermograms are pre-processed, and areas of interest are extracted for further processing. The investigation of the spread of inflammation is performed along with the statistical analysis of the pre-processed thermograms. The objectives of the study include: i) Generation of a novel thermogram acquisition standard for inflammatory pain disease ii) Analysis of the spread of the inflammation related to RA and OA using K-means clustering. iii) First and second order statistical analysis of pre-processed thermograms. The conclusion reflects that, in most of the cases, RA oriented inflammation affects bilateral knees whereas inflammation related to OA present in the unilateral knee. Also due to the spread of inflammation in OA, contralateral asymmetries are detected through the statistical analysis.

  11. Acute intermittent porphyria leading to posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): a rare cause of abdominal pain and seizures.

    PubMed

    Dagens, Andrew; Gilhooley, Michael James

    2016-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited deficiency in the haem biosynthesis pathway. AIP is rare, affecting around 1 in 75 000 people. Acute attacks are characterised by abdominal pain associated with autonomic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. AIP is rarely associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). PRES is a clinicoradiological condition caused by the failure of the posterior circulation to autoregulate, resulting in cerebral oedema, headaches, nausea and seizures. This association is important because drugs used in the management of seizures may worsen an attack of AIP. This article describes a case of AIP and PRES in a young woman. PMID:27277587

  12. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  13. Completing the Pain Circuit: Recent Advances in Imaging Pain and Inflammation beyond the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    This review describes some of the recent developments in imaging aspects of pain in the periphery. It is now possible to image nerves in the cornea non-invasively, to image receptor level expression and inflammatory processes in injured tissue, to image nerves and alterations in nerve properties, to image astrocyte and glial roles in neuroinflammatory processes, and to image pain conduction functionally in the trigeminal ganglion. These advances will ultimately allow us to describe the pain pathway, from injury site to behavioral consequence, in a quantitative manner. Such a development could lead to diagnostics determining the source of pain (peripheral or central), objective monitoring of treatment progression, and, hopefully, objective biomarkers of pain. PMID:24228169

  14. Imaging Biomarkers and the Role of Neuroinflammation in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Cooper, Mark S.; Clark, Vincent P.

    2013-01-01

    The papers from this thematic issue followed a translational research workshop, Imaging Neuroinflammation and Neuropathic Pain, that focused on the search for neuroimaging biomarkers to assess neuroinflammation associated with neuropathic pain. The topics covered in this issue include overviews of the historical and current knowledge regarding neuropathic pain, the potential mechanisms involved, the often under-recognized clinical presentations that can delay diagnosis, the various neuroimaging techniques that have been applied to evaluate neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation, to case series illustrating novel treatments of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, the use of telemedicine to disseminate knowledge and improve the diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes is also discussed. PMID:23666404

  15. The effect of Reiki on pain and anxiety in women with abdominal hysterectomies: a quasi-experimental pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Anne T; O'Connor, Priscilla C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare reports of pain and levels of state anxiety in 2 groups of women after abdominal hysterectomy. A quasi-experimental design was used in which the experimental group (n = 10) received traditional nursing care plus three 30-minute sessions of Reiki, while the control group (n = 12) received traditional nursing care. The results indicated that the experimental group reported less pain and requested fewer analgesics than the control group. Also, the experimental group reported less state anxiety than the control group on discharge at 72 hours postoperation. The authors recommend replication of this study with a similar population, such as women who require nonemergency cesarian section deliveries. PMID:17099413

  16. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain.

    PubMed

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. "Hyperstimulation analgesia" with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  17. Imaging-guided hyperstimulation analgesia in low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Gorenberg, Miguel; Schwartz, Kobi

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain in patients with myofascial pain syndrome is characterized by painful active myofascial trigger points (ATPs) in muscles. This article reviews a novel, noninvasive modality that combines simultaneous imaging and treatment, thus taking advantage of the electrodermal information available from imaged ATPs to deliver localized neurostimulation, to stimulate peripheral nerve endings (Aδ fibers) and in turn, to release endogenous endorphins. “Hyperstimulation analgesia” with localized, intense, low-rate electrical pulses applied to painful ATPs was found to be effective in 95% patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain, in a clinical validation study. PMID:23847430

  18. Pain related to robotic cholecystectomy with lower abdominal ports: effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique of rectus sheath block in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Soo; Choi, Jong Bum; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Wook Hwan; Baek, Nam Hyun; Kim, Jayoun; Park, Chu Kyung; Lee, Yeon Ju; Park, Sung Yong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic cholecystectomy (RC) using port sites in the lower abdominal area (T12-L1) rather than the upper abdomen has recently been introduced as an alternative procedure for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Therefore, we investigated the time course of different components of pain and the analgesic effect of the bilateral ultrasound-guided split injection technique for rectus sheath block (sRSB) after RC in female patients. Methods: We randomly assigned 40 patients to undergo ultrasound-guided sRSB (RSB group, n = 20) or to not undergo any block (control group, n = 20). Pain was subdivided into 3 components: superficial wound pain, deep abdominal pain, and referred shoulder pain, which were evaluated with a numeric rating scale (from 0 to 10) at baseline (time of awakening) and at 1, 6, 9, and 24 hours postoperatively. Consumption of fentanyl and general satisfaction were also evaluated 1 hour (before discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and 24 hours postoperatively (end of study). Results: Superficial wound pain was predominant only at awakening, and after postoperative 1 hour in the control group. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB significantly decreased superficial pain after RC (P < 0.01) and resulted in a better satisfaction score (P < 0.05) 1 hour after RC in the RSB group compared with the control group. The cumulative postoperative consumption of fentanyl at 6, 9, and 24 hours was not significantly different between groups. Conclusions: After RC with lower abdominal ports, superficial wound pain predominates over deep intra-abdominal pain and shoulder pain only at the time of awakening. Afterwards, superficial and deep pain decreased to insignificant levels in 6 hours. Bilateral ultrasound-guided sRSB was effective only during the first hour. This limited benefit should be balanced against the time and risks entailed in performing RSB. PMID:27495072

  19. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  20. Complex abdominal wall defects: appearances at prenatal imaging.

    PubMed

    Pakdaman, Reza; Woodward, Paula J; Kennedy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal wall defects are a complex group of anomalies, and many are incorrectly diagnosed. Evaluation of the defect relative to the umbilical cord insertion site is fundamentally important in differentiating among the various malformations. The two most common abdominal wall defects are gastroschisis, in which the defect is on the right side of the normally inserting cord and free-floating bowel loops are present, and omphalocele, in which the cord inserts on a membrane-covered midline defect. Omphalocele may also form a portion of a more complex defect that may remain undiagnosed without thorough evaluation. In cloacal exstrophy, the defect extends inferiorly and the bowel loops extrude between the two bladder halves. In pentalogy of Cantrell, the defect extends superiorly and is typically associated with ectopia cordis. Bladder exstrophy is a lower abdominal defect in which the hallmark finding is absence of a fluid-filled bladder. The cord insertion site is normal to low but does not form part of the defect. Both body stalk anomaly and abdominoschisis due to amniotic bands cause severe malformations, often involving extrusion of solid organs and the bowel. Although these two entities have many overlapping features, body stalk anomaly may be recognized on the basis of absence of a free-floating umbilical cord. With use of an algorithmic approach beginning with discovery of the location of the defect, a more precise diagnosis can be determined that may directly affect pre- and postnatal management decisions. PMID:25763744

  1. Use of In-labeled autologous leukocytes to image an abdominal abscess in a horse

    SciTech Connect

    Koblik, P.D.; Lofstedt, J.; Jakowski, R.M.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-06-15

    Indium 111-labeled autologous leukocytes were used to image an abdominal abscess in a horse with a palpable abdominal mass and history of Streptococcus equi infection. A focal area of radioactivity was identified in the location corresponding to the abscess. Imaging of this focal uptake was optimal 48 hours after injection. Similar scans obtained in 2 clinically normal horses revealed no evidence of focal radioactivity in this region. The cell labeling procedure gave acceptable labeling efficiency (87.5%) but an excessive number of damaged WBC, resulting in persistent lung radioactivity on all images. No adverse effects were noted. Radiation measured in the horse and its excreta were well within acceptable limits.

  2. A case of familial Mediterranean fever who complained of periodic fever and abdominal pain diagnosed by MEFV gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Chie; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Kisida, Dai; Kakudou, Mariko; Yazaki, Masahide; Nakamura, Akinori; Azuma, Kouta; Tsuboi, Kazuyuki; Abe, Takeo; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Furukawa, Tetsuya; Maruoka, Momo; Tamura, Masao; Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Saito, Atsushi; Nishioka, Aki; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto; Kitano, Masayasu; Tsunoda, Shinichiro; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Sano, Hajime

    2016-01-01

      Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disease caused by Mediterranean FeVergene (MEFV) mutations on Chromosome 16, and characterized by periodic fever of and serositis. FMF is the result of gain-of-function mutations in pyrin that lead to interleukin-1β activation. FMF can be classified as "typical" and "atypical" types based on clinical finding and genetic screening. Although MEFV genotyping has enabled FMF to be confirmed in some cases, the diagnosis remains predominantly clinical since genotyping has shown that the disease is characterized by variable manifestations in Japanese. In 1976, the first report performed on the case of Japanese FMF with periodic fever of and serositis. Since 2002, genetic analyses are performed on Japanese FMF patients by K. Shiozaki et al. and N. Tomiyama et al. In our case, she was a 25-year-old Japanese woman with at periodic fever and abdominal pain. MEFV gene analysis demonstrated a heterozygous mutation of variant M694I, leading to a diagnosis of FMF. After the increase dose (up to 3 mg/day) of colchicine, periodic fever and abdominal pain disappeared. It is the important candidate of FMF for differential diagnosis with unexplained periodic fever and serositis, such as our case. PMID:27181238

  3. Control of acute pain after major abdominal surgery in 585 patients given tramadol and ketorolac by intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Pieri, M; Meacci, L; Santini, L; Santini, G; Dollorenzo, R; Sansevero, A

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of postoperative pain relief using tramadol and ketorolac in continuous intravenous infusion. The 585 patients included in the study underwent major surgery according to a protocol involving the parenteral administration of 100 mg tramadol approximately 40 min before the end of surgery. This was followed by the continuous intravenous infusion of 600 mg tramadol and 180 mg ketorolac diluted with physiological solution to a total volume of 96 ml. Delivery was carried out using an elastomeric pump or a syringe pump and administered over a 48-hour period at a constant rate of 2 ml/h. Any further doses consisted of 100 mg tramadol up to a maximum of 300 mg over a 24-h period. Pain was assessed on a verbal numeric scale (VNS). For each patient the intensity of pain was assessed both at rest and on movement (coughing, deep breathing, movement of lower limbs). At the scheduled times (T0-T72, every 6 h), the following parameters were evaluated: hemodynamic stability; respiratory function; the appearance of any side effects; the level of sedation; and the need for any further doses of analgesic. The analysis of the data obtained showed the good quality of postoperative pain relief achieved: pain intensity at rest was, on average, always below VNS level 3, while during movement it always had an average VNS level of 3-4. The only side effects found with any frequency were nausea (22.6%) and vomiting (8.5%); hemodynamic and respiratory parameters remained stable. The method adopted was of limited cost and was well accepted by both patients and staff. On the basis of the data obtained, it is possible to affirm that the post-operative pain protocol proposed is effective, safe, without significant side effects, and of limited cost. Therefore, it is the first choice protocol for our operating unit after major abdominal surgery. PMID:12224377

  4. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL IMAGE QUALITY IN PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: DEPENDENCY ON THE LEVEL OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASiR) AND THE TYPE OF CONVOLUTION KERNEL.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Joel; Båth, Magnus; Ledenius, Kerstin; Caisander, Håkan; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different combinations of convolution kernel and the level of Adaptive Statistical iterative Reconstruction (ASiR™) on diagnostic image quality as well as visualisation of anatomical structures in paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations. Thirty-five paediatric patients with abdominal pain with non-specified pathology undergoing abdominal CT were included in the study. Transaxial stacks of 5-mm-thick images were retrospectively reconstructed at various ASiR levels, in combination with three convolution kernels. Four paediatric radiologists rated the diagnostic image quality and the delineation of six anatomical structures in a blinded randomised visual grading study. Image quality at a given ASiR level was found to be dependent on the kernel, and a more edge-enhancing kernel benefitted from a higher ASiR level. An ASiR level of 70 % together with the Soft™ or Standard™ kernel was suggested to be the optimal combination for paediatric abdominal CT examinations. PMID:26922785

  5. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  6. Computer Tomography Imaging Findings of Abdominal Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma: A Report of 5 Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Zhang, Xin-Ke; Chen, Rui-Ying; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Lv, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a neoplasm that arises from follicular dendritic cells. FDCSs originating in the abdomen are extremely rare. Clinically, they often mimic a wide variety of other abdominal tumors, and correct preoperative diagnosis is often a challenging task. To date, only scattered cases of abdominal FDCS have been reported and few data are available on their radiological features. Here we present the computer tomography imaging findings of 5 patients with surgically and pathologically demonstrated abdominal FDCS. An abdominal FDCS should be included in the differential diagnosis when single or multiple masses with relatively large size, well- or ill-defined borders, complex internal architecture with marked internal necrosis and/or focal calcification, and heterogeneous enhancement with "rapid wash-in and slow wash-out" or "progressive enhancement" enhancement patterns in the solid component are seen. PMID:26735543

  7. Abdominal applications of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Where do we stand

    PubMed Central

    Morani, Ajaykumar C; Elsayes, Khaled M; Liu, Peter S; Weadock, William J; Szklaruk, Janio; Dillman, Jonathan Russell; Khan, Asra; Chenevert, Thomas L; Hussain, Hero K

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is one of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences providing qualitative as well as quantitative information at a cellular level. It has been widely used for various applications in the central nervous system. Over the past decade, various extracranial applications of DWI have been increasingly explored, as it may detect changes even before signal alterations or morphological abnormalities become apparent on other pulse sequences. Initial results from abdominal MRI applications are promising, particularly in oncological settings and for the detection of abscesses. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinically relevant basic concepts of DWI, techniques to perform abdominal DWI, its analysis and applications in abdominal visceral MR imaging, in addition to a brief overview of whole body DWI MRI. PMID:23671743

  8. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  9. Abdominal pain and swelling as an initial presentation of spinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Elgendy, Akram Y; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (Pott's disease) is one of the common extra-pulmonary presentations of tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis commonly presents with back pain, fever and night sweats. In this report, we present a case of spinal tuberculosis complicated by bilateral large psoas abscesses. The patient presented with bilateral flank pain and swellings rather than the classic presentation of back pain. The aim of this report is to draw the attention of physicians to this uncommon presentation of spinal tuberculosis, as an early recognition of such condition may expedite diagnosis and treatment, thereby preventing future complications of the disease. PMID:24554681

  10. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal pain Acute cholecystitis Acute kidney failure Addison disease Adenomyosis Annular pancreas Aplastic anemia Appendicitis Ascariasis Atheroembolic renal disease Biliary atresia Blind loop syndrome Cholangitis Chronic ...

  11. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  12. Parasitic Infection of the Gallbladder: Cystoisospora belli Infection as a Cause of Chronic Abdominal Pain and Acalculous Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Matthew G; Lee, Johnathan Y

    2016-06-01

    Herein we describe two cases of Cystoisospora belli infection of the gallbladder in patients with chronic abdominal pain and review the published literature to date. C. belli is an intracellular protozoan parasite that typically infects the small bowel of immunocompromised hosts. Little is known of the significance of C. belli infection of the gallbladder at this point as only four cases have been reported as yet, only one of which occurred in an immunocompetent patient. It is often treatable with antibiotics, and the patient's immune status, including HIV testing, should be investigated. Neither of the patients at our institution was found to be immunocompromised, and HIV-1/2 antibody testing was non-reactive in both. PMID:27526491

  13. Haemoptysis and left upper quadrant abdominal pain: an unusual presentation of partial thoracic migration of an adjustable gastric band's tube

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, César; Milheiro, António; Manso, António Canaveira; Castro Sousa, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic gastric banding is considered the safest bariatric procedure, holding satisfactory long-term weight loss results, low rates of early complications and negligible mortality. Long-term follow-up are showing a high prevalence of late complications. We describe the case of a 40-year-old female patient, with a medical history of laparoscopic gastric banding, admitted in the emergency department complaining of haemoptysis, left upper quadrant abdominal pain and a slight tachycardia. After an exhaustive clinical evaluation with laboratorial and radiological assessments, diagnosis of partial thoracic migration of the band's tube was established. Despite the unusual clinical setting, this case emphasises the necessity of awareness for the potential long-term complications of gastric banding either from primary or secondary care providers. PMID:23420734

  14. Analysis of abdominal wounds made by surgical trocars using functional luminal imaging probe (FLIP) technology.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Barry P; O'Donovan, Deidre; Liao, Donghua; Zhao, Jingbo; Schiretz, Rich; Heninrich, Russell; Gregersen, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The aim was to use a novel functional luminal imaging probe for evaluation of wound defects and tissue damage resulting from the use of trocars. Following general anesthesia of 4 adult pigs, 6 different trocars were randomly inserted at preselected locations in the porcine abdominal wall. The functional luminal imaging probe was used to profile the trocar holes during bag distension from 8 axial cross-sectional area measurements. The cross-sectional areas and pressure in the bag were recorded and exported to Matlab for analysis and data display. Geometric profiles were generated, and the minimum cross-sectional area and hole length (abdominal wall thickness) were used as endpoints. Successful distensions were made in all cases. The slope of the contours increased away from the narrowest point of the hole. The slope increased more rapidly toward the inner abdominal wall than toward the outer wall. The slope of the linear trend lines for the cross-sectional area-pressure relation represents the compliance at the narrowest point in the wall. The hole length (abdominal wall thickness) could be obtained at different cross-sectional area cutoff points. A cutoff point of 300 mm(2) gave good results when compared to the length of the hole measured after the tissue was excised. This technique represents a new and straightforward way to evaluate the effects of trocars on the abdominal wall. It may also prove useful in comparing techniques and technology from different manufacturers. PMID:18757380

  15. Segmentation of the liver from abdominal MR images: a level-set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalbari, Anwar; Huang, Xishi; Ren, Jing

    2015-03-01

    The usage of prior knowledge in segmentation of abdominal MR images enables more accurate and comprehensive interpretation about the organ to segment. Prior knowledge about abdominal organ like liver vessels can be employed to get an accurate segmentation of the liver that leads to accurate diagnosis or treatment plan. In this paper, a new method for segmenting the liver from abdominal MR images using liver vessels as prior knowledge is proposed. This paper employs the technique of level set method to segment the liver from MR abdominal images. The speed image used in the level set method is responsible for propagating and stopping region growing at boundaries. As a result of the poor contrast of the MR images between the liver and the surrounding organs i.e. stomach, kidneys, and heart causes leak of the segmented liver to those organs that lead to inaccurate or incorrect segmentation. For that reason, a second speed image is developed, as an extra term to the level set, to control the front propagation at weak edges with the help of the original speed image. The basic idea of the proposed approach is to use the second speed image as a boundary surface which is approximately orthogonal to the area of the leak. The aim of the new speed image is to slow down the level set propagation and prevent the leak in the regions close to liver boundary. The new speed image is a surface created by filling holes to reconstruct the liver surface. These holes are formed as a result of the exit and the entry of the liver vessels, and are considered the main cause of the segmentation leak. The result of the proposed method shows superior outcome than other methods in the literature.

  16. Analysis of Gastric and Duodenal Eosinophils in Children with Abdominal Pain Related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders According to Rome III Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran; Lee, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (AP-FGID) is common in children and adults. However, the mechanism of AP-FGID is not clearly known. Recently, micro-inflammation, especially eosinophilia in the gastrointestinal tract, was suggested in the pathophysiology of AP-FGID in adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of gastric and duodenal eosinophilia with pediatric AP-FGID. Methods In total, 105 pediatric patients with AP-FGID were recruited and classified into 4 subgroups based on the Rome III criteria. Eosinophil counts in the gastric and duodenal tissues of children with AP-FGID were compared to those from normal pathology references or those of children with Helicobacter pylori infection. Tissue eosinophil counts were also compared among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Results Eosinophil counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with AP-FGID than normal reference values. Duodenal eosinophil counts were higher in children with AP-FGID, but not significantly when compared with normal reference values. There were no significant differences in eosinophil counts of the stomach or duodenum among the 4 subtypes of AP-FGID. Eosinophils counts in the gastric antrum and body were significantly higher in children with H. pylori infection than in those with AP-FGID. Duodenal eosinophilia was prominent in cases of H. pylori infection, but not statistically significant when compared with AP-FGID. Conclusions Our study revealed that gastric eosinophilia is associated with AP-FGID in children, regardless of the subtype of functional abdominal pain. This suggests some contribution of gastrointestinal eosinophils in the development of pediatric AP-FGID. PMID:27053514

  17. Young children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) followed in pediatric gastroenterology (PED-GI) vs primary pediatric care (PED): Differences in outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children with recurrent abdominal pain without alarm signs be managed in pediatric rather than specialty care. However, many of these children are seen in tertiary care. In a longitudinal examination of physical and psychological symptoms, we hypothes...

  18. Discriminative Validity of the Behavior Assessment System for Children-Parent Rating Scales in Children with Recurrent Abdominal Pain and Matched Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Paul M.; Schoff, Kristin M.; Glutting, Joseph J.; Abelkop, A. Shayne

    2003-01-01

    Examined discriminative validity of the Parent Rating Scale (PRS) of the Behavior Assessment System for Children (BASC; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1992, Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Services). Two groups were compared: a cohort with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) (n = 49) and children from the BASC-PRS standardization sample (n = 49) matched on…

  19. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  20. Postsurgical pain outcome of vertical and transverse abdominal incision: Design of a randomized controlled equivalence trial [ISRCTN60734227

    PubMed Central

    Reidel, Margot A; Knaebel, Hanns-Peter; Seiler, Christoph M; Knauer, Christine; Motsch, Johann; Victor, Norbert; Büchler, Markus W

    2003-01-01

    Background There are two ways to open the abdominal cavity in elective general surgery: vertically or transversely. Various clinical studies and a meta-analysis have postulated that the transverse approach is superior to other approaches as regards complications. However, in a recent survey it was shown that 90 % of all abdominal incisions in visceral surgery are still vertical incisions. This discrepancy between existing recommendations of clinical trials and clinical practice could be explained by the lack of acceptance of these results due to a number of deficits in the study design and analysis, subsequent low internal validity, and therefore limited external generalisability. The objective of this study is to address the issue from the patient's perspective. Methods This is an intraoperatively randomized controlled observer and patient-blinded two-group parallel equivalence trial. The study setting is the Department of General-, Visceral-, Trauma Surgery and Outpatient Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, Medical School. A total of 172 patients of both genders, aged over 18 years who are scheduled for an elective abdominal operation and are eligible for either a transverse or vertical incision. To show equivalence of the two approaches or the superiority of one of them from the perspective of the patient, a primary endpoint is defined: the pain experienced by the patient (VAS 0–100) on day two after surgery and the amount of analgesic required (piritramide [mg/h]). A confidence interval approach will be used for analysis. A global α-Level of 0.05 and a power of 0.8 is guaranteed, resulting in a size of 86 patients for each group. Secondary endpoints are: time interval to open and close the abdomen, early-onset complications (frequency of burst abdomen, postoperative pulmonary complications, and wound infection) and late complications (frequency of incisional hernias). Different outcome variables will be ranked by patients and surgeons to assess the

  1. Abdominal manifestations of histiocytic disorders in adults: imaging perspective.

    PubMed

    Sunnapwar, Abhijit; Menias, Christine O; Ojili, Vijaynadh; Policarpio Nicolas, Maria; Katre, Rashmi; Gangadhar, Kiran; Nagar, Arpit

    2016-09-01

    Histiocytic disorders (HDs) are a diverse group of diseases characterized by pathologic infiltration of normal tissues by cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. The spectrum of these diseases ranges from treatable infectious diseases to rapidly progressive, life-threatening conditions. Although they are rare and difficult diagnoses, HDs can be diagnosed with the help of clinical and laboratory analyses, imaging features and tissue biopsy. The clinicopathology and imaging spectrum of select entities belonging to this disorder are presented in this review. PMID:27332519

  2. Evaluation Experiment of Ultrasound Computed Tomography for the Abdominal Sound Speed Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, Keisuke; Yamada, Akira

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal sound speed tomographic imaging using through-transmission travel time data on the body surface was investigated. To this end, a hundred kHz range low-frequency wave was used to reduce the wave attenuation within an inner body medium. A method was investigated for the reconstruction of the image with the smallest possible number of path data around the abdominal surface. Specifically, the data from a strong scattering spinal cord should be avoided. To fulfill the requirement, the smoothed path algebraic reconstruction technique was introduced. The validity of this method was examined both on the numerically synthesized data and the experimentally measured data for the phantom specimen and actual human subject. It was shown that an abdominal tomographic sound speed image could be successfully obtained by preparing only 32 transducer locations at the circumference around the abdominal surface and their combination of less than 100 number of observation path data as well as by avoiding the data intersecting the spinal cord. In addition, fat regions were extracted having a sound speed lower than the threshold value to demonstrate the possibility of this method for metabolic syndrome diagnosis.

  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of splenic enlargement using wave pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong Won

    2006-03-01

    It is known that the spleen accompanied by liver cirrhosis is hypertrophied or enlarged. We have examined a wave pattern at the left boundary of spleen on the abdominal CT images having liver cirrhosis, and found that they are different from those on the images having a normal liver. It is noticed that the abdominal CT images of patient with liver cirrhosis shows strong bending in the wave pattern. In the case of normal liver, the images may also have a wave pattern, but its bends are not strong. Therefore, the total waving area of the spleen with liver cirrhosis is found to be greater than that of the spleen with a normal liver. Moreover, we found that the waves of the spleen from the image with liver cirrhosis have the higher degree of circularity compared to the normal liver case. Based on the two observations above, we propose an automatic method to diagnose splenic enlargement by using the wave pattern of the spleen in abdominal CT images. The proposed automatic method improves the diagnostic performance compared with the conventional process based on the size of spleen.

  4. Evaluation of five image registration tools for abdominal CT: pitfalls and opportunities with soft anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Burke, Ryan P.; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Image registration has become an essential image processing technique to compare data across time and individuals. With the successes in volumetric brain registration, general-purpose software tools are beginning to be applied to abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we evaluate five current tools for registering clinically acquired abdominal CT scans. Twelve abdominal organs were labeled on a set of 20 atlases to enable assessment of correspondence. The 20 atlases were pairwise registered based on only intensity information with five registration tools (affine IRTK, FNIRT, Non-Rigid IRTK, NiftyReg, and ANTs). Following the brain literature, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. However, interpretation was confounded due to a significant proportion of outliers. Examining the retrospectively selected top 1 and 5 atlases for each target revealed that there was a substantive performance difference between methods. To further our understanding, we constructed majority vote segmentation with the top 5 DSC values for each organ and target. The results illustrated a median improvement of 85% in DSC between the raw results and majority vote. These experiments show that some images may be well registered to some targets using the available software tools, but there is significant room for improvement and reveals the need for innovation and research in the field of registration in abdominal CTs. If image registration is to be used for local interpretation of abdominal CT, great care must be taken to account for outliers (e.g., atlas selection in statistical fusion).

  5. Does mechanical massage of the abdominal wall after colectomy reduce postoperative pain and shorten the duration of ileus? Results of a randomized study.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc-Louvry, Isabelle; Costaglioli, Bruno; Boulon, Catherine; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Ducrotte, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of mechanical abdominal massage on postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. We hypothesized that parietal abdominal stimulation could counteract induced pain and postoperative ileus, through common spinal-sensitive pathways, with nociceptive visceral messages. After preoperative randomization, 25 patients (age 52 +/- 5 years) underwent active mechanical massage by intermittent negative pressure on the abdominal wall resulting in aspiration (Cellu M50 device, LPG, Valence, France), and 25 patients (age 60 +/- 6 years) did not receive active mechanical massage (placebo group). Massage sessions began the first day after colectomy and were performed daily until the seventh postoperative day. In the active-massage group, amplitude and frequency were used, which have been shown to be effective in reducing muscular pain, whereas in the placebo group, ineffective parameters were used. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, doses of analgesics (propacetamol), and delay between surgery and the time to first passage of flatus were assessed. Types and dosages of the anesthetic drugs and the duration of the surgical procedure did not differ between groups. From the second and third postoperative days, respectively, VAS pain scores (P < 0.001) and doses of analgesics (P < 0.05) were significantly lower in patients receiving active massage compared to the placebo group. Time to first passage of flatus was also significantly shorter in the active-massage group (1.8 +/- 0.3 days vs. 3.6 +/- 0.4 days, P < 0.01). No adverse effects were observed. These results suggest that mechanical massage of the abdominal wall may decrease postoperative pain and ileus after colectomy. PMID:11986017

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... main blood vessel that supplies blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs ... dissection). Symptoms of rupture include: Pain in the abdomen or back. The pain may be severe, sudden, ...

  7. Crystal-Associated Colitis with Ulceration Leading to Hematochezia and Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Meeta; Reiprich, Aaron; Khov, Nancy; Yang, Zhaohai; Mathew, Abraham; Levenick, John

    2016-01-01

    Lower GI bleeding is a common cause for hospitalization in adults. Medication-associated mucosal injury is an important clinical entity that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a 3-month history of intermittent abdominal cramping and rectal bleeding. Her medical history was extensive and included end-stage renal disease and a remote history of endometrial carcinoma that was treated with radiation. Initial workup was concerning for ischemic and radiation colitis, however, histology was most consistent with acute inflammation and ulceration associated with crystal fragments. Sevelamer and cholestyramine are commonly used ion-exchange resins that have been associated with mucosal damage. Both medications were discontinued and her symptoms resolved. Our case highlights an underrecognized but important cause of hematochezia. PMID:27482192

  8. High resolution intravital imaging of subcellular structures of mouse abdominal organs using a microstage device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liqin; Kobayakawa, Satoru; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Abe, Kuniya

    2012-01-01

    Intravital imaging of brain and bone marrow cells in the skull with subcellular resolution has revolutionized neurobiology, immunology and hematology. However, the application of this powerful technology in studies of abdominal organs has long been impeded by organ motion caused by breathing and heartbeat. Here we describe for the first time a simple device designated 'microstage' that effectively reduces organ motions without causing tissue lesions. Combining this microstage device with an upright intravital laser scanning microscope equipped with a unique stick-type objective lens, the system enables subcellular-level imaging of abdominal organs in live mice. We demonstrate that this technique allows for the quantitative analysis of subcellular structures and gene expressions in cells, the tracking of intracellular processes in real-time as well as three-dimensional image construction in the pancreas and liver of the live mouse. As the aforementioned analyses based on subcellular imaging could be extended to other intraperitoneal organs, the technique should offer great potential for investigation of physiological and disease-specific events of abdominal organs. The microstage approach adds an exciting new technique to the in vivo imaging toolbox. PMID:22479464

  9. CNS Animal fMRI imaging in Pain and Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2010-01-01

    Animal imaging of brain systems offers exciting opportunities to better understand the neurobiology of pain and analgesia. Overall functional studies have lagged behind human studies as a result of technical issues including the use of anesthesia. Now that many of these issues have been overcome including the possibility of imaging awake animals, there are new opportunities to study whole brain systems neurobiology of acute and chronic pain as well as analgesic effects on brain systems de novo (using pharmacological MRI) or testing in animal models of pain. Understanding brain networks in these areas may provide new insights into translational science, and use neural networks as a “language of translation” between preclinical to clinical models. In this review we evaluate the role of functional and anatomical imaging in furthering our understanding in pain and analgesia. PMID:21126534

  10. Intra-abdominal fat. Part I. The images of the adipose tissue localized beyond organs

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Unaltered fat is a permanent component of the abdominal cavity, even in slim individuals. Visceral adiposity is one of the important factors contributing to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain neoplasms. Moreover, the adipose tissue is an important endocrine and immune organ of complex function both when normal and pathological. Its role in plastic surgery, reconstruction and transplantology is a separate issue. The adipose tissue has recently drawn the attention of research institutes owing to being a rich source of stem cells. This review, however, does not include these issues. The identification of fat is relatively easy using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. It can be more difficult in an ultrasound examination for several reasons. The aim of this paper is to present various problems associated with US imaging of unaltered intra-abdominal fat located beyond organs. Based on the literature and experience, it has been demonstrated that the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity has variable echogenicity, which primarily depends on the amount of extracellular fluid and the number of connective tissue septa, i.e. elements that potentiate the number of areas that reflect and scatter ultrasonic waves. The normal adipose tissue presents itself on a broad gray scale: from a hyperechoic area, through numerous structures of lower reflection intensity, to nearly anechoic regions mimicking the presence of pathological fluid collections. The features that facilitate proper identification of this tissue are: sharp margins, homogeneous structure, high compressibility under transducer pressure, no signs of infiltration of the surrounding structures and no signs of vascularization when examined with the color and power Doppler. The accumulation of fat tissue in the abdominal cavity can be generalized, regional or focal. The identification of the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity using ultrasonography is not always easy. When in doubt, the

  11. Intra-abdominal fat. Part I. The images of the adipose tissue localized beyond organs.

    PubMed

    Smereczyński, Andrzej; Kołaczyk, Katarzyna; Bernatowicz, Elżbieta

    2015-09-01

    Unaltered fat is a permanent component of the abdominal cavity, even in slim individuals. Visceral adiposity is one of the important factors contributing to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain neoplasms. Moreover, the adipose tissue is an important endocrine and immune organ of complex function both when normal and pathological. Its role in plastic surgery, reconstruction and transplantology is a separate issue. The adipose tissue has recently drawn the attention of research institutes owing to being a rich source of stem cells. This review, however, does not include these issues. The identification of fat is relatively easy using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. It can be more difficult in an ultrasound examination for several reasons. The aim of this paper is to present various problems associated with US imaging of unaltered intra-abdominal fat located beyond organs. Based on the literature and experience, it has been demonstrated that the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity has variable echogenicity, which primarily depends on the amount of extracellular fluid and the number of connective tissue septa, i.e. elements that potentiate the number of areas that reflect and scatter ultrasonic waves. The normal adipose tissue presents itself on a broad gray scale: from a hyperechoic area, through numerous structures of lower reflection intensity, to nearly anechoic regions mimicking the presence of pathological fluid collections. The features that facilitate proper identification of this tissue are: sharp margins, homogeneous structure, high compressibility under transducer pressure, no signs of infiltration of the surrounding structures and no signs of vascularization when examined with the color and power Doppler. The accumulation of fat tissue in the abdominal cavity can be generalized, regional or focal. The identification of the adipose tissue in the abdominal cavity using ultrasonography is not always easy. When in doubt, the

  12. [Paravertebral and intra-abdominal abscess due to oxygen-ozone therapy for lower back pain].

    PubMed

    Menéndez, P; García, A; Peláez, R

    2014-01-01

    Complications secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy are rare, but they have been described in medical literature. There are only two cases of infectious complications after oxygen-ozone therapy. Our aim is to describe a rare case of purulent complication that was secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of lower back pain. We report the clinical improvement with conservative treatment for a local complication after percutaneous oxygen-ozone treatment. According to the clinical improvement of our patient, conservative treatment should be considered before any aggressive surgery. PMID:24071048

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy.

  14. Diagnostic Imaging of Fetal and Neonatal Abdominal and Soft Tissue Tumors.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Usha D; Kline-Fath, Beth M

    2015-01-01

    Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and staging of prenatal and neonatal tumors, and is essential in treatment planning. Though obstetrical ultrasound is the first choice prenatally, fetal MRI continues to play an increasing role as experience with this imaging modality increases. In the neonate, in addition to ultrasound and MRI, CT and nuclear medicine studies can also play an important role. We describe the prenatal and neonatal imaging findings of some of the most common congenital abdominal and soft tissue neoplasms including neuroblastoma, renal, liver and soft tissue tumors. PMID:26168940

  15. Electromechanical delay of abdominal muscles is modified by low back pain prevention exercise.

    PubMed

    Szpala, Agnieszka; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja; Drapala, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the research was to assess the effect of a 4-week-long training program on selected parameters: electromechanical delay (EMD) and amplitude of electromyographic signal (EMG). Fourteen female students of the University School of Physical Education participated in the study. Torques and surface electromyography were evaluated under static conditions. Surface electrodes were glued to both sides of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and erector spinae (ES) muscles. The 4-week-long program was aimed at strengthening the abdominal muscles and resulted in increased EMD during maximum torque production by flexors of the trunk, increased amplitudes of the signals of the erector spinae ( p = 0.005), and increased EMG amplitude asymmetry of the lower ( p = 0.013) and upper part ( p = 0.006) of the rectus abdominis muscle. In a training program composed of a large number of repetitions of strength exercises, in which the training person uses their own weight as the load (like in exercises such as curl-ups), the process of recruitment of motor units is similar to that found during fatiguing exercises and plyometric training. PMID:25307027

  16. Agreement between objective and subjective assessment of image quality in ultrasound abdominal aortic aneurism screening

    PubMed Central

    Wolstenhulme, S; Keeble, C; Moore, S; Evans, J A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate agreement between objective and subjective assessment of image quality of ultrasound scanners used for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. Methods: Nine ultrasound scanners were used to acquire longitudinal and transverse images of the abdominal aorta. 100 images were acquired per scanner from which 5 longitudinal and 5 transverse images were randomly selected. 33 practitioners scored 90 images blinded to the scanner type and subject characteristics and were required to state whether or not the images were of adequate diagnostic quality. Odds ratios were used to rank the subjective image quality of the scanners. For objective testing, three standard test objects were used to assess penetration and resolution and used to rank the scanners. Results: The subjective diagnostic image quality was ten times greater for the highest ranked scanner than for the lowest ranked scanner. It was greater at depths of <5.0 cm (odds ratio, 6.69; 95% confidence interval, 3.56, 12.57) than at depths of 15.1–20.0 cm. There was a larger range of odds ratios for transverse images than for longitudinal images. No relationship was seen between subjective scanner rankings and test object scores. Conclusion: Large variation was seen in the image quality when evaluated both subjectively and objectively. Objective scores did not predict subjective scanner rankings. Further work is needed to investigate the utility of both subjective and objective image quality measurements. Advances in knowledge: Ratings of clinical image quality and image quality measured using test objects did not agree, even in the limited scenario of AAA screening. PMID:25494526

  17. A Novel Diagnostic Aid for Detection of Intra-Abdominal Adhesions to the Anterior Abdominal Wall Using Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Randall, David; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; ten Broek, Richard; Strik, Chema; Spencer, Paul; Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Abdominal adhesions can cause serious morbidity and complicate subsequent operations. Their diagnosis is often one of exclusion due to a lack of a reliable, non-invasive diagnostic technique. Development and testing of a candidate technique are described below. Method. During respiration, smooth visceral sliding motion occurs between the abdominal contents and the walls of the abdominal cavity. We describe a technique involving image segmentation and registration to calculate shear as an analogue for visceral slide based on the tracking of structures throughout the respiratory cycle. The presence of an adhesion is attributed to a resistance to visceral slide resulting in a discernible reduction in shear. The abdominal movement due to respiration is captured in sagittal dynamic MR images. Results. Clinical images were selected for analysis, including a patient with a surgically confirmed adhesion. Discernible reduction in shear was observed at the location of the adhesion while a consistent, gradually changing shear was observed in the healthy volunteers. Conclusion. The technique and its validation show encouraging results for adhesion detection but a larger study is now required to confirm its potential. PMID:26880884

  18. Diagnostic imaging in the evaluation of leg pain in athletes.

    PubMed

    Bresler, Michael; Mar, Winnie; Toman, Jordan

    2012-04-01

    The causes of leg pain in the athlete are diverse. Pain can relate to more common etiologies, such as musculotendinous injury to the hamstrings and Achilles tendon as well as stress injury to bone, with tibial stress injuries comprising the most common cause for lower leg pain in athletes. Less-common causes include chronic exertional compartment syndrome and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, both of which cause pain as a result of muscle ischemia. Radiologic evaluation plays an important role in differentiating among the many possible causes of leg pain and is often essential in determining degree of injury as well as in documenting healing before patient return to athletic activity. With PAES and hamstring and Achilles injuries, imaging may be helpful in surgical planning as well as in determining an underlying anatomic cause for injury. Several of these conditions can be evaluated with multiple different imaging modalities. The imaging modality of choice should be selected based on the sensitivity and specificity of the imaging examination but should also be tailored to each individual patient after determining comorbidities that may preclude certain types of imaging as well as assessing the patient's ability to undergo such testing. PMID:22341013

  19. The significance of life-events as contributing factors in childhood recurrent abdominal pain in an urban community in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Boey, C C; Goh, K L

    2001-10-01

    This study aimed to look at the link between childhood recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and the presence of recent life-events in an urban community in Malaysia. School children aged from 9 to 15 years in the city of Petaling Jaya were randomly selected to fill in a questionnaire and to be interviewed. The prevalence of RAP among 1488 school children studied was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI), 8.18-11.25). Higher prevalences of RAP were found in children who had experienced the following life-events in the previous year: loss of a family member through death (P<.001), hospitalisation of a family member (P<.001), the child's own hospitalisation (P=.001), change of address (P<.001), change in occupation of an immediate family member (P<.001), failure in a major school examination (P<.001), bullying at school (P=.001). Following logistic regression analysis, five life-events remain significant: hospitalisation of a family member (P=.038), the child's own hospitalisation (P=.034), change in occupation of an immediate family member (P=.049), examination failure (P=.001) and bullying at school (P=.028). This study strongly suggests that recent stressful life-events are important risk-factors for RAP. PMID:11595243

  20. Beyond abuse: the association among parenting style, abdominal pain, and somatization in IBS patients.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Jeffrey M; Gudleski, Gregory D; Blanchard, Edward B

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the relative strength of the association between abuse, negative parenting style, and somatization in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Drawing from preclinical stress physiology and abuse research identifying the family social climate as a frequently stronger and independent determinant of long-term health effects than abuse-specific variables, we predicted that negative parenting behaviors would more strongly correlate with somatization than abuse. Subjects were 81 consecutively evaluated patients, who at baseline underwent psychological testing, measuring perceived parental style, abuse history, somatization, and pain. Although abuse correlated with maternal and paternal rejection, abuse was not associated with somatization. Higher levels of rejection and/or hostility among fathers (not mothers) were more strongly correlated with somatization than was abuse. Further, paternal parenting behaviors were more predictive of somatization than abuse, age, and gender. The lack of an association between abuse and somatization is discussed in light of limitations of biopsychosocial IBS models, whose strong focus on "pathological stressors" (e.g., abuse, trauma) as risk factors may overlook the importance of "less extreme" parenting variables in influencing somatic complaints. The relationship between parenting and somatization is discussed in the context of broader behavioral science research linking disruptions in the quality of parenting to dramatic and long-term changes in patterns of stress reactivity and brain abnormalities seen in IBS patients. PMID:14744522

  1. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and

  2. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20–50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  3. Adhesions to Mesh after Ventral Hernia Mesh Repair Are Detected by MRI but Are Not a Cause of Long Term Chronic Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Langbach, Odd; Holmedal, Stein Harald; Grandal, Ole Jacob; Røkke, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the present study was to perform MRI in patients after ventral hernia mesh repair, in order to evaluate MRI's ability to detect intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and Methods. Single-center long term follow-up study of 155 patients operated for ventral hernia with laparoscopic (LVHR) or open mesh repair (OVHR), including analyzing medical records, clinical investigation with patient-reported pain (VAS-scale), and MRI. MRI was performed in 124 patients: 114 patients (74%) after follow-up, and 10 patients referred for late complaints after ventral mesh repair. To verify the MRI-diagnosis of adhesions, laparoscopy was performed after MRI in a cohort of 20 patients. Results. MRI detected adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall/mesh in 60% of the patients and mesh shrinkage in 20-50%. Adhesions were demonstrated to all types of meshes after both LVHR and OVHR with a sensitivity of 70%, specificity of 75%, positive predictive value of 78%, and negative predictive value of 67%. Independent predictors for formation of adhesions were mesh area as determined by MRI and Charlson index. The presence of adhesions was not associated with more pain. Conclusion. MRI can detect adhesions between bowel and abdominal wall in a fair reliable way. Adhesions are formed both after open and laparoscopic hernia mesh repair and are not associated with chronic pain. PMID:26819601

  4. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  5. Rapid evaluation of acute abdominal pain by hepatobiliary scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-iprofenin (PIPIDA)

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, J.E.; Gulati, R.M.

    1980-10-03

    One hundred eighty-six patients with suspected acute cholecystitis (AC) underwent radionuclide hepatobiliary imaging with technetium Tc 99m-iprofenin to assess the ability of this tracer to detect AC. After intravenous injection of 5 to 10 mCi of this agent, 500,000 count anterior images were obtained at ten-minute intervals for 60 minutes. An abnormal hepatobiliary scan (HBS) diagnostic of AC was defined as one in which the common bile duct, but not the gallbladder, visualized within one hour of tracer administration. In this series, the sensitivity and specificity for HBS in the detection of AC were 97 and 87%, respectively. The hepatobiliary scan should be the procedure of choice for the rapid detection of AC. It is simple, rapid, and safe to perform, enabling a diagnosis to be established within one hour.

  6. Imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay K; Sodickson, Aaron; Abujudeh, Hani

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the imaging findings of abdominal and pelvic injuries in victims of the Boston Marathon bombing. A retrospective review of 87 patients following the Boston Marathon bombing was performed to evaluate for abdominal and pelvic injuries on plain radiography or CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. Imaging exams were evaluated for shrapnel, soft tissue injury, visceral damage, vascular disruption, and fractures. The injuries were classified as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries. Eleven of the 87 patients had positive findings in the abdomen or pelvis (M:F = 7:4, average age 34.6 years). There were 22 ball bearings, two nails, one screw, and two irregular metal fragments in the 11 patients with secondary blast (shrapnel) injuries. There was no peritoneal penetration or visceral injury seen in any of the patients. One patient had multiple transverse process fractures, representing tertiary blast injury. All but one patient had superficial penetrating abdominal or pelvic injuries secondary to shrapnel. There were no cases of bowel or solid visceral organ injuries due to the lack of peritoneal violation from the relatively low-powered explosions. Absence of peritoneal penetration by shrapnel indicates no need for laparotomy following low-powered explosions. PMID:26445949

  7. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  8. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of Pacific White Shrimp L. vannamei and identification of abdominal muscle proteins.

    PubMed

    Schey, Kevin L; Hachey, Amanda J; Rose, Kristie L; Grey, Angus C

    2016-06-01

    MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has been applied to whole animal tissue sections of Pacific White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, in an effort to identify and spatially localize proteins in specific organ systems. Frozen shrimp were sectioned along the ventral-dorsal axis and methods were optimized for matrix application. In addition, tissue microextraction and homogenization was conducted followed by top-down LC-MS/MS analysis of intact proteins and searches of shrimp EST databases to identify imaged proteins. IMS images revealed organ system specific protein signals that highlighted the hepatopancreas, heart, nervous system, musculature, and cuticle. Top-down proteomics identification of abdominal muscle proteins revealed the sequence of the most abundant muscle protein that has no sequence homology to known proteins. Additional identifications of abdominal muscle proteins included titin, troponin-I, ubiquitin, as well as intact and multiple truncated forms of flightin; a protein known to function in high frequency contraction of insect wing muscles. The combined use of imaging mass spectrometry and top-down proteomics allowed for identification of novel proteins from the sparsely populated shrimp protein databases. PMID:26990122

  9. [Imaging of the painful cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Chevrot, A; Drapé, J L; Godefroy, D; Dupont, A M

    2003-02-01

    Neck pain can occur in several circumstances: traumatic, spontaneous, associated or not with motion, with or without head or upper limb irradiations. Each case requires appropriate clinical examination and radiographs. CT and MRI can be used to obtain additional information. Myelography and arteriography are exceptionally used. Cervical discography and facet joint arthrography are used therapeutically. After a brief anatomical review, normal and pathological patterns will be reviewed using radiographs. Each circumstance is studied: traumatic, degenerative, inflammatory and tumoral. It is emphasized that discogenic cervico-brachial neuralgia usually has a favorable spontaneous outcome. A special chapter is dedicated to calcifying and ossifying diseases of the cervical spine. Cervico-occipital neuralgia is also discussed. PMID:12665720

  10. Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, a Plant Virus Associated with Specific Immune Responses, Fever, Abdominal Pains, and Pruritus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colson, Philippe; Richet, Hervé; Desnues, Christelle; Balique, Fanny; Moal, Valérie; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Berbis, Philippe; Lecoq, Hervé; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Berland, Yvon; Raoult, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, metagenomic studies have identified viable Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV), a plant virus, in the stool of healthy subjects. However, its source and role as pathogen have not been determined. Methods and Findings 21 commercialized food products containing peppers, 357 stool samples from 304 adults and 208 stool samples from 137 children were tested for PMMoV using real-time PCR, sequencing, and electron microscopy. Anti-PMMoV IgM antibody testing was concurrently performed. A case-control study tested the association of biological and clinical symptoms with the presence of PMMoV in the stool. Twelve (57%) food products were positive for PMMoV RNA sequencing. Stool samples from twenty-two (7.2%) adults and one child (0.7%) were positive for PMMoV by real-time PCR. Positive cases were significantly more likely to have been sampled in Dermatology Units (p<10−6), to be seropositive for anti-PMMoV IgM antibodies (p = 0.026) and to be patients who exhibited fever, abdominal pains, and pruritus (p = 0.045, 0.038 and 0.046, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a local source of PMMoV and linked the presence of PMMoV RNA in stool with a specific immune response and clinical symptoms. Although clinical symptoms may be imputable to another cofactor, including spicy food, our data suggest the possibility of a direct or indirect pathogenic role of plant viruses in humans. PMID:20386604

  11. Effect of head and limb orientation on trunk muscle activation during abdominal hollowing in chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) have altered activations patterns of the anterior trunk musculature when performing the abdominal hollowing manœuvre (attempt to pull umbilicus inward and upward towards the spine). There is a subgroup of individuals with CLBP who have high neurocognitive and sensory motor deficits with associated primitive reflexes (PR). The objective of the study was to determine if orienting the head and extremities to positions, which mimic PR patterns would alter anterior trunk musculature activation during the hollowing manoeuvre. Methods This study compared surface electromyography (EMG) of bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal obliques (IO) of 11 individuals with CLBP and evident PR to 9 healthy controls during the hollowing manoeuvre in seven positions of the upper quarter. Results Using magnitude based inferences it was likely (>75%) that controls had a higher ratio of left IO:RA activation with supine (cervical neutral), asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR) left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical extension positions. A higher ratio of right IO:RA was detected in the cervical neutral and ATNR left position for the control group. The CLBP group were more likely to show higher activation of the left RA in the cervical neutral, ATNR left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical flexion positions as well as in the cervical neutral and cervical flexion position for the right RA. Conclusions Individuals with CLBP and PR manifested altered activation patterns during the hollowing maneuver compared to healthy controls and that altering cervical and upper extremity position can diminish the group differences. Altered cervical and limb positions can change the activation levels of the IO and EO in both groups. PMID:24558971

  12. Association of Abdominal Obesity with Lumbar Disc Degeneration – A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Näyhä, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether midsagittal (abdominal) obesity in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), waist circumference (WC) and body fat percentage are associated with lumbar disc degeneration in early adulthood. Methods We obtained the lumbar MRI (1.5-T scanner) of 325 females and 233 males at a mean age of 21 years. Lumbar disc degeneration was evaluated using Pfirrmann classification. We analysed the associations of MRI measures of obesity (abdominal diameter (AD), sagittal diameter (SAD), ventral subcutaneous thickness (VST), and dorsal subcutaneous thickness (DST)), WC and body fat percentage with disc degeneration sum scores using ordinal logistic regression. Results A total of 155 (48%) females and 147 (63%) males had disc degeneration. AD and SAD were associated with a disc degeneration sum score of ≥3 compared to disc degeneration sum score of 0–2 (OR 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–2.33 and OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.12–1.75, respectively) among males, but we found no association among females. WC was also associated with disc degeneration among males (OR 1.03 per one cm; 95% CI 1.00–1.05), but not among females. Conclusion Measures of abdominal obesity in MRI and waist circumference were associated with disc degeneration among 21-year-old males. PMID:23418543

  13. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  14. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Sastra, Stephen A.; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young’s moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity.

  15. Elasticity mapping of murine abdominal organs in vivo using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Sastra, Stephen A; Chen, Hong; Han, Yang; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-08-01

    Recently, ultrasonic imaging of soft tissue mechanics has been increasingly studied to image otherwise undetectable pathologies. However, many underlying mechanisms of tissue stiffening remain unknown, requiring small animal studies and adapted elasticity mapping techniques. Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) assesses tissue viscoelasticity by inducing localized oscillation from a periodic acoustic radiation force. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI for in vivo elasticity mapping of abdominal organs in small animals. Pathological cases, i.e. chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, were also studied in vivo to assess the capability of HMI for detection of the change in mechanical properties. A 4.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (FUS) generated an amplitude-modulated beam resulting in 50 Hz harmonic tissue oscillations at its focus. Axial tissue displacement was estimated using 1D-cross-correlation of RF signals acquired with a 7.8 MHz diagnostic transducer confocally aligned with the FUS. In vitro results in canine liver and kidney showed the correlation between HMI displacement and Young's moduli measured by rheometry compression testing. HMI was capable of providing reproducible elasticity maps of the mouse abdominal region in vivo allowing the identification of, from stiffest to softest, the murine kidney, pancreas, liver, and spleen. Finally, pancreata affected by pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer showed HMI displacements 1.7 and 2.2 times lower than in the control case, respectively, indicating higher stiffness. The HMI displacement amplitude was correlated with the extent of fibrosis as well as detecting the very onset of stiffening even before fibrosis could be detected on H&E. This work shows that HMI can produce reliable elasticity maps of mouse abdominal region in vivo, thus providing a potentially critical tool to assess pathologies affecting organ elasticity. PMID:27401609

  16. Pancreas-Targeted NIR Fluorophores for Dual-Channel Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Vargas, Christina; Gravier, Julien; Park, GwangLi; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V.; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pancreas-related complications are some of the most serious ones in abdominal surgery. The goal of this study was to develop and validate novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that would enable real-time pancreas imaging to avoid the intraoperative pancreatic injury. Design: After initial screening of a large NIR fluorophore library, the performance of 3 selected pancreas-targeted 700 nm NIR fluorophores, T700-H, T700-F, and MB, were quantified in mice, rats, and pigs. Dose ranging using 25 and 100 nmol, and 2.5 µmol of T700-F, and its imaging kinetics over a 4 h period were tested in each species. Three different 800 nm NIR fluorophores were employed for dual-channel FLARE™ imaging in pigs: 2 μmol of ZW800-1 for vessels and kidney, 1 μmol of ZW800-3C for lymph nodes, and 2 μmol of ESNF31 for adrenal glands. Results: T700-F demonstrated the highest signal to background ratio (SBR), with peak SBR at 4 h postinjection in mice. In pigs, T700-F produced an SBR ≥ 2 against muscle, spleen, and lymph nodes for up to 8 h after a single intravenous injection. The combination of T700-F with each 800 nm NIR fluorophore provided simultaneous dual-channel intraoperative imaging of pancreas with surrounding organs in real time. Conclusion: Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores combined with the FLARE dual-channel imaging system enable the real-time intraoperative pancreas imaging which helps surgeons perform safer and more curative abdominal surgeries. PMID:25553094

  17. MR imaging of sports-related groin pain.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Erik N; Kassarjian, Ara; Palmer, William E

    2005-11-01

    With increasing participation in professional and recreational athletics, activity-limiting pelvic and groin pain presents a growing challenge for patients and health care providers. The causes of musculoskeletal-related groin pain among athletes are diverse, with considerable overlap in history and physical examination findings. Pubalgia is a clinical diagnosis invoked when no more specific cause ofa patient's symptoms can be determined on history and physical examination. In many cases, dedicated MR imaging of the hip and pelvis can provide a prompt and specific diagnosis, which allows for early treatment and return to participation. PMID:16275580

  18. Abdominal emergencies in the geriatric patient

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most frequent reasons that elderly people visit the emergency department (ED). In this article, we review the deadliest causes of abdominal pain in this population, including mesenteric ischemia, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and appendicitis and potentially lethal non-abdominal causes. We also highlight the pitfalls in diagnosing, or rather misdiagnosing, these clinical entities. PMID:25635203

  19. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  20. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe; Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. PMID:20012039

  1. Size-specific dose estimates: Localizer or transverse abdominal computed tomography images?

    PubMed Central

    Pourjabbar, Sarvenaz; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Saini, Akshay; Blake, Michael A; Kalra, Mannudeep K

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effect of body dimensions obtained from localizer radiograph and transverse abdominal computed tomography (CT) images on Size Specific Dose Estimate. METHODS: This study was approved by Institutional Review Board and was compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Fifty patients with abdominal CT examinations (58 ± 13 years, Male:Female 28:22) were included in this study. Anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral (Lat) diameters were measured at 5 cm intervals from the CT exam localizer radiograph (simple X-ray image acquired for planning the CT exam before starting the scan) and transverse CT images. Average of measured AP and Lat diameters, as well as maximum, minimum and mid location AP and Lat were measured on both image sets. In addition, off centering of patients from the gantry iso-center was calculated from the localizers. Conversion factors from American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) report 204 were obtained for AP, Lat, AP + Lat, and effective diameter (√ AP * Lat) to determine size specific dose estimate (SSDE) from the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) recorded from the dose reports. Data were analyzed using SPSS v19. RESULTS: Total number of 5376 measurements was done. In some patients entire body circumference was not covered on either projection radiograph or transverse CT images; hence accurate measurement of AP and Lat diameters was not possible in 11% (278/2488) of locations. Forty one patients were off-centered with mean of 1.9 ± 1.8 cm (range: 0.4-7 cm). Conversion factors for attained diameters were not listed on AAPM look-up tables in 3% (80/2488) of measurements. SSDE values were significantly different compared to CTDIvol, ranging from 32% lower to 74% greater than CTDIvol. CONCLUSION: There is underestimation and overestimation of dose comparing SSDE values to CTDIvol. Localizer radiographs are associated with overestimation of patient size and therefore underestimation of SSDE. PMID

  2. Spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hydatıd cyst into the peritoneum causing only mild abdominal pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Kemal

    2007-01-01

    Hydatid disease is an endemic disease in certain areas of the world. It is located mostly in the liver. Spontaneous rupture of the hydatid cyst into the peritoneum is a rare condition, which is accompanied by serious morbidity and mortality generally. We present herein a case with a spontaneous rupture of a hepatic hidatid disease into the peritoneum without any serious symptoms. A 15-year-old boy was admitted to the emergency room with a mild abdominal pain lasting for a day. Physical examination revealed only mild abdominal tenderness. There was no history of trauma or complaints related to hydatid diseases. Ultrasonography showed a large amount of free fluid and a cystic lesion with irregular borders in the liver. He was operated on. Postoperative albendazol therapy was given for 2 mo. No recurrence or secondary hydatidosis was seen on CT investigation in the 3rd, 6th and 12th mo following surgery. PMID:17278209

  3. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  4. Intravenous acetaminophen is superior to ketamine for postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Behzadi, Behzad; Ghodraty, Mohammad Reza; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, intravenously (IV) administered acetaminophen has become one of the most common perioperative analgesics. Despite its now-routine use, IV acetaminophen’s analgesic comparative efficacy has never been compared with that of ketamine, a decades-old analgesic familiar to obstetricians, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists alike. This doubleblind clinical trial aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of ketamine and IV acetaminophen on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods Eighty women aged 25–70 years old and meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups of 40 to receive either IV acetaminophen or ketamine intraoperatively. Postoperatively, each patient had patient-controlled analgesia. Pain and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale) were documented based on the visual analog scale in the recovery room and at 4 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after the surgery. Hemodynamic changes, adverse medication effects, and the need for breakthrough meperidine were also recorded for both groups. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the IV acetaminophen group at each time point (P<0.05), and this group required significantly fewer doses of breakthrough analgesics compared with the ketamine group (P=0.039). The two groups had no significant differences in terms of adverse effects. Conclusion Compared with ketamine, IV acetaminophen significantly improved postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:24465135

  5. Abdominal Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases GI Health Centers Colorectal Cancer Hepatitis C Inflammatory Bowel ... GI Symptoms Gastroparesis See All Topics (A-Z) GI Procedures Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer Screening See All Procedures ( ...

  6. Abdominal Pain or Cramping

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by hormones that slow your digestion, the pressure of your growing uterus, constipation and ... may be caused by hormones that slow your digestion, the pressure of your growing uterus, constipation and ...

  7. Classification of visual signs in abdominal CT image figures in biomedical literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyun; You, Daekeun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Thoma, George R.

    2014-03-01

    "Imaging signs" are a critical part of radiology's language. They not only are important for conveying diagnosis, but may also aid in indexing radiology literature and retrieving relevant cases and images. Here we report our work towards representing and categorizing imaging signs of abdominal abnormalities in figures in the radiology literature. Given a region-of-interest (ROI) from a figure, our goal was to assign a correct imaging sign label to that ROI from the following seven: accordion, comb, ring, sandwich, small bowel feces, target, or whirl. As training and test data, we created our own "gold standard" dataset of regions containing imaging signs. We computed 2997 feature attributes to represent imaging sign characteristics for each ROI in training and test sets. Following feature selection they were reduced to 70 attributes and were input to a Support Vector Machine classifier. We applied image-enhancement methods to compensate for variable quality of the images in radiology articles. In particular we developed a method for automatic detection and removal of pointers/markers (arrows, arrowheads, and asterisk symbols) on the images. These pointers/markers are valuable for approximately locating ROIs; however, they degrade the classification because they are often (partially) included in the training ROIs. On a test set of 283 ROIs, our method achieved an overall accuracy of 70% in labeling the seven signs, which we believe is a promising result for using imaging signs to search/retrieve radiology literature. This work is also potentially valuable for the creation of a visual ontology of biomedical imaging entities.

  8. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings*

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D’Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. PMID:26185345

  9. Abdominal tuberculosis: a radiological review with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Eduardo Lima; Pedrassa, Bruno Cheregati; Bormann, Renata Lilian; Kierszenbaum, Marcelo Longo; Torres, Lucas Rios; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease whose incidence has increased principally as a consequence of HIV infection and use of immunosuppressive drugs. The abdomen is the most common site of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It may be confused with several different conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and other infectious diseases. Delay in the diagnosis may result in significantly increased morbidity, and therefore an early recognition of the condition is essential for proper treatment. In the present essay, cases with confirmed diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis were assessed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, demonstrating the involvement of different organs and systems, and presentations which frequently lead radiologists to a diagnostic dilemma. A brief literature review was focused on imaging findings and their respective prevalence. PMID:26185345

  10. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low/medium/high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a reader

  11. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low∕medium∕high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a

  12. Imaging of Hip Pain: From Radiography to Cross-Sectional Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia; Ansari, Afshin; Guzmán Álvarez, Luis; Castellano García, Maria del Mar; Martínez Martínez, Alberto; Tercedor Sánchez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain can have multiple causes, including intra-articular, juxta-articular, and referred pain, mainly from spine or sacroiliac joints. In this review, we discuss the causes of intra-articular hip pain from childhood to adulthood and the role of the appropriate imaging techniques according to clinical suspicion and age of the patient. Stress is put on the findings of radiographs, currently considered the first imaging technique, not only in older people with degenerative disease but also in young people without osteoarthritis. In this case plain radiography allows categorization of the hip as normal or dysplastic or with impingement signs, pincer, cam, or a combination of both. PMID:26885391

  13. Importance of Defect Detectability in Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Haruki; Nakaichi, Tetsu; Tsuji, Shiro; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was designed to assess defect detectability in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of abdominal lesions. Methods: A National Electrical Manufactures Association International Electrotechnical Commission phantom was used. The simulated abdominal lesion was scanned for 10 min using dynamic list-mode acquisition method. Images, acquired with scan duration of 1-10 min, were reconstructed using VUE point HD and a 4.7 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) Gaussian filter. Iteration-subset combinations of 2-16 and 2-32 were used. Visual and physical analyses were performed using the acquired images. To sequentially evaluate defect detectability in clinical settings, we examined two middle-aged male subjects. One had a liver cyst (approximately 10 mm in diameter) and the other suffered from pancreatic cancer with an inner defect region (approximately 9 mm in diameter). Results: In the phantom study, at least 6 and 3 min acquisition durations were required to visualize 10 and 13 mm defect spheres, respectively. On the other hand, spheres with diameters ≥17 mm could be detected even if the acquisition duration was only 1 min. The visual scores were significantly correlated with background (BG) variability. In clinical settings, the liver cyst could be slightly visualized with an acquisition duration of 6 min, although image quality was suboptimal. For pancreatic cancer, the acquisition duration of 3 min was insufficient to clearly describe the defect region. Conclusion: The improvement of BG variability is the most important factor for enhancing lesion detection. Our clinical scan duration (3 min/bed) may not be suitable for the detection of small lesions or accurate tumor delineation since an acquisition duration of at least 6 min is required to visualize 10 mm lesions, regardless of reconstruction parameters. Improvements in defect detectability are important for radiation treatment planning and accurate PET-based diagnosis. PMID:27408887

  14. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  15. Automated Delineation of Vessel Wall and Thrombus Boundaries of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Multispectral MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Vila, B.; Tarjuelo-Gutierrez, J.; Sánchez-González, P.; Verbrugghe, P.; Fourneau, I.; Maleux, G.; Herijgers, P.; Gomez, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    A correct patient-specific identification of the abdominal aortic aneurysm is useful for both diagnosis and treatment stages, as it locates the disease and represents its geometry. The actual thickness and shape of the arterial wall and the intraluminal thrombus are of great importance when predicting the rupture of the abdominal aortic aneurysms. The authors describe a novel method for delineating both the internal and external contours of the aortic wall, which allows distinguishing between vessel wall and intraluminal thrombus. The method is based on active shape model and texture statistical information. The method was validated with eight MR patient studies. There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall area. Resulting segmented images presented a mean Dice coefficient with respect to manual segmentations of 0.88 and a mean modified Hausdorff distance of 1.14 mm for the internal face and 0.86 and 1.33 mm for the external face of the arterial wall. Preliminary results of the segmentation show high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the vessel wall and thrombus areas. However, since the dataset is small the conclusions cannot be generalized. PMID:26236390

  16. Construction of an anthropopathic abdominal phantom for accuracy validation of deformable image registration.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y L; Chen, H B; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    The purpose of this study is to design and fabricate an anthropopathic abdominal phantom for accuracy evaluation of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms in adaptive radiation therapy. The constructed deformable organs, including the liver, kidney, spleen and stomach, are made of mixture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and softener dioctyl terephthalate, while the rigid structures, i.e. vertebrae, are made of white cement. Relation between the PVC-softener blending ratio and organ CT number is studied, and three-dimensional printing technic is employed to create highly anthropopathic organs in terms of organ shape and density. Detailed steps for phantom construction, landmark point placement and choice of phantom ingredients and construction recipe are introduced. Preliminary results of the mechanical properties of the fabricated organs are also presented. The experimental results indicate that the constructed phantom has satisfactory elastic characteristics and close CT number with corporal organs, and can potentially be applied to simulate real abdominal organ deformation in geometric accuracy validation of DIR algorithms. PMID:27177102

  17. Randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-3856 in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in abdominal pain and bloating in those with predominant constipation

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin; Pélerin, Fanny; Maudet, Corinne; Housez, Béatrice; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Jüsten, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and/or discomfort. Probiotics have been reported to benefit IBS symptoms but the level of benefit remains quite unclear. Objective This study was designed to assess the benefit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms. Methods A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial has been performed in 379 subjects with diagnosed IBS. Subjects were randomly supplemented with the probiotics (1000 mg) or placebo for 12 weeks. Questionnaires (gastrointestinal symptoms, stools, wellbeing, and quality of life) were completed. Primary endpoint was percentage of responders defined as having a 50% decrease in the weekly average “intestinal pain/discomfort score” for at least 4 out of the last 8 weeks of the study. Results There was no overall benefit of S. cerevisiae I-3856 on IBS symptoms and wellbeing in the study population. Moreover, S. cerevisiae I-3856 was not statistically significant predictor of the responder status of the subjects (p > 0.05). Planned subgroup analyses showed significant effect in the IBS-C subjects: improvement of gastrointestinal symptoms was significantly higher in active group, compared to placebo, on abdominal pain/discomfort and bloating throughout the study and at the end of the supplementation. Conclusions In this study, S. cerevisiae I-3856 at the dose of 1000 mg per day does not improve intestinal pain and discomfort in general IBS patients. However, it seems to have an effect in the subgroup with constipation which needs further studies to confirm (NCT01613456 in ClinicalTrials.gov registry). PMID:27403301

  18. Abdominal Imaging with Contrast-enhanced Photon-counting CT: First Human Experience.

    PubMed

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Symons, Rolf; Sandfort, Veit; Mallek, Marissa; Fuld, Matthew K; Henderson, Gregory; Jones, Elizabeth C; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Folio, Les R; Bluemke, David A

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To evaluate the performance of a prototype photon-counting detector (PCD) computed tomography (CT) system for abdominal CT in humans and to compare the results with a conventional energy-integrating detector (EID). Materials and Methods The study was HIPAA-compliant and institutional review board-approved with informed consent. Fifteen asymptomatic volunteers (seven men; mean age, 58.2 years ± 9.8 [standard deviation]) were prospectively enrolled between September 2 and November 13, 2015. Radiation dose-matched delayed contrast agent-enhanced spiral and axial abdominal EID and PCD scans were acquired. Spiral images were scored for image quality (Wilcoxon signed-rank test) in five regions of interest by three radiologists blinded to the detector system, and the axial scans were used to assess Hounsfield unit accuracy in seven regions of interest (paired t test). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess reproducibility. PCD images were also used to calculate iodine concentration maps. Spatial resolution, noise-power spectrum, and Hounsfield unit accuracy of the systems were estimated by using a CT phantom. Results In both systems, scores were similar for image quality (median score, 4; P = .19), noise (median score, 3; P = .30), and artifact (median score, 1; P = .17), with good interrater agreement (image quality, noise, and artifact ICC: 0.84, 0.88, and 0.74, respectively). Hounsfield unit values, spatial resolution, and noise-power spectrum were also similar with the exception of mean Hounsfield unit value in the spinal canal, which was lower in the PCD than the EID images because of beam hardening (20 HU vs 36.5 HU; P < .001). Contrast-to-noise ratio of enhanced kidney tissue was improved with PCD iodine mapping compared with EID (5.2 ± 1.3 vs 4.0 ± 1.3; P < .001). Conclusion The performance of PCD showed no statistically significant difference compared with EID when the abdomen was evaluated in a conventional scan mode. PCD provides

  19. High prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in women in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and direct association with abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Gonçalves da Silva, Gabriela Pagano; do Nascimento, Anderson Luís; Michelazzo, Daniela; Junior, Fernando Filardi Alves; Rocha, Marcelo Gondim; Rosa-e-Silva, Júlio César; Candido-dos-Reis, Francisco José; Nogueira, Antonio Alberto; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic pelvic pain is a disease that directly affects the social and professional lives of women. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of this clinical condition and to identify independent factors associated with it in women living in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. METHODS: A one-year cross-sectional study was conducted in a population sample of 1,278 women over the age of 14 years. The target population was predominantly composed of women who are treated by the public health system. The questionnaire was administered by interviewers who were not linked to the city health care programs. The prevalence of the morbidity was estimated. First, we identified the significant variables associated with pelvic pain (p<0.10) and then we attributed values of 0 or 1 to the absence or presence of these variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify and estimate the simultaneous impact of the independent variables. The results were expressed by odds ratio and their 95% confidence interval with p<0.05. RESULTS: The disease was found in 11.5% (147/1,278) of the sample. The independent predictors were dyspareunia, previous abdominal surgery, depression, dysmenorrhea, anxiety, current sexual activity, low back pain, constipation, urinary symptoms, and low educational level. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of chronic pelvic pain in Ribeirão Preto is high and is associated with conditions that can usually be prevented, controlled, or resolved by improvement of public health policies and public education. PMID:21915476

  20. Disseminated herpes zoster infection initially presenting with abdominal pain in patients with lymphoma undergoing conventional chemotherapy: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hitomi Sumiyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Makita, Shinichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Dai; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral disseminated varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease has a high mortality rate, and occurs in immunocompromised hosts, mostly subsequent to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Only a few cases of this disease that onset during conventional chemotherapy in patients with lymphoma have been reported. The present study reports the cases of 3 patients with disseminated and visceral VZV infection undergoing treatment for follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. All 3 patients presented with initial symptoms of abdominal pain, and 2 patients demonstrated syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone and hepatitis. All patients developed widespread cutaneous dissemination, and all had a low cluster of differentiation 4 cell count or lymphocyte count at the time of VZV diagnosis and at least 4 month prior. With intravenous systemic acyclovir therapy (Cases 1 and 3, 1500 mg/day; Case 2, 750 mg/day), the patients achieved complete recovery by day 14 of therapy. Visceral disseminated VZV infection is not limited to patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, and may present with abdominal pain with or without skin eruption. Visceral infection may take a poor clinical course, therefore, in patients with prolonged duration of low lymphocyte count and/or long-term use of steroids, the prophylactic use of acyclovir may be considered. PMID:27446355

  1. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  2. Postoperative Pain After Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial Comparing the Effects of Tramadol and Gabapentin as Premedication

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Farnoush; Naderi Nabi, Bahram; Mirmansouri, Ali; Fakoor, Fereshteh; Atrkar Roshan, Zahra; Biazar, Gelareh; Zarei, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncontrolled postoperative pain, characteristic to abdominal hysterectomy, results in multiple complications. One of the methods for controlling postoperative pain is preemptive analgesia. Gabapentin and tramadol are both used for this purpose. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effects of tramadol and gabapentin, as premedication, in decreasing the pain after hysterectomy. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 120 eligible elective abdominal hysterectomy patients, divided in three groups of 40, receiving tramadol, gabapentin and placebo, respectively. Two hours before the surgery, the first group was given 300 mg gabapentin, the second one was given 100 mg tramadol, while the other group was given placebo, with 50 ml water. After the surgery, in case of visual analog pain scale (VAS) > 3, up to 3 mg of diclofenac suppository would be used. Pain score, nausea, vomiting, sedation, patient’s satisfaction and the number of meperidine administered during 24 hours (1 - 4 - 8 - 12 - 16 - 20 - 24 hours) were recorded. If patients had VAS > 3, despite using diclofenac, intravenous meperidine (0.25 mg/kg) would be prescribed. Data were analyzed using SPSS 21 software, chi-square test, general linear model and repeated measurement. Results: The three groups were similar regarding age and length of surgery (up to 2 hours). The average VAS, in the placebo group, was higher than in the other two groups (P = 0.0001) and the average received doses of meperidine during 24-hour time were considerably higher in placebo group, compared to the other two groups (55.62 mg in placebo, 18.75 mg in gabapentin and 17.5 mg in tramadol groups, P = 0.0001). Nausea, vomiting and sedation, in the tramadol group, were higher than in the other two groups, although they were not significant. Patients’ dissatisfaction, in the placebo group, during initial hours, especially in the fourth hour, was higher (P = 0.0001). In the gabapentin and tramadol groups

  3. Detection and measurement of fetal abdominal contour in ultrasound images via local phase information and iterative randomized Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Qin, Jing; Zhu, Lei; Ni, Dong; Chui, Yim-Pan; Heng, Pheng-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Due to the characteristic artifacts of ultrasound images, e.g., speckle noise, shadows and intensity inhomogeneity, traditional intensity-based methods usually have limited success on the segmentation of fetal abdominal contour. This paper presents a novel approach to detect and measure the abdominal contour from fetal ultrasound images in two steps. First, a local phase-based measure called multiscale feature asymmetry (MSFA) is de ned from the monogenic signal to detect the boundaries of fetal abdomen. The MSFA measure is intensity invariant and provides an absolute measurement for the signi cance of features in the image. Second, in order to detect the ellipse that ts to the abdominal contour, the iterative randomized Hough transform is employed to exclude the interferences of the inner boundaries, after which the detected ellipse gradually converges to the outer boundaries of the abdomen. Experimental results in clinical ultrasound images demonstrate the high agreement between our approach and manual approach on the measurement of abdominal circumference (mean sign difference is 0.42% and correlation coef cient is 0.9973), which indicates that the proposed approach can be used as a reliable and accurate tool for obstetrical care and diagnosis. PMID:24212021

  4. A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Epidural Clonidine vs Bupivacaine for Pain Control During and After Lower Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Guirguis, Maged; DeWood, Mark S.; Zaky, Sherif S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alpha-2 adrenergic agonists produce safe and effective analgesia, but most investigations studying the analgesic effect of alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists postoperatively included previous or concomitant administration of other analgesics. Because clonidine potentiates the effect of these drugs, its own intrinsic analgesic effect has been difficult to establish. This study was designed to compare the intraoperative and postoperative effects of epidural clonidine vs bupivacaine for patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 40 patients aged 18-50 who were scheduled for elective lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group I (n=20) received epidural clonidine; Group II (n=20) received epidural bupivacaine. Intraoperative and postoperative hemodynamics, pain scores, and complications were monitored. Results Mean pain scores were significantly lower in Group I compared to Group II (1.5 ± 0.5 compared to 3.4 ± 1.0, respectively) in the first 12 hours after surgery. Sedation was more prominent in Group I until 9 hours after surgery. Opioid requirements were significantly lower in Group I. Respiratory rate was similar in the 2 groups. Group I had larger decreases from baseline in systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than Group II. Heart rate in Group I was reduced from baseline, while it was increased in Group II. Less postoperative nausea and vomiting, urinary retention, pruritus, and shivering were observed in Group I. Conclusion Compared to bupivacaine, epidural clonidine provided effective intraoperative and postoperative analgesia in selected patients, resulting in a decreased intravenous pain medication requirement and prolonged duration of analgesia after epidural infusion was discontinued. PMID:26130975

  5. Comparative study of ultrasound-guided abdominal field blocks versus port infiltration in laparoscopic cholecystectomies for post-operative pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Ruchi; Joshi, Saurabh; Srivastava, Kuldeep; Tiwari, Shashank; Sharma, Nitin; Valecha, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Post-operative pain is a major concern for day care surgeries like laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ultrasound guided abdominal field blocks (USAFB) with port site infiltrations for post-operative analgesia in terms of quality of pain relief, opioid consumption and patient satisfaction for day care surgeries Methods: Eighty patients presenting for laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to two groups either to receive port-site infiltration of local anaesthetic (n = 40, Group A) or USAFB (n = 40, Group B group). Numeric rating scores (NRS) were measured postoperatively to primarily assess the pain severity and opioid requirements. Data were analysed using Chi-Square test/Fisher's exact test for categorical data and Mann–Whitney test/unpaired t-test for quantitative data. Results: The study group (Group B) had significantly reduced NRS and opioid consumption over 24 h. The overall fentanyl consumption in patients receiving port infiltrations was approximately twice (200 ΁ 100 μg) as compared to patients in USAFB group (120 ΁ 74 μg) (P < 0.0001). Maximum fentanyl consumption was 400 μg (Group A) and 262 μg (Group B) over 24 h and the minimum requirement was 50 μg and zero, respectively. Conclusion: Superior post-operative analgesia was observed with USAFB which may help in minimising opioid-related adverse effects and facilitating faster recovery.

  6. Active-shape-model-based segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysms in CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Niessen, Wiro J.; Maintz, J. B. Antoine; Viergever, Max A.

    2002-05-01

    An automated method for the segmentation of thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms from CTA data is presented. The method is based on Active Shape Model (ASM) fitting in sequential slices, using the contour obtained in one slice as the initialisation in the adjacent slice. The optimal fit is defined by maximum correlation of grey value profiles around the contour in successive slices, in contrast to the original ASM scheme as proposed by Cootes and Taylor, where the correlation with profiles from training data is maximised. An extension to the proposed approach prevents the inclusion of low-intensity tissue and allows the model to refine to nearby edges. The applied shape models contain either one or two image slices, the latter explicitly restricting the shape change from slice to slice. To evaluate the proposed methods a leave-one-out experiment was performed, using six datasets containing 274 slices to segment. Both adapted ASM schemes yield significantly better results than the original scheme (p<0.0001). The extended slice correlation fit of a one-slice model showed best overall performance. Using one manually delineated image slice as a reference, on average a number of 29 slices could be automatically segmented with an accuracy within the bounds of manual inter-observer variability.

  7. Novel application of simultaneous multi-image display during complex robotic abdominal procedures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The surgical robot offers the potential to integrate multiple views into the surgical console screen, and for the assistant’s monitors to provide real-time views of both fields of operation. This function has the potential to increase patient safety and surgical efficiency during an operation. Herein, we present a novel application of the multi-image display system for simultaneous visualization of endoscopic views during various complex robotic gastrointestinal operations. All operations were performed using the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) with the assistance of Tilepro, multi-input display software, during employment of the intraoperative scopes. Three robotic operations, left hepatectomy with intraoperative common bile duct exploration, low anterior resection, and radical distal subtotal gastrectomy with intracorporeal gastrojejunostomy, were performed by three different surgeons at a tertiary academic medical center. Results The three complex robotic abdominal operations were successfully completed without difficulty or intraoperative complications. The use of the Tilepro to simultaneously visualize the images from the colonoscope, gastroscope, and choledochoscope made it possible to perform additional intraoperative endoscopic procedures without extra monitors or interference with the operations. Conclusion We present a novel use of the multi-input display program on the da Vinci Surgical System to facilitate the performance of intraoperative endoscopies during complex robotic operations. Our study offers another potentially beneficial application of the robotic surgery platform toward integration and simplification of combining additional procedures with complex minimally invasive operations. PMID:24628761

  8. Comparison of Liver Tumor Motion With and Without Abdominal Compression Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Patel, Ritesh; Simeonov, Anna K.; Lockwood, Gina; Haider, Masoom; Dawson, Laura A.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Abdominal compression (AC) can be used to reduce respiratory liver motion in patients undergoing liver stereotactic body radiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to measure the changes in three-dimensional liver tumor motion with and without compression using cine-magnetic resonance imaging. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients treated as a part of an institutional research ethics board-approved liver stereotactic body radiotherapy protocol underwent cine T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging through the tumor centroid in the coronal and sagittal planes. A total of 240 cine-magnetic resonance imaging sequences acquired at one to three images each second for 30-60 s were evaluated using an in-house-developed template matching tool (based on the coefficient correlation) to measure the magnitude of the tumor motion. The average tumor edge displacements were used to determine the magnitude of changes in the caudal-cranial (CC) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, with and without AC. Results: The mean tumor motion without AC of 11.7 mm (range, 4.8-23.3) in the CC direction was reduced to 9.4 mm (range, 1.6-23.4) with AC. The tumor motion was reduced in both directions (CC and AP) in 52% of the patients and in a single direction (CC or AP) in 90% of the patients. The mean decrease in tumor motion with AC was 2.3 and 0.6 mm in the CC and AP direction, respectively. Increased motion occurred in one or more directions in 28% of patients. Clinically significant (>3 mm) decreases were observed in 40% and increases in <2% of patients in the CC direction. Conclusion: AC can significantly reduce three-dimensional liver tumor motion in most patients, although the magnitude of the reduction was smaller than previously reported.

  9. Acupuncture-Related Modulation of Pain-Associated Brain Networks During Electrical Pain Stimulation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gizewski, Elke R.; Wen, Ming; Rampp, Thomas; Gasser, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav J.; Forsting, Michael; Musial, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Findings of existing functional MRI (fMRI) studies on the neural mechanisms that mediate effects of acupuncture analgesia are inconsistent. This study analyzes the effects of manual acupuncture on pain ratings and brain activation in response to experimental, electrical pain stimuli. Design: Fourteen healthy volunteers were examined by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. The intensity of pain stimuli was adjusted to individual pain ratings on a numeric rating scale. Baseline fMRI was performed during electrical pain stimulation in a blocked design. For the second session, manual acupuncture with repeated stimulation was performed on contralateral acupoints—large intestine 4, liver 3, and stomach 36—before imaging. After imaging, subjective pain ratings and ratings of the de qi sensation were assessed. Results: Compared with baseline, volunteers showed modulated brain activity under pain conditions in the cingulate gyrus, insula, primary somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal areas after the acupuncture session. In accordance with the literature, anterior insular and prefrontal activity seemed to be correlated with acupuncture treatment. Conclusion: This study supports the existence of analgesic acupuncture effects that outlast the needling period. Pain-associated brain areas were modulated in direct response to a preceding acupuncture treatment. PMID:25389905

  10. Non-contrast MRA using an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery SSFP technique in pediatric abdominal imaging.

    PubMed

    Serai, Suraj; Towbin, Alexander J; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2012-03-01

    Abdominal contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) is routinely performed in children. CE-MRA is challenging in children because of patient motion, difficulty in obtaining intravenous access, and the inability of young patients to perform a breath-hold during imaging. The combination of pediatric-specific difficulties in imaging and the safety concerns regarding the risk of gadolinium-based contrast agents in patients with impaired renal function has renewed interest in the use of non-contrast (NC) MRA techniques. At our institution, we have optimized 3-D NC-MRA techniques for abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the utility of an inflow-enhanced, inversion recovery balanced steady-state free precession-based (b-SSFP) NC-MRA technique. PMID:22072071

  11. Solitary Painful Osseous Metastases: Correlation of Imaging Features with Pain Palliation after Radiofrequency Ablation—A Multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Guenette, Jeffrey P.; Lopez, Michael J.; Kim, Eunhee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the correlation of pre- and postablation imaging features with pain relief, pain intensity, and patient mood after radiofrequency (RF) ablation of solitary painful osseous metastases. Materials and Methods: This prospective, multicenter group trial was approved by each institutional review board. Participants were enrolled between November 1, 2001, and April 6, 2006. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects, and patient confidentiality protocols were followed in compliance with HIPAA. Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation and contrast material–enhanced 1-month follow-up CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging were performed in 49 subjects (24 men, 25 women; age range, 34–83 years) with a confirmed malignant solitary bone lesion of maximum dimension of 8 cm or smaller that was causing intractable pain. Pain intensity and patient mood were measured before and after RF ablation. Tumor imaging features were recorded. Unadjusted and adjusted linear mixed-effects models, with a random intercept for each subject, were used to model patient mood, pain relief, and pain intensity scores at three times after ablation as a function of each tumor characteristic. Results: Decreased postablation tumor pain correlated with preablation tumor volume (P = .02) and pathologic fracture (P = .01), while pain relief correlated with pathologic fracture (P = .03) and percentage of bone-tumor interface (BTI) ablated (P = .02). Conversely, presence of an irregular rim after ablation (P = .02) and rim thickness (P = .01) correlated with increased pain. There was no evidence in this study that RF ablation of larger tumor percentage or larger volume leads to better pain relief or decreased pain (P > .05). Conclusion: Existing pathologic fracture and smaller tumor size appear to be predictive parameters of success when selecting patients for palliative RF ablation of painful solitary osseous metastases. Successful palliation also appears to be related

  12. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0–1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  13. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H N; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-07-21

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy. PMID:27362636

  14. Diagnostic imaging of intra-abdominal cyst in heifer using the computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    OTOMARU, Konosuke; FUJIKAWA, Takuro; SAITO, Yasuo; ANDO, Takaaki; OBI, Takeshi; MIURA, Naoki; KUBOTA, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    A 10-month-old Japanese black heifer was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal cyst using computed tomography (CT). Through a posterior ventral midline incision, the cyst was removed, and the heifer completely recovered after the surgery. CT scans enabled detection of the intra-abdominal cyst and measurements of the diameter of the cyst before the surgery. PMID:25924971

  15. Pineal gland calcification, lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta calcifying atherosclerosis correlate in low back pain subjects: A cross-sectional observational CT study.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Sönmez, Iclal; Cakıt, Burcu Duyur; Koşar, Pınar; Koşar, Uğur

    2008-06-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional observational study was to assess the possible impact of pineal gland calcification upon the intervertebral disc degeneration and abdominal aorta atherosclerosis in subjects with low back pain, and to investigate the course of these processes with aging. The study was carried out on 81 (66 women and 15 men) subjects: younger than 45 years (group X, n=22), 45-65 years of age (group Y, n=45), and older than 65 years (group Z, n=14). In addition to clinical data, computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain as well as X-ray and CT examination of the lumbar spine were recorded in this study. The degree of disc degeneration and calcification rates of aortic wall and pineal gland were independently determined by two radiologists. Both ratio of calcified pineal gland and density of pineal calcification increased progressively with aging. Also, both the degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score increased with advancing age. On CT scan, a positive correlation between degree of aortic wall calcification and disc degeneration score was found (r=0.306, p<0.01). Importantly, there was a positive association between calcification of the pineal gland and degenerative disc disease in X-ray or CT study (r=0.378 and r=0.295, p<0.005 and p<0.01, respectively), as well as between abdominal aorta atherosclerosis and pineal calcification (r=0.634, p<0.001). Our findings suggest that there is a significant interaction between pineal gland calcification and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration and also abdominal aorta atherosclerosis. However, further studies with a larger subject cohorts are needed. PMID:18215511

  16. Effects of 2 Different Doses of Pregabalin on Morphine Consumption and Pain After Abdominal Hysterectomy: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Aytaç; Özturk, Erdoğan; Aydoğan, M. Said; Durmuş, Mahmut; Çolak, Cemil; Ersoy, M. Özcan

    2011-01-01

    Background Pregabalin has a similar pharmacologic profile to that of its developmental predecessor gabapentin but has shown greater analgesic activity in rodent models of neuropathic pain. Objective The objective of the study was to compare the effects of 2 different doses of pregabalin and placebo on postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Methods Ninety patients who underwent abdominal hysterectomy were included in the study and randomly divided into 3 groups in a doubled-blinded manner. They were given 150 mg of pregabalin (group P300, n = 30), 300 mg of pregabalin (group P600, n = 30), or placebo capsules (group C, n = 30) 4 hours before the induction of anesthesia; they received a second dose of the drug 12 hours postoperatively. Morphine consumption, nausea, and vomiting, visual analogue scale-pain intensity (VAS-PI), sedation scores, and dissatisfaction scores were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 2, 4, 6, and 24 hours after operation. Results Morphine consumption at 24 hours was 40.80 (3.42) mg, 33.79 (5.77) mg, and 46.97 (6.67) mg in groups P300, P600, and C, respectively (P < 0.001). VAS-PI scores at movement and at rest in the PACU and at 2, 4, and 6 hours decreased in group P600 (P < 0.01). In the PACU and at 2, 4, and 6 hours, the sedation scores were increased in group P600 compared with the scores in group C (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.01, P = 0.006, respectively). Patient satisfaction was higher in group P600 than in group C for all time points (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P = 0.001, P < 0.001, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups for side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and dizziness (P = 0.58). Conclusions Pregabalin at a total dose of 600 mg, administered before operation and at 12 hours postoperatively after abdominal hysterectomy, reduced morphine consumption and pain intensity and increased patient satisfaction. No significant differences in side effects were

  17. Multimodality Imaging of the Painful Elbow: Current Imaging Concepts and Image-Guided Treatments for the Injured Thrower's Elbow.

    PubMed

    Gustas, Cristy N; Lee, Kenneth S

    2016-09-01

    Elbow pain in overhead sport athletes is not uncommon. Repetitive throwing can lead to chronic overuse and/or acute injury to tendons, ligaments, bones, or nerves about the elbow. A thorough history and physical examination of the thrower's elbow frequently establishes the diagnosis for pain. Imaging can provide additional information when the clinical picture is unclear or further information is necessary for risk stratification and treatment planning. This article focuses on current imaging concepts and image-guided treatments for injuries commonly affecting the adult throwing athlete's elbow. PMID:27545422

  18. Vomiting and Hyponatremia Are Risk Factors for Worse Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Hospitalized Due to Nonsurgical Abdominal Pain: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Goren, Idan; Israel, Ariel; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin N; Kliers, Iris; Gringauz, Irina; Dagan, Amir; Lavi, Bruno; Segal, Omer; Segal, Gad

    2016-04-01

    After initial evaluation in the Emergency Department (ED), many patients complaining of abdominal pain are classified as suffering from nonsurgical abdominal pain (NSAP). Clinical characteristics and risk factors for worse prognosis were not published elsewhere.Characterizing the clinical profile of patients hospitalized due to NSAP and identifying predictor variables for worse clinical outcomes.We made a retrospective cohort analysis of patients hospitalized due to NSAP compared to matched control patients (for age, gender, and Charlson comorbidity index) hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons in a ratio of 1 to 10. We further performed in-group analysis of patients admitted due to NSAP in order to appreciate variables (clinical and laboratory parameters) potentially associated with worse clinical outcomes.Overall 23,584 patients were included, of which 2144 were admitted due to NSAP and 21,440 were matched controls. Patients admitted due to NSAP had overall better clinical outcomes: they had lower rates of in-hospital and 30-days mortality (2.8% vs 5.5% and 7.9% vs 10.4% respectively, P < 0.001 for both comparisons). They also had a significantly shorter length of hospital stay (3.9 vs 6.2 days, P < 0.001). Rates of re-hospitalization within 30-days were not significantly different between study groups. Among patients hospitalized due to NSAP, we found that vomiting or hyponatremia at presentation or during hospital stay were associated with worse clinical outcomes.Compared to patients hospitalized due to other, nonsurgical reasons, the overall prognosis of patients admitted due to NSAP is favorable. The combination of NSAP with vomiting and hyponatremia is associated with worse clinical outcomes. PMID:27057886

  19. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p<0.05). However, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ (G1) was not related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p>0.05). Conclusion Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain. PMID:25473637

  20. Registration of Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound to Tomographic Images of the Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Reidar; Iversen, Daniel Høyer; Tangen, Geir Arne; Dahl, Torbjørn

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an image-based method for registration of real-time 3-D ultrasound to computed tomography (CT) of the abdominal aorta, targeting future use in ultrasound-guided endovascular intervention. We proposed a method in which a surface model of the aortic wall was segmented from CT, and the approximate initial location of this model relative to the ultrasound volume was manually indicated. The model was iteratively transformed to automatically optimize correspondence to the ultrasound data. Feasibility was studied using data from a silicon phantom and in vivo data from a volunteer with previously acquired CT. Through visual evaluation, the ultrasound and CT data were seen to correspond well after registration. Both aortic lumen and branching arteries were well aligned. The processing was done offline, and the registration took approximately 0.2 s per ultrasound volume. The results encourage further patient studies to investigate accuracy, robustness and clinical value of the approach. PMID:27156015

  1. Correlation of pain with objective quantification of MR images in older adults with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Bernard P; Agarwal, Vikas; Boardman, John; Perera, Subashan; Weiner, Debra K; Vo, Nam; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional study. Objective The goal of this study is to identify relationships between objectively measured and subjectively scored parameters and reported pain. Summary of Background Data Studies have demonstrated the unreliability of MRI based parameters to identify pathological pain generators of chronic low back pain patients, but they were based on visual inspection and subjective assessment of lumbar disc features. Advancements in computer image analysis provide objective measurements of lumbar disc features. Methods Two radiologists evaluated 39 axial and sagittal T1 and T2 weighted MRI images of chronic axial low back pain patients (age > 65 years) and graded 4 subjective lumbar disc parameters (T2 signal intensity, nucleus shape, Modic changes, and osteophyte formation) whose sum is the cumulative MRI score. Objective parameter, MRIindex, was calculated as the product of the measured lumbar disc area and total disc MRI signal intensity. Discs were sorted from least to most degenerated relative to each parameter. Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple linear regression analysis were performed between the reported pain score and each parameter. Results The most and least degenerated discs in each patient, as assessed by MRIindex, had the highest negative and positive correlation coefficient and regression weight contribution respectively. All subjective parameters had low correlation coefficients and regression goodness of fit. Conclusion Although limited by small sample size, the objective parameter, MRIindex, can be a potential imaging biomarker used to identify possible pain generators. This study presents a potential new application of MR imaging in identifying pain generators of chronic low back pain patients. PMID:24384652

  2. Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Blood Flow in the Microvasculature of Abdominal Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truica, Loredana Sorina

    In this thesis, water diffusion in human liver and placenta is studied using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. For short, randomly oriented vascular segments, intravascular water motion is diffusion-like. For tissues with large vascular compartments the diffusion decay is bi-exponential with one component corresponding to diffusing water and the other to water in the microvasculature. This model, known as the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model, is seldom used with abdominal organs because of motion artifacts. This limitation was overcome for the experiments reported here by introducing: 1) parallel imaging, 2) navigator echo respiratory triggering (NRT), 3) a double echo diffusion sequence that inherently compensates for eddy current effects, 4) SPAIR fat suppression and 5) a superior approach to image analysis. In particular, the use of NRT allowed us to use a free breathing protocol instead of the previously required breath hold protocol. The resulting DWI images were of high quality and motion artifact free. Diffusion decays were measured over a larger portion of the decay than had previously been reported and the results are considerably better than those previously reported. For both studies, reliable measurements of the diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D) and perfusion fraction (f), were obtained using a region of interest analysis as well as a pixel-by-pixel approach. To within experimental error, all patients had the same values of D (1.10 mum 2/ms +/- 0.16 mum2/ms), D* (46 mum2/ms +/- 17 mum2/ms) and f (44.0% +/- 6.9%) in liver and D (1.8 mum 2/ms +/- 0.2 mum2/ms), D* (30 mum 2/ms +/- 12 mmu2/ms), and f (40% +/- 6%) in the placenta. No dependence on gestational age was found for the placental study. Parametric maps of f and D* were consistent with blood flow patterns in both systems. The model worked well for both investigated organs even though their anatomical structures are quite different. A method for

  3. Sex differences in trauma symptoms, body image and intensity of pain in a Polish sample of patients suffering from chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Rzeszutek, Marcin; Oniszczenko, Włodzimierz; Schier, Katarzyna; Biernat-Kałuża, Edyta; Gasik, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The main goal of the current study was to investigate sex differences in the relationship between the level of trauma symptoms appearing in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and intensity of pain in a sample of 300 Polish patients suffering from chronic pain, specifically rheumatoid arthritis and lower back pain. We also focused on participants' body image with body esteem as a mediator. To assess the intensity of pain among participants, we used the Numerical Rating Scale. The level of trauma symptoms was assessed with the PTSD Factorial Version Inventory. To measure body image among participants, we used the Body Esteem Scale. The results of our study suggest that trauma symptoms and body image dimensions were significant predictors of pain intensity among men suffering from chronic pain. Moreover, trauma symptoms and age were significant predictors of pain intensity among women suffering from chronic pain. Finally, we demonstrated that sex differentiates the reaction to chronic pain. PMID:26609737

  4. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  5. On-line MR imaging for dose validation of abdominal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Glitzner, M; Crijns, S P M; de Senneville, B Denis; Kontaxis, C; Prins, F M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2015-11-21

    For quality assurance and adaptive radiotherapy, validation of the actual delivered dose is crucial.Intrafractional anatomy changes cannot be captured satisfactorily during treatment with hitherto available imaging modalitites. Consequently, dose calculations are based on the assumption of static anatomy throughout the treatment. However, intra- and interfraction anatomy is dynamic and changes can be significant.In this paper, we investigate the use of an MR-linac as a dose tracking modality for the validation of treatments in abdominal targets where both respiratory and long-term peristaltic and drift motion occur.The on-line MR imaging capability of the modality provides the means to perform respiratory gating of both delivery and acquisition yielding a model-free respiratory motion management under free breathing conditions.In parallel to the treatment, the volumetric patient anatomy was captured and used to calculate the applied dose. Subsequently, the individual doses were warped back to the planning grid to obtain the actual dose accumulated over the entire treatment duration. Ultimately, the planned dose was validated by comparison with the accumulated dose.Representative for a site subject to breathing modulation, two kidney cases (25 Gy target dose) demonstrated the working principle on volunteer data and simulated delivery. The proposed workflow successfully showed its ability to track local dosimetric changes. Integration of the on-line anatomy information could reveal local dose variations  -2.3-1.5 Gy in the target volume of a volunteer dataset. In the adjacent organs at risk, high local dose errors ranging from  -2.5 to 1.9 Gy could be traced back. PMID:26531846

  6. On-line MR imaging for dose validation of abdominal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; Crijns, S. P. M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Kontaxis, C.; Prins, F. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    For quality assurance and adaptive radiotherapy, validation of the actual delivered dose is crucial. Intrafractional anatomy changes cannot be captured satisfactorily during treatment with hitherto available imaging modalitites. Consequently, dose calculations are based on the assumption of static anatomy throughout the treatment. However, intra- and interfraction anatomy is dynamic and changes can be significant. In this paper, we investigate the use of an MR-linac as a dose tracking modality for the validation of treatments in abdominal targets where both respiratory and long-term peristaltic and drift motion occur. The on-line MR imaging capability of the modality provides the means to perform respiratory gating of both delivery and acquisition yielding a model-free respiratory motion management under free breathing conditions. In parallel to the treatment, the volumetric patient anatomy was captured and used to calculate the applied dose. Subsequently, the individual doses were warped back to the planning grid to obtain the actual dose accumulated over the entire treatment duration. Ultimately, the planned dose was validated by comparison with the accumulated dose. Representative for a site subject to breathing modulation, two kidney cases (25 Gy target dose) demonstrated the working principle on volunteer data and simulated delivery. The proposed workflow successfully showed its ability to track local dosimetric changes. Integration of the on-line anatomy information could reveal local dose variations  -2.3-1.5 Gy in the target volume of a volunteer dataset. In the adjacent organs at risk, high local dose errors ranging from  -2.5 to 1.9 Gy could be traced back.

  7. Coexistence of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm and aggravated intervertebral disc extrusion -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nan Seol; Kang, Sung Hyun; Park, Sun Young

    2013-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is included in the differential diagnosis of lower back pain. Although rare, this important disease can cause potentially lethal complications. In this case, expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm coexisted with intervertebral disc extrusion. The diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm was delayed, putting the patient at risk of aneurysmal rupture. In the management of patients with degenerative spinal diseases, we should not overlook the possibility of comorbidities such as an abdominal aortic aneurysm. We also suggest the importance of interpreting images more carefully, especially for elderly male patients. PMID:24228150

  8. Beyond patient reported pain: perfusion magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates reproducible cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew A; Krause, Kristina; Khawaja, Nadine; Massat, Nathalie; Zelaya, Fernando; Schumann, Gunter; Huggins, John P; Vennart, William; Williams, Steven C R; Renton, Tara F

    2011-01-01

    Development of treatments for acute and chronic pain conditions remains a challenge, with an unmet need for improved sensitivity and reproducibility in measuring pain in patients. Here we used pulsed-continuous arterial spin-labelling [pCASL], a relatively novel perfusion magnetic-resonance imaging technique, in conjunction with a commonly-used post-surgical model, to measure changes in regional cerebral blood flow [rCBF] associated with the experience of being in ongoing pain. We demonstrate repeatable, reproducible assessment of ongoing pain that is independent of patient self-report. In a cross-over trial design, 16 participants requiring bilateral removal of lower-jaw third molars underwent pain-free pre-surgical pCASL scans. Following extraction of either left or right tooth, repeat scans were acquired during post-operative ongoing pain. When pain-free following surgical recovery, the pre/post-surgical scanning procedure was repeated for the remaining tooth. Voxelwise statistical comparison of pre and post-surgical scans was performed to reveal rCBF changes representing ongoing pain. In addition, rCBF values in predefined pain and control brain regions were obtained. rCBF increases (5-10%) representing post-surgical ongoing pain were identified bilaterally in a network including primary and secondary somatosensory, insula and cingulate cortices, thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain and brainstem (including trigeminal ganglion and principal-sensory nucleus), but not in a control region in visual cortex. rCBF changes were reproducible, with no rCBF differences identified across scans within-session or between post-surgical pain sessions. This is the first report of the cerebral representation of ongoing post-surgical pain without the need for exogenous tracers. Regions of rCBF increases are plausibly associated with pain and the technique is reproducible, providing an attractive proposition for testing interventions for on-going pain that do not rely solely

  9. A Novel Multiinstance Learning Approach for Liver Cancer Recognition on Abdominal CT Images Based on CPSO-SVM and IO

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Dehui

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy. PMID:24368931

  10. A new method for detecting colonic polyps based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Nakada, Yuichi; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Takayama, Tetsuji; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Nawano, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for detecting colonic polyps from abdominal CT images based on Hessian matrix analysis. Recently, virtual colonoscopy (VC) has widely received attention as a new and less-invasive colon diagnostic method. A physician diagnoses the inside of the colon using a virtual colonoscopy system. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, a physician has to change viewpoints and viewing directions of the virtual camera many times while diagnosing. Lesions behind haustra may be overlooked. Thus this paper proposes an automated colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images. Colonic polyps are located on the colonic wall, and their CT values are higher than colonic lumen regions. In addition, CT values inside polyps tend to gradually increase from outward to inward (blob-like structure). We employ a blob structure enhancement filter based on the eigenvalues of a Hessian matrix to detect polyps with the above blob-shaped characteristics. For reducing FPs, we eliminate polyp candidate regions in which the maximum output value of the blob structure enhancement filter is smaller than given threshold values. Also small regions are removed from candidates. We applied the proposed method to 23 cases of abdominal CT images. Overall, 74.4% of the polyps were detected with 3.8 FPs per case.

  11. [Abdominal splenosis: an often underdiagnosed entity].

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Bello-Arqués, P; Pelegrí-Martínez, L; Hervás-Benito, I; Loaiza-Góngora, J L; Falgas-Lacueva, M; Ruiz-Llorca, C; Pérez-Velasco, R; Mateo-Navarro, A

    2011-01-01

    Splenosis is defined as the heterotopic autotransplantation of splenic tissue because of a ruptured spleen due to trauma or surgery. It is a benign and incidental finding, although imaging tests may sometimes orient toward malignancy simulating renal tumors, abdominal lymphomas, endometriosis, among other. We report the case of a 42-year old male in whom a MRI was performed after a study due to abdominal pain. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed in the abdomen, suggestive of lymphoproliferative disease. As an important background, splenectomy was carried out due to abdominal trauma at age 9. After several studies, it was decided to perform a (99m)Tc-labeled heat-damaged red blood cell scintigraphy that showed multiple pathological deposits distributed throughout the abdomen, and even the pelvis, being consistent with splenosis. PMID:20570413

  12. Fifty Years of Technological Innovation: Potential and Limitations of Current Technologies in Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Morelli, John; Budjan, Johannes; Henzler, Thomas; Sourbron, Steven; Bock, Michael; Riffel, Philipp; Hernando, Diego; Ong, Melissa M; Schoenberg, Stefan O

    2015-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important modality for the diagnosis of intra-abdominal pathology. Hardware and pulse sequence developments have made it possible to derive not only morphologic but also functional information related to organ perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), oxygen saturation (blood oxygen level dependent), tissue cellularity (diffusion-weighted imaging), and tissue composition (spectroscopy). These techniques enable a more specific assessment of pathologic lesions and organ functionality. Magnetic resonance imaging has thus transitioned from a purely morphologic examination to a modality from which image-based disease biomarkers can be derived. This fits well with several emerging trends in radiology, such as the need to accurately assess response to costly treatment strategies and the need to improve lesion characterization to potentially avoid biopsy. Meanwhile, the cost-effectiveness, availability, and robustness of computed tomography (CT) ensure its place as the current workhorse for clinical imaging. Although the lower soft tissue contrast of CT relative to MRI is a long-standing limitation, other disadvantages such as ionizing radiation exposure have become a matter of public concern. Nevertheless, recent technical developments such as dual-energy CT or dynamic volume perfusion CT also provide more functional imaging beyond morphology.The aim of this article was to review and discuss the most important recent technical developments in abdominal MRI and state-of-the-art CT, with an eye toward the future, providing examples of their clinical utility for the evaluation of hepatic and renal pathologies. PMID:26039773

  13. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cellular Inflammation in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    McBride, O.M.B.; Joshi, N.V.; Robson, J.M.J.; MacGillivray, T.J.; Gray, C.D.; Fletcher, A.M.; Dweck, M.R.; van Beek, E.J.R.; Rudd, J.H.F.; Newby, D.E.; Semple, S.I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation is critical in the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease. Combined 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET-CT) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide (USPIO)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive methods of assessing tissue inflammation. The aim of this study was to compare these techniques in patients with AAA. Materials and methods Fifteen patients with asymptomatic AAA with diameter 46 ± 7 mm underwent PET-CT with 18F-FDG, and T2*-weighted MRI before and 24 hours after administration of USPIO. The PET-CT and MRI data were then co-registered. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated to measure 18F-FDG activity, and USPIO uptake was determined using the change in R2*. Comparisons between the techniques were made using a quadrant analysis and a voxel-by-voxel evaluation. Results When all areas of the aneurysm were evaluated, there was a modest correlation between the SUV on PET-CT and the change in R2* on USPIO-enhanced MRI (n = 70,345 voxels; r = .30; p < .0001). Although regions of increased 18F-FDG and USPIO uptake co-localised on occasion, this was infrequent (kappa statistic 0.074; 95% CI 0.026–0.122). 18F-FDG activity was commonly focused in the shoulder region whereas USPIO uptake was more apparent in the main body of the aneurysm. Maximum SUV was lower in patients with mural USPIO uptake. Conclusions Both 18F-FDG PET-CT and USPIO-MRI uptake identify vascular inflammation associated with AAA. Although they demonstrate a modest correlation, there are distinct differences in the pattern and distribution of uptake, suggesting a differential detection of macrophage glycolytic and phagocytic activity respectively. PMID:26919936

  14. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  15. Pain relief for infants undergoing abdominal surgery: comparison of infusions of i.v. morphine and extradural bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Wolf, A R; Hughes, D

    1993-01-01

    We have undertaken a prospective, randomized double-blind study to compare extradural bupivacaine infusions with i.v. morphine infusions for postoperative analgesia in 32 infants younger than 4 yr undergoing abdominal surgery. "Sham" extradural or i.v. catheters were used to maintain the blinded nature of the study. Both techniques provided adequate analgesia for most of the 36-h postoperative period; differences in the pattern or quality of the analgesia were not detected. Patients in the i.v. morphine group were significantly more sedated; this was accompanied by slower ventilatory frequencies (26.7 (SD 1.8) b.p.m.) compared with the extradural group (33.6 (1.3) b.p.m.). Similarly, oxygen saturation was significantly less (P < 0.01) in patients receiving morphine (medians and quartiles of 94.0 (93-96)% compared with 96.0 (93-96)%). Mean systolic arterial pressure was similar in the two groups and there were no life-threatening complications. The lack of sedation was troublesome in three patients in the extradural group. PMID:8431313

  16. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abdominal Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91– ... are abdominal adhesions and intestinal obstructions ... generally do not require treatment. Surgery is the only way to treat abdominal ...

  17. [Abdominal pregnancy, institutional experience].

    PubMed

    Bonfante Ramírez, E; Bolaños Ancona, R; Simón Pereyra, L; Juárez García, L; García-Benitez, C Q

    1998-07-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare entity, which has been classified as primary or secondary by Studiford criteria. A retrospective study, between January 1989 and December 1994, realized at Instituto Nacional de Perinatología, found 35,080 pregnancies, from which 149 happened to be ectopic, and 6 of them were abdominal. All patients belonged to a low income society class, age between 24 and 35 years, and average of gestations in 2.6. Gestational age varied from 15 weeks to 32.2 weeks having only one delivery at term with satisfactory postnatal evolution. One patient had a recurrent abdominal pregnancy, with genital Tb as a conditional factor. Time of hospitalization varied from 4 to 5 days, and no further patient complications were reported. Fetal loss was estimated in 83.4%. Abdominal pregnancy is often the sequence of a tubarian ectopic pregnancy an when present, it has a very high maternal mortality reported in world literature, not found in this study. The stated frequency of abdominal pregnancy is from 1 of each 3372, up to 1 in every 10,200 deliveries, reporting in the study 1 abdominal pregnancy in 5846 deliveries. The study had two characteristic entities one, the recurrence and two, the delivery at term of one newborn. Abdominal pregnancy accounts for 4% of all ectopic pregnancies. Clinical findings in abdominal pregnancies are pain, transvaginal bleeding and amenorrea, being the cardinal signs of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:9737070

  18. Incidental discovery of a chronically thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chris Y; Rectenwald, John E

    2015-07-01

    Chronic spontaneously thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are rare. We present a patient with a completely thrombosed abdominal aortic aneurysm found incidentally on imaging for evaluation of unrelated abdominal pain. The patient was asymptomatic with regards to the aneurysm due to extensive collateralization of the intercostal and lumbar arteries to the bilateral hypogastric and internal mammary arteries to the common femoral arteries bilaterally. Follow-up imaging after 10 months showed no aneurysmal change. Further study is needed regarding indications for elective repair, medical therapy, and surveillance modality and schedule for patients with chronically occluded AAAs as these patients are at risk for aneurysm rupture and thrombus propagation. PMID:25770381

  19. An unusual case of retained abdominal pregnancy for 36 years in a postmenopausal woman

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Kajal Ramendranath; Ratnaparkhi, Chetana Ramesh; Gedam, Bapuji Shrawan; Tayade, Kushal Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy which occurs due to ruptured uterine or tubal pregnancy into the abdomen. Fetal loss is a common complication of these pregnancies and patient presents with acute abdominal pain which is a surgical emergency. Another rare but established complication of this ectopic pregnancy is fetal demise with the dead fetus being retained in the abdomen. It gets macerated and mummified over a period of time and is mostly detected incidentally during imaging. Radiological imaging has hallmark appearances of such a macerated fetus showing multiple fetal parts embedded in a calcified sac termed as lithopedion or stone baby. We report a unique case of retained abdominal pregnancy for 36 years in a 60-year-old postmenopausal female presented with abdominal pain and difficulty in micturition. Computed tomography showed multiple fetal bones in the abdomen surrounded by a membrane which was surprisingly not calcified. PMID:26539374

  20. Systematic review of blunt abdominal trauma as a cause of acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Toumi, Zaher; Chan, Anthony; Hadfield, Matthew B; Hulton, Neil R

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acute appendicitis commonly presents as an acute abdomen. Cases of acute appendicitis caused by blunt abdominal trauma are rare. We present a systematic review of appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma. The aim of this review was to collate and report the clinical presentations and experience of such cases. SUBJECTS AND METHODS A literature review was performed using PubMed, Embase and Medline and the keywords ‘appendicitis’, ‘abdominal’ and ‘trauma’. RESULTS The initial search returned 381 papers, of which 17 articles were included. We found 28 cases of acute appendicitis secondary to blunt abdominal trauma reported in the literature between 1991 and 2009. Mechanisms of injury included road-traffic accidents, falls, assaults and accidents. Presenting symptoms invariably included abdominal pain, but also nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Only 12 patients had computed tomography scans and 10 patients had ultrasonography. All reported treatment was surgical and positive for appendicitis. CONCLUSIONS Although rare, the diagnosis of acute appendicitis must be considered following direct abdominal trauma especially if the patient complains of abdominal right lower quadrant pain, nausea and anorexia. Haemodynamically stable patients who present shortly after blunt abdominal trauma with right lower quadrant pain and tenderness should undergo urgent imaging with a plan to proceed to appendicectomy if the imaging suggested an inflammatory process within the right iliac fossa. PMID:20513274

  1. Imaging Tests for Lower Back Pain: When You Need Them -- and When You Don't

    MedlinePlus

    ... an imaging test right away. Talk to your doctor if you have back pain with any of the following symptoms: Weight loss ... few weeks, you may want to ask your doctor about other treatments for lower-back pain. Treatments include: Physical therapy Chiropractic care Acupuncture Yoga ...

  2. Sclerotic Vertebral Metastases: Pain Palliation Using Percutaneous Image-Guided Cryoablation

    SciTech Connect

    Costa de Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Menezes, Marcos Roberto de; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Cryoablative therapies have been proposed to palliate pain from soft-tissue or osteolytic bone tumors. A case of a patient with painful thoracic and sacral spine sclerotic metastases successfully treated by image-guided percutaneous cryoablation with the aid of insulation techniques and thermosensors is reported in this case report.

  3. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Splenic Enlargement Using Wave Pattern of Spleen in Abdominal CT Images: Initial Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Won; Cho, June-Sik; Noh, Seung-Moo; Park, Jong-Won

    In general, the spleen accompanied by abnormal abdomen is hypertrophied. However, if the spleen size is originally small, it is hard to detect the splenic enlargement due to abnormal abdomen by simply measure the size. On the contrary, the spleen size of a person having a normal abdomen may be large by nature. Therefore, measuring the size of spleen is not a reliable diagnostic measure of its enlargement or the abdomen abnormality. This paper proposes an automatic method to diagnose the splenic enlargement due to abnormality, by examining the boundary pattern of spleen in abdominal CT images.

  4. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Parameters across MR Imagers and Field Strengths: Evaluation in Upper Abdominal Organs.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Donati, Olivio F; Froehlich, Johannes M; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine the reproducibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters measured in upper abdominal organs with magnetic resonance (MR) imagers from different vendors and with different field strengths. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the independent ethics committees of Kanton Bern and Kanton Zurich, and signed informed consent was obtained from all participants. Abdominal diffusion-weighted images in 10 healthy men (mean age, 37 years ± 8 [standard deviation]) were acquired by using 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imagers from three different vendors. Two readers independently delineated regions of interest that were used to measure IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient [Dt], perfusion fraction [Fp], and pseudodiffusion coefficient [Dp]) in the left and right lobes of the liver, and in the pancreas, spleen, renal cortex, and renal medulla. Measurement reproducibility between readers was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Variability across MR imagers was analyzed by using between- and within-subject coefficients of variation (CVs) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Between-reader reproducibility was high for Dt (ICC, 94.6%), intermediate for Fp (ICC, 81.7%), and low for Dp (ICC, 69.5%). Between- and within-subject CVs of Dt were relatively high (>20%) in the left lobe of the liver and relatively low (<10%) in the renal cortex and renal medulla. CVs generally exceeded 15% for Fp values and 20% for Dp. ANOVA indicated significant differences (P < .05) between MR imagers. Conclusion IVIM parameters in the upper abdomen may differ substantially across MR imagers. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26678455

  5. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  6. Hemodynamic Changes Quantified in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with Increasing Exercise Intensity Using MR Exercise Imaging and Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Ga-Young; Les, Andrea S.; Tenforde, Adam S.; Shadden, Shawn C.; Spilker, Ryan L.; Yeung, Janice J.; Cheng, Christopher P.; Herfkens, Robert J.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Taylor, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a vascular disease resulting in a permanent, localized enlargement of the abdominal aorta. We previously hypothesized that the progression of AAA may be slowed by altering the hemodynamics in the abdominal aorta through exercise. To quantify the effect of exercise intensity on hemodynamic conditions in 10 AAA subjects at rest and during mild and moderate intensities of lower-limb exercise (defined as 33 ± 10% and 63 ± 18% increase above resting heart rate, respectively), we used magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics techniques. Subject-specific models were constructed from magnetic resonance angiography data and physiologic boundary conditions were derived from measurements made during dynamic exercise. We measured the abdominal aortic blood flow at rest and during exercise, and quantified mean wall shear stress (MWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and particle residence time (PRT). We observed that an increase in the level of activity correlated with an increase of MWSS and a decrease of OSI at three locations in the abdominal aorta, and these changes were most significant below the renal arteries. As the level of activity increased, PRT in the aneurysm was significantly decreased: 50% of particles were cleared out of AAAs within 1.36 ± 0.43, 0.34 ± 0.10, and 0.22 ± 0.06 s at rest, mild exercise, and moderate exercise levels, respectively. Most of the reduction of PRT occurred from rest to the mild exercise level, suggesting that mild exercise may be sufficient to reduce flow stasis in AAAs. PMID:21509633

  7. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  8. Measuring the Pain Area: An Intra- and Inter-Rater Reliability Study Using Image Analysis Software.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Felipe Jose Jandre; de Barros E Silva, Veronica; de Lucena, Raphaela Nunes; Mendes Cardoso, Bruno Alexandre; Nogueira, Leandro Calazans

    2016-01-01

    Pain drawings have frequently been used for clinical information and research. The aim of this study was to investigate intra- and inter-rater reliability of area measurements performed on pain drawings. Our secondary objective was to verify the reliability when using computers with different screen sizes, both with and without mouse hardware. Pain drawings were completed by patients with chronic neck pain or neck-shoulder-arm pain. Four independent examiners participated in the study. Examiners A and B used the same computer with a 16-inch screen and wired mouse hardware. Examiner C used a notebook with a 16-inch screen and no mouse hardware, and Examiner D used a computer with an 11.6-inch screen and a wireless mouse. Image measurements were obtained using GIMP and NIH ImageJ computer programs. The length of all the images was measured using GIMP software to a set scale in ImageJ. Thus, each marked area was encircled and the total surface area (cm(2) ) was calculated for each pain drawing measurement. A total of 117 areas were identified and 52 pain drawings were analyzed. The intrarater reliability between all examiners was high (ICC = 0.989). The inter-rater reliability was also high. No significant differences were observed when using different screen sizes or when using or not using the mouse hardware. This suggests that the precision of these measurements is acceptable for the use of this method as a measurement tool in clinical practice and research. PMID:25490926

  9. Quantification of Particle Residence Time in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Ga-Young; Les, Andrea S.; Tenforde, Adam S.; Shadden, Shawn C.; Spilker, Ryan L.; Yeung, Janice J.; Cheng, Christopher P.; Herfkens, Robert J.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Taylor, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Hemodynamic conditions are hypothesized to affect the initiation, growth, and rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), a vascular disease characterized by progressive wall degradation and enlargement of the abdominal aorta. This study aims to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to quantify flow stagnation and recirculation in eight AAAs by computing particle residence time (PRT). Specifically, we used gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography to obtain images of the vessel lumens, which were used to generate subject-specific models. We also used phase-contrast MRI to measure blood flow at supraceliac and infrarenal locations to prescribe physiologic boundary conditions. CFD was used to simulate pulsatile flow, and PRT, particle residence index, and particle half-life of PRT in the aneurysms were computed. We observed significant regional differences of PRT in the aneurysms with localized patterns that differed depending on aneurysm geometry and infrarenal flow. A bulbous aneurysm with the lowest mean infrarenal flow demonstrated the slowest particle clearance. In addition, improvements in particle clearance were observed with increase of mean infrarenal flow. We postulate that augmentation of mean infrarenal flow during exercise may reduce chronic flow stasis that may influence mural thrombus burden, degradation of the vessel wall, and aneurysm growth. PMID:21103933

  10. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  11. Abdominal mass

    MedlinePlus

    ... Several conditions can cause an abdominal mass: Abdominal aortic aneurysm can cause a pulsating mass around the navel. ... This could be a sign of a ruptured aortic aneurysm, which is an emergency condition. Contact your health ...

  12. Large Abdominal Wall Endometrioma Following Laparoscopic Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borncamp, Erik; Mehaffey, Philip; Rotman, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis is a common condition in women that affects up to 45% of patients in the reproductive age group by causing pelvic pain. It is characterized by the presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity and is rarely found subcutaneously or in abdominal incisions, causing it to be overlooked in patients with abdominal pain. Methods: A 45-year-old woman presented with lower abdominal pain 2 years following a laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. She was found to have incidental cholelithiasis and a large abdominal mass suggestive of a significant ventral hernia on CT scan. Results: Due to the peculiar presentation, surgical intervention took place that revealed a large 9cm×7.6cm×6.2cm abdominal wall endometrioma. Conclusion: Although extrapelvic endometriosis is rare, it should be entertained in the differential diagnosis for the female patient who presents with an abdominal mass and pain and has a previous surgical history. PMID:21902990

  13. Functional imaging and the neural systems of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Sean C; Maeda, Fumiko

    2004-07-01

    Pain remains a serious health care problem affecting millions of individuals, costing billions of dollars, and causing an immeasurable amount of human suffering. In designing improved therapies, there is still much to learn about peripheral nociceptor, nerves, and the spinal cord, and brain stem modulatory systems. Nevertheless, it is the brain that presents us with an incredible opportunity to understand the experience we call pain. Functional neuroimaging is helping to unlock the secrets of the sensory and emotional components of pain and its autonomic responses. These techniques are helping us to understand that pain is not a static disease with the pathologic findings localized to the periphery but is instead a highly plastic condition affecting multiple central neural systems. Functional neuroimaging is transforming our understanding of the neurobiology of pain and will be instrumental in helping us to design more rational treatments ultimately aimed at reducing the impact of pain on our patients. It is opening windows into the function of the brain that were previously closed. PMID:15246336

  14. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  15. Successful multiple-step management of intravenous leiomyomatosis diagnosed after episode of acute abdominal pain: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiadis, Christoforos; Petousis, Stamatios; Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Tzouveleki, Ioanna; Margioula-Siarkou, Chrysoula; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We present the case of a 37-year old woman diagnosed with intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) that was managed uneventfully with multiple-step management. Presentation of case A 37-year-old woman was admitted because of acute abdominal pain. Emergency Computed Tomography demonstrated a big pelvic mass 5 × 15 cm of heterogenous composition intaking the contrast agent. Total hysterectomy with salpingoophorectomy was proposed to patient, however, patient expressed her will for fertility preservation and gave consent only for the resection of a single ovary. Laparotomy revealed the presence of myoma, multiple lesions of potential adenomyosis and cordon-shaped formations arising from uterus and extending mainly to left ovary. Final histological diagnosis was intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL). MRI angiography revealed the presence of residual lesions in inferior vena cava. Laparoscopic resection was performed one month after laparotomy and left ovary was resected without complications. Venovenous bypass was finally performed three months later from initial surgery. The process was significantly labored, resulted in the successful resection of intravenous lesions but was complicated intraoperatively by right kidney rupture. After a follow-up of 33 months, case remains uncomplicated without signs or symptoms of potential recurrence. Discussion Intravenous leiomyomatosis represents a rare clinical entity histologically bening but clinically aggressive. No consensus exists regarding the optimal management, especially in cases with initial will for fertility preservation. Conclusion IVL represents a rare clinical entity often presenting difficulties in diagnosis and optimal treatment. Large case-series studies should be encouraged to assess the optimal management. PMID:26282558

  16. Idiopathic Focal Eosinophilic Enteritis (IFEE), an Emerging Cause of Abdominal Pain in Horses: The Effect of Age, Time and Geographical Location on Risk

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Debra C.; Costain, Deborah A.; Sherlock, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic focal eosinophilic enteritis (IFEE) is an emerging cause of abdominal pain (colic) in horses that frequently requires surgical intervention to prevent death. The epidemiology of IFEE is poorly understood and it is difficult to diagnose pre-operatively. The aetiology of this condition and methods of possible prevention are currently unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate temporal and spatial heterogeneity in IFEE risk and to ascertain the effect of horse age on risk. Methodology/Principal Findings A retrospective, nested case-control study was undertaken using data from 85 IFEE cases and 848 randomly selected controls admitted to a UK equine hospital for exploratory laparotomy to investigate the cause of colic over a 10-year period. Generalised additive models (GAMs) were used to quantify temporal and age effects on the odds of IFEE and to provide mapped estimates of ‘residual’ risk over the study region. The relative risk of IFEE increased over the study period (p = 0.001) and a seasonal pattern was evident (p<0.01) with greatest risk of IFEE being identified between the months of July and November. IFEE risk decreased with increasing age (p<0.001) with younger (0–5 years old) horses being at greatest risk. The mapped surface estimate exhibited significantly atypical sub-regions (p<0.001) with increased IFEE risk in horses residing in the North-West of the study region. Conclusions/Significance IFEE was found to exhibit both spatial and temporal variation in risk and is more likely to occur in younger horses. This information may help to identify horses at increased risk of IFEE, provide clues about the aetiology of this condition and to identify areas that require further research. PMID:25463382

  17. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  18. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  19. The study of pain with blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibinson, James W.

    Using blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD FMRI), the brain areas activated by pain were studied. These initial studies led to interesting new findings about the body's response to pain and to the refinement of one method used in FMRI analysis for correction of physiologic noise (signal fluctuations caused by the cyclic and non-cyclic changes in the cardiovascular and respiratory status of the body). In the first study, evidence was provided suggesting that the multiple painful stimulations used in typical pain FMRI block designs may cause attenuation over time of the BOLD signal within activated areas. The effect this may have on pain investigations using multiple tasks has not been previously investigated. The demonstrated BOLD attenuation seems unique to pain studies. Several possible explanations exist, but two of the most likely are neural activity modulation by descending pain inhibitory mechanisms and changing hemodynamics caused by a physiologic response to pain. The second study began the investigation of hemodynamics by monitoring the physiologic response to pain for eight subjects in two phases. Phase one used a combination of standard operating suite monitors and research equipment to characterizing the physiologic response to pain. Phase two collected magnetic resonance quantitative flow images during painful nerve stimulation to test for changes in global cerebral blood flow. It is well established that changes in respiration and global blood flow can affect the BOLD response, leading to the final investigation of this dissertation. The brain activation induced by pain for the same eight subjects used in the physiologic response experiments described above was then studied by BOLD FMRI. By including the respiration signal and end-tidal carbon dioxide levels in the analysis of the images, the quantification and removal of image intensity variations correlated to breathing and end-tidal carbon dioxide changes could be

  20. What is the preferred strength setting of the sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm in abdominal CT imaging?

    PubMed

    Hardie, Andrew D; Nelson, Rachel M; Egbert, Robert; Rieter, William J; Tipnis, Sameer V

    2015-01-01

    Our primary objective in this study was to determine the preferred strength setting for the sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction algorithm (SAFIRE) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) imaging. Sixteen consecutive clinical CT scans of the abdomen were reconstructed by use of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and 5 SAFIRE strengths: S1-S5. Six readers of differing experience were asked to rank the images on preference for overall diagnostic quality. The contrast-to-noise ratio was not significantly different between SAFIRE S1 and FBP, but increased with increasing SAFIRE strength. For pooled data, S2 and S3 were preferred equally but both were preferred over all other reconstructions. S5 was the least preferred, with FBP the next least preferred. This represents a marked disparity between the image quality based on quantitative parameters and qualitative preference. Care should be taken to factor in qualitative in addition to quantitative aspects of image quality when one is optimizing iterative reconstruction images. PMID:25164978

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Changes in Abdominal Compartments in Obese Diabetics during a Low-Calorie Weight-Loss Program

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lena J.; Steveling, Antje; Meffert, Peter J.; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Kessler, Rebecca; Hosten, Norbert; Krüger, Janine; Gärtner, Simone; Aghdassi, Ali A.; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate changes in the fat content of abdominal compartments and muscle area during weight loss using confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in overweight diabetics. Methods Twenty-nine obese diabetics (10/19 men/women, median age: 59.0 years, median body mass index (BMI): 34.0 kg/m2) prospectively joined a standardized 15-week weight-loss program (six weeks of formula diet exclusively, followed by reintroduction of regular food with gradually increasing energy content over nine weeks) over 15 weeks. All subjects underwent a standardized MRI protocol including a confounder-adjusted chemical-shift-encoded MR sequence with water/fat separation before the program as well at the end of the six weeks of formula diet and at the end of the program at 15 weeks. Fat fractions of abdominal organs and vertebral bone marrow as well as volumes of visceral and subcutaneous fat were determined. Furthermore, muscle area was evaluated using the L4/L5 method. Data were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for paired samples. Results Median BMI decreased significantly from 34.0 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2 (p < 0.001) at 15 weeks. Liver fat content was normalized (14.2% to 4.1%, p < 0.001) and vertebral bone marrow fat (57.5% to 53.6%, p = 0.018) decreased significantly throughout the program, while fat content of pancreas (9.0%), spleen (0.0%), and psoas muscle (0.0%) did not (p > 0.15). Visceral fat volume (3.2 L to 1.6 L, p < 0.001) and subcutaneous fat diameter (3.0 cm to 2.2 cm, p < 0.001) also decreased significantly. Muscle area declined by 6.8% from 243.9 cm2 to 226.8 cm2. Conclusion MRI allows noninvasive monitoring of changes in abdominal compartments during weight loss. In overweight diabetics, weight loss leads to fat reduction in abdominal compartments, such as visceral fat, as well as liver fat and vertebral bone marrow fat while pancreas fat remains unchanged. PMID:27110719

  2. Use of a web-based image reporting and tracking system for assessing abdominal imaging examination quality issues in a single practice.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Johnson, Evan; Sanger, Joseph J

    2015-10-01

    This article presents our local experience in the implementation of a real-time web-based system for reporting and tracking quality issues relating to abdominal imaging examinations. This system allows radiologists to electronically submit examination quality issues during clinical readouts. The submitted information is e-mailed to a designate for the given modality for further follow-up; the designate may subsequently enter text describing their response or action taken, which is e-mailed back to the radiologist. Review of 558 entries over a 6-year period demonstrated documentation of a broad range of examination quality issues, including specific issues relating to protocol deviation, post-processing errors, positioning errors, artifacts, and IT concerns. The most common issues varied among US, CT, MRI, radiography, and fluoroscopy. In addition, the most common issues resulting in a patient recall for repeat imaging (generally related to protocol deviation in MRI and US) were identified. In addition to submitting quality problems, radiologists also commonly used the tool to provide recognition of a well-performed examination. An electronic log of actions taken in response to radiologists' submissions indicated that both positive and negative feedback were commonly communicated to the performing technologist. Information generated using the tool can be used to guide subsequent quality improvement initiatives within a practice, including continued protocol standardization as well as education of technologists in the optimization of abdominal imaging examinations. PMID:26182885

  3. Incorporation of another person's limb into body image relieves phantom limb pain: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Sharon R; Tsao, Jack W

    2010-12-01

    Phantom limb phenomena are well characterized, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report a patient who relieves his phantom sensations and pain, experienced as itching and cramping, through scratching or massaging his prosthesis or the leg of another person. This pain relief occurs only when phantom limb sensations are present. We hypothesize that symptom relief results from incorporation of the foreign limb into the patient's body image, mediated by the sensory mirror neuron system, relieving pain by restoring concordance between sensory systems. PMID:20425663

  4. Negative Body Image Associated with Changes in the Visual Body Appearance Increases Pain Perception

    PubMed Central

    Osumi, Michihiro; Imai, Ryota; Ueta, Kozo; Nobusako, Satoshi; Morioka, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Changing the visual body appearance by use of as virtual reality system, funny mirror, or binocular glasses has been reported to be helpful in rehabilitation of pain. However, there are interindividual differences in the analgesic effect of changing the visual body image. We hypothesized that a negative body image associated with changing the visual body appearance causes interindividual differences in the analgesic effect although the relationship between the visual body appearance and analgesic effect has not been clarified. We investigated whether a negative body image associated with changes in the visual body appearance increased pain. Twenty-five healthy individuals participated in this study. To evoke a negative body image, we applied the method of rubber hand illusion. We created an “injured rubber hand” to evoke unpleasantness associated with pain, a “hairy rubber hand” to evoke unpleasantness associated with embarrassment, and a “twisted rubber hand” to evoke unpleasantness associated with deviation from the concept of normality. We also created a “normal rubber hand” as a control. The pain threshold was measured while the participant observed the rubber hand using a device that measured pain caused by thermal stimuli. Body ownership experiences were elicited by observation of the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand as well as the normal rubber hand. Participants felt more unpleasantness by observing the injured rubber hand and hairy rubber hand than the normal rubber hand and twisted rubber hand (p<0.001). The pain threshold was lower under the injured rubber hand condition than with the other conditions (p<0.001). We conclude that a negative body appearance associated with pain can increase pain sensitivity. PMID:25210738

  5. Semiautomatic vessel wall detection and quantification of wall thickness in computed tomography images of human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, Judy; DiMartino, Elena S.; Goldhammer, Adam; Goldman, Daniel H.; Acker, Leah C.; Patel, Gopal; Ng, Julie H.; Martufi, Giampaolo; Finol, Ender A.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Quantitative measurements of wall thickness in human abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) may lead to more accurate methods for the evaluation of their biomechanical environment. Methods: The authors describe an algorithm for estimating wall thickness in AAAs based on intensity histograms and neural networks involving segmentation of contrast enhanced abdominal computed tomography images. The algorithm was applied to ten ruptured and ten unruptured AAA image data sets. Two vascular surgeons manually segmented the lumen, inner wall, and outer wall of each data set and a reference standard was defined as the average of their segmentations. Reproducibility was determined by comparing the reference standard to lumen contours generated automatically by the algorithm and a commercially available software package. Repeatability was assessed by comparing the lumen, outer wall, and inner wall contours, as well as wall thickness, made by the two surgeons using the algorithm. Results: There was high correspondence between automatic and manual measurements for the lumen area (r=0.978 and r=0.996 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively) and between vascular surgeons (r=0.987 and r=0.992 for ruptured and unruptured aneurysms, respectively). The authors' automatic algorithm showed better results when compared to the reference with an average lumen error of 3.69%, which is less than half the error between the commercially available application Simpleware and the reference (7.53%). Wall thickness measurements also showed good agreement between vascular surgeons with average coefficients of variation of 10.59% (ruptured aneurysms) and 13.02% (unruptured aneurysms). Ruptured aneurysms exhibit significantly thicker walls (1.78{+-}0.39 mm) than unruptured ones (1.48{+-}0.22 mm), p=0.044. Conclusions: While further refinement is needed to fully automate the outer wall segmentation algorithm, these preliminary results demonstrate the method's adequate reproducibility

  6. The Acute Abdominal Aorta.

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Heiken, Jay P

    2015-11-01

    Acute disorders of the abdominal aorta are potentially lethal conditions that require prompt evaluation and treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging method for evaluating these conditions because of its availability and speed. Volumetric CT acquisition with multiplanar reconstruction and three-dimensional analysis is now the standard technique for evaluating the aorta. MR imaging may be useful for select applications in stable patients in whom rupture has been excluded. Imaging is indispensable for diagnosis and treatment planning, because management has shifted toward endoluminal repair. Acute abdominal aortic conditions most commonly are complications of aneurysms and atherosclerosis. PMID:26526434

  7. New guidance on imaging tests for a range of chest pain scenarios.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    New recommendations from the American College of Cardiology and the American College of Radiology offer guidance to emergency providers on which imaging tests to use in 20 different clinical scenarios involving chest pain. For each clinical scenario, an expert panel rated the appropriateness of a range of imaging modalities as rarely appropriate (R), may be appropriate (M), or appropriate (A). The guidelines are constructed to flow from the clinician's judgment as to the probable cause of the chest pain. The recommendations for each clinical scenario are condensed into tables that can be fashioned into notecards or a smartphone app for quick reference. Developers note that the guidelines will need to be revisited when high-sensitivity troponin tests are approved for use in the United States, as these newer-generation blood tests may negate the need for many imaging tests when patients present with chest pain. PMID:27093767

  8. Measuring abdominal circumference and skeletal muscle from a single cross-sectional CT image: a step-by-step guide for clinicians using National Institutes of Health ImageJ

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Perez, Sandra L.; Haus, Jacob M; Sheean, Patricia; Patel, Bimal; Mar, Winnie; Chaudhry, Vivek; McKeever, Liam; Braunschweig, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans provide numerous opportunities for body composition analysis including quantification of abdominal circumference, abdominal adipose tissues (subcutaneous, visceral and intermuscular) and skeletal muscle (SM). CT scans are commonly performed for diagnostic purposes in clinical settings and methods for estimating abdominal circumference and whole-body SM mass from them have been reported. A supine abdominal circumference is a valid measure of waist circumference (WC). The valid correlation between a single cross sectional CT image (slice) at third lumbar (L3) for abdominal SM and whole body SM is also well established. Sarcopenia refers to the age-associated decreased in muscle mass and function. A single dimensional definition of sarcopenia using CT images that includes only assessment of low whole body SM has been validated in clinical populations and significantly associated with negative outcomes. However, despite the availability and precision of SM data from CT scans and the relationship between these measurements and clinical outcomes, they have not become a routine component of clinical nutrition assessment. Lack of time, training, and expense are potential barriers that prevent clinicians from fully embracing this technique. This tutorial presents a systematic, step-by-step guide to quickly quantify abdominal circumference as a proxy for WC and SM using a cross-sectional CT image from a regional diagnostic CT scan for clinical identification of sarcopenia. Multiple software options are available, however this tutorial utilizes ImageJ, a free public domain software developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). PMID:26392166

  9. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  10. Intra-abdominal pulmonary secuestration as an exceptional cause of abdominal mass in the adult☆

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Sanz, C.; Herrero Bogajo, M.L.; Picazo-Yeste, J.; Morandeira Rivas, A.; Manzanera-Diaz, M.; Sedano-Vizcaino, C.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pulmonary sequestration (PS) is an extremely rare malformation defined as a portion of lung tissue isolated from the pulmonary system. PSs are classified into intralobar type and intra-abdominal PS that represents only 2.5% of cases. There are 20 cases of PS reported in adults and only two were managed by laparoscopic approach. We report a case of intra-abdominal PS mimicking a gastroesophageal duplication cyst in an adult. Besides its rarity, this is the first intra-abdominal PS in an adult managed by an anterior laparoscopic approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old female patient had had epigastric and left upper quadrant pain for several days. Physical examination was normal. Image test were consistent with a gastroesophageal duplication. The patient was taken to the operating room for laparoscopic exploration and resection. The pathological diagnosis was extralobar pulmonary sequestration. DISCUSSION Less than 20 cases of PS have been reported in adults and only two cases were managed by a lateral laparoscopic approach. In contrast to these reports, we used an anterior approach due to the GEJ suspected origin of the mass. CONCLUSION Extralobar intra-abdominal PS is an extremely rare condition during adulthood but this diagnosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a left-sided suprarenal mass. Due to the difficulty in achieving a definitive preoperative diagnosis, surgery is recommended. Laparoscopic resection is safe and effective but careful preoperative imaging studies are recommended in order to plan the most suitable approach. PMID:24091075

  11. Quantitative comparison and evaluation of software packages for assessment of abdominal adipose tissue distribution by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, S; Ghosh, P; Crawford, S; Solga, SF; Horska, A; Brancati, FL; Diehl, AM; Smith, S; Clark, JM

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine five available software packages for the assessment of abdominal adipose tissue with magnetic resonance imaging, compare their features and assess the reliability of measurement results. Design Feature evaluation and test–retest reliability of softwares (NIHImage, SliceOmatic, Analyze, HippoFat and EasyVision) used in manual, semi-automated or automated segmentation of abdominal adipose tissue. Subjects A random sample of 15 obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Measurements Axial T1-weighted spin echo images centered at vertebral bodies of L2–L3 were acquired at 1.5 T. Five software packages were evaluated (NIHImage, SliceOmatic, Analyze, HippoFat and EasyVision), comparing manual, semi-automated and automated segmentation approaches. Images were segmented into cross-sectional area (CSA), and the areas of visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). Ease of learning and use and the design of the graphical user interface (GUI) were rated. Intra-observer accuracy and agreement between the software packages were calculated using intra-class correlation. Intra-class correlation coefficient was used to obtain test–retest reliability. Results Three of the five evaluated programs offered a semi-automated technique to segment the images based on histogram values or a user-defined threshold. One software package allowed manual delineation only. One fully automated program demonstrated the drawbacks of uncritical automated processing. The semi-automated approaches reduced variability and measurement error, and improved reproducibility. There was no significant difference in the intra-observer agreement in SAT and CSA. The VAT measurements showed significantly lower test–retest reliability. There were some differences between the software packages in qualitative aspects, such as user friendliness. Conclusion Four out of five packages provided essentially the same results with respect to the inter- and intra-rater reproducibility. Our

  12. Association of Intraluminal Thrombus, Hemodynamic Forces, and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Expansion Using Longitudinal CT Images.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Byron A; Gharahi, Hamidreza; Lim, ChaeYoung; Jaberi, Farhad A; Choi, Jongeun; Lee, Whal; Baek, Seungik

    2016-05-01

    While hemodynamic forces and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) are believed to play important roles on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), it has been suggested that hemodynamic forces and ILT also interact with each other, making it a complex problem. There is, however, a pressing need to understand relationships among three factors: hemodynamics, ILT accumulation, and AAA expansion for AAA prognosis. Hence this study used longitudinal computer tomography scans from 14 patients and analyzed the relationship between them. Hemodynamic forces, represented by wall shear stress (WSS), were obtained from computational fluid dynamics; ILT accumulation was described by ILT thickness distribution changes between consecutives scans, and ILT accumulation and AAA expansion rates were estimated from changes in ILT and AAA volume. Results showed that, while low WSS was observed at regions where ILT accumulated, the rate at which ILT accumulated occurred at the same rate as the aneurysm expansion. Comparison between AAAs with and without thrombus showed that aneurysm with ILT recorded lower values of WSS and higher values of AAA expansion than those without thrombus. Findings suggest that low WSS may promote ILT accumulation and submit the idea that by increasing WSS levels ILT accumulation may be prevented. PMID:26429788

  13. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction and vesselness filters for liver vessel segmentation on abdominal CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Moelker, Adriaan; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-05-01

    Liver vessel segmentation in CTA images is a challenging task, especially in the case of noisy images. This paper investigates whether pre-filtering improves liver vessel segmentation in 3D CTA images. We introduce a quantitative evaluation of several well-known filters based on a proposed liver vessel segmentation method on CTA images. We compare the effect of different diffusion techniques i.e. Regularized Perona-Malik, Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch and Vessel Enhancing Diffusion as well as the vesselness approaches proposed by Sato, Frangi and Erdt. Liver vessel segmentation of the pre-processed images is performed using a histogram-based region grown with local maxima as seed points. Quantitative measurements (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) are determined based on manual landmarks inside and outside the vessels, followed by T-tests for statistic comparisons on 51 clinical CTA images. The evaluation demonstrates that all the filters make liver vessel segmentation have a significantly higher accuracy than without using a filter (p  <  0.05) Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch achieves the best performance. Compared to the diffusion filters, vesselness filters have a greater sensitivity but less specificity. In addition, the proposed liver vessel segmentation method with pre-filtering is shown to perform robustly on a clinical dataset having a low contrast-to-noise of up to 3 (dB). The results indicate that the pre-filtering step significantly improves liver vessel segmentation on 3D CTA images.

  14. How pain empathy depends on ingroup/outgroup decisions: A functional magnet resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Ruckmann, Judith; Bodden, Maren; Jansen, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Dodel, Richard; Rief, Winfried

    2015-10-30

    Showing empathy is crucial for social functioning and empathy is related to group membership. The aim of the current study was to investigate the influence of experimentally generated groups on empathy for pain in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Thirty healthy participants underwent a minimal group paradigm to create two groups. While BOLD contrast was measured using fMRI, subjects were instructed to empathize with ingroup and outgroup members, who were depicted in a picture paradigm of painful and neutral situations. Behavioral measure of state empathy was measured using a visual analog scale. Furthermore, self-reported trait empathy measures were obtained. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted for fMRI and behavioral data. In addition to a main effect of pain in pain-related areas, a main effect of group in areas belonging to the visual cortex was found. Although there was no ingroup bias for empathy ratings, subjects showed altered neural activation in regions of the right fusiform gyrus, the cerebellum, the hippocampal and amygdala region during the pain×group interaction. Activation in the preceding structures, revealed by the interaction of pain by group, suggests that activation in the pallidum might reflect specific empathy for pain-related regulation processes. PMID:26323252

  15. Giant adrenal hemangioma: Unusual cause of huge abdominal mass

    PubMed Central

    Tarchouli, Mohamed; Boudhas, Adil; Ratbi, Moulay Brahim; Essarghini, Mohamed; Njoumi, Noureddine; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is an extremely rare benign and non-functioning neoplasm of the adrenal gland. We report a case of a 71-year-old woman admitted for intermittent abdominal pain and abdominal distension associated with vomiting and chronic constipation for 5 years. Physical examination revealed a large abdominal mass. Both computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging suggested hemangioma in the right lobe of the liver. Laboratory examinations and tumour markers were within normal limits, except for hypochromic microcytic anemia. The mass was removed intact by conventional surgery and histopathology revealed a cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland with no signs of malignancy. Surgical resection was curative, with no recurrence at the 2-year follow-up. PMID:26600897

  16. Imaging of posterior element axial pain generators: facet joints, pedicles, spinous processes, sacroiliac joints, and transitional segments.

    PubMed

    Kotsenas, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    The role of the posterior elements in generating axial back and neck pain is well established; the imaging detection of posterior element pain generators remains problematic. Morphologic imaging findings have proved to be nonspecific and are frequently present in asymptomatic patients. Edema, inflammation, and hypervascularity are more specific for sites of pain generation, but are often overlooked by imagers if physiologic imaging techniques such as fat-suppressed T2 or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide bone scanning with single-photon emission computed tomography (CT), or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT are not used. PMID:22643392

  17. Evaluation of Effective Dose During Abdominal Three-Dimensional Imaging for Three Flat-Panel-Detector Angiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kidouchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Asako; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Ozaki, Yutaka

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose during abdominal three-dimensional (3D) imaging on phantoms and estimate the dose-area product (DAP) for effective dose conversion factors for three types of angiographic units. Three-dimensional imaging was performed for three sizes (small, medium, large) of human-shaped phantoms using three types of angiographic units (Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, AXIOM Artis dTA). We calculated 25 organ doses and effective doses using Monte Carlo technique for the three phantoms with a program for a personal computer. As benchmark studies to back up the results by Monte Carlo technique, we measured the organ doses directly on the small phantom using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. The DAP value increased as the phantom size increased. The organ doses and the effective doses during the 3D imaging increased as the phantom size increased. The effective doses for the small phantom by Monte Carlo technique were 1.9, 2.2, and 2.1 mSv for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively, while those by direct measurement were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.6 mSv. The effective doses to DAP ratios by Monte Carlo technique were 0.37-0.45, 0.26-0.32, and 0.13-0.15 (mSv Gy{sup -1}cm{sup -2}) for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively. In conclusion, the effective doses during 3D imaging and the dose-to-DAP ratios differ among angiographic units, and the effective dose can be estimated using a proper conversion factor for each angiographic unit.

  18. [Magnetic resonance imaging in the exploration of abdominal and anoperineal fistulas in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Boudghène, F; Aboun, H; Grange, J D; Wallays, C; Bodin, F; Bigot, J M

    1993-01-01

    In a twelve month period, ten patients with fistulas related to Crohn's disease were explored by magnetic resonance imaging performed with a high-field supraconductive magnet. This technique demonstrated 3 cases of peri-anal abcesse invisible by other imaging modalities, and in 8 cases, fistules tracts, including 5 complex fistules, and one communicating with the bladder. This examination defined the extension of these lesions relative to the elevator plane, and demonstrated diffusion to the inferior space in 4 cases, to the superior space in 2 cases, and to both spaces in 2 cases. This method seems to be efficacious and does not expose the patient to X-rays. PMID:8330690

  19. Interaction of expanding abdominal aortic aneurysm with surrounding tissue: Retrospective CT image studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sebastian T.; Burek, William; Dupay, Alexander C.; Farsad, Mehdi; Baek, Seungik; Park, Eun-Ah; Lee, Whal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that rupture have a high mortality rate. Rupture occurs when local mechanical stress exceeds the local mechanical strength of an AAA, so stress profiles such as those from finite element analysis (FEA) are useful. The role and effect of surrounding tissues, like the vertebral column, which have not been extensively studied, are examined in this paper. Methods Longitudinal CT scans from ten patients with AAAs were studied to see the effect of surrounding tissues on AAAs. Segmentation was performed to distinguish the AAA from other tissues and we studied how these surrounding tissues affected the shape and curvature of the AAA. Previously established methods by Veldenz et al. were used to split the AAA into 8 sections and examine the specific effects of surrounding tissues on these sections [1]. Three-dimensional models were created to better examine these effects over time. Registration was done in order to compare AAAs longitudinally. Results The vertebral column and osteophytes were observed to have been affecting the shape and the curvature of the AAA. Interaction with the spine caused focal flattening in certain areas of the AAA. In 16 of the 41 CT scans, the right posterior dorsal section (section 5), had the highest radius of curvature, which was by far the section that had the maximum radius for a specified CT scan. Evolution of the growing AAA showed increased flattening in this section when comparing the last CT scan to the first scan. Conclusion Surrounding tissues have a clear influence on the geometry of an AAA, which may in turn affect the stress profile of AAA. Incorporating these structures in FEA and G&R models will provide a better estimate of stress. Clinical Relevance Currently, size is the only variable considered when deciding whether to undergo elective surgery to repair AAA since it is an easy enough measure for clinicians to utilize. However, this may not be the best indicator of rupture risk

  20. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals. PMID:26481791

  1. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  2. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  3. Abdominal MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you have: Artificial heart valves Brain aneurysm clips Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) ... which the test may be performed: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Atheroembolic renal disease Carcinoma of the renal pelvis ...

  4. An Abdominal Wall Desmoid Tumour Mimicking Cesarean Scar Endometriomas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Fisun; Müezzinoglu, Bahar

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal wall desmoid tumours (DT) are rare, slow-growing benign muscular-aponeurotic fibrous tumours with the tendency to locally invade and recur. They constitute 0.03% of all neoplasms and high infiltration and recurrence rate, but there is no metastatic potential. Although surgery is the primary treatment modality, the optimal treatment remains unclear. Abdominal wall endometriosis is also an unusual disease, and preoperative clinical diagnosis is not always easy. The preoperative radiologic imaging modalities may not aid all the time. Herein, we report an abdominal mass presenting as cyclic pain. Forty-two years old woman who gave birth by cesarean section admitted the complaints of painful abdominal mass (78x45 mm in size) under her cesarean incision scar. She had severe pain, particularly during menstruation. The clinical and radiological imaging findings mimicking endometrioma. We performed wide surgical excision of mass with a 1 cm tumor-free margin with the diagnosis of a benign mesenchymal tumor in the frozen section. The postoperative course was uneventful and recovered without any complication and recurrence three years after surgery. This report presents a case of abdominal wall desmoid tumor mimicking endometrioma. In this paper, shortcomings in diagnosis, abdominal wall endometriomas, and DTs were discussed in the view of literature. PMID:26500967

  5. Comparison of image quality from filtered back projection, statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction algorithms in abdominal computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu; Lin, Yi-Yang; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Lin, Chung-Jung; Chiou, Yi-You; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to compare the image noise-reducing abilities of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) with those of traditional filtered back projection (FBP) and statistical iterative reconstruction (IR) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) images This institutional review board-approved retrospective study enrolled 103 patients; informed consent was waived. Urinary bladder (n = 83) and renal cysts (n = 44) were used as targets for evaluating imaging quality. Raw data were retrospectively reconstructed using FBP, statistical IR, and IMR. Objective image noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Subjective image quality was evaluated and analyzed using Wilcoxon signed-rank test with Bonferroni correction. Objective analysis revealed a reduction in image noise for statistical IR compared with that for FBP, with no significant differences in SNR. In the urinary bladder group, IMR achieved up to 53.7% noise reduction, demonstrating a superior performance to that of statistical IR. IMR also yielded a significantly superior SNR to that of statistical IR. Similar results were obtained in the cyst group. Subjective analysis revealed reduced image noise for IMR, without inferior margin delineation or diagnostic confidence. IMR reduced noise and increased SNR to greater degrees than did FBP and statistical IR. Applying the IMR technique to abdominal CT imaging has potential for reducing the radiation dose without sacrificing imaging quality. PMID:27495078

  6. Lyme Myocarditis Presenting as Chest Pain in an Adolescent Girl.

    PubMed

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Marchese, Ronald F; Callahan, James M

    2016-07-01

    A previously healthy adolescent girl presented to the emergency department with new onset chest and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Laboratory studies and imaging were consistent with myocarditis. She developed heart block after admission and required stabilization in the cardiac intensive care unit. Lyme serology returned positive, and her condition was diagnosed as Lyme disease-associated myocarditis. PMID:26945194

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for pain after surgical treatment for athletic pubalgia and the "sports hernia".

    PubMed

    Zoga, Adam C; Meyers, William C

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technique and findings in the setting of athletic pubalgia, including injury at the rectus abdominis/adductor aponeurosis, are becoming widely recognized. A subset of these patients is treated with various pelvic floor repairs, mesh reinforcements, and tendon releases. Most of these patients do well after intervention, but some have persistent or refractory groin pain, and others eventually develop new injuries in the pubic region or elsewhere about the pelvic girdle. This review describes the expected and some unexpected MRI findings in patients with recurrent or persistent groin pain after a "sports hernia" repair. PMID:21928160

  8. COMPARISON OF ADAPTIVE STATISTICAL ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (ASIR™) AND MODEL-BASED ITERATIVE RECONSTRUCTION (VEO™) FOR PAEDIATRIC ABDOMINAL CT EXAMINATIONS: AN OBSERVER PERFORMANCE STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGE QUALITY.

    PubMed

    Hultenmo, Maria; Caisander, Håkan; Mack, Karsten; Thilander-Klang, Anne

    2016-06-01

    The diagnostic image quality of 75 paediatric abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations reconstructed with two different iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms-adaptive statistical IR (ASiR™) and model-based IR (Veo™)-was compared. Axial and coronal images were reconstructed with 70 % ASiR with the Soft™ convolution kernel and with the Veo algorithm. The thickness of the reconstructed images was 2.5 or 5 mm depending on the scanning protocol used. Four radiologists graded the delineation of six abdominal structures and the diagnostic usefulness of the image quality. The Veo reconstruction significantly improved the visibility of most of the structures compared with ASiR in all subgroups of images. For coronal images, the Veo reconstruction resulted in significantly improved ratings of the diagnostic use of the image quality compared with the ASiR reconstruction. This was not seen for the axial images. The greatest improvement using Veo reconstruction was observed for the 2.5 mm coronal slices. PMID:26873711

  9. PET Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with 64Cu-Labeled Anti-CD105 Antibody Fab Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Sixiang; Orbay, Hakan; Yang, Yunan; Graves, Stephen A.; Nayak, Tapas R.; Hong, Hao; Hernandez, Reinier; Luo, Haiming; Goel, Shreya; Theuer, Charles P.; Nickles, Robert J.; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    The critical challenge in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) research is the accurate diagnosis and assessment of AAA progression. Angiogenesis is a pathological hallmark of AAA, and CD105 is highly expressed on newly formed vessels. Our goal was to use 64Cu-labeled anti-CD105 antibody Fab fragment for noninvasive assessment of angiogenesis in the aortic wall in a murine model of AAA. Methods Fab fragment of TRC105, a mAb that specifically binds to CD105, was generated by enzymatic papain digestion and conjugated to NOTA for 64Cu-labeling. Binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-TRC105-Fab was evaluated by flow cytometry and various ex vivo studies. BALB/c mice were anesthetized and treated with calcium phosphate to induce AAA, which underwent weekly PET scans using 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-Fab. Biodistribution and autoradiography studies were also performed to confirm the accuracy of PET results. Results NOTA-TRC105-Fab exhibited high purity and specifically bound to CD105 in vitro. Uptake of 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-Fab increased from a control level of 3.4 ± 0.1 to 9.5 ± 0.4 %ID/g at 6 h p.i. on Day 5, and decreased to 7.2 ± 1.4 %ID/g on Day 12 which correlated well with biodistribution and autoradiography studies (i.e. much higher tracer uptake in AAA than normal aorta). Of note, enhanced AAA contrast was achieved, due to the minimal background in the abdominal area of mice. Degradation of elastic fibers and highly expressed CD105 were observed in ex vivo studies. Conclusion 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-Fab cleared rapidly through kidneys, which enabled noninvasive PET imaging of the aorta with enhanced contrast and showed increased angiogenesis (CD105 expression) during AAA. 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105-Fab PET may potentially be used for future diagnosis and prognosis of AAA. PMID:25883125

  10. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  11. Pain and spinal cord imaging measures in children with demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Nadia; Gorman, Mark P.; Benson, Leslie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a significant problem in diseases affecting the spinal cord, including demyelinating disease. To date, studies have examined the reliability of clinical measures for assessing and classifying the severity of spinal cord injury (SCI) and also to evaluate SCI-related pain. Most of this research has focused on adult populations and patients with traumatic injuries. Little research exists regarding pediatric spinal cord demyelinating disease. One reason for this is the lack of reliable and useful approaches to measuring spinal cord changes since currently used diagnostic imaging has limited specificity for quantitative measures of demyelination. No single imaging technique demonstrates sufficiently high sensitivity or specificity to myelin, and strong correlation with clinical measures. However, recent advances in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) measures are considered promising in providing increasingly useful and specific information on spinal cord damage. Findings from these quantitative imaging modalities correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. These techniques may be of potential use for defining the evolution of the disease state, how it may affect specific spinal cord pathways, and contribute to the management of pediatric demyelination syndromes. Since pain is a major presenting symptom in patients with transverse myelitis, the disease is an ideal model to evaluate imaging methods to define these regional changes within the spinal cord. In this review we summarize (1) pediatric demyelinating conditions affecting the spinal cord; (2) their distinguishing features; and (3) current diagnostic and classification methods with particular focus on pain pathways. We also focus on concepts that are essential in developing strategies for the detection, monitoring, treatment and repair of pediatric myelitis. PMID:26509120

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: advance and current status in abdominal imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the field of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US), contrast agents are classified as either first- or second-generation agents depending on the gas within the microbubbles. In the case of first-generation contrast agents, a high-mechanical-index technique is used and only intermittent scanning is possible due to the early destruction of the microbubbles during the scanning. The use of second-generation contrast agents in a low-mechanical-index technique enables continuous scanning. Besides the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions, contrastenhanced US is helpful in the monitoring of radiofrequency ablation therapy and in the targeting step of an US-guided biopsy. Recently, there has been a demand for new criteria to evaluate the treatment response obtained using anti-angiogenic agents because morphologic criteria alone may not reflect the treatment response of the tumor and contrast-enhanced US can provide quantitative markers of tissue perfusion. In spite of the concerns related to its cost-effectiveness, contrast-enhanced US has the potential to be more widely used as a complimentary tool or to substitute the current imaging modalities in some occasions. PMID:25342120

  13. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  14. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  15. Abdominal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy. PMID:27363829

  16. Measuring Abdominal Circumference and Skeletal Muscle From a Single Cross-Sectional Computed Tomography Image: A Step-by-Step Guide for Clinicians Using National Institutes of Health ImageJ.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Perez, Sandra L; Haus, Jacob M; Sheean, Patricia; Patel, Bimal; Mar, Winnie; Chaudhry, Vivek; McKeever, Liam; Braunschweig, Carol

    2016-03-01

    Diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans provide numerous opportunities for body composition analysis, including quantification of abdominal circumference, abdominal adipose tissues (subcutaneous, visceral, and intermuscular), and skeletal muscle (SM). CT scans are commonly performed for diagnostic purposes in clinical settings, and methods for estimating abdominal circumference and whole-body SM mass from them have been reported. A supine abdominal circumference is a valid measure of waist circumference (WC). The valid correlation between a single cross-sectional CT image (slice) at third lumbar (L3) for abdominal SM and whole-body SM is also well established. Sarcopenia refers to the age-associated decreased in muscle mass and function. A single dimensional definition of sarcopenia using CT images that includes only assessment of low whole-body SM has been validated in clinical populations and significantly associated with negative outcomes. However, despite the availability and precision of SM data from CT scans and the relationship between these measurements and clinical outcomes, they have not become a routine component of clinical nutrition assessment. Lack of time, training, and expense are potential barriers that prevent clinicians from fully embracing this technique. This tutorial presents a systematic, step-by-step guide to quickly quantify abdominal circumference as a proxy for WC and SM using a cross-sectional CT image from a regional diagnostic CT scan for clinical identification of sarcopenia. Multiple software options are available, but this tutorial uses ImageJ, a free public-domain software developed by the National Institutes of Health. PMID:26392166

  17. From the nutcracker-phenomenon of the left renal vein to the midline congestion syndrome as a cause of migraine, headache, back and abdominal pain and functional disorders of pelvic organs.

    PubMed

    Scholbach, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    their intramural inflammation, reduction of their mass effects (especially by the replaced spinal fluid inside the spinal canal and the skull), and altogether a reduction of pain and functional derangement in the affected midline organs. The proposed theory might influence the current understanding of such frequent and difficult to treat diseases as chronic back pain, headaches, frequent cystitis, enuresis, abdominal pain, flank pain and might spur new theories of arterial hypertension, placental insufficiency, prostate diseases and myelopathies. PMID:17161550

  18. Comparison of the strain field of abdominal aortic aneurysm measured by magnetic resonance imaging and stereovision: a feasibility study for prediction of the risk of rupture of aortic abdominal aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Joannic, David; Delassus, Patrick; Lalande, Alain; Juillion, Patrick; Fontaine, Jean-François

    2015-04-13

    The prediction of the risk of rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex problem. Currently the criteria to predict rupture of abdominal aortic aneurysms are aneurysm diameter and growth rates. It is generally believed that study of the wall strain distribution could be helpful to find a better decision criterion for surgery of aortic aneurysms before their rupture. The wall strain distribution depends on many biological and biomechanical factors such as elastic properties of the aorta, turbulent blood flow, anatomy of the aorta, presence of thrombus or not and so on. Recently, numerical simulations to estimate rupture-potential have received many attentions. However, none of the medical imaging tools for screening and monitoring of AAAs were studied in terms of mechanical behavior and experimentally to demonstrate their capability to measure relevant variables. The aim of this study was to develop a metrological approach for deployment testing of the ability of techniques for measuring local in-vitro deformations based on comparison of stereovision and MRI. In this paper, we present the implementation approach and results of the study based on cylindrical phantoms with or without AAA representing, respectively, healthy and unhealthy artery. Through this study, an experimental device was developed for the behavior study of AAA during a cardiac cycle. The results show that the stereovision techniques used in laboratory is well suited and is qualitatively and quantitatively equivalent with MRI measurements. PMID:25661521

  19. Image-guided Nerve Cryoablation for Post-thoracotomy Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, Yilun; Mannes, Andrew J.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) can cause significant patient distress and is frequently difficult to manage. Percutaneous intercostal nerve (ICN) cryoablation by palpation of surface landmarks can be risky, as inaccurate probe placement can lead to hemo- or pneumothorax. Experience with image-guided ICN cryoablation with treatment planning and device navigation is limited. A patient with intractable PTPS was treated with ICN cryoablation under cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance with software-assisted needle trajectory planning and ablation zone simulation. This procedure provided the patient approximately 8 weeks of relief. This case demonstrated that ICN cryoablation is feasible under image-guidance with device navigation and ablation simulation, and may result in a few months of pain relief in cases of intractable PTPS. PMID:23954965

  20. Stress Tests for Chest Pain: When You Need an Imaging Test -- and When You Don't

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Resources Stress Tests for Chest Pain Stress Tests for Chest Pain When you need an imaging test—and when you don’t DOWNLOAD PDF If ... that suggests you might have heart disease, a test that stresses the heart can help you and ...

  1. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture. PMID:24964430

  2. Do We Really Need Additional Contrast-Enhanced Abdominal Computed Tomography for Differential Diagnosis in Triage of Middle-Aged Subjects With Suspected Biliary Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, In Kyeom; Lee, Yoon Suk; Kim, Jaihwan; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon; Hwang, Jin-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhanced computed tomography (CT) is widely used for evaluating acute biliary pain in the emergency department (ED). However, concern about radiation exposure from CT has also increased. We investigated the usefulness of pre-contrast CT for differential diagnosis in middle-aged subjects with suspected biliary pain. A total of 183 subjects, who visited the ED for suspected biliary pain from January 2011 to December 2012, were included. Retrospectively, pre-contrast phase and multiphase CT findings were reviewed and the detection rate of findings suggesting disease requiring significant treatment by noncontrast CT (NCCT) was compared with cases detected by multiphase CT. Approximately 70% of total subjects had a significant condition, including 1 case of gallbladder cancer and 126 (68.8%) cases requiring intervention (122 biliary stone-related diseases, 3 liver abscesses, and 1 liver hemangioma). The rate of overlooking malignancy without contrast enhancement was calculated to be 0% to 1.5%. Biliary stones and liver space-occupying lesions were found equally on NCCT and multiphase CT. Calculated probable rates of overlooking acute cholecystitis and biliary obstruction were maximally 6.8% and 4.2% respectively. Incidental significant finding unrelated with pain consisted of 1 case of adrenal incidentaloma, which was also observed in NCCT. NCCT might be sufficient to detect life-threatening or significant disease requiring early treatment in young adults with biliary pain. PMID:25700321

  3. Strategy and optimization of diagnostic imaging in painful hip in adults.

    PubMed

    Blum, A; Raymond, A; Teixeira, P

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostic imaging strategy in painful hip depends on many factors, but in all cases, plain X-ray is the first investigation. It may be sufficient to reach diagnosis and determine treatment options. More effective but more expensive exploration is indicated in two circumstances: when plain X-ray is non-contributive, and when diagnosis has been established but more accurate imaging assessment is needed to guide treatment. Following radiography, the choice of imaging techniques depends not only on the suspected pathology but also on the availability of equipment and its performance. MRI is probably the technique that provides the most comprehensive results; recent improved accessibility has significantly simplified the diagnostic algorithm. CT remains invaluable, and current techniques have reduced patient irradiation to a level similar to that of standard X-ray. Finally, cost is an important consideration in choosing the means of exploration, but the overall financial impact of the various strategies for diagnosis of painful hip is not well established. This article aims to provide a simple and effective diagnostic strategy for the assessment of painful hip, taking account of the clinical situation, and to detail the most typical semiologic patterns of each disease affecting this joint. PMID:25599865

  4. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  5. Abdominal Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adhesions 1 Ward BC, Panitch A. Abdominal adhesions: current and novel therapies. Journal of Surgical Research. 2011;165(1):91–111. Seek Help for ... and how to participate, visit the NIH Clinical Research Trials and You website ... Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders 700 West Virginia ...

  6. Approach to Patients with Epigastric Pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Patrick; Perkins, John C

    2016-05-01

    Epigastric pain is an extremely common complaint in the emergency department and has an associated broad differential diagnosis. In the differential it is important to consider cardiac causes that may be mistaken for gastrointestinal disorders as well as various serious intra-abdominal causes. This article highlights the limitations in laboratory testing and guides providers through the appropriate considerations for advanced imaging. Special attention is focused on acute pancreatitis, esophageal emergencies, and peptic ulcer disease/gastritis and their associated complications. PMID:27133240

  7. Abdominal organs (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine further digests food and begins the absorption of nutrients. Secretions from the pancreas in the ... gallbladder and liver emulsify fat and enhance the absorption of fatty acids. The large intestine temporarily stores ...

  8. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  9. Abdominal rigidity

    MedlinePlus

    Rigidity of the abdomen ... is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand ... Causes can include: Abscess inside the abdomen Appendicitis ... small intestine, large bowel, or gallbladder ( gastrointestinal ...

  10. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yueh-Feng; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuo-Hsin; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Yeh, Hsin-Pei; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT); however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT) has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity developed during treatment or follow-up. Concurrent HT with or without systemic treatment could be a safe salvage therapy for chemorefractory locally advanced breast cancer patients with extensive cutaneous metastasis. PMID:27284253

  11. Laparoscopic resection of an intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Kawano, Fumihiro; Fujita, Shohei; Omori, Satoshi; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki; Sakaguchi, Asumi; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the alimentary tract is a rare congenital malformation that occurs most often in the abdominal region, whereas esophageal duplication cyst develops typically in the thoracic region but occasionally in the neck and abdominal regions. Esophageal duplication cyst is usually diagnosed in early childhood because of symptoms related to bleeding, infection, and displacement of tissue surrounding the lesion. We recently encountered a rare adult case of esophageal duplication cyst in the abdominal esophagus. A 50-year-old man underwent gastroscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging to investigate epigastric pain and dysphagia that started 3 months earlier. Imaging findings suggested esophageal duplication cyst, and the patient underwent laparoscopic resection followed by intraoperative esophagoscopy to reconstruct the esophagus safely and effectively. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed two layers of smooth muscle in the cystic wall, confirming the diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst. PMID:25883826

  12. The relevance of image quality indices for dose optimization in abdominal multi-detector row CT in children: experimental assessment with pediatric phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisse, H. J.; Brenot, J.; Pierrat, N.; Gaboriaud, G.; Savignoni, A.; DeRycke, Y.; Neuenschwander, S.; Aubert, B.; Rosenwald, J.-C.

    2009-04-01

    This study assessed and compared various image quality indices in order to manage the dose of pediatric abdominal MDCT protocols and to provide guidance on dose reduction. PMMA phantoms representing average body diameters at birth, 1 year, 5 years, 10 years and 15 years of age were scanned in a four-channel MDCT with a standard pediatric abdominal CT protocol. Image noise (SD, standard deviation of CT number), noise derivative (ND, derivative of the function of noise with respect to dose) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The 'relative' low-contrast detectability (rLCD) was introduced as a new quantity to adjust LCD to the various phantom diameters on the basis of the LCD1% assessed in a Catphan® phantom and a constant central absorbed dose. The required variations of CTDIvol16 with respect to phantom size were analyzed in order to maintain each image quality index constant. The use of a fixed SD or CNR level leads to major dose ratios between extreme patient sizes (factor 22.7 to 44 for SD, 31.7 to 51.5 for CNR2.8%), whereas fixed ND and rLCD result in acceptable dose ratios ranging between factors of 2.9 and 3.9 between extreme phantom diameters. For a 5-9 mm rLCD1%, adjusted ND values range between -0.84 and -0.11 HU mGy-1. Our data provide guidance on dose reduction on the basis of patient dimensions and the required rLCD (e.g., to get a constant 7 mm rLCD1% for abdominal diameters of 10, 13, 16, 20 and 25 cm, tube current-time product should be adjusted in order to obtain CTDIvol16 values of 6.2, 7.2, 8.8, 11.6 and 17.7 mGy, respectively).

  13. Motor cortex stimulation: functional magnetic resonance imaging-localized treatment for three sources of intractable facial pain.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Darian R; Pisansky, Marc T; Dafer, Rima M; Anderson, Douglas E

    2011-01-01

    Neuropathic facial pain can be a debilitating condition characterized by stabbing, burning, dysesthetic sensation. With a large range of causes and types, including deafferentation, postherpetic, atypical, and idiopathic, both medicine and neurosurgery have struggled to find effective treatments that address this broad spectrum of facial pain. The authors report the use of motor cortex stimulation to alleviate 3 distinct conditions associated with intractable facial pain: trigeminal deafferentation pain following rhizotomy, deafferentation pain secondary to meningioma, and postherpetic neuralgia. Functional MR imaging was used to localize facial areas on the precentral gyrus prior to surgery. All 3 patients experienced long-lasting complete or near-complete resolution of pain following electrode implantation. Efficacy in pain reduction was achieved through variation of stimulation settings over the course of treatment, and it was assessed using the visual analog scale and narrative report. Surgical complications included moderate postsurgical incisional pain, transient cerebral edema, and intraoperative seizure. The authors' results affirm the efficacy and broaden the application of motor cortex stimulation to several forms of intractable facial pain. PMID:20509733

  14. Rapid Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosing Cancer-related Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hollingworth, William; Gray, Darryl T; Martin, Brook I; Sullivan, Sean D; Deyo, Richard A; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study compared the relative efficiency of lumbar x-ray and rapid magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for diagnosing cancer-related low back pain (LBP) in primary care patients. DESIGN We developed a decision model with Markov state transitions to calculate the cost per case detected and cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of rapid MR imaging. Model parameters were estimated from the medical literature. The costs of x-ray and rapid MR were calculated in an activity-based costing study. SETTING AND PATIENTS A hypothetical cohort of primary care patients with LBP referred for imaging to exclude cancer as the cause of their pain. MAIN RESULTS The rapid MR strategy was more expensive due to higher initial imaging costs and larger numbers of patients requiring conventional MR and biopsy. The overall sensitivity of the rapid MR strategy was higher than that of the x-ray strategy (62% vs 55%). However, because of low pre-imaging prevalence of cancer-related LBP, this generates <1 extra case per 1,000 patients imaged. Therefore, the incremental cost per case detected using rapid MR was high ($213,927). The rapid MR strategy resulted in a small increase in quality-adjusted survival (0.00043 QALYs). The estimated incremental cost per QALY for the rapid MR strategy was $296,176. CONCLUSIONS There is currently not enough evidence to support the routine use of rapid MR to detect cancer as a cause of LBP in primary care patients. PMID:12709099

  15. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA with centric ordering in k space: a preliminary clinical experience in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral arterial vasculature.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A N; Bis, K G; Vrachliotis, T G; Kirsch, M; Shirkhoda, A; Ellwood, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical utility of a contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography (MRA) pulse sequence in imaging the abdominal aorta and renal and peripheral lower extremity arteries. Twenty-eight MRA studies were performed on 23 patients and four volunteers at 1.5 T using a 3D contrast-enhanced, centric reordered pulse sequence. In 20 patients, the abdominal aorta and renal arteries were imaged, and in seven patients, the lower extremity arteries were imaged. In 19 patients, a total of 51 renal vessels were evaluated (33 renal arteries using .1 mmol/kg of gadopentetate dimeglumine and 18 renal arteries using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol). A total of 70 peripheral arterial segments were assessed using .2 mmol/kg of gadoteridol. Correlation with conventional angiography was made for the following 14 cases: renal artery stenosis (four cases), abdominal aortic stenosis (one case), arteriovenous fistula in a transplant kidney (one case), renal arteriovenous malformation (one case), common iliac artery aneurysms (one case), and peripheral lower extremity (six cases). Of the 70 peripheral arterial segments evaluated, in 35, there was correlation with x-ray angiography. The mean percent of aortic signal enhancement was significantly higher in the .2 mmol/kg dose group (370.8 +/- 190.3) than in the .1 mmol/kg dose group (184.5 +/- 128.9) (P = .02). However, there was no apparent difference between the two doses for visualization of the renal and accessory renal arteries. There was concordance between the contrast-enhanced 3D MRA studies and conventional angiography in all cases of renal artery and peripheral arterial stenoses and occlusions, including visualization of reconstituted peripheral arterial segments. There was no evidence of spin dephasing effects at sites of stenoses on the 3D contrast-enhanced MRA studies. Contrast-enhanced, centric reordered, 3D MRA can rapidly image the abdominal aorta and renal

  16. Sensation and experience of pain in children.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Y

    1993-04-01

    The study explored children's self-assessment of the pain experience and to understood the relative factors that influence the words used to represent children's pain. Using an outline of a human figure and a section of the open questionnaire to study, 106 nine- to sixteen-year-old children marked their pain location using colors to represent pain. They rated the intensity and duration of their pain, and described their experience of pain (sensation, causes, and ways to manage pain). The results showed that children clearly described pain, that there were appreciable differences between feelings of headache, leg pain, backache, and shoulder pain with pain intensity and duration of pain; that explained the difference of occurrence of abdominal pain in cross effect between age and sex; that explained the difference of the occurrence of toothache in cross effect among triangle of hospitalized experience, age, and sex; that there was significant relationship between abdominal pain and family structure. For severe abdominal pain or toothache the children could ask doctors for pain relief. For the others, they could take medication or rest for their middle or mild abdominal pain. The ways to manage leg pain were injection and massage. Change of position was applied to relieve backache. From the children's self-reports, we understand that causes of children's pain were derived from bad sleep, food, decayed teeth, exercising, and hitting. Pain avoidance is best achieved by accident prevention, cultivation of good health habits, and integration of daily living skills. PMID:8320754

  17. Consciousness and body image: lessons from phantom limbs, Capgras syndrome and pain asymbolia.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, V S

    1998-01-01

    Words such as 'consciousness' and 'self' actually encompass a number of distinct phenomena that are loosely lumped together. The study of neurological syndromes allows us to explore the neural mechanisms that might underlie different aspects of self, such as body image and emotional responses to sensory stimuli, and perhaps even laughter and humour. Mapping the 'functional logic' of the many different attributes of human nature on to specific neural circuits in the brain offers the best hope of understanding how the activity of neurons gives rise to conscious experience. We consider three neurological syndromes (phantom limbs, Capgras delusion and pain asymbolia) to illustrate this idea. PMID:9854257

  18. Consciousness and body image: lessons from phantom limbs, Capgras syndrome and pain asymbolia.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S

    1998-11-29

    Words such as 'consciousness' and 'self' actually encompass a number of distinct phenomena that are loosely lumped together. The study of neurological syndromes allows us to explore the neural mechanisms that might underlie different aspects of self, such as body image and emotional responses to sensory stimuli, and perhaps even laughter and humour. Mapping the 'functional logic' of the many different attributes of human nature on to specific neural circuits in the brain offers the best hope of understanding how the activity of neurons gives rise to conscious experience. We consider three neurological syndromes (phantom limbs, Capgras delusion and pain asymbolia) to illustrate this idea. PMID:9854257

  19. Reliability of Ultrasound Imaging of the Transversus Deep Abdominial, Internal Oblique and External Oblique Muscles of Patients with Low Back Pain Performing the Drawing-in Maneuver

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung doo

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the reliability of ultrasound imaging (USI) measurements of muscle thicknesses of patients with low back pain (LBP) performing the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) [Subjects] Twenty patients with LBP were the subjects. [Methods] Muscle thickness measurements of transversus abdominis (Tra), internal obliques (IO), and external obliques (EO) muscles were measured using ultrasound imaging at rest and during performance of the ADIM. [Results] The intra-examiner reliability estimates ranged from 0.55 to 0.97 in the rest position, and from 0.82 to 0.95 during ADIM. The inter-examiner reliability estimates ranged from 0.77 to 0.98 in the rest position, and from 0.86 to 0.98 during ADIM. [Conclusion] ADIM thickness measurements of the TrA, IO, and EO muscles in patients with LBP based on the mean of 2 measures are highly reliable when taken by a single examiner and adequately reliable when taken by different examiners. PMID:24259867

  20. [Ultrasound diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a 52 year old woman].

    PubMed

    Romero-Hernández, Juan José; Lozano-Corona, Marco Antonio; Díaz-Méndez, Macrina; Aspeitia-León, Jorge Alejandro; Hernández-Díaz, Víctor; Magaña-Cabrera, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is defined as increasing the diameter of the aorta in more than 50 % of its original size and the infra-renal location is the most common (90 %). AAA disease mainly affects older men and white smokers, and has a male: female ratio of 4:1, as well the diagnosis is rare in women under age 55. Aneurysm rupture is the most common complication and cause of death in the general population, its etiology is unclear, but is commonly associated with atherosclerosis. The AAA do not exhibit rupture and it is usually asymptomatic diagnosed incidentally, however, as the aneurysm grows, appears symptoms such as back pain, abdominal or groin pain, well as palpation of a pulse mass on umbilical and supra-umbilical region. Imaging study such as ultrasound and CT scan are the mainstay of diagnosis. We present a case of 52 years old patient with no history related to the diagnosis, who presented sudden and severe abdominal pain. She was admitted to the emergency room with a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis vs. acute pancreatitis. After ultrasound and CT studies, the diagnosis was a complicated abdominal aortic aneurysm. PMID:22882988

  1. Lanthanum carbonate has a radiopaque appearance on the plain abdominal radiography.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Pardo, José; Ibáñez Cánovas, Noelia; Abrisqueta Carrión, Jesús; Luján Mompeán, Juan Antonio; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2016-06-01

    An 84-year-old woman presented to her local emergency department for abdominal pain. Her medical history included hemodialysis in the treatment of chronic renal failure, Parkinson's disease, chronic atrial fibrillation, chronic constipation, appendicectomy and cholecystectomy. The patient complained of diffuse abdominal pain for 4 days, associated with nausea and vomiting in the last 24 hours. Physical examination revealed a soft and depressible abdomen, diffusely painful, without signs of peritoneal irritation. A digital rectal exam revealed large amount of stool in the rectal vault without palpable masses. Blood tests showed a creatinine level of 2.7 mg/dl due to chronic renal failure and the plain abdominal radiography revealed a dolichocolon completely contrasted. The patient denied the realization of any medical imaging-proofs with oral or rectal contrast. Reviewing home treatment, the patient was taking lanthanum carbonate (2 tablets of 750 mg per day) since 1 month ago, a drug that contrasts the digestive tract. Appreciating contrast in the colon, intestinal subocclusion was excluded and the clinical picture was attributed to her chronic constipation. In conclusion, it should be noted that lanthanum carbonate contrasts the digestive tract, with radiopaque appearance on the plain abdominal radiography and without any pathological significance. PMID:27324519

  2. Malignant Schwannoma of Anterior Abdominal Wall: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Nasiri, Shirzad; Rezakhanlu, Freshteh; Sodagari, Nassim

    2009-01-01

    Malignant schwannoma of the anterior abdominal wall nerves is extremely rare. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) represent approximately 10% of all soft tissue sarcomas and it is found in 4% of patients with neurofibromatosis 1. We present a case of malignant schwannoma in a 28-year-old female patient with neurofibromatosis 1. She presented with a painful mass in the right upper quadrant of her abdomen. The tumor location was in the abdominal wall in explorative laparatomy and malignant schwannoma was diagnosed in pathologic assessment. The tumor recurred in 3 months and computed tomography showed two masses in the right side of abdominopelvic cavity. Thereafter, second complete surgical resection was performed and pathologic finding was the same. In spite of administering chemotherapy after second surgery,the tumor recurred and magnetic resonance imaging finding showed a huge heterogeneously enhancing mass with adhesion to the inner side of the abdominal wall. The patient died because of acute respiratory failure due to multiple bilateral pulmonary metastases. Tumor location and rapid recurrence was unique in our patient. Keywords Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor; Malignant schwannoma; Abdominal wall PMID:22461875

  3. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  4. Abdominal muscle size and symmetry at rest and during abdominal hollowing exercises in healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mannion, A F; Pulkovski, N; Toma, V; Sprott, H

    2008-01-01

    The symmetry of, and physical characteristics influencing, the thickness of the lateral abdominal muscles at rest and during abdominal exercises were examined in 57 healthy subjects (20 men, 37 women; aged 22–62 years). M-mode ultrasound images were recorded from the abdominal muscles at rest and during abdominal hollowing exercises in hook-lying. The fascial lines bordering the transvs. abdominis, obliquus internus and obliquus externus were digitized and the absolute thickness, relative thickness (% of total lateral thickness) and contraction ratio (thickness during hollowing/thickness at rest), as well as the asymmetry (difference between sides expressed as a percent of the smallest value for the two sides) for each of these parameters were determined for each muscle. Both at rest and during hollowing, obliquus internus was the thickest and transvs. abdominis the thinnest muscle. There were no significant differences between left and right sides for group mean thicknesses of any muscle; however, individual asymmetries were evident, with mean values for the different muscles ranging from 11% to 26%; asymmetry was much less for the contraction ratios (mean % side differences, 5–14% depending on muscle). Body mass was the most significant positive predictor of absolute muscle thickness, for all muscles at rest and during hollowing, accounting for 30–44% variance. Body mass index explained 20–30% variance in transvs. abdominis contraction ratio (negative relationship). The influence of these confounders must be considered in comparative studies of healthy controls and back pain patients, unless groups are very carefully matched. Asymmetries observed in patients should be interpreted with caution, as they are also common in healthy subjects. PMID:19172732

  5. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... AK, Gillard JH, et al, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New York, NY: Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 3. Kim DH, Pickhardt PJ. Diagnostic imaging procedures in gastroenterology. In: Goldman L, Ausiello ...

  6. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: The effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-06-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  7. Internal abdominal hernia: Intestinal obstruction due to trans-mesenteric hernia containing transverse colon

    PubMed Central

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Orendo-Velásquez, Edwin; Andrade, Felipe P.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal abdominal hernias are infrequent but an increasing cause of bowel obstruction still often underdiagnosed. Among adults its usual causes are congenital anomalies of intestinal rotation, postsurgical iatrogenic, trauma or infection diseases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report the case of a 63-year-old woman with history of chronic constipation. The patient was hospitalized for two days with acute abdominal pain, abdominal distension and inability to eliminate flatus. The X-ray and abdominal computerized tomography scan (CT scan) showed signs of intestinal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy performed revealed a trans-mesenteric hernia containing part of the transverse colon. The intestine was viable and resection was not necessary. Only the hernia was repaired. DISCUSSION Internal trans-mesenteric hernia constitutes a rare type of internal abdominal hernia, corresponding from 0.2 to 0.9% of bowel obstructions. This type carries a high risk of strangulation and even small hernias can be fatal. This complication is specially related to trans-mesenteric hernias as it tends to volvulize. Unfortunately, the clinical diagnosis is rather difficult. CONCLUSION Trans-mesenteric internal abdominal hernia may be asymptomatic for many years because of its nonspecific symptoms. The role of imaging test is relevant but still does not avoid the necessity of exploratory surgery when clinical features are uncertain. PMID:24880799

  8. The Effect of Oral Morphine on Pain-Related Brain Activation - An Experimental Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Graversen, Carina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge about cerebral mechanisms underlying pain perception and effect of analgesic drugs is important for developing methods for diagnosis and treatment of pain. The aim was to explore altered brain activation before and after morphine treatment using functional magnetic resonance imaging recorded during experimental painful heat stimulation. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were recorded and analysed in 20 healthy volunteers (13 men and 7 women, 24.9 ± 2.6 years) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Painful stimulations were applied to the right forearm using a contact heat evoked potential stimulator (CHEPS) before and after treatment with 30 mg oral morphine and placebo. CHEPS stimulations before treatment induced activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex/insula, thalamus and cerebellum (n = 16, p < 0.05). In response to morphine treatment, the spatial extent of these pain-specific areas decreased (n = 20). Reduced pain-induced activation was seen in the right insula, anterior cingulate cortex and inferior parietal cortex after morphine treatment compared to before treatment (n = 16, p < 0.05), and sensory ratings of pain perception were significantly reduced after morphine treatment (p = 0.02). No effect on pain-induced brain activation was seen after placebo treatment compared to before treatment (n = 12, p > 0.05). In conclusion, heat stimulation activated areas in the 'pain matrix' and a clinically relevant dose of orally administered morphine revealed significant changes in brain areas where opioidergic pathways are predominant. The method may be useful to investigate the mechanisms of analgesics. PMID:25924691

  9. Abdominal Organ Location, Morphology, and Rib Coverage for the 5th, 50th, and 95th Percentile Males and Females in the Supine and Seated Posture using Multi-Modality Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Ashley R.; Gayzik, F. Scott; Moreno, Daniel P.; Martin, R. Shayn; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use data from a multi-modality image set of males and females representing the 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile (n=6) to examine abdominal organ location, morphology, and rib coverage variations between supine and seated postures. Medical images were acquired from volunteers in three image modalities including Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and upright MRI (uMRI). A manual and semi-automated segmentation method was used to acquire data and a registration technique was employed to conduct a comparative analysis between abdominal organs (liver, spleen, and kidneys) in both postures. Location of abdominal organs, defined by center of gravity movement, varied between postures and was found to be significant (p=0.002 to p=0.04) in multiple directions for each organ. In addition, morphology changes, including compression and expansion, were seen in each organ as a result of postural changes. Rib coverage, defined as the projected area of the ribs onto the abdominal organs, was measured in frontal, lateral, and posterior projections, and also varied between postures. A significant change in rib coverage between postures was measured for the spleen and right kidney (p=0.03 and p=0.02). The results indicate that posture affects the location, morphology and rib coverage area of abdominal organs and these implications should be noted in computational modeling efforts focused on a seated posture. PMID:24406951

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  11. Abdominal CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... results may also be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abscesses Appendicitis Bowel wall thickening Retroperitoneal fibrosis Renal ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Read More Abdominal aortic aneurysm Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open Abscess Acute cholecystitis ...

  12. Changes in Pain Processing in the Spinal Cord and Brainstem after Spinal Cord Injury Characterized by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Stroman, Patrick W; Khan, Hamza S; Bosma, Rachel L; Cotoi, Andrea I; Leung, Roxanne; Cadotte, David W; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of devastating consequences, including high prevalence of chronic pain and altered pain sensitivity. The causes of altered pain states vary depending on the injury and are difficult to diagnose and treat. A better understanding of pain mechanisms after SCI is expected to lead to better diagnostic capabilities and improved treatments. We therefore applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brainstem and spinal cord in a group of participants with previous traumatic SCI to characterize changes in pain processing as a result of their injuries. The same thermal stimulus was applied to the medial palm (C8 dermatome) as a series of repeated brief noxious thermal pulses in a group of 16 participants with a cervical (n = 14) and upper thoracic (n = 2) injuries. Functional MRI of the brainstem and spinal cord was used to determine the neuronal activity evoked by the noxious stimulation, and connectivity between regions was characterized with structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that pain ratings, the location and magnitude of blood oxygenation-level dependent fMRI results, and connectivity assessed with SEM varied widely across participants. However, the results varied in relation to the perceived pain and the level/severity of injuries, particularly in terms of hypothalamus connectivity with other regions, and descending modulation via the periaqueductal gray matter-rostral ventromedial medulla-cord pathway. The results, therefore, appear to provide sensitive indicators of each individual's pain response, and information about the mechanisms of altered pain sensitivity. The ability to characterize changes in pain processing in individuals with SCI represents a significant technological advance. PMID:26801315

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a fluorescent analog of phenytoin as a potential inhibitor of neuropathic pain and imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Walls, Thomas H.; Grindrod, Scott C.; Beraud, Dawn; Zhang, Li; Baheti, Aparna R.; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.; MacArthur, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report on a novel fluorescent analog of phenytoin as a potential inhibitor of neuropathic pain with potential use as an imaging agent. Compound 2 incorporated a heptyl side chain and dansyl moiety onto the parent compound phenytoin and produced greater displacement of BTX from sodium channels and greater functional blockade with greatly reduced toxicity. Compound 2 reduced mechano-allodynia in a rat model of neuropathic pain and was visualized ex vivo in sensory neuron axons with two-photon microscopy. These results suggest a promising strategy for developing novel sodium channel inhibitors with imaging capabilities. PMID:22863530

  14. Combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic and abdominal splenosis.

    PubMed

    Javadrashid, Reza; Paak, Neda; Salehi, Ahad

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of combined subcutaneous, intrathoracic, and abdominal splenosis who presented with attacks of flushing, tachycardia and vague abdominal pain. The patient's past medical history included a splenectomy due to abdominal trauma and years later, a lung lobectomy due to recurrent pneumonia. An enhancing solid mass adjacent to the upper pole of the left kidney and nodular pleural based lesions in the left hemi-thorax along with nodular lesions in subcutaneous tissue of the left chest wall suggested possible adrenal malignancy with multiple metastases. Histopathologic examination demonstrated benign lesions of ectopic splenic tissue. PMID:20804314

  15. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient With Cloacal Exstrophy.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Caleb E; Kennedy, Alfred P; Smith, D Preston

    2016-07-01

    We present a rare complication of abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) in a child undergoing complex urologic reconstruction. A 10-year-old female born with the abdominal wall defect cloacal exstrophy who had previously undergone multiple abdominal procedures then developed findings consistent with ACS following a complex Mitrofanoff procedure. Although intravesical pressures were not documented because of the nature of her reconstruction, her ACS-type findings were (1) abdominal pain, (2) melena, (3) pulmonary hypoinflation, (4) renal insufficiency, (5) tachycardia, and (6) segmental ischemic small bowel. Management consisted of abdominal decompression, segmental bowel resections, and wound vacuum-assisted-closure management. Patient was eventually discharged home. PMID:26921644

  16. Abdominal computed tomographic scan-merits and demerits over ultrasonography: evaluation of 70 cases.

    PubMed

    Obajimi, M O; Ogunseyinde, A O; Agunloye, A M

    2002-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and Ultrasonography (USS) are commonly used to ascertain the cause of abdominal symptoms. In a retrospective study of 70 Nigerian patients who had abdominal ultrasonography prior to abdominal CT scans, the most frequent clinical feature was abdominal pain, which was reported in 20.8% of the patients. The prevalent ultrasonographic finding was hepatomegaly (12.2%) while bowel displacement was the most frequently reported CT finding (18.3%). There was no correlation between USS and CT findings in 11 patients (15.7%). There was some agreement in the findings of both tests in 75.7% of cases. Additional findings were noted in 38 (54.3%) of the latter group of patients on CT scans. Hundred percent agreement was reported in both imaging techniques in 5 radiological findings namely: dilated gall bladder, renal cysts, ascites, adrenal mass and utero-cervical mass. These findings suggest a high yield of diagnostic accuracy from abdominal sonography and increased diagnostic details provided by CT imaging. Our overall impression is that the diagnostic information provided by the two techniques are complimentary. PMID:12518911

  17. Correlation of Computed Tomography Imaging Features With Pain Response in Patients With Spine Metastases After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitera, Gunita; Probyn, Linda; Ford, Michael; Donovan, Andrea; Rubenstein, Joel; Finkelstein, Joel; Christakis, Monique; Zhang, Liying; Campos, Sarah; Culleton, Shaelyn; Nguyen, Janet; Sahgal, Arjun; Barnes, Elizabeth; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Holden, Lori; Yee, Albert; Khan, Luluel; Chow, Edward

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate computed tomography (CT) imaging features of spinal metastases with pain relief after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients receiving computed tomography (CT)-simulated RT for spinal metastases in an outpatient palliative RT clinic from January 2007 to October 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Forty spinal metastases were evaluated. Pain response was rated using the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party endpoints. Three musculoskeletal radiologists and two orthopaedic surgeons evaluated CT features, including osseous and soft tissue tumor extent, presence of a pathologic fracture, severity of vertebral height loss, and presence of kyphosis. Results: The mean patient age was 69 years; 24 were men and 9 were women. The mean worst pain score was 7/10, and the mean total daily oral morphine equivalent was 77.3 mg. Treatment doses included 8 Gy in one fraction (22/33), 20 Gy in five fractions (10/33), and 20 Gy in eight fractions (1/33). The CT imaging appearance of spinal metastases included vertebral body involvement (40/40), pedicle involvement (23/40), and lamina involvement (18/40). Soft tissue component (10/40) and nerve root compression (9/40) were less common. Pathologic fractures existed in 11/40 lesions, with resultant vertebral body height loss in 10/40 and kyphosis in 2/40 lesions. At months 1, 2, and 3 after RT, 18%, 69%, and 70% of patients experienced pain relief. Pain response was observed with various CT imaging features. Conclusions: Pain response after RT did not differ in patients with and without pathologic fracture, kyphosis, or any other CT features related to extent of tumor involvement. All patients with painful spinal metastases may benefit from palliative RT.

  18. Impact of thallium-201 imaging on clinical assessment and management of patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Schmoliner, R.; Dudczak, R.; Kronik, G.; Moesslacher, H.; Zangeneh, M.; Pollak, C.; Schurz, B.; Schoberwalter, A.

    1984-12-01

    The histories, rest, and exercise ECG results of 60 patients without myocardial infarction complaining of chest pain were submitted to 6 physicians (3 cardiologists and 3 noncardiologists) who were unaware of the angiographic findings. The physicians were requested to estimate the probability of coronary artery disease present in percentages and to assess the need for coronary angiography on a five-point scale (1 . definitely not indicated, 5 . definitely indicated). After obtaining the results of thallium-201 imaging following dipyridamole (0.50 mg/kg intravenously) administration, the physicians were again requested to estimate probability and need for angiography. In the 43 patients with coronary artery disease the judgment of probability was increased significantly after /sup 201/Tl from 75.6 +/- 20.2% to 82.9 +/- 23.2% (p less than 0.001) and the need for angiography from 4.3 +/- 0.9% to 4.5 +/- 0.9% (p less than 0.001). In the subgroup of patients with atypical angina the relative change in probability was higher than in other subgroups of patients with coronary artery disease. In the 17 patients with normal coronary arteries the probability estimation fell after /sup 201/Tl from 36.7 +/- 22.0% to 24.8 +/- 21.0% (p less than 0.001), the need for angiography was decreased from 2.7 +/- 1.1% to 2.2 +/- 1.2% (p less than 0.001). With the /sup 201/Tl information, cardiologists performed a better diagnostic differentiation of patients with and without coronary artery disease than noncardiologists. The study demonstrates the improvement of clinical diagnosis in patients with chest pain by thallium-201 imaging and confirms the favorable influence of the method on the management of the patients in terms of indications for coronary angiography.

  19. The Small Bodies Imager Browser --- finding asteroid and comet images without pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, E.; Sykes, M.; Davis, D.; Neese, C.

    2014-07-01

    To facilitate accessing and downloading spatially resolved imagery of asteroids and comets in the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS), we have created the Small Bodies Image Browser. It is a HTML5 webpage that runs inside a standard web browser needing no installation (http://sbn.psi.edu/sbib/). The volume of data returned by spacecraft missions has grown substantially over the last decade. While this wealth of data provides scientists with ample support for research, it has greatly increased the difficulty of managing, accessing and processing these data. Further, the complexity necessary for a long-term archive results in an architecture that is efficient for computers, but not user friendly. The Small Bodies Image Browser (SBIB) is tied into the PDS archive of the Small Bodies Asteroid Subnode hosted at the Planetary Science Institute [1]. Currently, the tool contains the entire repository of the Dawn mission's encounter with Vesta [2], and we will be adding other datasets in the future. For Vesta, this includes both the level 1A and 1B images for the Framing Camera (FC) and the level 1B spectral cubes from the Visual and Infrared (VIR) spectrometer, providing over 30,000 individual images. A key strength of the tool is providing quick and easy access of these data. The tool allows for searches based on clicking on a map or typing in coordinates. The SBIB can show an entire mission phase (such as cycle 7 of the Low Altitude Mapping Orbit) and the associated footprints, as well as search by image name. It can focus the search by mission phase, resolution or instrument. Imagery archived in the PDS are generally provided by missions in a single or narrow range of formats. To enhance the value and usability of this data to researchers, SBIB makes these available in these original formats as well as PNG, JPEG and ArcGIS compatible ISIS cubes [3]. Additionally, we provide header files for the VIR cubes so they can be read into ENVI without additional processing. Finally

  20. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472